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1

Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Active oil shale operations: Eastern Uinta Basin  

SciTech Connect

A Utah Geological and Mineral survey Map of the Eastern Uinta Basin is presented. Isopach lines for the Mahogany oil shale are given, along with the locations of active oil shale operations and the land ownership (i.e. federal, state, or private).

Ritzma, H.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is...

4

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

5

Underbalanced drilling in the Piceance basin. Final report, June 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling technology is established and fairly well understood in some areas in the U.S. such as Appalachia. The primary objective of this cooperative project in the Piceance Basin was to use underbalanced drilling technologies to reduce rates of penetration such that significant cost reductions could occur. Fluids evaluated included air/mist, stiff foams and aerated muds. Underbalanced drilling was successful particularly in the surface hole; however, heaving shales in the Wasatch section were problematic.

Lewis, C.A.; Graham, R.L.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Oil shale of the Uinta Basin, northeastern Utah  

SciTech Connect

The Tertiary rocks, which occupy the interior of the Uinta basin, have been subdivided into four formations: Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Uinta. The division is based on stratigraphic and paleontologic evidence. Hydrocarbon materials have been found in all four formations, although bedded deposits (asphaltic sandstone and oil shale) are known only in the Wasatch and Green River. Veins of gilsonite, elaterite, ozocerite, and other related hydrocarbons cut all the Tertiary formation of the Uinta basin. Good oil shale (Uinta basin of Utah) is black or brownish black except on weathered surfaces, where it is blue-white or white. It is fine grained, slightly calcareous, and usually free from grit. It is tough and in thin-bedded deposits remarkably flexible. Although oil shale consists of thin laminae, this is not apparent in some specimens until after the rock has been heated and the oil driven off. Freshly broken oil shale gives off a peculiar odor similar to that of crude petroleum. Oil shale contains a large amount of carbonaceous matter (largely remains of lower plants, including algae), which is the source of the distillation products. Thin splinters of oil shale will burn with a very sooty flame and give off an asphaltic odor. Lean specimens of oil shale have a higher specific gravity than rich specimens and are generally heavier than coal.

Winchester, D.E.

1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy makers accurate estimates of energy efficiencies, water requirements, water availability, and CO2 emissions associated with the development of the 60 percent portion of the Piceance Basin where economic potential is the greatest, and where environmental conditions and societal concerns and controversy are the most challenging: i.e., the portion of the Piceance where very high quality oil shale resources and useful ground water co-exist. Evaluation of Energy Efficiency, Water Requirements and Availability, and CO2 Emissions Associated With the Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in

8

Microsoft Word - DE-FC26-05NT42660_FINAL_TECHNICAL_REPORT_091210b...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Washakie; Exxon-Mobil - Piceance; Kerr-McGee Oil & Gas Onshore - Uinta; Shell Exploration & Production - Green River; Williams Exploration & Production - Piceance....

9

Uinta County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uinta County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Uinta County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2107397°, -110.6168921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2107397,"lon":-110.6168921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Oil shale in the Piceance Basin: an analysis of land use issues  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to contribute to a framework for establishing policies to promote efficient use of the nation's oil shale resources. A methodology was developed to explain the effects of federal leasing policies on resource recovery, extraction costs, and development times associated with oil shale surface mines. This report investigates the effects of lease size, industrial development patterns, waste disposal policies, and lease boundaries on the potential of Piceance Basin oil shale resource. This approach should aid in understanding the relationship between federal leasing policies and requirements for developing Piceance Basin oil shale. 16 refs., 46 figs. (DMC)

Rubenson, D.; Pei, R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

SEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Piceance basin area have created the Mesaverde Group tight gas sand reservoirs. As shown in Figure 2 of siltstones, shales and tight sandstones with a coaly interval at the base. The main producing interval was predominantly from the fluvial point bar sand bodies, with extremely low matrix permeabilities (

12

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

c:es .B~l:JJ:. }eti. ',~, Colorado School of Mines, VoL 2'1,v Piceance Creek Basin v Colorado r and 9 p' 1974. Pc:u:~tBetween 'che White and Colorado Rivers, '! \\lo:ci:hwegt:ern

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Types of Paradox in Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paradoxes are a relatively frequent occurrence in physics. The nature of their genesis is diverse and they are found in all branches of physics. There are a number of general and special classifications of paradoxes, but there are no classifications of paradoxes in physics. Nowadays, physics is a fundamental and rather formalized science, the paradoxes of which imply falsity and imprecision. One of the basic methods of addressing a problem is to present classifications that facilitate its formulation and study. This work groups together the paradoxes in physics according to certain common characteristics, which should assist in explaining the causes for paradox formation.

Dragoljub A. Cucic

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

14

Hydrology of the Piceance Basin and its impact on oil shale development  

SciTech Connect

The Piceance Basin is a structural downwarp in NW. Colorado. The Green River Formation, the uppermost stratigraphic unit in the basin, contains the richest oil shale deposits in the U.S. The near-surface rocks are commonly jointed. The joint density is a function of the competency and thickness of the individual layers, the lateral distance to a free surface, and the depth below the surface. These joints provide permeable paths for the flow of ground water. Consequently, soluble elements in the rock have been leached, thereby enhancing the transmissivity by fracture enlargement. Thus, the oil-shale layers are part of the aquifer matrix, and the richest layers of oil shale occur between, below or are part of the basin's complex aquifer system. Well over 1 million acre-ft of potable water is contained in the Green River ground-water system.

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Modeling of gas generation from the Cameo coal zone in the Piceance Basin Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas generative potential of the Cretaceous Cameo coal in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado, was evaluated quantitatively by sealed gold tube pyrolysis. The H/C and O/C elemental ratios show that pyrolyzed Cameo coal samples follow the Van Krevelen humic coal evolution pathway, reasonably simulating natural coal maturation. Kinetic parameters (activation energy and frequency factor) for gas generation and vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) changes were calculated from pyrolysis data. Experimental R{sub o} results from this study are not adequately predicted by published R{sub o} kinetics and indicate the necessity of deriving basin-specific kinetic parameters when building predictive basin models. Using derived kinetics for R{sub o}, evolution and gas generation, basin modeling was completed for 57 wells across the Piceance Basin, which enabled the mapping of coal-rank and coalbed gas potential. Quantities of methane generated at approximately 1.2% R{sub o} are about 300 standard cubic feet per ton (scf/ton) and more than 2500 scf/ton (in-situ dry-ash-free coal) at R{sub o}, values reaching 1.9%. Gases generated in both low- and high-maturity coals are less wet, whereas the wetter gas is expected where R{sub o} is approximately 1.4-1.5%. As controlled by regional coal rank and net coal thickness, the largest in-place coalbed gas resources are located in the central part of the basin, where predicted volumes exceed 150 bcf/mi, excluding gases in tight sands.

Zhang, E.; Hill, R.J.; Katz, B.J.; Tang, Y.C. [Shell Exploration and Production Co., BTC, Houston, TX (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Paradox 7 for Windows 95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Appropriate for either self-paced or group learning, this book provides an excellent way to learn Paradox 7.0 in a short period of time. The text/template package covers the most commonly used features of Paradox 7 for Windows 95.

Betsy Newberry

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reservoir Characterization of the Lower Green River Formation, Southwest Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the study were to increase both primary and secondary hydrocarbon recovery through improved characterization (at the regional, unit, interwell, well, and microscopic scale) of fluvial-deltaic lacustrine reservoirs, thereby preventing premature abandonment of producing wells. The study will encourage exploration and establishment of additional water-flood units throughout the southwest region of the Uinta Basin, and other areas with production from fluvial-deltaic reservoirs.

Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; McClure, Kevin P.; Bereskin, S. Robert; Deo, Milind D.

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

18

Resource appraisal of three rich oil-shale zones in the Green River Formation, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The main oil-shale-bearing member of the Eocene Green River Formation, the Parachute Creek Member, contains several distinct rich oil-shale zones that underlie large areas of Piceance Creek Basin in NW. Colorado. Three of these have been selected for an oil-shale resource-appraisal study. Two over-lie and one underlies the main saline zone in the Parachute Creek Member. The uppermost of these zones, the Mahogany Zone, is in the upper third of the Parachute Creek Member/ it ranges in thickness from less than 75 to more than 225 ft and is the most persistent oil- shale unit in the Green River Formation underlying an area of more than 1,200 sq miles in the Piceance Creek Basin. The second rich zone is separated from the Mahogany Zone by a variable thickness of sandstone, siltstone, or low- grade oil shale. This zone attains a maximum thickness of more than 250 ft and underlies an area of more than 700 sq miles. The third rich oil-shale zone is in the lower third of the Parachute Creek Member. It underlies an area of about 300 sq miles near the depositional center of the Piceance Creek Basin and attains a thickness of more than 150 ft. The 3 rich oil-shale zones have total resources of 317 billion bbl of oil in the areas appraised.

Donnell, J.R.; Blair, R.W. Jr.

1970-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Overcoming the EPR paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The EPR paradox has a local realist solution. Quantum theory does not require action at a distance, because entanglement can be derived from quantum superposition. If two identical or symmetrical populations are governed by uncertainty (locally, in each group), non-factorizable mixtures emerge. Quantum superposition, in turn, can be interpreted as a classical process whenever multiple components act as an ensemble. The net state of a Schrodinger's Cat system is a well-defined vector. The key is to assume individual quanta adapt to their context and always switch to the net state, instead of moving in several directions at the same time. Existing observations are compatible with such a scenario. Self-interference is not a verifiable principle, even though it fits the data. In this new approach, formal predictions remain unchanged. Only the interpretation is different.

Ghenadie N. Mardari

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

20

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

U.S. Geological Survey Energy and Minerals Science Strategy--A Resource Lifecycle Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................................................9 5. Isoresource map of Mahogany oil shale zone in Uinta and Piceance Basins showing oil yield....................................... 9 Oil Shale: Evaluating an Energy Resource and Its Extractive Effects

Fleskes, Joe

22

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

23

Biofuel Policies and the Green Paradox.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper attempts to identify whether or not the green paradox is withheld when renewable fuel standards and blending mandate policies implemented by the U.S. (more)

Potter, Emily Spooner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata in the Piceance basin, western Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas samples were collected for geochemical analyses from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata of the Piceance basin in western Colorado to: 1) determine the origin of gases (i.e., microbial versus thermogenic), 2) determine the thermogenic source rock(s) for the gas-rich Williams Fork Formation, and 3) assess the nature of gas migration. Mud logging gases were sampled approximately every 60 m between 350 and 2800 m and analyzed for "C compositions and CI/C,-3 ratios. Samples collected from low gas content intervals above 1950 m define two parallel trends of increasing "Cc, content with depth. Data from the first trend are based on eighteen analyses and range from-69.9 to-38.3%o (R 2 = 0.92). These data suggest a microbial and mixed microbial/thermogenic origin for methane. Only one sample from above 1950 m contained sufficient amounts of C2for isotopic analysis (813 CC2 =-27.0%o at 1718 m). Data from the second trend are based on seven analyses and are offset by approximately +20%o compared with the primary trend at comparable depths. These data range from-65.0 to-38.5%0 (R' = 0.84). 813c ci and C,/CI-3data from both trends are similar when viewed on a crossplot, thus suggesting that large-scale, vertical gas migration has occurred. Migration was probably aided by fractures that formed during maximum burial and peak gas generation. Except for one sample collected at 1718 m, "CC2compositions above 1950 m were not determined due to insufficient sample sizes. Below 1950 m, gas contents abruptly increase and approach 10-4' gas units. These gases have "C compositions indicative of thermogenic origin. Gases between 1950 and 2450 m have relatively uniform geochemistries (8"Cc, =-39.9 0?.3%ol 613C C2 =-27.4 I?.i%ol CI/Cl-3 = 0-91 0?.03), and are chemically distinct and therefore Renetically different from gases between 2450 and 2791 M (513C ci =-37.9 +-O.2%og 813C C2 =-26.4 0?.5%09 CI/Cl-3 = 0.88 0?.01). Gases of the latter group were probably derived from coalbeds that comprise the Cameo Group, as abundant coals are found between 2450 and 2630 m. Only three thin coalbeds occur within the Coal Ridge Group between 1950 and 2450 m, so gases from this interval were probably derived from interbedded shales. Core and cuttings samples were also collected and sealed in cans from several intervals for geochemical analyses. Canned methanes at or above 858 m are "C-enriched by 13 to 33%o compared with logging methanes at equivalent intervals. Below 1934 m, however, 813C ci values for core and cuttings are comparable to logging gas values. This observation suggests that 813 Cc, discrepancies above 858 m are related to low gas contents in the core and cutting samples. Therefore, geochemical data from core and cuttings were not used to assess migration or to interpret gas origin.

Katz, David Jonathan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern Great Basin Appalachian Denver Florida Peninsula Black Warrior W Y T h ru st B e lt Powder River Paradox- Uinta- Grtr Green River MT Thrust Belt Powder River North (1) Powder River South (2) Denver North (1) Denver South (3) Denver Middle (2) TX CA MT AZ ID NV NM CO IL OR UT KS WY IA NE SD MN ND OK FL WI MO AL WA GA AR LA MI IN PA NY NC MS TN KY VA OH SC

26

"Information Paradox" and Schwarzschildian geodesics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the "Information Paradox" follows from inappropriate considerations on the geodesics of a Schwarzschildian manifold created by a gravitating point-mass. In particular, we demonstrate that the geometric differential equation which gives the radial coordinate as a function of the angular coordinate of the geodesics does not represent fully all the consequences following from the metric tensor. We remark that: i) it does not yield the conditions characterizing the circular orbits; (this fact has been ignored in the previous literature); ii) it "neglects" the space region in which the radial coordinate is minor or equal to twice the mass of the gravitating point (in suitable units of measure).

A. Loinger; T. Marsico

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Reservoir characteristics in Uinta basin gas wells. Final report, September 1, 1978-January 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Volumes of 29 lenticular tight gas sandstone reservoirs in the Uinta Basin, Utah have been approximated from long-term pressure buildups on 6 wells. Average reservoir volume was interpreted to be about 240,000 ft/sup 3/ per ft of net pay. Outcrop reservoir geometry studies indicate an average reservoir volume (without any reservoir interconnection assumed) of about 30% less than the average based upon production analysis. Therefore, some reservoir interconnection may exist. Results of this study are consistent with the Knutson lenticular reservoir model in which average reservoir width is 22 times the gross sand thickness, length is 10 times the width, and reservoir interconnection is a function of the sand fraction in the productive interval. Apparent reservoir permeabilities, assuming radial flow, range from .009 to .052 millidarcies and actual sandstone matrix permeabilities are interpreted to range from .06 to .21 millidarcies. Fracture half lengths are interpreted to be about 0.1 ft/bbl of fluid with an average proppant load of 1.2 to 1.7 lb/gal at injection rates of 18 to 24 BPM and injection pressures of 2,500 to 4,600 psi for each 100 ft of gross sand in the fracced interval.

Boardman, C.R.; Knutson, C.F.

1979-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

28

Errors and paradoxes in quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Errors and paradoxes in quantum mechanics, entry in the Compendium of Quantum Physics: Concepts, Experiments, History and Philosophy, ed. F. Weinert, K. Hentschel, D. Greenberger and B. Falkenburg (Springer), to appear

D. Rohrlich

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

29

Gibbs Paradox and Similarity Principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As no heat effect and mechanical work are observed, we have a simple experimental resolution of the Gibbs paradox: both the thermodynamic entropy of mixing and the Gibbs free energy change are zero during the formation of any ideal mixtures. Information loss is the driving force of these spontaneous processes. Information is defined as the amount of the compressed data. Information losses due to dynamic motion and static symmetric structure formation are defined as two kinds of entropies - dynamic entropy and static entropy, respectively. There are three laws of information theory, where the first and the second laws are analogs of the two thermodynamic laws. However, the third law of information theory is different: for a solid structure of perfect symmetry (e.g., a perfect crystal), the entropy (static entropy for solid state) S is the maximum. More generally, a similarity principle is set up: if all the other conditions remain constant, the higher the similarity among the components is, the higher the value of entropy of the mixture (for fluid phases) or the assemblage (for a static structure or a system of condensed phases) or any other structure (such as quantum states in quantum mechanics) will be, the more stable the mixture or the assemblage will be, and the more spontaneous the process leading to such a mixture or an assemblage or a chemical bond will be.

Shu-Kun Lin

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

A better understanding of a Uinta Basin channelized analog reservoir through geostatistics and reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Green River Formation is located in the Uinta basin of northeastern Utah. It contains several reservoirs that can be classified as lacustrine such as the Altamont-Bluebell and Red Wash. Lacustrine reservoirs are abundant in other provinces in the world such as China, Southeast Asia, Brazil, West Africa, and the Caspian Sea. Even though they can contain important accumulations of hydrocarbons, our understanding of the primary controls on fluid flow within these systems is still not clear. This ambiguity leads in some cases to inefficient recovery of hydrocarbons in such reservoirs. This study is aimed at clarifying the effects of heterogeneities in channelized reservoirs on fluid flow. It uses a multidisciplinary approach combining geologic knowledge with reservoir engineering. It involves the geologic modeling and fluid flow simulation of a channelized outcrop of the Green River formation. The study of this outcrop provides insights for modeling, understanding, and possibly predicting the behavior of channelized oil and gas reservoirs. Results show that the number of channels in the model can have a significant effect on performance. The rock properties in these channels and the channel paths are also important factors that determine the recovery efficiency. Other findings include the effect on performance of vertical anisotropy in a channelized reservoir. We discovered that an isotropic reservoir performs better than an anisotropic one and that the well perforation interval is extremely important when comparing the performance of several anisotropic cases. Finally, we investigated the effects of the recovery strategy on performance in a channelized setting. We found that waterflooding yields better results than any of the other recovery techniques analyzed. Sensitivity runs with different waterflood patterns indicated that a staggered line drive results in the best performance in the analog channelized reservoir we modeled, as it allows for the best recovery factor in the least amount of time. The results of this work can be used qualitatively to predict performance in a channelized setting but their use is limited quantitatively because of the issue of scale, i.e. the outcrop width is much less than typical interwell scale.

Robbana, Enis

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Characterization and interwell connectivity evaluation of Green Rver reservoirs, Wells Draw study area, Uinta Basin, Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent efforts to optimize oil recovery from Green River reservoirs, Uinta Basin, have stimulated the need for better understanding of the reservoir connectivity at the scale of the operational unit. This study focuses on Green River reservoirs in the Wells Draw study area where oil production response to implemented waterflood is poor and a better understanding of the reservoir connectivity is required to enhance future secondary oil recovery. Correlating the sand bodies between well locations in the area remains difficult at 40-acre well spacing. Thus, interwell connectivity of the reservoirs is uncertain. Understanding the reservoir connectivity in the Wells Draw study area requires integration of all static and dynamic data for generation of probabilistic models of the reservoir at the interwell locations. The objective of this study is two-fold. The first objective was to determine reservoir connectivity at the interwell scale in the Wells Draw study area. To achieve this goal, I used well log and perforation data in the Wells Draw study area to produce probabilistic models of net-porosity for four producing intervals: (1) Castle Peak, (2) Lower Douglas Creek, (3) Upper Douglas Creek, and (4) Garden Gulch. The second objective was to find readily applicable methods for determining interwell connectivity. To achieve this goal, I used sandstone net thickness and perforation data to evaluate interwell connectivity in the Wells Draw study area. This evaluation was done to: (1) assess and visualize connectivity, (2) provide an assessment of connectivity for validating / calibrating percolation and capacitance based methods, and (3) determine flow barriers for simulation. The probabilistic models encompass the four producing intervals with a gross thickness of 1,900 ft and enable simulation assessments of different development strategies for optimization of oil recovery in the Wells Draw study area. The method developed for determining interwell connectivity in Wells Draw study area is reliable and suited to the four producing intervals. Also, this study shows that the percolation based method is reliable for determining interwell connectivity in the four producing intervals.

Abiazie, Joseph Uchechukwu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah??s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah??s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ?? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer??s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah??s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah??s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Evidence Against Klein Paradox in Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that both transmission and reflection coefficients associated to the Klein paradox at a step barrier are positive and less than unity, so that the particle-antiparticle pair creation mechanism commonly linked to this phenomenon is not necessary. Because graphene is a solid-state testing ground for quantum electrodynamics phenomena involving massless Dirac fermions we suggest that the transport characteristic through a p-n graphene junction can decide between the results obtained in this paper and the common Klein paradox theory, which imply negative transmission and higher-than-unity reflection coefficients. Recent experimental evidence supports our findings.

Daniela Dragoman

2007-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

35

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Quantum, Photo-Electric Single Capacitor Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work single capacitor paradox (a variation of the remarkable two capacitor paradox) is considered in a new, quantum discrete form. Simply speaking we consider well-known usual, photoelectric effect experimental device, i.e. photo electric cell, where cathode and anode are equivalently charged but non-connected. It, obviously, represents a capacitor that initially, i.e. before action of the photons with individual energy equivalent to work function, holds corresponding energy of the electrical fields between cathode and anode. Further, we direct quantum discretely photons, one by one, toward cathode where according to photo-electrical effect electrons discretely, one by one, will be emitted and directed toward anode. It causes discrete discharge of the cell, i.e. capacitor and discrete decrease of the electrical field. Finally, total discharge of the cell, i.e. capacitor, and total disappearance of the electrical field and its energy will occur. Given, seemingly paradoxical, capacitor total energy loss can be simply explained without any dissipative effects (Joule heating or electromagnetic waves emission can be neglected as high order small corrections) by work done by the electrical field by movement of the electrons from cathode to anode. (Remarkable two capacitors paradox can be, obviously, formulated and explained in the completely analogous way.)

Darko Kapor; Vladan Pankovic

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

37

Infinitely Many Resolutions of Hempel's Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What sorts of observations could confirm the universal hypothesis that all ravens are black? Carl Hempel proposed a number of simple and plausible principles which had the odd ("paradoxical") result that not only do observations of black ravens confirm that hypothesis, but so too do observations of yellow suns, green seas and white shoes. Hempel's response to his own paradox was to call it a psychological illusion--i.e., white shoes do indeed confirm that all ravens are black. Karl Popper on the other hand needed no response: he claimed that no observation can confirm any general statement--there is no such thing as confirmation theory. Instead, we should be looking for severe tests of our theories, strong attempts to falsify them. Bayesian philosophers have (in a loose sense) followed the Popperian analysis of Hempel's paradox (while retaining confirmation theory): they have usually judged that observing a white shoe in a shoe store does not qualify as a severe test of the hypothesis and so, while providing Bayesian confirmation, does so to only a minute degree. This rationalizes our common intuition of non-confirmation. All of these responses to the paradox are demonstrably wrong--granting an ordinary Bayesian measure of confirmation. A proper Bayesian analysis reveals that observations of white shoes may provide the raven hypothesis any degree of confirmation whatsoever.

Kevin B. Korb

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Quantum Mechanics: Structures, Axioms and Paradoxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Mechanics: Structures, Axioms and Paradoxes Diederik Aerts Center Leo Apostel, Brussels present an analysis of quantum mechanics and its problems and para- doxes taking into account the results that have been obtained during the last two decades by investigations in the field of `quantum structures re

Aerts, Diederik

39

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 5: an investigation of dewatering for the modified in-situ retorting process, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The C-a and the C-b tracts in the Piceance Creek Basin are potential sites for the development of oil shale by the modified in-situ retorting (MIS) process. Proposed development plans for these tracts require the disturbance of over three billion m/sup 3/ of oil shale to a depth of about 400 m (1312 ft) or more below ground level. The study investigates the nature and impacts of dewatering and reinvasion that are likely to accompany the MIS process. The purpose is to extend earlier investigations through more refined mathematical analysis. Physical phenomena not adequately covered in previous studies, particularly the desaturation process, are investigated. The present study also seeks to identify, through a parametric approach, the key variables that are required to characterize systems such as those at the C-a and C-b tracts.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Absence of Black Holes Information Paradox in Group Field Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we will analyse the black hole information paradox in group field cosmology. We will first construct a group field cosmology with third quantized gauge symmetry. Then we will argue that that in this group field cosmology the process that change the topology of spacetime are unitarity process. Thus, the information paradox from this perspective appears only because we are using a second quantized formalism to explain a third quantized process. A similar paradox would also occur if we analyse a second quantized process in first quantized formalism. Hence, we will demonstrated that in reality there is no information paradox but only a breakdown of the second quantized formalism.

Mir Faizal

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Continuity and permeability development in the tight gas sands of the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The relationships between reservoir characteristics and flow regimes exhibited by twenty-one Uinta Basin gas wells represent fluvial, lake margin, and lacustrine deposits. Production data were analyzed to determine the type of flow for each well. This analysis indicated that one well exhibits radial flow, thirteen wells linear flow, and seven wells indeterminate flow regimes. Values of SSP, ..delta..t, R/sub w/ and SP curve patterns were determined from well logs. These data were compared for the three types of flow observed. It appears that SSP, R/sub w/ and SP pattern may be useful in qualitatively distinguishing between sands of low continuity and those with moderate continuity. The permeabilities are considerably higher than those normally attributed to ''tight sands.'' Also permeability correlates inversely with the number of sands completed in each well. Consideration of the orientations of linear features in the area and those of reservoir lenses in outcrops indicates that the relationship between frac orientation and lens geometry cannot be effectively predicted without a good technique to predict lens orientation. Completion strategies to optimize frac efficiency are suggested, based upon the findings of this study.

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 6: oil-shale development in the Piceance Creek Basin and potential water-quality changes  

SciTech Connect

This report brackets the stream quality changes due to pre-mining pumping activites required to prepare oil shale lease Tracts C-a and C-b for modified in situ retorting. The fluxes in groundwater discharged to the surface were identified for Tract C-b in a modeling effort by another laboratory. Assumed fluxes were used for Tract C-a. The quality of the groundwater aquifers of the Piceance Basin is assumed to be that reported in the literature. The changes are bracketed in this study by assuming all premining pumping is discharged to the surface stream. In one case, the pumped water is assumed to be of a quality like that of the upper aquifer with a relatively high quality. In the second case, the pumped water is assumed to come from the lower aquifer. Complete mixing and conservation of pollutants was assumed at sample points at the White River and at Lees Ferry of the Colorado River. A discussion of possible secondary effects of oil shale and coal mining is presented. In addition, a discussion of the uncertainties associated with the assumptions used in this study and alternative uses for the water to prevent stream contamination by oil shale development is provided.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rio Grande Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Uinta Basin Appa lachia n Basin Utica Marcellus Devonian (Ohio) Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Woodford- Caney Pearsall- Eagle Ford Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Maverick Sub-Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley and Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest City Basin Piceance Basin Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles ± Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies

44

Coal gas openhole completion well effectiveness in the Piceance Basin, Colorado: Preliminary results, South Shale Ridge [number sign]11-15 well  

SciTech Connect

Since 1983, the Deep Coal Seam Project (DCSP) and the Western Cretaceous Coal Seam Project (WCCSP) of the Gas Research institute has funded research efforts in the Piceance and San Juan basins of Colorado and New Mexico to further the knowledge of all facets of commercial coalbed natural gas reservoir development. Because of WCCSP research into openhole completion well effectiveness in the Fruitland play, and the need to complete a successful Cameo coal openhole well, the South Shale Ridge [number sign]11-15 well was deemed to be an excellent chance for technology transfer and evaluation. Because of implementation of carefully designed air mist drilling and controlled openhole completion techniques, along with a sufficient magnitude of cleat permeability, it appears that the [number sign]11-15 well is commercial. The cavity was installed without major problems. The initial gas production test rate of roughly 280 MCFGPD is one of the best in South Shale Ridge. The [number sign]11-15 well case study is quite important in that it may serve to emphasize the point that the conservative attitude towards commercialization of previously untapped petroleum resources is often not correct. It is now an open question as to whether the conventional wisdom that most of the Cameo coal gas play is too tight to enable commercial production is indeed true, or if by analogy with Fruitland openhole wells, Cameo coal wells that have been hydraulic fracture stimulated are commonly very poorly connected to the cleat permeability of the reservoir. There is no significant reason to believe that the South Shale Ridge area is geologically unique, and thus there is a distinct possibility that more widespread Cameo coal production than has been previously recorded can be achieved.

Close, J.C. (Resource Enterprises, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Dowden, D. (Conquest Oil Co., Greeley, CO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Quantum Information Paradox: Real or Fictitious?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the outstanding puzzles of theoretical physics is whether quantum information indeed gets lost in the case of Black Hole (BH) evaporation or accretion. Let us recall that Quantum Mechanics (QM) demands an upper limit on the acceleration of a test particle. On the other hand, it is pointed out here that, if a Schwarzschild BH would exist, the acceleration of the test particle would blow up at the event horizon in violation of QM. Thus the concept of an exact BH is in contradiction of QM and quantum gravity (QG). It is also reminded that the mass of a BH actually appears as an INTEGRATION CONSTANT of Einstein equations. And it has been shown that the value of this integration constant is actually zero. Thus even classically, there cannot be finite mass BHs though zero mass BH is allowed. It has been further shown that during continued gravitational collapse, radiation emanating from the contracting object gets trapped within it by the runaway gravitational field. As a consequence, the contracting body attains a quasi-static state where outward trapped radiation pressure gets balanced by inward gravitational pull and the ideal classical BH state is never formed in a finite proper time. In other words, continued gravitational collapse results in an "Eternally Collapsing Object" which is a ball of hot plasma and which is asymptotically approaching the true BH state with M=0 after radiating away its entire mass energy. And if we include QM, this contraction must halt at a radius suggested by highest QM acceleration. In any case no EH is ever formed and in reality, there is no quantum information paradox.

Abhas Mitra

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

46

The IT productivity paradox revisited: technological determinism masked by management method?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The productivity paradox in information technology is that investment in IT does not seem to be reflected in increased productivity. There is a host of possible explanations, but little consensus on which are responsible, or even on whether the paradox ... Keywords: information technology, management method, productivity paradox

Stuart Macdonald

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A paradox about an atom and a photon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we propose a new relativistic paradox concerning the absorption of a photon by a hydrogen atom. We show that the actual cause of the paradox is one of the hypotheses of Bohr model; therefore, in order to solve the paradox, we have to move away from Bohr model. Our analysis is carried out only in the special relativistic framework, so we are not interested in giving a full quantum mechanical treatment of the problem. We derive some expressions for emission and absorption of photons by atoms, which are in perfect agreement with special relativity, although comparable to the classical Bohr formula with an excellent degree of approximation. Quite interestingly, these expressions are no more invariant under a global shift of energy levels, showing a breaking of classical "gauge invariance" of energy. We stress that, to the best of our knowledge, the present approach has never been considered in literature. At the end we will be able to solve the proposed paradox.

Carlo Maria Scandolo

2013-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

48

A Quantum Cognition Analysis of the Ellsberg Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 'expected utility hypothesis' is one of the foundations of classical approaches to economics and decision theory and Savage's 'Sure-Thing Principle' is a fundamental element of it. It has been put forward that real-life situations exist, illustrated by the 'Allais' and 'Ellsberg paradoxes', in which the Sure-Thing Principle is violated, and where also the expected utility hypothesis does not hold. We have recently presented strong arguments for the presence of a double layer structure, a 'classical logical' and a 'quantum conceptual', in human thought and that the quantum conceptual mode is responsible of the above violation. We consider in this paper the Ellsberg paradox, perform an experiment with real test subjects on the situation considered by Ellsberg, and use the collected data to elaborate a model for the conceptual landscape surrounding the decision situation of the paradox. We show that it is the conceptual landscape which gives rise to a violation of the Sure-Thing Principle and leads to the paradoxical situation discovered by Ellsberg.

Diederik Aerts; Bart D'Hooghe; Sandro Sozzo

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

File:EIA-UP-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 16.74 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:45, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:45, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (16.74 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

50

File:EIA-UP-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 16.91 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:45, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:45, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (16.91 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

51

File:EIA-UP-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 16.86 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:46, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:46, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (16.86 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

52

Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, September 30, 1993--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Bluebell field produces from the Tertiary lower Green River and Wasatch Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in a fluvial-dominated deltaic lacustrine environment, sandstones deposited in fluvial-dominated deltas; and carbonates and some interbedded sandstones of the lower Wasatch transition deposited in mud flats. Bluebell project personnel are studying ways to improve completion techniques used in the field to increase primary production in both new wells and recompletions. The study includes detailed petrographic examination of the different lithologic reservoir types in both the outcrop and core. Outcrop, core, and geophysical logs are being used to identify and map important depositional cycles. Petrographic detail will be used to improve log calculation methods which are currently highly questionable due to varying water chemistry and clay content in the Green River and Wasatch Formations. Field mapping of fractures and their relationship to basin tectonics helps predict the orientation of open fractures in the subsurface. The project includes acquiring bore-hole imaging logs from new wells in the Bluebell field thereby obtaining detailed subsurface fracture data previously not available. Reservoir simulation models are being constructed to improve the understanding of pressure and fluid flow within the reservoir. A detailed database of well completion histories has been compiled and will be studied to determine which were the most and the least effective methods used in the past.

Allison, M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

PICEANCE BASIN Conservation Action Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sites Lead Notes Energy development, associated roads and infrastructure Dudley Bluffs BLM Continue revision. Low BLM 2013 Energy development, associated roads and infrastructure Dudley Bluffs private that is conducted with federal funds would be responsible for the plants under the ESA. County WAS pre- consulting

54

1-D Dirac Equation, Klein Paradox and Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions of the one dimensional Dirac equation with piece-wise constant potentials are presented using standard methods. These solutions show that the Klein Paradox is non-existent and represents a failure to correctly match solutions across a step potential. Consequences of this exact solution are studied for the step potential and a square barrier. Characteristics of massless Dirac states and the momentum linear band energies for Graphene are shown to have quite different current and momentum properties.

S. P. Bowen

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Quantum Cognition Analysis of the Ellsberg Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 'expected utility hypothesis' is one of the foundations of classical approaches to economics and decision theory and Savage's 'Sure-Thing Principle' is a fundamental element of it. It has been put forward that real-life situations exist, illustrated by the 'Allais' and 'Ellsberg paradoxes', in which the Sure-Thing Principle is violated, and where also the expected utility hypothesis does not hold. We have recently presented strong arguments for the presence of a double layer structure, a 'classical logical' and a 'quantum conceptual', in human thought and that the quantum conceptual mode is responsible of the above violation. We consider in this paper the Ellsberg paradox, perform an experiment with real test subjects on the situation considered by Ellsberg, and use the collected data to elaborate a model for the conceptual landscape surrounding the decision situation of the paradox. We show that it is the conceptual landscape which gives rise to a violation of the Sure-Thing Principle and leads to the pa...

Aerts, Diederik; Sozzo, Sandro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Published in Synthese 130 (2002), 279-302. MCKINSEY PARADOXES, RADICAL SCEPTICISM, AND THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Published in Synthese 130 (2002), 279-302. MCKINSEY PARADOXES, RADICAL SCEPTICISM literature has been devoted to the so-called `McKinsey' paradox which purports to show that semantic is due to Crispin Wright and Martin Davies. I argue that it fails to meet the challenge posed by McKinsey

Edinburgh, University of

57

Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report  

SciTech Connect

A summation is presented of the coring program site identification, and drilling and testing activity in the four primary study areas of the Western Gas Sands Project (WGSP). Pertinent information for January, February, and March, 1978 is included for each study area. The areas are the Northern Great Plains Province, the Greater Green River Basin, the Piceance Basin, and the Uinta Basin.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Western Gas Sands Project Quarterly Basin Activities Report  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly basin activities report is a summation of three months drilling and testing activities in the Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin. Detailed information is given for each study area for the first quarter of 1979.

Atkinson, C H

1979-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Kolmogorov Complexity, String Information, Panspermia and the Fermi Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bit strings rather than byte files can be a mode of transmission both for intelligent signals and for travels of extraterrestrial life. Kolmogorov complexity, i.e. the minimal length of a binary coded string completely defining a system, can then, due to its universality, become a key concept in the strategy of the search of extraterrestrials. Evaluating, for illustration, the Kolmogorov complexity of the human genome, one comes to an unexpected conclusion that a low complexity compressed string - analog of Noah's ark - will enable the recovery of the totality of terrestrial life. The recognition of bit strings of various complexity up to incompressible Martin-L\\"{o}f random sequences, will require a different strategy for the analysis of the cosmic signals. The Fermi paradox "Where is Everybody?" can be viewed under in the light of such information panspermia, i.e. a Universe full of traveling life streams.

V. G. Gurzadyan

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Towards experimentally testing the paradox of black hole information loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information about the collapsed matter in a black hole will be lost if Hawking radiations are truly thermal. Recent studies discover that information can be transmitted from a black hole by Hawking radiations, due to their spectrum deviating from exact thermality when back reaction is considered. In this paper, we focus on the spectroscopic features of Hawking radiation from a Schwarzschild black hole, contrasting the differences between the nonthermal and thermal spectra. Of great interest, we find that the energy covariances of Hawking radiations for the thermal spectrum are exactly zero, while the energy covariances are non-trivial for the nonthermal spectrum. Consequently, the nonthermal spectrum can be distinguished from the thermal one by counting the energy covariances of successive emissions, which provides an avenue towards experimentally testing the long-standing "information loss paradox".

Zhang, Baocheng; Zhan, Ming-sheng; You, Li; 10.1103/PhysRevD.87.044006

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONSTRAINTS, AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAHS UINTA BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. Chief among the challenges facing prospective unconventional fuel developers is the ability to access these resources. Access is heavily dependent upon land ownership and applicable management requirements. Understanding constraints on resource access and the prospect of consolidating resource holdings across a fragmented management landscape is critical to understanding the role Utahs unconventional fuel resources may play in our nations energy policy. This Topical Report explains the historic roots of the crazy quilt of western land ownership, how current controversies over management of federal public land with wilderness character could impact access to unconventional fuels resources, and how land exchanges could improve management efficiency. Upon admission to the Union, the State of Utah received the right to title to more than one-ninth of all land within the newly formed state. This land is held in trust to support public schools and institutions, and is managed to generate revenue for trust beneficiaries. State trust lands are scattered across the state in mostly discontinuous 640-acre parcels, many of which are surrounded by federal land and too small to develop on their own. Where state trust lands are developable but surrounded by federal land, federal land management objectives can complicate state trust land development. The difficulty generating revenue from state trust lands can frustrate state and local government officials as well as citizens advocating for economic development. Likewise, the prospect of industrial development of inholdings within prized conservation landscapes creates management challenges for federal agencies. One major tension involves whether certain federal public lands possess wilderness character, and if so, whether management of those lands should emphasize wilderness values over other uses. On December 22, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Orders implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utahs Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those resources found in the southern part of the state. Management requirements independent of l

Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Quantum information cannot be completely hidden in correlations: implications for the black-hole information paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The black-hole information paradox has fueled a fascinating effort to reconcile the predictions of general relativity and those of quantum mechanics. Gravitational considerations teach us that black holes must trap everything that falls into them. Quantum mechanically the mass of a black hole leaks away as featureless (Hawking) radiation, but if the black hole vanishes, where is the information about the matter that made it? We treat the states of the in-fallen matter quantum mechanically and show that the black-hole information paradox becomes more severe. Our formulation of the paradox rules out one of the most conservative resolutions: that the state of the in-falling matter might be hidden in correlations between semi-classical Hawking radiation and the internal states of the black hole. As a consequence, either unitarity or Hawking's semi-classical predictions must break down. Any resolution of the black-hole information crisis must elucidate one of these possibilities.

Samuel L. Braunstein; Arun K. Pati

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Information Loss Paradox Tested on Chiral Fermion Coupled to a Background Dilatonic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model where chiral boson is coupled to a background dilatonic field is considered to study the s-wave scattering of fermion by a back ground dilatonic black hole. Unlike the conclusion drawn in \\cite{MIT} it is found that the presence of chiral fermion does not violate unitarity and information remains preserved. Regularization plays a crucial role on the information paradox.

Anisur Rahaman

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

64

Focusing of weak shock waves and the von Neumann paradox of oblique shock reflection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focusing of weak shock waves and the von Neumann paradox of oblique shock reflection Esteban G of weak shock waves at small angles are considered: the focusing of curved fronts at a&es, the transition between regular and irregular reflection of oblique shock waves on rigid walls and the diffraction

Tabak, Esteban G.

65

On the paradox of pesticides Y. Charles Li and Yipeng Yang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the leaves not sprayed with the pesticides remain low (below the crop's economic thresholds]. In the experiment of [7] [3], pesticide effects on arthropods in the rice field are studied. There are four groups- specific relationship and the intraspecific density effect. To avoid the paradox of pesticides, farmers can

Li, Charles

66

Collection of technical data for tight gas sands in support of the massive hydraulic fracturing system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of work performed to study case histories of logging problems/requirements in tight gas sand areas, provide production histories/completion information on selected Uinta Basin tight gas sand wells, provide geologic guidance and additional technical input for computer simulation of tight gas sand well behavior, and develop information about production histories, completion techniques and reservoir rock characteristics from selected tight gas sand key wells in the Piceance and Green River Basins. A list of gas sand wells in the Uinta Basin is included along with gas production statistics, completion and reservoir data, and well production data. (JRD)

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1978-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

67

Renewable Electric Plant Information System user interface manual: Paradox 7 Runtime for Windows  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS) is a comprehensive database with detailed information on grid-connected renewable electric plants in the US. The current version, REPiS3 beta, was developed in Paradox for Windows. The user interface (UI) was developed to facilitate easy access to information in the database, without the need to have, or know how to use, Paradox for Windows. The UI is designed to provide quick responses to commonly requested sorts of the database. A quick perusal of this manual will familiarize one with the functions of the UI and will make use of the system easier. There are six parts to this manual: (1) Quick Start: Instructions for Users Familiar with Database Applications; (2) Getting Started: The Installation Process; (3) Choosing the Appropriate Report; (4) Using the User Interface; (5) Troubleshooting; (6) Appendices A and B.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Paradox Basin source rock, southeastern Utah : organic geochemical characterization of Gothic and Chimney Rock units, Ismay and Desert Creek zones, within a sequence stratigraphic framework.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Chimney Rock and Gothic units of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation have long been considered source rocks for the rich hydrocarbon fields of southeastern Utah. (more)

Tischler, Keith Louris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Authors: Danielle Lehle and Michael D. Vanden Berg, Utah Geological Survey. Venue: Economic Geology of the Rocky Mountain Region session, May 11, 2009, Geological Society of America-Rocky Mountain Section annual meeting, Orem, Utah, May 11-13, 2009. http://www.geosociety.org/sectdiv/rockymtn/09mtg/index.htm [external site] Abstract: The upper Green River formation’s oil shale deposits located within the Uinta Basin of Utah and the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado contain remarkably similar stratigraphic sequences despite being separated by the Douglas Creek arch. Individual horizons, as well as individual beds, can be traced for hundreds of miles within and between the two basins. However, changes in the topography-controlled runoff patterns between the basins, as well as changes in localized climate conditions throughout upper Green River time, created significant differences between basin-specific deposits. These variations affected the richness and thickness of each oil shale zone, resulting in basin-specific preferred extraction techniques (i.e., in-situ in Colorado and mining/retort in Utah). Colorado’s oil-shale resource was mapped and quantified by the USGS in the late 1970s, whereas this study is the first attempt at quantifying Utah’s overall resource by specific oil shale horizon. This presentation focuses on the Mahogany zone (MZ) and the stratigraphically lower R-6 zone; subsequent work will define other important horizons.

70

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

Klein's Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve the one dimensional Feshbach-Villars equation for spin-1/2 particle subjected to a scalar smooth potential. The eight component wave function is given in terms of the hypergeometric functions and via a limiting procedure, the wave functions of the step potential are deduced. These wave functions are used to test the validity of the boundary conditions deduced from the Feshbach-Villars transformation. The creation of pairs is predicted from the boundary condition of the charge density.

A. Bounames; L. Chetouani

2007-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

72

vol. 179, no. 3 the american naturalist march 2012 Insects on Plants: Explaining the Paradox of Low Diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

species pools. Herbivore diversity increases as a power function of plant diversity, and the rate specialized herbivores or pathogens have density-dependent effects on plant growth and fitness, put- tingvol. 179, no. 3 the american naturalist march 2012 Insects on Plants: Explaining the Paradox of Low

73

Random Access Game in Fading Channels with Capture: Equilibria and Braess-like Paradoxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nash equilibrium point of the transmission probabilities in a slotted ALOHA system with selfish nodes is analyzed. The system consists of a finite number of heterogeneous nodes, each trying to minimize its average transmission probability (or power investment) selfishly while meeting its average throughput demand over the shared wireless channel to a common base station (BS). We use a game-theoretic approach to analyze the network under two reception models: one is called power capture, the other is called signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) capture. Contrary to one's intuition, we show analytically the occurrence of Braess-like paradoxes that the performance of the system may degrade when channel state information (CSI) is available at the nodes.

Hsu, Fu-Te

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Parrondo's paradox and superactivation of classical and quantum capacity of communication channels with memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There exist memoryless zero-capacity quantum channels that when used jointly result in the channel with positive capacity. This phenomenon is called superactivation. Making use of Parrondo's paradox, we exhibit examples of superactivation-like effect for the capacity of classical communication channels as well as quantum and private capacity of quantum channels with memory. There are several ingredients necessary for superactivation of quantum capacity to occur in memoryless case. The first one is the requirement for the quantum channels which are amenable for superactivation to come from two distinct families - binding entanglement channels and erasure channels. The second one is the ability to utilize inputs which are entangled across the uses of the channels. Our construction uses a single family of erasure channels with classical memory to achieve the same superactivation-like effect for quantum capacity without any of the ingredients above.

Sergii Strelchuk

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hydrogeochemistry & Gas Chemistry of Uinta Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.britannica.com/ Natural gas is a fast growing component of world energy. #12;Types of Natural Gas http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-069/dds-069-b/REPORTS/Chapter_1.pdf BCG #12;Origins of Natural Gas Shurr & Ridgley (2002) #12;Impact Dominion wells with gas composition #12;Groundwater Dynamics · Shallow (normal P) · Intermediate (Over

Zhang, Ye

76

The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

Utah, University of

77

Negotiating the paradoxes of poverty: presidential rhetoric on welfare from Johnson to Clinton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project examines how Presidents Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton discussed issues of poverty and welfare from Johnson?s declaration of War on Poverty in 1964 to Clinton?s signing of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act in 1996. I argue that there are four critical tensions relevant to the debate concerning contemporary poverty in the United States?politics vs. policy, deserving vs. undeserving, help vs. hinder, and equality vs. freedom?and the key to improving the manner in which the nation confronts the problem of poverty requires understanding and negotiating these tensions. The analysis reveals that the five presidents had a mixed but overall rather poor record in confronting the four paradoxes. In general they tended either to avoid the tensions altogether, or fall to one or the other extreme. That being said, the analysis also reveals that there is considerable common ground concerning some critical issues between all the presidents, whether they were Democrats or Republicans, ideologically moderate or more partisan. Foremost among these are the beliefs that equal opportunity should be the overarching ideal, work should be rewarded well, and those that cannot help themselves should be supported as generously as possible by the government. I conclude that the 1996 law, while based in part on questionable assumptions concerning the condition of the poor, could lead to a significant re-framing of the debate away from the generally unpopular focus on welfare and welfare recipients and toward the working poor and the conditions and difficulties under which they labor, which could potentially lead to other positive transformations beneficial to the American poor.

Carcasson, Martin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Towards a Solution to the Early Faint Sun Paradox: A Lower Cosmic Ray Flux from a Stronger Solar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standard solar models predict a solar luminosity that gradually increased by about 30% over the past 4.5 billion years. Under the faint sun, Earth should have been frozen solid for most of its existence. Yet, running water is observed to have been present since very early in Earth's history. This enigma is known as the faint sun paradox. We show here that it can be partially resolved once we consider the cooling effect that cosmic rays are suspected to have on the global climate and that the younger sun must have had a stronger solar wind, such that it was more effective at stopping cosmic rays from reaching Earth. The paradox can then be completely resolved with the further contribution of modest greenhouse gas warming. When we add the cosmic ray flux modulation by a variable star formation rate in the Milky Way, we recover the long term glacial activity on Earth. As to the future, we find that the average global temperature will increase by typically 10K in the coming 2 Gyr.

Nir J. Shaviv

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

79

Revegetation research on oil shale lands in the Piceance Basin  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to study the effects of various reclamation practices on above- and belowground ecosystem development associated with disturbed oil shale lands in northwestern Colorado. Plant growth media that are being used in field test plots include retorted shale, soil over retorted shale, subsoil materials, and surface disturbed topsoils. Satisfactory stands of vegetation failed to establish on unleached retorted shale during two successive years of seeding. All seedings with soil over retorted shale were judged to be successful at the end of three growing seasons, but deep-rooted shrubs that depend upon subsoil moisture may have their growth hampered by the retorted shale substrate. Natural revegetation on areas with various degrees of disturbance shows that natural invasion and succession was slow at best. Invasion of species on disturbed topsoil plots showed that after three years introduced seed mixtures were more effective than native mixtures in occupying space and closing the community to invading species. Fertilizer appears to encourage the invasion of annual plants even after the third year following application. Long-term storage of topsoil without vegetation significantly decreases the mycorrhizal infection potential and, therefore, decreases the relative success of aboveground vegetation and subsequent succession. Ecotypic differentation related to growth and competitive ability, moisture stress tolerance, and reproductive potential have been found in five native shrub species. Germplasm sources of two grasses and two legumes, that have shown promise as revegetation species, have been collected and evaluated for the production of test seed. Fertilizer (nitrogen) when added to the soil at the time of planting may encourage competition from annual weeds to the detriment of seeded species.

Redente, E.F.; Cook, C.W.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

598 The Physics Teacher Vol. 48, December 2010 DOI: 10.1119/1.3517026 paradox problem as we videotaped them. They were given a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Experience and School (National Academies Press, Washington, DC, 1999). Appendix: Twin paradox version. Shaffer, and the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington (Prentice Hall, 1998); R. E is shown in a second window. http://www.compadre.org/OSP/items/detail.cfm?ID=10383 Initial conditions

Steinberg, Richard N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hydrogeochemistry and gas compositions of the Uinta Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to geothermal energy extraction and radionu- clide transport as well as conventional and un- conventional oil cracking of bitumen and oil into gas) or from a mix of thermogenic-biogenic sources. Moreover M.S. degree from Louisiana State University (1978) and her Ph.D. from the University of Miami (1983

Zhang, Ye

83

Uinta Basin Oil and Gas Development Air Quality Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production EASTERN UTAH BLM Proposed Leasing for Oil Shale and Tar Sands Development "Indian Country" ­ Regulatory Authority Controlled by the Tribes and EPA Oil Shale Leasing Tar Sands Leasing "Indian Country

Utah, University of

84

HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the second half of the third project year (October 6, 2002, through April 5, 2003). The primary work included describing and mapping regional facies of the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Regional cross sections show the development of ''clean carbonate'' packages that contain all of the productive reservoir facies. These clean carbonates abruptly change laterally into thick anhydrite packages that filled several small intra-shelf basins in the upper Ismay zone. Examination of upper Ismay cores identified seven depositional facies: open marine, middle shelf, inner shelf/tidal flat, bryozoan mounds, phylloid-algal mounds, quartz sand dunes, and anhydritic salinas. Lower Desert Creek facies include open marine, middle shelf, protomounds/collapse breccia, and phylloid-algal mounds. Mapping the upper Ismay zone facies delineates very prospective reservoir trends that contain porous, productive buildups around the anhydrite-filled intra-shelf basins. Facies and reservoir controls imposed by the anhydritic intra-shelf basins should be considered when selecting the optimal location and orientation of any horizontal drilling from known phylloidalgal reservoirs to undrained reserves, as well as identifying new exploration trends. Although intra-shelf basins are not present in the lower Desert Creek zone of the Blanding sub-basin, drilling horizontally along linear shoreline trends could also encounter previously undrilled, porous intervals and buildups. Technology transfer activities consisted of a technical presentation at a Class II Review conference sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory at the Center for Energy and Economic Diversification in Odessa, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

86

MULTICOMPONENT SEISMIC ANALYSIS AND CALIBRATION TO IMPROVE RECOVERY FROM ALGAL MOUNDS: APPLICATION TO THE ROADRUNNER/TOWAOC AREA OF THE PARADOX BASIN, UTE MOUNTAIN UTE RESERVATION, COLORADO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-02NT15451, ''Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado'', for the Second Biennial Report covering the time period May 1, 2003 through October 31, 2003. During this period, the project achieved two significant objectives: completion of the acquisition and processing design and specifications 3D9C seismic acquisition and the 3D VSP log; and completion of the permitting process involving State, Tribal and Federal authorities. Successful completion of these two major milestones pave the way for field acquisition as soon as weather permits in the Spring of 2004. This report primarily describes the design and specifications for the VSP and 3D9C surveys.

Paul La Pointe; Claudia Rebne; Steve Dobbs

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Identification of geopressured occurrences outside of the Gulf Coast. Final report, Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an extension of its efforts in the development of the geopressured resources of the Gulf Coast, the Division of Geothermal Energy of the US Department of Energy is interested in determining the extent and characteristics of geopressured occurrences in areas outside the Gulf Coast. The work undertaken involved a literature search of available information documenting such occurrences. Geopressured reservoirs have been reported from various types of sedimentary lithologies representing virtually all geologic ages and in a host of geologic environments, many of which are unlike those of the Gulf Coast. These include many Rocky Mountain basins (Green River, Big Horn, Powder River, Wind River, Uinta, Piceance, Denver, San Juan), Mid-Continent basins (Delaware, Anadorko, Interior Salt, Williston, Appalachian), California basins (Sacramento, San Joaquin, Los Angeles, Ventura, Coast Ranges), Alaskan onshore and offshore basins, Pacific Coast offshore basins, and other isolated occurrences, both onshore and offshore.

Strongin, O.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 30, 2013 | Release Date: January 31, January 30, 2013 | Release Date: January 31, 2013 | Next Release: February 7, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Natural gas dry production at selected points in the United States Rocky Mountain region have rebounded during the final two weeks of January, according to data from BENTEK Energy LLC (Bentek). Production declines took place in this region during the middle of the month, likely due to the effect of a cold front that moved into the region. The cold weather led to a number of reported wellhead freeze-offs, and correlated with production decreases in the San Juan, Green River, Uinta and Piceance basins, according to Bentek. This was particularly the case in the San Juan Basin, located in Colorado

89

Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas-Louisiana- Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin Appalachian Basin Wind River Basin Eastern Shelf NW Shelf Abo Sussex-Shannon Muddy J Mesaverde- Lance-Lewis Medina/Clinton-Tuscarora Bradford-Venango-Elk Berea-Murrysville Piceance Basin Bossier Williston Basin Ft Worth Basin Davis Bighorn Basin Judith River- Eagle Permian Basin Anadarko Basin Denver Basin San Juan Basin North-Central Montana Area Uinta Basin Austin Chalk Codell-Niobrara Penn-Perm Carbonate Niobrara Chalk Dakota Morrow Mesaverde Thirty- One Cleveland Ozona Canyon Wasatch- Mesaverde Red Fork Mesaverde Granite Wash Stuart City-Edwards Bowdoin- Greenhorn Travis Peak Olmos Cotton Valley Vicksburg Wilcox Lobo Pictured Cliffs Cretaceous Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Mancos- Dakota Gilmer Lime Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States

90

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Cold weather in December had significant effects on demand, supply, and prices across the country. Cold weather led to a net withdrawal of 285 billion cubic feet (Bcf) for the week ending Friday, December 13. This was the largest storage withdrawal since recordkeeping began in 1994. Another larger-than-normal storage withdrawal of 177 Bcf occurred the following week. Widespread freeze-offs occurred in December and disrupted production for several days in the Piceance Basin in Utah and Wyoming, the Uinta Basin in Utah, the San Joaquin Basin in California, and the Williston Basin in North Dakota. Imports from Canada helped mitigate the loss of supply. During the month, prices rose across most of the country, and the Henry Hub price averaged about $0.60/MMBtu higher than the previous month's average.

91

Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report  

SciTech Connect

A summation of information is presented on geology and drilling activity in the four primary study areas of the Western Gas Sands Project. The areas of interest are the Greater Green River Basin, the Piceance Basin, the Uinta Basin, and the Northern Great Plains Province. Drilling activity is discussed for the months of October, November, and December, 1977, with the major emphasis on wells located in low permeability sandstone areas, having significant gas production and utilizing hydraulic fracturing treatments. The drilling information was obtained primarily from ''The Rocky Mountain Region Report'' published by Petroleum Information Corporation on a daily basis. Another source of information was the ''Montana Oil and Gas Journal'' which is released weekly.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resuces of the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1, Colorado,"exploit the na'cion' s oil shale reserves. The two Coloradothe estimated world reserves of oil shale, respectively. in

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

P-WAVE TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC DATA INTERPRETATION AT RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of unconventional fossil energy sources such as oil shale and hydrates; clean coal technologies; third

94

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shale development is unique in the sense that the actual productionshale is exploited USSR where it is fed directly into a power station for generation of electricity, in China where oil production

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil shale development is unique in the sense that the actual productionshale is exploited USSR where it is fed directly into a power station for generation of electricity, in China where oil production

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

porous media although their fractured nature is recognized. The subject of partially saturated fluid flow

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hydraulic fracture optimization using hydraulic fracture and reservoir modeling in the Piceance Basin, Colorado.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydraulic fracturing is an important stimulation method for producing unconventional gas reserves. Natural fractures are present in many low-permeability gas environments and often provide important (more)

Reynolds, Harris Allen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercially Producing Oil Shale: World Oil, Vol. 190, No.A Tech~ nology Assessment. of Oil Shale Development,"13th Oil Shale Symposium Proceedings, Colorado School of

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 38 p, 1968. and O:Ll~~shale Resources of the Pi~ Domwll,Commercially Producing Oil Shale: World Oil, Vol. 190, No.nology Assessment. of Oil Shale Development," 13th Oil Shale

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resuces of the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1, Colorado,"exploit the na'cion' s oil shale reserves. The two Coloradoof the estimated world reserves of oil shale, respectively.

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A second row Parking Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider two variations of the discrete car parking problem where at every vertex of the integers a car arrives with rate one, now allowing for parking in two lines. a) The car parks in the first line whenever the vertex and all of its nearest neighbors are not occupied yet. It can reach the first line if it is not obstructed by cars already parked in the second line (screening). b) The car parks according to the same rules, but parking in the first line can not be obstructed by parked cars in the second line (no screening). In both models, a car that can not park in the first line will attempt to park in the second line. If it is obstructed in the second line as well, the attempt is discarded. We show that both models are solvable in terms of finite-dimensional ODEs. We compare numerically the limits of first and second line densities, with time going to infinity. While it is not surprising that model a) exhibits an increase of the density in the second line from the first line, more remarkably this is also true for model b), albeit in a less pronounced way.

S. R. Fleurke; C. Kuelske

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Quark-gluon plasma paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on simple physics arguments it is shown that the concept of quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter consisting of uncorrelated quarks, antiquarks, and gluons, has a fundamental problem.

Dariusz Miskowiec

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

103

Mpemba Paradox Revisited -- Numerical Reinforcement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inspired by responses to the work (arXiv:1310.6514), we solved the one-dimensional, nonlinear Fourier initial and boundary condition problem using the finite element method. Examination of all possible parameters reveals the following: 1. Hydrogen bond has memory effect to emit energy at a rate, or with a relaxation time, depending on initial energy storage. 2. Skin super-solidity creates gradients in thermal diffusion coefficient for heat conduction in liquid with the optimal skin-bulk ratio of 1.48. 3. Convection alone produces no such effect. 4. Mpemba effect happens only in the highly non-diabetic source-path-drain cycling system.

Zhang, Xi; Ma, Zengsheng; Sun, Chang Q

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Mpemba Paradox Revisited -- Numerical Reinforcement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inspired by responses to the work (arXiv:1310.6514), we solved the one-dimensional, nonlinear Fourier initial and boundary condition problem using the finite element method. Examination of all possible parameters reveals the following: 1. Hydrogen bond has memory effect to emit energy at a rate, or with a relaxation time, depending on initial energy storage. 2. Skin super-solidity creates gradients in thermal diffusion coefficient for heat conduction in liquid with the optimal skin-bulk ratio of 1.48. 3. Convection alone produces no such effect. 4. Mpemba effect happens only in the highly non-diabetic source-path-drain cycling system.

Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; Zengsheng Ma; Chang Q Sun

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

105

Methane recovery from coalbeds project. Monthly progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress made on the Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project (MRCP) is reported in the Raton Mesa Coal Region. The Uinta and Warrior basin reports have been reviewed and will be published and delivered in early December. A cooperative core test with R and P Coal Company on a well in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, was negotiated. In a cooperative effort with the USGS Coal Branch on three wells in the Wind River Basin, desorption of coal samples showed little or no gas. Completed field testing at the Dugan Petroleum well in the San Juan Basin. Coal samples showed minimal gas. Initial desorption of coal samples suggests that at least a moderate amount of gas was obtained from the Coors well test in the Piceance Basin. Field work for the Piceance Basin Detailed Site Investigation was completed. In the Occidental Research Corporation (ORC) project, a higher capacity vacuum pump to increase CH/sub 4/ venting operations has been installed. Drilling of Oxy No. 12 experienced delays caused by mine gas-offs and was eventually terminated at 460 ft after an attempt to drill through a roll which produced a severe dog leg and severely damaged the drill pipe. ORC moved the second drill rig and equipment to a new location in the same panel as Oxy No. 12 and set the stand pipe for Oxy No. 13. Drill rig No. 1 has been moved east of the longwall mining area in anticipation of drilling cross-panel on 500 foot intervals. Waynesburg College project, Equitable Gas Company has received the contract from Waynesburg College and has applied to the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission for a new tariff rate. Waynesburg College has identified a contractor to make the piping connections to the gas line after Equitable establishes their meter and valve requirements.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Table of Contents.ai  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster Presentation AAPG National Meeting April 2004 Poster Presentation Abstract Poster Anadarko Basin (AB) Uinta Basin (UB) Anadarko Basin (AB) Uinta Basin (UB) Abstract Poster...

107

4. Nuclei and Radioactivity Paradoxes and Puzzles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radioactivity, it may not be legally sold in the United States. 4. Of those killed by the Hiroshima atomic bomb anecdotes and say, "Of course." Radioactivity Radioactivity is the explosion of the nucleus of the atom nucleus of one atom is about million times greater than in a chemical explosion of a single atom

Browder, Tom

108

Decision Making Consequences of the Paradoxical Flip.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The hard-easy manipulation (i.e., manipulation of item difficulty) has been used to demonstrate that participants are sometimes overconfident while believing they are worse than average. (more)

Lester, Houston

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Slippery Thermals and the Cumulus Entrainment Paradox  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In numerical simulations of growing congestus clouds, the maximum upward velocities w typically occur in compact toroidal vortices or thermals. These maxima were tracked, and the momentum budget was analyzed within spherical regions centered on ...

Steven C. Sherwood; Daniel Hernndez-Deckers; Maxime Colin; Francis Robinson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Paradox of Hunger and Obesity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

October 2004. 8. Mohammad K. Iran National Health Survey,2000. 9. Government of Iran. National Household Expenditurelack of resources (7).. In Iran, the 1999 National Health

Harrison, Gail G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The Paradoxical Success of Fuzzy Logic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of choice at Davis is Trona, sodium sesquacarbonate, a natural sodium based acid gas control reagent lime or sodium bicarbonate. TIle stD chiometric Trona addition iate is 155 Ib/hr based upon historic powdered limestone in the llmtace throat, Trona and powdered hydrated lime injection belore and aller

Baltes, Jacky

112

On the Paradoxical Book of Bell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an essay-review on a recently re-issued book of John Bell "Speakable and Unspeakable in Quantum Mechanics". The discussion concentrates around the Bell Theorem, its assumptions, consequences and frequent overinterpretations.

Marek Zukowski

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

113

A Paradoxical Property of the Monkey Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A "monkey book" is a book consisting of a random distribution of letters and blanks, where a group of letters surrounded by two blanks is defined as a word. We compare the statistics of the word distribution for a monkey book with the corresponding distribution for the general class of random books, where the latter are books for which the words are randomly distributed. It is shown that the word distribution statistics for the monkey book is different and quite distinct from a typical sampled book or real book. In particular the monkey book obeys Heaps' power law to an extraordinary good approximation, in contrast to the word distributions for sampled and real books, which deviate from Heaps' law in a characteristics way. The somewhat counter-intuitive conclusion is that a "monkey book" obeys Heaps' power law precisely because its word-frequency distribution is not a smooth power law, contrary to the expectation based on simple mathematical arguments that if one is a power law, so is the other.

Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Minnhagen, Petter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Slippery thermals and the cumulus entrainment paradox  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In numerical simulations of growing congestus clouds, the maximum upward velocities w typically occur in compact toroidal vortices or thermals. These maxima were tracked, and the momentum budget analyzed within spherical regions centred on them ...

Steven C. Sherwood; Daniel Hernndez-Deckers; Maxime Colin; Francis Robinson

115

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Special issue - the emerging reality of oil shale: government plays a prominent role in leasing and developing oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The federal government announced in mid-1979 its intention to develop 400 dam3/day (2.5 million bpd) of oil substitutes by 1990, including 64 dam3/day (400,000 bpd) for oil shale. The federal government owns much of the oil shale reserves in Colorado's Piceance Creek Basin and Utah's Uinta Basin. State and private interests control the remaining 20% of the most marketable reserves. In most of Utah and Colorado, the US controls the richest and largest consolidated oil shale reserves. As a result, the federal government is in a unique position to spur rapid oil shale development through an expedited and expanded federal shale development program. In May 1980, the Department of Interior announced a broad new program for developing federal oil shale reserves. Also in May and June, 1980, the Supreme Court announced 2 decisions, Andrus vs. Utah and Shell Oil vs. Andrus, that opened up for federal development vast oil shale reserves in Utah and clarified in part, the status of private oil shale claims. These developments, coupled with substantial financial inducements soon to emerge from the Synthetic Fuels Corp., suggest the long-awaited promise of oil shale development may finally arrive.

Israel, D.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Western Gas Sands Project. Status report  

SciTech Connect

The progress during December, 1977 of the major government sponsored endeavors undertaken to increase gas production from the low permeability gas sands of the western United States is summarized. The USGS is continuing geological and geophysical studies in the four major western basins to better characterize the resource base. Shipping arrangements for the core donated to the USGS by Inexco WASP (a well drilled for possible nuclear explosive stimulation in Wyoming) have been made, and cores for macrofossil and ostracode analysis from the Bowdoin Dome area have been collected. The National Laboratories, funded by DOE, are continuing their work in the area of research and development. The emphasis is on the development of new tools and instrumentation systems, rock mechanics, mathematical modeling and data analysis. Field tests and demonstrations active in the Uinta and Piceance Basins are Gas Producing Enterprises (GPE) Natural Buttes, Wells No. 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, and 22; Mobil Research and Development, Well No. F-31-13G; and Rio Blanco Natural Gas Company, Well No. 498-4-1. Colorado Interstate Gas Company has initiated activity on its project with the installation of equipment, and Mitchell Energy Company's proposal to conduct an MHF test in the Cotton Valley lime gas reservoir in Texas is nearing the contract negotiation stage.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall production of the well, identify areas that may be by-passed by a waterflood, and prevent rapid water breakthrough. In the eastern Paradox Basin, Colorado, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of increasing the mud weight during drilling operations before penetrating the overpressured Desert Creek zone; centralizing treatment facilities; and mixing produced water from pumping oil wells with non-reservoir water and injecting the mixture into the reservoir downdip to reduce salt precipitation, dispose of produced water, and maintain reservoir pressure to create a low-cost waterflood. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of technical presentations to members of the Technical Advisory Board in Colorado and the Colorado Geological Survey. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity/PUMP 2 Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity/PUMP 2 DE-FC26-02NT15133 Goal The primary goal of this study is to increase recovery of oil reserves from existing reservoirs and from new discoveries by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. The overall objectives of this study are to: 1) increase recoverable oil from existing reservoirs, 2) add new discoveries, 3) prevent premature abandonment of numerous small fields, 4) increase deliverability through identifying the latest drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques, and 5) reduce development costs and risk. Performer Utah Geological Survey (UGS), Salt Lake City, UT

120

MAJOR PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

SciTech Connect

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land-use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the second project year (July 1 through September 30, 2003). This work included (1) describing the Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play, subplays, and outcrop reservoir analogs of the Uinta Green River Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit (Eocene Green River Formation), and (2) technology transfer activities. The Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit can be divided into plays having a dominantly southern sediment source (Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play) and plays having a dominantly northern sediment source (Conventional Northern Uinta Basin Play). The Conventional Southern Uinta Basin Play is divided into six subplays: (1) conventional Uteland Butte interval, (2) conventional Castle Peak interval, (3) conventional Travis interval, (4) conventional Monument Butte interval, (5) conventional Beluga interval, and (6) conventional Duchesne interval fractured shale/marlstone. We are currently conducting basin-wide correlations to define the limits of the six subplays. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. Outcrop analogs for each subplay except the Travis interval are found in Indian and Nine Mile Canyons. During this quarter, the project team members submitted an abstract to the American Association of Petroleum Geologists for presentation at the 2004 annual national convention in Dallas, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed by overlying argillaceous and non-fractured units. The best outcrop analogs for Twin Creek reservoirs are found at Devils Slide and near the town of Peoa, Utah, where fractures in dense, homogeneous non-porous limestone beds are in contact with the basal siltstone units (containing sealed fractures) of the overlying units. The shallow marine, Mississippian Leadville Limestone is a major oil and gas reservoir in the Paradox Basin of Utah and Colorado. Hydrocarbons are produced from basement-involved, northwest-trending structural traps with closure on both anticlines and faults. Excellent outcrops of Leadville-equivalent rocks are found along the south flank of the Uinta Mountains, Utah. For example, like the Leadville, the Mississippian Madison Limestone contains zones of solution breccia, fractures, and facies variations. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. In the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of: (1) owning drilling rigs and frac holding tanks; (2) perforating sandstone beds with more than 8 percent neutron porosity and stimulate with separate fracture treatments; (3) placing completed wells on primary production using artificial lift; (4) converting wells relatively soon to secondary waterflooding maintaining reservoir pressure above the bubble point to maximize oil recovery; (5) developing waterflood units using an alternating injector--producer pattern on 40-acre (16-ha) spacing; and (6) recompleting producing wells by perforating all beds that are productive in the waterflood unit. As part of technology transfer activities during this quarter, an abstract describing outcrop reservoir analogs was accepted by the American Assoc

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Western gas sands: Technology status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on western gas sands is conducted by the US Department of Energy's Morgantown Technology Center to encourage the development of very low permeability gas sands in the western United States. The current search is an outgrowth of earlier Government research on tight sands in which nuclear and massive hydraulics fracturing stimulations were tested without definitive results. Based on input from the gas industry, universities, and geologic and engineering consulting firms, activites were broadened to include fundamental research and development. Consequently, the focus of the research for the last several years has been on improving diagnostic instruments for evaluating reservoir and stimulation performances, interpreting geophysical and engineering data, and stimulation techniques. Intergrated geologic studies of three depositional basins that contain tight lenticular sandstone units have also been pursued as part of this new effort. To date, the following tentative conclusions have been formulated: The permeability of the tight gas sands can be as much as three to four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional gas deposits. Nineteen western geologic basins and trends have been identified that contain significant volumes of tight gas. Gas resources in the priority geologic basins have been estimated as follows: Piceance Basin, 420 Tcf.; Greater Green River Basin, 4971 Tcf.; and Uinta Basin, 21 Tcf. The critical parameters for successfully developing tight sandstone resources are the presence of natural fractures within a reservoir and the effective propped length of hydraulically induced fractures. Stimulation technology is presently insufficient to efficiently recover gas from lenticular, tight reservoirs. 15 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect

Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

Robert Caldwell

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Selected elemental distributions as determined by reference retorting of oil shale and possible correlation with Fischer assay oil yield  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In previous work, the concentrations and distribution of selected elements in oil shale retort products were reported for the Department of Energy interim reference shales and Mahogany zone shale from Colorado corehole No. 1. As an extension of this work, the distribution of the same elements for a new shale group was investigated. The new shale group was composed of rich and lean shale pairs from other Mahogany zone coreholes in the Piceance Creek and Uinta Basins. This report summarizes graphically the distribution data collected to date, including data for the reference shales, Colorado corehole No. 1, and the rich and lean shale pairs. Also included are elemental concentrations by product stream for the new shale group. The data previously reported for Colorado corehole No. 1 were combined with the data from the new shale group to develop a capability for predicting the distribution of these elements in the different product streams. The data collected for the reference shales were not considered in the development of this predictive capability. The empirical data were collected for the new shale group using the same experimental approach as previously reported. Briefly, the general experimental design was to use mass balance Fischer assay as a reference retorting method, with subsequent analysis of the feedstock and all retort products for the elements of concern by instrumental analysis. The elements examined were arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nitrogen, selenium, silver, sulfur, and zinc. Initially, data analysis also remained the same. Unlike the previous work, statistical analysis was used to test for differences between shale groups for the distribution of a given element in a given product stream. 42 refs., 61 figs., 27 tabs.

Johnson, L.S.; Wood, F.J. Jr.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Measurement and Modeling of Sorption-Induced Strain and Permeability Changes in Coal  

SciTech Connect

Strain caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A., and high-volatile bituminous coal from the Uinta-Piceance basin of Utah, U.S.A. using a newly developed strain measurement apparatus. The apparatus can be used to measure strain on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal strain. The swelling and shrinkage (strain) in the coal samples resulting from the adsorption of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, helium, and a mixture of gases was measured. Sorption-induced strain processes were shown to be reversible and easily modeled with a Langmuir-type equation. Extended Langmuir theory was applied to satisfactorily model strain caused by the adsorption of gas mixtures using the pure gas Langmuir strain constants. The amount of time required to obtain accurate strain data was greatly reduced compared to other strain measurement methods. Sorption-induced changes in permeability were also measured as a function of pres-sure. Cleat compressibility was found to be variable, not constant. Calculated variable cleat-compressibility constants were found to correlate well with previously published data for other coals. During permeability tests, sorption-induced matrix shrinkage was clearly demonstrated by higher permeability values at lower pore pressures while holding overburden pressure constant. Measured permeability data were modeled using three dif-ferent permeability models from the open literature that take into account sorption-induced matrix strain. All three models poorly matched the measured permeability data because they overestimated the impact of measured sorption-induced strain on permeabil-ity. However, by applying an experimentally derived expression to the measured strain data that accounts for the confining overburden pressure, pore pressure, coal type, and gas type, the permeability models were significantly improved.

Eric P. Robertson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future projectspecific analyses. Additional information about the PEIS can be found at http://ostseis.anl.gov.

Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Western gas sands project status report  

SciTech Connect

The Western Gas Sands Project Plan, Project Implementation Plans and Project Plan Document FY 78 are in various stages of preparation. Information gathering by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) of the initial data base for many of the project activities is nearing completion. Some base maps are complete and field investigations in the principal areas of interest are being conducted. Research and development by Energy Research Centers and National Laboratories were directed toward new tools and instrumentation systems, rock mechanics experiments, mathematical modeling, and data analysis. The Uinta Basin in Utah and Piceance Basin in Colorado have ongoing massive hydraulic fracture (MHF) experiments in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas formations. These are: CER Corporation, MHF 3; Gas Producing Enterprises, Natural Buttes No. 14, 18, 19, 20; Mobil Oil, F-31-13G; and Rio Blanco Natural Gas, 498-4-1. Colorado Interstate Gas Company has been awarded a contract to determine if productivity in low permeability reservoirs can be improved by reducing the interstitialwater saturation. They will be using two wells, the Sprague No. 1 and Miller No. 1, completed in the Dakota J formation in the Wattenberg Field in north central Colorado. All of the massive hydraulic fracture wells, with the exception of the Pacific Transmission well, have been fractured as planned. The Mobil and GPE No. 14, 18, and 20 wells show significant improvement as compared to original flow rates. The Mobil well is being tested for additional MHF treatments. Sandia Laboratories is continuing their research program in hydraulic fracturing at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS).

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Development of an Improved Methodology to Assess Potential Unconventional Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering the important role played today by unconventional gas resources in North America and their enormous potential for the future around the world, it is vital to both policy makers and industry that the volumes of these resources and the impact of technology on these resources be assessed. To provide for optimal decision making regarding energy policy, research funding, and resource development, it is necessary to reliably quantify the uncertainty in these resource assessments. Since the 1970s, studies to assess potential unconventional gas resources have been conducted by various private and governmental agencies, the most rigorous of which was by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS employed a cell-based, probabilistic methodology which used analytical equations to calculate distributions of the resources assessed. USGS assessments have generally produced distributions for potential unconventional gas resources that, in our judgment, are unrealistically narrow for what are essentially undiscovered, untested resources. In this article, we present an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources. Our methodology is a stochastic approach that includes Monte Carlo simulation and correlation between input variables. Application of the improved methodology to the Uinta-Piceance province of Utah and Colorado with USGS data validates the means and standard deviations of resource distributions produced by the USGS methodology, but reveals that these distributions are not right skewed, as expected for a natural resource. Our investigation indicates that the unrealistic shape and width of the gas resource distributions are caused by the use of narrow triangular input parameter distributions. The stochastic methodology proposed here is more versatile and robust than the USGS analytic methodology. Adoption of the methodology, along with a careful examination and revision of input distributions, should allow a more realistic assessment of the uncertainty surrounding potential unconventional gas resources.

Salazar, Jesus; McVay, Duane A., E-mail: mcvay@pe.tamu.edu; Lee, W. John [Texas A and M University, Department of Petroleum Engineering, 3116 TAMU (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Paradox of Federal Energy and Defense Installations in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

these effects. These sites include Hanford in eastern Washington, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and the Nevada Test Site only a little more than an hour's drive from...

131

Dead ringers : globalization and the paradoxes of development and identity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paul. 2004. Implored to Offshore More: U.S. Firms Are TooComprehensive Impact of Offshore IT Software and ServicesChronicle. 2004. Looking Offshore: Straight from the Mouth:

Nadeem, Shehzad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

EconoThermodynamics, or the world economy "thermal death" paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper present one of attempts to apply the thermodynamics laws to economics. Introducing common thermodynamic parameters and considering world economics as a one macrosystem, authors demonstrate the possible consequences of entropy increasing due to irreversible economics activities. "Entropy" advices to leaders of different business units are presented.

Tishin, A M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

ISSN 1745-9648 The Paradox of the Exclusion of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the emerging guidelines?2 This may seem like an esoteric debate, but it translates into fundamental guidance

Feigon, Brooke

134

Perfect Execution: Abolitionism and the Paradox of Lethal Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

denial of certiorari) (electrocution); and Gray v. Lucas,States shift from hanging to electrocution as its method ofthe death penalty: electrocution [medicalization]. By the

Kaufman-Osborn, Timothy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Paradoxical Republics: Tropes of Civic Longing in Postcolonial Caribbean Writing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

el rey de los mestizos de Venezuela viene luego; desvanecidohave suggested Mexico or Venezuela as Conrads favoredfourteen year residence in Venezuela (1945-1959), a nation

Ramos, Luis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Internet Paradox A Social Technology That Reduces Social Involvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

122 48 W 1860 + 392 049035 XNP TRONA 35 46 N 117 23 W 1695 + 393 049043 XNP TRUCKEE RS 39 20 N 120 11

Kiesler, Sara

137

Gasoline Prices, Fuel Economy, and the Energy Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is often asserted that consumers purchasing automobiles or other goods and services underweight the costs of gasoline or other "add-ons." We test this hypothesis in the US automobile market by examining the effects of ...

Wozny, Nathan

138

Exploring the Inventor's Paradox: Applying Jigsaw to Software Visualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: to understand the code structure and relationships between entities within a package; and to understand|Private} Declaration of a public, protected or private method DefStatic Declaration of a static method Package name structure. Figure 2: List view of Document, Interface, and Package entities. number of documents

Anslow, Craig

139

The Diesel Paradox: Why Dieselization Will Lead to Cleaner Air  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are challenges facing the U.S. and the world that are brought on by the growing demand for transporting people and goods. These include the growing consumption of petroleum, urban air pollution, and global climate change.

Eberhardt, James J.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. Leaked Documents Reveal Fossil Fuel Influence in Whiterelationships between fossil fuel resources and development,and the ineffi- cient fossil fuel consumers. The first

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Institutional Paradoxes: Why Welfare Workers Can't Reform Welfare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

program for families with children (AFDC). These changes hadwith Dependent Children (AFDC) program was established asadditional changes in the AFDC program. These changes

Meyers, Marcia K.; Glaser, Bonnie; Dillon, Nara; MacDonald, Karin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

EPR Paradox, Locality and Completeness of Quantum Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantum theory (QT) and new stochastic approaches have no deterministic prediction for a single measurement or for a single time?series of events observed for a trapped ion

M. Kupczynski

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

John Topham and Susan Redd Butler Off-Campus Faculty Research Awards James Ayres, University of Arizona, "The Manufacturing and Marketing of Railroad Ties in the Uinta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Virginia, "Sovereignty and Survival: American Energy Development and Indian Self as a Woman: Race, Gender, and Reform on the Wind River Reservation" Jason Strykowski, University of New': Gendered Labor, Ethnic Identity, and Citizenship in the American Southwest, 1846-1912" Public Programming

Hart, Gus

144

Development of an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources in North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, various private and governmental agencies have conducted studies to assess potential unconventional gas resources, particularly those resources contained in tight sands, fractured shales, and coal beds. The US Geological Survey (USGS) has assessed the amount of unconventional gas resources in North America, and its estimates are used by other government agencies as the basis for their resource estimates. While the USGS employs a probabilistic methodology, it is apparent from the resulting narrow ranges that the methodology underestimates the uncertainty of these undiscovered, untested, potential resources, which in turn limits the reliability and usefulness of the assessments. The objective of this research is to develop an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources that better accounts for the uncertainty in these resources. This study investigates the causes of the narrow ranges generated by the USGS analyticprobabilistic methodology used to prepare the 1995 national oil and gas assessment and the 2000 NOGA series, and presents an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources. The new model improves upon the USGS method by using a stochastic approach, which includes correlation between the input variables and Monte Carlo simulation, representing a more versatile and robust methodology than the USGS analytic-probabilistic methodology. The improved methodology is applied to the assessment of potential unconventional gas resources in the Uinta-Piceance province of Utah and Colorado, and compared to results of the evaluation performed by the USGS in 2002. Comparison of the results validates the means and standard deviations produced by the USGS methodology, but shows that the probability distributions generated are rather different and, that the USGS distributions are not skewed to right, as expected for a natural resource. This study indicates that the unrealistic shape and width of the resulting USGS probability distributions are not caused by the analytic equations or lack of correlation between input parameters, but rather the use of narrow triangular probability distributions as input variables. Adoption of the improved methodology, along with a careful examination and revision of input probability distributions, will allow a more realistic assessment of the uncertainty surrounding potential unconventional gas resources.

Salazar Vanegas, Jesus

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

PRISE: petroleum resource investigation summary and evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As conventional resources are depleted, unconventional gas (UG: gas from tight sands, coal beds, and shale) resources are becoming increasingly important to U.S and world energy supply. The volume of UG resources is generally unknown in most international basins. However, in 25 mature U.S. basins, UG resources have been produced for decades and are well characterized in the petroleum literature. The objective of this work was to develop a method for estimating recoverable UG resources in target, or exploratory, basins. The method was based on quantitative relations between known conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon resource types in mature U.S. basins. To develop the methodology to estimate resource volumes, we used data from the U.S. Geological Survey, Potential Gas Committee, Energy Information Administration, National Petroleum Council, and Gas Technology Institute to evaluate relations among hydrocarbon resource types in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Greater Green River, Illinois, San Juan, Uinta-Piceance, and Wind River basins. We chose these seven basins because they are mature basins for both conventional and unconventional oil and gas production. We assumed that a seven basin study would be sufficient for preliminary gas resource analysis and assessment of the new methodology. We developed a methodology we call PRISE, which uses software that investigates relationships among data published for both conventional and unconventional resources in the seven mature U.S. basins. PRISE was used to predict recoverable UG resources for target basins, on the basis of their known conventional resources. Input data for PRISE were cumulative production, proved reserves, growth, and undiscovered resources. We used published data to compare cumulative technically recoverable resources for each basin. For the seven basins studied, we found that 10% of the recoverable hydrocarbon resources are conventional oil and gas, and 90% are from unconventional resources. PRISE may be used to estimate the volume of hydrocarbon resources in any basin worldwide and, hopefully, assist early economic and development planning. PRISE methodology for estimating UG resources should be further tested in diverse sedimentary basin types.

Old, Sara

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Utah | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 27, 2010 CX-004194: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cretaceous Mancos Shale Uinta Basin, Utah: Resource Potential and Best Practices For an Emerging Shale CX(s)...

147

Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Unita Basin, Utah. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This project aspires to increase the productivity and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstration of improved completion techniques. Subsurface studies were performed this period.

Allison, M.L.

1995-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Real values derived using the GDP Chain-type Price Index, 2005 = 100.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8. Estimated average rail transportation rates for coal originating in the Uinta Basin Transportation cost per short ton (nominal) Transportation

149

ForestRangelandandWatershedStewardship 1472CampusDelivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lessons From 35 Years of Research on Oil Shale Lands in the Piceance Basin Fort Collins Fort Collins with oil shale extraction. The project involved approximately ten independent field studies, which were established on a 20-ha site located near what was then the focal point of oil shale activity in the Piceance

150

The Paradox of Domesticity: Resistance to the Myth of Home in Contemporary American Literature and Film  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on novels and films produced in the second half of the twentieth century that critique traditional notions of home in contemporary America to expand on the large body of work on American domesticity in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. These texts demonstrate the damaging power and overwhelming force of conventional domesticity, complicating traditional notions of home by speaking from positions of marginality. In each text, key figures react to limited ideologies of domesticity that seek to maintain sameness, silence, and servitude by enacting embodied resistance to domestic entrapment. The areas of convergence between the figure of the conventional, middle-class home, and the material and psychic reality of home disavow the expectations of the middle-class home ideal and offer real resistance to narrow, and often damaging, visions of home. These spaces allow for new conceptions of home and suggest that it may be possible to conceive of home as something other than fixed in place, governed by family and community, or created by prolific consumption of goods. In this way, this dissertation intervenes in the established binary of home/stability in opposition to mobility/freedom, which maintains the limits of appropriate ways of establishing and enacting domesticity along gender and class lines. By considering portraits of domesticity that are often left out of discussions of home in the United States my research intersects with a broad range of theoretical fields and discourses about mobility, historical and popular culture representations of the tramp, the body and surveillance, the home as spatial construct, and housekeeping as both oppressive and subversive. Drawing on historical and theoretical examinations of women within the home space, coupled with literary criticism and close-readings, I seek to determine the nature of confining domesticity and examine the varied ways that different groups of people respond to their entrapment. At stake in this dissertation is a deeper understanding of the ways that literary and filmic representations of home at the end of the twentieth century suggest a conflict between the ways that home and houses, are popularly represented and the fact that home remains a contested and dangerous space.

Cox, Kimberly O'Dell

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ningling Wang. 2009. ?Power Generation from Pulverized Coaland Opening up Power Generation 1985~1997 4. Restructuringinvested in power generation since they would be able to

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zhongguo dianli chanye (Chinas Electricity Industry at themulti_page.pdf. State Electricity Regulatory Commission.The Annual Report on Electricity Regulation (2006). Beijing:

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Paradoxes and Dilemmas in Managing E-Learning in Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.C. (2002) The Role of US Higher Education in the Global E-Paper Series: Center for Studies in Higher Education.1.02, Higher Education in the Digital Age Project,

Guri-Rosenblit, Sarah

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry and suggest electricity tariff rates to the Stateof the ?coal-electricity tariff automatic mechanism? (designed the coal-electricity tariff automatic mechanism in

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The kinetic paradox of objects : a working theory for designing architectural fabric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If all architectural form could be simplistically grouped into only two categories, these might be "object" and "partial enclosure," where objects are in dialogue with the space around them while partial enclosures articulate ...

Jeffery, Helen B. (Helen Barbara)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese electric power industry). ? Zhongguo Dianliwang (in Chinese State Industry: An Analysis of Evidence onchanye (Chinas Electricity Industry at the Crossroad). ? In

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal forced most thermal power plants to suspend production.the suspension of thermal power plant projects for threeof small-scale thermal power plants since its start-up in

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Remediation of a large contaminated reactor cooling reservoir: Resolving and environmental/regulatory paradox  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a case study of a former reactor cooling water reservoir, PAR Pond, located Savannah River Site. PAR Pond, a 2640 acre, man-made reservoir was built in 1958 and until 1988, received cooling water from two DOE nuclear production reactors, P and R. The lake sediments were contaminated with low levels of radiocesium (CS-137) and transuranics in the late 1950s and early 1960s because of leaking fuel elements. Elevated levels of mercury accumulated in the sediments from pumping water from the Savannah River to maintain a full pool. PAR Ponds` stability, size, and nutrient content made a significant, unique, and highly studied ecological resource for fish and wildlife populations until it was partially drained in 1991 due to a depression in the downslope of the earthen dam. The drawdown, created 1340 acres of exposed, radioactively contaminated sediments along 33 miles of shoreline. This led US EPA to declare PAR Pond as a CERCLA operable unit subject to remediation. The drawdown also raised concerns for the populations of aquatic plants, fish, alligators, and endangered species and increased the potential for off-site migration of contaminated wildlife from contact with the exposed sediments. Applicable regulations, such as NEPA and CERCLA, require wetland loss evaluations, human health and ecological risk assessments, and remediation feasibility studies. DOE is committed to spending several million dollars to repair the dam for safety reasons, even though the lake will probably not be used for cooling purposes. At the same time, DOE must make decisions whether to refill and expend additional public funds to maintain a full pool to reduce the risks defined under CERCLA or spend hundreds of millions in remediation costs to reduce the risks of the exposed sediments.

Bowers, J.A.: Gladden, J.B.; Hickey, H.M.; Jones, M.P.; Mackey, H.E.; Mayer, J.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Doswell, A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the rising barriers to electricity trade across provinces. AEconomic and Trade Commission State Electricity Regulatoryand trade commissions (PETCs) and provincial development and planning commissions (PDPCs) took on the responsibilities of managing the electricity

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Patent Paradox Revisited: Determinants of Patenting in the U.S. Semiconductor Industry, 1980-94  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i.e. , firms with high capital intensity, as defined below)our interviews). The capital-intensity of the firm, measuredwe add firm size and capital intensity to the model, the R&D

Hall, Bronwyn H.; Ham Ziedonis, Rosemarie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Patent Paradox Revisited: Determinants of Patenting in the US Semiconductor Industry, 1980-94  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i.e. , firms with high capital intensity, as defined below)our interviews). The capital-intensity of the firm, measuredwe add firm size and capital intensity to the model, the R&D

Hall, Bronwyn H.; Ham, Rose Marie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006). Beijing: China Electric Power Press. Zhu, Chengzhang.reform in the Chinese electric power industry). ? Zhongguoand Challenges for Chinas Electric Power Industry. ? The

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The political effectiveness of non-state violence : paradox, polarity, and the pursuit of power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When is non-state violence politically effective? Existing scholarship suggests that insurgency and terrorism are generally effective or ineffective based on the analysis of unitary non-state coercers operating solely at ...

Krause, Peter John Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Yemazhai power plant The growth rates were 13.2 per centto economic growth. Second, new power plants not only createpower plants and then reap profits in local revenues and economic growth.

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

DISCONNECTION FROM THE TERMINATION SHOCK: THE END OF THE VOYAGER PARADOX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most recent Voyager 1 observations show rapidly increasing galactic cosmic ray fluxes with simultaneously decreasing anomalous cosmic ray fluxes. While this has been suggested to somehow herald the imminent crossing of the heliopause, which bounds the heliosphere, we show that such observations should naturally arise from the heliosphere's global magnetic topology. For a blunt termination shock, there must be a region of magnetic flux, still inside the heliopause, but beyond the last magnetic connection point to the termination shock, with poorer access for the shock-accelerated anomalous cosmic rays and better access for the galactic cosmic rays entering the heliosphere.

McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A., E-mail: dmccomas@swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply to attract investment in the energy-intensive industries.industry to secure a stable supply of raw materials. In 2006, Huaneng Energy andsupply enables the local government to attract energy-intensive, heavy industries

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were to construct coal-fired power plants and to explorethere were 23 coal-fired power plants with a total installedthe construction of coal- fired power plants and hydropower

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chanye (Chinas Electricity Industry at the Crossroad). ? InCapture in the Electricity Industry 2. Cross-Sectorals Telecoms and Electricity Industries. ? European Journal of

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry, such as rising coal prices and rigid electricityagainst soaring coal prices, the central government designedadjustment of power prices when coal prices increase more

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Paradoxes of hybrid organizing in the Cambridge Energy Alliance by Jason Jesurum Jay.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid organizations combine institutional logics, often in a search for novel solutions to complex problems such as climate change. This dissertation explores the conditions under which hybrid organizations are effective ...

Jay, Jason Jesurum

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the fourth quarter of the first project year (April 1 through June 30, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs to the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, the major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. The Nugget Sandstone was deposited in an extensive dune field that extended from Wyoming to Arizona. Outcrop analogs are found in the stratigraphically equivalent Navajo Sandstone of southern Utah which displays large-scale dunal cross-strata with excellent reservoir properties and interdunal features such as oases, wadi, and playa lithofacies with poor reservoir properties. Hydrocarbons in the Paradox Formation are stratigraphically trapped in carbonate buildups (or phylloid-algal mounds). Similar carbonate buildups are exposed in the Paradox along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. Reservoir-quality porosity may develop in the types of facies associated with buildups such as troughs, detrital wedges, and fans, identified from these outcrops. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting the project plans, objectives, and products at a booth at the 2003 annual convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Grant C. Willis

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 4820 of 9,640 results. Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy makers...

173

Microsoft Word - S04902_LetterReport Cover Letter.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

gas-bearing sandstone formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43 kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a depth of 8,426 feet...

174

Microsoft Word - S08407_LTHMP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the tight, gas-bearing formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43-kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a depth of 8,426 feet...

175

Microsoft Word - S06010_Ltr.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the tight, gas-bearing formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43 kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a depth of 8,426 feet...

176

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81-final-environmental-assessment Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy...

177

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

spr-annual-reports-congress Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy...

178

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ea-1628-mitigation-action-plan Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy...

179

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

tion-study-san-francisco-workshop Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy...

180

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

states-2010-volume-ii-main-report Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 3: air-quality impacts  

SciTech Connect

The effects of a mature oil shale industry on the air quality over the Green River Oil Shale Formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming is described. Climate information is supplied for the Piceance Creek Basin. (ACR)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

chapter-37-service-contracting Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and...

183

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

tegorical-exclusion-determination Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy...

184

RETORT ABANDONMENT -- ISSUES AND RESEARCH NEEDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Management In Oil Shale Mining, Golder Associates,R. D. , IIDisposal of oil Shale Ash,1I Quarterly of theRequirements at an oil Shale Surface Mine, Piceance Creek

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

DO NOT MICROFILM COVER  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

e t o r t i n g process, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado. (Presented a t t h e 1 4 t h Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, Colorado, April Rydrogeologic consequences o f t h e mod- 22-24,...

186

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is-0225-sa-05-supplement-analysis Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy...

187

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 3440 of 10,268 results. Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy...

188

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

audit-report-cr-b-95-06 Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy...

189

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects - Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 DE-NT0005671 Goal The goal of this project is to overcome existing water-related environmental barriers to possible oil shale development in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Data collected from this study will help alleviate problems associated with disposal of produced saline water, which is a by-product of methods used to facilitate conventional hydrocarbon production. Performers Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84114 Collaborators Uinta Basin Petroleum Companies: Questar, Anadarko, Newfield, Enduring Resources, Bill Barrett, Berry Petroleum, EOG Resources, FIML, Wind River Resources, Devon, Rosewood, Flying J, Gasco, Mustang Fuel,

190

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09122-07 SCNGO 2010 Gary Covatch 36 months Price, Carbon County, UT Cretaceous Mancos Shale Uinta Basin,Utah: Resource Potential and Best Practices for an Emerging Shale Develop...

191

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utah Geological Survey SCNGO FY1224 months Gary Covatch Salt Lake City, UT Basin-Scale Produced Water Management Tools and Options - Uinta Basin, Utah Collect, compile, and use...

192

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects - Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5152012 DE-NT0005671 Goal The goal of...

193

Ocean Heat Transport and Water Vapor Greenhouse in a Warm Equable Climate: A New Look at the Low Gradient Paradox  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors study the role of ocean heat transport (OHT) in the maintenance of a warm, equable, ice-free climate. An ensemble of idealized aquaplanet GCM calculations is used to assess the equilibrium sensitivity of global mean surface temperature ...

Brian E. J. Rose; David Ferreira

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Islamist paradox in Iran : a study of Olivier Roy's thesis on 'the failure of political Islam'.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to test Olivier Roys thesis on the failure of political Islam, by considering its relevance in explaining religio-political developments (more)

Grnvik, Arnhild

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ocean Heat Transport and Water Vapor Greenhouse in a Warm Equable Climate: A New Look at the Low Gradient Paradox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors study the role of ocean heat transport (OHT) in the maintenance of a warm, equable, ice-free climate. An ensemble of idealized aquaplanet GCM calculations is used to assess the equilibrium sensitivity of global ...

Rose, Brian E. J.

196

Electronic access to information and the privacy paradox: rethinking practical obscurity and its impact on electronic freedom of information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article addresses the U.S. Supreme Court's formulation of "practical obscurity" in Reporters Committee v. Department of Justice, a seminal case interpreting the U.S. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). By examining lower federal court opinions ... Keywords: department of Justice, electronic information, freedom of information, privacy, reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press

Charles N. Davis

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Miami Modern Metropolis: Paradise and Paradox in Mid-century Architecture and Planning Edited by Allan Shulman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Virginia Press. Grenier, G. & Stepick A. eds.York: Routledge. Stepick, Grenier, Castro & Dunn. 2003. Thischaracteristics (Croucher 1999, Grenier 1992, Portes et al.

Burga, Hector Fernando

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Separation anxiety: metaphoric transmutations from a paradoxical biological instrument, or: What is a cactus doing in our concert hall?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its original rendition, Degrees of Separation: Grandchild of Tree (1998) is performed with cactus, outboard digital effects, and CD playback, with simple lighting. The work is a metaphor which portrays subtle transformations (or ...

Paul Rudy

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

WE WON'T TURN BACK: THE POLITICAL ECONOMY PARADOXES OF IMMIGRANT AND ETHNIC MINORITY SETTLEMENT IN SUBURBAN AMERICA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigates the intersection of suburban political economy and recent immigrant and ethnic minority suburbanization in the United States. It uses both quantitative and (more)

Frasure, Lorrie Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The boxer, the wrestler, and the coin flip: A paradox of Bayesian inference, robust Bayes, and belief functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bayesian inference requires all unknowns to be represented by probability distributions, which awkwardly implies that the probability of an event for which we are completely ignorant (e.g., that the worlds greatest boxer would defeat the worlds greatest wrestler) must be assigned a particular numerical value such as 1/2, as if it were known as precisely as the probability of a truly random event (e.g., a coin flip). Robust Bayes and belief functions are two methods that have been proposed to distinguish ignorance and randomness. In robust Bayes, a parameter can be restricted to a range, but without a prior distribution, yielding a range of potential posterior inferences. In belief functions (also known as the Dempster-Shafer theory), probability mass can be assigned to subsets of parameter space, so that randomness is represented by the probability distribution and uncertainty is represented by large subsets, within which the model does not attempt to assign probabilities. Through a simple example involving a coin flip and a boxing/wrestling match, we illustrate difficulties with pure Bayes, robust Bayes, and belief functions. In short: pure Bayes does not distinguish ignorance and randomness; robust Bayes allows ignorance to spread too broadly, and belief functions inappropriately collapse to simple Bayesian models.

Andrew Gelman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity  

SciTech Connect

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust belt play is divided into two subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust-Mesozoic-cored structures and (2) A

Thomas Chidsey

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Release Date: November 16, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Estimated average rail transportation rates for coal originating in the Uinta Basin" 8. Estimated average rail transportation rates for coal originating in the Uinta Basin" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Transportation cost per short ton (real)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton",,"Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA",,"Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Year "," STB","EIA",,"STB","EIA",,,,"(nominal) EIA ","(real) EIA ",,,"STB ","EIA " 2001," $14.32"," -",," $15.78"," -",," - ",," - "," - "," - ",," 23.5%"," - "

203

THE EFFECTS OF FAULT-INDUCED STRESS ANISOTROPY ON FRACTURING, FOLDING AND SILL EMPLACEMENT: INSIGHTS FROM THE BOWIE COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: INSIGHTS FROM THE BOWIE COAL MINES, SOUTHERN PICEANCE BASIN, WESTERN COLORADO by Eric D. Robeck A thesis-INDUCED STRESS ANISOTROPY ON FRACTURING, FOLDING AND SILL EMPLACEMENT: INSIGHTS FROM THE BOWIE COAL MINES. The Bowie underground coal mines of western Colorado expose a reverse-reactivated growth fault

Seamons, Kent E.

204

ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to locate the best locations to drill for them. The tight gas sands of the Piceance Basin have long been understanding of the way that fractures have controlled the production of gas in these tight gas sands an east to west trend of tight gas sand fields that produce a substantial amount of the total gas produced

205

Volume 6 Number 3 FROM THE DESK OF THE DIRECTOR . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. PUBLICATIONS REPORT ON WATER IN AN OIL SHALE AREA U.S.G.S. hydrologists have summarized data on the relation between oil shale development and the quantity and quality of surface and groundwater in the Piceance Basin of northwest Colorado which contains the largest known deposits of high-grade oil shale

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

206

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers research activities for the second half of the second project year (October 6, 2001, through April 5, 2002). This work includes description and analysis of cores, correlation of geophysical well logs, reservoir mapping, petrographic description of thin sections, cross plotting of permeability and porosity data, and development of horizontal drilling strategies for the Little Ute and Sleeping Ute fields in Montezuma County, Colorado. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative core, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells.

Wray, Laura L.; Eby, David E.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.

2002-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

207

The power of the ideology of gender equality and the limitations of state bureaucracy : paradoxes in the institutionalization of gender equality policies in South Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Janet. 2006. The Changing Gender Contract as the Engine ofThe Family as the Locus of Gender, Class, and PoliticalJones, Nicola. 2006. Gender and the Political Opportunities

Cho, Se-Hyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Comments on "The Coronal Heating Paradox" by M.J. Aschwanden, A. Winebarger, D. Tsiklauri and H. Peter [2007, Astrophys J., 659, 1673  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We point out the priority of our paper (Mahajan et al. 2001, Phys. Plasmas, 8, 1340) over (Aschwanden et al. 2007, Astrophys J., 659, 1673) in introducing the term "Formation and primary heating of the solar corona" working out explicit models (theory as well as simulation) for coronal structure formation and heating. On analyzing the Aschwanden et al. (2007) scenario of coronal heating process (shifted to the chromospheric heating) we stress, that for efficient loop formation, the primary upflows of plasma in chromosphere/transition region should be relatively cold and fast (as opposed to hot). It is during trapping and accumulation in closed field structures, that the flows thermalize (due to the dissipation of the short scale flow energy) leading to a bright and hot coronal structure. The formation and primary heating of a closed coronal structure (loop at the end) are simultaneous and a process like the "filling of the empty coronal loop by hot upflows" is purely speculative and totally unlikely.

Mahajan, Swadesh M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, UTE Mountain UTE Reservation, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of this project were: (1) To enhance recovery of oil contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute tribal lands. (2) To promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American Oil production corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other Tribes. (3) To develop an understanding of multicomponent seismic data as it relates to the variations in permeability and porosity of algal mounds, as well as lateral facies variations, for use in both reservoir development and exploration. (4) To identify any undiscovered algal mounds for field-extension within the area of seismic coverage. (5) To evaluate the potential for applying CO{sub 2} floods, steam floods, water floods or other secondary or tertiary recovery processes to increase production. The technical work scope was carried out by: (1) Acquiring multicomponent seismic data over the project area; (2) Processing and reprocessing the multicomponent data to extract as much geological and engineering data as possible within the budget and time-frame of the project; (3) Preparing maps and data volumes of geological and engineering data based on the multicomponent seismic and well data; (4) Selecting drilling targets if warranted by the seismic interpretation; (5) Constructing a static reservoir model of the project area; and (6) Constructing a dynamic history-matched simulation model from the static model. The original project scope covered a 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) area encompassing two algal mound fields (Towaoc and Roadrunner). 3D3C seismic data was to acquired over this area to delineate mound complexes and image internal reservoir properties such as porosity and fluid saturations. After the project began, the Red Willow Production Company, a project partner and fully-owned company of the Southern Ute Tribe, contributed additional money to upgrade the survey to a nine-component (3D9C) survey. The purpose of this upgrade to nine components was to provide additional shear wave component data that might prove useful in delineating internal mound reservoir attributes. Also, Red Willow extended the P-wave portion of the survey to the northwest of the original 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) 3D9C area in order to extend coverage further to the northwest to the Marble Wash area. In order to accomplish this scope of work, 3D9C seismic data set covering two known reservoirs was acquired and processed. Three-dimensional, zero-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data was acquired to determine the shear wave velocities for processing the sh3Dseismic data. Anisotropic velocity, and azimuthal AVO processing was carried out in addition to the conventional 3D P-wave data processing. All P-, PS- and S-wave volumes of the seismic data were interpreted to map the seismic response. The interpretation consisted of conventional cross-plots of seismic attributes vs. geological and reservoir engineering data, as well as multivariate and neural net analyses to assess whether additional resolution on exploration and engineering parameters could be achieved through the combined use of several seismic variables. Engineering data in the two reservoirs was used to develop a combined lithology, structure and permeability map. On the basis of the seismic data, a well was drilled into the northern mound trend in the project area. This well, Roadrunner No.9-2, was brought into production in late April 2006 and continues to produce modest amounts of oil and gas. As of the end of August 2007, the well has produced approximately 12,000 barrels of oil and 32,000 mcf of gas. A static reservoir model was created from the seismic data interpretations and well data. The seismic data was tied to various markers identified in the well logs, which in turn were related to lithostratigraphy. The tops and thicknesses of the various units were extrapolated from well control based upon the seismic data that was calibrated to the well picks. The reservoir engineering properties were available from a number of wel

Joe Hachey

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Working Paper No. 636 Bernankes Paradox: Can He Reconcile His Position on the Federal Budget with His Recent Charge to Prevent Deflation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Levy Institute scholars and conference participants. The purpose of the series is to disseminate ideas to and elicit comments from academics and professionals. Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, founded in 1986, is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, independently funded research organization devoted to public service. Through scholarship and economic research it generates viable, effective public policy responses to important economic problems that profoundly affect the quality of life in the United States and abroad.

Pavlina R. Tcherneva

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The boxer, the wrestler, and the coin flip: A paradox of robust Bayesian inference and belief functions. The American Statistician 60  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bayesian inference requires all unknowns to be represented by probability distributions, which awkwardly implies that the probability of an event for which we are completely ignorant (e.g., that the worlds greatest boxer would defeat the worlds greatest wrestler) must be assigned a particular numerical value such as 1/2, as if it were known as precisely as the probability of a truly random event (e.g., a coin flip). Robust Bayes and belief functions are two methods that have been proposed to distinguish ignorance and randomness. In robust Bayes, a parameter can be restricted to a range, but without a prior distribution, yielding a range of potential posterior inferences. In belief functions (also known as the Dempster-Shafer theory), probability mass can be assigned to subsets of parameter space, so that randomness is represented by the probability distribution and uncertainty is represented by large subsets, within which the model does not attempt to assign probabilities. Through a simple example involving a coin flip and a boxing/wrestling match, we illustrate difficulties with robust Bayes and belief functions. In short: pure Bayes does not distinguish ignorance and randomness; robust Bayes allows ignorance to spread too broadly, and belief functions inappropriately collapse to simple Bayesian models. Keywords: Belief functions, Dempster-Shafer theory, epistemic and aleatory uncertainty, foundations of probability, ignorance, robust Bayes, subjective prior distribution

Andrew Gelman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The power of the ideology of gender equality and the limitations of state bureaucracy : paradoxes in the institutionalization of gender equality policies in South Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1994. Women of Japan and Korea : Continuity and Changeof Democratization in South Korea. New York: PalgraveState Policy on Women in Korea (1962-79). Ph.D. dissertation

Cho, Se-Hyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

CX-004194: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cretaceous Mancos Shale Uinta Basin, Utah: Resource Potential and Best Practices For an Emerging ShaleCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1Date: 09/27/2010Location(s): Price, UtahOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

214

Summary of the setting, air quality problems, and meteorological activities in the oil shale region  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses air quality problems that may arise in the valleys of the Uinta mountains and the Roan Ridge in the oil shale area in western Colorado and eastern Utah. A meteorological field expedition that was undertaken in August 1980 by LASL and PNL is described. (DLC)

Barr, S.; Clements, W.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 17860 of 28,905 results. 51 - 17860 of 28,905 results. Download Audit Report: IG-0490 Containers Suitable for Shipping Fissile Material http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-ig-0490 Page Web Policies Accessibility http://energy.gov/about-us/web-policies Download Chapter 37- Service Contracting http://energy.gov/management/downloads/chapter-37-service-contracting Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy makers accurate estimates of energy efficiencies, water requirements, water availability, and CO2 emissions associated with the... http://energy.gov/fe/downloads/evaluation-production-oil-gas-oil-shale-piceance-basin Rebate Net Metering Note:... http://energy.gov/savings/net-metering-26

216

Slant hole completion test. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategies and Objectives in the Natural Gas Program is to conduct activities to transfer technology from R&D programs to potential users. The Slant Hole Completion Test has achieved exactly this objective. The Slant Hole site is essentially the same as the Multiwell site and is located in the southeastern portion of the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. The Piceance Basin is typical of the Western low permeability basins that contain thick sequences of sands, silts and coals deposited during the Cretaceous period. These sequences contain vast amounts of natural gas but have proven to be resistant to commercial production because of the low permeability of the host rocks. Using the knowledge gained from the DOE`s earlier Multiwell experiment, the SHCT-1 was drilled to demonstrate that by intersecting the natural fractures found in these ``tight rocks,`` commercial gas production can be obtained.

Mann, R.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Case study of a stimulation experiment in a fluvial, tight-sandstone gas reservoir  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that a successful stimulation experiment was conducted in a fluvial sandstone of the Mesaverde formation at the U.S. DOE's Multiwell Experiment (MWX) Site in the Piceance basin of Colorado. The stimulation experiment consisted of stress tests, a three-well prefracture interference test, step-rate/flowback tests, a minifracture, a full stimulation treatment borehole geophone diagnostics during fracturing, and a postfracture interference test.

Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, R.; Thorne, B.J.; Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Branagan, P.T.; Cipolla, C.L. (CER Corp., Las Vegas, NV (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Fracture Model, Ground Displacements and Tracer Observations: Fruitland Coals, San Juan Basin, New Mexico,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ________________________________________________ San Juan 0.9 ? 20 (coal bed) Piceance 2.4 1 ­ 4 620 (tight sands) Barnett 2 2 ­ 3 380 (shale) GreenEnergy Methane Indirect CO2 Direct CO2 #12;Total GHG footprints for natural gas, diesel fuel, and coal (g C MJ-1/ndx_marcil.pdf Shales hold a lot of natural gas (methane), but very dispersed, not economical using traditional

Wilson, Thomas H.

219

Super-Index of Mathematical Encyclopedia - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... Eisenstein Conjecture Eisenstein Series Elation Elder's Theorem Election Early Results Electric Motor Curve Elementary Proof Elevator Paradox...

220

A Review of Green Logistics Schemes Used in Cities Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green Logistics (The Paradoxes of), Handbook of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, edited by Brewer, A. , Button,

Geroliminis, Nikolaos; Daganzo, Carlos F.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

222

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Authors: Michael D. Vanden Berg, Stephanie Carney, Michael D. Laine, Craig D. Morgan, Utah Geological Survey; and Paul B. Anderson, consulting geologist. Venue: Poster Session: Responsible Development, Sustainability, and Climate Science—Groundwater and Site Remediation, June 9, 2009, American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual meeting, Denver, CO, June 7 to 10, 2009. http://www.aapg.org/denver/ [external site] Abstract: Saline water disposal is the single most pressing issue with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of Utah. Conventional oil and gas fields in the basin provide 67% of Utah’s total crude oil production and 71% of Utah’s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 175% in the last 10 years. As petroleum production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of fresh water sources. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that petroleum and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. Researchers have begun efforts to re-map the base of the moderately saline aquifer within the Uinta Basin using more robust data and more sophisticated GIS techniques than previous efforts. Below this base, they believe that saline water can be injected without damage to the overlying freshwater reservoirs. Water chemistry data are being collected from wells of operators and governmental agencies. These ground-truth data are supplemented with water chemistry information calculated from geophysical logs. In addition to the new GIS-based map, the researchers are constructing cross sections showing the stratigraphic position of the moderately saline to very saline transition and its relationship to potential seals and disposal zones in the Uinta Basin. A potentially suitable disposal zone for large volume saline water disposal is the fresh to slightly saline Bird’s-Nest aquifer. This aquifer is located in the oil shale zone of the Green River formation’s Parachute Creek member and is 200 to 300 ft above the kerogen-rich Mahogany zone. A significant concern is that saline water disposal into the Bird’s-Nest by conventional gas producers may hinder oil shale development by creating unforeseen economic and technical hurdles. With increased saline water disposal, the water quality in the Bird’s-Nest could degrade and create additional water disposal problems for oil shale development companies. Researchers have examined this aquifer in outcrop, core, and geophysical logs and have gained a better understanding of its areal extent, thickness, and zones of differing water chemistry

223

Naturally fractured tight gas: Gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Economically viable natural gas production from the low permeability Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado requires the presence of an intense set of open natural fractures. Establishing the regional presence and specific location of such natural fractures is the highest priority exploration goal in the Piceance and other western US tight, gas-centered basins. Recently, Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) completed a field program at Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, to test and demonstrate the use of advanced seismic methods to locate and characterize natural fractures. This project began with a comprehensive review of the tectonic history, state of stress and fracture genesis of the basin. A high resolution aeromagnetic survey, interpreted satellite and SLAR imagery, and 400 line miles of 2-D seismic provided the foundation for the structural interpretation. The central feature of the program was the 4.5 square mile multi-azimuth 3-D seismic P-wave survey to locate natural fracture anomalies. The interpreted seismic attributes are being tested against a control data set of 27 wells. Additional wells are currently being drilled at Rulison, on close 40 acre spacings, to establish the productivity from the seismically observed fracture anomalies. A similar regional prospecting and seismic program is being considered for another part of the basin. The preliminary results indicate that detailed mapping of fault geometries and use of azimuthally defined seismic attributes exhibit close correlation with high productivity gas wells. The performance of the ten new wells, being drilled in the seismic grid in late 1996 and early 1997, will help demonstrate the reliability of this natural fracture detection and mapping technology.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 4. Solid waste from mining and surface retorts  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this study were to: review and evaluate published information on the disposal, composition, and leachability of solid wastes produced by aboveground shale oil extraction processes; examine the relationship of development to surface and groundwater quality in the Piceance Creek basin of northwestern Colorado; and identify key areas of research necessary to quantitative assessment of impact. Information is presented under the following section headings: proposed surface retorting developments; surface retorting processes; environmental concerns; chemical/mineralogical composition of raw and retorted oil shale; disposal procedures; water quality; and research needs.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Microsoft Word - SWP.Aneth.factsheet.10.26.2009.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Mexico Tech Field Test Information: Field Test Name Paradox Basin, Utah: Aneth Field - Combined Enhanced Oil Recovery with Concomitant CO 2 Sequestration Test...

226

Impact of Public Market Information System (PMIS) on Farmers Food Marketing Decisions: Case of Benin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.B. (2008). Smallholder market participation: Concepts andBehavior with Missing Markets: Some Paradoxes Explained.at the Farmgate or Travelling to Market. American Journal of

Kpenavoun Chogou, Sylvain; Gandonou, Esaie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Symmetry Breaking of H2 Dissociation by a Single Photon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by breaking the molecular symmetry. A Molecular Paradox Symmetries in nature, such as the human body's bilateral symmetry and the snowflake's six-fold rotational symmetry, abound...

228

How Safe Is the Ride? Evaluation of Design and Policy Responses to Womens Fear of Victimization and Crime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Fear of Victimization and Crime: Fallacies, Paradoxes,s Fear of Victimization and Crime Principal Investigator:confirmed that fear about crime affects transit ridership.

Loukaitou-Sideris, Anastasia Loukaitou

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Erotic Conceit: History, Sexuality and the Urdu ghazal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but, paradoxically, esoteric tradition of tasavvuf fromof the anti-rationalist, esoteric, metaphysical movement,jism?n?yat) in the realm of esoteric, mystical practice.

Naved, Shad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Quantifiable Effects of Nuclear Conflict on Health and Society  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The much-heralded Non-Proliferation Treaty is now taking hard knockssadly and paradoxically from its initial proponents, and governments are glibly talking.

231

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Epifluorescence Techniques The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques to Determine Potential Oil-Prone Areas in the Mississippian Leadville Limestone, Northern Paradox Basin, Utah...

232

The Narrative Construction of Breast Cancer: A Comparative Case Study of the Susan G. Komen Foundation and National Breast Cancer Coalisions' Campaign Strategies, Messages, and Effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goal of this research is to reveal the connections, contradictions, tensions, and paradoxes inherent in the narratives of breast cancer created by the Susan (more)

Olson, Amanda M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

cfploq.html  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation and Quality Topics: A Re-examination of the "Polar Paradox" Paradigm Omega-3 Challenges: Stability, Processing and Human Nutrition Antioxidants and Oxidation Control: Analytical Metho

234

Nuclear New Zealand: New Zealand's nuclear and radiation history to 1987.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New Zealand has a paradoxical relationship with nuclear science. We are as proud of Ernest Rutherford, known as the father of nuclear science, as of (more)

Priestley, Rebecca Katherine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

CX-000434: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

evaluation of carbon 14 gas analyzers that detect carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels for sequestration leak studies. Paradox Basin is field evaluation site....

236

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

large numbers of electrons that do not interact so strongly. Paradoxically, the high mobility and density of electrons give rise to a screening effect that reduces the...

237

Coal - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Most Requested Most Requested Change category... Most Requested Consumption Environment Imports & Exports Industry Characteristics Prices Production Projections Reserves Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Reports Today in Energy - Coal Short, timely articles with graphs about recent coal issues and trends Coal News & Markets Summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAP), Northern Appalachia (NAP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Power River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. Weekly Coal Production Estimates of U.S. coal production by State based on railroad car loadings data. (archived versions) Archived Versions Weekly Coal Production - Archive Weekly NYMEX Coal Futures

238

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Annual report, September 1993--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an annual summarization of an ongoing research in the field of modeling and detecting naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The current research is in the Piceance basin of Western Colorado. The aim is to use existing information to determine the most optimal zone or area of fracturing using a unique reaction-transport-mechanical (RTM) numerical basin model. The RTM model will then subsequently help map subsurface lateral and vertical fracture geometries. The base collection techniques include in-situ fracture data, remote sensing, aeromagnetics, 2-D seismic, and regional geologic interpretations. Once identified, high resolution airborne and spaceborne imagery will be used to verify the RTM model by comparing surficial fractures. If this imagery agrees with the model data, then a further investigation using a three-dimensional seismic survey component will be added. This report presents an overview of the Piceance Creek basin and then reviews work in the Parachute and Rulison fields and the results of the RTM models in these fields.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ecological effects of oil shale development: problems, perspectives, and approaches  

SciTech Connect

Although current oil shale developments in the Piceance Basin appear to have had little impact on ecosystems, it is important to recognize that planned expansion of the industry in the Basin will greatly magnify the potential for serious perturbations of the Piceance environs. The relatively small scale of the present oil shale activities in the Basin provides the biologist with a unique opportunity to establish and conduct quantitative studies designed to measure impacts as they occur. This paper is intended to focus attention on some of the problems, perspectives and recommended approaches to conducting ecosystem effects studies that will provide criteria for evaluation and mitigation of impacts should they occur. The purpose of this paper is not to criticize past and current environmental studies on oil shale, but in light of anticipated growth of the industry, to focus attention on the need to carefully define, design and execute ecological effects studies to quantify and provide mitigation criteria for impacts that will undoubtedly result from accelerated industry activities.

Hakonson, T.E.; White. G.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, June 1, 1976--May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A substantial number of samples of water, stream sediment, soils, plants, oil shale, spent shale, shale oil and other materials were collected for analyses. A considerable amount of effort was also involved in the development and validation of methods for preparing and analyzing these samples for trace element content. Among the results are: Cu, Li, and Zn exhibit well-defined trends in soils over the Piceance Basin, with values increasing from north to south; As, Mo, B, and Se are all elevated in the soils of the Piceance Basin; Mo and B are more soluble in TOSCO spent shale than in unprocessed shale and are also elevated in plants growing on spent shale; F is less soluble in spent (TOSCO) shale than in unprocessed oil shale, but although the levels in leachates are quite significant (25 mg/l). F is not readily leached out; and As and Se are not very soluble in spent shale (TOSCO) and are not taken up to a significant extent by plants.

Not Available

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Six Conjectures in Quantum Physics and Computational Neuroscience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A paradox on Hilbert's problem 6 is identified. To avoid the paradox, equilibrium-based YinYang bipolar sets and bipolar dynamic logic (BDL) are introduced. Bipolar quantum entanglement is defined. BDL leads to a bipolar axiomatization for physics. Applicability ... Keywords: YinYang Bipolar Dynamic Logic (BDL), Bipolar Universal Modus Ponens (BUMP), Axiomatization for Physics, Bipolar Quantum Entanglement, Computational Neuroscience

Wen-Ran Zhang

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Propensities and conditional probabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper deals with the objection that Paul Humphreys raised against the propensity interpretation of probability - ''Humphreys' paradox''. An update on existing solutions is offered, and it is concluded that none of them is completely satisfactory ... Keywords: Conditionalization, Humphreys' paradox, Propensity

Isabelle Drouet

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barn Pole Paradox Barn Pole Paradox Name: Kwanalouie Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: TX Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: I do not see how this relativity problem is explained. Its a variation of the barn pole paradox. Can you offer insights? Replies: Kwanalouie, Einstein's special relativity theories apply to constant VELOCITY situations. This means no change of speed or direction. An observer on the ring is constantly changing direction. After half of a revolution, the observer's direction has exactly reversed. Length contraction is much more complex in such a situation. General relativity is needed for this situation. Dr. Ken Mellendorf Physics Instructor Illinois Central College You are mixing relative effects with non-relative effects to create the paradox. In creating what you think is a paradox, you are placing unrealistic constraints on the system (e.g. how do you decouple this massively energetic ring from the silo?).

244

Evaluation of Energy Efficiency, Water Requirements and Availability, and CO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05/14/2012 1 05/14/2012 1 Evaluation of Energy Efficiency, Water Requirements and Availability, and CO 2 Emissions Associated With the Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin of Western Colorado, Based on Shell's In-Situ Conversion Process (ICP) F. Dexter Sutterfield, Ph.D., INTEK Inc. Peter M. Crawford and Jeffrey Stone, INTEK Inc. James C. Killen, United States Department of Energy I. Summary A detailed description of background information, the purpose of this paper, methodologies and major assumptions, and results are provided below, beginning with Section II. A summary of this information follows: The United States has been endowed with vast oil shale resources in the Green River Formation in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming, about three-fourths of which are located on public lands. Green River

245

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Project Rulison - CO 0-10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison - CO 0-10 Rulison - CO 0-10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PROJECT RULISON (CO.0-10) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Southwest limb of the Piceance Creek Basin , Garfield County , Colorado CO.0-10-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 CO.0-10-1 Site Operations: The project was a Plowshare experiment conducted from 1969-1971 to determine the commercial feasibility of nuclear stimulation of natural gas reservoirs. CO.0-10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria CO.0-10-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes CO.0-10-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: No Surface Contamination; Underground Detonation Circa 1969 CO.0-10-1 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring as well as periodic hydrologic surveillance CO.0-10-1

246

NETL: Shale Gas and Other Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas | Environmental | Other Natural Gas Related Resources | Completed NG Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10122-47 Predicting higher-than-average permeability zones in tight-gas sands, Piceance basin: An integrated structural and stratigraphic analysis Colorado School of Mines 10122-43 Diagnosis of Multi-Stage Fracturing in Horizontal Well by Downhole Temperature Measurement for Unconventional Oil and Gas Wells Texas A&M University 10122-42 A Geomechanical Analysis of Gas Shale Fracturing and Its Containment Texas A&M University 09122-02 Characterizing Stimulation Domains, for Improved Well Completions in Gas Shales Higgs-Palmer Technologies 09122-04 Marcellus Gas Shale Project Gas Technology Institute (GTI)

247

Oil shale mining cost analysis. Volume I. Surface retorting process. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An Oil Shale Mining Economic Model (OSMEM) was developed and executed for mining scenarios representative of commercially feasible mining operations. Mining systems were evaluated for candidate sites in the Piceance Creek Basin. Mining methods selected included: (1) room-and-pillar; (2) chamber-and-pillar, with spent shale backfilling; (3) sublevel stopping; and (4) sublevel stopping, with spent shale backfilling. Mines were designed to extract oil shale resources to support a 50,000 barrels-per-day surface processing facility. Costs developed for each mining scenario included all capital and operating expenses associated with the underground mining methods. Parametric and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the sensitivity of mining cost to changes in capital cost, operating cost, return on investment, and cost escalation.

Resnick, B.S.; English, L.M.; Metz, R.D.; Lewis, A.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application study report: shale oil recovery application  

SciTech Connect

The US has large shale oil energy resources, and many companies have undertaken considerable effort to develop economical means to extract this oil within environmental constraints. The recoverable shale oil reserves in the US amount to 160 x 10/sup 9/ m/sup 3/ (1000 x 10/sup 9/ bbl) and are second in quantity only to coal. This report summarizes a study to apply an 1170-MW(t) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - process steam/cogeneration (HTGR-PS/C) to a shale oil recovery process. Since the highest potential shale oil reserves lie in th Piceance Basin of Western Colorado, the study centers on exploiting shale oil in this region.

Rao, R.; McMain, A.T. Jr.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) generated during the oil shale extraction process. AMSO, which holds a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) lease from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for a 160-acre parcel of Federal land in northwest Colorado's oil-shale rich Piceance Basin, will provide technical assistance and oil shale core samples. If AMSO can demonstrate an economically viable and environmentally acceptable extraction process, it retains the right to acquire a 5,120-acre commercial lease. When subject to high temperatures and high pressures, oil shale (a sedimentary rock that is rich in hydrocarbons) can be converted into oil. Through mineralization, the CO 2 could be stored in the shale

251

Compendium of basins for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geological and hydrological feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed formations in the San Juan, Powder River, Greater Green River, Piceance, Black Warrior, Appalachian and Michigan basins. Results from the surveys indicated that geology dominated research efforts for many of the basins. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the basins. All of the basins contain some potential for the use of Jack McIntyre`s patented production process. This process is designed specifically to separate produced water and produced gas in a downhole environment and may allow for more efficient and economical development of coalbed methane resources in this area.

Reed, P.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Rehabilitation potential and practices of Colorado oil shale lands. Progress report, June 1, 1978--May 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

The following document is a third-year progress report for the period June 1, 1978 to May 31, 1979. The overall objective of the project is to study the effects of seeding techniques, species mixtures, fertilizer, ecotypes, improved plant materials, mycorrhizal fungi, and soil microorganisms on the initial and final stages of reclamation obtained through seeding and subsequent succession on disturbed oil shale lands. Plant growth medias that are being used in field-established test plots include retorted shale, soil over retorted shale, subsoil materials, and surface disturbed topsoils. Because of the long-term nature of successional and ecologically oriented studies the project is just beginning to generate significant publications. Several of the studies associated with the project have some phases being conducted principally in the laboratories and greenhouses at Colorado State Univerisity. The majority of the research, however, is being conducted on a 20 hectare Intensive Study Site located near the focal points of oil shale activity in the Piceance Basin. The site is at an elevation of 2,042 m, receives approximately 30 to 55 cm of precipitation annually, and encompasses the plant communities most typical of the Piceance Basin. Most of the information contained in this report originated from the monitoring and sampling of research plots established in either the fall of 1976 or 1977. Therefore, data that have been obtained from the Intensive Study Site represent only first- or second-year results. However, many trends have been identified in thesuccessional process and the soil microorganisms and mycorrhizal studies continue to contribute significant information to the overall results. The phytosociological study has progressed to a point where field sampling is complete and the application and publication of this materials will be forthcoming in 1979.

Cook, C.W.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Oil shale: a framework for development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The price escalation of petroleum in recent times has removed the economic barrier to shale oil production, or soon will. A technological base for production is available which can be rapidly developed to the size and quality needed. The resource base in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado can support production of 1 to 5 million barrels of oil per day for hundreds of years. Institutional problems are the major remaining impediment to the development of oil shale. The small part of the resource in private hands is economically marginal and cannot support large production rates or the most efficient methods. The best land is owned by the Federal Government and is unavailable under present laws and policies. The lack of an integrated federal policy and an implementation plan prevents the development that is now technically and economically practical. One possible solution is a Piceance Basin Authority chartered by Congress to efficiently manage this resource and coordinate the federal governmental responsibility for oil shale resource development and conservation, water development, environmental control, and land use policy. It should be located in Colorado for an effective interaction with State and local authorities where both have responsibility. Government lands must be made accessible on a scale suitable to the technology and in a way that is acceptable to the public and to industry. Government and industry can then cooperate in a unitized, coordinated development of the resource and the area. With access to the resource and a clear government responsibility for area-wide, non-commercial planning and development, industry can provide the technology and capital for production and marketing of shale oil on an economically competitive basis.

Lewis, A.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

SWP.Aneth.factsheet.919  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name Paradox Basin, Utah: Aneth EOR-Sequestration Test Location Near Bluff, Utah Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons...

255

Maintaining secrecy when information leakage is unavoidable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) We apply the framework to get new results, creating (a) encryption schemes with very short keys, and (b) hash functions that leak no information about their input, yet-paradoxically-allow testing if a candidate ...

Smith, Adam (Adam Davidson), 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

15 Puzzle 2x mod 1 Map A Integral A Sequence abc Conjecture ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... Covariant Tensors Cover Cover (Minimal) Cow Hitch Cox's Theorem Coxeter .... Early Results Electric Motor Curve Elementary Proof Elevator Paradox Elkies ..... Kirby's List Kirillov-Bernat Theorem Kirillov Conjecture Kirkman's Schoolgirl ..... Untouchable Numbers Urchin Utility Graph Problem Utility Problem Valency...

257

The role of mismatch repair in mediating cellular sensitivity to cisplatin : the Escherichia coli methyl-directed repair paradigm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The anticancer drug cisplatin is in widespread use but its mechanism of action is only poorly understood. Moreover, human cancers acquire resistance to the drug, which limits its clinical utility. A paradox in the field ...

Robbins, Jennifer L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Defeasible Deontic Reasoning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper combines a system of deontic logic with a system for default reasoning to analyze a notorious philosophical problem: Chisholm's Paradox. The basic approach is to write deontic rules with explicit exceptions, but we also consider the extent ...

L. Thorne Mccarty

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hypodensity/Hyperdensity ; or, Apple skies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hypodensity/Hyperdensity is a reaction to the paradoxical modern urban condition of emptiness: the 'ring of drek,' left like a smear around Boston by post-industrial deflation. This area is close to both the crowded city ...

Cira, Gabriel (Gabriel Blue)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we demonstrate how the interpretation of quantum mechanics due to Land\\'e resolves the Schr\\"odinger cat paradox and disposes of the problem of wave function collapse.

H. V. Mweene

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, has produced over 440 million barrels of oil. Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Aneth is a stratigraphic trap, with...

262

Published in The Philosophical Quarterly 54 (2004), 604-13. SOME RECENT WORK IN EPISTEMOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-called `McKinsey paradox' concerning the putative incompatibility of content externalism and privileged self the pair where some of the epistemological morals of the McKinsey debate were first extracted. The focus

Edinburgh, University of

263

Published in Philosophia 31 (2004), 345-54. AN ARGUMENT FOR THE INCONSISTENCY OF CONTENT EXTERNALISM AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Knowledge', Philosophical Topics 17 (1989), pp. 5-26; and Michael McKinsey, `Anti-Individualism and Privileged Access', Analysis 51 (1991), pp. 9-16. See also, Duncan Pritchard, `McKinsey Paradoxes, Radical Scepticism

Edinburgh, University of

264

Little green men  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Little green men 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2013 All Issues submit Little green men Enrico Fermi's paradox about the lack of evidence for...

265

Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapyA, Ward E, Thun MJ: Recent trends in breast cancer incidencein France: a paradoxical trend. Bull Cancer 10. Katalinic A,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WITH HETEROGENEITY IN OIL AND GAS RESERVOIRS APPLIED TO CO 2sedimentary basins, oil and gas fields, and industrial CO 2Harr, C.L. , 1996, Paradox oil and gas potential of the Ute

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Re-thinking the immigrant narrative in a global perspective : representations of labor, gender and im/migration in contemporary cultural productions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Santiago. Island paradox : Puerto Rico in the 1990s. Newbetween the U.S. and Puerto Rico. While I have organized myCharco 101 Migration from Puerto Rico At first glance, it

Mata, Irene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The ambivalence of gentrifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the paradox faced by 25-34 year-old, White, well-educated persons who choose to live in predominantly low-income neighborhoods. In particular, this thesis asks if gentrifiers are aware of gentrification ...

Novak, Alison Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A New Look at the Energy Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The traditional derivation of the energy cycle is reviewed and some paradoxical properties of the energy conversion and flux terms under non-acceleration conditions (steady, conservative motion) are noted. An alternative scheme is derived, based ...

R. Alan Plumb

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Life in the woods : production and consumption of the urban forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of wood is fraught with paradox. Wood as a building material is embraced for its naturalness, while the cutting of trees is indicted as a destruction of nature. Wood is lauded for its structural properties and ...

Volicer, Nadine (Nadine M.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

David S. Meyer Department of Sociology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1993, Washington, DC. "Political Opportunity after the Cold War: The Paradox of Open Windows," American Advocacy," with Kristine Coulter, American Political Science Association, September 3, 2010, Washington, DC, August 14, 2000, Washington, DC. Discussant, "Politics from Below," American Sociological Association

Stanford, Kyle

272

Designing building skins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis involves framing criteria and discerning issues to be considered in the design of building skins in an urban environment. The 'information age' has paradoxically seen the demise of the facade as an important ...

Desai, Arjun

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The competition between coal and natural gas : the importance of sunk costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the seeming paradox between the predominant choice of natural gas for capacity additions to generate electricity in the United States and the continuing large share of coal in meeting incremental ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Quantum Mechanics and Closed Timelike Curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General relativity allows solutions exhibiting closed timelike curves. Time travel generates paradoxes and quantum mechanics generalizations were proposed to solve those paradoxes. The implications of self-consistent interactions on acausal region of space-time are investigated. If the correspondence principle is true, then all generalizations of quantum mechanics on acausal manifolds are not renormalizable. Therefore quantum mechanics can only be defined on global hyperbolic manifolds and all general relativity solutions exhibiting time travel are unphysical.

Florin Moldoveanu

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

275

Do Accelerating Turing Machines Compute the Uncomputable?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating Turing machines have attracted much attention in the last decade or so. They have been described as "the work-horse of hypercomputation" (Potgieter and Rosinger 2010: 853). But do they really compute beyond the "Turing limit"--e.g., compute ... Keywords: ATM paradox, Accelerating Turing machine, Epistemic embedding, External and internal computation, Halting problem, Hypercomputation, Ontology of computing, Supertask, Thompson lamp paradox, Turing-machine purism, Turing-machine realism

B. Jack Copeland; Oron Shagrir

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Bayesian Inference from Scratch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study epistemological and philosophical aspects of the Bayesian approach in different areas of science. The basic intuition as well as pedagogical introduction to the Bayesian framework is given for a further discussion concerning Bayesian inference in physics. We claim Bayesian inference to be susceptible to some epistemic limitations. We also point out paradoxes of confirmation, like Goodman's paradox, appearing in Bayesian Theory of Confirmation in the context of cosmological applications.

Mielczarek, Jakub; Tambor, Pawel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Coal News and Markets - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal News and Markets Coal News and Markets Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 24, 2013 "Coal News and Markets Report" summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAPP), Northern Appalachia (NAPP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Powder River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. The report includes data on average weekly coal commodity spot prices, total monthly coal production, eastern monthly coal production, electric power sector coal stocks, and average cost of metallurgical coal at coke plants and export docks. The historical data for coal commodity spot market prices are proprietary and not available for public release. Average weekly coal commodity spot prices (dollars per short ton)

278

Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} "The Colorado Plateau is a high standing crustal block of relatively undeformed rocks surrounded by the highly deformed Rocky Mountains, and Basin and Range Provinces. The Uinta Mountains of Utah and Rocky Mountains of Colorado define the northern and northeastern boundaries of the Plateau. The Rio Grande Rift Valley in New Mexico defines the eastern boundary. The southern boundary is marked by the Mogollon Rim, an erosional cuesta that separates the Colorado Plateau from the extensively faulted Basin and Rang Province. To the west is a broad transition zone where the geologic

279

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-004201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal Carbon Dioxide Storage CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 09/27/2010 Location(s): South Carolina Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 27, 2010 CX-004194: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cretaceous Mancos Shale Uinta Basin, Utah: Resource Potential and Best Practices For an Emerging Shale CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 09/27/2010 Location(s): Price, Utah Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 27, 2010 CX-004188: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation

280

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duchesne and Uintah Counties, UT Duchesne and Uintah Counties, UT Basin-Scale Produced Water Management Tools and Options - Uinta Basin, Utah Sample key alluvial aquifer wells and springs, which will be identified during the course of the project, in order to help establish baseline water quality conditions in the alluvial aquifer. Gary L. Covatch Digitally signed by Gary L. Covatch DN: cn=Gary L. Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.09.06 08:49:06 -04'00' 09 06 2012 Jesse Garcia Digitally signed by Jesse Garcia DN: cn=Jesse Garcia, o=NETL, ou=ECD, email=jesse.garcia@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.09.11 09:01:20 -04'00' 09 11 2012 CX covers the field work which includes collecting water samples, GIS model development and geo-statistical analysis of produced water streams

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mountain Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Wind Mountain Wind Jump to: navigation, search Mountain Wind is a wind farm located in Uinta County, Wyoming. It consists of 67 turbines and has a total capacity of 140.7 MW. It is owned by Edison Mission Group.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Fort Bridger, its approximate coordinates are 41.318716°, -110.386418°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.res-americas.com/wind-farms/operational-/mountain-wind-i-wind-farm.aspx Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mountain_Wind&oldid=132229" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

282

EPA Notice of Availability of the Federal Draft Environmental Impact Statement and State of Montana Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. (MATL) 230-kV Transmission Line (02/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 Federal Register 9 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 32 / Friday, February 15, 2008 / Notices counties, UT, Montrose County, CO, and Uinta County, WY. Summary: EPA has environmental concerns about potential water quality impacts and recommends that the final EIS evaluate and compare the environmental impacts by alternative, of removing interim protections from the 86 eligible stream segments. Rating EC1. Final EISs EIS No. 20070530, ERP No. F-COE- E39071-00, Wolf Creek Dam/Lake Cumberland Project, Emergency Measures in Response to Seepage, Mississippi River, South Central Kentucky and Central Tennessee. Summary: EPA continues to have environmental concerns about water quantity and water quality impacts. EIS No. 20070556, ERP No. F-NGB- E11062-MS, Camp Shelby Joint Force

283

Seventh National Green Power Marketing Conference: Sept. 30-Oct. 2, 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview for the Seventh National Green Power Conference Overview for the Seventh National Green Power Conference The Seventh National Green Power Marketing Conference was held in Washington D.C. on September 30 - October 2. Conference speakers reviewed the past year's green power highlights, analyzed utility green pricing programs, presented insights into how to target green power demand, examined green certificate trading and tracking mechanisms, and described the best ways to market and sell green power. In addition, Green Power Leadership Awards were presented to recognize those who are significantly advancing the development of renewable electricity sources in the marketplace. We thank the following conference sponsors: E Source, Green Mountain Energy Company, and Xenergy. Event sponsors included ComEd, Fetzer Vineyards, and Uinta Brewing Company.

284

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 7950 of 28,905 results. 41 - 7950 of 28,905 results. Download CX-004188: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/27/2010 Location(s): University Park, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004188-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004194: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cretaceous Mancos Shale Uinta Basin, Utah: Resource Potential and Best Practices For an Emerging Shale CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 09/27/2010 Location(s): Price, Utah Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004194-categorical-exclusion-determination

285

EPA Notice of Availability of the Orlando Gasification Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0383) (08/25/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 Federal Register 11 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 165 / Friday, August 25, 2006 / Notices Summary: EPA was supportive of the selection of the Drainage Impaired Land Retirement Alternative, but expressed environmental concerns about treatment methods to remove selenium from drainage water and potential impacts to air quality. EPA requested additional analysis and monitoring commitments prior to implementation of any alternative and expressed continued objections if an out of valley alternative. EIS No. 20060259, ERP No. F-BLM- J02042-UT, Uinta Basin Natural Gas Project, Proposal to Produce and Transport Natural Gas in the Atchee Wash Oil and Gas Production Region, Resource Development Group, Right- of-Way Grant, U.S. COE Section 404 Permit and Endangered Species Act

286

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Wyoming and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Wyoming, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 7 Lincoln Sublette Teton CLIMATE ZONE 6 Albany Fremont Park Big Horn Hot Springs Sheridan Campbell Johnson Sweetwater Carbon Laramie Uinta Converse Natrona Washakie Crook Niobrara Weston CLIMATE ZONE 5

287

Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

Eric P. Robertson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

On the pattern of black hole information release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a step towards a resolution to black hole information paradox by analyzing scattering amplitudes of a complex scalar field around a Schwarzschild black hole. The scattering cross section reveals much information on the incoming state but exhibits flux loss at the same time. The flux loss should be temporary, and indicate mass growth of the black hole. The black hole should Hawking-radiate subsequently, thereby, compensating for the flux loss. We comment on the possibility that information bleaching may be the key to the paradox.

I. Y. Park

2013-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

R. Y. Chiao

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

290

Impact of excavation technique on strength of oil shale pillars  

SciTech Connect

The load carrying capacity of oil shale pillars excavated by conventional blasting, presplit blasting, and mechanical mining is evaluated. The study was based on a comparison of in-situ vertical stresses and fractures obtained from overcoring horizontal holes in the Colony Mine, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado. Results indicate that conventional blasting causes a zone of damage approximately 3 m (10 ft) thick with low stress distributions. Presplit blasting reduces damage significantly, and increases the load carrying capacity in the 3 m (10 ft) thick zone by 5.93 MPa (860 psi). Mechanical mining causes little or no rock damage, and an increase of 9.83 MPa (1425 psi) in strength in the same 3 m (10 ft) thick zone. An example of pillar design is given showing that the use of presplit blasting and mechanical mining techniques can increase the extraction ratio by at least three and five percent, respectively, as compared to conventional blasting. It is speculated that comparable increases in extraction should also occur due to increases in span dimensions.

Agapito, J.F.T.; Aggson, J.R.; Maleki, H.N.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Explosively produced fracture of oil shale. Progress report, October-December 1982  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory is conducting rock fragmentation research in oil shale to develop the blasting and fluid-flow technologies required to prepare a rubble bed for a modified in situ retort. The first section of this report details the continued planning for the DOE/Sandia/Los Alamos joint rock fragmentation program, including preliminary designs for the first stemming tests and the blasting mat experiment. Section I also describes our current and planned computer modeling program for rock fracture, tracer flow, and oil shale retorting. The second section presents three papers, two on computer modeling and theory and one on oil shale field experiments. The first describes the Bedded Crack Model and its theoretical basis. The second discusses a two-dimensional numerical model of underground oil shale retorting that fully couples retorting chemistry with fluid and heat flow. This paper condenses the code documentation manual, which will be published separately with a user's guide. The third paper focuses on the empirical characterization of 200 cratering experiments conducted in Piceance Creek Basin oil shale, evaluates scaling laws as a tool to predict large-scale experiment results, and investigates the influence of geology and shale grade on rock fragmentation.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Water-related impacts of in-situ oil shale processing  

SciTech Connect

This study discusses the water-related impacts of an in-situ oil shale industry located in the Upper Colorado River Basin. It focuses on a 50,000 barrel per day industry based on the modified in-situ process and located in the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado. It reviews the history of oil shale development in the United States and the reserves, geology, and characteristics of domestic oil shales. In-situ technologies that have been tested or are under active consideration for commercialization are reviewed, and their commercial potential is evaluated. The existing hydrology and water quality of the Upper Colorado River Basin is surveyed as is water use and the statuatory framework for water availability and water quality for in-situ oil shale development. The major environmental problem of in-situ processing, groundwater disruption from in-situ leachates and large-scale dewatering, is analyzed, pertinent experimental results are summarized and interpreted, and recommendations are made for additional research. Methods to control groundwater disruption are identified and discussed and preliminary cost projections are developed. Finally, the reuse, treatment and disposal of effluents produced by in-situ retorting - retort water, gas condensate, mine waters, and others - are discussed.

Fox, J.P.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Hydraulic fracture model and diagnostics verification at GRI/DOE multi-site projects and tight gas sand program support. Final report, July 28, 1993--February 28, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over twenty years. Early production experiments included nuclear stimulations and massive hydraulic fracture treatments. This work culminated in the US Department of Energy (DOE)`s Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory designed to study the reservoir and production characteristics of low permeability sands. A key feature of MWX was an infrastructure which included several closely spaced wells that allowed detailed characterization of the reservoir through log and core analysis, and well testing. Interference and tracer tests, as well as the use of fracture diagnostics gave further information on stimulation and production characteristics. Thus, the Multiwell Experiment provided a unique opportunity for identifying the factors affecting production from tight gas sand reservoirs. The purpose of this operation was to support the gathering of field data that may be used to resolve the number of unknowns associated with measuring and modeling the dimensions of hydraulic fractures. Using the close-well infrastructure at the Multiwell Site near Rifle, Colorado, this operation focused primarily on the field design and execution of experiments. The data derived from the experiments were gathered and analyzed by DOE team contractors.

Schroeder, J.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the original research program and of its continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large-scale testing sufficient to describe commercial-scale embankment behavior. The large-scale testing was accomplished by constructing five lysimeters, each 7.3{times}3.0{times}3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process (Schmalfield 1975). Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was placed in the lysimeter cells. This report discusses and summarizes results from scientific efforts conducted between October 1991 and September 1992 for Fiscal Year 1992.

Turner, J.P.; Reeves, T.L.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

296

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

297

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

298

Control strategies for abandoned in situ oil shale retorts  

SciTech Connect

In situ oil shale retorting may result in a number of environmental impacts including degradation of local surface and groundwaters, low resource recovery, and subsidence. The target of present oil shale commercialization activities is the Mahogany zone in Colorado's Piceance Creek Basin. The principal oil shale resource in this area is surrounded by two confined aquifers. During mining and retorting, these aquifers are dewatered. When the site is abandoned, groundwater will reinvade the area and flow through the abandoned retorts, leaching potentially toxic or carcinogenic materials from the spent oil shale. This material may then be transported in local aquifers, withdrawn in wells or discharged into the Colorado River system as base flow. Certain control technologies appear potentially able to protect groundwater quality at reasonable cost. These include designing retort blocks to include a hydraulic bypass around abandoned retorts (about $0.50/bbl), placing absorbent clays in abandoned retorts to catch and hold leachable matter (about $0.50/bbl), collecting leachate and treating it on the surface (about $1.20/bbl), protecting abandoned retorts from leaching by placing a grout curtain around a block of abandoned retorts (about $2.00 to $3.00/bbl), or grouting abandoned retorts with spent shale (about $3 to $4/bbl).

Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Oil shale resources of the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The resource of potential oil represented by Green River Formation oil shale on Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1 (NOSR No. 1) in the southeast corner of Colorado's Piceance Creek Basin is evaluated in detail. NOSR No. 1 is the site of intensive long-term oil-shale development studies and is the source of innumerable oil-shale samples for all manner of testing. A brief history of these studies is presented. This oil-shale resource is defined from oil-yield assay data on 33 cores plotted as histograms and correlated into cross sections. Contour maps of thickness, richness and oil resource in place are presented for the Mahogany Zone, the rich zone in the Mahogany zone, and for 2 units beneath and 5 units above the Mahogany zone. Total oil shale resource on NOSR No. 1 is 20.4 billion barrels of which 17.4 billion barrels are particularly suitable for development by vertical modified in-place processes. A previously unknown Mahogany zone outcrop providing much additional development access is described. Now under sole control of the US Department of Energy (DOE), NOSR No. 1 offers DOE a unique site for oil shale testing and development.

Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Trudell, L.G.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Distribution and origin of sulfur in Colorado oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The sulfur content of 1,225 samples of Green River oil shale from two core holes in the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, ranges from nearly 0 to 4.9 weight percent. In one core hole, the average sulfur content of a sequence of oil shale 555 m thick, which represents nearly the maximum thickness of oil shale in the basin, is 0.76 weight percent. The vertical distribution of sulfur through the oil shale is cyclic. As many as 25 sulfur cycles have lateral continuity and can be traced between the core holes. Most of the sulfur resides in iron sulfides (pyrite, marcasite, and minor. pyrrhotite), and small amounts are organically bound in kerogen. In general, the concentration of sulfur correlates moderately with oil shale yield, but the degree of association ranges from quite high in the upper 90 m of the oil shale sequence to low or none in the leached zone and in illitic oil shale in the lower part of the sequence. Sulfur also correlates moderately with iron in the carbonate oil shale sequence, but no correlation was found in the illitic samples. Sulfide mineralization is believed to have occurred during early and late stages of diagenesis, and after lithification, during development of the leached zone. Significant amounts of iron found in ankeritic dolomite and in illite probably account for the lack of a strong correlation between sulfur and iron.

Dyni, J.R.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Production of Shale Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan provides a blueprint for the development of a 28,000 acre holding on Clear Creek in Garfield County, Colorado on property acquired by Standard Oil of California in the late 1940's and early 1950's. The paper describes these planning activities and the principal features of a proposed $5 billion project to develop facilities for production of 100,000 barrels per day of synthetic crude from oil shale. Subjects included are resource evaluation, environmental baseline studies, plans for acquisition of permits, plans for development of required retorting and mining technology and a preliminary description of the commercial project which will ultimately emerge from these activities. General financial impact of the project and the case for additional tax incentives to encourage it will be described.

Loper, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development  

SciTech Connect

Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

EditorialIT Investment Payoff in E-Business Environments: Research Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-business environments pose unique challenges to the measurement of information technology payoff. In this paper we discuss some of those challenges as stemming from issues such as the productivity paradox, level of measurement, choice of metrics and ... Keywords: E-business environments, E-commerce, IT payoff, information technology investment, information technology productivity

Rajiv Kohli; Susan A. Sherer; Ayelet Baron

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Black Hole Firewalls Require Huge Energy of Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The unitary moving mirror model is one of the best quantum systems for checking the reasoning of the firewall paradox in quantum black holes. Though the late-time part of radiations emitted from the mirror is fully entangled with the early-part, no AMPS's firewall exists with a deadly, huge average energy flux in this model. This is because high-energy entanglement structure of the discretized systems in almost maximally entangled states is modified so as to yield the correct description of low-energy effective field theory. Due to the Reeh-Schlieder theorem in quantum field theory, another firewall paradox is inevitably raised with quantum remote measurements in the model. We resolve this paradox from the viewpoint of the energy cost of measurements. No firewall appears, as long as the energy for the measurement is much smaller than the ultraviolet cutoff scale. Furthermore, the strong subadditivity paradox of firewalls is resolved using non-locality of general one-particle states and zero-point fluctuation entanglement.

Masahiro Hotta; Jiro Matsumoto; Ken Funo

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

305

Information Release Administration Database (IRAD), Software Design Description (SDD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IRAD system is a client server system that is written in Paradox for DOS. This system will be replaced with a Visual Basic and SQL Server in order to update the technology, eliminate obsolete functions, as well as to automate the manual interfaces.

CAREY, D.S.

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

d i i v v i i s s i i o o n n Friday, March 16, 2007 11:00 am (refreshments available) Iran Thomas Auditorium (8600) "The Hunt for a Snark: 50 years of Landauer Paradox" Sergei V....

307

Phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli-modeling of single action potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we detail a phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli. The model is derived using the basic laws of physics like conservation of energy law. This model eliminates the paradox of instantaneous propagation of the action potential ... Keywords: Action potential, Brain response, External stimuli, Phase lagging model, Single neuron

Karthik Seetharaman; Hamidreza Namazi; Vladimir V. Kulsih

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Page 1 of 3 DRAFT Minutes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this rulemaking. Sarah ­ in Paradox valley we have a proposed uranium mill with a surface mining operation that in Subpart W should take into consideration the radon from uranium mines in the vicinity of the uranium mill (Strathmore) Sarah Fields (Uranium Watch) Steve Brown (SENES) Jan Johnson (Tetratech) Travis Stills, Energy

309

Are the shrimps Halocaridina rubra and H. palahemo simply different morphotypes of the same species?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using UV lighting to simulate daylight, and fed Ocean Star International Inc. Spirulina Flake mixed paradox. Amazon mollies share disadvantages of both sexual reproduction (the costs of finding a mate and costs of mating) and unisexual reproduction (accumulation of deleterious mutations that cannot be purged

Cowles, David L.

310

INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . RESOURCES--GENERAL . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sunday, September 9, 2007; A01 ARECIBO, Puerto Rico -- In the tangled forests of Puerto Rico's steamy gearing up to fight proposed cuts. By contrast, Puerto Rico, a commonwealth of the United States, has's director for financial help from Puerto Rico's government struck him as paradoxical, given the island

US Army Corps of Engineers

311

Top 100 U.S. Oil & Gas Fields By 2009 Proved Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ventura basin los angeles basin central coastal basin w y t h r u s t 7 b e l t u i n t ae -f p i c e a n c e b a s i n grea er gr en rive basin paradox basin raton ...

312

Regulatory governance in African telecommunications: Testing the resource curse hypothesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines regulatory governance in the context of African telecommunications. Though there is already a substantial literature devoted to the regulatory practices in developing countries, it generally conceptualizes the quality of regulation ... Keywords: Africa, Development, Paradox of plenty, Regulatory governance, Resource curse, Telecommunications regulation

Krishna Jayakar; Brandie Martin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Social cognition, artefacts, and stigmergy: A comparative analysis of theoretical frameworks for the understanding of artefact-mediated collaborative activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collective behaviour is often characterised by the so-called 'coordination paradox': looking at individual ants, for example, they do not seem to cooperate or communicate explicitly, but nevertheless at the social level cooperative behaviour, such as ... Keywords: Activity theory, Artefacts, Distributed cognition, Situated action, Social interactions, Stigmergy

Tarja Susi; Tom Ziemke

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The queue protocol: a deadlock-free, homogeneous, non-two-phase locking protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The M-pitfall protocol (MPP) is the most general homogeneous non-two-phase locking protocol which supports shared and exclusive locks. It has two major disadvantages: it is not deadlock-free and it has the paradoxical property that concurrency is often ...

Udo Kelter

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The Graviton and the Nature of Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I discuss various thoughts, old and new, about the cosmological constant (or dark energy) paradox. In particular, I suggest the possibility that the cosmological ``constant'' may decay as $\\Lambda \\sim \\alpha^2 m_N^3 / \\tau$, where $\\tau$ is the age of the universe.

A. Zee

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

316

Super-tasks, accelerating Turing machines and uncomputability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating Turing machines are devices with the same computational structure as Turing machines (TM), but able to perform super-tasks. We ask whether performing super-tasks alone produces more computational power; for example, whether accelerating ... Keywords: Thomson's paradox, accelerating Turing machines, halting problem, super-task

Oron Shagrir

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Scholars from northeast Brazil, Costa Rica, southeast Mexico, Nicaragua, Italy, and the United States gathered for a think-tank international week April 18-22, 2011 to examine Latin America's equity-gap challenges using a community engagement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scholars from northeast Brazil, Costa Rica, southeast Mexico, Nicaragua, Italy, and the United. The keynote address--Brazil's Unified Health System May Promote Social Inequality: Paradox or dialectic/northeastern Brazil constitute nadirs of economic and health inequality. The stunting rates among children

Liu, Taosheng

318

ZOOM: The Global Race to Fuel the Car of the Future, Reprint edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Zoom goes zero to sixty in nothing flat. It's an exciting ride into the future of the world's favorite physical object, the automobile."-Gregg Easterbrook, author of THE PROGRESS PARADOX"Zoom offers a new way to think about cars and energy that's key ...

Vijay Vaitheeswaran; Iain Carson

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Chapters 1 and 3 Notion of greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Chapters 1 and 3 Notion of greenhouse gas · A gas, natural or anthropogenic, that absorbs the paradox of the faint young Sun. Near-infrared greenhouse gas absorption bands (Fig. 3.13) near infrared trace gas concentrations to radiative forcing: the effects of anthropogenic greenhouse gases on global

Wolfe, Alexander P.

320

EPA Approval of Pesticide Labeling1 Frederick Fishel2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the leaves not sprayed with the pesticides remain low (below the crop's economic thresholds]. In the experiment of [7] [3], pesticide effects on arthropods in the rice field are studied. There are four groups- specific relationship and the intraspecific density effect. To avoid the paradox of pesticides, farmers can

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Putting the Genie Back in the Bottle: The Science of Nuclear Non-Proliferation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, which date back to the 1950s. The proliferation of international and regional courts has prompted some or related trade arrangements. Paradoxically, while we have witnessed the proliferation of international for Ethics, Justice, and Public Life Brandeis University 6 is by treaty and by custom - the two formal

Gilfoyle, Jerry

322

Modelling collaborative knowledge to support engineering design project manager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Product development cycles are nowadays tightened to the minimum and submitted to a growing competitive pressure. However, product and process complexities are constantly increasing. This paradox requires new organisational concepts to satisfy customers' ... Keywords: Collaborative design, Collaborative knowledge, Engineering design model

Vincent Robin; Bertrand Rose; Philippe Girard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The parXXL Environment: Scalable Fine Grained Development for Large Coarse Grained Platforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and datastructure update, that are mandatory to send cell output into con- nected cell input buffers on remote with a paradoxical situation: their modeling and thinking is fine-grained, speaking e.g. of atoms, cells, items collaborations with researchers in optic components and hot plasma (from LMOPS and LPMIA lab- oratories) guide

Vialle, Stéphane

324

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Unproved technically recoverable resource assumptions by basin 4. Unproved technically recoverable resource assumptions by basin Basin AEO2006 (as of 1/1/2004) AEO2007 (as of 1/1/2005) AEO2008 (as of 1/1/2006) AEO2009 (as of 1/1/2007) AEO2010 (as of 1/1/2008) AEO2011 (as of 1/1/2009) AEO2012 (as of 1/1/2010) Shale Gas (trillion cubic feet) Appalachian 15 15 14 51 59 441 187 Fort Worth 40 39 38 60 60 20 19 Michigan 11 11 11 10 10 21 18 San Juan 10 10 10 10 10 12 10 Illinois 3 3 3 4 4 11 11 Williston 4 4 4 4 4 7 3 Arkoma -- 42 42 49 45 54 27 Anadarko -- 3 3 7 6 3 13 TX-LA-MS Salt -- -- -- 72 72 80 66 Western Gulf -- -- -- -- 18 21 59 Columbia -- -- -- -- 51 41 12 Uinta -- -- -- -- 7 21 11 Permian -- -- -- -- -- 67 27 Greater Green River -- -- -- -- -- 18 13

325

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2012 0, 2012 Research Projects to Address Technical Challenges Facing Small Oil and Natural Gas Producers Selected by DOE for Further Development Washington, DC - Nine new research projects aimed at extending the life of mature oil and natural gas fields, while simultaneously reducing the environmental footprint of production operations and minimizing environmental risks, have been selected to receive a total of $8.5 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). Research needs addressed by the projects include the development of "green" fracturing fluids, a non-chemical ultrasonic method for reducing paraffin deposits in wellbore tubulars, and an innovative multiphase compressor that can help reduce fugitive methane emissions. Other projects will focus on enhancing recovery from mature oil fields, developing digital produced-water management tools to facilitate more efficient regulatory decisions related to unconventional gas development in the Uinta Basin, and furthering the development of a solar-powered humidification-dehumidification method to treat produced water.

326

Fracture detection, mapping, and analysis of naturally fractured gas reservoirs using seismic technology. Final report, November 1995  

SciTech Connect

Many basins in the Rocky Mountains contain naturally fractured gas reservoirs. Production from these reservoirs is controlled primarily by the shape, orientation and concentration of the natural fractures. The detection of gas filled fractures prior to drilling can, therefore, greatly benefit the field development of the reservoirs. The objective of this project was to test and verify specific seismic methods to detect and characterize fractures in a naturally fractured reservoir. The Upper Green River tight gas reservoir in the Uinta Basin, Northeast Utah was chosen for the project as a suitable reservoir to test the seismic technologies. Knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic geologic setting, the fracture azimuths, and estimates of the local in-situ stress field, were used to guide the acquisition and processing of approximately ten miles of nine-component seismic reflection data and a nine-component Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP). Three sources (compressional P-wave, inline shear S-wave, and cross-line, shear S-wave) were each recorded by 3-component (3C) geophones, to yield a nine-component data set. Evidence of fractures from cores, borehole image logs, outcrop studies, and production data, were integrated with the geophysical data to develop an understanding of how the seismic data relate to the fracture network, individual well production, and ultimately the preferred flow direction in the reservoir. The multi-disciplinary approach employed in this project is viewed as essential to the overall reservoir characterization, due to the interdependency of the above factors.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CIRCULAR 1 CIRCULAR 1 2 CENTER FOR WATER R E S ~ U R C E ~ REHiARCH GROUND-WATER SERIES C - 1 GEOHYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE PICEANCE CREEK B A S I N BETWEEN THE WHITE AND COLQRAD.0 RIVERS, NORTHWESTERN COLORADO D . L. C o f f i n , F . A. W e l d e r , R . K. G l a n z m a n , and X. W. D u t t o n U n i t e d S t a t e s G e o l o g i c a l Survey Prepared by T h e U n i t e d S t a t e s G e o l o g i c a l Survey i n c o o p e r a t i o n w i t h . 1 he C o l o r a . d o W a . t e r C o n s e r v a t i o n B o a r d D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o . 1 9 6 8 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. CONTENTS Page I n t r o d u c t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Well-numbering s y s t e m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . Aqui'fer t e s t of t h d a l l u v i u m a l o n g P i c e a n c e Creek 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . Geology o f t h e pumping-test s

328

Empirical characterization of oil shale fragmentation experiments  

SciTech Connect

Shale oil recovery rates that can be achieved in underground in situ retorts can be strongly influenced by the shale breakage and fragment-size distribution achieved during rubblization. Since the fragmentation pattern in the retort is a direct result of the blast design used for rubblization, the characterizing blast parameters should be carefully selected. Explosives should be matched to the host material and blast geometries properly chosen so that the required fragmentation results are achieved at optimum costs. Special attention must be directed to selecting blast parameters that produce uniform bed permeability, suppression of fines, proper fragment size distribution, and minimal damage to the retort walls and ceiling. The influence of joints and natural fractures should also be known. In instances where the requisite blasting parameters are unknown, they should be determined from test blasts. Small and intermediate size cratering and bench blast experiments are being made to determine critical depths, volume crater constants, and fragment-size distribution scaling constants for Piceance Creek Basin oil shale. The small tests are made using PETN explosive in meter-sized blocks. The intermediate-sized tests are on the ten-to-twenty foot scale using an ANFO explosive. The experiments are designed to investigate the adequacy of using empirical scaling laws to describe the influence of bedding plane orientation, burden distance, explosive energy release, and borehole diameter on blast results. Crater volumes, sieved fragment-size distributions, free surface velocities, and explosive detonation velocities are measured. Data are treated using a Livingston type performance evaluation based on explosive volume to determine critical and optimum depths. Measured fragment-size distributions are interpreted using empirical scaling techniques.

Schmidt, S.C.; Edwards, C.L.; Oliver, R.; Johnson, J.N.; Wapner, P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Empirical characterization of oil-shale cratering experiments. [RDX, ANFO, PETN, TNT  

SciTech Connect

Numerous small- and intermediate-size cratering experiments have been conducted in Piceance Creek Basin oil shale at the Colony and Anvil Points oil shale mines near Rifle, Colorado. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate scaling as a tool to infer the behavior of large-scale tests from small-scale experiments, to calibrate the hydrodynamic computer codes used to model explosive fragmentation of oil shale, and to investigate the influence of bedding plane orientation, natural joints, fractures, and the grade of oil shale on rock fragmentation. The small tests were made using PETN and RDX explosive with charge sizes of a few grams. The intermediate-sized tests used ANFO or TNT explosives with charge sizes of 5 to 100 kg. Crater dimensions were measured on all experiments. Crater volumes were calculated from screened rubble volumes on the intermediate-scale experiments and measured directly on the small-scale experiments. Fragment size distributions were measured on most of the intermediate-sized tests and on several of the small-scale experiments. The analyses of these cratering data show: (1) small-scale cratering tests can be used to qualitatively predict the kinds of geologic interactions that will influence a larger-scale experiment; (2) the site specific geology plays a dominant role in the formation of the crater; (3) small flaws and fractures influence crater development and particle size distributions in small-scale craters in the same manner that joint and fracture systems influence intermediate-scale experiments; (4) complex site geology causes increases in the critical and optimum depths of burial and changes the symmetry of the crater; and (5) small- and intermediate-scale cratering experiments can be used to calibrate hydrodynamic computer codes if great care is used to identify the effect of site specific geology. 15 figures, 6 tables.

Edwards, C.L.; Craig, J.L.; Lombardo, K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Selected elemental distributions as determined by reference retorting of oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to determine potential hindrances to the commercial development of the oil shale industry mass balance Fischer assay was used as a reference retorting method to examine the distribution of selected elements generally considered as contaminants in the final retort products. The elements examined were nitrogen, sulfur, silver, arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, lead, selenium, and zinc. The shales used in this study were an eastern (New Albany) interim reference shale, a western (Green River Formation) interim reference shale, and a series of stratigraphically differentiated shales from Colorado corehole No. 1 in the Piceance Creek Basin. Analysis of the raw shale and retort products was accomplished using instrumental elemental methods including inductively coupled argon plasma spectroscopy and graphite furnace atomic absorption. Carbon balances indicated a high potential for achieving good mass closures existed. However, instrumental limitations combined with a high potential for contamination and/or representative sampling problems resulted in poor closures for many of the trace elements. Consistent closures were obtained for arsenic, barium, copper, and zinc. Given the operating conditions of the retort all elements under consideration remained primarily in the spent shale. Elements verified in the oil product included nitrogen and sulfur compounds and arsenic and selenium. The water product was also contaminated by nitrogen and sulfur compounds and arsenic and selenium. Evidence suggests the sulfur occurs primarily as organic sulfur. Quantitative results for the gas product were poor. However, sulfur and mercury were determined to be present at significant levels in the gas stream. The data presented here concurs with previously reported data that suggests the existence of several potential problem areas in the development of an oil shale industry. 42 refs., 1 fig., 42 tabs.

Johnson, L.S.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

File:EIA-PSJ-NW-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PSJ-NW-LIQ.pdf PSJ-NW-LIQ.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 11.68 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

332

File:EIA-PSJ-SE-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PSJ-SE-GAS.pdf PSJ-SE-GAS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 13.13 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

333

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Green Racing Paradox The Green Racing Paradox By Forrest Jehlik, Principal Mechanical Engineer Forrest Jehlik and crew Argonne researcher Forrest Jehlik (second from right) with the Dalton Zehr Racing crew. Left to right: chief crew mechanic Mark Jones, team owner Marty Zehr, driver Dalton Zehr, Circle Track magazine editor Robert Fisher, Jehlik and Argonne electrical engineer Danny Bocci. Let's talk about stereotypes. When you think about automotive racing and environmentalism, it presents a potential battle royale of stereotypes. On the green side, picture a stereotypical environmentalist: a Birkenstock-wearing hippy armed with a polished rant about polar bears and melting ice caps. On the racing side, the clichéd race fan: a blue-collar gearhead who wrenches on a hot rod and

334

File:EIA-PSJ-NW-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File File Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:EIA-PSJ-NW-GAS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 11.69 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

335

Anomalous ring-down effects and breakdown of the decay rate concept in optical cavities with negative group delay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propagation of light pulses through negative group velocity media is known to give rise to a number of paradoxical situations that seem to violate causality. The solution of these paradoxes has triggered the investigation of a number of interesting and unexpected features of light propagation. Here we report a combined theoretical and experimental study of the ring-down oscillations in optical cavities filled with a medium with such a strongly negative frequency dispersion to give a negative round-trip group delay time. We theoretically anticipate that causality imposes the existence of additional resonance peaks in the cavity transmission, resulting in a non-exponential decay of the cavity field and in a breakdown of the cavity decay rate concept. Our predictions are validated by simulations and by an experiment using a room-temperature gas of metastable helium atoms in the detuned electromagnetically induced transparency regime as the cavity medium.

T. Lauprtre; S. Schwartz; R. Ghosh; I. Carusotto; F. Goldfarb; F. Bretenaker

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

336

Time-symmetric quantization in spacetimes with event horizons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard quantization formalism in spacetimes with event horizons implies a non-unitary evolution of quantum states, as initial pure states may evolve into thermal states. This phenomenon is behind the famous black hole information loss paradox which provoked long-standing debates on the compatibility of quantum mechanics and gravity. In this paper we demonstrate that within an alternative time-symmetric quantization formalism thermal radiation is absent and states evolve unitarily in spacetimes with event horizons. We also discuss the theoretical consistency of the proposed formalism. We explicitly demonstrate that the theory preserves the microcausality condition and suggest a "reinterpretation postulate" to resolve other apparent pathologies associated with negative energy states. Accordingly as there is a consistent alternative, we argue that choosing to use time-asymmetric quantization is a necessary condition for the black hole information loss paradox.

Archil Kobakhidze; Nicholas L. Rodd

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

337

Information conservation is fundamental: recovering the lost information in Hawking radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In both classical and quantum world, information cannot appear or disappear. This fundamental principle, however, is questioned for a black hole, by the acclaimed "information loss paradox". Based on the conservation laws of energy, charge, and angular momentum, we recently show the total information encoded in the correlations among Hawking radiations equals exactly to the same amount previously considered lost, assuming the non-thermal spectrum of Parikh and Wilczek. Thus the information loss paradox can be falsified through experiments by detecting correlations, for instance, through measuring the covariances of Hawking radiations from black holes, such as the manmade ones speculated to appear in LHC experiments. The affirmation of information conservation in Hawking radiation will shine new light on the unification of gravity with quantum mechanics.

Zhang, Baocheng; Zhan, Ming-sheng; You, Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

File:EIA-PSJ-SE-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File File Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:EIA-PSJ-SE-LIQ.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 13.12 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona

339

File:EIA-PSJ-SE-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SE-BOE.pdf SE-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 13.15 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

340

File:EIA-PSJ-NW-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NW-BOE.pdf NW-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 11.69 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado DE-FG26-02NT15451 Project Goal The project is designed to: Promote development of both discovered and undiscovered oil reserves contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute, Southern Ute, and Navaho native-controlled lands. Promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American oil exploration corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other tribes. Develop the most cost-effective approach to using non-invasive seismic imaging to reduce the risk in exploration and development of algal mound reservoirs on surrounding Native American lands.

342

Internet Evolution and Social Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earlier HomeNet publications reported small but reliable negative effects of using the Internet on measures of social involvement and psychological well-being among new Internet users in a sample of Pittsburgh families in 1995--1996. The effects were called a "paradox" because participants in the sample used the Internet heavily for communication, which typically has positive effects on well-being. Since that first study, the Internet changed markedly, giving people much greater choice of contacts, activities, and information.

Sara Kiesler; Robert Kraut; Jonathon Cummings; Vicki Helgeson; Anne Crawford

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

S'eminaire Lotharingien de Combinatoire 47 (2001), Article B47a Les nombres hyperharmoniques et  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, . .,.notons X(0)nle nombre d'emplacements vides dans l'album de l'a^in'e `a l'instant n, de sorte que X(0)0= m et X(0)T= 0. Pour k = 1, 2, . .,.notons aussi X(k)nle nombre de vignettesPqui sont apparues). _ Birth- day paradox, coupon collectors, caching algorithms and self-organizing search, Discrete Appl

Lass, Bodo

344

Les nombres hyperharmoniques et la fratrie du collectionneur de vignettes (*)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, . .,.notons X(0)nle nombre d'emplacements vides dans l'album de l'a^in'e `a l'instant n, de sorte que X(0)0= m et X(0)T= 0. Pour k = 1, 2, . .,.notons aussi X(k)nle nombre de vignettesPqui sont apparues). _ Birth- day paradox, coupon collectors, caching algorithms and self-organizing search, Discrete Appl

Foata, Dominique

345

On the Relativistic Formulation of Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A critical analysis of the relativistic formulation of matter reveals some surprising inconsistencies and paradoxes. Corrections are discovered which lead to the long-sought-after equality of the gravitational and inertial masses, which are otherwise different in general relativity. Realizing the potentially great impact of the discovered corrections, an overview of the situation is provided resulting from the newly discovered crisis, amid the evidences defending the theory.

Vishwakarma, Ram Gopal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Quantum random walks with history dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a multi-coin discrete quantum random walk where the amplitude for a coin flip depends upon previous tosses. Although the corresponding classical random walk is unbiased, a bias can be introduced into the quantum walk by varying the history dependence. By mixing the biased random walk with an unbiased one, the direction of the bias can be reversed leading to a new quantum version of Parrondo's paradox.

Adrian P. Flitney; Derek Abbott; Neil F. Johnson

2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

347

Using the Learning Design Language to model activities supported by services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the field of Learning Design (LD) is to provide teachers and instructional designers with the conceptual and technological means to create and manage e-learning activities. This paper addresses a paradox in existing ... Keywords: CSCL, LDL, MDE, computer-supported collaborative learning, e-learning, educational technologies, electronic learning, learning activities modelling, learning design language, learning technology, model driven architecture, model driven engineering, online learning, services modelling

Christian Martel; Laurence Vignollet

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Information Storage in Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The information loss paradox for Schwarzschild black holes is examined, using the ADS/CFT correspondence extended to the $M_6 (4,2)$ bulk. It is found that the only option compatible with the preservation of the quantum unitarity is when a regular remnant region of the black hole survives to the black hole evaporation process, where information can be stored and eventually retrieved.

M. D. Maia

2005-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

On the pattern of black hole information release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a resolution to black hole information paradox by analyzing scattering amplitudes of a complex scalar field around a Schwarzschild black hole. The scattering cross section reveals much information on the incoming state but exhibits flux loss at the same time. The flux loss should be temporary, and indicate mass growth of the black hole. The black hole should Hawking-radiate subsequently, thereby, compensating for the flux loss.

Park, I Y

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Quantum information and general relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as one-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks.

Asher Peres

2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Are Black Holes Elementary Particles?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum black holes are the smallest and heaviest conceivable elementary particles. They have a microscopic size but a macroscopic mass. Several fundamental types have been constructed with some remarkable properties. Quantum black holes in the neighborhood of the Galaxy could resolve the paradox of ultra-high energy cosmic rays detected in Earths atmosphere. They may also play a role as dark matter in cosmology. 1 1

Yuan K. Ha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Author: Thomas C. Chidsey, Petroleum Section Chief, Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT. Venue: International Oil Scouts Association’s 84th annual meeting, Stein Eriksen Lodge, Park City, UT, June 17–20, 2007, (http://www.oilscouts.com/index-main.html [external site]). Abstract: Utah’s natural gas and oil exploration history extends back more than 100 years, fluctuating greatly due to discoveries, price trends, and changing exploration targets. During the boom period of the early 1980s, activity peaked at over 500 wells per year. After slowing in the 1990s, drilling activity has again increased, reaching an all-time peak of 1,058 wells spudded and over 2,000 APDs (application for permit to drill) filed in 2006. This increase in activity has been spurred by high prices for both natural gas and oil and by the perception that Utah is highly prospective and underexplored. In recent years, the proportion of new wells exploring for gas has increased greatly. Total cumulative natural gas production from Utah fields now exceeds 8 Tcf. Recent successful drilling has been expanding reserves by about 10 percent per year, one of the highest rates of gas reserves increase in the country. Although gas production from some fields declined during the late 1990s, two factors caused overall gas production to increase. The development of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) accumulations in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone play, in particular Drunkards Wash field in central Utah, has increased the State’s annual gas production by 20–30 percent. Also, deeper exploratory and development drilling in the eastern and southern Uinta Basin during the past 5 years has led to discoveries of substantial gas accumulations in tight-sand reservoirs of the Tertiary Wasatch Formation, Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, and Jurassic Entrada and Wingate Sandstones. Significant potential exists for other coalfields (Book Cliffs, Sego, and Wasatch Plateau) around the Uinta Basin to yield CBNG, and the extent of deeper conventional and tight-gas plays remains to be explored. In addition, shale gas reservoirs in the Mississippian Manning Canyon Shale, Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group, and Cretaceous Mancos Shale of central, southeastern, and northeastern Utah, respectively, have tremendous untapped potential. Utah oilfields have produced a cumulative total of 1.3 billion barrels (bbl) of oil. Although annual production decreased from a peak of 41 million bbl in 1985 to 13 million bbl in 2003, the trend has since reversed, and 2005 production reached nearly 17 million bbl. A component (about one-third of the increase) of this turnaround has been the 2004 discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah thrust belt, or "Hingeline." This new field has already produced 3 million bbl of Mississippian-sourced oil from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in a thrusted anticline formed during the Sevier orogeny. This new oil play is the focus of extensive leasing and exploration activity—comparable to the late 1970s and early 1980s in the Utah-Wyoming salient of the thrust belt to the north.

353

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Reserve Class Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1- 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

354

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1- 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

355

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Reserve Class Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1- 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

356

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques to Determine Potential Oil-Prone Areas in the Mississippian Leadville Limestone, Northern Paradox Basin, Utah Authors: David E. Eby, Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr., and Craig D. Morgan Venue: Rocky Mountain Section AAPG Conference, Colorado Convention Center, July 9-11, 2008, http://www.aapg.org/ Abstract: Potential oil-prone areas for the Mississippian Leadville Limestone were identified in the northern Paradox Basin (Paradox fold and fault belt), Utah, based on hydrocarbon shows using low-cost epifluorescence techniques. The trapping mechanisms for Leadville producing fields are usually anticlines bounded by large, basement-involved normal faults. Epifluorescence microscopy is a technique used to provide information on diagenesis, pore types, and organic matter (including “live” hydrocarbons) within sedimentary rocks. It is a rapid, non-destructive procedure that uses a petrographic microscope equipped with reflected-light capabilities, a Hg-vapor light, and appropriate filtering.

357

B  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B B l a c k H i l l s R e g io n Northern Anthracite Field S o u t h e r n A n t h r a c i t e F i e l d E. Middle Anthracite F ield Rhode Island Meta-Anthrac ite Terling ua Coal Field Coos Bay Coal Field Turtle Montain Coal Field North Central Coal Region San Juan Basin G u l f C o a s t C o a l R e g i o n Ft. Union Coal Re gion (Willist on Basin) Northern Appalachian Ba sin Powder Rive r Ba sin Uinta Basin Cheroke e P la tform Ce nt ra l Appalachian Ba sin Gr ea te r Gr ee n Ri ve r Ba si n T e r t i a r y L a k e B e d s R e g i o n Arkom a Ba sin Pic eance Ba sin Big Horn Ba sin Wind River Ba sin R a to n B as in Black Mesa Basin Taylorville Basin D e e p R i v e r B a s i n N. & Mid. Park Basins C u l p e p p e r B a s in Ha nna -Carbon Ba sin J a c k s o n H o le C o a l F ie ld He nr y Mo u nta ins Co al F iel d Rock Creek Coal Field Glacier Coal Field Goshen Hole Coal Field D a n R i v e r - D a n v i l l e B a s i n Goose Creek Field

358

Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Report for the period October 1992--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The current project targeted three fluvial deltaic reservoirs in the Uinta Basin, Utah. In primary recovery, the performance of the Monument Butte unit was typical of an undersaturated reservoir whose initial pressure was close to the bubble point pressure. The unit was producing at a rate of 40 stb/day when the water flood was initiated. The unit has been producing at more than 300 stb/day for the past four years. The reservoir characteristics of Monument Butte were established in the geologic characterization study. The reservoir fluid properties were measured in the engineering study. Results of a comprehensive reservoir simulation study using these characteristics provided excellent match with the field production data. Extended predictions using the model showed that it would be possible to recover a total of 20--25% of the oil in place. In the Travis unit, logs from the newly drilled 14a-28 showed extensively fractured zones. A new reservoir was discovered and developed on the basis of the information provided by the formation micro imaging logs. This reservoir also behaved in a manner similar to undersaturated reservoirs with initial reservoir pressures close to the reservoir fluid bubble point. The water flood activity was enhanced in the Travis unit. Even through the reservoir continued to be gradually pressurized, the water flood in the Travis unit appeared to be significantly affected by existing or created fractures. A dual-porosity, dual permeability reservoir model provided a good match with the primary production history. The well drilled in the Boundary unit did not intersect any producible zones, once again illustrating the unique challenges to developing fluvial deltaic reservoirs.

Pennington, B.I.; Lomax, J.D. [Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Neilson, D.L.; Deo, M.D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Authors: Paul La Pointe, FracMan Technology Group, Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, WA; Robert D. Benson, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; and Claudia Rebne, Legacy Energy, Denver, CO. Venue: American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Rocky Mountain Section Annual Meeting in Snowbird, UT, October 7-9, 2007. Abstract: A 3D9C survey was carried out over a 6 square mile portion of the Roadrunner and Towaoc fields on the Ute Mountain Ute reservation in southwestern Colorado. This survey was jointly funded by DOE and the Southern Ute tribe’s Red Willow Corporation to promote development of Ismay algal mound plays in the Paradox Basin within Ute Mountain Tribal lands and elsewhere in the Paradox Basin. Multicomponent data were utilized to better delineate the external mound geometry as well as to estimate internal mound reservoir parameters such as matrix permeability, saturation, and porosity. Simple cross-plotting of various multicomponent attributes against reservoir properties did not provide the desired predictive accuracy, in part due to sub-optimal frequency content in components derived from the shear wave data. However, a multivariate statistical analysis greatly improved the predictive accuracy. These multivariate regressions were then used to prescribe reservoir properties for a static reservoir model, which in turn formed the basis for a dynamic reservoir simulation model of the project area to assess the usefulness of the multivariate relations developed. This poster presentation will illustrate the workflow used to carry out the multivariate modeling, key maps of the reservoir properties that were derived, the static model, and results from the dynamic simulation used to assess the usefulness of the approach. Results from wells drilled based on the seismic data also will be presented.

360

Multi-Site Application of the Geomechanical Approach for Natural Fracture Exploration  

SciTech Connect

In order to predict the nature and distribution of natural fracturing, Advanced Resources Inc. (ARI) incorporated concepts of rock mechanics, geologic history, and local geology into a geomechanical approach for natural fracture prediction within mildly deformed, tight (low-permeability) gas reservoirs. Under the auspices of this project, ARI utilized and refined this approach in tight gas reservoir characterization and exploratory activities in three basins: the Piceance, Wind River and the Anadarko. The primary focus of this report is the knowledge gained on natural fractural prediction along with practical applications for enhancing gas recovery and commerciality. Of importance to tight formation gas production are two broad categories of natural fractures: (1) shear related natural fractures and (2) extensional (opening mode) natural fractures. While arising from different origins this natural fracture type differentiation based on morphology is sometimes inter related. Predicting fracture distribution successfully is largely a function of collecting and understanding the available relevant data in conjunction with a methodology appropriate to the fracture origin. Initially ARI envisioned the geomechanical approach to natural fracture prediction as the use of elastic rock mechanics methods to project the nature and distribution of natural fracturing within mildly deformed, tight (low permeability) gas reservoirs. Technical issues and inconsistencies during the project prompted re-evaluation of these initial assumptions. ARI's philosophy for the geomechanical tools was one of heuristic development through field site testing and iterative enhancements to make it a better tool. The technology and underlying concepts were refined considerably during the course of the project. As with any new tool, there was a substantial learning curve. Through a heuristic approach, addressing these discoveries with additional software and concepts resulted in a stronger set of geomechanical tools. Thus, the outcome of this project is a set of predictive tools with broad applicability across low permeability gas basins where natural fractures play an important role in reservoir permeability. Potential uses for these learnings and tools range from rank exploration to field-development portfolio management. Early incorporation of the permeability development concepts presented here can improve basin assessment and direct focus to the high potential areas within basins. Insight into production variability inherent in tight naturally fractured reservoirs leads to improved wellbore evaluation and reduces the incidence of premature exits from high potential plays. A significant conclusion of this project is that natural fractures, while often an important, overlooked aspect of reservoir geology, represent only one aspect of the overall reservoir fabric. A balanced perspective encompassing all aspects of reservoir geology will have the greatest impact on exploration and development in the low permeability gas setting.

R. L. Billingsley; V. Kuuskraa

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Final Rulison Path Forward  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management developed this report as a guide for discussions with the Colorado State regulators and other interested stakeholders in response to increased drilling for natural gas reserves near the underground nuclear explosion site at Rulison, Colorado. The Rulison site is located in the Piceance Basin of western Colorado, 40 miles northeast of Grand Junction. The Rulison test was the second natural gas reservoir stimulation experiment in the Plowshare Program, which was designed to develop peaceful uses for nuclear energy. On September 10, 1969, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency of DOE, detonated a 40-kiloton nuclear device 8426 feet below the ground surface in an attempt to release commercially marketable quantities of natural gas. The blast vaporized surrounding rock and formed a cavity about 150 feet in diameter. Although the contaminated materials from drilling operations were subsequently removed from the surface of the blast site, no feasible technology exists to remove subsurface radioactive contamination in or around the test cavity. An increase in drilling for natural gas near the site has raised concern about the possibility of encountering residual radioactivity from the area of the detonation. DOE prohibits drilling in the 40-acre lot surrounding the blast site at a depth below 6000 feet. DOE has no evidence that indicates contamination from the Rulison site detonation has migrated or will ever migrate beyond the 40-acre institutional control boundary. The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) established two wider boundaries around the site. When a company applies for a permit to drill within a 3-mile radius of surface ground zero, COGCC notifies DOE and provides an opportunity to comment on the application. COGCC also established a half-mile radius around surface ground zero. An application to drill within one-half mile requires a full hearing before the commission. This report outlines DOE's recommendation that gas developers adopt a conservative, staged drilling approach allowing gas reserves near the Rulison site to be recovered in a manner that minimizes the likelihood of encountering contamination. This staged approach calls for collecting data from wells outside the half-mile zone before drilling closer, and then drilling within the half-mile zone in a sequential manner, first at low contamination probability locations and then moving inward. DOE's recommended approach for drilling in this area will protect public safety while allowing collection of additional data to confirm that contamination is contained within the 40-acre institutional control boundary.

None

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Directed transport as a mechanism for protein folding in vivo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a model for protein folding in vivo based on a Brownian-ratchet mechanism in the multidimensional energy landscape space. The device is able to produce directed transport taking advantage of the assumed intrinsic asymmetric properties of the proteins and employing the consumption of energy provided by an external source. Through such a directed transport phenomenon, the polypeptide finds the native state starting from any initial state in the energy landscape with great efficacy and robustness, even in the presence of different type of obstacles. This model solves Levinthal's paradox without requiring biased transition probabilities but at the expense of opening the system to an external field.

Gonzalez-Candela, Ernesto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Directed transport as a mechanism for protein folding in vivo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a model for protein folding in vivo based on a Brownian-ratchet mechanism in the multidimensional energy landscape space. The device is able to produce directed transport taking advantage of the assumed intrinsic asymmetric properties of the proteins and employing the consumption of energy provided by an external source. Through such a directed transport phenomenon, the polypeptide finds the native state starting from any initial state in the energy landscape with great efficacy and robustness, even in the presence of different type of obstacles. This model solves Levinthal's paradox without requiring biased transition probabilities but at the expense of opening the system to an external field.

Ernesto Gonzalez-Candela; Victor Romero-Rochin

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

An Empirical Growth Model for Major Oil Exporters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

119.7 124.7 1.9 23.3 5 Source: GDP data is from the IMF International Financial Statistics, oil export data is from OPEC Annual Statistical Bulletin, and oil reserve and production data is from the British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy... ) argue that it is the volatility of commodity prices rather than abundance per se, that drives the "resource curse" paradox. 3See, for example, Amuzegar (2008) and the British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy. 3 Figure 1: Oil Export Revenues...

Esfahani, Hadi Salehi; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Pesaran, M. Hashem

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 33 Number 1 : Notes and Topics: The Responsibility of a Buddhist in the Present Day World - I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. political power and technology have led mankind back to the dark age of mistrust and destruction, a gruesome example of which was provided when, thirty three years ago, an atom bomb reduced the city of Hiroshima into ashes and brought down the proud... thinking for a progressive future based on radical social change. tolerance and sanity. yet. paradoxically. the modern world has created a monster in the shape of a doomsday bomb, At a time such as this. it is for every individual Buddhist and peace...

Gyaltsen, Karma Thinlay

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

An Entangled Web of Crime: Bell's Theorem as a Short Story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-locality of the type first elucidated by Bell in 1964 is a difficult concept to explain to non-specialists and undergraduates. Here we attempt this by showing how such non-locality can be used to solve a problem in which someone might find themselves as the result of a collection of normal, even if somewhat unlikely, events. Our story is told in the style of a Sherlock Holmes mystery, and is based on Mermin's formulation of the "paradoxical" illustration of quantum non-locality discovered by Greenberger, Horne and Zeilinger.

Jacobs, K; Jacobs, Kurt; Wiseman, Howard

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

An Entangled Web of Crime: Bell's Theorem as a Short Story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-locality of the type first elucidated by Bell in 1964 is a difficult concept to explain to non-specialists and undergraduates. Here we attempt this by showing how such non-locality can be used to solve a problem in which someone might find themselves as the result of a collection of normal, even if somewhat unlikely, events. Our story is told in the style of a Sherlock Holmes mystery, and is based on Mermin's formulation of the "paradoxical" illustration of quantum non-locality discovered by Greenberger, Horne and Zeilinger.

Kurt Jacobs; Howard Wiseman

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

Persistence and Success in the Attention Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hallmark of the attention economy is the competition for the attention of others. Thus people persistently upload content to social media sites, hoping for the highly unlikely outcome of topping the charts and reaching a wide audience. And yet, an analysis of the production histories and success dynamics of 10 million videos from \\texttt{YouTube} revealed that the more frequently an individual uploads content the less likely it is that it will reach a success threshold. This paradoxical result is further compounded by the fact that the average quality of submissions does increase with the number of uploads, with the likelihood of success less than that of playing a lottery.

Wu, Fang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Einstein's Gravity Under Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mysterious `dark energy' needed to explain the current observations, poses a serious confrontation between fundamental physics and cosmology. The present crisis may be an outcome of the (so far untested) prediction of the general theory of relativity that the pressure of the matter source also gravitates. In this view, a theoretical analysis reveals some surprising inconsistencies and paradoxes faced by the energy-stress tensor (in the presence of pressure) which is used to model the matter content of the universe, including dark energy.

Ram Gopal Vishwakarma

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

Translation by adaptor-helicase cycle in oligomer world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mechanism of the translation in oligomer world is proposed. The translation is carried out by a minimum cycle, which is sustained by adaptors and helicases, and the first information processing in oligomer world. We expect that such a cycle actually worked in a primitive cell and can be constructed in vitro. By computer simulation we have shown that a proofreading is achieved by the fluctuation in the cell. It is rather paradoxical that the proofreading is effective for the system consisting of molecular machines with low efficiency.

Hayato Tsuda; Osamu Narikiyo

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Philosophy at Cambridge, Newsletter of the Faculty of Philosophy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@cam.ac.uk 1 For more interesting details see A Concise History of the University of Cambridge by Elisabeth Leedham-Green (CUP 1996). The Faculty gratefully acknowledges support for this newsletter from 3M library security systems. In 1963 I anticipated... of Confrontations, reenacting famous incendiary disputes from the history of philosophy. http://www.cam.ac.uk/societies/asc/ Tim Button is an MPhil student description of his love of philosophy with the paradox that he is drawn to it in alternating waves...

373

The pre-history of quantum computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main ideas behind developments in the theory and technology of quantum computation were formulated in the late 1970s and early 1980s by two physicists in the West and a mathematician in the former Soviet Union. It is not generally known in the West that the subject has roots in the Russian technical literature. The author hopes to present as impartial a synthesis as possible of the early history of thought on this subject. The role of reversible and irreversible computational processes is examined briefly as it relates to the origins of quantum computing and the so-called Information Paradox in physics.

P. H. Potgieter

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

Time machines and traversable wormholes in modified theories of gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review recent work on wormhole geometries in the context of modified theories of gravity, in particular, in f(R) gravity and with a nonminimal curvature-matter coupling, and in the recently proposed hybrid metric-Palatini theory. In principle, the normal matter threading the throat can be shown to satisfy the energy conditions and it is the higher order curvatures terms that sustain these wormhole geometries. We also briefly review the conversion of wormholes into time-machines, explore several of the time travel paradoxes and possible remedies to these intriguing side-effects in wormhole physics.

Francisco S. N. Lobo

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Dirac Equation and Quantum Relativistic Effects in a Single Trapped Ion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method of simulating the Dirac equation in 3+1 dimensions for a free spin-1/2 particle in a single trapped ion. The Dirac bispinor is represented by four ionic internal states, and position and momentum of the Dirac particle are associated with the respective ionic variables. We show also how to simulate the simplified 1+1 case, requiring the manipulation of only two internal levels and one motional degree of freedom. Moreover, we study relevant quantum-relativistic effects, like the Zitterbewegung and Klein's paradox, the transition from massless to massive fermions, and the relativistic and nonrelativistic limits, via the tuning of controllable experimental parameters.

Lamata, L.; Leon, J. [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Schaetz, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Solano, E. [Physics Department, ASC, and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Munich (Germany); Seccion Fisica, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Apartado Postal 1761, Lima (Peru)

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

Dynamics of momentum entanglement in lowest-order QED  

SciTech Connect

We study the dynamics of momentum entanglement generated in the lowest-order QED interaction between two massive spin-(1/2) charged particles, which grows in time as the two fermions exchange virtual photons. We observe that the degree of generated entanglement between interacting particles with initial well-defined momentum can be infinite. We explain this divergence in the context of entanglement theory for continuous variables, and show how to circumvent this apparent paradox. Finally, we discuss two different possibilities of transforming momentum into spin entanglement, through dynamical operations or through Lorentz boosts.

Lamata, L. [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Leon, J. [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Solano, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Seccion Fisica, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Apartado Postal 1761, Lima (Peru)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Bohmian Trajectories as the Foundation of Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bohmian trajectories have been used for various purposes, including the numerical simulation of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation and the visualization of time-dependent wave functions. We review the purpose they were invented for: to serve as the foundation of quantum mechanics, i.e., to explain quantum mechanics in terms of a theory that is free of paradoxes and allows an understanding that is as clear as that of classical mechanics. Indeed, they succeed in serving that purpose in the context of a theory known as Bohmian mechanics, to which this article is an introduction.

Sheldon Goldstein; Roderich Tumulka; Nino Zanghi

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

378

Some new views on the low-energy side of gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common wisdom associates all the unraveled and theoretically challenging aspects of gravity with its UV-completion. However, there appear to be few difficulties afflicting the effective framework for gravity already at low energy that are likely to be detached from the high-energy structure. Those include the black hole information paradox, the cosmological constant problem and the rather involved and fine tuned model building required to explain our cosmological observations. I review some directions of on-going research that aim to generalize and extend the low-energy framework for gravity.

Piazza, Federico

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Gauge/Gravity Duality (Gauge Gravity Duality)  

SciTech Connect

Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

Polchinski, Joseph (Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics)

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

380

Towards a dynamical theory of observation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a model of classical and quantum observation based on contextuality and dynamically evolving apparatus. Power sets of classical bits model the four classical states of elementary detectors, viz. the two normal yes/no signal states, the faulty or decommissioned state and the non-existence state. Operators over power set registers are used to describe various physical scenarios such as the construction and decommissioning of physical devices in otherwise empty laboratories, the dynamics of signal states over those detectors, the extraction of information from those states, and multiple observers. We apply our quantum formalism to the Elitzur-Vaidman bomb-tester experiment and the Hardy paradox experiment.

George Jaroszkiewicz

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Magnetism of a relativistic degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The magnetization and magnetic susceptibility of a degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field in which electrons are located on the ground Landau level and the electron gas has the properties of a nonlinear paramagnet have been calculated. The paradoxical properties of the electron gas under these conditions-a decrease in the magnetization with the field and an increase in the magnetization with the temperature-have been revealed. It has been shown that matter under the corresponding conditions of neutron stars is a paramagnet with a magnetic susceptibility of {chi} {approx} 0.001.

Skobelev, V. V., E-mail: v.skobelev@inbox.ru [Moscow State Industrial University (Russian Federation)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Emissions with butane/propane blends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports on various aspects of exhaust emissions from a light-duty car converted to operate on liquefied petroleum gas and equipped with an electrically heated catalyst. Butane and butane/propane blends have recently received attention as potentially useful alternative fuels. Butane has a road octane number of 92, a high blending vapor pressure, and has been used to upgrade octane levels of gasoline blends and improve winter cold starts. Due to reformulated gasoline requirements for fuel vapor pressure, however, industry has had to remove increasing amounts of butane form the gasoline pool. Paradoxically, butane is one of the cleanest burning components of gasoline.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Quantum Black Holes As Elementary Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Are black holes elementary particles? Are they fermions or bosons? We investigate the remarkable possibility that quantum black holes are the smallest and heaviest elementary particles. We are able to construct various fundamental quantum black holes: the spin-0, spin-1/2, spin-1, and the Planckcharge cases, using the results in general relativity. Quantum black holes in the neighborhood of the Galaxy could resolve the paradox posed by the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin limit on the energy of cosmic rays from distant sources. They could also play a role as dark matter in cosmology.

Yuan K. Ha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Challenges in petroleum policy for the next president of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next president of Mexico, who will take office on Dec. 1, 1994, faces the challenge of construction a new legal, commercial, and philosophical paradigm for the oil and gas industry in Mexico. As this review of petroleum policies and measures of the past 5 years will show, the existing paradigm has worked only imperfectly, and there are a number of items of unfinished business that the new administration must address. The paper discusses upstream developments and trends, trade issues, environmental gasoline, environmental and industrial safety, natural gas distribution, Pemex morale problems, Nafta and the presidency, project financing, regulatory risk, paradox of financial strategy and Nafta's promise.

Baker, G. (Baker and Associates, Oakland, CA (United States))

1994-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Methodology for the Assessment of Unconventional (Continuous) Resources with an Application to the Greater Natural Buttes Gas Field, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Greater Natural Buttes tight natural gas field is an unconventional (continuous) accumulation in the Uinta Basin, Utah, that began production in the early 1950s from the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group. Three years later, production was extended to the Eocene Wasatch Formation. With the exclusion of 1100 non-productive ('dry') wells, we estimate that the final recovery from the 2500 producing wells existing in 2007 will be about 1.7 trillion standard cubic feet (TSCF) (48.2 billion cubic meters (BCM)). The use of estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) per well is common in assessments of unconventional resources, and it is one of the main sources of information to forecast undiscovered resources. Each calculated recovery value has an associated drainage area that generally varies from well to well and that can be mathematically subdivided into elemental subareas of constant size and shape called cells. Recovery per 5-acre cells at Greater Natural Buttes shows spatial correlation; hence, statistical approaches that ignore this correlation when inferring EUR values for untested cells do not take full advantage of all the information contained in the data. More critically, resulting models do not match the style of spatial EUR fluctuations observed in nature. This study takes a new approach by applying spatial statistics to model geographical variation of cell EUR taking into account spatial correlation and the influence of fractures. We applied sequential indicator simulation to model non-productive cells, while spatial mapping of cell EUR was obtained by applying sequential Gaussian simulation to provide multiple versions of reality (realizations) having equal chances of being the correct model. For each realization, summation of EUR in cells not drained by the existing wells allowed preparation of a stochastic prediction of undiscovered resources, which range between 2.6 and 3.4 TSCF (73.6 and 96.3 BCM) with a mean of 2.9 TSCF (82.1 BCM) for Greater Natural Buttes. A second approach illustrates the application of multiple-point simulation to assess a hypothetical frontier area for which there is no production information but which is regarded as being similar to Greater Natural Buttes.

Olea, Ricardo A., E-mail: olea@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey (United States); Cook, Troy A. [Denver Federal Center (United States); Coleman, James L. [U.S. Geological Survey (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Angular momentum conservation in measurements on spin Bose-Einstein condensates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a thought experiment where two operators, Alice and Bob, perform transverse spin measurements on a quantum system; this system is initially in a double Fock spin state, which extends over a large distance in space so that the two operators are far away from each other. Standard quantum mechanics predicts that, when Alice makes a few measurements, a large transverse component of the spin angular momentum may appear in Bob's laboratory. A paradox then arises since local angular momentum conservation seems to be violated. It has been suggested that this angular momentum may be provided by the interaction with the measurement apparatuses. We show that this solution of the paradox is not appropriate, so that another explanation must be sought. The general question is the retroaction of a quantum system onto a measurement apparatus. For instance, when the measured system is entangled with another quantum system, can its reaction on a measurement apparatus be completely changed? Is angular momentum conserved only on average over several measurements, but not during one realization of the experiment?

F. Lalo; W. J. Mullin

2013-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fermi 3/29/02  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

24, 2002 24, 2002 Number 9 f I N S I D E : 2 Ti m e f o r C o m m u n i c a t o r s t o C a t c h U p 4 B e a m M e U p 8 T h o s e ' D a m ' B e a v e r s 1 4 F e r m i l a b A r t s S e r i e s Photo by Reidar Hahn DIGGING IN 10 DIGGING IN 10 Communicators Communicating particle physics in the 21 st century INTERACTIONS INTERACTIONS Respond online at www.fnal.gov/pub/ferminews/ interactions/index.html or send email to ferminews@fnal.gov TIME for Communicators If large collaborations can achieve one goal, why can't labs speak in harmony? TO CATCH UP 2 FERMINEWS Friday, May 24, 2002 MENLO PARK, Calif.-In high-energy physics, we are accustomed to dealing with paradoxes. We build huge detectors for tiny particles. Studying the infinitesimally small contributes to our understanding of the farthest reaches of the universe. But we have created for ourselves a paradox

389

Revolution at ICECUBE horizons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently (May-July 2013) highest energy neutrino events have been presented by ICECUBE. Most (21) of all these (28) events are cascades shower whose flux exhibits a sharp hardening respect other lower energy atmospheric neutrino component; these events are suggesting an injection of extraterrestrial neutrino, mostly of electron or tau flavor, making cascades. ICECUBE claimed that a component (10-12) of these events must be a trace of expected downward muons and-or atmospheric neutrinos (mostly muon track dominated): this imply that nearly all of the few observed muon tracks (at least 6 of the 7) must be themselves of atmospheric origin: therefore remaining 16-18 extraterrestrial events must be mostly of electron or of tau flavor (or rare neutral current events). The probability that this scenario occurs is very poor, about 0.1-0.5%, well below 1.0%. This muon neutrino paucity paradox cannot be solved if part or even all the events are made by terrestrial prompt charmed signals. The paradox might be somehow solved if nearly all of the 28 events are originated by extraterrestrial sources arriving to us in de-coherent states. This overestimation of atmospheric neutrino flux has deep consequences. Few cascades shower events in Antares yearly might test the flavor changes at TeVs and tens TeV energy range.

Daniele Fargion; Paolo Paggi

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Happiness through consumption: towards a theoretical approach based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

human needs satisfaction Economic welfare is traditionally related to happiness as increases in economic welfare are viewed as increases in utility, which has been a measure of happiness since the marginalist revolution at the beginning of XX century. Consumption is one of the main activities analysed by economic theory that is thought to account for greatest utility. However, the analysis of macroeconomic data do not allow the statement that individual consumption choices do not lead to greatest social welfare or global happiness, as in most capitalist societies deprivation and negative effects from over-consumption are experienced simultaneously. The neoclassical formal approach, which is the main theoretical framework followed by economist, does not intend to contemplate everyday paradoxes of consumption and happiness as it is based upon Utilitarianism. To maintain the link between theory and real economy it is necessary to progress towards a theoretical framework that facilitates the evaluation of consumption and its effects on individual and social welfare or happiness. This normative framework could facilitate the theoretical analysis of the paradoxes found

Monica Guillen Royo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A New Look at the Position Operator in Quantum Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The postulate that coordinate and momentum representations are related to each other by the Fourier transform has been accepted from the beginning of quantum theory by analogy with classical electrodynamics. As a consequence, an inevitable effect in standard theory is the wave packet spreading (WPS) of the photon coordinate wave function in directions perpendicular to the photon momentum. This leads to the following paradoxes: if the major part of photons emitted by stars are in wave packet states (what is the most probable scenario) then we should see not separate stars but only an almost continuous background from all stars; no anisotropy of the CMB radiation should be observable; data on gamma-ray bursts, signals from directional radio antennas (in particular, in experiments on Shapiro delay) and signals from pulsars show no signs of WPS. In addition, a problem arises why there are no signs of WPS for protons in the LHC ring. We argue that the above postulate is based neither on strong theoretical arguments nor on experimental data and propose a new consistent definition of the position operator. Then WPS in directions perpendicular to the particle momentum is absent and the paradoxes are resolved. Different components of the new position operator do not commute with each other and, as a consequence, there is no wave function in coordinate representation. Implications of the results for entanglement, quantum locality and the problem of time in quantum theory are discussed.

Felix M. Lev

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

392

Orientation-dependent handedness and chiral design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chirality occupies a central role in fields ranging from biological self assembly to the design of optical meta-materials. The definition of chirality, as given by lord Kelvin, associates it with the lack of mirror symmetry: the inability to superpose an object on its mirror image. While this definition has guided the classification of chiral objects for over a century, the quantification of handed phenomena based on this definition has proven elusive, if not impossible as manifest in the paradox of chiral connectedness. In this work we put forward a quantification scheme in which the handedness of an object depends on the direction in which it is viewed. While consistent with familiar chiral notions, such as the right hand rule, this framework allows objects to be simultaneously right and left handed. We demonstrate this orientation dependence in three different systems: a biomimetic elastic bilayer, a chiral propeller and optical meta-material and find quantitative agreement with chirality pseudo-tensors whose form we explicitly compute. The use of this approach resolves the existing paradoxes and naturally enables the design of handed meta materials from symmetry principles.

Efi Efrati; William T. M. Irvine

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Nature and Origin of Time-asymmetric Spacetime Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-asymmetric spacetime structures, in particular those representing black holes and the expansion of the universe, are intimately related to other arrows of time, such as the second law and the retardation of radiation. The nature of the quantum arrow, often attributed to a collapse of the wave function, is essential, in particular, for understanding the much discussed "black hole information loss paradox". This paradox assumes a new form and can possibly be avoided in a consistent causal treatment that may be able to avoid horizons and singularities. The master arrow that would combine all arrows of time does not have to be identified with a direction of the formal time parameter that serves to formulate the dynamics as a succession of global states (a trajectory in configuration or Hilbert space). It may even change direction with respect to a fundamental physical clock such as the cosmic expansion parameter if this was formally extended either into a future contraction era or to negative "pre-big-bang" values.

H. D. Zeh

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Quantum Zeno Effect -- Watched Pots in the Quantum World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the 5th century B.C.,the philosopher and logician Zeno of Elea posed several paradoxes which remained unresolved for over two thousand five hundred years. The $20^{th}$ century saw some resolutions to Zeno's mind boggling problems. This long journey saw many significant milestones in the form of discoveries like the tools of converging series and theories on infinite sets in mathematics. In recent times, the Zeno effect made an intriguing appearance in a rather unlikely place - a situation involving the time evolution of a quantum system, which is subject to "observations" over a period of time. Leonid Khalfin working in the former USSR in the 1960s and ECG Sudarshan and B. Misra at the University of Texas, Austin, first drew attention to this problem. In 1977, ECG Sudarshan and B. Misra published a paper on the quantum Zeno effect, called "The Zeno's paradox in quantum theory". Their fascinating result revealed the bizarre workings of the quantum world. Misra and Sudarshan's 1977 paper activated over two decades of theoretical and experimental explorations into the subject and still continues to evoke a lot of interest. In the following, the quantum Zeno effect is described and a brief outline of some of the work following Misra and Sudarshan's paper is given. The quantum Zeno effect is yet another example of the myriad unimaginable possibilities that lie waiting in the magical world of the quantum.

Anu Venugopalan

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stacking Samples: General Considerations Stacking Samples: General Considerations Stacking Samples: The Paradoxical Effect of Shielding Samples on a Table (or The Advantages of Foam Sample Holders) Stacking Samples: General Considerations When planning beam time requests, an important consideration is how many samples can be exposed at the same time. The large beam spot with uniform illumination (about 20 x 20 cm2) allows for as many as four T75 flasks or six T25 flasks to be contained within the beam center. Under certain conditions it is possible to stack multiple samples along the beam direction. The effect of stacked samples can either increase the dose or decrease the dose depending on the heavy ion being used, the beam energy, and other considerations. The details of dose delivery need careful consideration before sample stacking is utilized.

396

Climate Instability and Public Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Instability and Public Health Climate Instability and Public Health Speaker(s): Paul Epstein Date: August 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Evan Mills Climate restricts the range of infectious diseases, while weather affects the timing and intensity of outbreaks. The ranges of several key diseases or their vectors are changing, along with shifts in plant communities and the retreat of alpine glaciers. In addition, extreme weather events associated with warming create conditions conducive to "clusters" of disease outbreaks. The rapid spread of West Nile virus in the Americas is related, paradoxically, to drought and its impact on wildlife (230 species of animals, 138 species of birds) could alter the ratios of predator birds to their prey (including rodents) and thus have implications for human

397

A symmetrical theory of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new Symmetrical Theory (ST) of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics which postulates: quantum mechanics is a theory about complete experiments, not particles; a complete experiment is maximally described by a complex transition amplitude density; and this transition amplitude density never collapses. This new ST is compared to the Conventional Theory (CT) of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics for the analysis of a beam-splitter experiment. The ST makes several experimentally testable predictions that differ from the CT, which can be checked using existing technology. The ST also solves one part of the CT measurement problem, and resolves some of the paradoxes of the CT. This nonrelativistic ST is the low energy limit of a relativistic ST presented in an earlier paper \\cite{Heaney1}.

Michael B. Heaney

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

CX-002920: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: Categorical Exclusion Determination 20: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002920: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reclamation Projects in Jo Dandy Lease Tract C-JD-7, Uranium Leasing Program CX(s) Applied: B1.28, B1.3 Date: 06/25/2010 Location(s): Naturita, Colorado Office(s): Legacy Management The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) proposes to close a mine portal and the related vent located on the Aztec Claim on Lease Tract C-JD-7. Independent contractors associated with Cotter Corporation, the leaseholder, would complete all work within an expected 2 days. The abandoned mine features, which DOE inherited when lease tract boundaries were reconfigured in 2007, are a public safety concern. The lease tract is in the Paradox Valley in western Montrose

399

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2006 4, 2006 Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO Calendar Thurs., December 14 12:00 p.m. Special Particle Astrophysics Seminar - The Dark Side (WH-6W) (NOTE DATE, TIME, LOCATION) Speaker: D. Stojkovic, Case Western Reserve University Title: Black Hole Formation, Evaporation and the Information Loss Paradox 1:00 p.m. ALCPG ILC Physics and Detector Seminar - Hornets Nest (WH-8XO) Speaker: R. Raja, Fermilab Title: The MIPP Experiment Upgrade and Hadronic Shower Simulations 2:30 p.m. Theoretical Physics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: G. Kozlov, JINR, Dubna Title: Lepton-Flavor Violation, Extra Gauge Bosons and New Physics Scale 3:30 p.m. Director's Coffee Break - 2nd Floor Crossover 4:00 p.m. Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - 1 West

400

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 4620 of 26,777 results. 11 - 4620 of 26,777 results. Download CX-000434: Categorical Exclusion Determination Near-Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready Carbon-14 Isotopic Analyzer (Paradox Basin) CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 01/04/2010 Location(s): Utah Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000434-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005769: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dismantle and Removal (D&R) and Enhance Chemical Cleaning (ECC) on Waste Tank 8F (General) CX(s) Applied: B1.28 Date: 04/19/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005769-categorical-exclusion-determination

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401

Hammerhead Ribozyme  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scott Research Scott Research UCSC Press Release Additional Materials Lightsources.Org 30 August 2006 The Elusive Active Fold of a Catalytic RNA Genes, which are made of nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) contain the instructions for how to make proteins, but still enzymes made of proteins are needed to replGenes, which are made of nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) contain the instructions for how to make proteins, but still enzymes made of proteins are needed to replicate the genes. This paradox was addressed ~20 years ago with the realization that some kinds of RNA can act as enzymes. These RNA enzymes, or ribozymes, are accordingly made of the genetic RNA material, but they act as chemical catalysts. This means that ribozymes would have enabled the first self-replicating molecules, also made of RNA, to copy themselves.

402

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 1250 of 28,905 results. 41 - 1250 of 28,905 results. Download CX-000436: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow Carbon Dioxide Injection CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 11/19/2009 Location(s): Greene County, Missouri Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000436-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000434: Categorical Exclusion Determination Near-Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready Carbon-14 Isotopic Analyzer (Paradox Basin) CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 01/04/2010 Location(s): Utah Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000434-categorical-exclusion-determination

403

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aneth Aneth Project Overview DE- FC26-05NT42591 James Rutledge Lianjie Huang Julianna Fessenden Los Alamos National Laboratory October 6-8, 2008 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Southwest Phase II - Aneth Project Paradox Basin, Utah: 150,000 tons/year Enhanced oil recovery with sequestration CO 2 Injection started in August, 2007 - 08/2007 12/2007 04/2008 - 05/2011 Aneth Unit Injection Schedule Sections 13 and 14 - Demonstration Study Area * 3D seismic over entire Unit * CO 2 soil flux measurements * Downhole geophone array deployment * Time-lapse VSP * Microseismic monitoring * SWD wells - one completed * Core well E-418 * Includes Gothic and Desert Creek * Tracer Test * Produced water sampling * UGS compiled all log data and mapped surface fractures * UU-EGI subsurface modeling and simulation Geophone cable deployment -

404

SWP.Aneth.factsheet.919  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name Paradox Basin, Utah: Aneth EOR-Sequestration Test Location Near Bluff, Utah Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source 150,000 tons/year; CO 2 sourced from McElmo Dome, CO Resolute Natural Resources Company Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Navajo Nation Oil and Gas Company Summary of Field Test Site and Operations General Geology and Target Reservoirs: The Aneth oil field, discovered in 1956, is one of the largest in the nation. Because the field is on Navajo Nation land, mineral royalties go to the Navajo Nation and are utilized in many ways, including a broad scholarship fund. Aneth is located on the McElmo-Cortez CO

405

EA-1037-FEA-1995.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7; Final Environmental Assessment for the Uranium Lease 7; Final Environmental Assessment for the Uranium Lease Management Program July 1995 (DOE/EA-1037) Table of Contents Glossary 1.0 Introduction 2.0 Purpose and Need for Action 3.0 Description of Alternatives 4.0 Affected Environment 5.0 Environmental Impacts 6.0 List of Persons Consulted 7.0 References Figures Figure 1. Uranium Lease Management Program Lease Tract Map Figure 2. Transportation Haul Routes Figure 3. Uravan Lease Tract Area Figure 4. Paradox Valley Lease Tract Area Figure 5. Slick Rock Lease Tract Area Tables Table 1. Cross Reference Numbers for DOE Lease Tracts Table 2A. Summary of Lease Tract Information Table 2B. Summary of Lease Tract Information (cont.) Table 3. Threatened and Endangered Species That Could Occur on DOE Lease Tracts Table 4. Summary of Environmental Impacts

406

The Localized Quantum Vacuum Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for the localized quantum vacuum is proposed in which the zero-point energy of the quantum electromagnetic field originates in energy- and momentum-conserving transitions of material systems from their ground state to an unstable state with negative energy. These transitions are accompanied by emissions and re-absorptions of real photons, which generate a localized quantum vacuum in the neighborhood of material systems. The model could help resolve the cosmological paradox associated to the zero-point energy of electromagnetic fields, while reclaiming quantum effects associated with quantum vacuum such as the Casimir effect and the Lamb shift; it also offers a new insight into the Zitterbewegung of material particles.

Daniela Dragoman

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Searching fast for a target on a DNA without falling to traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genomic expression depends critically both on the ability of regulatory proteins to locate specific target sites on a DNA within seconds and on the formation of long lived (many minutes) complexes between these proteins and the DNA. Equilibrium experiments show that indeed regulatory proteins bind tightly to their target site. However, they also find strong binding to other non-specific sites which act as traps that can dramatically increase the time needed to locate the target. This gives rise to a conflict between the speed and stability requirements. Here we suggest a simple mechanism which can resolve this long-standing paradox by allowing the target sites to be located by proteins within short time scales even in the presence of traps. Our theoretical analysis shows that the mechanism is robust in the presence of generic disorder in the DNA sequence and does not require a specially designed target site.

O. Bnichou; Y. Kafri; M. Sheinman; R. Voituriez

2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

408

Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin.

Not Available

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility managements have two primary responsibilities. They must supply reliable electric service to meet the needs of their customers at the most efficient price possible while at the same time generating the maximum rate of return possible for their shareholders. Regulator hostility towards the addition of generating capacity has made it difficult for utilities to simultaneously satisfy both the needs of their ratepayers and the needs of their shareholders. Recent advances in thermal energy storage may solve the utilities' paradox. Residential thermal energy storage promises to provide the ratepayers significantly lower electricity rates and greater comfort levels. Utilities benefit from improved load factors, peak capacity additions at low cost, improved shareholder value (ie. a better return on assets), improved reliability, and a means of satisfying growing demand without the regulatory and litigious nightmares associated with current supply side solutions. This paper discusses thermal energy storage and its potential impact on the electric utilities and introduces the demand side plant concept.

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Pauli matrices and 2D electron gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper it will be argued that transport in a 2D electron gas can be implemented as 'local hidden instrument based' variables. With this concept of instrumentalism it is possible to explain the quantum correlation, the particle-wave duality and Wheeler's 'backward causation of a particle'. In the case of quantum correlation the spin measuring variant of the Einstein Podolsky and Rosen paradox is studied. In the case of particle-wave duality the system studied is single photon Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometry with a phase shift size $\\delta$. The idea that the instruments more or less neutrally may show us the way to the particle will be replaced by the concept of laboratory equipment contributing in an unexpected way to the measurement.

J. F. Geurdes

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

411

Remote-Sensing Quantum Hyperspace by Entangled Photon Interferometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even though ideas of extracting future-related, or Faster-Than-Light (FTL) information from hyperspace using quantum entanglement have generally been refuted in the last ten years, in this paper we show that the original 'Delayed Choice Quantum Eraser Experiment', 1st performed by Yoon-Ho Kim, R. Yu, S.P. Kulik, Y.H. Shih, designed by Marlan O. Scully & Druhl in 1982-1999, still features hidden topological properties that may have been overlooked by previous analysis, and which prohibit, by principle, the extraction of future-related or real-time information from the detection of the signal particle on the delayed choice of its entangled idler twin(s). We show that such properties can be removed, and quantum-level information from certain hypersurfaces of past, present or future spacetime may be collected real-time, without resulting in any paradox or violation of causality.

Gergely A. Nagy

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

412

Toward the Quantum Design of Multichannel Systems (The Inverse Problem Approach)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The multichannel generalization of the theory of spectral, scattering and decay control is presented. New universal algorithms of construction of complex quantum systems with given properties are suggested. Particularly, transformations of interaction matrices leading to the concentration of waves in a chosen partial channel and spatial localization are shown. The limiting instructive cases illustrating different phenomena which occur with the combination of 'incompatible' properties are considered. For example, the scattering solutions with different resonance widths at the same energy for the same interaction are revealed. Analogously, a 'paradoxical' coexistence of both strong reflection and absolute transparency is explained. The case of the violation of 'natural' asymptotic behavior of partial wave function is demonstrated : it has a greater damping decrement for the channel with a lower threshold. Peculiarities of the multichannel periodic structures, bound states embedded into continuum, resonance tunneling and degeneracy of states are described.

V. M. Chabanov; B. N. Zakhariev; I. V. Amirkhanov

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

Toward the Quantum Design of Multichannel Systems (The Inverse Problem Approach)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The multichannel generalization of the theory of spectral, scattering and decay control is presented. New universal algorithms of construction of complex quantum systems with given properties are suggested. Particularly, transformations of interaction matrices leading to the concentration of waves in a chosen partial channel and spatial localization are shown. The limiting instructive cases illustrating different phenomena which occur with the combination of 'incompatible' properties are considered. For example, the scattering solutions with different resonance widths at the same energy for the same interaction are revealed. Analogously, a 'paradoxical' coexistence of both strong reflection and absolute transparency is explained. The case of the violation of 'natural' asymptotic behavior of partial wave function is demonstrated : it has a greater damping decrement for the channel with a lower threshold. Peculiarities of the multichannel periodic structures, bound states embedded into continuum, resonance tunn...

Chabanov, V M; Amirkhanov, I V

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Complementarity of Process and Substance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Process Philosophy endeavours to replace the classical ontology of substances by a process ontology centered on notions of changes and transitions. We argue, that the substantial and processual approach are mutually complementary. Here, complementarity is to be understood in the sense of a "Generalized Quantum Theory", which is not restricted to physical phenomena. From this point of view, restricting oneself to either substance or process ontology would be as ill-advised as exclusively relying on position or momentum observables in physics. A new view on Zeno's paradox lends itself. The meaning of an "internal energy observable", complementary to inner time, and its relationship to "akategorial states" of the human mind will also be discussed.

Hartmann Roemer

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

415

Minimization of Motion Smear: Reducing Avian Collision with Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: July 12, 1999 -- August 31, 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collisions with wind turbines can be a problem for many species of birds. Of particular concern are collisions by eagles and other protected species. This research study used the laboratory methods of physiological optics, animal psychophysics, and retinal electrophysiology to analyze the causes of collisions and to evaluate visual deterrents based on the results of this analysis. Bird collisions with the seemingly slow-moving turbines seem paradoxical given the superb vision that most birds, especially raptors, possess. However, our optical analysis indicated that as the eye approaches the rotating blades, the retinal image of the blade (which is the information that is transmitted to the animal's brain) increases in velocity until it is moving so fast that the retina cannot keep up with it. At this point, the retinal image becomes a transparent blur that the bird probably interprets as a safe area to fly through, with disastrous consequences. This phenomenon is called"motion smear" or"motion blur."

Hodos, W.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Communication Technologies and Their Effect on Cultural Homogeneity, Consensus, and the Diffusion of New Ideas," Sociological Perspectives 38(4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A view of communication technologies as creating artificial agents and affecting the information processing capabilities of agents is forwarded. The constructural theory is adapted to account for agents varying in their information processing capabilities, and hence to account for technology. Given this theoretical modification, the constructural model is used to examine the impact of different communication technologies and socio-cultural landscapes on the rate at which information diffuses and the time it takes for the society to reach cultural homogeneity and consensus. The findings suggest that as the available communication technologies change the role of the socio-cultural landscape in effecting social change varies. Paradoxically, this research suggests that mass-communication technologies that enable greater competition among messages and greater message complexity will enable faster information diffusion, than will those technologies that inhibit competition and message complexity. Communication Technologies Communication Technologies and Their Effect on Cultural Homogeneity, Consensus, and the Diffusion of New Ideas

Kathleen M. Carley

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

adaptive energy metabolism with CNS-linked hyperactivity in PGC-1alpha null mice. Cell 119: 121135  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes, including mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration, hepatic gluconeogenesis, and muscle fiber-type switching. We show here that, while hepatocytes lacking PGC-1 ? are defective in the program of hormone-stimulated gluconeogenesis, the mice have constitutively activated gluconeogenic gene expression that is completely insensitive to normal feeding controls. C/EBP ? is elevated in the livers of these mice and activates the gluconeogenic genes in a PGC-1?-independent manner. Despite having reduced mitochondrial function, PGC-1 ? null mice are paradoxically lean and resistant to diet-induced obesity. This is largely due to a profound hyperactivity displayed by the null animals and is associated with lesions in the striatal region of the brain that controls movement. These data illustrate a central role for PGC-1 ? in the control of energy metabolism but also reveal novel systemic compensatory mechanisms and pathogenic effects of impaired energy homeostasis.

Ie Lin; Pei-hsuan Wu; Paul T. Tarr; Katrin S. Lindenberg; Julie St-pierre; Chen-yu Zhang; Vamsi K. Mootha; Sibylle Jger; Claudia R. Vianna; Richard M. Reznick; Libin Cui; Monia Manieri; Mi X. Donovan; Zhidan Wu; Marcus P. Cooper; Melina C. Fan; Lindsay M. Rohas; Ann Marie Zavacki; Saverio Cinti; Gerald I. Shulman; Bradford B. Lowell; Dimitri Krainc; Bruce M. Spiegelman; Department Of Neurology

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Differential aging from acceleration, an explicit formula  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a clock 'paradox' framework where an observer leaves an inertial frame, is accelerated and after an arbitrary trip comes back. We discuss a simple equation that gives, in the 1+1 dimensional case, an explicit relation between the time elapsed on the inertial frame and the acceleration measured by the accelerating observer during the trip. A non-closed trip with respect to an inertial frame appears closed with respect to another suitable inertial frame. Using this observation we define the differential aging as a function of proper time and show that it is non-decreasing. The reconstruction problem of special relativity is also discussed showing that its, at least numerical, solution would allow the construction of an 'inertial clock'.

E. Minguzzi

2004-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

419

How fast can a black hole release its information?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a shell collapses through its horizon, semiclassical physics suggests that information cannot escape from this horizon. One might hope that nonperturbative quantum gravity effects will change this situation and avoid the `information paradox'. We note that string theory has provided a set of states over which the wavefunction of the shell can spread, and that the number of these states is large enough that such a spreading would significantly modify the classically expected evolution. In this article we perform a simple estimate of the spreading time, showing that it is much shorter than the Hawking evaporation time for the hole. Thus information can emerge from the hole through the relaxation of the shell state into a linear combination of fuzzballs.

Samir D. Mathur

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

420

Residential segregation and cultural dissemination: An Axelrod-Schelling model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Axelrod's model of cultural dissemination, we consider mobility of cultural agents through the introduction of a density of empty sites and the possibility that agents in a dissimilar neighborhood can move to them if their mean cultural similarity with the neighborhood is below some threshold. While for low values of the density of empty sites the mobility enhances the convergence to a global culture, for high enough values of it the dynamics can lead to the coexistence of disconnected domains of different cultures. In this regime, the increase of initial cultural diversity paradoxically increases the convergence to a dominant culture. Further increase of diversity leads to fragmentation of the dominant culture into domains, forever changing in shape and number, as an effect of the never ending eroding activity of cultural minorities.

Gracia-Lazaro, C; Floria, L M; Moreno, Y

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Athens University of Economics and BusinessCapital Mobility, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Rate of Return to Capital in the Presence of Non-Traded Goods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper constructs a general equilibrium trade model of a small open economy producing an exported good, an imported good and a non-traded good by using two or more factors of production, one of which, namely capital, is imperfectly internationally mobile. Within this framework, it is shown that an exogenous capital inflow may lead to a depreciation of the real exchange rate, and to an increase in both the nominal and the real rate of return to capital. For these paradoxical results to occur it is necessary that the non-traded good is capital intensive. Key words: capital mobility, real exchange rate, nominal and real rate of return to capital Correspondence:

Konstantine Gatsios; Konstantine Gatsios; Konstantine Gatsios

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Cleaning up the Streets of Denver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between 1913 and 1924, several Denver area facilities extracted radium from carnotite ore mined from the Paradox basin region of Colorado. Tailings or abandoned ores from these facilities were apparently incorporated into asphalt used to pave approximately 7.2 kilometers (4.5 miles) of streets in Denver. A majority of the streets are located in residential areas. The radionuclides are bound within the asphalt matrix and pose minimal risk unless they are disturbed. The City and County of Denver (CCoD) is responsible for controlling repairs and maintenance on these impacted streets. Since 2002, the CCoD has embarked on a significant capital improvement project to remove the impacted asphalt for secure disposal followed by street reconstruction. To date, Parsons has removed approximately 55 percent of the impacted asphalt. This paper discusses the history of the Denver Radium Streets and summarizes on-going project efforts. (authors)

Stegen, R.L.; Wood, T.R.; Hackett, J.R. [Parsons, 1700 Broadway, Suite 900, Denver, Colorado 80290 (United States); Sogue, A. [City and County of Denver, 201 West Colfax, Denver, Colorado 80202 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A $1/t$ damped electrostatic electron plasma wave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an electron plasma, besides the exponentially Landau damped electron plasma waves, there can also exist modes, namely the ballistic or Case-Van Kampen modes, that usually decay faster (say, $\\sim \\exp(-t^2)$) than the linear Landau damping. In this paper, a slower (namely $\\sim 1/t$) damped mode is considered. The latter resolves the paradox of why Landau damping is difficult to realize in the numerical simulations based solely on the Vlasov-Ampere (V-A) equations, even though the modes have the same dispersion properties as that obtained from the Vlasov-Poisson equations. The mode of interest here corresponds to a residual mode of the V-A system, and its spectrum is also discussed.

Hua-sheng Xie

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

Poincare Recurrences and Topological Diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finite entropy thermal systems undergo Poincare recurrences. In the context of field theory, this implies that at finite temperature, timelike two-point functions will be quasi-periodic. In this note we attempt to reproduce this behavior using the AdS/CFT correspondence by studying the correlator of a massive scalar field in the bulk. We evaluate the correlator by summing over all the SL(2,Z) images of the BTZ spacetime. We show that all the terms in this sum receive large corrections after at certain critical time, and that the result, even if convergent, is not quasi-periodic. We present several arguments indicating that the periodicity will be very difficult to recover without an exact re-summation, and discuss several toy models which illustrate this. Finally, we consider the consequences for the information paradox.

M. Kleban; M. Porrati; R. Rabadan

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

425

The zero age main sequence of WIMP burners  

SciTech Connect

We modify a stellar structure code to estimate the effect upon the main sequence of the accretion of weakly-interacting dark matter onto stars and its subsequent annihilation. The effect upon the stars depends upon whether the energy generation rate from dark matter annihilation is large enough to shut off the nuclear burning in the star. Main sequence weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMP) burners look much like proto-stars moving on the Hayashi track, although they are in principle completely stable. We make some brief comments about where such stars could be found, how they might be observed and more detailed simulations which are currently in progress. Finally we comment on whether or not it is possible to link the paradoxically hot, young stars found at the galactic center with WIMP burners.

Fairbairn, Malcolm; Scott, Pat; Edsjoe, Joakim [PH-TH, CERN, Geneva, Switzerland and King's College London, WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Cosmology, Particle Astrophysics and String Theory, Physics, Stockholm University and High Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology Centre (HEAC), AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Reinterpretation of Sieczka-Ho{\\l}yst financial market model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we essentially reinterpreted the Sieczka-Ho{\\l}yst (SH) model to make it more suited for description of real markets. For instance, this reinterpretation made it possible to consider agents as crafty. These agents encourage their neighbors to buy some stocks if agents have an opportunity to sell these stocks. Also, agents encourage them to sell some stocks if agents have an opposite opportunity. Furthermore, in our interpretation price changes respond only to the agents' opinions change. This kind of respond protects the stock market dynamics against the paradox (present in the SH model), where all agents e.g. buy stocks while the corresponding prices remain unchanged. In this work we found circumstances, where distributions of returns (obtained for quite different time scales) either obey power-law or have at least fat tails. We obtained these distributions from numerical simulations performed in the frame of our approach.

Denys, Mateusz; Kutner, Ryszard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Turbulent Density Spectrum in Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density fluctuation spectrum in the solar wind reveals a Kolmogorov-like scaling with a spectral slope of -5/3 in wavenumber space. The energy transfer process in the magnetized solar wind, characterized typically by MHD turbulence, over extended length-scales remains an unresolved paradox of modern turbulence theories, raising the question of how a compressible magnetofluid exhibits a turbulent spectrum that is characteristic of an incompressible hydrodynamic fluid. To address these questions, we have undertaken three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of a compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluid describing super-Alfv\\'enic, supersonic and strongly magnetized plasma fluid. It is shown that a Kolmogorov-like density spectrum can develop by plasma motions that are dominated by Alfv\\'enic cascades whereas compressive modes are dissipated.

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Density Spectrum in the Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density fluctuation spectrum in the solar wind reveals a Kolmogorov-like scaling with a spectral slope of -5/3 in wavenumber space. The energy transfer process in the magnetized solar wind, characterized typically by MHD turbulence, over extended length-scales remains an unresolved paradox of modern turbulence theories, raising the question of how a compressible magnetofluid exhibits a turbulent spectrum that is characteristic of an incompressible hydrodynamic fluid. To address these questions, we have undertaken three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of a compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluid describing super-Alfv\\'enic, supersonic and strongly magnetized plasma fluid. It is shown that a Kolmogorov-like density spectrum can develop by plasma motions that are dominated by Alfv\\'enic cascades whereas compressive modes are dissipated.

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Turbulent Spectra in the Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of interstellar scintillations at radio wavelengths reveal a Kolmogorov-like scaling of the electron density spectrum with a spectral slope of -5/3 over six decades in wavenumber space. A similar turbulent density spectrum in the solar wind plasma has been reported. The energy transfer process in the magnetized solar wind plasma over such extended length-scales remains an unresolved paradox of modern turbulence theories raising the especially intriguing question of how a compressible magnetized solar wind exhibits a turbulent spectrum that is a characteristic of an incompressible hydrodynamic fluid. To address these questions, we have undertaken three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of a compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluid describing super-Alfv\\'enic, supersonic and strongly magnetized plasma. It is shown that the observed Kolmogorov-like (-5/3) spectrum can develop in the solar wind plasma by supersonic plasma motions that dissipate into highly subsonic motion that passively ...

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Space does not exist, so time can  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is often said that in general relativity time does not exist. This is because the Einstein equations generate motion in time that is a symmetry of the theory, not true time evolution. In quantum gravity, the timelessness of general relativity clashes with time in quantum theory and leads to the ``problem of time'' which, in its various forms, is the main obstacle to a successful quantum theory of gravity. I argue that the problem of time is a paradox, stemming from an unstated faulty premise. Our faulty assumption is that space is real. I propose that what does not fundamentally exist is not time but space, geometry and gravity. The quantum theory of gravity will be spaceless, not timeless. If we are willing to throw out space, we can keep time and the trade is worth it.

Fotini Markopoulou

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

431

Is the Average of Expert Tasters Grades a Good Price Predictor?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary Version This paper takes yet another look at the price/quality relationship studied in Combris, Lecocq and Visser (1997, 2000). The data come from an experimental study that is very similar to the two previous studies. Like in the earlier studies, quality, measured as the average of expert tasters grades, has a small impact on wine prices. Exploiting the fact that the new data are recorded on a relatively ner levelexpert-specic grades are observed instead of averagesthe paper sheds new light on the price/quality paradox. We nd a strong correlation between average grades and price when the dispersion of grades is small, i.e. when there is much consensus among experts about the quality of a wine. Wine prices are also strongly correlated with the highest grade assigned. Possible explanations for these ndings are given.

Sbastien Lecocq Y; Michael Visser Z

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Friends Only: Examining a Privacy-Enhancing Behavior in Facebook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Privacy practices in social network sites often appear paradoxical, as content-sharing behavior stands in conflict with the need to reduce disclosure-related harms. In this study we explore privacy in social network sites as a contextual information practice, managed by a process of boundary regulation. Drawing on a sample survey of undergraduate Facebook users, we examine a particular privacy-enhancing practice: having a friends-only Facebook profile. Particularly, we look at the association between network composition, expectancy violations, interpersonal privacy practices and having a friends-only profile. We find that expectancy violations by weak ties and increased levels of interpersonal privacy management are positively associated with having a friends-only profile. We conclude with a discussion of how these findings may be integrated into the design of systems to facilitate interaction while enhancing individual privacy. Author Keywords Social network sites, social networking, Facebook, privacy,

Fred Stutzman; Jacob Kramer-duffield

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Dependence of the Vertical Excitation Energy of Benzene on the Size and Force Constant of the Excited State  

SciTech Connect

Griffing1 computed the vertical excitation energy for the first electronic transition of benzene as a function of the carbon-carbon distance (rn) within the Sklar valence bond (SVB) and Goeppert-Mayer and Sklar molecular orbital (G1SMO) methods to evaluate the change on excitation of the carbon-carbon equilibrium internuclear separation (rn0) and of the corresponding stretching force constant, f. While ring expansion was correctly predicted, both methods appeared to predict that f increases on excitation, contrary to experiment. We shall demonstrate a) that Griffing's paradox may be resolved if terms higher than the second power in rn are included in the energy expressions for the states and b) that a Huckel calculation leads to results qualitatively similar to those obtained from the more elaborate calculations.

Ehrenson, S; Wolfsberg, Max

1966-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

434

U.S.A.I.D. Higher Education Summit for Global Development | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A.I.D. Higher Education Summit for Global Development A.I.D. Higher Education Summit for Global Development U.S.A.I.D. Higher Education Summit for Global Development April 30, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis Remarks as Prepared For Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you Henrietta, for that introduction. It is a pleasure to be here to talk about education, a subject that is near and dear to my heart. And I was pleased to see Dr. Bement here. When it comes to science and science education, we are faced with a remarkable paradox. On the one hand, the world is more dependent than ever before on science and technological innovation to provide the solutions to the challenges ahead, especially in the energy arena. At the same time, it seems as though support for basic physical science research and the interest young people are taking in math and science seem

435

On conditions of negativity of friction resistance for non-stationary modes of blood flow and possible mechanism of affecting of environmental factors on energy effectiveness of cardio-vascular system functioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that initiated by action of molecular viscosity impulse flow, directed usually from the moving fluid to limiting it solid surface, can, under certain conditions, turn to zero and get negative values in the case of non-stationary flow caused by alternating in time longitudinal (along the pipe axis) pressure gradient. It is noted that this non-equilibrium mechanism of negative friction resistance in the similar case of pulsating blood flow in the blood vessels, in addition to the stable to turbulent disturbances swirled blood flow structure providing, can also constitute hydro-mechanical basis of the observed but not explained yet paradoxically high energy effectiveness of the normal functioning of the cardio-vascular system (CVS). We consider respective mechanism of affecting on the stability of the normal work of CVS by environmental variable factors using shifting of hydro-dynamic mode with negative resistance realization range boundaries and variation of linear hydro-dynamic instability leading ...

Chefranov, S G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography Title Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hussey, Daniel S., Dusan Spernjak, Adam Z. Weber, Rangachary Mukundan, Joseph Fairweather, Eric L. Brosha, John Davey, Jacob S. Spendelow, David L. Jacobson, and Rodney L. Borup Journal Journal of Applied Physics Volume 112 Issue 10 Pagination 104906 Date Published 2012 ISSN 00218979 Keywords electrolyte fuel-cells, in-situ, liquid water, microchannel plate detectors, model, nafion, polymer electrolytes, schroeders-paradox, transport, x-ray-scattering Abstract The water sorption of proton-exchange membranes (PEMs) was measured in situ using high-resolution neutron imaging in small-scale fuel cell test sections. A detailed characterization of the measurement uncertainties and corrections associated with the technique is presented. An image-processing procedure resolved a previously reported discrepancy between the measured and predicted membrane water content. With high-resolution neutron-imaging detectors, the water distributions across N1140 and N117 Nafion membranes are resolved in vapor-sorption experiments and during fuel cell and hydrogen-pump operation. The measured in situ water content of a restricted membrane at 80 degrees C is shown to agree with ex situ gravimetric measurements of free-swelling membranes over a water activity range of 0.5 to 1.0 including at liquid equilibration. Schroeder's paradox was verified by in situ water-content measurements which go from a high value at supersaturated or liquid conditions to a lower one with fully saturated vapor. At open circuit and during fuel cell operation, the measured water content indicates that the membrane is operating between the vapor-and liquid-equilibrated states.

437

Black holes and beyond  

SciTech Connect

The black hole information paradox forces us into a strange situation: we must find a way to break the semiclassical approximation in a domain where no quantum gravity effects would normally be expected. Traditional quantizations of gravity do not exhibit any such breakdown, and this forces us into a difficult corner: either we must give up quantum mechanics or we must accept the existence of troublesome 'remnants'. In string theory, however, the fundamental quanta are extended objects, and it turns out that the bound states of such objects acquire a size that grows with the number of quanta in the bound state. The interior of the black hole gets completely altered to a 'fuzzball' structure, and information is able to escape in radiation from the hole. The semiclassical approximation can break at macroscopic scales due to the large entropy of the hole: the measure in the path integral competes with the classical action, instead of giving a subleading correction. Putting this picture of black hole microstates together with ideas about entangled states leads to a natural set of conjectures on many long-standing questions in gravity: the significance of Rindler and de Sitter entropies, the notion of black hole complementarity, and the fate of an observer falling into a black hole. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The information paradox is a serious problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To solve it we need to find 'hair' on black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In string theory we find 'hair' by the fuzzball construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuzzballs help to resolve many other issues in gravity.

Mathur, Samir D., E-mail: mathur.16@osu.edu

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Assessment of CO2 Sequestration and ECBM Potential of U.S. Coalbeds  

SciTech Connect

In October, 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy, through contractor Advanced Resources International, launched a multi-year government-industry R&D collaboration called the Coal-Seq project. The Coal-Seq project is investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coalseams, by performing detailed reservoir studies of two enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) field projects in the San Juan basin. The two sites are the Allison Unit, operated by Burlington Resources, and into which CO{sub 2} is being injected, and the Tiffany Unit, operating by BP America, into which N{sub 2} is being injected (the interest in understanding the N{sub 2}-ECBM process has important implications for CO{sub 2} sequestration via flue-gas injection). The purposes of the field studies are to understand the reservoir mechanisms of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} injection into coalseams, demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the ECBM and sequestration processes, an engineering capability to simulate them, and to evaluate sequestration economics. In support of these efforts, laboratory and theoretical studies are also being performed to understand and model multi-component isotherm behavior, and coal permeability changes due to swelling with CO{sub 2} injection. This report describes the results of an important component of the overall project, applying the findings from the San Juan Basin to a national scale to develop a preliminary assessment of the CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery potential of U.S. coalbeds. Importantly, this assessment improves upon previous investigations by (1) including a more comprehensive list of U.S. coal basins, (2) adopting technical rationale for setting upper-bound limits on the results, and (3) incorporating new information on CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} replacement ratios as a function of coal rank. Based on the results of the assessment, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) The CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of U.S. coalbeds is estimated to be about 90 Gt. Of this, about 38 Gt is in Alaska (even after accounting for high costs associated with this province), 14 Gt is in the Powder River basin, 10 Gt is in the San Juan basin, and 8 Gt is in the Greater Green River basin. By comparison, total CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation plants is currently about 2.2 Gt/year. (2) The ECBM recovery potential associated with this sequestration is estimated to be over 150 Tcf. Of this, 47 Tcf is in Alaska (even after accounting for high costs associated with this province), 20 Tcf is in the Powder River basin, 19 Tcf is in the Greater Green River basin, and 16 Tcf is in the San Juan basin. By comparison, total CBM recoverable resources are currently estimated to be about 170 Tcf. (3) Between 25 and 30 Gt of CO{sub 2} can be sequestered at a profit, and 80-85 Gt can be sequestered at costs of less than $5/ton. These estimates do not include any costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and transportation, and only represent geologic sequestration. (4) Several Rocky Mountain basins, including the San Juan, Raton, Powder River and Uinta appear to hold the most favorable conditions for sequestration economics. The Gulf Coast and the Central Appalachian basin also appear to hold promise as economic sequestration targets, depending upon gas prices. (5) In general, the 'non-commercial' areas (those areas outside the main play area that are not expected to produce primary CBM commercially) appear more favorable for sequestration economics than the 'commercial' areas. This is because there is more in-place methane to recover in these settings (the 'commercial' areas having already been largely depleted of methane).

Scott R. Reeves

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

A 4D Synchrotron X-Ray-Tomography Study of the Formation of Hydrocarbon- Migration Pathways in Heated Organic-Rich Shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interest in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low-permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the kinetics of hydrocarbon formation in source rocks, expulsion timing, and how the resulting hydrocarbons escape from or are retained in the source rocks motivates further investigation. In particular, many mechanisms have been proposed for the transport of hydrocarbons from the rocks in which they are generated into adjacent rocks with higher permeabilities and smaller capillary entry pressures, and a better understanding of this complex process (primary migration) is needed. To characterize these processes, it is imperative to use the latest technological advances. In this study, it is shown how insights into hydrocarbon migration in source rocks can be obtained by using sequential high-resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography. Three-dimensional images of several immature "shale" samples were constructed at resolutions close to 5 um. This is sufficient to resolve the source-rock structure down to the grain level, but very-fine-grained silt particles, clay particles, and colloids cannot be resolved. Samples used in this investigation came from the R-8 unit in the upper part of the Green River shale, which is organic rich, varved, lacustrine marl formed in Eocene Lake Uinta, USA. One Green River shale sample was heated in situ up to 400 degrees C as X-ray-tomography images were recorded. The other samples were scanned before and after heating at 400 degrees C. During the heating phase, the organic matter was decomposed, and gas was released. Gas expulsion from the low-permeability shales was coupled with formation of microcracks. The main technical difficulty was numerical extraction of microcracks that have apertures in the 5- to 30-um range (with 5 um being the resolution limit) from a large 3D volume of X-ray attenuation data. The main goal of the work presented here is to develop a methodology to process these 3D data and image the cracks. This methodology is based on several levels of spatial filtering and automatic recognition of connected domains. Supportive petrographic and thermogravimetric data were an important complement to this study. An investigation of the strain field using 2D image correlation analyses was also performed. As one application of the 4D (space + time) microtomography and the developed workflow, we show that fluid generation was accompanied by crack formation. Under different conditions, in the subsurface, this might provide paths for primary migration.

Hamed Panahi; Paul Meakin; Francois Renard; Maya Kobchenko; Julien Scheibert; Adriano Mazzini; Bjorn Jamtveit; Anders Malthe-Sorenssen; Dag Kristian Dysthe

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

ROS signaling, oxidative stress and Nrf2 in pancreatic beta-cell function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review focuses on the emerging evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from glucose metabolism, such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, act as metabolic signaling molecules for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic beta-cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential inhibitory role of endogenous antioxidants, which rise in response to oxidative stress, in glucose-triggered ROS and GSIS. We propose that cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress challenge, such as nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant induction, plays paradoxical roles in pancreatic beta-cell function. On the one hand, induction of antioxidant enzymes protects beta-cells from oxidative damage and possible cell death, thus minimizing oxidative damage-related impairment of insulin secretion. On the other hand, the induction of antioxidant enzymes by Nrf2 activation blunts glucose-triggered ROS signaling, thus resulting in reduced GSIS. These two premises are potentially relevant to impairment of beta-cells occurring in the late and early stage of Type 2 diabetes, respectively. In addition, we summarized our recent findings that persistent oxidative stress due to absence of uncoupling protein 2 activates cellular adaptive response which is associated with impaired pancreatic beta-cell function.

Pi Jingbo, E-mail: jpi@thehamner.or [Division of Translational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Zhang Qiang [Division of Computational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Fu Jingqi [Division of Translational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, 110001 (China); Woods, Courtney G. [Division of Computational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences Incorporated, Annandale, NJ 08801 (United States); Hou Yongyong [Division of Translational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, 110001 (China); Corkey, Barbara E. [Obesity Research Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Collins, Sheila [Division of Translational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Andersen, Melvin E. [Division of Computational Biology, Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hydrogen diffusion and chemistry during the annealing-induced generation of mobile protons in the oxide layer of Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si capacitors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a number of recent studies the generation of mobile protons in the buried oxide of SOI materials and in thermal oxide buried underneath a poly-Si layer has been discussed. The protons are found to be stable and can be easily rearranged by applying an electric field. The details of the hydrogen reactions leading to the generation of the mobile H{sup +} are still under investigation. In a recent work a dynamic equilibrium model was presented. The forward reaction dominates above {approximately} 500 C and the resulting H{sup +} is mobile and entrapped inside the SiO{sub 2}. The electron is donated to the Si. The H{sup 0} is likely to be formed through H{sub 2} + K {Leftrightarrow} HK + H{sup 0}, where K is a cracking site. In the same work it was shown that the reactive hydrogen species enter the oxide from the device edges. Hence, the amount of the reactive species reaching the oxide by diffusion through the Si overlayer is negligible. These results seem to contradict earlier studies where it is shown that hydrogen can easily diffuse through the top Si layer under the given experimental conditions. The authors present here new details on hydrogen diffusion and chemistry during the protonation anneal that may offer an explanation for the hydrogen diffusion paradox. The new findings suggest that reactions at the ambient/SiO{sub 2} interface play a key role.

Vanhuesden, K. [Air Force Research Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States). Space Electronics and Protection Branch; Devine, R.A.B. [France Telecom/CNET, Meylan (France); Fleetwood, D.M.; Warren, W.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Connection Between Inertial Forces and the Vector Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The inertia property of matter is discussed in terms of a type of induction law related to the extended charged particle's own vector potential. Our approach is based on the Lagrangian formalism of canonical momentum writing Newton's second law in terms of the vector potential and a development in terms of obtaining retarded potentials, that allow an intuitive physical interpretation of its main terms. This framework provides a clear physical insight on the physics of inertia. It is shown that the electron mass has a complete electromagnetic origin and the covariant equation obtained solves the "4/3 mass paradox". This provides a deeper insight into the significance of the main terms of the equation of motion. In particular a force term is obtained from the approach based on the continuity equation for momentum that represents a drag force the charged particle feels when in motion relatively to its own vector potential field lines. Thus, the time derivative of the particle's vector potential leads to the acceleration inertia reaction force and is equivalent to the Schott term responsible for the source of the radiation field. We also show that the velocity dependent term of the particle's vector potential is connected with the relativistic increase of mass with velocity and generates a stress force that is the source of electric field lines deformation. This understanding broadens the possibility to manipulate inertial mass and potentially suggests some mechanisms for possible applications to electromagnetic propulsion and the development of advanced space propulsion physics.

Alexandre A. Martins; Mario J. Pinheiro

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

443

Coordinated studies in support of hydraulic fracturing of coalbed methane. Annual report, January 1993-April 1994  

SciTech Connect

The production of natural gas from coal typically requires stimulation in the form of hydraulic fracturing and, more recently, cavity completions. The results of hydraulic fracturing treatments have ranged from extremely successful to less than satisfactory. The purpose of this work is to characterize common and potential fracturing fluids in terms of coal-fluid interactions to identify reasons for less than satisfactory performance and to ultimately devise alternative fluids and treatment procedures to optimize production following hydraulic fracturing. The laboratory data reported herein has proven helpful in designing improved hydraulic fracturing treatments and remedial treatments in the Black Warrior Basin. Acid inhibitors, scale inhibitors, additives to improve coal relative permeability to gas, and non-damaging polymer systems for hydraulic fracturing have been screened in coal damage tests. The optimum conditions for creating field-like foams in the laboratory have been explored. Tests have been run to identify minimum polymer and surfactant concentrations for applications of foam in coal. The roll of 100 mesh sand in controlling leakoff and impairing conductivity in coal has been investigated. The leakoff and proppant transport of fluids with breaker has been investigated and recommendations have been made for breaker application to minimize damage potential in coal. A data base called COAL`S has been created in Paradox (trademark) for Windows to catalogue coalbed methane activities in the Black Warrior and San Juan Basins.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATION FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DE-FE0001116 DE-FE0001116 Planetary Emissions Management, Inc. FE Sequestration 2009 Bruce W. Lani December 1,2009-November 30,2013 NEAR-SURFACE LEAKAGE MONITORING FOR THE VERIFICATION AND ACCOUNTING OF GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION USING A FIELD READY 14C ISOTOPIC ANALYZER Design, construction, and field evaluation of 14C gas analyzers that detect CO2 from the combustion of fossil fuels for sequestration leak studies. Paradox Basin is field evaluation site. Bruce W. Lani Digitally signed by Bruce W. Lani DN: cn=Bruce W. Lani, o=USDOE-NETL, ou=Sequestration Division, email=lani@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2009.12.01 15:00:22 -05'00' 12 01 2009 Mark Lusk Digitally signed by Mark Lusk DN: cn=Mark Lusk, o=NETL-DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=mark.lusk@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.01.04 10:00:02 -05'00'

445

Policy Responses to the New Offshoring: Think Globally, Invest Locally  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for help with completing this paper. 1 When asked to provide a framework piece on offshoring, I decided it would be much easier to have the work done by an Indian consulting firm. A quick bit of research turned up a perfect partner in Infiniti Research. Not surprisingly, the company has a London-based front end it is a fact of the industry that many customers prefer to work through a Western intermediary. From their brochure, Infiniti quotes the job at $63,000, no GST. Thats about ten times less than a Canadian management consulting firm would charge, but still too rich for my academic salary. So you are stuck with me. The experience taught me two things. First, you can outsource just about anything, from which I conclude that all of our jobs are threatened. Second, the big money in outsourcing goes to the business analysts who help OECD customers communicate their needs to business process outsourcers in low-cost countries. I conclude from this that off-shoring brings remarkable opportunities to us all. Therein lies the paradox of offshoring: it is both a threat and an opportunity.

Daniel Trefler

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Unfurling of the band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) domain of the merlin tumor suppressor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The merlin-1 tumor suppressor is encoded by the Neurofibromatosis-2 (Nf2) gene and loss-of-function Nf2 mutations lead to nervous system tumors in man and to several tumor types in mice. Merlin is an ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family cytoskeletal protein that interacts with other ERM proteins and with components of cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs). Merlin stabilizes the links of AJs to the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, its loss destabilizes AJs, promoting cell migration and invasion, which in Nf2{sup +/-} mice leads to highly metastatic tumors. Paradoxically, the 'closed' conformation of merlin-1, where its N-terminal four-point-one, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) domain binds to its C-terminal tail domain, directs its tumor suppressor functions. Here we report the crystal structure of the human merlin-1 head domain when crystallized in the presence of its tail domain. Remarkably, unlike other ERM head-tail interactions, this structure suggests that binding of the tail provokes dimerization and dynamic movement and unfurling of the F2 motif of the FERM domain. We conclude the 'closed' tumor suppressor conformer of merlin-1 is in fact an 'open' dimer whose functions are disabled by Nf2 mutations that disrupt this architecture.

Yogesha, S.D.; Sharff, Andrew J.; Giovannini, Marco; Bricogne, Gerard; Izard, Tina (House Ear); (Globel Phasing); (Scripps)

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

447

Carbon Sequestration Atlas and Interactive Maps from the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In November of 2002, DOE announced a global climate change initiative involving joint government-industry partnerships working together to find sensible, low cost solutions for reducing GHG emissions. As a result, seven regional partnerships were formed; the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) is one of those. These groups are utilizing their expertise to assess sequestration technologies to capture carbon emissions, identify and evaluate appropriate storage locations, and engage a variety of stakeholders in order to increase awareness of carbon sequestration. Stakeholders in this project are made up of private industry, NGOs, the general public, and government entities. There are a total of 44 current organizations represented in the partnership including electric utilities, oil and gas companies, state governments, universities, NGOs, and tribal nations. The SWP is coordinated by New Mexico Tech and encompasses New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, Utah, and portions of Kansas, Nevada, Texas, and Wyoming. Field test sites for the region are located in New Mexico (San Juan Basin), Utah (Paradox Basin), and Texas (Permian Basin).[Taken from the SWP C02 Sequestration Atlas] The SWP makes available at this website their CO2 Sequestration Atlas and an interactive data map.

McPherson, Brian

448

A Review on Fish Swimming and Bird/Insect Flight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This expository review is devoted to fish swimming and bird/insect flight. (i) The simple waving motion of an elongated flexible ribbon plate of constant width, immersed in a fluid at rest, propagating a wave distally down the plate to swim forward is first considered to provide a fundamental concept on energy conservation. It is generalized to include variations in body width and thickness, vortex shedding from appended dorsal, ventral and caudal fins to closely simulate fish swimming for which a nonlinear theory is presented for large-amplitude propulsion. (ii) For bird flight, the pioneering studies on oscillating rigid wings are briefed, followed by presenting a nonlinear unsteady theory for flexible wing with arbitrary variations in shape and trajectory with a comparative study with experiments. (iii) For insect flight, more recent advances are reviewed under aerodynamic theory and modeling, computational methods, and experiments, on forward and hovering flights with producing leading-edge vortex to give unsteady high lift. (iv) Prospects are explored on extracting intrinsic flow energy by fish and bird to gain thrust for propulsion. (v) The mechanical and biological principles are drawn together for unified studies on the energetics in deriving metabolic power for animal locomotion, leading to a surprising discovery that the hydrodynamic viscous drag on swimming fish is largely associated with laminar boundary layers, thus drawing valid and sound evidences for a resolution to the fish-swim paradox proclaimed by Gray (1936, 1968).

Theodore Yaotsu Wu

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

449

Monitoring Fish Contaminant Responses to Abatement Actions: Factors that Affect Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring of contaminant accumulation in fish has been conducted in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee since 1985. Bioaccumulation trends are examined over a twenty year period coinciding with major pollution abatement actions by a Department of Energy facility at the stream s headwaters. Although EFPC is enriched in many contaminants relative to other local streams, only polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury (Hg) were found to accumulate in the edible portions of fish to levels of human health concern. Mercury concentrations in redbreast sunfish were found to vary with season of collection, sex and size of individual fish. Over the course of the monitoring, waterborne Hg concentrations were reduced[80%; however, this did not translate into a comparable decrease in Hg bioaccumulation at most sites. Mercury bioaccumulation in fish did respond to decreased inputs in the industrialized headwater reach, but paradoxically increased in the lowermost reach of EFPC. As a result, the downstream pattern of Hg concentration in fish changed from one resembling dilution of a headwater point source in the 1980s to a uniform distribution in the 2000s. The reason for this remains unknown, but is hypothesized to involve changes in the chemical form and reactivity of waterborne Hg associated with the removal of residual chlorine and the addition of suspended particulates to the streamflow. PCB concentrations in fish varied greatly from year-to-year, but always exhibited a pronounced downstream decrease, and appeared to respond to management practices that limited episodic inputs from legacy sources within the facility.

Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Abrams Primary School passive solar system, Bessemer Board of Education, Bessemer, Alabama. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The general economic feasibility of the project was poor. Without federal assistance the solar enhancements would never have been considered economically feasible. The most optimistic payback time ranged up to 30 years or more. The construction was not any more difficult than a conventional building. Operation of the building is not affected by the solar enhancements insofar as any human participation is concerned: it is completely passive in response to the owner's original program criteria. Natural daylighting would be the feature the architect would recommend most to other designers. The advantages are obvious to anyone who sees the building, whereas the effect of passive heat storage and rejection systems is too esoteric and not directly discernible to the layman observer. The architect would design another passive commercial building without federal assistance provided the owner was willing to pay for the extra design effort and greater cost of construction. Federal participation created a paradox: funding was crucial to the realization of the project, but the cost of design was increased substantially by the level of detail required in reporting. The architect realizes very well the need for such detail in a publicly funded project but he doesn't think he would be inclined to participate in such a program in the future.

McWilliams, R.S.

1984-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

451

Observation of Two-source Interference in the Photoproduction Reaction AuAu --> AuAu rho 0  

SciTech Connect

In ultra-peripheral relativistic heavy-ion collisions, a photon from the electromagnetic field of one nucleus can fluctuate to a quark-antiquark pair and scatter from the other nucleus, emerging as a {rho}{sup 0}. The {rho}{sup 0} production occurs in two well-separated (median impact parameters of 20 and 40 fermi for the cases considered here) nuclei, so the system forms a 2-source interferometer. At low transverse momenta, the two amplitudes interfere destructively, suppressing {rho}{sup 0} production. Since the {rho}{sup 0} decays before the production amplitudes from the two sources can overlap, the two-pion system can only be described with an entangled non-local wave function, and is thus an example of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox. We observe this suppression in 200 GeV per nucleon-pair gold-gold collisions. The interference is 87% {+-} 5%(stat.) {+-} 8% (syst.) of the expected level. This translates into a limit on decoherence due to wave function collapse or other factors, of 23% at the 90% confidence level.

STAR Coll

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

452

Analysis of porosity in lower Ismay phylloid algal packstone using high-resolution computed x-ray tomography  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional images of porosity were created using high- resolution computed tomographic (CT) analysis as part of a larger study of phylloid algal packstone from bioherms in the lower Ismay (Des Moinesian, Paradox Formation). The sample imaged was collected at Eight Foot Rapids along the San Juan River in southeastern Utah 40 km west of the Aneth field. The larger study includes analysis of lithofacies, diagenesis, and quantitative analysis of porosity. Our goal is to predictively model porosity in phylloid algal reservoirs. Field observations suggest a relationship between porosity and lithology. Porosity is best established in phylloid algal packstone such as the one chosen for three-dimensional imaging. Locally, porosity is also associated with fractures and stylolitization. Petrographic observations suggest that formation of moldic and vuggy porosity in this sample was controlled by multiple episodes of dissolution and infill of blocky calcite. Porosity in thin section (5.94%) was measured using NIH Image (public domain) on a Macintosh desktop computer. High-resolution CT radiography of a 2.3 cm diameters cm high, cylindrical sample generated a series of 110 images at 0.1 mm intervals. Three-dimensional isosurface images of porosity reveal the degree of interconnection, pore size (up to 12 mm long and from 0.5 mm to 7 mm wide), and their highly irregular shape. These images can also be used to create animations of scans through the rock and three-dimensional, rotating images of the pores.

Beall, J.L., Gordon, I.T.; Gournay, J.P. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

What is wrong in the current models of tunneling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we show that the conventional quantum-mechanical model of a non-resonant tunneling, as a subprocess of a one-dimensional completed scattering (OCS), is non-complete. It does not allow tracing the tunneling dynamics at all stages of scattering, what makes it impossible to resolve the tunneling time problem without coming into conflict with the (macro-)causality principle. As is shown, all timekeeping procedures to underlie the tunneling-time concepts and experiments presented in the tunneling time literature (TTL) fill this gap in the current description of the tunneling dynamics by 'self-evident' assumptions which are erroneous on closer inspection. We present the alternative model of the OCS, which allows tracing the tunneling dynamics at all stages of scattering and, as a consequence, is free from those paradoxes that flood the current TTL. By this model, among two fundamental velocity concepts of the wave dynamics -- the flow velocity and the group one -- only the former can be used to determine the velocity of tunneling particles in the barrier region.

Nikolay Chuprikov

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

454

Pure States, Mixed States and Hawking Problem in Generalized Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is the continuation of a study into the information paradox problem started by the author in his earlier works. As previously, the key instrument is a deformed density matrix in quantum mechanics of the early universe. It is assumed that the latter represents quantum mechanics with fundamental length. It is demonstrated that the obtained results agree well with the canonical viewpoint that in the processes involving black holes pure states go to the mixed ones in the assumption that all measurements are performed by the observer in a well-known quantum mechanics. Also it is shown that high entropy for Planck remnants of black holes appearing in the assumption of the Generalized Uncertainty Relations may be explained within the scope of the density matrix entropy introduced by the author previously. It is noted that the suggested paradigm is consistent with the Holographic Principle. Because of this, a conjecture is made about the possibility for obtaining the Generalized Uncertainty Relations from the covariant entropy bound at high energies in the same way as R. Bousso has derived Heisenberg uncertainty principle for the flat space.

A. E. Shalyt-Margolin

2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

455

New quantum gravity effect, dark energy, accelerating universe, black hole and experimental scheme using superfluid Helium and atom interferometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable attention has been focused on Verlinde's recent work, claiming that Newton's gravity is not a fundamental force. In a recent work (arXiv:1012.5858), we give further the logic basis and basic clues to derive the Newton's gravity, inertia law and Einstein's weak equivalence principle. In this work, we show that if the gravity is not a fundamental force, in special case, it could be repulsive when quantum wavepacket effect is considered. This quantum gravity effect leads to several physical effects: (1) It is consistent with the universe with accelerating expansion, if the gravity and quantum effect of the fluctuating 'vacuum' (dark energy) is considered. The role of the cosmological constant is naturally interpreted when the gravity and quantum effect of the whole 'vacuum' background is considered. (2) It leads to new idea about black hole information paradox, no-hair theorem and Hawking radiation. (3) With a sphere full of superfluid Helium, we propose a feasible experimental scheme to test our idea with an atom interferometer placed in the sphere. Our calculations show that the accuracy Delta g/g below 10^(-8) could be used to test our idea, which satisfies the present experimental technique of atom interferometer.

Hongwei Xiong

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

456

Micropillar compression technique applied to micron-scale mudstone elasto-plastic deformation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mudstone mechanical testing is often limited by poor core recovery and sample size, preservation and preparation issues, which can lead to sampling bias, damage, and time-dependent effects. A micropillar compression technique, originally developed by Uchic et al. 2004, here is applied to elasto-plastic deformation of small volumes of mudstone, in the range of cubic microns. This study examines behavior of the Gothic shale, the basal unit of the Ismay zone of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and potential shale gas play in southeastern Utah, USA. Precision manufacture of micropillars 5 microns in diameter and 10 microns in length are prepared using an ion-milling method. Characterization of samples is carried out using: dual focused ion - scanning electron beam imaging of nano-scaled pores and distribution of matrix clay and quartz, as well as pore-filling organics; laser scanning confocal (LSCM) 3D imaging of natural fractures; and gas permeability, among other techniques. Compression testing of micropillars under load control is performed using two different nanoindenter techniques. Deformation of 0.5 cm in diameter by 1 cm in length cores is carried out and visualized by a microscope loading stage and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Axisymmetric multistage compression testing and multi-stress path testing is carried out using 2.54 cm plugs. Discussion of results addresses size of representative elementary volumes applicable to continuum-scale mudstone deformation, anisotropy, and size-scale plasticity effects. Other issues include fabrication-induced damage, alignment, and influence of substrate.

Michael, Joseph Richard; Chidsey, Thomas (Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT); Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Boyce, Brad Lee; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

overview of Mathematical Models of Collective Dynamics in Biology and Evolution (University of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indeed, when? Solution to this apparent paradox is amazingly simple, provided we do not interpret the problem straightforwardly. Take one female and one male individual of any animal species, keep them together for a sufficiently long time, feed them properly and then after a while you will normally get more than two of them. Otherwise, keep them far away from each other or do not feed them well enough and you will obtain zero at the end. The above example may look somewhat like an anecdote but it is, in fact, quite serious. As a matter of fact, it grasps the essence of the population dynamics and very much that of collective dynamics in general: once the interaction between subsystems becomes strong enough, a new entity may emerge. It emphasizes the importance of different temporal and spatial scales and also stresses the principal difference between the dynamics of closed and open systems. Once the system is open to influxes of mass, energy and information, one plus one is not necessarily two any more. Collective dynamicsunderstood as the dynamics arising from the interplay between the constituting elementary argents or parts of a more complex systemhas been one of the main paradigms of the natural sciences over the last several decades. Interactions between the argents are often non-linear and therefore it also greatly fertilized mathematical development, in particular, in the areas such as nonlinear

Alexander Gorban; Sergei Petrovskii

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Zero emission coal: a future source of clean electric power and hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pairing of two novel technologies may permit coal energy to satisfy a dramatically increasing world energy demand for the next few hundred years. This can be done while virtually eliminating not only airborne SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, mercury and particulate emissions, but also the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The Zero Emission Coal Alliance, a collaboration of approximately 20 international industrial and government entities is investigating these concepts with the objective of completing the first pilot plant within 5 years. Paradoxically, climate change was not the overriding consideration that drove the development of these inventions. The more important consideration was that, if world carbon use continues to accelerate at rates even close to those in the last century, carbon from fossil fuels will overwhelm the natural CO{sub 2} sinks. In this view, the 'Kyoto' objectives are almost meaningless and misdirect enormous resources - both human and financial. If a world population of 10 billion reaches a standard of living comaprable, on the average, to that of the US in 2000 (with similar carbon use), then world yearly CO{sub 2} emissions will be ten times their current level. Carbon (in the form of coal) is our most important energy resource. The Challenge is to find sustainable ways of using it.

Ziock, H. J. (Hans-Joachim)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Avalanching and Self Organised Criticality, a paradigm for geomagnetic activity?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characterization of global energy storage and release in the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere system remains one of the fundamental problems of space physics.Recently, it has been realised that a new paradigm in physics, that of Self Organised Criticality (SOC) may encapsulate the mixing and merging of flux on many scales in the magnetotail prompting bursty energy release and reconfiguration. SOC is consistent with qualitative measures such as power law power spectra and bursty bulk flows and with more quantitative tests such as power law burst distributions in auroral indices and auroral optical activity. Here, we present a careful classification of the broad range of systems that fall under the general description of "SOC". We argue that some, but not all, of these are consistent with our current understanding of the magnetosphere. We discuss the observed low dimensionality of the dynamic magnetosphere in terms of both SOC model properties, and observables. Observations of burst statistics are highlighted; we show that these are currently suggestive but not sufficient to confirm SOC and in particular we find that auroral indices are not effective at distinguishing the internal dynamics of the magnetosphere from that of the intermittent solar wind driver. This may also elucidate the paradox of predictability and complexity of the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere system.

Sandra Chapman; Nicholas Watkins

2000-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

460

EVIDENCE FOR A TRIAXIAL MILKY WAY DARK MATTER HALO FROM THE SAGITTARIUS STELLAR TIDAL STREAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the lengthy tidal streams produced by the destruction of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal (Sgr dSph) are capable of providing strong constraints on the shape of the Galactic gravitational potential. However, previous work, based on modeling different stream properties in axisymmetric Galactic models, has yielded conflicting results: while the angular precession of the Sgr leading arm is most consistent with a spherical or slightly oblate halo, the radial velocities of stars in this arm are reproduced only by prolate halo models. We demonstrate that this apparent paradox can be resolved by instead adopting a triaxial potential. Our new Galactic halo model, which simultaneously fits all well-established phase space constraints from the Sgr stream, provides the first conclusive evidence for, and tentative measurement of, triaxiality in an individual dark matter halo. The Milky Way halo within {approx}60 kpc is best characterized by a minor/major axis ratio of the isovelocity contours c/a {approx} 0.67, intermediate/major axis ratio b/a {approx} 0.83, and triaxiality parameter T {approx} 0.56. In this model, the minor axis of the dark halo is coincident with the Galactic X-axis connecting the Sun and the Galactic center to within {approx}15 deg., while the major axis also lies in the Galactic plane, approximately along the Galactic Y-axis.

Law, David R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-0818 (United States); Johnston, Kathryn V., E-mail: drlaw@astro.ucla.ed, E-mail: srm4n@virginia.ed, E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.ed [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2009-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

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461

International perceptions of US nuclear policy.  

SciTech Connect

The report presents a summary of international perceptions and beliefs about US nuclear policy, focusing on four countries--China, Iran, Pakistan and Germany--chosen because they span the spectrum of states with which the United States has relationships. A paradox is pointed out: that although the goal of US nuclear policy is to make the United States and its allies safer through a policy of deterrence, international perceptions of US nuclear policy may actually be making the US less safe by eroding its soft power and global leadership position. Broadly held perceptions include a pattern of US hypocrisy and double standards--one set for the US and its allies, and another set for all others. Importantly, the US nuclear posture is not seen in a vacuum, but as one piece of the United States behavior on the world stage. Because of this, the potential direct side effects of any negative international perceptions of US nuclear policy can be somewhat mitigated, dependent on other US policies and actions. The more indirect and long term relation of US nuclear policy to US international reputation and soft power, however, matters immensely to successful multilateral and proactive engagement on other pressing global issues.

Stanley, Elizabeth A. (Georgetown Universtiy, Washington, DC)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Towards the Modelling of the Second Solar Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the modelling issue of the linearly-polarized solar limb spectrum, which is due to scattering processes and it offers a rich diagnostic potential for exploring solar magnetic fields via the Hanle effect. However, this so-called second solar spectrum is full of mysterious spectral features, which cannot be understood with simplified polarization transfer theories, thus suggesting that the underlying scattering physics is more complex than previously thought. In this paper we argue that the physical understanding of the second solar spectrum requires the consideration of scattering processes in multilevel atomic models, taking fully into account the transfer of atomic polarization among all the levels involved. The consideration of lower-level atomic polarization leads to non-linear and non-local coupled sets of equations, even for the two-level model atom case considered in this paper. The unknowns of the problem are the irreducible tensor components of the atomic density matrix whose self-consistent values have first to be obtained to be able to calculate the emergent Stokes profiles. To solve numerically this non-LTE problem of the second kind we present some iterative methods that are very suitable for developing a general multilevel scattering polarization code. We demonstrate that there exists metastable-level atomic polarization in the solar chromosphere, which suggests that the solution to some recently-formulated "paradoxes" is to be found by carefully revising our current ideas about the chromospheric magnetic field.

J. Trujillo Bueno

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

463

Survey Evidence on the Willingness of U.S. Consumers to Pay for Automotive Fuel Economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prospect theory, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002, holds that human beings faced with a risky bet will tend to value potential losses about twice as much as potential gains. Previous research has demonstrated that prospect theory could be sufficient to explain an energy paradox in the market for automotive fuel economy. This paper analyzes data from four random sample surveys of 1,000 U.S. households each in 2004, 2011, 2012 and 2013. Households were asked about willingness to pay for future fuel savings as well as the annual fuel savings necessary to justify a given upfront payment. Payback periods inferred from household responses are consistent over time and across different formulations of questions. Mean calculated payback periods are short, about 3 years, but there is substantial dispersion among individual responses. Calculated payback periods do not appear to be correlated with the attributes of respondents. Respondents were able to quantitatively describe their uncertainty about both vehicle fuel economy and future fuel prices. Simulation of loss averse behavior based on this stated uncertainty illustrate how loss aversion could lead consumers to substantially undervalue future fuel savings relative to their expected value.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Evans, David H [Sewanee, The University of the South; Hiestand, John [Indiana University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

More Secrecy...More Knowledge Disclosure? On Disclosure Outside of Patents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is an important concern that innovators by waiving their patent rights might obstruct the disclosure of knowledge and therefore retard progress. This paper explores this concern by using a simple model of two innovators who must decide sequentially whether to protect an innovation with limited patent rights. Two features are crucial to the disclosure decision. First: the second inventor may use his valid patent right to exclude the rst inventor from using a secret invention. Second: when waiving her patent right, the rst inventor may disclose her knowledge outside of a patent. Disclosure informs the Patent O ce and courts that related inventions from later inventors may lack novelty and hence should not be protected by valid patent rights. This paper shows that when the rst inventor chooses not to patent the innovation, the amount of disclosure is related to the intellectual property choices in a paradoxical way: the amount of disclosure will be large (small) when the second inventor chooses secrecy (patenting) to protect the innovation too.

Carlos J. Ponce Y

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z