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1

This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or Impediments to their Development: The ParadoxSan Juan, Uinta Piceance, Greater Green River, and Powder River Basins and the Montana Thrust Belt. Prepared by the...

2

Appendix A: Handling of Federal  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

or Impediments to their Development: The ParadoxSan Juan, Uinta Piceance, Greater Green River, and Powder River Basins and the Montana Thrust Belt. Prepared by the...

3

Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

05671_UintaWaterStudy | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5152012 DE-NT0005671 Goal The goal of...

5

Coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As predicted, from an evolving coalbed methane producibility model, prolific coalbed methane production is precluded in the Piceance Basin by the absence of coal bed reservoir continuity and dynamic ground-water flow. The best potential for production may lie at the transition zone from hydropressure to hydrocarbon overpressure and/or in conventional traps basinward of where outcrop and subsurface coals are in good reservoir and hydraulic communication. Geologic and hydrologic synergy among tectonic and structural setting, depositional systems and coal distribution, coal rank, gas content, permeability and hydrodynamics are the controls that determine the coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin. Within the coal-bearing Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork Formation, the prime coalbed methane target, reservoir heterogeneity and thrust faults cause coal beds along the Grand Hogback and in the subsurface to be in modest to poor reservoir and hydraulic communication, restricting meteoric ground water recharge and basinward flow. Total subsurface coalbed methane resources are still estimated to be approximately 99 Tcf (3.09 Tm{sup 3}), although coalbed methane resource estimates range between 80 (2.49 Tm{sup 3}) and 136 Tcf (4.24 Tm{sup 3}), depending on the calculation method used. To explore for high gas contents or fully gas-saturated coals and consequent high productivity in the Piceance Basin, improved geologic and completion technologies including exploration and development for migrated conventionally and hydrodynamically trapped gases, in-situ generated secondary biogenic gases, and solution gases will be required.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

SEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a quarter of the proven natural gas reserves in the United States. Rulison Field, located in the PiceanceSEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO by Gerardo J-based rock physics to estimate the seismic anisotropy of the tight gas reservoir at Rulison Field. Seismic

7

Hydrotreating Uinta Basin bitumen-derived heavy oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy oils derived from Uinta Basin bitumens have been hydrotreated under varying conditions. The process variables investigated included total reactor pressure (11.0-16.9 MPa), reactor temperature (616-711 K), feed rate (0.29-1.38 WHSV), and catalyst composition. The extent of heteroatom removal and residuum conversion were determined by the feed molecular weight and catalyst selection. Catalytic activity for heteroatom conversion removal was primarily influenced by metal loading. The heteroatom removal activity of the catalysts studied were ranked HDN catalysts > HDM catalysts > HDN-support. Catalytic activity for residuum conversion was influenced by both metal loading and catalyst surface area. The residuum conversion activity of HDN catalysts were always higher than the activity of HDM catalysts and HDN supports. The residuum conversion activity of HDN-supports surpassed the activity of HDM catalyst at higher temperatures. The conversions achieved with HDN catalysts relative to the HDM catalysts indicated that the low metals contents of the Uinta Basin bitumens obviate the need for hydrodemetallation as an initial upgrading step with these bitumens. The upgrading of Uinta Basin bitumens for integration into refinery feed slates should emphasize molecular weight and boiling range reduction first, followed by hydrotreating of the total liquid product produced in the pyrolysis process. Kinetics of residuum conversion can be modeled by invoking a consecutive-parallel mechanism in which native residuum in the feed is rapidly converted to volatile products and to product residuum. Deep conversion of residuum is only achieved when the more refractory product residuum is converted to volatile products.

Longstaff, D.C.; Balaji, G.V.; Kim, J.W. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Uinta County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401 et seq. -Udhaya Energy Photovoltaics PActionUinta

9

Geologic and production characteristics of the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This study provides a critical comparison of the geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of existing Mesaverde gas producing areas within the basin to those same characteristics at the MWX site near Rifle, Colorado. As will be discussed, the basin has been partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Stimulation techniques have been reviewed for each partitioned area to determine the most effective stimulation technique currently used in the Mesaverde. This study emphasizes predominantly the southern Piceance Basin because of the much greater production and geologic data there. There may be Mesaverde gas production in northern areas but because of the lack of production and relatively few penetrations, the northern Piceance Basin was not included in the detailed parts of this study. 54 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

Myal, F.R.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Kukal, G.C.; Abadie, P.A.; Riecken, C.C.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Oil shale in the Piceance Basin: an analysis of land use issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to contribute to a framework for establishing policies to promote efficient use of the nation's oil shale resources. A methodology was developed to explain the effects of federal leasing policies on resource recovery, extraction costs, and development times associated with oil shale surface mines. This report investigates the effects of lease size, industrial development patterns, waste disposal policies, and lease boundaries on the potential of Piceance Basin oil shale resource. This approach should aid in understanding the relationship between federal leasing policies and requirements for developing Piceance Basin oil shale. 16 refs., 46 figs. (DMC)

Rubenson, D.; Pei, R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c:es .B~l:JJ:. }eti. ',~, Colorado School of Mines, VoL 2'1,v Piceance Creek Basin v Colorado r and 9 p' 1974. Pc:u:~·tBetween 'che White and Colorado Rivers, '! \\lo:ci:hwegt:ern

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Depositional environment of lower Green River Formation sandstones (Eocene), Red Wash field (Uinta Basin), Uintah County, Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DFPOSITIONAL FNVIRONMENT OF LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION SANDSTONES (EOCENE), RED WASH FIELD (UINTA BASIN), UINTAH COUNTY, UTAH A Thesis by ANTHONY SCOTT MCCLAIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Geology OPPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF LOWFR BPEEN RIVER FORMATION SANDSTONES (EOCFNE. ), RED WASH FIELD (UINTA BASIN), UINTAH COUNTY, UTAH A Thesis by ANTHONY SCOTT MCCLAIN Approved...

McClain, Anthony Scott

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Play analysis and stratigraphic position of Uinta Basin tertiary - age oil and gas fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tertiary-age sediments in the Uinta basin produce hydrocarbons from five types of plays. These play types were determined by hydrocarbon type, formation, depositional environment, rock type, porosity, permeability, source, and per-well recovery. Each well was reviewed to determine the stratigraphic position and producing characteristics of each producing interval. The five types of plays are as follows: (1) naturally fractured oil reservoirs, (2) low-permeability oil reservoirs, (3) high-permeability of oil reservoirs, (4) low-permeability gas reservoirs, and (5) tight gas sands. Several fields produce from multiple plays, which made it necessary to segregate the hydrocarbon production into several plays. The stratigraphic position of the main producing intervals is shown on a basin-wide cross section, which is color-coded by play type. This 61-well cross section has several wells from each significant Tertiary oil and gas field in the Uinta basin.

Williams, R.A. (Pennzoil Exploration and Production Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Reservoir Characterization of the Lower Green River Formation, Southwest Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were to increase both primary and secondary hydrocarbon recovery through improved characterization (at the regional, unit, interwell, well, and microscopic scale) of fluvial-deltaic lacustrine reservoirs, thereby preventing premature abandonment of producing wells. The study will encourage exploration and establishment of additional water-flood units throughout the southwest region of the Uinta Basin, and other areas with production from fluvial-deltaic reservoirs.

Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; McClure, Kevin P.; Bereskin, S. Robert; Deo, Milind D.

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

15

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil shales of the Green River Formation, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, and the Uinta Basin, Utah- a preliminary report, Chemical Geology,

Fox, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

OIL SHALE RESEARCH. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Shales of the Green River Formation, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, and the Uinta Basin, Utah--A Preliminary Report," Chemical Geology,

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Shales of the Green River Formation, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, and the Uinta Basin, Utah--A Preliminary Report," Chemical Geology,

Cairns, E.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF LEACHATES FROM AN IN SITU OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Shale of the Green River FonThction, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, and the Uinta Basin, Utah - A Prelirninary Report, Chemical Geology,

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Shales of the Green River Formation, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, and the Uinta Basin, Utah—A Preliminary Report," Chemical Geology,

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The quercetin paradox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Free radical scavenging antioxidants, such as quercetin, are chemically converted into oxidation products when they protect against free radicals. The main oxidation product of quercetin, however, displays a high reactivity towards thiols, which can lead to the loss of protein function. The quercetin paradox is that in the process of offering protection, quercetin is converted into a potential toxic product. In the present study, this paradox is evaluated using rat lung epithelial (RLE) cells. It was found that quercetin efficiently protects against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced DNA damage in RLE cells, but this damage is swapped for a reduction in GSH level, an increase in LDH leakage as well as an increase of the cytosolic free calcium concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first study that indicates that the quercetin paradox, i.e. the exchange of damage caused by quercetin and its metabolites, also occurs in living lung cells. Following depletion of GSH in the cells by BSO pre-treatment, this quercetin paradox becomes more pronounced, confirming that the formation of thiol reactive quercetin metabolites is involved in the quercetin paradox. The quercetin paradox in living cells implies that the anti-oxidant directs oxidative damage selectively to thiol arylation. Apparently, the potential toxicity of metabolites formed during the actual antioxidant activity of free radical scavengers should be considered in antioxidant supplementation.

Boots, Agnes W. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: a.boots@farmaco.unimaas.nl; Li, Hui [Institut fuer Umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF), Heinrich-Heine Universitaet Duesseldorf, Auf 'm Hennekamp 50, 40255 Duesseldorf (Germany); Schins, Roel P.F. [Institut fuer Umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF), Heinrich-Heine Universitaet Duesseldorf, Auf 'm Hennekamp 50, 40255 Duesseldorf (Germany); Duffin, Rodger [Institut fuer Umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF), Heinrich-Heine Universitaet Duesseldorf, Auf 'm Hennekamp 50, 40255 Duesseldorf (Germany); Heemskerk, Johan W.M. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Maastricht, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Bast, Aalt [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Haenen, Guido R.M.M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Types of Paradox in Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paradoxes are a relatively frequent occurrence in physics. The nature of their genesis is diverse and they are found in all branches of physics. There are a number of general and special classifications of paradoxes, but there are no classifications of paradoxes in physics. Nowadays, physics is a fundamental and rather formalized science, the paradoxes of which imply falsity and imprecision. One of the basic methods of addressing a problem is to present classifications that facilitate its formulation and study. This work groups together the paradoxes in physics according to certain common characteristics, which should assist in explaining the causes for paradox formation.

Dragoljub A. Cucic

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modeling of gas generation from the Cameo coal zone in the Piceance Basin Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas generative potential of the Cretaceous Cameo coal in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado, was evaluated quantitatively by sealed gold tube pyrolysis. The H/C and O/C elemental ratios show that pyrolyzed Cameo coal samples follow the Van Krevelen humic coal evolution pathway, reasonably simulating natural coal maturation. Kinetic parameters (activation energy and frequency factor) for gas generation and vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) changes were calculated from pyrolysis data. Experimental R{sub o} results from this study are not adequately predicted by published R{sub o} kinetics and indicate the necessity of deriving basin-specific kinetic parameters when building predictive basin models. Using derived kinetics for R{sub o}, evolution and gas generation, basin modeling was completed for 57 wells across the Piceance Basin, which enabled the mapping of coal-rank and coalbed gas potential. Quantities of methane generated at approximately 1.2% R{sub o} are about 300 standard cubic feet per ton (scf/ton) and more than 2500 scf/ton (in-situ dry-ash-free coal) at R{sub o}, values reaching 1.9%. Gases generated in both low- and high-maturity coals are less wet, whereas the wetter gas is expected where R{sub o} is approximately 1.4-1.5%. As controlled by regional coal rank and net coal thickness, the largest in-place coalbed gas resources are located in the central part of the basin, where predicted volumes exceed 150 bcf/mi, excluding gases in tight sands.

Zhang, E.; Hill, R.J.; Katz, B.J.; Tang, Y.C. [Shell Exploration and Production Co., BTC, Houston, TX (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Characterization and interwell connectivity evaluation of Green Rver reservoirs, Wells Draw study area, Uinta Basin, Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and seal rocks of the Green River petroleum system. Datum is Mahoganey oil shale bed (1). 49 27 Fig. 11?Cross-section of thermal maturity of oil accumulations in the Green River petroleum system. 49 28 Fig. 12? Lake Uinta depositional... This petroleum system has produced more than 450 MMBO mainly from two formations, the Green River and Colton Formations. 7 The Green River Formation contains the source rock and most of the reservoir and seal rocks (Fig. 10). 49 Most of the kerogen-rich oil...

Abiazie, Joseph Uchechukwu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION, SOUTHWEST UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anastamosing, low gradient distributary channels produce {approx}30 gravity, paraffinic oils from the Middle Member of the lacustrine Eocene Green River Formation in the south-central portion of the Uinta Basin. This localized depocenter was situated along the fluctuating southern shoreline of Lake Uinta, where complex deposits of marginal-lacustrine to lower delta plain accumulations are especially characteristic. The Middle Member contains several fining-upward parasequences that can be recognized in outcrop, core, and downhole logs. Each parasequence is about 60 to 120 feet thick and consists of strata deposited during multiple lake level fluctuations that approach 30 to 35 feet in individual thickness. Such parasequences represent 300,000-year cycles based on limited absolute age dating. The subaerial to subaqueous channels commonly possess an erosional base and exhibit a fining upward character. Accordingly, bedding features commonly range from large-scale trough and planar cross bedding or lamination at the base, to a nonreservoir, climbing ripple assemblage near the uppermost reservoir boundary. The best reservoir quality occurs within the laminated to cross-stratified portions, and the climbing ripple phase usually possesses more deleterious micas and/or detrital clays. Diagenesis also exerts a major control on reservoir quality. Certain sandstones were cemented by an early, iron-poor calcite cement, which can be subsequently leached. Secondary intergranular porosity (up to 20%) is largely responsible for the 10 -100 millidarcy rock, which represents petrophysical objectives for both primary and secondary production. Otherwise, intense compaction, silicic and iron-rich carbonate cements, and authigenic clays serve to reduce reservoir quality to marginal economic levels.

S. Robert Bereskin

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

27

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins. Topical report, January 1991-July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins was evaluated in the context of geologic and hydrologic characteristics identified in the San Juan Basin, the nation's leading coalbed methane producing basin. The major comparative criteria were (1) coalbed methane resources, (2) geologic and hydrologic factors that predict areas of high gas producibility and high coalbed reservoir permeability, and (3) coalbed thermal maturity. The technical criteria were expanded to include structure, depositional systems, and data base and then combined with economic criteria (production, industry activity, and pipeline availability) to evaluate the coalbed methane potential of the basins. The Greater Green River and Piceance Basins have primary potential to make a significant near-term contribution to the nation's gas supply. These basins have large gas resources, high-rank coals, high gas contents, and established coalbed methane production. The Greater Green River Basin has numerous coalbed methane targets, good coal-seam permeability, and extensive hydrologic areas favorable for production. The Powder River and Raton Basins were judged to have secondary potential. Coal beds in the Powder River Basin are thermally immature and produce large volumes of water; the Raton Basin has a poor data base and has no gas pipeline infrastructure. Low production and minimal industry activity further limit the near-term potential of the Raton Basin. However, if economic criteria are discounted and only major technical criteria are considered, the Greater Green River and Raton Basins are assigned primary potential. The Raton Basin's shallow, thermally mature coal beds of good permeability are attractive coalbed methane targets, but low coal-seam permeability limits the coalbed methane potential of the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Geologic and hydrologic controls critical to coalbed methane producibility and resource assessment: Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Northwest Colorado. Topical report, December 1, 1993-November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are: To further evaluate the interplay of geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane production and resource assessment; to refine and validate our basin-scale coalbed methane producibility model; and to analyze the economics of coalbed methane exploration and development in the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The four particles paradox in special relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a novel paradox in special relativity together with its solution. We call it the four particles paradox. The purpose of this paradox is pedagogical and therefore directed towards students and lecturers of physics. Even if most paradoxes in special relativity theory are very interrelated and some are special cases of others, the paradox we present here is original and illuminates on the very nice subject and the literature of special relativity.

J. Manuel Garcia-Islas

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

32

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Paradoxical Success of Fuzzy Logic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of litera- ture on the use of fuzzy logic in heuristic control and in expert systems, and on prac- ticalI The Paradoxical Success of Fuzzy Logic CharlesElkan, Universityof California,San Diego Fuzzy of fuzzy logic remain under attack. Taken together, these two facts constitute a paradox. A second para

Baltes, Jacky

35

Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 5: an investigation of dewatering for the modified in-situ retorting process, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The C-a and the C-b tracts in the Piceance Creek Basin are potential sites for the development of oil shale by the modified in-situ retorting (MIS) process. Proposed development plans for these tracts require the disturbance of over three billion m/sup 3/ of oil shale to a depth of about 400 m (1312 ft) or more below ground level. The study investigates the nature and impacts of dewatering and reinvasion that are likely to accompany the MIS process. The purpose is to extend earlier investigations through more refined mathematical analysis. Physical phenomena not adequately covered in previous studies, particularly the desaturation process, are investigated. The present study also seeks to identify, through a parametric approach, the key variables that are required to characterize systems such as those at the C-a and C-b tracts.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

EPR Paradox and Bell Inequalities 24.1 Bohm Version of the EPR Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 24 EPR Paradox and Bell Inequalities 24.1 Bohm Version of the EPR Paradox Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) were concerned with the following issue. Given two spatially separated quantum properties of B represented by noncommuting projectors can be measured indirectly in this manner, and EPR

Griffiths, Robert B.

38

Spin entanglement, decoherence and Bohm's EPR paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain criteria for entanglement and the EPR paradox for spin-entangled particles and analyse the effects of decoherence caused by absorption and state purity errors. For a two qubit photonic state, entanglement can occur for all transmission efficiencies. In this case, the state preparation purity must be above a threshold value. However, Bohm's spin EPR paradox can be achieved only above a critical level of loss. We calculate a required efficiency of 58%, which appears achievable with current quantum optical technologies. For a macroscopic number of particles prepared in a correlated state, spin entanglement and the EPR paradox can be demonstrated using our criteria for efficiencies {\\eta} > 1/3 and {\\eta} > 2/3 respectively. This indicates a surprising insensitivity to loss decoherence, in a macroscopic system of ultra-cold atoms or photons.

E. G. Cavalcanti; P. D. Drummond; H. A. Bachor; M. D. Reid

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Evidence Against Klein Paradox in Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is demonstrated that both transmission and reflection coefficients associated to the Klein paradox at a step barrier are positive and less than unity, so that the particle-antiparticle pair creation mechanism commonly linked to this phenomenon is not necessary. Because graphene is a solid-state testing ground for quantum electrodynamics phenomena involving massless Dirac fermions we suggest that the transport characteristic through a p-n graphene junction can decide between the results obtained in this paper and the common Klein paradox theory, which imply negative transmission and higher-than-unity reflection coefficients. Recent experimental evidence supports our findings.

Daniela Dragoman

2007-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

Paradoxical Signaling by a Secreted Molecule Leads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*Correspondence: nir.friedman@weizmann.ac.il http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2014.07.033 SUMMARY A widespread molecule can induce opposite effects in the responding cells. For example, the cytokine IL-2 can promote to the paradoxical effect of IL-2, which increases the proliferation rate cooperatively and the death rate linearly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The information paradox: A pedagogical introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The black hole information paradox is a very poorly understood problem. It is often believed that Hawking's argument is not precisely formulated, and a more careful accounting of naturally occurring quantum corrections will allow the radiation process to become unitary. We show that such is not the case, by proving that small corrections to the leading order Hawking computation cannot remove the entanglement between the radiation and the hole. We formulate Hawking's argument as a `theorem': assuming `traditional' physics at the horizon and usual assumptions of locality we will be forced into mixed states or remnants. We also argue that one cannot explain away the problem by invoking AdS/CFT duality. We conclude with recent results on the quantum physics of black holes which show the the interior of black holes have a `fuzzball' structure. This nontrivial structure of microstates resolves the information paradox, and gives a qualitative picture of how classical intuition can break down in black hole physics.

Samir D. Mathur

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

42

Quantum mechanics and the time travel paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The closed causal chains arising from backward time travel do not lead to paradoxes if they are self consistent. This raises the question as to how physics ensures that only self-consistent loops are possible. We show that, for one particular case at least, the condition of self consistency is ensured by the interference of quantum mechanical amplitudes associated with the loop. If this can be applied to all loops then we have a mechanism by which inconsistent loops eliminate themselves.

David T. Pegg

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

Russia in a European coat : the paradoxes of Peter Chaadaev.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??“What is Russia’s identity if it is not to follow the Western path?” Peter Chaadaev first posed this question. His paradoxical views of Russia led… (more)

Brandon, Kristina D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

COMPUTER IMPLICATION AND CURRY'S PARADOX WAYNE AITKEN, JEFFREY A. BARRETT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPUTER IMPLICATION AND CURRY'S PARADOX WAYNE AITKEN, JEFFREY A. BARRETT Abstract. There are theoretical limitations to what can be implemented by a computer program. In this paper we are concerned with a limitation on the strength of computer implemented deduction. We use a version of Curry's paradox to arrive

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

45

Notes on the firewall paradox, complexity, and quantum theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate what it means to apply the solution, proposed to the firewall paradox by Harlow and Hayden, to the famous quantum paradoxes of Sch\\"odinger's Cat and Wigner's Friend if ones views these as posing a thermodynamic decoding problem (as does Hawking radiation in the firewall paradox). The implications might point to a relevance of the firewall paradox for the axiomatic and set theoretic foundations underlying mathematics. We reconsider in this context the results of Benioff on the foundational challenges posed by the randomness postulate of quantum theory. A central point in our discussion is that one can mathematically not naturally distinguish between computational complexity (as central to the approach of Harlow and Hayden and further developed by Susskind) and proof theoretic complexity (since they represent the same concept on a Turing machine), with the latter being related to a finite bound on Kolmogorov entropy (due to Chaitin incompleteness).

Karl-Georg Schlesinger

2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Mpemba paradox: Hydrogen bond memory and water-skin supersolidity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical reproduction of measurements, experimental evidence for skin super-solidity and hydrogen-bond memory clarified that Mpemba paradox integrates the heat emission-conduction-dissipation dynamics in the source-path-drain cycle system.

Chang Q Sun

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

47

PERSPECTIVE Resolving the biodiversity paradox James S. Clark,1,2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDEA AND PERSPECTIVE Resolving the biodiversity paradox James S. Clark,1,2,3 * Mike Dietze,1 The paradox of biodiversity involves three elements, (i) mathematical models predict that species must differ-dimensional tradeoffs nor neutrality can resolve the biodiversity paradox, in part by showing that they do not properly

Agarwal, Pankaj K.

48

"Audacity or Precision": The Paradoxes of Henri Villat's Fluid Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 "Audacity or Precision": The Paradoxes of Henri Villat's Fluid Mechanics in Interwar France David researches on fluid mechanics. Most of his original work was done before the First Word War; it was highly on, he held the fluid mechanics chair established by the Air Ministry at the Sorbonne in Paris

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONSTRAINTS, AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAH’S UINTA BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. Chief among the challenges facing prospective unconventional fuel developers is the ability to access these resources. Access is heavily dependent upon land ownership and applicable management requirements. Understanding constraints on resource access and the prospect of consolidating resource holdings across a fragmented management landscape is critical to understanding the role Utah’s unconventional fuel resources may play in our nation’s energy policy. This Topical Report explains the historic roots of the “crazy quilt” of western land ownership, how current controversies over management of federal public land with wilderness character could impact access to unconventional fuels resources, and how land exchanges could improve management efficiency. Upon admission to the Union, the State of Utah received the right to title to more than one-ninth of all land within the newly formed state. This land is held in trust to support public schools and institutions, and is managed to generate revenue for trust beneficiaries. State trust lands are scattered across the state in mostly discontinuous 640-acre parcels, many of which are surrounded by federal land and too small to develop on their own. Where state trust lands are developable but surrounded by federal land, federal land management objectives can complicate state trust land development. The difficulty generating revenue from state trust lands can frustrate state and local government officials as well as citizens advocating for economic development. Likewise, the prospect of industrial development of inholdings within prized conservation landscapes creates management challenges for federal agencies. One major tension involves whether certain federal public lands possess wilderness character, and if so, whether management of those lands should emphasize wilderness values over other uses. On December 22, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Order’s implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics — whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 — are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utah’s Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those resources found in the southern part of the state. Management requirements independent of l

Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Correlation properties of entangled multiphoton states and Bernstein's paradox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A normally ordered characteristic function (NOCF) of Bose operators is calculated for a number of discrete-variable entangled states (Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) and Werner (W) qubit states and a cluster state). It is shown that such NOCFs contain visual information on two types of correlations: pseudoclassical and quantum correlations. The latter manifest themselves in the interference terms of the NOCFs and lead to quantum paradoxes, whereas the pseudoclassical correlations of photons and their cumulants satisfy the relations for classical random variables. Three- and four-qubit states are analyzed in detail. An implementation of an analog of Bernstein's paradox on discrete quantum variables is discussed. A measure of quantumness of an entangled state is introduced that is not related to the entropy approach. It is established that the maximum of the degree of quantumness substantiates the numerical values of the coefficients in multiqubit vector states derived from intuitive considerations.

Chirkin, A. S., E-mail: aschirkin@rambler.ru; Belyaeva, O. V., E-mail: lisenok.msu@gmail.com; Belinsky, A. V., E-mail: belinsky@inbox.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

1-D Dirac Equation, Klein Paradox and Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions of the one dimensional Dirac equation with piece-wise constant potentials are presented using standard methods. These solutions show that the Klein Paradox is non-existent and represents a failure to correctly match solutions across a step potential. Consequences of this exact solution are studied for the step potential and a square barrier. Characteristics of massless Dirac states and the momentum linear band energies for Graphene are shown to have quite different current and momentum properties.

S. P. Bowen

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

52

Western consciousness, absurdity, and rebellion: the influence of paradox in the early works of Albert Camus.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis explores the paradoxical nature of Albert Camus's ideas of Western consciousness, absurdity, and rebellion. Camus believes that as members of the Occident, we… (more)

Lanier, Clinton David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

BRAESS PARADOX IN DYNAMIC ROUTING FOR THE COHEN-KELLY Atsushi Inoie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BRAESS PARADOX IN DYNAMIC ROUTING FOR THE COHEN-KELLY NETWORK Atsushi Inoie Doctoral Program of dynamic routing in the Cohen-Kelly network is studied. Intuitively, we expect that adding capacity in which Cohen and Kelly discovered a paradox in static routing. We consider the dy- namic routing problems

Touati, Corinne

54

Paradoxical games, ratchets, and related phenomena Juan M.R. Parrondo Luis Dinis Javier Buceta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paradoxical games, ratchets, and related phenomena Juan M.R. Parrondo Luis Din´is Javier Buceta states in spatially extended systems [2, 3, 4]. Brownian ratchets show that noise can be rectified a Brownian ratchet. In fact, the paradox came up as a translation to gambling games of the flashing ratchet

Lindenberg, Katja

55

BARRY LOEWER AND MARVIN BELZER HELP FOR THE GOOD SAMARITAN PARADOX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BARRY LOEWER AND MARVIN BELZER HELP FOR THE GOOD SAMARITAN PARADOX (Received180~ober, t985 (the good Samaritan) ought to help Barbarella who has asked her to spare a dime. Now, Arabella someone. The paradoxical argument in SDL is this: Let Hx and Kx stand for "Arabella helps x" and "Arabella

Loewer, Barry

56

Beyond the Productivity Paradox: Computers are the Catalyst for Bigger Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beyond the Productivity Paradox: Computers are the Catalyst for Bigger Changes Forthcoming, The Wharton School lhitt@wharton.upenn.edu http://grace.wharton.upenn.edu/~lhitt/ #12;Beyond the Productivity Paradox Page 1 I. Why Should We Care About Productivity? An important question that has been debated

57

The double-slit and the EPR experiments: A paradox-free kinematic description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paradoxes of the double-slit and the EPR experiments with particles are shown to originate in the implicit assumption that the particles are always located in the classical space. It is demonstrated that there exists a natural substitute for this assumption that provides a method of resolving the paradoxes.

Alexey A. Kryukov

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

58

Monetary circulation, the paradox of profits, and the velocity of money1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monetary circulation, the paradox of profits, and the velocity of money1 Olivier ALLAIN Université of money is higher than one because some monetary units are used in several transactions of goods. Key words: paradox of profits, circulation, endogenous money, velocity of money, stock-flow consistent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

59

Black Hole Remnants and the Information Loss Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forty years after the discovery of Hawking radiation, its exact nature remains elusive. If Hawking radiation does not carry any information out from the ever shrinking black hole, it seems that unitarity is violated once the black hole completely evaporates. On the other hand, attempts to recover information via quantum entanglement lead to the firewall controversy. Amid the confusions, the possibility that black hole evaporation stops with a "remnant" has remained unpopular and is often dismissed due to some "undesired properties" of such an object. Nevertheless, as in any scientific debate, the pros and cons of any proposal must be carefully scrutinized. We fill in the void of the literature by providing a timely review of various types of black hole remnants, and provide some new thoughts regarding the challenges that black hole remnants face in the context of information loss paradox and its latest incarnation, namely the firewall controversy. The importance of understanding the role of curvature singularity is also emphasized, after all there remains a possibility that singularity cannot be cured even by quantum gravity. In this context a black hole remnant conveniently serves as a cosmic censor. We conclude that a remnant remains a possible end state of Hawking evaporation, and if it contains large interior geometry, may help to ameliorate information loss and the firewall paradox. We hope that this will raise some interests in the community to investigate remnants more critically but also more thoroughly.

Pisin Chen; Yen Chin Ong; Dong-han Yeom

2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Kolmogorov Complexity, String Information, Panspermia and the Fermi Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bit strings rather than byte files can be a mode of transmission both for intelligent signals and for travels of extraterrestrial life. Kolmogorov complexity, i.e. the minimal length of a binary coded string completely defining a system, can then, due to its universality, become a key concept in the strategy of the search of extraterrestrials. Evaluating, for illustration, the Kolmogorov complexity of the human genome, one comes to an unexpected conclusion that a low complexity compressed string - analog of Noah's ark - will enable the recovery of the totality of terrestrial life. The recognition of bit strings of various complexity up to incompressible Martin-L\\"{o}f random sequences, will require a different strategy for the analysis of the cosmic signals. The Fermi paradox "Where is Everybody?" can be viewed under in the light of such information panspermia, i.e. a Universe full of traveling life streams.

V. G. Gurzadyan

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Western consciousness, absurdity, and rebellion: the influence of paradox in the early works of Albert Camus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the paradoxical nature of Albert Camus's ideas of Western consciousness, absurdity, and rebellion. Camus believes that as members of the Occident, we are the products of both the Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian cultures. We...

Lanier, Clinton David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

Uncertainty relations for the realisation of macroscopic quantum superpositions and EPR paradoxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a unified approach, based on the use of quantum uncertainty relations, for arriving at criteria for the demonstration of the EPR paradox and macroscopic superpositions. We suggest to view each criterion as a means to demonstrate an EPR-type paradox, where there is an inconsistency between the assumptions of a form of realism, either macroscopic realism (MR) or local realism (LR), and the completeness of quantum mechanics.

E. G. Cavalcanti; M. D. Reid

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

63

Paradoxes of cosmological physics in the beginning of the 21-st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the history of cosmology physical paradoxes played important role for development of contemporary world models. Within the modern standard cosmological model there are both observational and conceptual cosmological paradoxes which stimulate to search their solution. Confrontation of theoretical predictions of the standard cosmological model with the latest astrophysical observational data is considered. A review of conceptual problems of the Friedmann space expending models, which are in the bases of modern cosmological model, is discussed. The main paradoxes, which are discussed in modern literature, are the Newtonian character of the exact Friedmann equation, the violation of the energy conservation within any comoving local volume, violation of the limiting recession velocity of galaxies for the observed high redshift objects. Possible observational tests of the nature of the cosmological redshift are discussed

Yurij Baryshev

2015-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

64

Colloquium: The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox: From concepts to applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Colloquium examines the field of the Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) gedanken experiment, from the original paper of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen, through to modern theoretical proposals of how to realize both the continuous-variable and discrete versions of the EPR paradox. The relationship with entanglement and Bell's theorem are analyzed, and the progress to date towards experimental confirmation of the EPR paradox is summarized, with a detailed treatment of the continuous-variable paradox in laser-based experiments. Practical techniques covered include continuous-wave parametric amplifier and optical fiber quantum soliton experiments. Current proposals for extending EPR experiments to massive-particle systems are discussed, including spin squeezing, atomic position entanglement, and quadrature entanglement in ultracold atoms. Finally, applications of this technology to quantum key distribution, quantum teleportation, and entanglement swapping are examined.

Reid, M. D.; Drummond, P. D.; Bowen, W. P.; Cavalcanti, E. G.; Lam, P. K.; Bachor, H. A.; Andersen, U. L.; Leuchs, G. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics and Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Melbourne, Victoria 3122 Australia (Australia); School of Physical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland 4111 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, Building 38, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Building 309, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Max-Planck Institute for the Science of Light and Department of Physics, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Paradoxes of cosmological physics in the beginning of the 21-st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the history of cosmology physical paradoxes played important role for development of contemporary world models. Within the modern standard cosmological model there are both observational and conceptual cosmological paradoxes which stimulate to search their solution. Confrontation of theoretical predictions of the standard cosmological model with the latest astrophysical observational data is considered. A review of conceptual problems of the Friedmann space expending models, which are in the bases of modern cosmological model, is discussed. The main paradoxes, which are discussed in modern literature, are the Newtonian character of the exact Friedmann equation, the violation of the energy conservation within any comoving local volume, violation of the limiting recession velocity of galaxies for the observed high redshift objects. Possible observational tests of the nature of the cosmological redshift are discussed

Baryshev, Yurij

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Terriary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO -) 2 flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) diagenetic characterization of project field reservoirs, and (2) technology transfer.

David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

67

Visualizing Statistical Mix Effects and Simpson's Paradox Zan Armstrong and Martin Wattenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visualizing Statistical Mix Effects and Simpson's Paradox Zan Armstrong and Martin Wattenberg Size is known to statis- · Zan Armstrong was with Google at the time of research, currently unaffiliated. E-mail: zan.armstrong@gmail.com. · Martin Wattenberg is with Google. E-mail: wattenberg@google.com. Manuscript

Cortes, Corinna

68

The paradoxical aspect of the Himalayan granites Jean-Louis VIGNERESSE1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paradoxical aspect of the Himalayan granites Jean-Louis VIGNERESSE1 and Jean-Pierre BURG2 1 as reference examples of collision-related granites. However, they are much smaller than the Hercynian collision-related granites. Additional comparison with magmatic arcs and cordilleran-type batholiths

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

69

The Innovation Paradox: Reconciling Creativity & Discipline How Winning Organizations Combine Inspiration With Perspiration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microprocessor was designed by a handful of engineers; the Centrioo required several hundred.] Yet creativityThe Innovation Paradox: Reconciling Creativity & Discipline How Winning Organizations Combine products globally find that their very size inhibits the creativity needed to invent such products

Kolodny, Avinoam

70

Bosnia-Herzegovina: Trying to Build a Federal State on Paradoxes Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bosnia-Herzegovina: Trying to Build a Federal State on Paradoxes Jens Woelk Introduction The basis for federalism in Bosnia-Herzegovina1 is rather peculiar due to the unique complexity. This was to be accomplished by physical reconstruction as well as by preserving Bosnia and Herzegovina as one country

Wintner, Shuly

71

Chronic Kidney Disease and Hypertension: The Paradox of Treating Patients with Spironolactone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chronic Kidney Disease and Hypertension: The Paradox of Treating Patients with Spironolactone Amber the correlation between CKD and hypertension 2. Describe the role of aldosterone in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and in resistant hypertension 3. Explain the mechanism of aldosterone antagonists 4

Pillow, Jonathan

72

The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

Utah, University of

73

Renewable Electric Plant Information System user interface manual: Paradox 7 Runtime for Windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS) is a comprehensive database with detailed information on grid-connected renewable electric plants in the US. The current version, REPiS3 beta, was developed in Paradox for Windows. The user interface (UI) was developed to facilitate easy access to information in the database, without the need to have, or know how to use, Paradox for Windows. The UI is designed to provide quick responses to commonly requested sorts of the database. A quick perusal of this manual will familiarize one with the functions of the UI and will make use of the system easier. There are six parts to this manual: (1) Quick Start: Instructions for Users Familiar with Database Applications; (2) Getting Started: The Installation Process; (3) Choosing the Appropriate Report; (4) Using the User Interface; (5) Troubleshooting; (6) Appendices A and B.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Possible Resolution of the Tolman Paradox as a Quantum Superposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is an attempt to find a hidden virtue in Tolman's paradox by showing that it can give rise to quantum superposition. We consider tachyon exchange between two particles and show that it can generate superposition of eigenstates characterizing each particle, as well as the entangled state of the particle pair. The new possible aspect of quantum superposition reveals an unexpected connection with cosmological expansion of the Universe.

Moses Fayngold

2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

75

On EPR Paradox, No Entanglement Theorem for Separate Particles and Consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPR paper contains an error. Its correction leads to a conclusion that position and momentum of a particle can be defined precisely simultaneously, EPR paradox does not exist and uncertainty relations have nothing to do with quantum mechanics. Logic of the EPR paper shows that entangled states of separated particles do not exist and therefore there are no nonlocality in quantum mechanics. Bell's inequalities are never violated, and results of experiments, proving their violation, are shown to be false. Experiments to prove absence of nonlocality are proposed where Bell's inequalities are replaced by precise prediction. Interpretation of quantum mechanics in terms of classical field theory is suggested. Censorship against this paper is demonstrated.

V. K. Igatovich

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

76

A model that solves to the wave-particle duality paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bohmian mechanics solves the wave-particle duality paradox by introducing the concept of a physical particle that is always point-like and a separate wavefunction with some sort of physical reality. However, this model has not been satisfactorily extended to relativistic levels. Here we introduce a model of permanent point-like particles that works at any energy level. Our model seems to have the benefits of Bohmian mechanics without its shortcomings. We propose an experiment for which the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics and our model make different predictions.

Eduardo V. Flores

2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

77

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox Basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Chidsey Jr., Thomas C.

2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment: Will the Enterprise Risk Assessment Model, Composite Risk Management and Associated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to assess the nation's military preparedness. However, risk management is not a panacea for the problemsThe Paradoxes of Military Risk Assessment: Will the Enterprise Risk Assessment Model, Composite Risk Management and Associated Techniques Provide the Predicted Benefits? Chris. W. Johnson, Glasgow

Johnson, Chris

80

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide- (CO{sub 2}-) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million bbl of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO-) flood 2 project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

Allison, M. Lee; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

From fermions to the Fermi paradox: a fertile cosmos fit for life?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paradoxes usually hint at gaps in our understanding. The resolution of Fermi's may require knowledge common to extraterrestrials accounting for a convergence in their cosmological outlook. What would a universe optimised for conscious lifeforms be like? Perhaps extraterrestrials would reply ours. How preposterous: life is rare, survival is a struggle, red giants purge orbiting planets of inhabitants, baryons only account for a small fraction of the universe and otherwise habitable planets orbiting the longest-lived stars are tidally locked. Think again: following a preliminary stelliferous era (~400Gyr) during which numerous planets with subsurface oceans form from the ejecta of type Ia supernovae and colonists are recruited, the universe might comfortably support colossal numbers of skilfully crafted aquatic lifeforms in uncrowded conditions for ~10^23 years. Fermionic dark matter could serve as the fuel, slowly annihilating within planets containing pressurised iron. Semiconductors can explore the proposal ...

Spivey, R J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Can a variable gravitational constant resolve the Faint Young Sun Paradox ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar models suggest that four billion years ago the young Sun was about 25% fainter than it is today, rendering Earth's oceans frozen and lifeless. However, there is ample geophysical evidence that Earth had a liquid ocean teeming with life 4 Gyr ago. Since ${\\cal L_\\odot} \\propto G^7M_\\odot^5$, the Sun's luminosity ${\\cal L_\\odot}$ is exceedingly sensitive to small changes in the gravitational constant $G$. We show that a percent-level increase in $G$ in the past would have prevented Earth's oceans from freezing, resolving the faint young Sun paradox. Such small changes in $G$ are consistent with observational bounds on ${\\Delta G}/G$. Since ${\\cal L}_{\\rm SNIa} \\propto G^{-3/2}$, an increase in $G$ leads to fainter supernovae, creating tension between standard candle and standard ruler probes of dark energy. Precisely such a tension has recently been reported by the Planck team.

Varun Sahni; Yuri Shtanov

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

The paradox of federal energy and defense installations in the West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most planners working west of the 100th meridian are aware that federal lands make up a large portion of the lands in the western states. In fact, federal lands comprise nearly 49% of the area of the fourteen states that make up the WPR family. These lands are usually under the Department of Agriculture (USFS) and the Department of Interior (BLM and NPS), but the Departments of Defense (DOD) and Energy (DOE) are also federal stewards of western lands. These federal military and energy installations play an important role in local and regional western communities and economies. They also play an important role in regional ecologies. It is a paradox that some of these sites have their share of legacy contamination from earlier missions, but they also include some of the most pristine remaining western ecosystems. In some cases, the sites are located near or surrounded by encroaching urbanization, making them particularly valuable lands both for recreation and habitat preservation.

Pava, Daniel S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

REGIONAL PARADOX FORMATION STRUCTURE AND ISOCHORE MAPS, BLANDING SUB-BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field (figure 1). However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Paradoxes in laser heating of plasmonic nanoparticles This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paradoxes in laser heating of plasmonic nanoparticles This article has been downloaded from to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience #12;T h e o p e n ­ a c c e s s j o u r n a l f o r p h y s i c s New Journal of Physics Paradoxes in laser heating

87

The energy-water tug of war: Drought exacerbates the paradox of efficiently producing energy while conserving water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drought exacerbates the paradox of e#30;ciently producing energy while conserving water Fall 2011 tx H2O 21 ] Timeline of Droughts in Texas 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 Conservation of water, which is recognized as being more...20 tx H2O Fall 2011 Story by Danielle Kalisek and Leslie Lee 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 The Sabine River Authority and the city of Dallas sign a contract to move water to the Dallas Water Utilities Eastside Water...

Kalisek, Danielle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (40-80 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvania (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performances, and report associated validation activities.

Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

89

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project's primary objective was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (4-8 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performance(s), and report associated validation activities.

Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laural L.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

90

Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Class II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m{sup 3}) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Chidsey, Thomas C.

2000-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Uinta Basin Oil and Gas Development Air Quality Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production EASTERN UTAH BLM Proposed Leasing for Oil Shale and Tar Sands Development "Indian Country" ­ Regulatory Authority Controlled by the Tribes and EPA Oil Shale Leasing Tar Sands Leasing "Indian Country

Utah, University of

92

05671_UintaWaterStudy | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNG IHDR€ÍSolar Energy41 (Dollars and Sense(ANL-IN-03-032)431stWater-Related

93

Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/teritiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meeting, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization: (1) interpretation of outcrop analogues; (2) reservoir mapping, (3) reservoir engineering analysis of the five project fields; and (4) technology transfer.

Allison, M.L.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

CREATIC.ca : Solution pour faciliter une appropriation immdiate et pour pallier le paradoxe technico-pdagogique vcu par les futurs enseignants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CREATIC.ca : Solution pour faciliter une appropriation immédiate et pour pallier le paradoxe *Université de Moncton, Professeures, FSE de l'Université de Moncton, Moncton, Canada Courriel : isabelc@umoncton.ca /vezinan@umoncton.ca ** Chef de groupe, Apprentissage électronique, ITI, CNRC, 55, chemin Crowley Farm

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

95

Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

Allison, M.L.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1996--February 8, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The Anasazi field was selected for the initial geostatistical modeling and reservoir simulation. A compositional simulation approach is being used to model primary depletion, waterflood, and CO{sub 2}-flood processes. During this second year of the project, team members performed the following reservoir-engineering analysis of Anasazi field: (1) relative permeability measurements of the supra-mound and mound-core intervals, (2) completion of geologic model development of the Anasazi reservoir units for use in reservoir simulation studies including completion of a series of one-dimensional, carbon dioxide-displacement simulations to analyze the carbon dioxide-displacement mechanism that could operate in the Paradox basin system of reservoirs, and (3) completion of the first phase of the full-field, three-dimensional Anasazi reservoir simulation model, and the start of the history matching and reservoir performance prediction phase of the simulation study.

Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, mule, Blue Hogan, heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The reservoir engineering component of the work completed to date included analysis of production data and well tests, comprehensive laboratory programs, and preliminary mechanistic reservoir simulation studies. A comprehensive fluid property characterization program was completed. Mechanistic reservoir production performance simulation studies were also completed.

Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Entropy is conserved in Hawking radiation as tunneling: A revisit of the black hole information loss paradox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research Highlights: > Information is found to be encoded and carried away by Hawking radiations. > Entropy is conserved in Hawking radiation. > We thus conclude no information is lost. > The dynamics of black hole may be unitary. - Abstract: We revisit in detail the paradox of black hole information loss due to Hawking radiation as tunneling. We compute the amount of information encoded in correlations among Hawking radiations for a variety of black holes, including the Schwarzchild black hole, the Reissner-Nordstroem black hole, the Kerr black hole, and the Kerr-Newman black hole. The special case of tunneling through a quantum horizon is also considered. Within a phenomenological treatment based on the accepted emission probability spectrum from a black hole, we find that information is leaked out hidden in the correlations of Hawking radiation. The recovery of this previously unaccounted for information helps to conserve the total entropy of a system composed of a black hole plus its radiations. We thus conclude, irrespective of the microscopic picture for black hole collapsing, the associated radiation process: Hawking radiation as tunneling, is consistent with unitarity as required by quantum mechanics.

Zhang Baocheng [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonances and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cai Qingyu, E-mail: qycai@wipm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonances and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhan Mingsheng [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonances and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Center for Cold Atom Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); You Li [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Identification of geopressured occurrences outside of the Gulf Coast. Final report, Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an extension of its efforts in the development of the geopressured resources of the Gulf Coast, the Division of Geothermal Energy of the US Department of Energy is interested in determining the extent and characteristics of geopressured occurrences in areas outside the Gulf Coast. The work undertaken involved a literature search of available information documenting such occurrences. Geopressured reservoirs have been reported from various types of sedimentary lithologies representing virtually all geologic ages and in a host of geologic environments, many of which are unlike those of the Gulf Coast. These include many Rocky Mountain basins (Green River, Big Horn, Powder River, Wind River, Uinta, Piceance, Denver, San Juan), Mid-Continent basins (Delaware, Anadorko, Interior Salt, Williston, Appalachian), California basins (Sacramento, San Joaquin, Los Angeles, Ventura, Coast Ranges), Alaskan onshore and offshore basins, Pacific Coast offshore basins, and other isolated occurrences, both onshore and offshore.

Strongin, O.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Results of hydraulic tests at Gibson Dome No. 1, Elk Ridge No. 1, and E. J. Kubat boreholes, Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic testing was conducted in three boreholes in southeastern Utah to provide a portion of the data needed to characterize the hydrogeology of the Elk Ridge and Gibson Dome areas of the western Paradox Basin, Utah. The tests at the E. J. Kubat borehole yielded representative values of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storativity, and potentiometric levels of the Leadville Limestone. Testing at Elk Ridge No. 1 provided values of similar parameters for the combined thickness of the upper Honaker Trail, Elephant Canyon, and Cedar Mesa formations. Composite transmissivities of similar zones from these borehole tests compared closely with the results of testing at borehole GD-1. A comparison of results from lab tests on core with results of extensive borehole testing at GD-1 indicates that short-term drill stem tests in a single well can provide representative estimates of bulk transmissivities and hydraulic conductivities in this field area for test zones that have a hydraulic conductivity of greater than about 1 x 10/sup -7/ cm/sec. However, lab tests produce more representative values of effective porosity and matrix permeability of individual strata. Results of lab tests and long-term borehole tests confirm that the lower Honaker Trail and upper Paradox formations have extremely low conductivities in the vicinity of the GD-1 borehole. The results of these tests were complete as of January 1981. 22 references, 29 figures, 5 tables.

Thackston, J.W.; Preslo, L.M.; Hoexter, D.E.; Donnelly, N.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

sciencesduvivant Le paradoxe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pour les plantes et les ani- maux terrestres. Les plantes et les animaux mi- croscopiques forment la phytoplancton) et d'ani- maux (le zooplancton) dont les formes sont extra- ordinairement variées. Ainsi, l

Dolan, John

103

HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing, vertical, field wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the third project year (April 6 through October 5, 2002). This work included capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and pore casting on selected samples from Cherokee and Bug fields, Utah. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found at these fields are indicators of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for enhanced oil recovery via horizontal drilling. The reservoir quality of Cherokee and Bug fields has been affected by multiple generations of dissolution, anhydrite plugging, and various types of cementation which act as barriers or baffles to fluid flow. The most significant diagenetic characteristics are microporosity (Cherokee field) and micro-boxwork porosity (Bug field), as shown from porethroat radii histograms, and saturation profiles generated from the capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, and identified by scanning electron microscopy and pore casting. These porosity types represent important sites for untapped hydrocarbons and primary targets for horizontal drilling. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, and publications. The project home page was updated for the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

105

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Cathedral Bluffs Shale Oil Company and Rio Blanco Oilfossil fuel) may make shale oil a cost-effective source ofthen pyrolyzed underground. The shale oil is pumped to the

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was or Atlantic Richfield, Ashland Oil, Shell Oil, and Thefor By 1976 and surface all of the re~ but Ashland hadwithdrawn, and Ashland entered into an agreement with

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resuces of the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1, Colorado,"exploit the na'cion' s oil shale reserves. The two Coloradoof the estimated world reserves of oil shale, respectively.

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata in the Piceance basin, western Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microbial/thermogenic origin for methane. Only one sample from above 1950 m contained sufficient amounts of C2for isotopic analysis (813 CC2 =-27.0%o at 1718 m). Data from the second trend are based on seven analyses and are offset by approximately +20%o...

Katz, David Jonathan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercially Producing Oil Shale: World Oil, Vol. 190, No.A Tech~ nology Assessment. of Oil Shale Development,"13th Oil Shale Symposium Proceedings, Colorado School of

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -DepartmentNovember 1, 2010December 1,Goals Chapter| Department of

111

MULTICOMPONENT SEISMIC ANALYSIS AND CALIBRATION TO IMPROVE RECOVERY FROM ALGAL MOUNDS: APPLICATION TO THE ROADRUNNER/TOWAOC AREA OF THE PARADOX BASIN, UTE MOUNTAIN UTE RESERVATION, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-02NT15451, ''Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado''. Optimizing development of highly heterogeneous reservoirs where porosity and permeability vary in unpredictable ways due to facies variations can be challenging. An important example of this is in the algal mounds of the Lower and Upper Ismay reservoirs of the Paradox Basin in Utah and Colorado. It is nearly impossible to develop a forward predictive model to delineate regions of better reservoir development, and so enhanced recovery processes must be selected and designed based upon data that can quantitatively or qualitatively distinguish regions of good or bad reservoir permeability and porosity between existing well control. Recent advances in seismic acquisition and processing offer new ways to see smaller features with more confidence, and to characterize the internal structure of reservoirs such as algal mounds. However, these methods have not been tested. This project will acquire cutting edge, three-dimensional, nine-component (3D9C) seismic data and utilize recently-developed processing algorithms, including the mapping of azimuthal velocity changes in amplitude variation with offset, to extract attributes that relate to variations in reservoir permeability and porosity. In order to apply advanced seismic methods a detailed reservoir study is needed to calibrate the seismic data to reservoir permeability, porosity and lithofacies. This will be done by developing a petrological and geological characterization of the mounds from well data; acquiring and processing the 3D9C data; and comparing the two using advanced pattern recognition tools such as neural nets. In addition, should the correlation prove successful, the resulting data will be evaluated from the perspective of selecting alternative enhanced recovery processes, and their possible implementation. The work is being carried out on the Roadrunner/Towaoc Fields of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, located in the southwestern corner of Colorado. Although this project is focused on development of existing resources, the calibration established between the reservoir properties and the 3D9C seismic data can also enhance exploration success. During the time period covered by this report, the majority of the project effort has gone into the permitting, planning and design of the 3D seismic survey, and to select a well for the VSP acquisition. The business decision in October, 2002 by WesternGeco, the projects' seismic acquisition contractor, to leave North America, has delayed the acquisition until late summer, 2003. The project has contracted Solid State, a division of Grant Geophysical, to carry out the acquisition. Moreover, the survey has been upgraded to a 3D9C from the originally planned 3D3C survey, which should provide even greater resolution of mounds and internal mound structure.

Paul La Pointe; Claudia Rebne; Steve Dobbs

2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

Coordinated Fee Structure for Developed Recreation Sites on the Ashley, Uinta, and Wasatch-Cache  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal and State agencies and private campgrounds in geographical areas of concern to determine fee, such as water, sewer, electricity and recreational equipment/infrastructure. 1 An abbreviated version

Standiford, Richard B.

113

A better understanding of a Uinta Basin channelized analog reservoir through geostatistics and reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

techniques analyzed. Sensitivity runs with different waterflood patterns indicated that a staggered line drive results in the best performance in the analog channelized reservoir we modeled, as it allows for the best recovery factor in the least amount...

Robbana, Enis

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Mpemba Paradox Revisited -- Numerical Reinforcement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspired by responses to the work (arXiv:1310.6514), we solved the one-dimensional, nonlinear Fourier initial and boundary condition problem using the finite element method. Examination of all possible parameters reveals the following: 1. Hydrogen bond has memory effect to emit energy at a rate, or with a relaxation time, depending on initial energy storage. 2. Skin super-solidity creates gradients in thermal diffusion coefficient for heat conduction in liquid with the optimal skin-bulk ratio of 1.48. 3. Convection alone produces no such effect. 4. Mpemba effect happens only in the highly non-diabetic source-path-drain cycling system.

Zhang, Xi; Ma, Zengsheng; Sun, Chang Q

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Interstellar Travel & The Fermi Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to work on, but warp drive and worm holes may have to wait. #12;Interstellar Travel: Issues 1. How far do

Shirley, Yancy

116

Cultivating Sustainable Coffee: Persistent Paradoxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

survival and sustainable development processes will dependinclusive and sustainable rural development processes. Ininclusive sustainable rural devel- opment process (Miranda

Bacon, Christopher M.; Mendez, Ernesto; Fox, Jonathan A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Quark-gluon plasma paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on simple physics arguments it is shown that the concept of quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter consisting of uncorrelated quarks, antiquarks, and gluons, has a fundamental problem.

Dariusz Miskowiec

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

Methane recovery from coalbeds project. Monthly progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made on the Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project (MRCP) is reported in the Raton Mesa Coal Region. The Uinta and Warrior basin reports have been reviewed and will be published and delivered in early December. A cooperative core test with R and P Coal Company on a well in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, was negotiated. In a cooperative effort with the USGS Coal Branch on three wells in the Wind River Basin, desorption of coal samples showed little or no gas. Completed field testing at the Dugan Petroleum well in the San Juan Basin. Coal samples showed minimal gas. Initial desorption of coal samples suggests that at least a moderate amount of gas was obtained from the Coors well test in the Piceance Basin. Field work for the Piceance Basin Detailed Site Investigation was completed. In the Occidental Research Corporation (ORC) project, a higher capacity vacuum pump to increase CH/sub 4/ venting operations has been installed. Drilling of Oxy No. 12 experienced delays caused by mine gas-offs and was eventually terminated at 460 ft after an attempt to drill through a roll which produced a severe dog leg and severely damaged the drill pipe. ORC moved the second drill rig and equipment to a new location in the same panel as Oxy No. 12 and set the stand pipe for Oxy No. 13. Drill rig No. 1 has been moved east of the longwall mining area in anticipation of drilling cross-panel on 500 foot intervals. Waynesburg College project, Equitable Gas Company has received the contract from Waynesburg College and has applied to the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission for a new tariff rate. Waynesburg College has identified a contractor to make the piping connections to the gas line after Equitable establishes their meter and valve requirements.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Facies, stratigraphic architecture, and lake evolution of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Eastern Uinta Basin, Utah.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Lacustrine basin systems have historically been valued for their abundant conventional oil and gas reserves, but they also contain a vast potential for unconventional petroleum… (more)

Rosenberg, Morgan Joshua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall production of the well, identify areas that may be by-passed by a waterflood, and prevent rapid water breakthrough. In the eastern Paradox Basin, Colorado, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of increasing the mud weight during drilling operations before penetrating the overpressured Desert Creek zone; centralizing treatment facilities; and mixing produced water from pumping oil wells with non-reservoir water and injecting the mixture into the reservoir downdip to reduce salt precipitation, dispose of produced water, and maintain reservoir pressure to create a low-cost waterflood. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of technical presentations to members of the Technical Advisory Board in Colorado and the Colorado Geological Survey. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

4. Nuclei and Radioactivity Paradoxes and Puzzles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Firearms tests wine, gin, whisky, and vodka for radioactivity. If the product does not have sufficient. The key feature of radioactivity that makes it so fascinating is that the energy released is enormous-- at least when compared to typical chemical energies. The typical energy release in the explosion of one

Browder, Tom

123

The Paradox of Meritocracy in Organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we develop and empirically test the theoretical argument that when an organizational culture promotes meritocracy (compared with when it does not), managers in that organization may ironically show greater ...

Castilla, Emilio J.

124

Genomic aggregation effects and Simpson's paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genomic studies have become commonplace, with thousands of gene expressions typically collected on single or multiple platforms and analyzed. Unaccounted time-ordered or epigenetic aspects of genetic expression may lead ...

Brimacombe, Michael

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

Janvier 2011 Les paradoxes de la quinoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, les agriculteurs se sont mis à cultiver des zones de plaine où les risques de gelée nocturne sont familles de l'Altiplano andin un exode définitif vers les villes ou l'étranger, il altère la durabilité du'exposition par rapport au soleil3 . Quinoa versus élevage Accaparant des plaines jusqu'alors dédiées au pâtu

126

Open Access: From Myth to Paradox  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

True open access to scientific publications not only gives readers the possibility to read articles without paying subscription, but also makes the material available for automated ingestion and harvesting by 3rd parties. Once articles and associated data become universally treatable as computable objects, openly available to 3rd party aggregators and value-added services, what new services can we expect, and how will they change the way that researchers interact with their scholarly communications infrastructure? I will discuss straightforward applications of existing ideas and services, including citation analysis, collaborative filtering, external database linkages, interoperability, and other forms of automated markup, and speculate on the sociology of the next generation of users.

Paul Ginsparg

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

127

THE BANACH-TARSKI PARADOX 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to the point where we are eventually writing out decompositions of the unit ball into 52 pieces. My second goal and that A and B are disjoint.) Now, consider the set S 1 ] C; it looks like some sort of wheel with an in#12;nite

Weston, Tom

128

THE BANACH-TARSKI PARADOX 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

writing out decompositions of the unit ball into 52 pieces. My second goal is to try to show.) Now, consider the set S1 C; it looks like some sort of wheel with an infinite number of spokes. (See

Weston, Tom

129

Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Measurement and Modeling of Sorption-Induced Strain and Permeability Changes in Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strain caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A., and high-volatile bituminous coal from the Uinta-Piceance basin of Utah, U.S.A. using a newly developed strain measurement apparatus. The apparatus can be used to measure strain on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal strain. The swelling and shrinkage (strain) in the coal samples resulting from the adsorption of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, helium, and a mixture of gases was measured. Sorption-induced strain processes were shown to be reversible and easily modeled with a Langmuir-type equation. Extended Langmuir theory was applied to satisfactorily model strain caused by the adsorption of gas mixtures using the pure gas Langmuir strain constants. The amount of time required to obtain accurate strain data was greatly reduced compared to other strain measurement methods. Sorption-induced changes in permeability were also measured as a function of pres-sure. Cleat compressibility was found to be variable, not constant. Calculated variable cleat-compressibility constants were found to correlate well with previously published data for other coals. During permeability tests, sorption-induced matrix shrinkage was clearly demonstrated by higher permeability values at lower pore pressures while holding overburden pressure constant. Measured permeability data were modeled using three dif-ferent permeability models from the open literature that take into account sorption-induced matrix strain. All three models poorly matched the measured permeability data because they overestimated the impact of measured sorption-induced strain on permeabil-ity. However, by applying an experimentally derived expression to the measured strain data that accounts for the confining overburden pressure, pore pressure, coal type, and gas type, the permeability models were significantly improved.

Eric P. Robertson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

Robert Caldwell

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future projectspecific analyses. Additional information about the PEIS can be found at http://ostseis.anl.gov.

Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

Sequence-Stratigraphic Analysis of the Rollins and the Cozzette Sandstone Members, the Upper Cretaceous Mount Garfield Formation of the Piceance Basin, Colorado.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the top. Both siltstone and mudstone are locally bioturbated. Siltstone beds (~20 cm) are sharp-based, light brown to gray in color, and are interbeded with mudstone beds. Coal with siltstone Trough-cross bedding Laminae/flaser beddin g/burrows 10 m10... it occurs at the top of the Rollins Sandstone Member. It is laterally continuous, distinctively white colored, and 22 capped with a coal bed (Figure 9). This unit is composed of six subunits arranged in an upward-coarsening trend and is described...

Ouaichouche, Fatma Zahra

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed by overlying argillaceous and non-fractured units. The best outcrop analogs for Twin Creek reservoirs are found at Devils Slide and near the town of Peoa, Utah, where fractures in dense, homogeneous non-porous limestone beds are in contact with the basal siltstone units (containing sealed fractures) of the overlying units. The shallow marine, Mississippian Leadville Limestone is a major oil and gas reservoir in the Paradox Basin of Utah and Colorado. Hydrocarbons are produced from basement-involved, northwest-trending structural traps with closure on both anticlines and faults. Excellent outcrops of Leadville-equivalent rocks are found along the south flank of the Uinta Mountains, Utah. For example, like the Leadville, the Mississippian Madison Limestone contains zones of solution breccia, fractures, and facies variations. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. In the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of: (1) owning drilling rigs and frac holding tanks; (2) perforating sandstone beds with more than 8 percent neutron porosity and stimulate with separate fracture treatments; (3) placing completed wells on primary production using artificial lift; (4) converting wells relatively soon to secondary waterflooding maintaining reservoir pressure above the bubble point to maximize oil recovery; (5) developing waterflood units using an alternating injector--producer pattern on 40-acre (16-ha) spacing; and (6) recompleting producing wells by perforating all beds that are productive in the waterflood unit. As part of technology transfer activities during this quarter, an abstract describing outcrop reservoir analogs was accepted by the American Assoc

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

John Topham and Susan Redd Butler Off-Campus Faculty Research Awards James Ayres, University of Arizona, "The Manufacturing and Marketing of Railroad Ties in the Uinta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Idaho Phosphate Mining and Fertilizer Industry" Clyde Milner, Arkansas State University, "The West-War Intermountain West" Stephanie Capaldo, University of Arizona, "Smoke and Mirrors: Smelter Pollution and the Cultural Construction of Environmental Justice in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands" Thomas Evans, Montana State

Hart, Gus

136

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research continued in the detection of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Tasks include modeling, data analysis, geologic assessment of the Piceance Basin, and remote sensing.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Globalization and Religion in Historical Perspective: A Paradoxical Relationship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

—especially among Buddhists, Christians, and Muslims—have also been integral sources of globalization distinct from economic practices like trade. The following section will present the “homogenization thesis,” and introduce the subject of the globalization... of completing the journey travel to Mecca, the Muslim holy city, annually after Ramadan. Of course, this is not always feasible, but Muslims are expected to undertake the hajj at least once in their life. The hajj gives Muslims the opportunity to experience...

Herrington, Luke M.

138

Paradoxical Republics: Tropes of Civic Longing in Postcolonial Caribbean Writing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Longing in Postcolonial Caribbean Writing By Luis Ramos ALonging in Postcolonial Caribbean Writing by Luis Ramoscorrespondence between Caribbean realities and a European

Ramos, Luis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pide tener en cuenta las emisiones per cápita para calcularapuesta por reducir las emisiones aunque no se apruebe el2008. Evolución de las emisiones de gases de efecto

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Cineplastic : temporal paradox in the movement-image medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It could be argued that the term 'digital' as a prefix to architecture is evidence that contemporary design practice is lost in time. Modernity's predilection of spatial constructs over temporal ones continues to cast a ...

Hanks, Travis W. (Travis Wesley)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Paradoxical Results in Perturbation-Based Signaling Network Reconstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to unknown intermediates. Moreover, our in vitro system utilizes proteins from a pathway in mammalian (and), are extensively employed to understand physicochemical pro- cesses in biological systems (1­4). The lack system involving the proteins from the canonical mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal

Sontag, Eduardo

142

Managing the Paradoxes of Perfection in Women's Daily Lives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conformity orientation may create a family climate that functions as a risk factor in suicidal behavior. Fathers who stress compliance and conformity may provide little support for the female individual who is struggling to discriminate her own... in which women are fully consumed and fulfilled by their children. Williams (2000) similarly argues that organizational cultures discriminate against women by punishing individuals who do not fit the ideal, masculine worker norm. Women cannot be totally...

Hampsten, Katherine

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

143

Braess' Paradox in a simple electric power system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pricing in the restructured electricity industry. Using a small-scale test network and assuming DC load lines in the system are upgraded. In these systems, locational prices (as currently used

Blumsack, Seth

144

Device independent Schmidt rank witness by using Hardy paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schmidt rank of bipartite pure state serves as a testimony of entanglement. It is a monotone under local operation + classical communications (LOCC) and puts restrictions in LOCC convertibility of quantum states. Identifying the Schmidt rank of an unknown quantum state therefore seek importance from information theoretic perspective. In this work it is shown that a modified version of Hardy's argument, which reveals the contradiction of quantum theory with local realism, turns out to be useful for inspecting the minimal Schmidt rank of the unknown state and hence also the minimal dimension of the system. Use of Hardy's test in such task provides a practical advantage: the Schmidt rank can be determined without knowing the detailed functioning of the experimental devices i.e., Hardy's test suffices to be a device independent Schmidt rank witness.

Amit Mukherjee; Arup Roy; Some Sankar Bhattacharya; Subhadipa Das; Md. Rajjak Gazi; Manik Banik

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

145

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results in 4° C global warming, sea level rise, specieslevels of greenhouse gases are responsible for incremental global warming.levels as that of the developing countries, the world would not today have faced the threat of global warming.

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Sustainability and Market Conditions:The Resource Efficiency paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability and Market Conditions energy conservation doand Market Conditions LITERATURE REVIEW Energy and resourcethe effect of market conditions on energy and resource

Delmas, Magali; Pekovic, Sanja

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s Fourth National Communication on Climate Change. A Reportclimate change can be assessed using data from national communicationscommunication were also reflected in the working drafts of the Spanish Climate Change

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on International Emissions Trading. Global Envi- ronmentalTask Group on Emissions Trading. Final Report: Introductionand Crawshaw, David. 2006. Emissions Trading Inquiry a Joke:

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

From Visible to Invisible: Tunisia’s Gendered Democracy Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

described by a US Embassy official as “outstanding”.24 While only 55% of the total voting population registered to vote, and only 45% of those registered were women, 90% of registered voters turned up at the polls. The extraordinarily high voter turnout... , was the continual utilization of women’s rights as a mechanism of state power and consolidation, under the guise of modernism.2 Nonetheless, the political, social, and economic nature of the protests and the interim government’s passage of a gender parity law...

Petkanas, Zoe

150

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

82 National Environment Policy (India), National Front-Leftof Open-Economy Policies in India, 1991 – 2000. Asian2002. Introduction to Public Policy in India: Some Emerging

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a subsidized growth path for renewable energy,” it wasgrowth strat- egies. Illustrative is the Plan for Developing Renewable Energies,renewable energy sources, and reforestation (ibid. , 331 – 32). Despite such high projected growth,

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Sustainability and Market Conditions:The Resource Efficiency paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics 23, 1- 14. Sustainability and Market Conditionsof environmental sustainability. Management InternationalJournal 44, 170-179. Sustainability and Market Conditions

Delmas, Magali; Pekovic, Sanja

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Climate Change Convention and Developing Countries: Fromand Climate Change: Perspectives from Developing Countries.developing countries by shift- ing the governance of climate change

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesendorf, Mark. 2003. Is “Clean Coal” an Oxymoron? Papercarbon sequestration and “clean coal” technology, for which149, 191, 206. See also clean coal Carr, Bob, 96 cars, 35,

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The Paradoxical Success of Fuzzy Logic \\Lambda Charles Elkan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications of fuzzy logic in heuristic control have been highly successful, but which aspects of fuzzy logic of fuzzy logic have not been detrimental in control applications because current fuzzy controllers are far is that almost all the hundreds or thousands of successful fuzzy logic applications are embedded controllers

Wang, Deli

156

Sustainability and Market Conditions:The Resource Efficiency paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organizational capabilities, market conditions and resource efficiencyefficiency practices, and then develop hypotheses on how organizationalefficiency practices should increase in downturn market conditions, such practices require complementary capabilities, strategies and organizational

Delmas, Magali; Pekovic, Sanja

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Gasoline Prices, Fuel Economy, and the Energy Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is often asserted that consumers purchasing automobiles or other goods and services underweight the costs of gasoline or other "add-ons." We test this hypothesis in the US automobile market by examining the effects of ...

Wozny, Nathan

158

Solving the Capacitive Paradox of 2D MXene using Electrochemical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wileyonlinelibrary.com the Ti 3 C 2 T x electrode under study with that of a similar mass micro-mesoporous BP2000 composite carbon electrode. Although the specifi c gravimetric...

159

Willa Cather and the small town: a paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and she does not consider any evidence in these works which is favorable to the small town. Russell Hlankenship devotes a few pages to "Willa Cather and the Village" in a chapter entitled "Beyond the Village" in American Lite ature as an ~sh . '. od... brought the town to life. By 1884 there were eight 10 pe. ssenger trains a day passing through Red Cloud, going and coming between Kansas City and denver. The dining car had not yet been invented, so many trai~s paused there long enough f...

Hall, Sharon Harless

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewable energy, and reforming the production structure and transport system (IEA 1992). Many developing countries

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Diesel Paradox: Why Dieselization Will Lead to Cleaner Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are challenges facing the U.S. and the world that are brought on by the growing demand for transporting people and goods. These include the growing consumption of petroleum, urban air pollution, and global climate change.

Eberhardt, James J.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

162

Dead ringers : globalization and the paradoxes of development and identity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X X X X X Hewlett Packard X HSBC X IBM X X X X X X X X X X Xexamples are the British banks HSBC and Barclays, which areoffices alike. I spoke with an HSBC call center employee at

Nadeem, Shehzad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-- -- -- -- 51 41 12 Uinta -- -- -- -- 7 21 11 Permian -- -- -- -- -- 67 27 Greater Green River -- -- -- -- -- 18 13 Black Warrior -- -- -- -- -- 4 5 Shale gas total 83 126 125...

164

ForestRangelandandWatershedStewardship 1472CampusDelivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons From 35 Years of Research on Oil Shale Lands in the Piceance Basin Fort Collins Fort Collins with oil shale extraction. The project involved approximately ten independent field studies, which were established on a 20-ha site located near what was then the focal point of oil shale activity in the Piceance

165

Microsoft Word - S07285_LTHMP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to fracture the tight, gas-bearing formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43-kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a...

166

Microsoft Word - S06010_Ltr.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to fracture the tight, gas-bearing formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43 kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a...

167

Microsoft Word - S04902_LetterReport Cover Letter.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to fracture the tight gas-bearing sandstone formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43 kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a...

168

Microsoft Word - S08407_LTHMP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to fracture the tight, gas-bearing formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43-kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a...

169

Production of Shale Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

Loper, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Exciton Lifetime Paradoxically Enhanced by Dissipation and Decoherence - Toward Efficient Energy Conversion of Solar Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy dissipation and decoherence are at first glance harmful to acquiring long exciton lifetime desired for efficient photovoltaics. In the presence of both optically forbidden (namely, dark) and allowed (bright) excitons, however, they can be instrumental as suggested in photosynthesis. By simulating quantum dynamics of exciton relaxations, we show that the optimized decoherence that imposes a quantum-to-classical crossover with the dissipation realizes a dramatically longer lifetime. In an example of carbon nanotube, the exciton lifetime increases by nearly two orders of magnitude when the crossover triggers stable high population in the dark exciton.

Yamada, Yasuhiro; Imada, Masatoshi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Exciton Lifetime Paradoxically Enhanced by Dissipation and Decoherence - Toward Efficient Energy Conversion of Solar Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy dissipation and decoherence are at first glance harmful to acquiring long exciton lifetime desired for efficient photovoltaics. In the presence of both optically forbidden (namely, dark) and allowed (bright) excitons, however, they can be instrumental as suggested in photosynthesis. By simulating quantum dynamics of exciton relaxations, we show that the optimized decoherence that imposes a quantum-to-classical crossover with the dissipation realizes a dramatically longer lifetime. In an example of carbon nanotube, the exciton lifetime increases by nearly two orders of magnitude when the crossover triggers stable high population in the dark exciton.

Yasuhiro Yamada; Youhei Yamaji; Masatoshi Imada

2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

*** In Press at Cognition 1/16/2011 *** The Paradox of Moral Focus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phillips3 1 Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2 Department * Young and Phillips contributed equally to this manuscript. Address correspondence to Liane Young, Van Horn, Grafton, & Sinnott-Armstrong, 2006; Cushman, 2008; Malle, 2006; Mikhail, 2007; Young

Knobe, Joshua

173

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

against soaring coal prices, the central government designedof power prices when coal prices increase more than 5 perthe mechanism even though coal prices increased more than 10

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

WORKING PAPER N 2013 11 The Grey Paradox: How Oil Owners Can Benefit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Fossil Fuels, GlobalWarming, Non-renewable Resources, OPEC PARIS-JOURDAN SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES 48, BD, Fossil Fuels, Global Warming, Non-renewable Resources, OPEC. JEL Classication: H21, H23, Q31, Q38, Q41, Q of fossil-fuel owners de- pends on the characteristics of their fossil fuels (recoverable reserves

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

175

Trends in pan evaporation and actual evapotranspiration across the conterminous U.S.: Paradoxical or complementary?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increasing trends in ET*a [Szilagyi et al., 2001], GCM-based estimates of evapotrans- piration [Manabe, 1997: the radiative budget and the advective budget. These budgets have been addressed previously [Szilagyi et al

RamĂ­rez, Jorge A.

176

Narrative and (Meta)Physical Paradox in "Grande Sertao: Veredas" and "Pedro Paramo"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

respostas já conhece de antemăo. Vim como combinamos porquecontei, remexer vivo o que vim dizendo. Porque năo narreipreso. Diadorim e eu viemos, vim; de rota abatida. Mas,

Schneider, Caroline LeFeber

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Too Little of a Good Thing A Paradox of Moderate Infection Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to improved nutrition,1 water purification,4 and reduced oppor- tunity for transmission. That reducing individuals.5,6 A classic example of such perversity is the increase in the incidence of congenital rubella

Cohen, Ted

178

Negotiating the paradoxes of poverty: presidential rhetoric on welfare from Johnson to Clinton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project examines how Presidents Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton discussed issues of poverty and welfare from Johnson?s declaration of War on Poverty in 1964 to Clinton?s signing of the Personal...

Carcasson, Martin

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Language Trap: U.S. Passing Fiction and its Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Through exploration of William Faulkner's, James Weldon Johnson's and Nella Larsen's "passing novels," this dissertation points out that narrative representation of racial passing facilitates and compromises the authors' challenge to the white...

Sugimori, Masami

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

180

Shedding light on the prompt high efficiency paradox - self consistent modeling of GRB afterglows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine GRBs with both Fermi-LAT and X-ray afterglow data. Assuming that the 100MeV (LAT) emission is radiation from cooled electrons accelerated by external shocks, we show that the kinetic energy of the blast wave estimated from the 100MeV flux is 50 times larger than the one estimated from the X-ray flux. This can be explained if either: i) electrons radiating at X-rays are significantly cooled by SSC (suppressing the synchrotron flux above the cooling frequency) or ii) if the X-ray emitting electrons, unlike those emitting at 100MeV energies, are in the slow cooling regime. In both cases the X-ray flux is no longer an immediate proxy of the blast wave kinetic energy. We model the LAT, X-ray and optical data and show that in general these possibilities are consistent with the data, and explain the apparent disagreement between X-ray and LAT observations. All possible solutions require weak magnetic fields: $10^{-6}energy...

Beniamini, Paz; Duran, Rodolfo Barniol; Piran, Tsvi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net), January 25, 2005, http://big5.southcn.com/gate/big5/www.southcn.com/finance/hot/200501260378.htm, accessed September 10, big step in expanding

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Paradoxes of hybrid organizing in the Cambridge Energy Alliance by Jason Jesurum Jay.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid organizations combine institutional logics, often in a search for novel solutions to complex problems such as climate change. This dissertation explores the conditions under which hybrid organizations are effective ...

Jay, Jason Jesurum

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

DRAFT WORKING PAPER JULY 2006 1 Abstract--Braess' Paradox describes a situation in which  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Locational Marginal Price I. NOMENCLATURE NL = Number of lines in the network NB = Number of buses reliability benefits to the system. The price paid for this reliability benefit is increased congestion flow between buses i and j i = Nodal price at bus i µij = Shadow price of transmission between buses i

Blumsack, Seth

184

English walnut rootstocks help avoid blackline disease, but produce less than ‘Paradox’ hybrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rootstock selection can help to prevent blackline infection.English walnut rootstocks help avoid blackline disease, but

Grant, Joseph A.; McGranahan, Gale H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Sarah Besky Culture and Agriculture Prelim: "Can a Plantation be Fair? Paradoxes and Possibilities in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Networks: Own Brand and Chocolate in UK Supermarkets. In Fair Trade: The Challenges Transforming: Power, Production, and History in the Americas. Steve Striffler and Mark Moberg, eds. Pp. 103.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, New School for Social Research. Erem, Suzan 2001 Labor Pains: Inside

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

186

Muon decays in the Earth's atmosphere, differential aging and the paradox of the twins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observation of the decay of muons produced in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic ray interactions provides a graphic illustration of the counter-intuitive space-time predictions of special relativity theory. Muons at rest in the atmosphere, decaying simultaneously, are subject to a universal time-dilatation effect when viewed from a moving frame and so are also observed to decay simultaneously in all such frames. The analysis of this example reveals the underlying physics of the differential aging effect in Langevin's travelling-twin thought experiment.

J. H. Field

2009-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

The political effectiveness of non-state violence : paradox, polarity, and the pursuit of power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When is non-state violence politically effective? Existing scholarship suggests that insurgency and terrorism are generally effective or ineffective based on the analysis of unitary non-state coercers operating solely at ...

Krause, Peter John Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - apparent paradoxical vault Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: , vaults, manholes, boilers, tunnels, sewer and sump pits, large HVAC equipment, the Physics Department... -required confined spaces. Underground Electrical...

189

Paradox Farm cold climate greenhouse Photo: Sue Wika Section I: Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Sustainable Building Research (CSBR). We would also like to thank all those who participated in the online Sustainable Development Partnership Virajita Singh, Senior Research Fellow, Center for Sustainable Building Research Dan Handeen, Research Fellow, Center for Sustainable Building Research Jody Rader, Research

Netoff, Theoden

190

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Loss in the Ertan Hydropower Project). ? In Yingxiang17 Due to sensitivity of hydropower performance to seasonalwater resources for future hydropower development. Among 156

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Holographic Thermalization, stability of AdS, and the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For a real massless scalar field in general relativity with a negative cosmological constant, we uncover a large class of spherically symmetric initial conditions that are close to AdS, but whose numerical evolution does not result in black hole formation. According to the AdS/CFT dictionary, these bulk solutions are dual to states of a strongly interacting boundary CFT that fail to thermalize at late times. Furthermore, as these states are not stationary, they define dynamical CFT configurations that do not equilibrate. We develop a two-timescale perturbative formalism that captures both direct and inverse cascades of energy and agrees with our fully nonlinear evolutions in the appropriate regime. We also show that this formalism admits a large class of quasi-periodic solutions. Finally, we demonstrate a striking parallel between the dynamics of AdS and the classic Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou problem.

Venkat Balasubramanian; Alex Buchel; Stephen R. Green; Luis Lehner; Steven L. Liebling

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zhongguo dianli chanye (China‘s Electricity Industry at themulti_page.pdf. State Electricity Regulatory Commission.The Annual Report on Electricity Regulation (2006). Beijing:

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the private-owned power plants that sell electricity to theElectricity Nominal IRA Ineffective Regulation Non-competitive Market Public & Privatein the private investors‘ inferiority. In the electricity

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Measurement Process in Local Quantum Theory and the EPR Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe in a qualitative way a possible picture of the Measurement Process in Quantum Mechanics, which takes into account: 1. the finite and non zero time duration T of the interaction between the observed system and the microscopic part of the measurement apparatus; 2. the finite space size R of that apparatus; 3. the fact that the macroscopic part of the measurement apparatus, having the role of amplifying the effect of that interaction to a macroscopic scale, is composed by a very large but finite number N of particles. The conventional picture of the measurement, as an instantaneous action turning a pure state into a mixture, arises only in the limit in which N and R tend to infinity, and T tends to 0. We sketch here a proposed scheme, which still ought to be made mathematically precise in order to analyse its implications and to test it in specific models, where we argue that in Quantum Field Theory this picture should apply to the unique time evolution expressing the dynamics of a given theory, and should comply with the Principle of Locality. We comment on the Einstein Podolski Rosen thought experiment (partly modifying the discussion on this point in an earlier version of this note), reformulated here only in terms of local observables (rather than global ones, as one particle or polarisation observables). The local picture of the measurement process helps to make it clear that there is no conflict with the Principle of Locality.

Sergio Doplicher

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

RESOLVING AMERICA’S HUMAN CAPITAL PARADOX: A PROPOSAL FOR A JOBS COMPACT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It’s generally understood that the United States can’t be competitive—and won’t be able to support high, and rising, living standards—without a well-trained, well-paid, and continuously improving workforce that can compete ...

Kochan, Thomas Anton

196

Narrative and (Meta)Physical Paradox in "Grande Sertao: Veredas" and "Pedro Paramo"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exijo… Pero la tierra no es tuya. Te has puesto a trabajareverything; “la tierra no es tuya,” Galileo’s brother-in-law

Schneider, Caroline LeFeber

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Pliocene Paradox (Mechanisms for a Permanent El Nin~o)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to and also very different from the world of today. The intensity of sunlight inci- dent on Earth, the global geography, and the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (1) were close to what they are today Research Interpreta- tions and Synoptic Mapping Project (PRISM) (2). Although there are some

deMenocal, Peter B.

198

The paradoxical Peking opera : performing tradition, history, and politics in 1949-1967 China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

largo), kuai sanyan (allegro), sanban (lyrical and looseflowing water), kuaiban (allegro), huilong and so on.largo), kuai sanyan (allegro), sanban (lyrical and loose

Liao, Fan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Remediation of a large contaminated reactor cooling reservoir: Resolving and environmental/regulatory paradox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of a former reactor cooling water reservoir, PAR Pond, located Savannah River Site. PAR Pond, a 2640 acre, man-made reservoir was built in 1958 and until 1988, received cooling water from two DOE nuclear production reactors, P and R. The lake sediments were contaminated with low levels of radiocesium (CS-137) and transuranics in the late 1950s and early 1960s because of leaking fuel elements. Elevated levels of mercury accumulated in the sediments from pumping water from the Savannah River to maintain a full pool. PAR Ponds` stability, size, and nutrient content made a significant, unique, and highly studied ecological resource for fish and wildlife populations until it was partially drained in 1991 due to a depression in the downslope of the earthen dam. The drawdown, created 1340 acres of exposed, radioactively contaminated sediments along 33 miles of shoreline. This led US EPA to declare PAR Pond as a CERCLA operable unit subject to remediation. The drawdown also raised concerns for the populations of aquatic plants, fish, alligators, and endangered species and increased the potential for off-site migration of contaminated wildlife from contact with the exposed sediments. Applicable regulations, such as NEPA and CERCLA, require wetland loss evaluations, human health and ecological risk assessments, and remediation feasibility studies. DOE is committed to spending several million dollars to repair the dam for safety reasons, even though the lake will probably not be used for cooling purposes. At the same time, DOE must make decisions whether to refill and expend additional public funds to maintain a full pool to reduce the risks defined under CERCLA or spend hundreds of millions in remediation costs to reduce the risks of the exposed sediments.

Bowers, J.A.: Gladden, J.B.; Hickey, H.M.; Jones, M.P.; Mackey, H.E.; Mayer, J.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Doswell, A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Paradox of Domesticity: Resistance to the Myth of Home in Contemporary American Literature and Film  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation focuses on novels and films produced in the second half of the twentieth century that critique traditional notions of home in contemporary America to expand on the large body of work on American domesticity in the eighteenth...

Cox, Kimberly O'Dell

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Paradox of Prop. 13: The Informed Public's Misunderstanding of California's Third Rail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mondak, Jeffery, and Mary Anderson. 2003. “A Knowledge Gap9. Mondak, Jeffery, and Mary Anderson. 2004. “The Knowledge

Nalder, Kimberly

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Towards explaining the Nd paradox using reversible scavenging in an ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the rare earth element neodymium (Nd) has the potential to serve as water-mass tracer, because a,b , Sidney Hemming a,b , Robert F. Anderson a,b a Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964, USA b Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia

Khatiwala, Samar

203

Narrative and (Meta)Physical Paradox in "Grande Sertao: Veredas" and "Pedro Paramo"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spiritual realm, a kind of Hades or purgatory, airless forchurch, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it.the Underworld for a wife. Hades agreed to give Persephone

Schneider, Caroline LeFeber

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust belt play is divided into two subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust-Mesozoic-cored structures and (2) A

Thomas Chidsey

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

The Paradoxical Persistence of James Earle Fraser's End of the Trail: Nostalgia, Souvenirs, and the Politics of Pictorial Representation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

End of the Trail, 1915, plaster sculpture. National CowboyProctor. Cowboy, 1893, plaster sculpture. ColumbianThe American Pioneer, 1915, plaster sculpture. Mooney Grove

Borrman, Kristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Paradoxical increase of positive answers to the CAGE questionnaire during a period of decreasing alcohol consumption: results from two population-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

first worldwide until 1983, in per capita yearly alcohol intake, and stayed in the top 6 countries since alcohol consumption: results from two population- based surveys in Île-de-France, 1991 and 2005. Short questionnaire during a period of decreasing alcohol consumption: results from two population- based surveys

Boyer, Edmond

207

Paradoxical effects of oxytocin and vasopressin on basal prolactin secretion and the estrogen-induced prolactin surge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The roles of oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on both basal and estrogen-induced prolactin (PRL) secretion were examined. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats that were ovariectomized for 3 weeks and received estrogen treatment for 1 week were used. Intravenous administration of hormones and serial blood sampling were accomplished through indwelling intraatrial catheters which were implanted two days before. Plasma PRL levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Oxytocin at a dose of 20 {mu}g/rat stimulated a moderate PRL release in the morning and lower doses were without effect. Vasopressin was most effective at a dose of 5 {mu}g/rat in stimulating PRL release, while consecutive injections of higher doses were less effective. In contrast, TRH, ranging from 1 to 8 {mu}g/rat, induced a dose-dependent increases in PRL secretion. Using the effective dosages determined from the morning studies, repeated injections of either OT, AVP or their specific antagonists MPOMeOVT were given hourly between 1300 to 1800h and blood samples were obtained hourly from 1100 to 1900h. It was found that either OT or AVP significantly reduced the afternoon PRL surge, while their antagonists were not as effective.

Mai, Leemin (National Yang-Ming Medical College, Taipei (Taiwan)); Pan, Jenntser (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Dispersed concentration of high-tech jobs in the new economy : the paradox of new information and communication technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More high-tech firms are conducting their business over long distances due to the use of new information and communication technologies (ICT). However, regional scientists articulate that geographic proximity is still ...

Kang, Myoung-Gu, 1970-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Miami Modern Metropolis: Paradise and Paradox in Mid-century Architecture and Planning Edited by Allan Shulman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Planning Edited by Allan Shulman Balcony Press,of Miami professor Allan Shulman, offers an unprecedented

Burga, Hector Fernando

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Paradoxical Persistence of James Earle Fraser's End of the Trail: Nostalgia, Souvenirs, and the Politics of Pictorial Representation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cowboy Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City. Fig. 3. Cyrus ECowboy Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. The image becameNorman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1973): 8. 14 Tulare

Borrman, Kristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Apolipoprotein E Genotype-Dependent Paradoxical Short-Term Effects of {sup 56}Fe Irradiation on the Brain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In humans, apolipoprotein E (apoE) is encoded by three major alleles ({epsilon}2, {epsilon}3, and {epsilon}4) and, compared to apoE3, apoE4 increases the risk of developing Alzheimer disease and cognitive impairments following various environmental challenges. Exposure to irradiation, including that of {sup 56}Fe, during space missions poses a significant risk to the central nervous system, and apoE isoform might modulate this risk. Methods and Materials: We investigated whether apoE isoform modulates hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance starting 2 weeks after {sup 56}Fe irradiation. Changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect cognition and are induced by irradiation. Therefore, after cognitive testing, we assessed hippocampal ROS levels in ex vivo brain slices, using the ROS-sensitive fluorescent probe, dihydroethidium (DHE). Brain levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), extracellular SOD, and apoE were assessed using Western blotting analysis. Results: In the water maze, spatial memory retention was impaired by irradiation in apoE2 and apoE4 mice but enhanced by irradiation in apoE3 mice. Irradiation reduced DHE-oxidation levels in the enclosed blade of the dentate gyrus and levels of 3-NT and CuZnSOD in apoE2 but not apoE3 or apoE4 mice. Finally, irradiation increased apoE levels in apoE3 but not apoE2 or apoE4 mice. Conclusions: The short-term effects of {sup 56}Fe irradiation on hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retention are apoE isoform-dependent.

Haley, Gwendolen E. [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States) [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR (United States); Villasana, Laura; Dayger, Catherine; Davis, Matthew J. [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)] [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Raber, Jacob, E-mail: raberj@ohsu.edu [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States) [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR (United States); Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Joel Poinsett and the Paradox of Imperial Republicanism: Chile, Mexico, and the Cherokee Nation, 1810-1841 .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis examines the intersection of republicanism and imperialism in the early nineteenth-century Americas. I focus primarily on Joel Roberts Poinsett, a United States ambassador… (more)

Freed, Feather Crawford, 1971-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Paradox of Peroxy Defects and Positive Holes in Rocks Part II: Outflow of Electric Currents from Stressed Rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the electrical properties of rocks is of fundamental interest. We report on currents generated when stresses are applied. Loading the center of gabbro tiles, 30x30x0.9 cm$^3$, across a 5 cm diameter piston, leads to positive currents flowing from the center to the unstressed edges. Changing the constant rate of loading over 5 orders of magnitude from 0.2 kPa/s to 20 MPa/s produces positive currents, which start to flow already at low stress levels, <5 MPa. The currents increase as long as stresses increase. At constant load they flow for hours, days, even weeks and months, slowly decreasing with time. When stresses are removed, they rapidly disappear but can be made to reappear upon reloading. These currents are consistent with the stress-activation of peroxy defects, such as O$_3$Si-OO-SiO$_3$, in the matrix of rock-forming minerals. The peroxy break-up leads to positive holes h$^{\\bullet}$, i.e. electronic states associated with O$^-$ in a matrix of O$^{2-}$, plus electrons, e'. Propagating...

Scoville, John; Freund, Friedemann

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Wave function perturbations propagation in multi-particle systems, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox and entanglement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If a one-particle or multi-particle non-relativistic quantum system is initially in a stationary state, and its wave function field is locally perturbed, then according to classical Schr\\"odinger equation, the perturbation instantaneously affects all infinite region because, according to the equation, speed of the wave function perturbations propagation is infinite. This feature strongly influences all theoretical predictions for time evolution of the system and contradicts the natural limitation of the perturbations propagation speed by speed of light. We develop finite propagation speed concept for multi-particle non-relativistic quantum systems. It consists of (a) eikonal type equation for the wave function perturbation traveltime describing finite speed perturbation waves in hyperspace including coordinates of all paricles in the system; (b) modified multi-particle Schr\\"odinger equation with finite speed of the wave function perturbations propagation; and (c) hypothesis that speed of the wave function pe...

Shnaid, Isaac

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The local and global geometrical aspects of the twin paradox in static spacetimes: II. Reissner--Nordström and ultrastatic metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a consecutive paper on the timelike geodesic structure of static spherically symmetric spacetimes. First we show that for a stable circular orbit (if it exists) in any of these spacetimes all the infinitesimally close to it timelike geodesics constructed with the aid of the general geodesic deviation vector have the same length between a pair of conjugate points. In Reissner--Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole metric we explicitly find the Jacobi fields on the radial geodesics and show that they are locally (and globally) maximal curves between any pair of their points outside the outer horizon. If a radial and circular geodesics in R--N metric have common endpoints, the radial one is longer. If a static spherically symmetric spacetime is ultrastatic, its gravitational field exerts no force on a free particle which may stay at rest; the free particle in motion has a constant velocity (in this sense the motion is uniform) and its total energy always exceeds the rest energy, i.~e.~it has no gravitational energy. Previously the absence of the gravitational force has been known only for the global Barriola--Vilenkin monopole. In the spacetime of the monopole we explicitly find all timelike geodesics, the Jacobi fields on them and the condition under which a generic geodesic may have conjugate points.

Leszek M. Soko?owski; Zdzis?aw A. Golda

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

216

Recycling flows in eMergy evaluation: A Mathematical Paradox? N.Y. Amponsah, O. Le Corre1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 Recycling involving recycling or reuse of waste. If waste exergy (its residual usefulness) is not negligible, wastes could serve as input to another process or be recycled. In cases of continuous waste recycle or reuse

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

217

The U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U sing a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a total of 1.525 trillion barrels of oil in place in seventeen oil shale zones in the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado.

unknown authors

218

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report discusses in details the geologic assessment of the Piceance Creek Basin. Analysis of the high resolution aeromagnetic survey concentrated on the high-resolution aeromagnetic data acquired by World Geoscience, but the interpretation was supplemented by examination of regional published gravity and magnetic data, as well as surface geology and subsurface geology.

NONE

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

auditory change detection: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The Dynamic Range Paradox: A Central Auditory Model of Intensity Change Detection Engineering Websites Summary: The Dynamic Range Paradox:...

220

Paradigm or Paradox: Can we Attribute Species Changes to Global Climate Change in Light of Decreasing Water Temperatures in Central California?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reef- fish assemblages in kelp habitats off Santa Barbara,1985. The ecology of giant kelp habitats in California: asubstrate and extensive kelp forests. Since 1992, NMFS

Breaker, Laurence; Cailliet, Gregor; Launer, Andrea; Wadsworth, Tom

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The paradox of success: the roll of capital markets in determining British policy toward the European common currency, 1979-1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

That Britain, one of Europe's largest economies, has opted not to adopt the European common currency (Euro) has puzzled students of the European Union for some time. As recent referenda demonstrate, Britons remain mysteriously cautious of monetary...

Walker, Caton Montgomery

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

222

Paradigm or Paradox: Can we Attribute Species Changes to Global Climate Change in Light of Decreasing Water Temperatures in Central California?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Jersey. 315 p. Hoffmann, J. P. , 2004. GeneralizedPoisson distribution (Hoffmann 2004). Because the majority

Breaker, Laurence; Cailliet, Gregor; Launer, Andrea; Wadsworth, Tom

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers research activities for the second half of the second project year (October 6, 2001, through April 5, 2002). This work includes description and analysis of cores, correlation of geophysical well logs, reservoir mapping, petrographic description of thin sections, cross plotting of permeability and porosity data, and development of horizontal drilling strategies for the Little Ute and Sleeping Ute fields in Montezuma County, Colorado. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative core, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells.

Wray, Laura L.; Eby, David E.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.

2002-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, UTE Mountain UTE Reservation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this project were: (1) To enhance recovery of oil contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute tribal lands. (2) To promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American Oil production corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other Tribes. (3) To develop an understanding of multicomponent seismic data as it relates to the variations in permeability and porosity of algal mounds, as well as lateral facies variations, for use in both reservoir development and exploration. (4) To identify any undiscovered algal mounds for field-extension within the area of seismic coverage. (5) To evaluate the potential for applying CO{sub 2} floods, steam floods, water floods or other secondary or tertiary recovery processes to increase production. The technical work scope was carried out by: (1) Acquiring multicomponent seismic data over the project area; (2) Processing and reprocessing the multicomponent data to extract as much geological and engineering data as possible within the budget and time-frame of the project; (3) Preparing maps and data volumes of geological and engineering data based on the multicomponent seismic and well data; (4) Selecting drilling targets if warranted by the seismic interpretation; (5) Constructing a static reservoir model of the project area; and (6) Constructing a dynamic history-matched simulation model from the static model. The original project scope covered a 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) area encompassing two algal mound fields (Towaoc and Roadrunner). 3D3C seismic data was to acquired over this area to delineate mound complexes and image internal reservoir properties such as porosity and fluid saturations. After the project began, the Red Willow Production Company, a project partner and fully-owned company of the Southern Ute Tribe, contributed additional money to upgrade the survey to a nine-component (3D9C) survey. The purpose of this upgrade to nine components was to provide additional shear wave component data that might prove useful in delineating internal mound reservoir attributes. Also, Red Willow extended the P-wave portion of the survey to the northwest of the original 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) 3D9C area in order to extend coverage further to the northwest to the Marble Wash area. In order to accomplish this scope of work, 3D9C seismic data set covering two known reservoirs was acquired and processed. Three-dimensional, zero-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data was acquired to determine the shear wave velocities for processing the sh3Dseismic data. Anisotropic velocity, and azimuthal AVO processing was carried out in addition to the conventional 3D P-wave data processing. All P-, PS- and S-wave volumes of the seismic data were interpreted to map the seismic response. The interpretation consisted of conventional cross-plots of seismic attributes vs. geological and reservoir engineering data, as well as multivariate and neural net analyses to assess whether additional resolution on exploration and engineering parameters could be achieved through the combined use of several seismic variables. Engineering data in the two reservoirs was used to develop a combined lithology, structure and permeability map. On the basis of the seismic data, a well was drilled into the northern mound trend in the project area. This well, Roadrunner No.9-2, was brought into production in late April 2006 and continues to produce modest amounts of oil and gas. As of the end of August 2007, the well has produced approximately 12,000 barrels of oil and 32,000 mcf of gas. A static reservoir model was created from the seismic data interpretations and well data. The seismic data was tied to various markers identified in the well logs, which in turn were related to lithostratigraphy. The tops and thicknesses of the various units were extrapolated from well control based upon the seismic data that was calibrated to the well picks. The reservoir engineering properties were available from a number of wel

Joe Hachey

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Generalized time-dependent density-functional-theory response functions for spontaneous density fluctuations and nonlinear response: Resolving the causality paradox in real time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalized time-dependent density-functional-theory response functions for spontaneous density shifted the focus of elec- tronic structure theory from the many-body wave function to the charge density response and spontaneous fluctuations of many-electron systems. The pth-order density response functions

Mukamel, Shaul

226

Comment on "Holographic Thermalization, stability of AdS, and the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou paradox" by V. Balasubramanian et al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We comment upon a numerical computation in a recent paper by Balasubramanian, Buchel, Green, Lehner, and Liebling.

Piotr Bizo?; Andrzej Rostworowski

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

227

Paradigm or Paradox: Can we Attribute Species Changes to Global Climate Change in Light of Decreasing Water Temperatures in Central California?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California and Adjacent Waters. University of Californiamarmoratus) in California waters as assessed in 2005. ReportMonitoring MPAs in Deep Water off Central California: 2007

Breaker, Laurence; Cailliet, Gregor; Launer, Andrea; Wadsworth, Tom

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The evaluation of system-wide financial incentives in pipeline decisions in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry : the paradox of R&D spend Vs. new drug approvals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For several decades, the ascendancy of the Pharma & Biotech sector was largely driven by favorable macro-economic conditions combined with an astonishing level of innovation and a clear focus on addressing unmet medical ...

Swarna, Kailash, 1963-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Clim. Past, 4, 7990, 2008 www.clim-past.net/4/79/2008/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimension Earth system Model of Intermediate complexity was used to understand this seem- ing paradox

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

230

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced a total of 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2000 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the first project year (July 1 through September 30, 2002). This work included producing general descriptions of Utah's major petroleum provinces, gathering field data, and analyzing best practices in the Utah Wyoming thrust belt. Major Utah oil reservoirs and/or source rocks are found in Devonian through Permian, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks. Stratigraphic traps include carbonate buildups and fluvial-deltaic pinchouts, and structural traps include basement-involved and detached faulted anticlines. Best practices used in Utah's oil fields consist of waterflood, carbon-dioxide flood, gas-injection, and horizontal drilling programs. Nitrogen injection and horizontal drilling programs have been successfully employed to enhance oil production from the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone (the major thrust belt oil-producing reservoir) in Wyoming's Painter Reservoir and Ryckman Creek fields. At Painter Reservoir field a tertiary, miscible nitrogen-injection program is being conducted to raise the reservoir pressure to miscible conditions. Supplemented with water injection, the ultimate recovery will be 113 million bbls (18 million m{sup 3}) of oil (a 68 percent recovery factor over a 60-year period). The Nugget reservoir has significant heterogeneity due to both depositional facies and structural effects. These characteristics create ideal targets for horizontal wells and horizontal laterals drilled from existing vertical wells. Horizontal drilling programs were conducted in both Painter Reservoir and Ryckman Creek fields to encounter potential undrained compartments and increase the overall field recovery by 0.5 to 1.5 percent per horizontal wellbore. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation to the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and two publications. A project home page was set up on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Quarterly Review of Methane from Coal-Seams Technology. Volume 8, Number 4, July 1991. Report for October-December 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents include reports on: Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana; Piceance Basin, Colorado; Raton Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Black Warrior Basin, Alabama; Coalbed Methane Development in the Appalachian Basin; Geologic Evaluation of Critical Production Parameters for Coalbed Methane Resources; Reservoir Engineering and Analysis; Coordinated Laboratory Studies in Support of Hydraulic Fracturing of Coalbed Methane; Physical Sciences Coalbed Methane Research; Coalbed Methane Opportunities in Alberta.

McBane, R.A.; Schwochow, S.D.; Stevens, S.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Displacements required during multiple drapefolding along the northwest Bighorn Mountain front, Wyoming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

folds of the eastern Uinta Mountains (Cook and Stearns, 1975). Shale sections also flow and thin easily and Vaughn (1976) reports consid. erable I;hinning in the Mesozoic fine-grained clastic rocks (Permian thru Jurassic) as they drape over... deposited on the continental shelf bor- dering the Paleozoic geosyncline. The Ordovicain Bighorn Dolomite is a massive, thick bedded dolomite, while the Devonian Jefferson-Three Fork Formation is a thin-bedded limestone interbedded wi. th thin shale...

Tirey, Martha Margaret

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Later Tertiary Leporidae of North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saskatchewan. Generic characters. Compared with Megalagus brachyodon, cheek-teeth less hypsodont, molarization of premolars less advanced, molars less reduced, and maxilla and mandibular ramus narrower in premolar region; P3-P4 each having shallow hypostria... the Myton Pocket in Utah and M. wyomingensis from Badwater Creek, Wyoming, specimens from the Wagonhound member of the Uinta Eocene, the Duchesne River (Rand- lett horizon), and the Swift Current Creek beds of Saskatchewan have been referred to this genus...

Dawson, M. R.

1958-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

236

Faster than Light Quantum Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faster than light communication might be possible using the collapse of the quantum wave-function without any accompanying paradoxes.

A. Y. Shiekh

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

237

Life in the Universe Summary & Speculation...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of years lead on us. #12;The Fermi Paradox As originally phrased by Erico Fermi, it seems a reasonable

Shirley, Yancy

238

Top Management Involvement in the Adoption of Energy Efficiency Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Efficiency Paradox: Bureaucratic and Organizationalenergy efficiency, including organizational and informationefficiency gap generally and the impact of organizational

Blass, Vered; Corbett, Charles J.; Delmas, Magali A; Muthulingam, Suresh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

What is philosophy? Peter G. Doyle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was `the alien banker's paradox'. This paradox, which apparently is quite well known, usually goes under, I'm going to call it the `alien banker's paradox. Here's how it goes. An alien comes down and amazes $100; the other box is opaque. Now the alien gives you a choice: You can keep the contents of either

Doyle, Peter

240

Quarterly review of methane from coal-seams technology. Volume 7, Number 3, July-September 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report contains: sources of coal well information; Powder River Basin, Wyoming; greater Green River coal region, Wyoming and Colorado; Piceance Basin, Colorado; San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Raton Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Black Warrior Basin, Alabama; the United States coalbed methane resource; western cretaceous coal seams project; multiple coal seams project; spalling and the development of a hydraulic fracturing strategy for coal; geologic evaluation of critical production parameters for coalbed methane resources; coalbed methane opportunities in Alberta; the coalbed methane forum; eastern coalbed methane forum.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 4. Solid waste from mining and surface retorts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this study were to: review and evaluate published information on the disposal, composition, and leachability of solid wastes produced by aboveground shale oil extraction processes; examine the relationship of development to surface and groundwater quality in the Piceance Creek basin of northwestern Colorado; and identify key areas of research necessary to quantitative assessment of impact. Information is presented under the following section headings: proposed surface retorting developments; surface retorting processes; environmental concerns; chemical/mineralogical composition of raw and retorted oil shale; disposal procedures; water quality; and research needs.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Rf.: Appay, Beatrice (2005) "L'autonomie contrle" In La dictature du succs: le paradoxe de l'autonomie contrle et de la prcarisation. Paris: L'Harmattan: 69-87  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'autonomie contrôlée et de la précarisation. Paris: L'Harmattan: 69-87 Résumé: Dans ce chapitre 3, la théorie de l de l'autonomie contrôlée et de la précarisation. Paris: L'Harmattan: 69-87 #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12

Boyer, Edmond

243

VOLUME 85, NUMBER 24 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 11 DECEMBER 2000 New Paradoxical Games Based on Brownian Ratchets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Games Based on Brownian Ratchets Juan M. R. Parrondo,1 Gregory P. Harmer,2 and Derek Abbott2 1) Based on Brownian ratchets, a counterintuitive phenomenon has recently emerged--namely, that two losing or randomly [1,2]. This so-called flashing ratchet is in the class of phenomena known as Brownian ratchets [3

Parrondo, Juan M.R.

244

A paradox resolved: Sulfide acquisition by roots of seep tubeworms sustains net chemoautotrophy John K. Freytag, Peter R. Girguis, Derk C. Bergquist, Jason P. Andras, James J. Childress, and Charles R.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. luymesi can be sufficient to fuel net autotrophic total dissolved inorganic carbon uptake. Hydrothermal to acquire sulfide at an average rate of 4.1 mol g 1 h 1. Net dissolved inorganic carbon uptake across conspicuous organisms at many of the hydrothermal vent sites in the eastern Pacific as well as many

Girguis, Peter R.

245

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Annual report, September 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an annual summarization of an ongoing research in the field of modeling and detecting naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The current research is in the Piceance basin of Western Colorado. The aim is to use existing information to determine the most optimal zone or area of fracturing using a unique reaction-transport-mechanical (RTM) numerical basin model. The RTM model will then subsequently help map subsurface lateral and vertical fracture geometries. The base collection techniques include in-situ fracture data, remote sensing, aeromagnetics, 2-D seismic, and regional geologic interpretations. Once identified, high resolution airborne and spaceborne imagery will be used to verify the RTM model by comparing surficial fractures. If this imagery agrees with the model data, then a further investigation using a three-dimensional seismic survey component will be added. This report presents an overview of the Piceance Creek basin and then reviews work in the Parachute and Rulison fields and the results of the RTM models in these fields.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Ecological effects of oil shale development: problems, perspectives, and approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although current oil shale developments in the Piceance Basin appear to have had little impact on ecosystems, it is important to recognize that planned expansion of the industry in the Basin will greatly magnify the potential for serious perturbations of the Piceance environs. The relatively small scale of the present oil shale activities in the Basin provides the biologist with a unique opportunity to establish and conduct quantitative studies designed to measure impacts as they occur. This paper is intended to focus attention on some of the problems, perspectives and recommended approaches to conducting ecosystem effects studies that will provide criteria for evaluation and mitigation of impacts should they occur. The purpose of this paper is not to criticize past and current environmental studies on oil shale, but in light of anticipated growth of the industry, to focus attention on the need to carefully define, design and execute ecological effects studies to quantify and provide mitigation criteria for impacts that will undoubtedly result from accelerated industry activities.

Hakonson, T.E.; White. G.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Geologic characterization of tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of US Geological Survey (USGS) work during FY 89 were to conduct geologic research characterizing tight gas-bearing sandstone reservoirs and their resources in the western United States. Our research has been regional in scope but, in some basins, our investigations have focused on single wells or small areas containing several wells where a large amount of data is available. The investigations, include structure, stratigraphy, petrography, x-ray mineralogy, source-rock evaluation, formation pressure and temperature, borehole geophysics, thermal maturity mapping, fission-track age dating, fluid-inclusion thermometry, and isotopic geochemistry. The objectives of these investigations are to provide geologic models that can be compared and utilized in tight gas-bearing sequences elsewhere. Nearly all of our work during FY 89 was devoted to developing a computer-based system for the Uinta basin and collecting, analyzing, and storage of data. The data base, when completed will contain various types of stratigraphic, organic chemistry, petrographic, production, engineering, and other information that relate to the petroleum geology of the Uinta basin, and in particular, to the tight gas-bearing strata. 16 refs., 3 figs.

Law, B.E.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - america genetic characterization Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the genetic... Paradox lost: genetic diversity and the success of ... Source: Roman, Joe - Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont; Vermont, University...

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - asian genetic diversity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

where this Asian... Paradox lost: genetic diversity and the success of aquatic invasions Joe Roman1 and John A Darling2... ? Here, we review recent empirical literature comparing...

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic fish hemoglobins Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: antarctic fish hemoglobins Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Is There an Answer? The Icefish Paradox.''...

251

KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTION IN CONFLICT AND INTERVENTION: THE ART OF COMPOSING THE PICTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, AND LOCAL RESPONSES IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA BORIS WILKE, A NEW LIBERAL PARADOX IN CONTEMPORARY SERBIA AND BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA- IMKE HANSEN, THE RIGHT RESPONSE

Uppsala Universitet

252

Feasibility/alternatives study for the planned replacement of Nuclear Material Safeguards System (NMSS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a study which describes the NMSS replacement alternatives and provides recommended solutions. It also describes a NMSS Paradox prototype.

McBride, K.C.; Russell, V.K.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

253

advanced load alleviation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

paradox of the pulsar wind nebula. Maxim Lyutikov 2002-02-19 89 A Technique to Utilize Smart Meter Load Information for Adapting Overcurrent Protection for Radial Distribution...

254

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES INVITED COMMENTARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, kinematic waves, transmissivity feedback, exchange between matrix and macropores, and so forth (Beven, 1989 these observations in the following way may prove useful. Paradox 1: Rapid Mobilization of Old Water The hydrology of old water' paradox, exemplified by Figure 1. In many small catchments, streamflow responds promptly

Kirchner, James W.

255

Characterization of natural fractures in Mesaverde core from the multiwell experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural fractures dominate the permeability of tight sandstone reservoirs in the Mesaverde Formation of the Piceance Creek Basin, north-western Colorado. Roughly 1900 natural fractures, detected in 4200 ft of Mesaverde core from the US Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX), have been differentiated into 10 different fracture types on the basis of fracture morphology, inclination, the presence of slickensides, the presence of dickite mineralization and/or host lithology. Approximately 75% of the MWX core fractures are dewatering planes in mudstone and are probably unimportant to reservoir permeability. The remaining 25% of the MWX core fractures include 275 mostly calcite-mineralized, vertical extension fractures, 61 irregular, dickite-mineralized extension fractures, 27 mostly calcite-mineralized, horizontal extension fractures, and 90 slickensided, occasionally mineralized shear fractures. These extension and shear fractures are all potentially important to reservoir permeability and consequently productivity. 13 refs., 61 figs., 2 tabs.

Finley, S.J.; Lorenz, J.C.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Screening Assessment of Potential Human-Health Risk from Future Natural-Gas Drilling Near Project Rulison in Western Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Project Rulison underground nuclear test was conducted in 1969 at a depth of 8,400 ft in the Williams Fork Formation of the Piceance Basin, west-central Colorado (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the steward of the site. Their management is guided by data collected from past site investigations and current monitoring, and by the results of calculations of expected behavior of contaminants remaining in the deep subsurface. The purpose of this screening risk assessment is to evaluate possible health risks from current and future exposure to Rulison contaminants so the information can be factored into LM's stewardship decisions. For example, these risk assessment results can inform decisions regarding institutional controls at the site and appropriate monitoring of nearby natural-gas extraction activities. Specifically, the screening risk analysis can provide guidance for setting appropriate action levels for contaminant monitoring to ensure protection of human health.

Daniels Jeffrey I.,Chapman Jenny B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Oil shale mining cost analysis. Volume I. Surface retorting process. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Oil Shale Mining Economic Model (OSMEM) was developed and executed for mining scenarios representative of commercially feasible mining operations. Mining systems were evaluated for candidate sites in the Piceance Creek Basin. Mining methods selected included: (1) room-and-pillar; (2) chamber-and-pillar, with spent shale backfilling; (3) sublevel stopping; and (4) sublevel stopping, with spent shale backfilling. Mines were designed to extract oil shale resources to support a 50,000 barrels-per-day surface processing facility. Costs developed for each mining scenario included all capital and operating expenses associated with the underground mining methods. Parametric and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the sensitivity of mining cost to changes in capital cost, operating cost, return on investment, and cost escalation.

Resnick, B.S.; English, L.M.; Metz, R.D.; Lewis, A.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Effect of confining pressure on pore volume in tight sandstones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of confining pressure on the pore volume of some tight sandstones from the Uinta Basin, Utah, was investigated. A new method based on the pressure-volume relationships of a gas was developed and used to measure pore volume reduction. The results were compared with the results obtained using the more common method that involves the measurement of liquid expelled from a saturated core and were found to be in good agreement. Pore volume compressibility of the samples studies is in the range of values reported by other investigators and ranges from 2.0 x 10/sup -6/ to 1.3 x 10/sup -5/ pv/pv/psi at a confining pressure of 5,000 psi.

Sampath, K.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Revista Iguanazul, Number 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

." JlIa.""" LeopoIJo Vall.,j,) (Gudad d~ l'u"bLl) Cnrru ponsale5 en r.Uxico ClaLldiu ObregOn 03irln (Canca n, Q uintaN! 11.00) U.miel Valera V,llencia iColima, Colima) MMi., EI .. na Hlnujo~ (Ct'ordoba. Veracr

Santopietro, Judith

260

Gas productivity related to cleat volumes derived from focused resistivity tools in coalbed methane (CBM) fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleats are critical for coal-bed methane (CBM) production, but operators usually lack a viable method to determine productivity except for costly well tests. Wireline logs, run over the CBM deposits of the Drunkards Wash Unit located in the Uinta Basin of Utah, were used to develop a new method to relate productivity to the cleat volume. The latter is derived from a focused resistivity log and the wellbore-fluid resistivity. Induction tools are unsuitable for this method, because they are dominated by borehole effects in high resistivity coals and low resistivity mud. Moreover, they read too deep to be significantly affected by the substitution of formation fluid by borehole fluid in the cleats on which the method is based. The method was demonstrated by relating cleat volume to CBM gas productivity in 24 wells, an exercise that clearly separated good from poor producers.

Yang, Y.H.; Peeters, M.; Cloud, T.A.; Van Kirk, C.W. [Kerr McGee Rocky Mountain Corporation, Denver, CO (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

Eric P. Robertson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Unwinding Sony  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

951 (suggesting that the Sony “staple article of commerce”symbolic than practical value). Sony Paradox article>by Stephen A. Kroft, Sony Corp. of America v. Universal City

Menell, Peter S.; Nimmer, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Statutory Damages in Copyright Law: A Remedy in Need of Reform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Universal sought to hold Sony liable for infringing uses ofe.g. , Jessica Litman, The Sony Paradox, 55 C ASE W. R ES .have been levied against Sony as one reason why the Court

Samuelson, Pamela; Wheatland, Tara

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The role of mismatch repair in mediating cellular sensitivity to cisplatin : the Escherichia coli methyl-directed repair paradigm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The anticancer drug cisplatin is in widespread use but its mechanism of action is only poorly understood. Moreover, human cancers acquire resistance to the drug, which limits its clinical utility. A paradox in the field ...

Robbins, Jennifer L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evolutionary tradeoffs can select against nitrogen fixation and thereby maintain nitrogen limitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. evolutionary ecology model Biological nitrogen (N) fixation--the conversion of atmo- spheric N2 gas) but is equally important to explaining the paradox of N limitation. Unlike the successional question

Menge, Duncan

266

Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University, New York  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Middle Ages The hermeneutics of the Christian Middle Ages assign the religious image and its aesthetic. This Christian hermeneutics or theory of symbolism endow the corporeal, painted image with a paradox inherent

Qian, Ning

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - af146527 genomic repeat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: af146527 genomic repeat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Population genomics20-02-2009 Antnio Rodrigues; Bruno Santos 59 Population Genomics Summary: -Paradox...

268

The Environmental Impacts of Logistics Systems and Options for Mitigation Nakul Sathaye, Yuwei Li, Arpad Horvath and Samer Madanat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Transportation Sustainability and Green Logistics ................................................3 1 .....................................................................................3 1.2. Considering Green Logistics with Industry Perspectives...................................................................................................................44 #12;2 Table of Tables Table 1 ­ Paradoxes of Green Logistics

California at Berkeley, University of

269

BOOKS ET AL. www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 328 21 MAY 2010 977  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:COURTESYQUAKERPEACEANDSOCIALWITNESS,THERELIGIOUSSOCIETYOFFRIENDSINBRITAIN T he paradoxical seriousness of games was reviewed synoptically by the Dutch historian Johan Huizinga for the humanistic insights of Huizinga. Although the essential ideas for game theory grew out of the analysis

Sigmund, Karl

270

A review of "Literature and Religious Culture in Seventeenth-Century England." by Reid Barbour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The community at Great Tew prized reason, censured violence, defended doubt and even dissent, and embraced a universalist soteriology. Barbour shows that Great Tew and REVIEWS 163 Little Gidding, paradoxically, both challenged and helped to sustain the court...

Holly Faith Nelson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Maintaining secrecy when information leakage is unavoidable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) We apply the framework to get new results, creating (a) encryption schemes with very short keys, and (b) hash functions that leak no information about their input, yet-paradoxically-allow testing if a candidate ...

Smith, Adam (Adam Davidson), 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Liberalism and ethical life : on equality, neutrality, and culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liberalism faces an apparent paradox. Its commitments to values such as neutrality and tolerance seem to recommend a hands-off attitude toward a society's ethical life. It seems the state should not regulate the value ...

Kurtz, Roxanne Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

advancing age potential: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

old, 12-month old, and adult) based on auditory event-related potentials Reilly, James P. 10 Paradoxical down?regulation of p16 INK4a mRNA with advancing age in Acute...

274

"Certainly the Proper Business of Woman": Household and Estate Management Techniques of Eighteenth-Century French Noblewomen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project explores the legal, economic, and social aspects of household and estate management in eighteenth-century France. It investigates two paradoxes surrounding noblewomen and household management. The first involves ...

Utech, Sally

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

275

The competition between coal and natural gas : the importance of sunk costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores the seeming paradox between the predominant choice of natural gas for capacity additions to generate electricity in the United States and the continuing large share of coal in meeting incremental ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A review of "The Senses in Religious Communities, 1600-1800: Early Modern 'Convents of Pleasure'" by Nicky Hallett  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of religious paradoxes: there is unity in diversity. Nicky Hallett. The Senses in Religious Communities, 1600-1800: Early Modern “Convents of Pleasure.” Farnham, Surrey, England: Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. xii+249. $109.95. Review by elena levy...

Levy-Navarro, Elena

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A review of "Religious Diversity and Early Modern English Texts: Catholic, Judaic, Feminist, and Secular Dimensions" edited by Arthur F. Marotti and Chanita Goodblatt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

echoes one of the most traditional of religious paradoxes: there is unity in diversity. Nicky Hallett. The Senses in Religious Communities, 1600-1800: Early Modern “Convents of Pleasure.” Farnham, Surrey, England: Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. xii+249...

Bentley, Greg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

One to one connections : building a community learning culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complexity of the school, society and policy, and dominant cultural beliefs about teaching, learning, and knowledge constrain people's mindsets, paradoxically preventing the fundamental changes that can take advantage ...

Urrea, Claudia M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A Bird’s Eye View of Human Language Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative studies of linguistic faculties in animals pose an evolutionary paradox: language involves certain perceptual and motor abilities, but it is not clear that this serves as more than an input–output channel for ...

Berwick, Robert C.

280

Life in the woods : production and consumption of the urban forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of wood is fraught with paradox. Wood as a building material is embraced for its naturalness, while the cutting of trees is indicted as a destruction of nature. Wood is lauded for its structural properties and ...

Volicer, Nadine (Nadine M.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hypodensity/Hyperdensity ; or, Apple skies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hypodensity/Hyperdensity is a reaction to the paradoxical modern urban condition of emptiness: the 'ring of drek,' left like a smear around Boston by post-industrial deflation. This area is close to both the crowded city ...

Cira, Gabriel (Gabriel Blue)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The ambivalence of gentrifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the paradox faced by 25-34 year-old, White, well-educated persons who choose to live in predominantly low-income neighborhoods. In particular, this thesis asks if gentrifiers are aware of gentrification ...

Novak, Alison Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Cooling of the Earth in the Archaean 8.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

paradox' has led many investigators to models in which cooling of the hotter Earth took place through' are strongly depen- dent on lithospheric age and hence on lithospheric recycling rate and mantle tem- perature

van Keken, Peter

284

www.ianrowland.com > Items To Buy > Diana Deutsch CDs Home Items To Buy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.ianrowland.com > Items To Buy > Diana Deutsch CDs Home Items To Buy Items To Buy > Auditory Illusions CDs by Diana Deutsch published by Philomel Records Actual titles: Musical Illusions and Paradoxes

285

Science at the Edge Traditionally distinct scientific disciplines are merging to create new  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lattice Engineering for Solar Cells - Addressing the High-Efficiency Low-Cost Paradox for PhotovoltaicGrange, Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Imaging Rapid, Irreversible

286

Decision Theory Up to this point most of our discussion has been about epistemology. But  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

farther into the philosophy of decision theory, as well as the concepts we will need for discussions later kinds of risk-aversion (especially the Allais Paradox), and with Newcomb's Problem. Causal Decision

Fitelson, Branden

287

R E V I E W : C L I M A T O L O G Y The Sun's Role in Climate Variations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or it is of no consequence whatsoever. The reality is that Earth's atmosphere, land surface, and oceans are not passive by observing the response to increased green- house gases. Eons and the Faint Sun Paradox The concept is well

288

GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as “baseline data” for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a “baseline” data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and visualization techniques of the Piceance Basin structure spatial distribution of the oil shale resources. The sur- face water/groundwater models quantify the water shortage and better understanding the spatial distribution of the available water resources. The energy resource development systems model reveals the phase shift of water usage and the oil shale production, which will facilitate better planning for oil shale development. Detailed descriptions about the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research will be given in the sec- tion of “ACCOMPLISHMENTS, RESULTS, AND DISCUSSION” of this report.

Zhou, Wei (Wendy) [Wendy; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

NORTH HILL CREEK 3-D SEISMIC EXPLORATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind River Resources Corporation (WRRC) received a DOE grant in support of its proposal to acquire, process and interpret fifteen square miles of high-quality 3-D seismic data on non-allotted trust lands of the Uintah and Ouray (Ute) Indian Reservation, northeastern Utah, in 2000. Subsequent to receiving notice that its proposal would be funded, WRRC was able to add ten square miles of adjacent state and federal mineral acreage underlying tribal surface lands by arrangement with the operator of the Flat Rock Field. The twenty-five square mile 3-D seismic survey was conducted during the fall of 2000. The data were processed through the winter of 2000-2001, and initial interpretation took place during the spring of 2001. The initial interpretation identified multiple attractive drilling prospects, two of which were staked and permitted during the summer of 2001. The two initial wells were drilled in September and October of 2001. A deeper test was drilled in June of 2002. Subsequently a ten-well deep drilling evaluation program was conducted from October of 2002 through March 2004. The present report discusses the background of the project; design and execution of the 3-D seismic survey; processing and interpretation of the data; and drilling, completion and production results of a sample of the wells drilled on the basis of the interpreted survey. Fifteen wells have been drilled to test targets identified on the North Hill Creek 3-D Seismic Survey. None of these wildcat exploratory wells has been a dry hole, and several are among the best gas producers in Utah. The quality of the data produced by this first significant exploratory 3-D survey in the Uinta Basin has encouraged other operators to employ this technology. At least two additional 3-D seismic surveys have been completed in the vicinity of the North Hill Creek Survey, and five additional surveys are being planned for the 2004 field season. This project was successful in finding commercial oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids production on a remote part of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation. Much of the natural gas and natural gas liquids are being produced from the Wingate Formation, which to our knowledge has never produced commercially anywhere. Another large percentage of the natural gas is being produced from the Entrada Formation which has not previously produced in this part of the Uinta Basin. In all, at least nine geologic formations are contributing hydrocarbons to these wells. This survey has clearly established the fact that high-quality data can be obtained in this area, despite the known obstacles.

Marc T. Eckels; David H. Suek; Denise H. Harrison; Paul J. Harrison

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

290

Distribution and origin of sulfur in Colorado oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sulfur content of 1,225 samples of Green River oil shale from two core holes in the Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado, ranges from nearly 0 to 4.9 weight percent. In one core hole, the average sulfur content of a sequence of oil shale 555 m thick, which represents nearly the maximum thickness of oil shale in the basin, is 0.76 weight percent. The vertical distribution of sulfur through the oil shale is cyclic. As many as 25 sulfur cycles have lateral continuity and can be traced between the core holes. Most of the sulfur resides in iron sulfides (pyrite, marcasite, and minor. pyrrhotite), and small amounts are organically bound in kerogen. In general, the concentration of sulfur correlates moderately with oil shale yield, but the degree of association ranges from quite high in the upper 90 m of the oil shale sequence to low or none in the leached zone and in illitic oil shale in the lower part of the sequence. Sulfur also correlates moderately with iron in the carbonate oil shale sequence, but no correlation was found in the illitic samples. Sulfide mineralization is believed to have occurred during early and late stages of diagenesis, and after lithification, during development of the leached zone. Significant amounts of iron found in ankeritic dolomite and in illite probably account for the lack of a strong correlation between sulfur and iron.

Dyni, J.R.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fluorescence analysis can identify movable oil in self-sourcing reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent surge of activity involving self-sourcing reservoirs and horizontal drilling recognizes a little tapped niche in the domestic energy mix. Such prolific pays as the Cretaceous Bakken and Austin Chalk have drawn research interest and large amounts of investment capital. Fluorescence analysis can discern movable oil--as opposed to exhausted source rock--in such reservoirs with an inexpensive test. Other potential targets are the Cretaceous Mesaverde in the Piceance basin, Devonian New Albany shale in Kentucky, Devonian Antrim shale in the Michigan basin, and the Cretaceous Niobrara, Mancos, and Pierre formations in Colorado and New Mexico. To insure success in this niche this key question must be answered positively: Is movable oil present in the reservoir? Even if tectonic studies verify a system of open fractures, sonic logs confirm overpressuring in the zone, and resistivity logs document the maturity of the source, the ultimate question remains: Is movable oil in the fractures available to flow to the borehole? The paper explains a technique that will answer these questions.

Calhoun, G.G. [Calhoun (Gerry G.), Midland, TX (United States)

1995-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

293

Application of horizontal drilling to tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical fractures and lithologic heterogeneity are extremely important factors controlling gas flow rates and total gas recovery from tight (very low permeability) reservoirs. These reservoirs generally have in situ matrix permeabilities to gas of less than 0.1 md. Enhanced gas recovery methods have usually involved hydraulic fracturing; however, the induced vertical hydraulic fractures almost always parallel the natural fracture and may not be an efficient method to establish a good conduit to the wellbore. Horizontal drilling appears to be an optimum method to cut across many open vertical fractures. Horizontal holes will provide an efficient method to drain heterogeneous tight reservoirs even in unfractured rocks. Although many horizontal wells have now been completed in coalbed methane and oil reservoirs, very few have been drilled to exclusively evaluate tight gas reservoirs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded some horizontal and slanthole drilling in order to demonstrate the applicability of these techniques for gas development. Four DOE holes have been drilled in Devonian gas shales in the Appalachian basin, and one hole has been drilled in Upper Cretaceous tight sandstones in the Piceance basin of Colorado. The Colorado field experiment has provided valuable information on the abundance and openness of deeply buried vertical fractures in tight sandstones. These studies, plus higher gas prices, should help encourage industry to begin to further utilize horizontal drilling as a new exploitation method for tight gas reservoirs.

Spencer, C.W. (U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (United States)); Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Brown, C.A. (Synder Oil Co., Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hydraulic fracture model and diagnostics verification at GRI/DOE multi-site projects and tight gas sand program support. Final report, July 28, 1993--February 28, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over twenty years. Early production experiments included nuclear stimulations and massive hydraulic fracture treatments. This work culminated in the US Department of Energy (DOE)`s Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory designed to study the reservoir and production characteristics of low permeability sands. A key feature of MWX was an infrastructure which included several closely spaced wells that allowed detailed characterization of the reservoir through log and core analysis, and well testing. Interference and tracer tests, as well as the use of fracture diagnostics gave further information on stimulation and production characteristics. Thus, the Multiwell Experiment provided a unique opportunity for identifying the factors affecting production from tight gas sand reservoirs. The purpose of this operation was to support the gathering of field data that may be used to resolve the number of unknowns associated with measuring and modeling the dimensions of hydraulic fractures. Using the close-well infrastructure at the Multiwell Site near Rifle, Colorado, this operation focused primarily on the field design and execution of experiments. The data derived from the experiments were gathered and analyzed by DOE team contractors.

Schroeder, J.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

296

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

297

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

298

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

299

Billiard in the space with a time machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a system of an elastic ball moving in the non-relativistic spacetime with a nontrivial causal structure produced by a wormhole-based time machine. For such a system it is possible to formulate a simple model of the so-called `grandfather paradox': for certain `paradoxical' initial conditions the standard straight trajectory of the ball would self-collide inconsistently. We analyze globally consistent solutions of local equations of motion, namely, we find all trajectories with one self-collision. It is demonstrated that all standard initial conditions have a consistent evolution, including those `paradoxical' ones, for which the inconsistent collision-free trajectory is superseded by a special consistent self-colliding trajectory. Moreover, it is shown that for a wide class of initial conditions more than one globally consistent evolution exist. The nontrivial causal structure thus breaks the uniqueness of the classical theory even for locally deterministic physical laws.

Jindrich Dolansky; Pavel Krtous

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

Hydrotreating the native bitumen from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit in the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah was hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variables. The process variables investigated included reactor pressure (11.2--16.7 MPa); reactor temperature (641--712 K) and liquid hourly space velocity (0.19--0.77 h{sup {minus}1}). The hydrogen/oil ratio, 890 m{sup 3} m{sup {minus}3} was fixed in all experiments. A sulphided Ni-Mo on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in these studies. The deactivation of the catalyst, 0.2 {degree}C/day, was monitored by thedecline in the API gravity of the total liquid product with time on-stream at a standard set of conditions. The effect of temperature, WHSV, and pressure on denitrogenation, desulphurization, and metals removalwere studied and apparent kinetic parameters determined. The effect of process variables on residue conversion and Conradson carbon residue reduction were also investigated.

Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hydrotreating the native bitumen from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit in the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah was hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variables. The process variables investigated included reactor pressure (11.2--16.7 MPa); reactor temperature (641--712 K) and liquid hourly space velocity (0.19--0.77 h[sup [minus]1]). The hydrogen/oil ratio, 890 m[sup 3] m[sup [minus]3] was fixed in all experiments. A sulphided Ni-Mo on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in these studies. The deactivation of the catalyst, 0.2 [degree]C/day, was monitored by thedecline in the API gravity of the total liquid product with time on-stream at a standard set of conditions. The effect of temperature, WHSV, and pressure on denitrogenation, desulphurization, and metals removalwere studied and apparent kinetic parameters determined. The effect of process variables on residue conversion and Conradson carbon residue reduction were also investigated.

Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A review of "Being Interior: Autobiography and the Contradictions of Modernity in Seventeenth-Century France." by Nicholas D. Paige  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Quite the contrary, what Paige seeks to illustrate is that from its very inception the autobiographical sub- ject is mired with contradictions and paradoxes, and it is precisely these contradictions and paradoxes which Paige claims to be con- stitutive... to interiority is seen at once as a voluntary act per- formed in the pursuit of self-cultivation (the fashioning of an inner self), and as a forced response to infringing forces from the external (social) world (the desire to turn inward did not originate from...

Zahi Zalloua

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

R. Y. Chiao

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

304

Due 'paradossi meccanici' della Collezione Storica degli Strumenti di Fisica dell'Universit\\`a di Palermo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many instruments of the Historical Collection of the Physics Instruments of the University of Palermo date back to the early nineteenth century, when experimental Physics begun to be taught in university studies by using instruments and apparatuses in the classroom to illustrate the laws of Physics. Among the various instruments belonging to the Collection, there are also the so-called 'paradoxes', instruments with surprising properties that do not seem to follow the laws of Physics. In this article we analyze two 'mechanical paradoxes' of the Collection and discuss their possible educational use.

Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Cirrincione, Daniela; Fiordilino, Emilio; Mirabello, Filippo; Taormina, Francesca

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

An electromagnetic perpetuum mobile?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A charge moving freely in orbit around the Earth radiates according to Larmor's formula. If the path is closed, it would constitute a perpetuum mobile. The solution to this energy paradox is found in an article by C. M. DeWitt and B. DeWitt from 1964. The main point is that the equation of motion of a radiating charge is modified in curved spacetime. In the present article we explain the physics behind this modification, and use the generalized equation to solve the perpetuum mobile paradox.

Řyvind Grřn; Sigurd Kirkevold Nćss

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Two-Higgs-Doublet Model: Past, Present and Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barroso Fest #12;Outline · A (biased) history of the two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM) · The paradox of tan; and Gunion and Haber. #12;Contributions to 2HDM Physics by A. Barroso and collaborators · R. Santos and A. Barroso, Renormalization of two-Higgs-doublet models, Phys. Rev. D56, 5366 (1997). Renormalization

California at Santa Cruz, University of

307

TWRS information locator database system administrator`s manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a guide for use by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Locator Database (ILD) System Administrator. The TWRS ILD System is an inventory of information used in the TWRS Systems Engineering process to represent the TWRS Technical Baseline. The inventory is maintained in the form of a relational database developed in Paradox 4.5.

Knutson, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ratcheting up energy by means of measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The destruction of quantum coherence can pump energy into a system. For our examples this is paradoxical since the destroyed correlations are ordinarily considered negligible. Mathematically the explanation is straightforward and physically one can identify the degrees of freedom supplying this energy. Nevertheless, the energy input can be calculated without specific reference to those degrees of freedom.

L. S. Schulman; B. Gaveau

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Dimensional scaling treatment of stability of atomic anions induced by superintense, high-frequency laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and often paradoxical electronic properties of atoms induced by high-frequency superintense radiation fields- lization of multiply charged anions of hydrogen10 and doubly charged anions of helium and lithium atoms.11 of molecular anions. II. LASER ATOM INTERACTION We consider a high-frequency monochromatic electric field

Kais, Sabre

310

Magnetic properties of nanomagnetic and biomagnetic systems analyzed using cantilever magnetometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and also for the rare earth elements Gd, Dy and Tb at various temperatures. In addition, the magnetic, such as that of Brown's paradox [5]. Micromechanical cantilevers used in atomic force microscopy [6] (AFM) are highly sensitive force and torque sensors and therefore ideal tools for detecting magnetic properties of small

Aste, Andreas

311

Decision-support for the management of traumatically injured limb A project funded by under EPSRC's KTA Scheme ImpactQM, Sept 2010-Aug 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of limb injuries due to the nature of contemporary blast munitions, plus paradoxical improvements where the injury pattern falls to one extreme (mild limb injury, no case for amputation) or the other (severe injury, no choice BUT amputation). However, in other situations, the injured limb falls

Roelleke, Thomas

312

Political Theology of the Ordinary: On Bonnie Honig's Emergency Politics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Political Theology of the Ordinary: On Bonnie Honig's Emergency Politics Bonnie Honig, Emergency Politics: Paradox, Law, Democracy. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2009. If Carl Schmitt offers a Christian political theology, what would a Jewish political theology look like? Instead

Doyle, Robert

313

Valuing IT through Virtual Process Measurement ICIS '94 Paper by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reasoning, Valuation of information tech- nology. c 1994 Mark E. Nissen #12;1 Productivity Paradox of IT through the business environment, this need for useful IT-valuation measures will certainly grow through time; moreover, to the extent that measures for IT valuation fail to capture the "true" economic bene

Scacchi, Walt

314

Time machines and quantum theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a deep structural link between acausal spacetimes and quantum theory. As a consequence quantum theory may resolve some "paradoxes" of time travel. Conversely, non-time-orientable spacetimes naturally give rise to electric charges and spin half. If an explanation of quantum theory is possible, then general relativity with time travel could be it.

Mark J Hadley

2006-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

This article was downloaded by:[American Museum of Natural History] On: 22 July 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713658732 Resolution of a Supertree/Supermatrix Paradox John Gatesy a ; Conrad Matthee b ; Rob DeSalle c, USA. First Published on: 01 July 2002 To cite this Article: Gatesy, John, Matthee, Conrad, De for geography, endemism and taxonomic af lation. Ecography 21: 181­203. FREY, J. K. 1992. Response

DeSalle, Rob

316

A Recent Story of NGOs in Northern Iraqi Kurdistan Giorgio Francia1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Recent Story of NGOs in Northern Iraqi Kurdistan Giorgio Francia1 and Gérard Gautier2 Abstract In comparison to the other areas of Iraq, Kurdistan Region, in the northern part of the country, witnessed very on the day-to-day life in Kurdistan Region, as well as ­ paradoxically ­ a negative one on the funding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

317

Changing patent laws could be a healthy move  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

products. This investment is usually protected for 15 years after patent acceptance. However, by the time to address this paradox without a lateral approach, such as altering patent laws internationally and reducingChanging patent laws could be a healthy move to combat resistance Sir -- A contradiction exists

Fischer, Daniel

318

Preprint of paper which appeared in the Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the Support Technologies for Mobile Machines FigurePreprint of paper which appeared in the Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the Support Technologies for Mobile Machines EXPLORING THE LOMBARD PARADOX

Stryk, Oskar von

319

To link to this article: DOI:10.1016/j.electacta.2013.02.063 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.electacta.2013.02.063  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Corrosion Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM) SIMS Aluminium alloys Hydrogen embrittlement a b s t r a c. This paradoxical concomitance suggested a combination of corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) phenom spectrometry for hydrogen detection in corroded 2024 aluminium alloy Electrochimica Acta. (2013) Vol. 110. pp

Mailhes, Corinne

320

Information Release Administration Database (IRAD), Software Design Description (SDD)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IRAD system is a client server system that is written in Paradox for DOS. This system will be replaced with a Visual Basic and SQL Server in order to update the technology, eliminate obsolete functions, as well as to automate the manual interfaces.

CAREY, D.S.

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

To appear in S. Wermter, J. Austin &D. Willshaw (eds.) Emergent neural computational architectures based on neuroscience. Springer-Verlag. Plasticity and nativism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.marcus@nyu.edu Abstract: Recent research in brain development and cognitive development leads to an apparent paradox. One for analyzing the world; another set of recent experiments suggests that brain development is extremely flexible structured in advance of experience. Another strand of contemporary scientific research suggests that brain

Marcus, Gary F.

322

Page 1 of 3 DRAFT Minutes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this rulemaking. Sarah ­ in Paradox valley we have a proposed uranium mill with a surface mining operation that in Subpart W should take into consideration the radon from uranium mines in the vicinity of the uranium mill (Strathmore) Sarah Fields (Uranium Watch) Steve Brown (SENES) Jan Johnson (Tetratech) Travis Stills, Energy

323

Branden Fitelson Philosophy 290 Notes 1 Conditionals Seminar: Day 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Acceptability: Bennett's Strong Assumption About Them ­ Lottery Paradoxes: A Cautionary Tale about Probability and Acceptance ­ The Equation (and my take on the Lewisian attacks on it) Bennett's Defence of the Equation Philosophy CHAPTER 4 (AND MY QUICK REACTION TO CHAPTER 5) OF BENNETT 09/21/04 #12;Branden Fitelson Philosophy

Fitelson, Branden

324

Branden Fitelson Philosophy 290 Notes 1 Conditionals Seminar: Day 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Acceptability: Bennett's Strong Assumption About Them ­ Lottery Paradoxes: A Cautionary Tale about Probability and Acceptance ­ The Equation (and my take on the Lewisian attacks on it) Bennett's Defence of the Equation Philosophy CHAPTER 4 (AND MY QUICK REACTION TO CHAPTER 5) OF BENNETT 09/21/04 Branden Fitelson Philosophy 290

Fitelson, Branden

325

Man-Up: A Men's Leadership Program Friday, March 14, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

let us know when you register and what school district you are in. You must have your Professional prevention education. He is co-founder of Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP), the most widely utilized and the U.S. military. He is the creator of the film Tough Guise 2, and author of The Macho Paradox

Sibille, Etienne

326

COLLOQUE DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, suppl6ment au n014, Tome 51, 15 juillet 1990  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the heat capacity of the undercooled liquid is higher than that of the crystalline phase (or phases). Aa entropy. Below this temperature, in order to avoid the Kauzmann paradox 131, a drop in heat capacity hae to occut, the amorphous alloy is formed and d b i t e a heat capacity comparablewith that of the stable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

327

Energy Landscape Diversity and Supercooled Liquid Properties Frank H. Stillingera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

typically exhibit little difference between liquid and crystal heat capacities Cp , and tend to have of the latter have liquid heat capacities that are significantly larger than the corresponding crystal values of the so-called "Kauzmann paradox". 5 The supercooled-liquid versus crystal heat capacity discrepancy, when

Stillinger, Frank

328

THE EFFECTS OF COUNTERFEIT ON LUXURY BRAND BUYING BEHAVIOR, IN TERMS OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and exclusive brand image of their products, all the while limiting accessibility. It is paradoxicalTHE EFFECTS OF COUNTERFEIT ON LUXURY BRAND BUYING BEHAVIOR, IN TERMS OF CONSUMPTION EXPERIENCE COLLOQUIUM MARKETING TRENDS PARIS, JANUARY 20-22 2011 THE EFFECTS OF COUNTERFEIT ON LUXURY BRAND BUYING

Boyer, Edmond

329

Pancreatic phospholipase A2 : new views on old issues Chunhua Yuan a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5. The structural paradox of PLA2: rigid but fragile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 1. Introduction Pancreatic phospholipase A2 (PLA2, EC 3.1.1.4), a sub-family of the growing PLA2', an `interfacial binding site', and a hydrogen-bonding network. The function of PLA2 is also unique ^ it is a water

Tsai, Ming-Daw

330

Regulating reproduction in India's population Efforts, Results and Recommen dations. By K. Srinivasan, Sage, New Delhi, 1995.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulating reproduction in India's population Efforts, Results and Recommen­ dations. By K, St. Louis, MO 63130 India's population growth is a paradox. In 1952, India became the first country in the world to institute a national policy to limit population, and the central government has pursued

McCarthy, John E.

331

Regulating reproduction in India's population Efforts, Results and Recommen-dations. By K. Srinivasan, Sage, New Delhi, 1995.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulating reproduction in India's population Efforts, Results and Recommen- dations., Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 India's population growth is a paradox. In 1952, India became the first countr* *y in the world to institute a national policy to limit population

McCarthy, John E.

332

Fighting Poverty: "Making Up" a New Society Around the Use of Human Development in Jordan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and alleviating it reach out to issues such as wealth distribution, social cohesion patterns, and power structure economic growth by promoting a people­centered approach to development whereby people are both the agents attempting at making up people (Hacking, 2000), paradoxically engineering the molding of a new society

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

333

Vulnerability of Hydropower Projects to Climate Change Revision: 20th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vulnerability of Hydropower Projects to Climate Change Revision: 20th December 2001 Dr Gareth P and increased use of renewable sources including hydropower. Paradoxically, climate change itself may alter role in whether emissions cuts are achieved. 2. Climate Change and Hydropower A rising demand

Harrison, Gareth

334

Regulation of metabolism during lactation in the rat D. H. WILLIAMSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the lactose and protein and a high proportion of the lipid con- tained in rat milk are synthesized within, in particular, milk production, appears to depend on two hormo- nes, prolactin and insulin. Secretion responsible for regula- tion of insulin secretion from the pancreas. The apparent paradox in lactation

Boyer, Edmond

335

NUEL D. BELNAP, JR. GUPTA'S RULE OF REVISION THEORY OF TRUTH l  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

build on Tarski) in order to permanently deepen our understanding of truth, of paradox (and of a predicate deriving its meaning by way of a Rule of Revision ought to impact significantly on the philosophy, as Gupta himself does, to the fact that he does not argue that we should take as a "fact" that truth

Belnap, Nuel

336

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Potential Network Mechanisms Mediating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, 2Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care, Massachusetts General Hospital with general anesthesia. Key words: propofol anesthesia; paradoxical excitation; GABAA ; M-current; EEG; beta rhythms Introduction General anesthesia is defined as a reversible, drug-induced con- junction of four

Kopell, Nancy

337

International Snow Science Workshop Grenoble Chamonix Mont-Blanc -2013 Why don't avalanche-dynamics models of higher complexity necessarily  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dynamics models of higher complexity necessarily lead to better predictions? Christophe Ancey École Polytechnique worldwide. Paradoxically, the substantial increase in model complexity can lead us to lose sight of the empirical nature of the assumptions used to build the models. Human expertise should still be of paramount

Lenstra, Arjen K.

338

Abstract--Policy surrounding the North American transmission grid, particularly in the wake of electric-industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not discriminate among customers when forced to physically ration consumption. Index Terms--Braess Paradox Engineering and Enginering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh PA 15213 (email: milic distribution factors II. INTRODUCTION estructuring in the U.S. electric power sector has encouraged investment

Blumsack, Seth

339

SPRU Wednesday Seminar Date 19 June 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Australia) Title The Paradox of Measurable Counterfactuals: Performing the efficiency of emissions trading Abstract This paper places the more or less uncontested history of emissions trading, beginning with Ronald a century earlier. Of particular relevance is the claim that emissions trading schemes are not only more

Sussex, University of

340

Closing Digital Divides, Increasing Digital Literacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

people s media ecology #12;2. MOBILE SHIFT #12;#12;THE MOBILE PARADOX #12;Are all digital media Closing Digital Divides, Increasing Digital Literacy S. Craig Watkins The University of Texas at Austin #12;4Shifts #12;1. Digital divides & Participation gaps (Jenkins 2006; Watkins 2012) #12;Young

Acton, Scott

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. ISSN 0077-8923 ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Cognitive Neuroscience The emotion paradox in the aging brain Mara Mather The USC Davis School Mather, Ph.D., The USC Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, 3715 Mc questions about which aspects of these age-related changes in emotional processing can be accounted

Mather, Mara

342

Technology Quo Vadis+ Katta G. Murty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Warming 4. Jet Plane Traffic Enhancing Global Warming 5. Disappearing Trees and Bushes 6. Peace for Humans.1. Everyone Is A Specialist 2.2. The Paradox of This New Century 2.3. Changes Wrought by Technology 3. Global mysterious at that time and our ancestors living in India tried to understand the causes for these mysteries

Murty, Katta G.

343

P. Kotz et al. (Eds.): INTERACT 2013, Part II, LNCS 8118, pp. 380394, 2013. IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system or programming infusion pumps. However, human error is inevitable. Paradoxically, results from: Human error, cognition, data-entry, presentation quality, number- entry, infusion pump, perception amounts of sensitive data in electronic health records (EHRs) and to program drug infusion pumps

Cairns, Paul

344

Published in The Philosophical Quarterly 54 (2004), 604-13. SOME RECENT WORK IN EPISTEMOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-called `McKinsey paradox' concerning the putative incompatibility of content externalism and privileged self: Blackwell, 2003. Pp. xii + 240. Price ÂŁ50.00 h/b, ÂŁ16.99 p/b). New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self content externalism and self-knowledge that is the #12;2 focus of the volume of essays edited by Susana

Edinburgh, University of

345

Problems with modelling closed timelike curves as post-selected teleportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this comment on S.Lloyd, et al, Phys.Rev.Lett. 106, 040403 (2011), we show that modelling closed timelike curves (CTCs) as post-selected teleportation allows signalling to past times before the creation of the CTC and allows information paradoxes to form.

T. C. Ralph

2011-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

346

On P vs. NP and Geometric Complexity Theory Dedicated to Sri Ramakrishna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is generally believed that resolution of this self referential paradox is the root di#culty underneath this problem; cf. the survey [2] and the references therein. A formal strategy of GCT to resolve this self, that are easy to verify and construct. Section 2 explains in what sense an explicit proof resolves the self

Mulmuley, Ketan

347

On P vs. NP and Geometric Complexity Theory Dedicated to Sri Ramakrishna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problems focussing on its main complexity theoretic results. These are: (1) two concrete lower bounds. determinant problems, (2) the Flip Theorem, which formalizes the self referential paradox in the P vs. NP. determinant problems into subproblems without self referen- tial difficulty, consisting of positivity

Mulmuley, Ketan

348

The Tunneling Transform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We supplement the Lorentz transform $L(v)$ with a new "Tunneling" transform $T(v)$. Application of this new transform to elementary quantum mechanics offers a novel, intuitive insight into the nature of quantum tunneling; in particular, the so called "Klein Paradox" is discussed.

Robert Hipple

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

Vulnerability Analysis of Complex Networks from Transportation Networks to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Methodological Tools · The Braess Paradox · Transportation and Critical Infrastructure Networks · A New Network Performance/Efficiency Measure with Applications to Critical Infrastructure Networks · A New Approach infrastructure systems and emphasis on transportation, will be the focus of this talk. #12;Bus Network Rail

Nagurney, Anna

350

http://crg.polytechnique.fr/v2/aegis.html#libellio Le Libellio d' AEGIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

perform the economy. Rather our aim is to refine the theory, to pinpoint some paradoxes related, performativity is opposed to embeddedness, to the idea that economy is embedded in a social world that determines it. What seems interesting to Michel Callon is not how the economy is embedded, but how it succeeds

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

351

Departments of Chemistry and Pharmacology Center for Structural Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;6 December 2011 © Jens Meiler 2 Schedule for Lecture 7 De Novo Protein Fold Prediction with Rosetta) Protein Folding Problem Holy Grail of Comp. Struct. Biology Given a protein's AA sequence, what is its 3 than 1010 years old. Cyrus Levinthal's paradox of protein folding,1968. 6 December 2011 © Jens Meiler

Meiler, Jens

352

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Volumetric strain associated with methane desorption and its impact on coalbed gas production from deep coal seams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For deep coal seams, significant reservoir pressure drawdown is required to promote gas desorption because of the Langmuir-type isotherm that typifies coals. Hence, a large permeability decline may occur because of pressure drawdown and the resulting increase in effective stress, depending on coal properties and the stress field during production. However, the permeability decline can potentially be offset by the permeability enhancement caused by the matrix shrinkage associated with methane desorption. The predictability of varying permeability is critical for coalbed gas exploration and production-well management. We have investigated quantitatively the effects of reservoir pressure and sorption-induced volumetric strain on coal-seam permeability with constraints from the adsorption isotherm and associated volumetric strain measured on a Cretaceous Mesaverde Group coal (Piceance basin) and derived a stress-dependent permeability model. Our results suggest that the favorable coal properties that can result in less permeability reduction during earlier production and an earlier strong permeability rebound (increase in permeability caused by coal shrinkage) with methane desorption include (1) large bulk or Young's modulus; (2) large adsorption or Langmuir volume; (3) high Langmuir pressure; (4) high initial permeability and dense cleat spacing; and (5) low initial reservoir pressure and high in-situ gas content. Permeability variation with gas production is further dependent on the orientation of the coal seam, the reservoir stress field, and the cleat structure. Well completion with injection of N2 and displacement of CH{sub 4} only results in short-term enhancement of permeability and does not promote the overall gas production for the coal studied.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Earth & Ocean Science

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Stratigraphy, coal occurrence, and depositional history of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Sand Wash basin, northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fort Union Formation in the Sand Wash basin is divided into the massive Cretaceous and Tertiary (K/T) sandstone unit, lower coal-bearing unit, gray-green mudstone unit, basin sandy unit, and upper shaly unit. Lithofacies and coal-occurrence maps of the stratigraphic units indicate that sandstone bodies and coal beds occur along south-north oriented, intermontane fluvial systems. Net-sandstone-thickness trends of the massive K/T sandstone unit reveal laterally extensive channel-fill sandstones formed in north-flowing fluvial systems. The massive K/T sandstone unit's dominant source was in the Sawatch Range. Sandstones within the lower coal-bearing unit consist of similar north-flowing fluvial systems, but they are laterally discontinuous and have several tectonically active source areas, including the Uinta and Sierra Madre-Park uplifts, and Sawatch Range. Coal-occurrence maps of the lower coal-bearing unit indicate that maximum coal-bed thicknesses are greatest along the south-north-oriented fluvial axes. Coal beds thin and split to the east and west, confirming a direct relation between the position of thick, fluvial-sandstone bodies, which form a stable platform for peat accumulation, and the location of the thick coal beds. Above the lower coal-bearing unit, the gray-green mudstone unit forms north-trending belts centered R91W and R100W. The gray-green mudstone thins to the north and into the basin center and probably is lacustrine in origin, reflecting tectonic quiescence and cessation of coarse clastic sedimentation. The basin sandy unit is best developed in the central parts of the basin, where its fluvial depositional axis is oriented south-north. The upper shaly unit directly overlies the basin sandy unit and includes a thin Cherokee coal zone. The upper shaly unit has variable thicknesses due to erosion at the base of the Wasatch Formation and lateral facies changes.

Tyler, R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Multipartite Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering and genuine tripartite entanglement with optical networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox established a link between entanglement and nonlocality in quantum mechanics. EPR steering is the nonlocality associated with the EPR paradox and has traditionally only been investigated between two parties. Here, we present the first experimental observations of multipartite EPR steering, and of the genuine tripartite continuous variable entanglement of three mesoscopic optical systems. We explore different linear optics networks - each one with optimised asymmetries - that create multipartite steerable states containing different numbers of quantised optical modes (qumodes). By introducing asymmetric loss on a 7-qumode state, we characterize 8 regimes of directional steering, showing that N + 1 regimes exist for an N-qumode state. Further, we reveal the directional monogamy of steering, and experimentally demonstrate continuous variable one-sided semi device-independent quantum secret sharing. Our methods establish principles for the development of multiparty quantum communication protocols with asymmetric observers, and can be extended to qubits, whether photonic, atomic, superconducting, or otherwise.

Seiji Armstrong; Meng Wang; Run Yan Teh; Qihuang Gong; Qiongyi He; Jiri Janousek; Hans-Albert Bachor; Margaret D. Reid; Ping Koy Lam

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

357

EPR-Steering measure for two-mode continuous variable states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steering is a manifestation of quantum correlations that embodies the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox. While there have been recent attempts to quantify steering, continuous variable systems remained elusive. We introduce a steering measure for two-mode continuous variable systems that is valid for arbitrary states. The measure is based on the violation of an optimized variance test for the EPR paradox, and admits a computable and experimentally friendly lower bound only depending on the second moments of the state, which reduces to a recently proposed quantifier of steerability by Gaussian measurements. We further show that Gaussian states are extremal with respect to our measure, minimizing it among all continuous variable states with fixed second moments. As a byproduct of our analysis, we generalize and relate well-known EPR-steering criteria. Finally an operational interpretation is provided, as the proposed measure is shown to quantify the optimal guaranteed key rate in semi-device independent qua...

Kogias, Ioannis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

EPR-Steering measure for two-mode continuous variable states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steering is a manifestation of quantum correlations that embodies the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox. While there have been recent attempts to quantify steering, continuous variable systems remained elusive. We introduce a steering measure for two-mode continuous variable systems that is valid for arbitrary states. The measure is based on the violation of an optimized variance test for the EPR paradox, and admits a computable and experimentally friendly lower bound only depending on the second moments of the state, which reduces to a recently proposed quantifier of steerability by Gaussian measurements. We further show that Gaussian states are extremal with respect to our measure, minimizing it among all continuous variable states with fixed second moments. As a byproduct of our analysis, we generalize and relate well-known EPR-steering criteria. Finally an operational interpretation is provided, as the proposed measure is shown to quantify the optimal guaranteed key rate in semi-device independent quantum key distribution.

Ioannis Kogias; Gerardo Adesso

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

359

Carnot Cycle at Finite Power: Attainability of Maximal Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We want to understand whether and to which extent the maximal (Carnot) efficiency for heat engines can be reached at a finite power. To this end we generalize the Carnot cycle so that it is not restricted to slow processes. We show that for realistic (i.e. not purposefully-designed) engine-bath interactions, the work-optimal engine performing the generalized cycle close to the maximal efficiency has a long cycle time and hence vanishing power. This aspect is shown to relate to the theory of computational complexity. A physical manifestation of the same effect is the Levinthal's paradox in the protein folding problem. The resolution of this paradox for realistic proteins allows to construct engines that can extract at a finite power 40% of the maximally possible work reaching 90% of the maximal efficiency. For purposefully designed engine-bath interactions, the Carnot efficiency is achievable at a large power.

Armen E. Allahverdyan; Karen V. Hovhannisyan; Alexey V. Melkikh; Sasun G. Gevorkian

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

360

A review of "The Public Mirror: Moličre and the Social Commerce of Depiction." by Larry F. Norman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and it is precisely these contradictions and paradoxes which Paige claims to be con- stitutive of modern subjectivity. In his introduction, Paige quotes approvingly Judith Butler?s formulation of the modern process of subjection: ??[T]aken to be the condition... for and instrument of agency,? Judith Butler has recently argued, ?[the subject] is at the same time the effect of subordination, understood as the deprivation of agency?? (4). This essentially Foucauldian insight is confirmed in the early writings ...

Kiki Gounaridou

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Revised Born-Oppenheimer approach and a reprojection method for inelastic collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantum reprojection method within the standard adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approach is derived for multielectron collision systems. The method takes nonvanishing asymptotic nonadiabatic couplings into account and distinguishes asymptotic currents in molecular-state channels and in atomic-state channels. The method is demonstrated for the example of low-energy inelastic Li + Na collisions for which the conventional application of the standard adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approach fails and leads to paradoxes such as infinite inelastic cross sections.

Belyaev, Andrey K. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Herzen University, St. Petersburg 191186 (Russian Federation) and Department of Chemistry, University of Rome 'La Sapienza', I-00185 Rome (Italy)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Organizational construction of self identity in technological society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the interrelated symbolic evidence for these processes within a brainwave, biofeedback company called the MindCenter. Three main perspectives are uncovered within the MindCenter's promotional literature which hinge upon the concept of agent and control.... Paradoxes abound when the reasoning within each perspective is examined. This thesis provides a glimpse into the complexity between the concepts: technology, organizations, and individuals, and may provide heuristic ground work for future studies...

Milburn, Trudy Anne

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

From Exogenous to Endogenous Networks: Internet Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incentive to deviate, will also find a lower incentive to implement a punishment for a possible deviant from the co-operative agreement. A possible escape from such a paradox may be found in the construction of more articulate punishment strategies, able... of the community 32 of internet users, calculated by taking into account the quality of interconnection between them. Formally, ?? ??? ? = +? iii npp ,? . The costs borne by a provider, instead, are assumed to increase with the number of both its users...

D'Ignazio, Alessio; Giovannetti, Emanuele

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

364

News  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

open meetings at MLA 2009 (see item 5 above). 3. The James Holly Hanford Award for a distinguished book recognized the excellence of Gordon Campbell, Thomas N. Corns, John K. Hale, and Fiona J. Tweedie, Milton and the Manuscript of De Doctrina... the excellence of Milton and Toleration, ed. Sharon Achinstein and Elizabeth Sauer Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007). 5. The James Holly Hanford Essay Awards recognize the excel- lence of John Creaser, ??Service is Perfect Freedom?: Paradox and Prosodic...

Dickson, Donald et. al

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A Review of "The Monarchical Republic of Early Modern England: Essays in Response to Patrick Collinson" Edited by John F. McDiarmid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.: Ashgate, 2007. xii + 301 pp. $99.95. Review by joseph p. ward, university of mississippi. In a set of thoughtful and thought-provoking essays published nearly a generation ago, Patrick Collinson offered an interpretation of Elizabethan politics... of Thomas Hobbes in England 1640-1700. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. $125. xi + 449. Review by geoffrey m. vaughan, assumption college. Jon Parkin argues that Hobbes?s method of reasoning?formu - lating a series of paradoxes...

Ward, Joseph P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A review of "Selfish Gifts: The Politics of Exchange and English Courtly Literature, 1580-1628" by Alison V. Scott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

good model for an intensive study of a broader range of travel narratives. Alison V. Scott. Selfish Gifts: The Politics of Exchange and English Courtly Literature, 1580 ? 1628. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2006. $55....00. Review by THOMAS P. ANDERSON, MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY. Alison Scott?s informative study of the paradoxical nature of gift ex- change and the quest for patronage in early modern England emphasizes the complex economy involving emerging market...

Anderson, Thomas P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Birthday Attack on Roulette  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A strategy for playing the game of roulette is presented in this paper. The strategy is based on the same probabilistic argument that leads to the well-known Birthday Paradox in Probability theory. Following the strategy, a player will have a positive expected gain per spin as well as in the long run despite the fact that the pay-off ratios in roulette favor the House.

Ranjan Chaudhuri

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

368

Inertial Frames and Clock Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article revisits the historiography of the problem of inertial frames. Specifically, the case of the twins in the clock paradox is considered to see that some resolutions implicitly assume inertiality for the non-accelerating twin. If inertial frames are explicitly identified by motion with respect to the large scale structure of the universe, it makes it possible to consider the relative inertiality of different frames.

Subhash Kak

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

369

Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Sympathy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Sympathy MARTIN J. MATUSTIK Fordham University Merleau-Ponty never wrote a phenomenology of sympathy. But his use of sympathy in accounting for human relationships parallels in intent and manner his treatment... of perception in the Phenomenology.} In addressing the paradox of alterity, he draws an analogy between perception and sympathy: just as perceptual consciousness founds intersubjective thematic experience, in the same way pre-personal sympathy accounts...

Matustik, Martin J.

370

ccsd00000553 L'ARGUMENT EINSTEIN PODOLSKY ROSEN (EPR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd­00000553 (version 1) : 29 Aug 2003 L'ARGUMENT EINSTEIN PODOLSKY ROSEN (EPR) : PARADOXE'article EPR (A. Einstein, B. Podolsky, N. Rosen, #19;ecrit en 1935), qui est #18;a l'origine de l'aujourd'hui, est analys#19;e. Avec Schrodinger, Bohr, Wigner et jusqu'#18;a aujourd'hui, la r#19;eponse #18;a EPR

371

ccsd-00000553(version1):29Aug2003 L'ARGUMENT EINSTEIN PODOLSKY ROSEN (EPR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd-00000553(version1):29Aug2003 L'ARGUMENT EINSTEIN PODOLSKY ROSEN (EPR) : PARADOXE, ALTERNATIVE montre clairement. On ne doit pas aujourd'hui lui faire dire le contraire. L'article EPR (A. Einstein, B, Wigner et jusqu'`a aujourd'hui, la r´eponse `a EPR a ´et´e le recours renouvel´e `a l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

372

Is the $ISO(2,1)$ Gauge Gravity equivalent to the Metric Formulation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantization of the gravitational Chern-Simons coefficient is investigated in the framework of $ISO(2,1)$ gauge gravity. Some paradoxes involved are cured. The resolution is largely based on the inequivalence of $ISO(2,1)$ gauge gravity and the metric formulation. Both the Lorentzian scheme and the Euclidean scheme lead to the coefficient quantization, which means that the induced spin is not quite exotic in this context.

Jin-Ho Cho; Hyuk-jae Lee

1996-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

373

Inverse Square Law of Gravitation in (2+1)-Dimensional Space-Time as a Consequence of Casimir Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational effect of vacuum polarization in space exterior to a particle in (2+1)-dimensional Einstein theory is investigated. In the weak field limit this gravitational field corresponds to an inverse square law of gravitational attraction, even though the gravitational mass of the quantum vacuum is negative. The paradox is resolved by considering a particle of finite extension and taking into account the vacuum polarization in its interior.

H. H. Soleng

1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

374

2005 clean coal and power conference. Conference proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theme of the conference was 'The paradox: today's coal technologies versus tomorrow's promise'. The sessions covered: today's technologies, tomorrow's potential; economic stability; energy security; transition to sustainable energy future; new coal power technologies leading to zero emission coal; existing power plants - improved performance through use of new technology; and carbon capture and storage R & D - challenges and opportunities. Some of the papers only consist of the viewgraphs/overheads.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

1 Why and How to be Ambidextrous? The Relationship between Environmental Factors, Innovation Strategy and Organizational Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

“Organizational ambidexterity ” has become an emerging research trend in both the organizational management and knowledge management field (Gibson & Birkinshaw, 2004; He & Wong, 2004). The central theme on organizational ambidexterity is about organizational capability to simultaneously deal with paradoxical or conflicting activities such as organizational alignment and adaptation; evolutionary and revolutionary change; manufacturing efficiency and flexibility; strategic alliance formation; and even strategic renewal (Adler, Goldoftas, & Levine,

Pei-wen Huang

376

Decision Making Under Ambiguity: A Belief-function Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

called EH). Received: 8 August 1996. Ernst & Young Professor Director, Ernst & Young Center for Auditing Research and Advanced Tech-nology Division of Accounting and Information Systems School of Business, The University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045, USA.... This rule is equivalent to "minimax" rule in a two-person zero-sum game. It is interesting to note that the proposition developed in the article not only explains Ellsberg's paradox but also models correctly all the behaviors observed by EH. The remaining...

Srivastava, Rajendra P.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

On the Possibility of an Astronomical Perspective in the Study of Human Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sapient Paradox is the apparently unexplainable time delay of several ten thousand years following the arrival of Homo sapiens in Asia and Europe and before the introduction of impressive innovations with the agricultural revolution. Renfrew (2007) has suggested that the solution of the paradox has to do with changes in modes of thought that occurred with sedentism. According to Renfrew, this is a subject of study for cognitive archaeology where the final goal would be to understand the formation of the human mind. Several scholars, however, affirm that climatic change was crucial to such a revolution as it would have been very difficult to develop agriculture during the Palaeolithic. In other words, sedentism was not justified during the ice age, and that may be the solution to the paradox. It is widely accepted that climate variations were due to so-called orbital forcing, the slow periodic changes of orbital parameters of the Earth (known also as the Milankovitch theory). These and other astronomical e...

Antonello, E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We extend the worldline measure for pocket formation in eternal inflation to allow for time-ordered bubble formation. Such a time-ordering is equivalent to imposing a preferred time-slicing on the "parent" de Sitter space. Using this measure, we describe a covariant version of the youngness paradox and show that the youngness paradox is a gauge artifact if the parent spacetime is an unbroken de Sitter space, due to the lack of an explicit time-ordering for the bubble nucleation events. We then show that one can add a "clock" to the de Sitter space, in the form of a vector field with a spontaneously broken symmetry that defines a unique timelike direction accessible to all observers. Once this is done, the existence of a preferred slicing means that the youngness paradox cannot be easily resolved. We use this to elucidate the apparent "persistence of memory" discussed recently by Garriga, Guth and Vilenkin, for inflationary universes produced by bubble nucleation.

Richard Easther; Eugene A. Lim

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

379

Holographic thought experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hamiltonian of classical anti-de Sitter gravity is a pure boundary term on-shell. If this remains true in nonperturbative quantum gravity then (i) boundary observables will evolve unitarily in time and (ii) the algebra of boundary observables is the same at all times. In particular, information available at the boundary at any one time t{sub 1} remains available at any other time t{sub 2}. Since there is also a sense in which the equations of motion propagate information into the bulk, these observations raise what may appear to be potential paradoxes concerning simultaneous (or spacelike separated) measurements of noncommuting observables, one at the asymptotic boundary and one in the interior. We argue that such potentially paradoxical settings always involve a breakdown of semiclassical gravity. In particular, we present evidence that making accurate holographic measurements over short time scales radically alters the familiar notion of causality. We also describe certain less intrinsically paradoxical settings which illustrate the above boundary unitarity and render the notion more concrete.

Marolf, Donald [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Correlation, entropy, and information transfer in black hole radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the discovery of Hawking radiation, its consistency with quantum theory has been widely questioned. In the widely described picture, irrespective of what initial state a black hole starts with before collapsing, it eventually evolves into a thermal state of Hawking radiations after the black hole is exhausted. This scenario violates the principle of unitarity as required for quantum mechanics and leads to the acclaimed "information loss paradox". This paradox has become an obstacle or a reversed touchstone for any possible theory to unify the gravity and quantum mechanics. Based on the results from Hawking radiation as tunneling, we recently show that Hawking radiations can carry off all information about the collapsed matter in a black hole. After discovering the existence of information-carrying correlation, we show in great detail that entropy is conserved for Hawking radiation based on standard probability theory and statistics. We claim that information previously considered lost remains hidden inside Hawking radiation. More specifically, it is encoded into correlations between Hawking radiations. Our study thus establishes harmony between Harking radiation and the unitarity of quantum mechanics, which establishes the basis for a significant milestone towards resolving the long-standing information loss paradox. The paper provides a brief review of the exciting development on Hawking raidation. In addition to summarize our own work on this subject, we compare and address other related studies.

Baocheng Zhang; Qingyu Cai; Mingsheng Zhan; Li You

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work plan for October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998 consisted of investigation of a number of topical areas. These topical areas were reported in four quarterly status reports, which were submitted to DOE earlier. These topical areas are reviewed in this volume. The topical areas covered during the year were: (1) Development of preliminary tests of a production method for determining areas of natural fracturing. Advanced Resources has demonstrated that such a relationship exists in the southern Piceance basin tight gas play. Natural fracture clusters are genetically related to stress concentrations (also called stress perturbations) associated with local deformation such a faulting. The mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is that deformation generally initiates at regions where the local stress field is elevated beyond the regional. (2) Regional structural and geologic analysis of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Application of techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project for sweet-spot delineation were demonstrated in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-typeUpper Cretaceous reservoirs of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). The effort included data acquisition/processing, base map generation, geophysical and remote sensing analysis and the integration of these data and analyses. (3) Examination of the Table Rock field area in the northern Washakie Basin of the Greater Green River Basin. This effort was performed in support of Union Pacific Resources- and DOE-planned horizontal drilling efforts. The effort comprised acquisition of necessary seismic data and depth-conversion, mapping of major fault geometry, and analysis of displacement vectors, and the development of the natural fracture prediction. (4) Greater Green River Basin Partitioning. Building on fundamental fracture characterization work and prior work performed under this contract, namely structural analysis using satellite and potential field data, the GGRB was divided into partitions that will be used to analyze the resource potential of the Frontier and Mesaverde Upper Cretaceous tight gas play. A total of 20 partitions were developed, which will be instrumental for examining the Upper Cretaceous play potential. (5) Partition Analysis. Resource assessment associated with individual partitions was initiated starting with the Vermilion Sub-basin and the Green River Deep (which include the Stratos well) partitions (see Chapter 5). (6) Technology Transfer. Tech transfer was achieved by documenting our research and presenting it at various conferences.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Multi-Site Application of the Geomechanical Approach for Natural Fracture Exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to predict the nature and distribution of natural fracturing, Advanced Resources Inc. (ARI) incorporated concepts of rock mechanics, geologic history, and local geology into a geomechanical approach for natural fracture prediction within mildly deformed, tight (low-permeability) gas reservoirs. Under the auspices of this project, ARI utilized and refined this approach in tight gas reservoir characterization and exploratory activities in three basins: the Piceance, Wind River and the Anadarko. The primary focus of this report is the knowledge gained on natural fractural prediction along with practical applications for enhancing gas recovery and commerciality. Of importance to tight formation gas production are two broad categories of natural fractures: (1) shear related natural fractures and (2) extensional (opening mode) natural fractures. While arising from different origins this natural fracture type differentiation based on morphology is sometimes inter related. Predicting fracture distribution successfully is largely a function of collecting and understanding the available relevant data in conjunction with a methodology appropriate to the fracture origin. Initially ARI envisioned the geomechanical approach to natural fracture prediction as the use of elastic rock mechanics methods to project the nature and distribution of natural fracturing within mildly deformed, tight (low permeability) gas reservoirs. Technical issues and inconsistencies during the project prompted re-evaluation of these initial assumptions. ARI's philosophy for the geomechanical tools was one of heuristic development through field site testing and iterative enhancements to make it a better tool. The technology and underlying concepts were refined considerably during the course of the project. As with any new tool, there was a substantial learning curve. Through a heuristic approach, addressing these discoveries with additional software and concepts resulted in a stronger set of geomechanical tools. Thus, the outcome of this project is a set of predictive tools with broad applicability across low permeability gas basins where natural fractures play an important role in reservoir permeability. Potential uses for these learnings and tools range from rank exploration to field-development portfolio management. Early incorporation of the permeability development concepts presented here can improve basin assessment and direct focus to the high potential areas within basins. Insight into production variability inherent in tight naturally fractured reservoirs leads to improved wellbore evaluation and reduces the incidence of premature exits from high potential plays. A significant conclusion of this project is that natural fractures, while often an important, overlooked aspect of reservoir geology, represent only one aspect of the overall reservoir fabric. A balanced perspective encompassing all aspects of reservoir geology will have the greatest impact on exploration and development in the low permeability gas setting.

R. L. Billingsley; V. Kuuskraa

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Final Rulison Path Forward  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management developed this report as a guide for discussions with the Colorado State regulators and other interested stakeholders in response to increased drilling for natural gas reserves near the underground nuclear explosion site at Rulison, Colorado. The Rulison site is located in the Piceance Basin of western Colorado, 40 miles northeast of Grand Junction. The Rulison test was the second natural gas reservoir stimulation experiment in the Plowshare Program, which was designed to develop peaceful uses for nuclear energy. On September 10, 1969, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency of DOE, detonated a 40-kiloton nuclear device 8426 feet below the ground surface in an attempt to release commercially marketable quantities of natural gas. The blast vaporized surrounding rock and formed a cavity about 150 feet in diameter. Although the contaminated materials from drilling operations were subsequently removed from the surface of the blast site, no feasible technology exists to remove subsurface radioactive contamination in or around the test cavity. An increase in drilling for natural gas near the site has raised concern about the possibility of encountering residual radioactivity from the area of the detonation. DOE prohibits drilling in the 40-acre lot surrounding the blast site at a depth below 6000 feet. DOE has no evidence that indicates contamination from the Rulison site detonation has migrated or will ever migrate beyond the 40-acre institutional control boundary. The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) established two wider boundaries around the site. When a company applies for a permit to drill within a 3-mile radius of surface ground zero, COGCC notifies DOE and provides an opportunity to comment on the application. COGCC also established a half-mile radius around surface ground zero. An application to drill within one-half mile requires a full hearing before the commission. This report outlines DOE's recommendation that gas developers adopt a conservative, staged drilling approach allowing gas reserves near the Rulison site to be recovered in a manner that minimizes the likelihood of encountering contamination. This staged approach calls for collecting data from wells outside the half-mile zone before drilling closer, and then drilling within the half-mile zone in a sequential manner, first at low contamination probability locations and then moving inward. DOE's recommended approach for drilling in this area will protect public safety while allowing collection of additional data to confirm that contamination is contained within the 40-acre institutional control boundary.

None

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

An Entangled Web of Crime: Bell's Theorem as a Short Story  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-locality of the type first elucidated by Bell in 1964 is a difficult concept to explain to non-specialists and undergraduates. Here we attempt this by showing how such non-locality can be used to solve a problem in which someone might find themselves as the result of a collection of normal, even if somewhat unlikely, events. Our story is told in the style of a Sherlock Holmes mystery, and is based on Mermin's formulation of the "paradoxical" illustration of quantum non-locality discovered by Greenberger, Horne and Zeilinger.

Kurt Jacobs; Howard Wiseman

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

Superluminal, subluminal, and negative velocities in free-space electromagnetic propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this Chapter the time-domain analysis of the velocity of the electromagnetic field pulses generated by a spatially compact source in free space is presented. Recent simulations and measurements of anomalous superluminal, subluminal, and negative velocities are discussed. It is shown that such velocities are local and instantaneous in nature and do not violate either causality or special relativity. Although these effects are mainly confined to the near- and intermediate-field zones, some of them seem paradoxical and still lack adequate physical interpretation.

Budko, Neil V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Earth's extensive entropy bound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility of planetary mass black hole production by crossing entropy limits is addressed. Such a possibility is given by pointing out that two geophysical quantities have comparable values: first, Earth's total negative entropy flux integrated over geological time and, second, its extensive entropy bound, which follows as a tighter bound to the Bekenstein limit when entropy is an extensive function. The similarity between both numbers suggests that the formation of black holes from planets may be possible through a strong fluctuation toward thermodynamic equilibrium which results in gravothermal instability and final collapse. Briefly discussed are implications for the astronomical observation of low mass black holes and for Fermi's paradox.

A. M. Lisewski

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

Making American: Constitutive Rhetoric in the Cold War  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, claiming that his behavior was directly opposed to everything America stood for. At the heart of so much of the rhetorical bullying was this idea of ?American.? Nobody could decide what it meant or who had the most of it. Was it more American... Rhetoric Reconsidered: Constitutive Paradoxes in G.W. Bush?s Iraq War Speeches.? Zagacki focuses on the idea of ?prophetic dualism? that he claims guided Bush?s rhetoric to the American people in an attempt to create identification between Americans...

Thorpe, Martha

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

How Firm a Foundation: Faith and Practice in the Works of William Inge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. If the narrative in My Son was his own life story, God was, to use one of his own phrases, “an ornery bastard.” God exacts a price for living a life of leisure and lust; he takes away precious children with the stroke of a razor blade, and he visits gloom upon... tested and punished while on Earth. It is the paradox of faith that you must be both afraid of the wrath of God yet also forgiven for all your sins in the name of his son. This contrast of hope and resurrection with fear and anguish...

Williams, Philip M.

2012-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

390

Probabilistic quantum phase-space simulation of Bell violations and their dynamical evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum simulations of Bell inequality violations are numerically obtained using probabilistic phase space methods, namely the positive P-representation. In this approach the moments of quantum observables are evaluated as moments of variables that have values outside the normal eigenvalue range. There is thus a parallel with quantum weak measurements and weak values. Nevertheless, the representation is exactly equivalent to quantum mechanics. A number of states violating Bell inequalities are sampled, demonstrating that these quantum paradoxes can be treated with probabilistic methods. We treat quantum dynamics by simulating the time evolution of the Bell state formed via parametric down-conversion, and discuss multi-mode generalizations.

Laura Rosales-Zárate; Bogdan Opanchuk; Peter D. Drummond; Margaret D. Reid

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

391

Time machines and traversable wormholes in modified theories of gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent work on wormhole geometries in the context of modified theories of gravity, in particular, in f(R) gravity and with a nonminimal curvature-matter coupling, and in the recently proposed hybrid metric-Palatini theory. In principle, the normal matter threading the throat can be shown to satisfy the energy conditions and it is the higher order curvatures terms that sustain these wormhole geometries. We also briefly review the conversion of wormholes into time-machines, explore several of the time travel paradoxes and possible remedies to these intriguing side-effects in wormhole physics.

Francisco S. N. Lobo

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

392

Scattering theory with localized non-Hermiticities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the context of the recent interest in solvable models of scattering mediated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians (cf. H. F. Jones, Phys. Rev. D 76, 125003 (2007)) we show that the well-known variability of the ad hoc choice of the metric {theta} which defines the physical Hilbert space of states can help us to clarify several apparent paradoxes. We argue that with a suitable {theta}, a fully plausible physical picture of the scattering can be recovered. Quantitatively, our new recipe is illustrated on an exactly solvable toy model.

Znojil, Miloslav [Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Haitian People  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

poverty, political instability, and the unjustified AIDS scare, have combined to almost totally wipe out the tourist industry. Paradoxically, the assertion that "even the souvenirs to take back to the tourist ship have likely as not been made in New..., Haitian edu­ cation is free and democratic; actually, no peasant child could be spared from labor long enough for schooling, or find money for proper clothes to go to school in. Inevitably the standard o f living is a reflection o f caste member­ ship...

Leyburn, James G.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Haitian People  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the imjustifi^ dEAlDS scare, have combinedto almost totally wipe out the tourisimdustry. Paradoxically, the assertion that "even the souvenirs to take back to the tourist ship have likely as not been made in New York and imported by the local shops' (p. 290..., Haitian edu­ cation is free and democratic; actually, no peasant child could be spared from labor long enough for schooling, or find money for proper clodies to go to school in. Inevitably the standard of living is a reflection of caste member­ ship...

Leyburn, James G.; Freeman, Bryant C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

On the Superluminal Quantum Tunneling and "Causality Violation"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is an analysis of some aspects of an old but still controversial topic, superluminal quantum tunneling. Some features of quantum tunneling described in literature, such as definition of the tunneling time and a frequency range of a signal, are discussed. The argument is presented that claim of superluminal signaling allegedly observed in frustrated internal reflection experiment was based on the wrong interpretation of the tunneling process. A thought experiment similar to that in the Tolman paradox is discussed. It shows that a new factor, attenuation, comes in the interplay between tunneled signals and macroscopic causality.

Moses Fayngold

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

396

Punctuated eternal inflation via AdS/CFT duality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work is an attempt to model a scenario of inflation in the framework of anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory duality, a potentially complete nonperturbative description of quantum gravity. We study bubble geometries with de Sitter interiors within an ambient Schwarzschild anti-de Sitter black hole spacetime and the properties of the corresponding states in the dual conformal field theory. It is argued the viable bubble states can be identified with a subset of the black hole microstates. Consistency checks are performed and a number of implications regarding cosmology are discussed including how the key problems or paradoxes of conventional eternal inflation are overcome in this scenario.

Lowe, David A. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Roy, Shubho [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Physics Department, City College of the CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lehman College of the CUNY, Bronx, New York 10468 (United States)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Euclid space-time diagram of the theory of relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A conventional space-time diagram is $r-ct$ one, which satisfies the Minkowski geometry. This geometry conflict the intuition from the Euclid geometry. In this work an Euclid space-time diagram is proposed to describe relativistic world lines with an exact Euclid geometry. The relativistic effects such as the dilation of moving clocks, the contraction of moving length, and the twin paradox can be geometrically expressed in the Euclid space-time diagram. It is applied to the case of a satellite clock to correct the gravitational effect. It is found that this Euclid space-time diagram is much more intuitive than the conventional space-time diagram.

W. LiMing

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

398

Unified criteria for multipartite quantum nonlocality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wiseman and co-workers [H. M. Wiseman, S. J. Jones, and A. C. Doherty, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 140402, (2007)] proposed a distinction among the nonlocality classes of Bell's nonlocality, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox or steering, and entanglement based on whether or not an overseer trusts each party in a bipartite scenario where they are asked to demonstrate entanglement. Here we extend that concept to the multipartite case and derive inequalities that progressively test for those classes of nonlocality, with different thresholds for each level. This framework includes the three classes of nonlocality above in special cases and introduces a family of others.

Cavalcanti, E. G. [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland 4111 (Australia); He, Q. Y.; Reid, M. D. [Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Centre for Quantum-Atom Optics (Australian Research Council), Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Wiseman, H. M. [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland 4111 (Australia); Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (Australian Research Council), Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland 4111 (Australia)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Operationalization of Relativistic Motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply the Helmholtz program of basic measurements to relativistic motion. We define a spatiotemporal order by practical comparison: "longer than" if one object or process covers the other. To express its value also numerically (how many times more) we cover them by a locally regular grid of light clocks. We define basic measures from physical operations. Interrelation of measurement operations by different observers reveals a genetic derivation of formal Lorentz transformation. Operationally impracticable configurations for accelerating observers clarify the way out of apparent Twin paradox. From simple measurement-methodical principles - without mathematical presuppositions - we derive all equations of relativistic Kinematics (and next same for classical and relativistic Dynamics).

Bruno Hartmann

2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

A review of "A Chronology and Calendar of Documents Related to the London Book Trade" by D. F. McKenzie and Maureen Bell, eds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

about the complexity of ecclesiastical polity. Those who continue to urge a portrait of the period as the seedbed of secular liberty will, like his contemporaries, find Goodwin a formidable obstacle and paradox. D. F. McKenzie and Maureen Bell, eds....00. Review by RANDY ROBERTSON, SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY. The Chronology and Calendar is a staggering achievement. Some years ago, D. F. McKenzie began to collect references to the book trade that he discov- ered in the Calendar of State Papers, Domestic...

Robertson, Randy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Directed transport as a mechanism for protein folding in vivo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a model for protein folding in vivo based on a Brownian-ratchet mechanism in the multidimensional energy landscape space. The device is able to produce directed transport taking advantage of the assumed intrinsic asymmetric properties of the proteins and employing the consumption of energy provided by an external source. Through such a directed transport phenomenon, the polypeptide finds the native state starting from any initial state in the energy landscape with great efficacy and robustness, even in the presence of different type of obstacles. This model solves Levinthal's paradox without requiring biased transition probabilities but at the expense of opening the system to an external field.

Ernesto Gonzalez-Candela; Victor Romero-Rochin

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

402

Remarkable Degenerate Quantum Stabilizer Codes Derived from Duadic Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Good quantum codes, such as quantum MDS codes, are typically nondegenerate, meaning that errors of small weight require active error-correction, which is--paradoxically--itself prone to errors. Decoherence free subspaces, on the other hand, do not require active error correction, but perform poorly in terms of minimum distance. In this paper, examples of degenerate quantum codes are constructed that have better minimum distance than decoherence free subspaces and allow some errors of small weight that do not require active error correction. In particular, two new families of [[n,1,>= sqrt(n)

Salah A. Aly; Andreas Klappenecker; Pradeep Kiran Sarvepalli

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

Addendum to Computational Complexity and Black Hole Horizons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this addendum to [arXiv:1402.5674] two points are discussed. In the first additional evidence is provided for a dual connection between the geometric length of an Einstein-Rosen bridge and the computational complexity of the quantum state of the dual CFT's. The relation between growth of complexity and Page's ``Extreme Cosmic Censorship" principle is also remarked on. The second point involves a gedanken experiment in which Alice measures a complete set of commuting observables at her end of an Einstein-Rosen bridge is discussed. An apparent paradox is resolved by appealing to the properties of GHZ tripartite entanglement.

Leonard Susskind

2014-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Process Model of Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A process model of quantum mechanics utilizes a combinatorial game to generate a discrete and finite causal space upon which can be defined a self-consistent quantum mechanics. An emergent space-time M and continuous wave function arise through a non-uniform interpolation process. Standard non-relativistic quantum mechanics emerges under the limit of infinite information (the causal space grows to infinity) and infinitesimal scale (the separation between points goes to zero). The model has the potential to address several paradoxes in quantum mechanics while remaining computationally powerful.

William Sulis

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

405

Contextual Risk and Its Relevance in Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainty in economics still poses some fundamental problems illustrated, e.g., by the Allais and Ellsberg paradoxes. To overcome these difficulties, economists have introduced an interesting distinction between 'risk' and 'ambiguity' depending on the existence of a (classical Kolmogorovian) probabilistic structure modeling these uncertainty situations. On the other hand, evidence of everyday life suggests that 'context' plays a fundamental role in human decisions under uncertainty. Moreover, it is well known from physics that any probabilistic structure modeling contextual interactions between entities structurally needs a non-Kolmogorovian quantum-like framework. In this paper we introduce the notion of 'contextual risk' with the aim of modeling a substantial part of the situations in which usually only 'ambiguity' is present. More precisely, we firstly introduce the essentials of an operational formalism called 'the hidden measurement approach' in which probability is introduced as a consequence of fluctuations in the interaction between entities and contexts. Within the hidden measurement approach we propose a 'sphere model' as a mathematical tool for situations in which contextual risk occurs. We show that a probabilistic model of this kind is necessarily non-Kolmogorovian, hence it requires either the formalism of quantum mechanics or a generalization of it. This insight is relevant, for it explains the presence of quantum or, better, quantum-like, structures in economics, as suggested by some authors, and can serve to solve the aforementioned paradoxes.

Diederik Aerts; Sandro Sozzo

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hawking radiation and the boomerang behavior of massive modes near a horizon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the behavior of massive modes near a horizon based on a study of the dispersion relation and wave packet simulations of the Klein-Gordon equation. We point out an apparent paradox between two (in principle equivalent) pictures of black-hole evaporation through Hawking radiation. In the picture in which the evaporation is due to the emission of positive-energy modes, one immediately obtains a threshold for the emission of massive particles. In the picture in which the evaporation is due to the absorption of negative-energy modes, such a threshold apparently does not exist. We resolve this paradox by tracing the evolution of the positive-energy massive modes with an energy below the threshold. These are seen to be emitted and move away from the black-hole horizon, but they bounce back at a 'red horizon' and are reabsorbed by the black hole, thus compensating exactly for the difference between the two pictures. For astrophysical black holes, the consequences are curious but do not affect the terrestrial constraints on observing Hawking radiation. For analogue-gravity systems with massive modes, however, the consequences are crucial and rather surprising.

Jannes, G. [Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Laboratoire J.-A. Dieudonne, UMR CNRS-UNS 6621, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France); Low Temperature Laboratory, Aalto University School of Science, PO Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland); Maiessa, P.; Rousseaux, G. [Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Laboratoire J.-A. Dieudonne, UMR CNRS-UNS 6621, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France); Philbin, T. G. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, Scotland (United Kingdom)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Magnetic and Electric Flux Quanta: the Pion Mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The angular momentum of the magnetic flux quantum is balanced by that of the associated supercurrent, such that in condensed matter the resultant angular momentum is zero. The notion of a flux quantum in free space is not so simple, needing both magnetic and electric flux quanta to propagate the stable dynamic structure of the photon. Considering these flux quanta at the scale where quantum field theory becomes essential, at the scale defined by the reduced Compton wavelength of the electron, exposes variants of a paradox that apparently has not been addressed in the literature. Leaving the paradox unresolved in this note, reasonable electromagnetic rationales are presented that permit to calculate the masses of the electron, muon, pion, and nucleon with remarkable accuracy. The calculated mass of the electron is correct at the nine significant digit limit of experimental accuracy, the muon at a part in one thousand, the pion at two parts in ten thousand, and the nucleon at seven parts in one hundred thousand. The accuracy of the pion and nucleon mass calculations reinforces the unconventional common notion that the strong force is electromagnetic in origin.

P Cameron

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

A New Look at the Position Operator in Quantum Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The postulate that coordinate and momentum representations are related to each other by the Fourier transform has been accepted from the beginning of quantum theory by analogy with classical electrodynamics. As a consequence, an inevitable effect in standard theory is the wave packet spreading (WPS) of the photon coordinate wave function in directions perpendicular to the photon momentum. This leads to the following paradoxes: if the major part of photons emitted by stars are in wave packet states (what is the most probable scenario) then we should see not separate stars but only an almost continuous background from all stars; no anisotropy of the CMB radiation should be observable; data on gamma-ray bursts, signals from directional radio antennas (in particular, in experiments on Shapiro delay) and signals from pulsars show no signs of WPS. In addition, a problem arises why there are no signs of WPS for protons in the LHC ring. We argue that the above postulate is based neither on strong theoretical arguments nor on experimental data and propose a new consistent definition of the position operator. Then WPS in directions perpendicular to the particle momentum is absent and the paradoxes are resolved. Different components of the new position operator do not commute with each other and, as a consequence, there is no wave function in coordinate representation. Implications of the results for entanglement, quantum locality and the problem of time in quantum theory are discussed.

Felix M. Lev

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

Firewall Phenomenology with Astrophysical Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most fundamental features of a black hole in general relativity is its event horizon: a boundary from which nothing can escape. There has been a recent surge of interest in the nature of these event horizons and their local neighbourhoods. In an attempt to resolve black hole information paradox(es), and more generally, to better understand the path towards quantum gravity, firewalls have been proposed as an alternative to black hole event horizons. In this letter, we explore the phenomenological implications of black holes possessing a surface or firewall. We predict a potentially detectable signature of these firewalls in the form of a high energy astrophysical neutrino flux. We compute the spectrum of this neutrino flux in different models and show that it is a possible candidate for the source of the PeV neutrinos recently detected by IceCube. We further show that, independent of the generation mechanism, IceCube data can be explained (at $1\\sigma$ confidence level) by conversion of accretion on...

Afshordi, Niayesh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Radio-wave propagation in the non-Gaussian interstellar medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radio waves propagating from distant pulsars in the interstellar medium (ISM), are refracted by electron density inhomogeneities, so that the intensity of observed pulses fluctuates with time. The theory relating the observed pulse time-shapes to the electron-density correlation function has developed for 30 years, however, two puzzles have remained. First, observational scaling of pulse broadening with the pulsar distance is anomalously strong; it is consistent with the standard model only when non-uniform statistics of electron fluctuations along the line of sight are assumed. Second, the observed pulse shapes are consistent with the standard model only when the scattering material is concentrated in a narrow slab between the pulsar and the Earth. We propose that both paradoxes are resolved at once if one assumes stationary and uniform, but non-Gaussian statistics of the electron-density distribution. Such statistics must be of Levy type, and the propagating ray should exhibit a Levy flight. We propose that a natural realization of such statistics may be provided by the interstellar medium with random electron-density discontinuities. We develop a theory of wave propagation in such a non-Gaussian random medium, and demonstrate its good agreement with observations. The qualitative introduction of the approach and the resolution of the anomalous-scaling paradox was presented earlier in [PRL 91, 131101 (2003); ApJ 584, 791 (2003)].

Stanislav Boldyrev; Carl R. Gwinn

2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

411

A Process Algebra Approach to Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process approach to NRQM offers a fourth framework for the quantization of physical systems. Unlike the standard approaches (Schrodinger-Heisenberg, Feynman, Wigner-Gronewald-Moyal), the process approach is not merely equivalent to NRQM and is not merely a re-interpretation. The process approach provides a dynamical completion of NRQM. Standard NRQM arises as a asymptotic quotient by means of a set-valued process covering map, which links the process algebra to the usual space of wave functions and operators on Hilbert space. The process approach offers an emergentist, discrete, finite, quasi-non-local and quasi-non-contextual realist interpretation which appears to resolve many of the paradoxes and is free of divergences. Nevertheless, it retains the computational power of NRQM and possesses an emergent probability structure which agrees with NRQM in the asymptotic quotient. The paper describes the process algebra, the process covering map for single systems and the configuration process covering map for multiple systems. It demonstrates the link to NRQM through a toy model. Applications of the process algebra to various quantum mechanical situations - superpositions, two-slit experiments, entanglement, Schrodinger's cat - are presented along with an approach to the paradoxes and the issue of classicality.

William H. Sulis

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

412

Volume 9: A Review of Socioeconomic Impacts of Oil Shale Development WESTERN OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT: A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of an oil shale industry in northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah has been forecast at various times since early this century, but the comparatively easy accessibility of other oil sources has forestalled development. Decreasing fuel supplies, increasing energy costs, and the threat of a crippling oil embargo finally may launch a commercial oil shale industry in this region. Concern for the possible impacts on the human environment has been fostered by experiences of rapid population growth in other western towns that have hosted energy resource development. A large number of studies have attempted to evaluate social and economic impacts of energy development and to determine important factors that affect the severity of these impacts. These studies have suggested that successful management of rapid population growth depends on adequate front-end capital for public facilities, availability of housing, attention to human service needs, long-range land use and fiscal planning. This study examines variables that affect the socioeconomic impacts of oil shale development. The study region is composed of four Colorado counties: Mesa, Moffat, Garfield and Rio Blanco. Most of the estimated population of 111 000 resides in a handful of urban areas that are separated by large distances and rugged terrain. We have projected the six largest cities and towns and one planned company town (Battlement Mesa) to be the probable centers for potential population impacts caused by development of an oil shale industry. Local planners expect Battlement Mesa to lessen impacts on small existing communities and indeed may be necessary to prevent severe regional socioeconomic impacts. Section II describes the study region and focuses on the economic trends and present conditions in the area. The population impacts analyzed in this study are contingent on a scenario of oil shale development from 1980-90 provided by the Department of Energy and discussed in Sec. III. We recognize that the rate of development, the magnitude of development, and the technology mix that will actually take place remain uncertain. Although we emphasize that other energy and mineral resources besides oil shale may be developed, the conclusions reached in this study reflect only those impacts that would be felt from the oil shale scenario. Socioeconomic impacts in the region reflect the uneven growth rate implied by the scenario and will be affected by the timing of industry developments, the length and magnitude of the construction phase of development, and the shift in employment profiles predicted in the scenario. The facilities in the southern portion of the oil shale region, those along the Colorado River and Parachute Creek, show a peak in the construction work force in the mid-1980s, whereas those f acil it i es in the Piceance Creek Bas into the north show a construction peak in the late 1980s. Together, the facilities will require a large construction work force throughout the decade, with a total of 4800 construction workers required in 1985. Construction at the northern sites and second phase construction in the south will require 6000 workers in 1988. By 1990, the operation work force will increase to 7950. Two important characteristics of oil shale development emerge from the work force estimates: (1) peak-year construction work forces will be 90-120% the size of the permanent operating work force; and (2) the yearly changes in total work force requirements will be large, as much as 900 in one year at one facility. To estimate population impacts on individual communities, we devised a population distribution method that is described in Sec. IV. Variables associated with the projection of population impacts are discussed and methodologies of previous assessments are compared. Scenario-induced population impacts estimated by the Los Alamos method are compared to projections of a model employed by the Colorado West Area Council of Governments. Oil shale development in the early decade, as defined by the scenario, will produce growth primarily

Rotariu,, G. J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Assessment of CO2 Sequestration and ECBM Potential of U.S. Coalbeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October, 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy, through contractor Advanced Resources International, launched a multi-year government-industry R&D collaboration called the Coal-Seq project. The Coal-Seq project is investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coalseams, by performing detailed reservoir studies of two enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) field projects in the San Juan basin. The two sites are the Allison Unit, operated by Burlington Resources, and into which CO{sub 2} is being injected, and the Tiffany Unit, operating by BP America, into which N{sub 2} is being injected (the interest in understanding the N{sub 2}-ECBM process has important implications for CO{sub 2} sequestration via flue-gas injection). The purposes of the field studies are to understand the reservoir mechanisms of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} injection into coalseams, demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the ECBM and sequestration processes, an engineering capability to simulate them, and to evaluate sequestration economics. In support of these efforts, laboratory and theoretical studies are also being performed to understand and model multi-component isotherm behavior, and coal permeability changes due to swelling with CO{sub 2} injection. This report describes the results of an important component of the overall project, applying the findings from the San Juan Basin to a national scale to develop a preliminary assessment of the CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery potential of U.S. coalbeds. Importantly, this assessment improves upon previous investigations by (1) including a more comprehensive list of U.S. coal basins, (2) adopting technical rationale for setting upper-bound limits on the results, and (3) incorporating new information on CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} replacement ratios as a function of coal rank. Based on the results of the assessment, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) The CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of U.S. coalbeds is estimated to be about 90 Gt. Of this, about 38 Gt is in Alaska (even after accounting for high costs associated with this province), 14 Gt is in the Powder River basin, 10 Gt is in the San Juan basin, and 8 Gt is in the Greater Green River basin. By comparison, total CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation plants is currently about 2.2 Gt/year. (2) The ECBM recovery potential associated with this sequestration is estimated to be over 150 Tcf. Of this, 47 Tcf is in Alaska (even after accounting for high costs associated with this province), 20 Tcf is in the Powder River basin, 19 Tcf is in the Greater Green River basin, and 16 Tcf is in the San Juan basin. By comparison, total CBM recoverable resources are currently estimated to be about 170 Tcf. (3) Between 25 and 30 Gt of CO{sub 2} can be sequestered at a profit, and 80-85 Gt can be sequestered at costs of less than $5/ton. These estimates do not include any costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and transportation, and only represent geologic sequestration. (4) Several Rocky Mountain basins, including the San Juan, Raton, Powder River and Uinta appear to hold the most favorable conditions for sequestration economics. The Gulf Coast and the Central Appalachian basin also appear to hold promise as economic sequestration targets, depending upon gas prices. (5) In general, the 'non-commercial' areas (those areas outside the main play area that are not expected to produce primary CBM commercially) appear more favorable for sequestration economics than the 'commercial' areas. This is because there is more in-place methane to recover in these settings (the 'commercial' areas having already been largely depleted of methane).

Scott R. Reeves

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

A 4D Synchrotron X-Ray-Tomography Study of the Formation of Hydrocarbon- Migration Pathways in Heated Organic-Rich Shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes that have received renewed interest in recent years because of the ever tightening supply of conventional hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low-permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models for conversion of kerogen into oil and gas and the timing of hydrocarbon generation have been well documented. However, lack of consensus about the kinetics of hydrocarbon formation in source rocks, expulsion timing, and how the resulting hydrocarbons escape from or are retained in the source rocks motivates further investigation. In particular, many mechanisms have been proposed for the transport of hydrocarbons from the rocks in which they are generated into adjacent rocks with higher permeabilities and smaller capillary entry pressures, and a better understanding of this complex process (primary migration) is needed. To characterize these processes, it is imperative to use the latest technological advances. In this study, it is shown how insights into hydrocarbon migration in source rocks can be obtained by using sequential high-resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography. Three-dimensional images of several immature "shale" samples were constructed at resolutions close to 5 um. This is sufficient to resolve the source-rock structure down to the grain level, but very-fine-grained silt particles, clay particles, and colloids cannot be resolved. Samples used in this investigation came from the R-8 unit in the upper part of the Green River shale, which is organic rich, varved, lacustrine marl formed in Eocene Lake Uinta, USA. One Green River shale sample was heated in situ up to 400 degrees C as X-ray-tomography images were recorded. The other samples were scanned before and after heating at 400 degrees C. During the heating phase, the organic matter was decomposed, and gas was released. Gas expulsion from the low-permeability shales was coupled with formation of microcracks. The main technical difficulty was numerical extraction of microcracks that have apertures in the 5- to 30-um range (with 5 um being the resolution limit) from a large 3D volume of X-ray attenuation data. The main goal of the work presented here is to develop a methodology to process these 3D data and image the cracks. This methodology is based on several levels of spatial filtering and automatic recognition of connected domains. Supportive petrographic and thermogravimetric data were an important complement to this study. An investigation of the strain field using 2D image correlation analyses was also performed. As one application of the 4D (space + time) microtomography and the developed workflow, we show that fluid generation was accompanied by crack formation. Under different conditions, in the subsurface, this might provide paths for primary migration.

Hamed Panahi; Paul Meakin; Francois Renard; Maya Kobchenko; Julien Scheibert; Adriano Mazzini; Bjorn Jamtveit; Anders Malthe-Sorenssen; Dag Kristian Dysthe

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Desynchronization in diluted neural networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamical behavior of a weakly diluted fully inhibitory network of pulse-coupled spiking neurons is investigated. Upon increasing the coupling strength, a transition from regular to stochasticlike regime is observed. In the weak-coupling phase, a periodic dynamics is rapidly approached, with all neurons firing with the same rate and mutually phase locked. The strong-coupling phase is characterized by an irregular pattern, even though the maximum Lyapunov exponent is negative. The paradox is solved by drawing an analogy with the phenomenon of 'stable chaos', i.e., by observing that the stochasticlike behavior is 'limited' to an exponentially long (with the system size) transient. Remarkably, the transient dynamics turns out to be stationary.

Zillmer, Ruediger [INFN Sezione Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Livi, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Sezione INFN, Unita' INFM e Centro Interdipartimentale per lo Studio delle Dinamiche Complesse, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Politi, Antonio; Torcini, Alessandro [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, CNR, CNR, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale per lo Studio delle Dinamiche Complesse, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Ghost in the Quantum Turing Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In honor of Alan Turing's hundredth birthday, I unwisely set out some thoughts about one of Turing's obsessions throughout his life, the question of physics and free will. I focus relatively narrowly on a notion that I call "Knightian freedom": a certain kind of in-principle physical unpredictability that goes beyond probabilistic unpredictability. Other, more metaphysical aspects of free will I regard as possibly outside the scope of science. I examine a viewpoint, suggested independently by Carl Hoefer, Cristi Stoica, and even Turing himself, that tries to find scope for "freedom" in the universe's boundary conditions rather than in the dynamical laws. Taking this viewpoint seriously leads to many interesting conceptual problems. I investigate how far one can go toward solving those problems, and along the way, encounter (among other things) the No-Cloning Theorem, the measurement problem, decoherence, chaos, the arrow of time, the holographic principle, Newcomb's paradox, Boltzmann brains, algorithmic info...

Aaronson, Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Stationary states of fermions in a sign potential with a mixed vector–scalar coupling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scattering of a fermion in the background of a sign potential is considered with a general mixing of vector and scalar Lorentz structures with the scalar coupling stronger than or equal to the vector coupling under the Sturm–Liouville perspective. When the vector coupling and the scalar coupling have different magnitudes, an isolated solution shows that the fermion under a strong potential can be trapped in a highly localized region without manifestation of Klein’s paradox. It is also shown that the lonely bound-state solution disappears asymptotically as one approaches the conditions for the realization of spin and pseudospin symmetries. -- Highlights: •Scattering of fermions in a sign potential assessed under a Sturm–Liouville perspective. •An isolated bounded solution. •No pair production despite the high localization. •No bounded solution under exact spin and pseudospin symmetries.

Castilho, W.M., E-mail: castilho.w@gmail.com; Castro, A.S. de, E-mail: castro@pq.cnpq.br

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Black Hole Thermodynamics Based on Unitary Evolutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we try to construct black hole thermodynamics based on the fact that, the formation and evaporation of a black hole can be described by quantum unitary evolutions. First, we show that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy $S_{BH}$ cannot be a Boltzmann or thermal entropy. To confirm this statement, we show that the original black hole's "first law" cannot be treated as the first law of thermodynamics formally, due to some missing metric perturbations caused by matter. Then, by including those (quantum) metric perturbations, we show that the black hole formation and evaporation can be described in a unitary manner effectively, through a quantum channel between the exterior and interior of the event horizon. In this way, the paradoxes of information loss and firewall can be resolved effectively. Finally, we show that black hole thermodynamics can be constructed in an ordinary way, by constructing statistical mechanics.

Feng, Yu-Lei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Dirac equation in low dimensions: The factorization method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a general approach to solve the (1+1) and (2+1)-dimensional Dirac equation in the presence of static scalar, pseudoscalar and gauge potentials, for the case in which the potentials have the same functional form and thus the factorization method can be applied. We show that the presence of electric potentials in the Dirac equation leads to a two Klein-Gordon equations including an energy-dependent potential. We then generalize the factorization method for the case of energy-dependent Hamiltonians. Additionally, the shape invariance is generalized for a specific class of energy-dependent Hamiltonians. We also present a condition for the absence of the Klein's paradox (stability of the Dirac sea), showing how Dirac particles in low dimensions can be confined for a wide family of potentials.

J. A. Sanchez-Monroy; C. J. Quimbay

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

In Self-contradiction, Machian Geocentrism Entails Absolute Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Luka Popov has attempted to advance Machian physics by maintaining that the heliocentric system must be replaced by Tycho Brahe's geocentric system. We show that while geocentrism relies on Mach's contention that accelerations are relative, this contention is untenable because, inter alia, the consequences of an acceleration of an object with respect to the fixed stars cannot be duplicated by acceleration of the stars with respect to this object and, if the universe and a co-rotating observer have the same angular velocity, this motion is detectable because they have different linear velocities. Also, geocentrism precludes the relativity of accelerations and leads to an absolute space while Mach argued against absolute space, Popov's result that the force exerted by the Earth on the Sun depends on the square of the Sun's mass but is independent of the Earth's mass is paradoxical, and the annual asymmetry of the Cosmic Microwave Background falsifies all geocentric or 'Tychonic/Brahean) systems.

Hartman, Herbert I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Another Look at Confidence Intervals: Proposal for a More Relevant and Transparent Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The behaviors of various confidence/credible interval constructions are explored, particularly in the region of low statistics where methods diverge most. We highlight a number of challenges, such as the treatment of nuisance parameters, and common misconceptions associated with such constructions. An informal survey of the literature suggests that confidence intervals are not always defined in relevant ways and are too often misinterpreted and/or misapplied. This can lead to seemingly paradoxical behaviours and flawed comparisons regarding the relevance of experimental results. We therefore conclude that there is a need for a more pragmatic strategy which recognizes that, while it is critical to objectively convey the information content of the data, there is also a strong desire to derive bounds on models and a natural instinct to interpret things this way. Accordingly, we attempt to put aside philosophical biases in favor of a practical view to propose a more transparent and self-consistent approach that better addresses these issues.

Steven D. Biller; Scott M. Oser

2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

422

MSW effect for large mixing angles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The traditional physical description of neutrino flavor conversion in the Sun focuses on the notion of resonance. However, the resonance picture is valid only in the limit of small mixing angles theta. For large values of theta, the resonance picture leads to seemingly paradoxical results. This observation is important for understanding the physics of neutrino flavor conversion in the Sun, since the latest solar neutrino data seems to prefer large mixing angles. Here we review the basic arguments and in particular show that the resonance does not in general coincide with either the point of maximal violation of adiabaticity in the nonadiabatic case or the point of maximal flavor conversion in the adiabatic case. We also discuss a modified adiabaticity criterion.

Alexander Friedland

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

423

Surely You Must All be Joking: An Outsider's Critique of Quantum Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A critique of the state of current quantum theory in physics is presented, based on a perspective outside the normal physics training. From this perspective, the acceptance of quantum nonlocality seems unwarranted, and the fundamental assumptions that give rise to it in the first place seem questionable, based on the current status of the quantum theory of light. The relevant data can instead be accounted for using physically motivated local models, based on detailed properties of the experimental setups. The semiclassical approach, particularly in the form of the fully coupled Maxwell-Dirac equations with a pure wave ontology, seems to provide a satisfying, local, paradox-free physical model of the quantum world, that appears consistent with known phenomena. It is unclear why this approach is not pursued more vigorously in the field, given its clear potential to resolve all the conundrums that have perplexed generations of physicists.

Randall C. O'Reilly

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

424

Internalizing Null Extraterrestrial "Signals": An Astrobiological App for a Technological Society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the beneficial outcomes of searching for life in the Universe is that it grants greater awareness of our own problems here on Earth. Lack of contact with alien beings to date might actually comprise a null "signal" pointing humankind toward a viable future. Astrobiology has surprising practical applications to human society; within the larger cosmological context of cosmic evolution, astrobiology clarifies the energetic essence of complex systems throughout the Universe, including technological intelligence that is intimately dependent on energy and likely will be for as long as it endures. The "message" contained within the "signal" with which today's society needs to cope is reasonably this: Only solar energy can power our civilization going forward without soiling the environment with increased heat yet robustly driving the economy with increased per capita energy usage. The null "signals" from extraterrestrials also offer a rational solution to the Fermi paradox as a principle of cosmic selection l...

Chaisson, Eric J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

On the exploitability of thermo-charged capacitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently [Physics Letters A, 374, (2010) 1801] the concept of vacuum capacitor spontaneously charged harnessing the heat from a single thermal reservoir at room temperature has been introduced, along with a mathematical description of its functioning and a discussion on the main paradoxical feature that seems to violate the Second Law of Thermodynamics. In the present paper we investigate the theoretical and practical possibility of exploiting a such thermo-charged capacitor as voltage/current generator: we show that if very weak provisos on the physical characteristics of the capacitor are fulfilled, then a non-zero current should flow across the device, allowing the generation of potentially usable voltage, current and electric power out of a single thermal source at room temperature. Preliminary results show that the power output is tiny but non-zero.

Germano D'Abramo

2009-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

Salt Wash Field, Grand Country, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salt Wash field is located 15 miles southeast of Green River, Utah, in the Paradox fold and fault belt. The field was discovered in 1961 and has produced over 1.3 million bbl of oil and 11.6 billion ft[sup 3] of gas from the Mississippian Leadville LImestone. The average surface elevation is 4389 ft above sea level, and the depth to the top of the oil production is form 8500 to 8914 ft. Salt Wash field is an anticline with over 200 ft of closure on top of the Leadville. The producing zone is in the lower Leadville with intercrystalline and vuggy porosity developed in limestone and crystalline dolomitic limestone. The produced oil is a 50 to 53 API gravity crude with a 40[degrees]F pour point. The gas, a mixture of two sources, is predominately nitrogen (>70[sup [approximately

Morgan, C.D. (Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

A Zero Knowledge Protocol For Nuclear Warhead Verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The verification of nuclear warheads for arms control faces a paradox: International inspectors must gain high confidence in the authenticity of submitted items while learning nothing about them. Conventional inspection systems featuring ''information barriers'', designed to hide measurments stored in electronic systems, are at risk of tampering and snooping. Here we show the viability of fundamentally new approach to nuclear warhead verification that incorporates a zero-knowledge protocol, designed such that sensitive information is never measured so does not need to be hidden. We interrogate submitted items with energetic neutrons, making in effect, differential measurements of neutron transmission and emission. Calculations of diversion scenarios show that a high degree of discrimination can be achieved while revealing zero information. Timely demonstration of the viability of such an approach could be critical for the nexxt round of arms-control negotiations, which will likely require verification of individual warheads, rather than whole delivery systems.

Glaser, Alexander [Princeton, Univ., NJ (United States). Program on Science and Global Security] [Princeton, Univ., NJ (United States). Program on Science and Global Security; Goldston, Robert J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Improved quantum correlations in second harmonic generation with a squeezed pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effects of a squeezed pump on the quantum properties and conversion efficiency of the light produced in single-pass second harmonic generation. Using stochastic integration of the two-mode equations of motion in the positive-P representation, we find that larger violations of continuous-variable harmonic entanglement criteria are available for lesser effective interaction strengths than with a coherent pump. This enhancement of the quantum properties also applies to violations of the Reid-Drummond inequalities used to demonstrate a harmonic version of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox. We find that the conversion efficiency is largely unchanged except for very low pump intensities and high levels of squeezing.

E. MArcellina; J. F. Corney; M. K. Olsen

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

429

Three +1 Faces of Invariance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A careful look at an allegedly well-known century-old concept reveals interesting aspects in it that have generally avoided recognition in literature. There are four different kinds of physical observables known or proclaimed as relativistic invariants under space-time rotations. Only observables in the first three categories are authentic invariants, whereas the single "invariant" - proper length - in the fourth category is actually not an invariant. The proper length has little is anything to do with proper distance which is a true invariant. On the other hand, proper distance, proper time, and rest mass have more in common than usually recognized, and particularly, mass - time analogy opens another view of the twin paradox.

Moses Fayngold

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fluctuation-dissipation theorem in general relativity and the cosmological constant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuum fluctuations are an essential feature of quantum field theory. Yet, the smallness of the scalar curvature of our universe suggests that the zero-point energy associated with these fluctuations does not curve spacetime. A possible way out of this paradox is suggested by the fact that microscopic fluctuations are generally accompanied by dissipative behavior in macroscopic systems. The intimate relation between the two is expressed by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem which extends to general relativity. The connection between quantum fluctuations and dissipation suggests a mechanism for the conversion of coherent stresses in the curvature of space into ordinary matter or radiation, thereby relaxing the effective cosmological ``constant`` to zero over time. The expansion of the universe may be the effect of this time-asymmetric relaxation process.

Mottola, E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Fluctuation-dissipation theorem in general relativity and the cosmological constant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuum fluctuations are an essential feature of quantum field theory. Yet, the smallness of the scalar curvature of our universe suggests that the zero-point energy associated with these fluctuations does not curve spacetime. A possible way out of this paradox is suggested by the fact that microscopic fluctuations are generally accompanied by dissipative behavior in macroscopic systems. The intimate relation between the two is expressed by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem which extends to general relativity. The connection between quantum fluctuations and dissipation suggests a mechanism for the conversion of coherent stresses in the curvature of space into ordinary matter or radiation, thereby relaxing the effective cosmological constant'' to zero over time. The expansion of the universe may be the effect of this time-asymmetric relaxation process.

Mottola, E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cross product in N Dimensions - the doublewedge product  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cross product frequently occurs in Physics and Engineering, since it has large applications in many contexts, e.g. for calculating angular momenta, torques, rotations, volumes etc. Though this mathematical operator is widely used, it is commonly expressed in a 3-D notation which gives rise to many paradoxes and difficulties. In fact, instead of other vector operators like scalar product, the cross product is defined just in 3-D space, it does not respect reflection rules and invokes the concept of "handedness". In this paper we are going to present an extension of cross product in an arbitrary number N of spatial Dimensions, different from the one adopted in the Exterior Algebra and explicitly designed for an easy calculus of moments.

Carlo Andrea Gonano; Riccardo Enrico Zich

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

433

Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (1/3)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

434

Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (3/3)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

435

Atom Interferometers and the Gravitational Redshift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From the principle of equivalence, Einstein predicted that clocks slow down in a gravitational field. Since the general theory of relativity is based on the principle of equivalence, it is essential to test this prediction accurately. Muller, Peters and Chu claim that a reinterpretation of decade old experiments with atom interferometers leads to a sensitive test of this gravitational redshift effect at the Compton frequency. Wolf et al dispute this claim and adduce arguments against it. In this article, we distill these arguments to a single fundamental objection: an atom is NOT a clock ticking at the Compton frequency. We conclude that atom interferometry experiments conducted to date do not yield such sensitive tests of the gravitational redshift. Finally, we suggest a new interferometric experiment to measure the gravitational redshift, which realises a quantum version of the classical clock "paradox".

Supurna Sinha; Joseph Samuel

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin.

Not Available

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Transport Phenomena and Light Element Abundances in the Sun and Solar Type Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observations of light elements in the Sun and Solar type stars give special clues for understanding the hydrodynamical processes at work in stellar interiors. In the Sun 7Li is depleted by 140 while 3He has not increased by more than 10% in 3 Gyrs. Meanwhile the inversion of helioseismic modes lead to a precision on the sound velocity of about .1%. The mixing processes below the solar convection zone are constrained by these observations. Lithium is depleted in most Pop I solar type stars. In halo stars however, the lithium abundance seems constant in the "spite plateau" with no observed dispersion, which is difficult to reconcile with the theory of diffusion processes. In the present paper, the various relevant observations will be discussed. It will be shown that the mu-gradients induced by element settling may help solving the "lithium paradox".

Sylvie Vauclair

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

Relativistic elasticity of rigid rods and strings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the equation of motion for a rigid one-dimensional elastic body (i.e. a rod or string whose speed of sound is equal to the speed of light) in a two-dimensional spacetime is simply the wave equation. We then solve this equation in a few simple examples: a rigid rod colliding with an unmovable wall, a rigid rod being pushed by a constant force, a rigid string whose endpoints are simultaneously set in motion (seen as a special case of Bell's spaceships paradox), and a radial rigid string that has partially crossed the event horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole while still being held from the outside.

Jose Natario

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (2/3)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

440

Paraxial Light Beams with Angular Momentum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamental and applied concepts concerning the ability of light beams to carry a certain mechanical angular momentum with respect to the propagation axis are reviewed and discussed. Following issues are included: Historical reference; Angular momentum of a paraxial beam and its constituents; Spin angular momentum and paradoxes associated with it; Orbital angular momentum; Circularly-spiral beams: examples and methods of generation; Orbital angular momentum and the intensity moments; Symmetry breakdown and decomposition of the orbital angular momentum; Mechanical models of the vortex light beams; Mechanical action of the beam angular momentum; Rotational Doppler effect, its manifestation in the image rotation; Spectrum of helical harmonics and associated problems; Non-collinear rotational Doppler effect; Properties of a beam forcedly rotating around its own axis. Research prospects and ways of practical utilization of optical beams with angular momentum.

A. Bekshaev; M. Soskin; M. Vasnetsov

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ER=EPR, GHZ, and the Consistency of Quantum Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper illustrates various aspects of the ER=EPR conjecture.It begins with a brief heuristic argument, using the Ryu-Takayanagi correspondence, for why entanglement between black holes implies the existence of Einstein-Rosen bridges. The main part of the paper addresses a fundamental question: Is ER=EPR consistent with the standard postulates of quantum mechanics? Naively it seems to lead to an inconsistency between observations made on entangled systems by different observers. The resolution of the paradox lies in the properties of multiple black holes, entangled in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger pattern. The last part of the paper is about entanglement as a resource for quantum communication. ER=EPR provides a way to visualize protocols like quantum teleportation. In some sense teleportation takes place through the wormhole, but as usual, classical communication is necessary to complete the protocol.

Susskind, Leonard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Wigner-function description of EPR experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a detailed description of the EPR paradox (in the Bohm version) for a two qubit-state in the discrete Wigner function formalism. We compare the probability distributions for two qubit relevant to simultaneously-measurable observables (computed from the Wigner function) with the probability distributions representing two perfectly-correlated classic particles in a discrete phase-space. We write in both cases the updating formulae after a measure, thus obtaining a mathematical definition of \\textit{classic collapse} and \\textit{quantum collapse}. We study, with the EPR experiment, the joint probability distributions of Alice's and Bob's qubit before and after the measure, analyzing the non-local effects. In particular, we give a more precise definition of locality, which we call m-locality: we show that quantum systems may violate this kind of locality, thus preserving, in an EPR-like argument, the completeness of Quantum Mechanics.

Riccardo Franco

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

443

Finite-time Lyapunov exponent for a random Ehrenfest gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the motion of a system of free particles moving in a plane with hard scatterers of regular polygonal shape arranged in a random manner. Calling this the Ehrenfest gas which is known to be pseudo-integrable, we propose a finite-time Lyapunov exponent characterizing the dynamics. In the limit of large number of vertices, where polygon tends to a circle, we recover the Lyapunov exponent for the Lorentz gas. To obtain this result, we generalized the reflection law of a pencil of rays incident on a polygonal scatterer in a way that the formula for the circular scatterer is recovered in the limit of infinite vertices. Thus, seemingly paradoxically, chaos seems to emerge from pseudo-chaos.

Sanjay Moudgalya; Sarthak Chandra; Sudhir R. Jain

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

444

ER=EPR, GHZ, and the Consistency of Quantum Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper illustrates various aspects of the ER=EPR conjecture.It begins with a brief heuristic argument, using the Ryu-Takayanagi correspondence, for why entanglement between black holes implies the existence of Einstein-Rosen bridges. The main part of the paper addresses a fundamental question: Is ER=EPR consistent with the standard postulates of quantum mechanics? Naively it seems to lead to an inconsistency between observations made on entangled systems by different observers. The resolution of the paradox lies in the properties of multiple black holes, entangled in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger pattern. The last part of the paper is about entanglement as a resource for quantum communication. ER=EPR provides a way to visualize protocols like quantum teleportation. In some sense teleportation takes place through the wormhole, but as usual, classical communication is necessary to complete the protocol.

Leonard Susskind

2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

445

Entropy and quantum gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give an account of the matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis which, unlike the standard approach to entropy based on coarse-graining, offers a definition for the entropy of a closed system as a real and objective quantity. We explain how this new approach offers an explanation for the Second Law of Thermodynamics in general and a non-paradoxical understanding of information loss during black hole formation and evaporation in particular. We also very briefly review some recent related work on the nature of equilibrium states involving quantum black holes and point out how it promises to resolve some puzzling issues in the current version of the string theory approach to black hole entropy.

Kay, Bernard S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Of fishes and birthdays: Efficient estimation of polymer configurational entropies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an algorithm to estimate the configurational entropy $S$ of a polymer. The algorithm uses the statistics of coincidences among random samples of configurations and is related to the catch-tag-release method for estimation of population sizes, and to the classic "birthday paradox". Bias in the entropy estimation is decreased by grouping configurations in nearly equiprobable partitions based on their energies, and estimating entropies separately within each partition. Whereas most entropy estimation algorithms require $N\\sim 2^{S}$ samples to achieve small bias, our approach typically needs only $N\\sim \\sqrt{2^{S}}$. Thus the algorithm can be applied to estimate protein free energies with increased accuracy and decreased computational cost.

Nemenman, Ilya; Strauss, Charlie E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Residential segregation and cultural dissemination: An Axelrod-Schelling model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Axelrod's model of cultural dissemination, we consider mobility of cultural agents through the introduction of a density of empty sites and the possibility that agents in a dissimilar neighborhood can move to them if their mean cultural similarity with the neighborhood is below some threshold. While for low values of the density of empty sites the mobility enhances the convergence to a global culture, for high enough values of it the dynamics can lead to the coexistence of disconnected domains of different cultures. In this regime, the increase of initial cultural diversity paradoxically increases the convergence to a dominant culture. Further increase of diversity leads to fragmentation of the dominant culture into domains, forever changing in shape and number, as an effect of the never ending eroding activity of cultural minorities.

Gracia-Lazaro, C; Floria, L M; Moreno, Y

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Anti-telephones in transformation optics: metamaterials with closed null geodesics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply the methods of transformation optics to theoretical descriptions of spacetimes that support closed null geodesic curves. The metric used is based on frame dragging spacetimes, such as the van Stockum dust or the Kerr black hole. Through transformation optics, this metric is analogous to a material that in theory should allow for communication between past and future. Presented herein is a derivation and description of the spacetime and the resulting permeability, permittivity, and magneto-electric couplings that a material would need in order for light in the material to follow closed null geodesics. We also address the paradoxical implications of such a material, and demonstrate why such a material would not actually result in a violation of causality. A full derivation of the Plebanski equations is also included.

Boston, S Reece

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Quantum hair and the string-black hole correspondence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a thought experiment in which an energetic massless string probes a "stringhole" (a heavy string lying on the correspondence curve between strings and black holes) at large enough impact parameter for the regime to be under theoretical control. The corresponding, explicitly unitary, $S$-matrix turns out to be perturbatively sensitive to the microstate of the stringhole: in particular, at leading order in $l_s/b$, it depends on a projection of the stringhole's Lorentz-contracted quadrupole moment. The string-black hole correspondence is therefore violated if one assumes quantum hair to be exponentially suppressed as a function of black-hole entropy. Implications for the information paradox are briefly discussed.

Gabriele Veneziano

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

Cleaning up the Streets of Denver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1913 and 1924, several Denver area facilities extracted radium from carnotite ore mined from the Paradox basin region of Colorado. Tailings or abandoned ores from these facilities were apparently incorporated into asphalt used to pave approximately 7.2 kilometers (4.5 miles) of streets in Denver. A majority of the streets are located in residential areas. The radionuclides are bound within the asphalt matrix and pose minimal risk unless they are disturbed. The City and County of Denver (CCoD) is responsible for controlling repairs and maintenance on these impacted streets. Since 2002, the CCoD has embarked on a significant capital improvement project to remove the impacted asphalt for secure disposal followed by street reconstruction. To date, Parsons has removed approximately 55 percent of the impacted asphalt. This paper discusses the history of the Denver Radium Streets and summarizes on-going project efforts. (authors)

Stegen, R.L.; Wood, T.R.; Hackett, J.R. [Parsons, 1700 Broadway, Suite 900, Denver, Colorado 80290 (United States); Sogue, A. [City and County of Denver, 201 West Colfax, Denver, Colorado 80202 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

PERSPECTIVES ON INTRACLUSTER ENRICHMENT AND THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stars formed in galaxy cluster potential wells must be responsible for the high level of enrichment measured in the intracluster medium (ICM); however, there is increasing tension between this truism and the parsimonious assumption that the stars in the generally old population studied optically in cluster galaxies emerged from the same formation sites at the same epochs. We construct a phenomenological cluster enrichment model to demonstrate that ICM elemental abundances are underestimated by a factor >2 for standard assumptions about the stellar population-a discrepancy we call the ''cluster elemental abundance paradox''. Recent evidence of an elliptical galaxy initial mass function (IMF) skewed to low masses deepens the paradox. We quantify the adjustments to the star formation efficiency and IMF, and Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) production efficiency, required to resolve this while being consistent with the observed ICM abundance pattern. The necessary enhancement in metal enrichment may, in principle, originate in the observed stellar population if a larger fraction of stars in the supernova-progenitor mass range form from an IMF that is either bottom-light or top-heavy, with the latter in some conflict with observed ICM abundance ratios. Other alternatives that imply more modest revisions to the IMF, mass return and remnant fractions, and primordial fraction, posit an increase in the fraction of 3-8 M{sub Sun} stars that explode as SNIa or assume that there are more stars than conventionally thought-although the latter implies a high star formation efficiency. We discuss the feasibility of these various solutions and the implications for the diversity of star formation in the universe, the process of elliptical galaxy formation, and the origin of this ''hidden'' source of ICM metal enrichment.

Loewenstein, Michael, E-mail: Michael.Loewenstein.1@nasa.gov [Also at CRESST and X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

What controls phytoplankton production in nutrient-rich areas of the open sea?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oceans play a critical role in regulating the global carbon cycle. Deep-ocean waters are roughly 200% supersaturated with CO{sub 2} compared to surface waters, which are in contact with the atmosphere. This difference is due to the flux of photosynthetically derived organic material from surface to deep waters and its subsequent remineralization, i.e. the ``biological pump``. The pump is a complex phytoplankton-based ecosystem. the paradoxical nature of ocean regions containing high nutrients and low phytoplankton populations has intrigued biological oceanographers for many years. Hypotheses to explain the paradox include the regulation of productivity by light, temperature, zooplankton grazing, and trace metal limitation and/or toxicity. To date, none of the hypotheses, or combinations thereof, has emerged as a widely accepted explanation for why the nitrogen and phosphorus are not depleted in these regions of the oceans. Recently, new evidence has emerged which supports the hypothesis that iron limitation regulates primary production in these areas. This has stimulated discussions of the feasibility of fertilizing parts the Southern Ocean with iron, and thus sequestering additional atmospheric CO{sub 2} in the deep oceans, where it would remain over the next few centuries. The economic, social, and ethical concerns surrounding such a proposition, along with the outstanding scientific issues, call for rigorous discussion and debate on the regulation of productivity in these regions. To this end, The American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) held a Special Symposium on the topic Feb. 22--24th, 1991. Participants included leading authorities, from the US and abroad, on physical, chemical, and biological oceanography, plant physiology, microbiology, and trace metal chemistry. Representatives from government agencies and industry were also present.

Weiler, C.S. [comp.

1991-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

453

What controls phytoplankton production in nutrient-rich areas of the open sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oceans play a critical role in regulating the global carbon cycle. Deep-ocean waters are roughly 200% supersaturated with CO{sub 2} compared to surface waters, which are in contact with the atmosphere. This difference is due to the flux of photosynthetically derived organic material from surface to deep waters and its subsequent remineralization, i.e. the biological pump''. The pump is a complex phytoplankton-based ecosystem. the paradoxical nature of ocean regions containing high nutrients and low phytoplankton populations has intrigued biological oceanographers for many years. Hypotheses to explain the paradox include the regulation of productivity by light, temperature, zooplankton grazing, and trace metal limitation and/or toxicity. To date, none of the hypotheses, or combinations thereof, has emerged as a widely accepted explanation for why the nitrogen and phosphorus are not depleted in these regions of the oceans. Recently, new evidence has emerged which supports the hypothesis that iron limitation regulates primary production in these areas. This has stimulated discussions of the feasibility of fertilizing parts the Southern Ocean with iron, and thus sequestering additional atmospheric CO{sub 2} in the deep oceans, where it would remain over the next few centuries. The economic, social, and ethical concerns surrounding such a proposition, along with the outstanding scientific issues, call for rigorous discussion and debate on the regulation of productivity in these regions. To this end, The American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) held a Special Symposium on the topic Feb. 22--24th, 1991. Participants included leading authorities, from the US and abroad, on physical, chemical, and biological oceanography, plant physiology, microbiology, and trace metal chemistry. Representatives from government agencies and industry were also present.

Weiler, C.S. (comp.)

1991-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

454

THIN SECTION DESCRIPTIONS: LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field in Utah (figure 1). However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

CARBON AND OXYGEN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS: BUG, CHEROKEE, AND PATTERSON CANYON FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Stephen T. Nelson

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

PRODUCTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

CAPILLARY PRESSURE/MERCURY INJECTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

THIN SECTION DESCRIPTIONS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

GEOPHYSICAL WELL LOG/CORE DESCRIPTIONS, CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

CROSS SECTIONS AND FIELD MAPS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND PORE CASTING: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Louis H. Taylor

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

POROSITY/PERMEABILITY CROSS-PLOTS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Evolution of a wave packet scattered by a one-dimensional potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the evolution of a wave packet that is made up of a group of the wave functions describing the stationary scattering process and tunnels through a one-dimensional potential of arbitrary form. As the main characteristics of the time difference of the tunnelling process, use is made of the propagation speed of the wave-packet maximum. We show that the known Hartman formula for the tunnelling time corresponds to the wave packet with a wavenumber-uniform spectral composition in the case, when the phase and transmission coefficient modulus dispersions are taken into account only in the linear approximation. The amplitude of the main peak of the transmitted wave intensity is proven to be independent of the tunnelling time and is determined by the transmission coefficient of the spectral component at the carrier frequency and the spectral width of the wave packet. In the limit of an infinitely wide potential barrier the amplitude of the wave-packet maximum is shown to tend to zero slower than the tunnelling time tends to its asymptotic value, i.e., indeed we deal with the paradox of an infinitely large propagation speed of a wave disturbance through the barrier. (propagation of wave fronts)

Khachatrian, A Zh; Alexanyan, Al G; Khoetsyan, V A; Alexanyan, N A

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

Coordinated studies in support of hydraulic fracturing of coalbed methane. Annual report, January 1993-April 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of natural gas from coal typically requires stimulation in the form of hydraulic fracturing and, more recently, cavity completions. The results of hydraulic fracturing treatments have ranged from extremely successful to less than satisfactory. The purpose of this work is to characterize common and potential fracturing fluids in terms of coal-fluid interactions to identify reasons for less than satisfactory performance and to ultimately devise alternative fluids and treatment procedures to optimize production following hydraulic fracturing. The laboratory data reported herein has proven helpful in designing improved hydraulic fracturing treatments and remedial treatments in the Black Warrior Basin. Acid inhibitors, scale inhibitors, additives to improve coal relative permeability to gas, and non-damaging polymer systems for hydraulic fracturing have been screened in coal damage tests. The optimum conditions for creating field-like foams in the laboratory have been explored. Tests have been run to identify minimum polymer and surfactant concentrations for applications of foam in coal. The roll of 100 mesh sand in controlling leakoff and impairing conductivity in coal has been investigated. The leakoff and proppant transport of fluids with breaker has been investigated and recommendations have been made for breaker application to minimize damage potential in coal. A data base called COAL`S has been created in Paradox (trademark) for Windows to catalogue coalbed methane activities in the Black Warrior and San Juan Basins.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

G\\"odel, Tarski, Turing and the conundrum of free will  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The problem of defining and locating free will (FW) in physics is studied. On basis of logical paradoxes, we argue that FW has a meta-theoretic character, like the concept of truth in Tarski's undefinability theorem. Free will exists relative to a base theory if there is freedom to deviate from the deterministic or indeterministic dynamics in the theory, with the deviations caused by parameters (representing will) in the meta-theory. By contrast, determinism and indeterminism do not require meta-theoretic considerations in their formalization, making FW a fundamentally new causal primitive. FW exists relative to the meta-theory if there is freedom for deviation, due to higher-order causes. Absolute free will, which corresponds to our intuitive introspective notion of free will, exists if this meta-theoretic hierarchy is infinite. We argue that this hierarchy corresponds to higher levels of uncomputability. In other words, at any finitely high order in the hierarchy, there are uncomputable deviations from the ...

Nayakar, Chetan S Mandayam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Set theory and physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inasmuch as physical theories are formalizable, set theory provides a framework for theoretical physics. Four speculations about the relevance of set theoretical modeling for physics are presented: the role of transcendental set theory (i) in chaos theory, (ii) for paradoxical decompositions of solid three-dimensional objects, (iii) in the theory of effective computability (Church-Turing thesis) related to the possible {open_quotes}solution of supertasks,{close_quotes} and (iv) for weak solutions. Several approaches to set theory and their advantages and disadvantages for physical applications are discussed: Cantorian {open_quotes}naive{close_quotes} (i.e., nonaxiomatic) set theory, contructivism, and operationalism. In the author`s opinion, an attitude, of {open_quotes}suspended attention{close_quotes} (a term borrowed from psychoanalysis) seems most promising for progress. Physical and set theoretical entities must be operationalized wherever possible. At the same time, physicists should be open to {open_quotes}bizarre{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}mindboggling{close_quotes} new formalisms, which need not be operationalizable or testable at the time of their creation, but which may successfully lead to novel fields of phenomenology and technology.

Svozil, K. [Univ. of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

The Ghost in the Quantum Turing Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In honor of Alan Turing's hundredth birthday, I unwisely set out some thoughts about one of Turing's obsessions throughout his life, the question of physics and free will. I focus relatively narrowly on a notion that I call "Knightian freedom": a certain kind of in-principle physical unpredictability that goes beyond probabilistic unpredictability. Other, more metaphysical aspects of free will I regard as possibly outside the scope of science. I examine a viewpoint, suggested independently by Carl Hoefer, Cristi Stoica, and even Turing himself, that tries to find scope for "freedom" in the universe's boundary conditions rather than in the dynamical laws. Taking this viewpoint seriously leads to many interesting conceptual problems. I investigate how far one can go toward solving those problems, and along the way, encounter (among other things) the No-Cloning Theorem, the measurement problem, decoherence, chaos, the arrow of time, the holographic principle, Newcomb's paradox, Boltzmann brains, algorithmic information theory, and the Common Prior Assumption. I also compare the viewpoint explored here to the more radical speculations of Roger Penrose. The result of all this is an unusual perspective on time, quantum mechanics, and causation, of which I myself remain skeptical, but which has several appealing features. Among other things, it suggests interesting empirical questions in neuroscience, physics, and cosmology; and takes a millennia-old philosophical debate into some underexplored territory.

Scott Aaronson

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

468

Uncertainty relation in Schwarzschild spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the entropic uncertainty relation in the curved background outside a Schwarzschild black hole, and find that Hawking radiation introduces a nontrivial modification on the uncertainty bound for particular observer, therefore it could be witnessed by proper uncertainty game experimentally. We first investigate an uncertainty game between a free falling observer and his static partner holding a quantum memory initially entangled with the quantum system to be measured. Due to the information loss from Hawking decoherence, we find an inevitable increase of the uncertainty on the outcome of measurements in the view of static observer, which is dependent on the mass of the black hole, the distance of observer from event horizon, and the mode frequency of quantum memory. To illustrate the generality of this paradigm, we relate the entropic uncertainty bound with other uncertainty probe, e.g., time-energy uncertainty. In an alternative game between two static players, we show that quantum information of qubit can be transferred to quantum memory through a bath of fluctuating quantum fields outside the black hole. For a particular choice of initial state, we show that the Hawking decoherence cannot counteract entanglement generation after the dynamical evolution of system, which triggers an effectively reduced uncertainty bound that violates the intrinsic limit $-\\log_2c$. Numerically estimation for a proper choice of initial state shows that our result is comparable with possible real experiments. Finally, a discussion on the black hole firewall paradox in the context of entropic uncertainty relation is given.

Jun Feng; Yao-Zhong Zhang; Mark D. Gould; Heng Fan

2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

469

Sub-second Morphological Changes in Nafion during Water Uptake Detected by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of Nafion® membrane to absorb water rapidly and create a network of hydrated interconnected water domains provides this material with an unmatched ability to conduct ions through a chemically and mechanically robust membrane. The morphology and composition of these hydrated membranes significantly affects their transport properties and performance. This work demonstrates that differences in interfacial interactions between the membranes exposed to vapor or liquid water can cause significant changes in kinetics of water uptake. In-situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments captured the rapid swelling of the membrane in liquid water with nanostructure rearrangement on the order of seconds. For membranes in contact with water vapor, morphological changes are four-orders-of-magnitude slower than in liquid water, suggesting that interfacial resistance limits the penetration of water into the membrane. Also, upon water absorption from liquid water, a structural rearrangement from a distribution of spherical and cylindrical domains to exclusively cylindrical-like domains is suggested. These differences in water-uptake kinetics and morphology provide a new perspective into Schroeder’s Paradox, which dictates different water contents for vaporand liquid-equilibrated ionomers at unit activity. The findings of this work provide critical insights into the fast kinetics of water absorption of Nafion membrane, which can aid in the design of energy conversion devices that operate under frequent changes in environmental conditions.

Kusoglu, Ahmet; Modestino, Miguel A.; Hexemer, Alexander; Segalman, Rachel A.; Weber, Adam Z.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

Uncertainty, loss aversion, and markets for energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing energy efficiency is critical to mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from fossil-fuel combustion, reducing oil dependence, and achieving a sustainable global energy system. The tendency of markets to neglect apparently cost-effective energy efficiency options has been called the efficiency gap or energy paradox. The market for energy efficiency in new, energy-using durable goods, however, appears to have a bias that leads to undervaluation of future energy savings relative to their expected value. This paper argues that the bias is chiefly produced by the combination of substantial uncertainty about the net value of future fuel savings and the loss aversion of typical consumers. This framework relies on the theory of contextdependent preferences. The uncertainty-loss aversion bias against energy efficiency is quantifiable, making it potentially correctible by policy measures. The welfare economics of such policies remains unresolved. Data on the costs of increased fuel economy of new passenger cars, taken from a National Research Council study, illustrate how an apparently cost-effective increase in energy efficiency would be uninteresting to lossaverse consumers.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated by the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J. [Mayo Clinic and Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Expected near-field thermal performance for nuclear waste repositories at potential salt sites: Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal analyses were made for the environmental assessments of seven potential salt sites for a nuclear waste repository. These analyses predicted that potential repository sites in domal salts located in the Gulf Coast will experience higher temperature than those in bedded salts of Paradox and Palo Duro Basins, mainly because of higher ambient temperatures at depth. The TEMPV5 code, a semi-analytical heat transfer code for finite line sources, calculated temperatures for commercial high-level waste (CHLW) and spent fuel from pressurized-water reactors (SFPWR). Benchmarks with HEATING6, THAC-SIP-3D, STEALTH, and SPECTROM-41 showed that TEMPV5 agreed closely in the very near field around the waste package and approximately in the near-field and far-field regions of the repository. The analyses used site-specific thermal conductivities that were increased by 40% to compensate for reductions caused by testing technique, salt impurities, and other heterogeneities, and sampling disturbance. Analyses showed peak salt temperatures of 236/sup 0/C (CHLW) and 134/sup 0/C (SFPWR) for the bedded salt and 296/sup 0/C (CHLW) and 180/sup 0/C (SFPWR) for the domal salt. Analyses with uncorrected laboratory thermal conductivities would increase peak salt temperatures by about 120/sup 0/C for CHLW and about 60/sup 0/C for SFPWR. These temperature increases would increase the thermally induced flow of brine and accelerate corrosion of the waste package. 30 refs., 35 figs., 48 tabs.

McNulty, E.G.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Nature of time and causality in Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conceptual definition and understanding of the nature of time, both qualitatively and quantitatively is of the utmost difficulty and importance, and plays a fundamental role in physics. Physical systems seem to evolve in paths of increasing entropy and of complexity, and thus, the arrow of time shall be explored in the context of thermodynamic irreversibility and quantum physics. In Newtonian physics, time flows at a constant rate, the same for all observers; however, it necessarily flows at different rates for different observers in special and general relativity. Special relativity provides important quantitative elucidations of the fundamental processes related to time dilation effects, and general relativity provides a deep analysis to effects of time flow, such as in the presence of gravitational fields. Through the special theory of relativity, time became intimately related with space, giving rise to the notion of spacetime, in which both parameters cannot be considered as separate entities. As time is incorporated into the proper structure of the fabric of spacetime, it is interesting to note that general relativity is contaminated with non-trivial geometries that generate closed timelike curves, and thus apparently violates causality. The notion of causality is fundamental in the construction of physical theories; therefore time travel and its associated paradoxes have to be treated with great caution. These issues are briefly analyzed in this review paper.

Francisco S. N. Lobo

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

474

An optical model for an analogy of Parrondo game and designing Brownian ratchets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An optical model of classical photons propagating through array of many beam splitters is developed to give a physical analogy of Parrondo's game and Parrondo-Harmer-Abbott game. We showed both the two games are reasonable game without so-called game paradox and they are essentially the same. We designed the games with long-term memory on loop lattice and history-entangled game. The strong correlation between nearest two rounds of game can make the combination of two losing game win, lose or oscillate between win and loss. The periodic potential in Brownian ratchet is analogous to a long chain of beam splitters. The coupling between two neighboring potential wells is equivalent to two coupled beam splitters. This correspondence may help us to understand the anomalous motion of exceptional Brownian particles moving in the opposite direction to the majority. We designed the capital wave for a game by introducing correlations into independent capitals instead of sub-games. Playing entangled quantum states in man...

Si, Tieyan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Engine coolant technology, performance, and life for light-duty applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently there has been interest by motor vehicle manufacturers in developing longer-lived automotive engine coolants with an emphasis on organic acid technology (OAT). Paradoxically, the lifetime of conventional technology remains largely undefined. Concerns arising from the depleting nature of silicate have led to modern conservative change recommendations of 30,000 to 50,000 miles ({approximately}48,279 to 80,464 km). In the present work, laboratory bench test, engine dynamometer and vehicle service data from traditional silicate, hybrid and nonsilicate coolants are compared and contrasted. A new electrochemical test is used to examine passivation kinetics on aluminum. It is shown that performance and lifetime are independent of chemistry and cannot be generalized. Examples include an American silicate coolant with excellent performance on high-heat-rejecting aluminum (80 W/cm{sup 2}). European and American silicate coolants with performance defined lifetimes in excess of 300,000 miles (482,790 km), and an OAT coolant with laboratory high lead solder protection. It is concluded that the primary benefit of OAT is to meet global specifications that include chemical limitations.

Turcotte, D.E.; Lockwood, F.E. [Valvoline Co., Lexington, KY (United States); Pfitzner, K.K.; Meszaros, L.L. [BASF Aktiengesellschaft, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Listebarger, J.K. [Ashland Chemical, Dublin, OH (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Electromagnetic Quantum Gravity Theory On Quantum Inertia and the Einstein Principle of Equivalence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On a new approach to quantum gravity called Electro-Magnetic Quantum Gravity (EMQG) which is manifestly compatible with Cellular Automata (CA) theory and is based on a new theory of inertia (ref. 5) proposed by R. Haisch, A. Rueda, and H. Puthoff (which we modified and called Quantum Inertia). Newtonian Inertia is due to the strictly local electrical force interactions of matter with the surrounding charged virtual particles of the quantum vacuum. The sum of all the tiny electrical forces originating from each charged particle in the mass with respect to the vacuum, is the source of the total inertial force of a mass which opposes accelerated motion in Newton's law 'F = MA'. The problems and paradoxes of accelerated motion introduced in Mach's principle are solved by suggesting that the state of acceleration of the charged virtual particles of the quantum vacuum (with respect to a mass) serves as Newton's universal reference frame for the mass. Einstein's principle of equivalence of inertial and gravitational...

Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Neutrino oscillations: Entanglement, energy-momentum conservation and QFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider several subtle aspects of the theory of neutrino oscillations which have been under discussion recently. We show that the $S$-matrix formalism of quantum field theory can adequately describe neutrino oscillations if correct physics conditions are imposed. This includes space-time localization of the neutrino production and detection processes. Space-time diagrams are introduced, which characterize this localization and illustrate the coherence issues of neutrino oscillations. We discuss two approaches to calculations of the transition amplitudes, which allow different physics interpretations: (i) using configuration-space wave packets for the involved particles, which leads to approximate conservation laws for their mean energies and momenta; (ii) calculating first a plane-wave amplitude of the process, which exhibits exact energy-momentum conservation, and then convoluting it with the momentum-space wave packets of the involved particles. We show that these two approaches are equivalent. Kinematic entanglement (which is invoked to ensure exact energy-momentum conservation in neutrino oscillations) and subsequent disentanglement of the neutrinos and recoiling states are in fact irrelevant when the wave packets are considered. We demonstrate that the contribution of the recoil particle to the oscillation phase is negligible provided that the coherence conditions for neutrino production and detection are satisfied. Unlike in the previous situation, the phases of both neutrinos from $Z^0$ decay are important, leading to a realization of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox.

E. Kh. Akhmedov; A. Yu. Smirnov

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

478

Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter) regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB). It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a parameter $c$, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural $c = 1$ line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the later case, the bound on $c$ is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on $c$ obtained from various observational tests.

R. Horvat

2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

479

"Nonrelativistic" kinematics: Particles or waves?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The kinematics of particles refer to events and tangent vectors, while that of waves refer to dual gradient planes. Special relativity [1-3] applies to both objects alike. Here we show that spacetime exchange symmetry [7] implicit in the SIdefinition of length based on the universal constant c has profound consequences at low velocities. Galilean physics, exact in the limit c \\to \\infty, is mirrored by a dual so-called Carrollian superluminal kinematics [4-6] exact in the limit c \\to 0. Several new results follow. The Galilean limit explains mass conservation in Newtonian mechanics, while the dual limit is a kinematical prerequisite for wavelike tachyonic motion [8, 9]. As an example, the Land\\'e paradox [19, 20] of waveparticle duality has a natural resolution within special relativity in terms of superluminal, particlelike waves. It is emphasized that internal particle energy mc^2 can not be ignored, while kinetic energy leads to an extended Galilei group. We also demonstrate that Maxwell's equations have magnetic and electric limits covariant under Galilean and Carrollian symmetry.

Jens Madsen Houlrik; Germain Rousseaux

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

480

Thermoelectric recovery of waste heat -- Case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of waste heat as an energy source for thermoelectric generation largely removes the constraint for the wide scale application of this technology imposed by its relatively low conversion efficiency (typically about 5%). Paradoxically, in some parasitic applications, a low conversion efficiency can be viewed as a distinct advantage. However, commercially available thermoelectric modules are designed primarily for refrigerating applications and are less reliable when operated at elevated temperatures. Consequently, a major factor which determines the economic competitiveness of thermoelectric recovery of waste heat is the cost per watt divided by the mean-time between module failures. In this paper is reported the development of a waste, warm water powered thermoelectric generator, one target in a NEDO sponsored project to economically recover waste heat. As an application of this technology case studies are considered in which thermoelectric generators are operated in both active and parasitic modes to generate electrical power for a central heating system. It is concluded that, in applications when the supply of heat essentially is free as with waste heat, thermoelectrics can compete economically with conventional methods of electrical power generation. Also, in this situation, and when the generating system is operated in a parasitic mode, conversion efficiency is not an important consideration.

Rowe, M.D.; Min, G.; Williams, S.G.K.; Aoune, A. [Cardiff School of Engineering (United Kingdom). Div. of Electronic Engineering; Matsuura, Kenji [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Kuznetsov, V.L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Fu, L.W. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Microelectronics Inst.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Manifestations of topological effects in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene is a monoatomic layer of graphite with Carbon atoms arranged in a two dimensional honeycomb lattice configuration. It has been known for more than sixty years that the electronic structure of graphene can be modelled by two-dimensional massless relativistic fermions. This property gives rise to numerous applications, both in applied sciences and in theoretical physics. Electronic circuits made out of graphene could take advantage of its high electron mobility that is witnessed even at room temperature. In the theoretical domain the Dirac-like behavior of graphene can simulate high energy effects, such as the relativistic Klein paradox. Even more surprisingly, topological effects can be encoded in graphene such as the generation of vortices, charge fractionalization and the emergence of anyons. The impact of the topological effects on graphene's electronic properties can be elegantly described by the Atiyah-Singer index theorem. Here we present a pedagogical encounter of this theorem and review its various applications to graphene. A direct consequence of the index theorem is charge fractionalization that is usually known from the fractional quantum Hall effect. The charge fractionalization gives rise to the exciting possibility of realizing graphene based anyons that unlike bosons or fermions exhibit fractional statistics. Besides being of theoretical interest, anyons are a strong candidate for performing error free quantum information processing.

Jiannis K. Pachos

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

482

A Signal Processing Model of Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper develops a deterministic model of quantum mechanics as an accumulation-and-threshold process. The model arises from an analogy with signal processing in wireless communications. Complex wavefunctions are interpreted as expressing the amplitude and phase information of a modulated carrier wave. Particle transmission events are modeled as the outcome of a process of signal accumulation that occurs in an extra (non-spacetime) dimension. Besides giving a natural interpretation of the wavefunction and the Born rule, the model accommodates the collapse of the wave packet and other quantum paradoxes such as EPR and the Ahanorov-Bohm effect. The model also gives a new perspective on the 'relational' nature of quantum mechanics: that is, whether the wave function of a physical system is "real" or simply reflects the observer's partial knowledge of the system. We simulate the model for a 2-slit experiment, and indicate possible deviations of the model's predictions from conventional quantum mechanics. We also indicate how the theory may be extended to a field theory.

Chris Thron; Johnny Watts

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

483

Preliminary interpretations of hydrogeologic data from boreholes and springs in the vicinity of Davis and Lavender Canyons, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This information is presented in tabular form and includes station locations, potentiometric levels, permeabilities, transmissibilities, total dissolved solids, depths, locations, data sources, a fracture log of the Gibson Dome No. 1 (GD-1) borehole, and other useful information. Three different ranking scales were used to evaluate available drill-stem test (DST) data. A preliminary detailed hydrogeologic column was prepared using the DST data and GD-1 borehole information. A series of preliminary potentiometric maps was interpreted from these data for the different hydrogeologic units. Preliminary potentiometric surface maps for the Lower Paleozoic Aquifer, Pennsylvanian Aquitard, Permian Aquifer/Aquitard, and Mesozoic (Jurassic) Aquifer were constructed. These maps show a general southwest flow direction in the Lower Paleozoic Aquifer, extremely low permeabilities in the Pennsylvanian, northerly ground-water flow in the Permian, and westward flow direction in the Mesozoic unit. The few data points in the Pennsylvanian tend to indicate that ground water in the upper Paradox Formation may be flowing toward the west and southwest in the area southeast of Six-Shooter Peaks.

Thackston, J.W.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Uncatalyzed assembly of spherical particles from SV40 VP1 pentamers and linear dsDNA incorporates both low and high cooperativity elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capsid of SV40 virion is comprised of 72 pentamers of the major capsid protein, VP1. We examined the synergism between pentamer-pentamer interaction and pentamer-DNA interaction using a minimal system of purified VP1 and a linear dsDNA 600-mer, comparing electrophoresis with electron microscopy and size exclusion chromatography. At low VP1/DNA ratios, large tubes were observed that apparently did not survive native agarose gel electrophoresis. As the VP1 concentration increased, electrophoretic migration was slower and tubes were replaced by 200 A diameter particles and excess free pentamer. At high VP1/DNA ratios, a progressively larger fraction of particles was similar to 450 A diameter virions. VP1 association with DNA is very strong compared to the concentrations in these experiments yet, paradoxically, stable complexes appear only at high ratios of VP1 to DNA. These data suggest a DNA saturation-dependent nucleation event based on non-specific pentamer-DNA interaction that controls assembly and the ultimate capsid geometry.

Mukherjee, Santanu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States); Kler, Stanislav; Oppenheim, Ariella [Department of Hematology, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, 91120 Jerusalem (Israel); Zlotnick, Adam, E-mail: azlotnic@indiana.ed [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47401 (United States)

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

485

Cosmic Ray Confinement and Transport Models for Probing their Putative Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent efforts in cosmic ray (CR) confinement and transport theory are discussed. Three problems are addressed as being crucial for understanding the present day observations and their possible telltale signs of the CR origin. The first problem concerns CR behavior right after their release from a source, such as a supernova remnant (SNR). At this phase the CRs are confined near the source by self-emitted Alfven waves. The second is the problem of diffusive propagation of CRs through the turbulent ISM. This is a seemingly straightforward and long-resolved problem, but it remains controversial and reveals paradoxes. A resolution based on the Chapman-Enskog asymptotic CR transport analysis, that also includes magnetic focusing, is suggested. The third problem is about a puzzling sharp ($\\sim10^{\\circ}$) anisotropies in the CR arrival directions that might bear on important clues of their transport between the source and observer. The overarching goal is to improve our understanding of all aspects of the CR's so...

Malkov, M A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

CAST: An Inspiring Axion Helioscope ala Sikivie  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CAST is a data taking axion helioscope using a recycled LHC test magnet, CERN's detector technology and cryogenics expertise. An imaging X-ray telescope improves substantially the detection sensitivity and axion-ID. Massive axion-like particles of the Kaluza-Klein type were first introduced to explain the paradox of the hot corona, which is even hotter at locations overlying magnetic spots. This is suggesting that the CAST detection principle might be at work there, but being somehow modified and performing better. Remarkably, the density profile of the Sun allows for resonance crossing (m{sub axion}c{sup 2{approx_equal}}h{omega}{sub plasma}), which axion helioscopes are aiming to reach. The restless Sun favours this occasionally even further. Then, such processes can give rise to a chimera of converted axions or the like, making the Sun appear, within known physics, as mysterious and unpredictable as it is. CAST axion limits were used to conclude also for the hidden sector paraphotons. This is then suggestive for novel helioscopes for exotica like paraphotons, chameleons, etc. Pierre Sikivie's pioneering idea was to use a magnetic field as a catalyst to transform particles from the dark sector to ours, and vice versa.

Zioutas, K.; Anastassopoulos, V. [University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Tsagri, M. [University of Patras, Patras (Greece); CERN, 1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Semertzidis, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Papaevangelou, T. [IRFU, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

487

Micropillar compression technique applied to micron-scale mudstone elasto-plastic deformation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mudstone mechanical testing is often limited by poor core recovery and sample size, preservation and preparation issues, which can lead to sampling bias, damage, and time-dependent effects. A micropillar compression technique, originally developed by Uchic et al. 2004, here is applied to elasto-plastic deformation of small volumes of mudstone, in the range of cubic microns. This study examines behavior of the Gothic shale, the basal unit of the Ismay zone of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and potential shale gas play in southeastern Utah, USA. Precision manufacture of micropillars 5 microns in diameter and 10 microns in length are prepared using an ion-milling method. Characterization of samples is carried out using: dual focused ion - scanning electron beam imaging of nano-scaled pores and distribution of matrix clay and quartz, as well as pore-filling organics; laser scanning confocal (LSCM) 3D imaging of natural fractures; and gas permeability, among other techniques. Compression testing of micropillars under load control is performed using two different nanoindenter techniques. Deformation of 0.5 cm in diameter by 1 cm in length cores is carried out and visualized by a microscope loading stage and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Axisymmetric multistage compression testing and multi-stress path testing is carried out using 2.54 cm plugs. Discussion of results addresses size of representative elementary volumes applicable to continuum-scale mudstone deformation, anisotropy, and size-scale plasticity effects. Other issues include fabrication-induced damage, alignment, and influence of substrate.

Michael, Joseph Richard; Chidsey, Thomas (Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT); Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Boyce, Brad Lee; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Observation of Two-source Interference in the Photoproduction Reaction AuAu --> AuAu rho 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In ultra-peripheral relativistic heavy-ion collisions, a photon from the electromagnetic field of one nucleus can fluctuate to a quark-antiquark pair and scatter from the other nucleus, emerging as a {rho}{sup 0}. The {rho}{sup 0} production occurs in two well-separated (median impact parameters of 20 and 40 fermi for the cases considered here) nuclei, so the system forms a 2-source interferometer. At low transverse momenta, the two amplitudes interfere destructively, suppressing {rho}{sup 0} production. Since the {rho}{sup 0} decays before the production amplitudes from the two sources can overlap, the two-pion system can only be described with an entangled non-local wave function, and is thus an example of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox. We observe this suppression in 200 GeV per nucleon-pair gold-gold collisions. The interference is 87% {+-} 5%(stat.) {+-} 8% (syst.) of the expected level. This translates into a limit on decoherence due to wave function collapse or other factors, of 23% at the 90% confidence level.

STAR Coll

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

489

International perceptions of US nuclear policy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a summary of international perceptions and beliefs about US nuclear policy, focusing on four countries--China, Iran, Pakistan and Germany--chosen because they span the spectrum of states with which the United States has relationships. A paradox is pointed out: that although the goal of US nuclear policy is to make the United States and its allies safer through a policy of deterrence, international perceptions of US nuclear policy may actually be making the US less safe by eroding its soft power and global leadership position. Broadly held perceptions include a pattern of US hypocrisy and double standards--one set for the US and its allies, and another set for all others. Importantly, the US nuclear posture is not seen in a vacuum, but as one piece of the United States behavior on the world stage. Because of this, the potential direct side effects of any negative international perceptions of US nuclear policy can be somewhat mitigated, dependent on other US policies and actions. The more indirect and long term relation of US nuclear policy to US international reputation and soft power, however, matters immensely to successful multilateral and proactive engagement on other pressing global issues.

Stanley, Elizabeth A. (Georgetown Universtiy, Washington, DC)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Gravitational Anomalies in the Solar System?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mindful of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury discovered by U. Le Verrier in the second half of the nineteenth century and its successful explanation by A. Einstein with his General Theory of Relativity in the early years of the twentieth century, discrepancies among observed effects in our Solar system and their theoretical predictions on the basis of the currently accepted laws of gravitation applied to known bodies have the potential of paving the way for remarkable advances in fundamental physics. This is particularly important now more than ever, given that most of the Universe seems to be made of unknown substances dubbed Dark Matter and Dark Energy. Should this not be directly the case, Solar system's anomalies could anyhow lead to advancements in cumulative science, as shown to us by the discovery of Neptune in the first half of the nineteenth century. Moreover, investigations in one of such directions can serendipitously enrich the other one as well. The current status of some alleged gravitational anomalies in the Solar system is critically reviewed. They are: a) Possible anomalous advances of planetary perihelia; b) Unexplained orbital residuals of a recently discovered moon of Uranus (Mab); c) The lingering unexplained secular increase of the eccentricity of the orbit of the Moon; d) The so-called Faint Young Sun Paradox; e) The secular decrease of the mass parameter of the Sun; f) The Flyby Anomaly; g) The Pioneer Anomaly; and h) The anomalous secular increase of the astronomical unit

Lorenzo Iorio

2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

491

Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter) regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB). It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a parameter $c$, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural $c = 1$ line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the later case, the bound on $c$ is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on $c$ obtained from various observational tests.

Horvat, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Assessing the massive young Sun hypothesis to solve the warm young Earth puzzle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A moderately massive early Sun has been proposed to resolve the so-called faint early Sun paradox. We calculate the time-evolution of the solar mass that would be required by this hypothesis, using a simple parametrized energy-balance model for Earth's climate. Our calculations show that the solar mass loss rate would need to have been 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than present for a time on the order of ~2 Gy. Such a mass loss history is significantly at variance (both in timescale and in the magnitude of the mass loss rates) with that inferred from astronomical observations of mass loss in younger solar analogues. While suggestive, the astronomical data cannot completely rule out the possibility that the Sun had the required mass loss history; therefore, we also examine the effects of the hypothetical historical solar mass loss on orbital dynamics in the solar system, with a view to identifying additional tests of the hypothesis. Planetary and satellite orbits provide a few tests, but these are weak or non-unique.

David A. Minton; Renu Malhotra

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

493

Cool horizons lead to information loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are two evidences for information loss during black hole evaporation: (i) a pure state evolves to a mixed state and (ii) the map from the initial state to final state is non-invertible. Any proposed resolution of the information paradox must address both these issues. The firewall argument focuses only on the first and this leads to order one deviations from the Unruh vacuum for maximally entangled black holes. The nature of the argument does not extend to black holes in pure states. It was shown by Avery, Puhm and the author that requiring the initial state to final state map to be invertible mandates structure at the horizon even for pure states. The proof works if black holes can be formed in generic states and in this paper we show that this is indeed the case. We also demonstrate how models proposed by Susskind, Papadodimas et al. and Maldacena et al. end up making the initial to final state map non-invertible and thus make the horizon "cool" at the cost of unitarity.

Borun D. Chowdhury

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

494

SETI at Planck Energy: When Particle Physicists Become Cosmic Engineers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the meaning of the Fermi Paradox -- are we alone or is starfaring rare? Can general relativity be united with quantum mechanics? The searches for answers to these questions could intersect. It is known that an accelerator capable of energizing particles to the Planck scale requires cosmic proportions. The energy required to run a Planck accelerator is also cosmic, of order 100 M_sun c^2 for a hadron collider, because the natural cross section for Planck physics is so tiny. If aliens are interested in fundamental physics, they could resort to cosmic engineering for their experiments. These colliders are detectable through the vast amount of "pollution" they produce, motivating a YeV SETI program. I investigate what kinds of radiation they would emit in a fireball scenario, and the feasibility of detecting YeV radiation at Earth, particularly YeV neutrinos. Although current limits on YeV neutrinos are weak, Kardashev 3 YeV neutrino sources appear to be at least 30--100 Mpc apart on average, if they are ...

Lacki, Brian C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Smooth horizons and quantum ripples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Black Holes are unique objects which allow for meaningful theoretical studies of strong gravity and even quantum gravity effects. An infalling and a distant observer would have very different views on the structure of the world. However, a careful analysis has shown that it entails no genuine contradictions for physics, and the paradigm of observer complementarity has been coined. Recently this picture was put into doubt. In particular, it was argued that in old Black Holes a firewall must form in order to protect the basic principles of quantum mechanics. This AMPS paradox has already been discussed in a vast number of papers with different attitudes and conclusions. Here we want to argue that a possible source of confusion is neglection of quantum gravity effects. Contrary to widespread perception, it does not necessarily mean that effective field theory is inapplicable in rather smooth neighbourhoods of large Black Hole horizons. The real offender might be an attempt to consistently use it over the huge distances from the near-horizon zone of old Black Holes to the early radiation. We give simple estimates to support this viewpoint and show how the Page time and (somewhat more speculative) scrambling time do appear.

Alexey Golovnev

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

496

Nicotine-mediated signals modulate cell death and survival of T lymphocytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capacity of nicotine to affect the behavior of non-neuronal cells through neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has been the subject of considerable recent attention. Previously, we showed that exposure to nicotine activates the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor in lymphocytes and endothelial cells, leading to alterations in cellular growth and vascular endothelial growth factor production. Here, we extend these studies to document effects of nicotine on lymphocyte survival. The data show that nicotine induces paradoxical effects that might alternatively enforce survival or trigger apoptosis, suggesting that depending on timing and context, nicotine might act both as a survival factor or as an inducer of apoptosis in normal or transformed lymphocytes, and possibly other non-neuronal cells. In addition, our results show that, while having overlapping functions, low and high affinity nAChRs also transmit signals that promote distinct outcomes in lymphocytes. The sum of our data suggests that selective modulation of nAChRs might be useful to regulate lymphocyte activation and survival in health and disease.

Oloris, Silvia C.S. [Integrated Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Denver, CO (United States); Instituto de Ciencias Exatas e Naturais, Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Mossoro, RN (Brazil); Frazer-Abel, Ashley A. [Integrated Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Denver, CO (United States); Complement Laboratory, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO (United States); Jubala, Cristan M. [Integrated Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Denver, CO (United States); Department of Craniofacial Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Fosmire, Susan P. [Integrated Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Denver, CO (United States); Helm, Karen M. [University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Robinson, Sally R.; Korpela, Derek M.; Duckett, Megan M. [Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, VMC 455 MMC 6194, 1365 Gortner Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Baksh, Shairaz [Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Alberta, AB (Canada); Modiano, Jaime F., E-mail: modiano@umn.ed [Integrated Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Denver, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, VMC 455 MMC 6194, 1365 Gortner Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Technology demonstration: geostatistical and hydrologic analysis of salt areas. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) requested Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to: (1) use geostatistical