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1

Fracture history of the Northern Piceance Creek Basin, Northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fracture pattern of the Northern Piceance Creek Basin, in Rio Blanco and Garfield Counties of Northwestern Colorado, evolved during at least four periods of brittle failure in Eocene rocks of the Green River and overlying Uinta Formations. Fractures in these rocks of are interest to hydrologists because matrix permeabilities in both formations are low, due either to poor sorting and interstitial calcite cement (Uinta sandstones) or to low pore volume and growth of authigenic minerals (Green River oil shales). Ground water at shallow to intermediate depths thus circulates mostly through secondary openings such as fractures and through voids created by the dissolution of nahcolite and halite. Fracture-induced permeabilities probably dominate most at shallow depths, where fractures are most abundant, apertures of fracture walls are greates, and solution openings are least common. Shallow, fracture-dominated aquifers are strongly anisotropic. At deeper levels, in leached zones of the ''saline facies'' of the lower part of the Green River Formation, solution openings contribute greatly to fluid flow and permeabilities probably are less direction dependent.

Verbeek, E.R.; Grout, M.A.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

05671_UintaWaterStudy | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5152012 DE-NT0005671 Goal The goal of...

3

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

4

Groundwater Ages and Mixing in the Piceance Basin Natural Gas Province, Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater Ages and Mixing in the Piceance Basin Natural Gas Province, Colorado ... Thomas, J. C.; McMahon, P. B. Overview of Groundwater Quality in the Piceance Basin, Western Colorado, 1946–2009; U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2012-5198; U.S. Geological Survey: Denver, CO, 2013. ... Hoak, T. E.; Klawitter, A. L. Prediction of Fractured Reservoir Production Trends and Compartmentalization Using an Integrated Analysis of Basement Structures in the Piceance Basin, Western Colorado. ...

Peter B. McMahon; Judith C. Thomas; Andrew G. Hunt

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

5

Coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As predicted, from an evolving coalbed methane producibility model, prolific coalbed methane production is precluded in the Piceance Basin by the absence of coal bed reservoir continuity and dynamic ground-water flow. The best potential for production may lie at the transition zone from hydropressure to hydrocarbon overpressure and/or in conventional traps basinward of where outcrop and subsurface coals are in good reservoir and hydraulic communication. Geologic and hydrologic synergy among tectonic and structural setting, depositional systems and coal distribution, coal rank, gas content, permeability and hydrodynamics are the controls that determine the coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin. Within the coal-bearing Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork Formation, the prime coalbed methane target, reservoir heterogeneity and thrust faults cause coal beds along the Grand Hogback and in the subsurface to be in modest to poor reservoir and hydraulic communication, restricting meteoric ground water recharge and basinward flow. Total subsurface coalbed methane resources are still estimated to be approximately 99 Tcf (3.09 Tm{sup 3}), although coalbed methane resource estimates range between 80 (2.49 Tm{sup 3}) and 136 Tcf (4.24 Tm{sup 3}), depending on the calculation method used. To explore for high gas contents or fully gas-saturated coals and consequent high productivity in the Piceance Basin, improved geologic and completion technologies including exploration and development for migrated conventionally and hydrodynamically trapped gases, in-situ generated secondary biogenic gases, and solution gases will be required.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Uinta County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uinta County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Uinta County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2107397°, -110.6168921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2107397,"lon":-110.6168921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata in the Piceance basin, western Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural gas samples were collected for geochemical analyses from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata of the Piceance basin in western Colorado to: 1) determine the origin of gases (i.e., microbial versus thermogenic), 2) determine the thermogenic...

Katz, David Jonathan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy makers accurate estimates of energy efficiencies, water requirements, water availability, and CO2 emissions associated with the development of the 60 percent portion of the Piceance Basin where economic potential is the greatest, and where environmental conditions and societal concerns and controversy are the most challenging: i.e., the portion of the Piceance where very high quality oil shale resources and useful ground water co-exist. Evaluation of Energy Efficiency, Water Requirements and Availability, and CO2 Emissions Associated With the Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in

9

Geologic and production characteristics of the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This study provides a critical comparison of the geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of existing Mesaverde gas producing areas within the basin to those same characteristics at the MWX site near Rifle, Colorado. As will be discussed, the basin has been partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Stimulation techniques have been reviewed for each partitioned area to determine the most effective stimulation technique currently used in the Mesaverde. This study emphasizes predominantly the southern Piceance Basin because of the much greater production and geologic data there. There may be Mesaverde gas production in northern areas but because of the lack of production and relatively few penetrations, the northern Piceance Basin was not included in the detailed parts of this study. 54 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

Myal, F.R.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Kukal, G.C.; Abadie, P.A.; Riecken, C.C.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c:es .B~l:JJ:. }eti. ',~, Colorado School of Mines, VoL 2'1,v Piceance Creek Basin v Colorado r and 9 p' 1974. Pc:u:~·tBetween 'che White and Colorado Rivers, '! \\lo:ci:hwegt:ern

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Play analysis and stratigraphic position of Uinta Basin tertiary - age oil and gas fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tertiary-age sediments in the Uinta basin produce hydrocarbons from five types of plays. These play types were determined by hydrocarbon type, formation, depositional environment, rock type, porosity, permeability, source, and per-well recovery. Each well was reviewed to determine the stratigraphic position and producing characteristics of each producing interval. The five types of plays are as follows: (1) naturally fractured oil reservoirs, (2) low-permeability oil reservoirs, (3) high-permeability of oil reservoirs, (4) low-permeability gas reservoirs, and (5) tight gas sands. Several fields produce from multiple plays, which made it necessary to segregate the hydrocarbon production into several plays. The stratigraphic position of the main producing intervals is shown on a basin-wide cross section, which is color-coded by play type. This 61-well cross section has several wells from each significant Tertiary oil and gas field in the Uinta basin.

Williams, R.A. (Pennzoil Exploration and Production Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Task progress reports. First quarter, January-March 1983. [Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to provide technical and administrative support to the Western Gas Sands project. Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following task assignments: No. 1-A, support and control program; No. 3-A, improve conventional log interpretation techniques; No. 4-A, improve reservoir analysis; No. 6-A, operate and maintain well testing unit; and No. 8, develop/improve geological understanding. Some of the highlights are: log analysis techniques developed from MWX data were being applied to the Mobil 31-13G well in the Piceance Basin; petrographic data obtained from analysis of MWX core were being entered into the MWX data base; BETC BOAST black oil reservoir model was reviewed and evaluated and suggestions were made as to modifications that would improve reservoir performance predictions; METC SUGAR and SUGARMD gas reservoir models were reviewed and evaluated and suggestions for modifications were made; and a paper that uses the correlation of logs from closely spaced wells to describe the dimensions of sand lenses in the Mesaverde formation of the Piceance Basin was completed.

Murphy, W.O.

1983-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

13

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Characterization and interwell connectivity evaluation of Green Rver reservoirs, Wells Draw study area, Uinta Basin, Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and seal rocks of the Green River petroleum system. Datum is Mahoganey oil shale bed (1). 49 27 Fig. 11?Cross-section of thermal maturity of oil accumulations in the Green River petroleum system. 49 28 Fig. 12? Lake Uinta depositional... This petroleum system has produced more than 450 MMBO mainly from two formations, the Green River and Colton Formations. 7 The Green River Formation contains the source rock and most of the reservoir and seal rocks (Fig. 10). 49 Most of the kerogen-rich oil...

Abiazie, Joseph Uchechukwu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

February 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

in the western United States. Producers reported wellhead freeze-offs in the San Juan, Green River, Uinta, and Piceance basins, according to recent Bentek Energy reports. As...

17

Modeling of gas generation from the Cameo coal zone in the Piceance Basin Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas generative potential of the Cretaceous Cameo coal in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado, was evaluated quantitatively by sealed gold tube pyrolysis. The H/C and O/C elemental ratios show that pyrolyzed Cameo coal samples follow the Van Krevelen humic coal evolution pathway, reasonably simulating natural coal maturation. Kinetic parameters (activation energy and frequency factor) for gas generation and vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) changes were calculated from pyrolysis data. Experimental R{sub o} results from this study are not adequately predicted by published R{sub o} kinetics and indicate the necessity of deriving basin-specific kinetic parameters when building predictive basin models. Using derived kinetics for R{sub o}, evolution and gas generation, basin modeling was completed for 57 wells across the Piceance Basin, which enabled the mapping of coal-rank and coalbed gas potential. Quantities of methane generated at approximately 1.2% R{sub o} are about 300 standard cubic feet per ton (scf/ton) and more than 2500 scf/ton (in-situ dry-ash-free coal) at R{sub o}, values reaching 1.9%. Gases generated in both low- and high-maturity coals are less wet, whereas the wetter gas is expected where R{sub o} is approximately 1.4-1.5%. As controlled by regional coal rank and net coal thickness, the largest in-place coalbed gas resources are located in the central part of the basin, where predicted volumes exceed 150 bcf/mi, excluding gases in tight sands.

Zhang, E.; Hill, R.J.; Katz, B.J.; Tang, Y.C. [Shell Exploration and Production Co., BTC, Houston, TX (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

The quercetin paradox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Free radical scavenging antioxidants, such as quercetin, are chemically converted into oxidation products when they protect against free radicals. The main oxidation product of quercetin, however, displays a high reactivity towards thiols, which can lead to the loss of protein function. The quercetin paradox is that in the process of offering protection, quercetin is converted into a potential toxic product. In the present study, this paradox is evaluated using rat lung epithelial (RLE) cells. It was found that quercetin efficiently protects against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced DNA damage in RLE cells, but this damage is swapped for a reduction in GSH level, an increase in LDH leakage as well as an increase of the cytosolic free calcium concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first study that indicates that the quercetin paradox, i.e. the exchange of damage caused by quercetin and its metabolites, also occurs in living lung cells. Following depletion of GSH in the cells by BSO pre-treatment, this quercetin paradox becomes more pronounced, confirming that the formation of thiol reactive quercetin metabolites is involved in the quercetin paradox. The quercetin paradox in living cells implies that the anti-oxidant directs oxidative damage selectively to thiol arylation. Apparently, the potential toxicity of metabolites formed during the actual antioxidant activity of free radical scavengers should be considered in antioxidant supplementation.

Boots, Agnes W. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: a.boots@farmaco.unimaas.nl; Li, Hui [Institut fuer Umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF), Heinrich-Heine Universitaet Duesseldorf, Auf 'm Hennekamp 50, 40255 Duesseldorf (Germany); Schins, Roel P.F. [Institut fuer Umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF), Heinrich-Heine Universitaet Duesseldorf, Auf 'm Hennekamp 50, 40255 Duesseldorf (Germany); Duffin, Rodger [Institut fuer Umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF), Heinrich-Heine Universitaet Duesseldorf, Auf 'm Hennekamp 50, 40255 Duesseldorf (Germany); Heemskerk, Johan W.M. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Maastricht, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Bast, Aalt [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Haenen, Guido R.M.M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Types of Paradox in Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paradoxes are a relatively frequent occurrence in physics. The nature of their genesis is diverse and they are found in all branches of physics. There are a number of general and special classifications of paradoxes, but there are no classifications of paradoxes in physics. Nowadays, physics is a fundamental and rather formalized science, the paradoxes of which imply falsity and imprecision. One of the basic methods of addressing a problem is to present classifications that facilitate its formulation and study. This work groups together the paradoxes in physics according to certain common characteristics, which should assist in explaining the causes for paradox formation.

Dragoljub A. Cucic

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

20

What is paradoxical about the "Three-box paradox"?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a comment on quant-ph/0606067 by Ravon and Vaidman, in which they defend the position that the ``three-box paradox'' is indeed paradoxical.

J. Finkelstein

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

22

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins. Topical report, January 1991-July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins was evaluated in the context of geologic and hydrologic characteristics identified in the San Juan Basin, the nation's leading coalbed methane producing basin. The major comparative criteria were (1) coalbed methane resources, (2) geologic and hydrologic factors that predict areas of high gas producibility and high coalbed reservoir permeability, and (3) coalbed thermal maturity. The technical criteria were expanded to include structure, depositional systems, and data base and then combined with economic criteria (production, industry activity, and pipeline availability) to evaluate the coalbed methane potential of the basins. The Greater Green River and Piceance Basins have primary potential to make a significant near-term contribution to the nation's gas supply. These basins have large gas resources, high-rank coals, high gas contents, and established coalbed methane production. The Greater Green River Basin has numerous coalbed methane targets, good coal-seam permeability, and extensive hydrologic areas favorable for production. The Powder River and Raton Basins were judged to have secondary potential. Coal beds in the Powder River Basin are thermally immature and produce large volumes of water; the Raton Basin has a poor data base and has no gas pipeline infrastructure. Low production and minimal industry activity further limit the near-term potential of the Raton Basin. However, if economic criteria are discounted and only major technical criteria are considered, the Greater Green River and Raton Basins are assigned primary potential. The Raton Basin's shallow, thermally mature coal beds of good permeability are attractive coalbed methane targets, but low coal-seam permeability limits the coalbed methane potential of the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Geologic and hydrologic controls critical to coalbed methane producibility and resource assessment: Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Northwest Colorado. Topical report, December 1, 1993-November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are: To further evaluate the interplay of geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane production and resource assessment; to refine and validate our basin-scale coalbed methane producibility model; and to analyze the economics of coalbed methane exploration and development in the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern Great Basin Appalachian Denver Florida Peninsula Black Warrior W Y T h ru st B e lt Powder River Paradox- Uinta- Grtr Green River MT Thrust Belt Powder River North (1) Powder River South (2) Denver North (1) Denver South (3) Denver Middle (2) TX CA MT AZ ID NV NM CO IL OR UT KS WY IA NE SD MN ND OK FL WI MO AL WA GA AR LA MI IN PA NY NC MS TN KY VA OH SC

27

The four particles paradox in special relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a novel paradox in special relativity together with its solution. We call it the four particles paradox. The purpose of this paradox is pedagogical and therefore directed towards students and lecturers of physics. Even if most paradoxes in special relativity theory are very interrelated and some are special cases of others, the paradox we present here is original and illuminates on the very nice subject and the literature of special relativity.

J. Manuel Garcia-Islas

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

28

RESOLUTION OF A ``RETRODICTION PARADOX''  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the ``retrodiction paradox'' recently introduced by Peres arises not because of the fallacy of the time-symmetric approach as he claimed, but due to an inappropriate usage of retrodiction.

Y. Aharonov; L. Vaidman

1995-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

29

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Geohydrologic feasibility study of the Piceance Basin of Colorado for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented gas/produced water separation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Piceance Basin through literature surveys. Jack McIntyre`s tool separates produced water from gas and disposes of the water downhole into aquifers unused because of poor water quality, uneconomic lifting costs or poor aquifer deliverability. The beneficial aspects of this technology are two fold. The process increases the potential for recovering previously uneconomic gas resources by reducing produced water lifting, treatment and disposal costs. Of greater importance is the advantage of lessening the environmental impact of produced water by downhole disposal. Results from the survey indicate that research in the Piceance Basin includes studies of the geologic, hydrogeologic, conventional and unconventional recovery oil and gas technologies. Available information is mostly found centered upon the geology and hydrology for the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Lesser information is available on production technology because of the limited number of wells currently producing in the basin. Limited information is available on the baseline geochemistry of the coal/sand formation waters and that of the potential disposal zones. No determination was made of the compatibility of these waters. The study also indicates that water is often produced in variable quantities with gas from several gas productive formations which would indicate that there are potential applications for Jack McIntyre`s patented tool in the Piceance Basin.

Kieffer, F.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Paradoxical Success of Fuzzy Logic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of litera- ture on the use of fuzzy logic in heuristic control and in expert systems, and on prac- ticalI The Paradoxical Success of Fuzzy Logic CharlesElkan, Universityof California,San Diego Fuzzy of fuzzy logic remain under attack. Taken together, these two facts constitute a paradox. A second para

Baltes, Jacky

34

Uncertain Climate Policy and the Green Paradox  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unintended consequences of announcing a climate policy well in advance of its implementation have been studied in a variety of situations. We show that a phenomenon akin to the so-called “Green-Paradox” holds als...

Sjak Smulders; Yacov Tsur; Amos Zemel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

EPR Paradox and Bell Inequalities 24.1 Bohm Version of the EPR Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 24 EPR Paradox and Bell Inequalities 24.1 Bohm Version of the EPR Paradox Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) were concerned with the following issue. Given two spatially separated quantum properties of B represented by noncommuting projectors can be measured indirectly in this manner, and EPR

Griffiths, Robert B.

36

Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bluebell field produces from the Tertiary lower Green River and Wasatch Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in a fluvial-dominated deltaic lacustrine environment. Wells in the Bluebell field are typically completed by perforating 40 or more beds over 1,000 to 3,000 vertical feet (300-900 m), then applying an acid-fracture stimulation treatment to the entire interval. This completion technique is believed to leave many potentially productive beds damaged and/or untreated, while allowing water-bearing and low-pressure (thief) zones to communicate with the wellbore. Geologic and engineering characterization has been used to define improved completion techniques. The study identified reservoir characteristics of beds that have the greatest long-term production potential.

Allison, M.L.; Morgan, C.D.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rio Grande Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Uinta Basin Appa lachia n Basin Utica Marcellus Devonian (Ohio) Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Woodford- Caney Pearsall- Eagle Ford Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Maverick Sub-Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley and Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest City Basin Piceance Basin Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles ± Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies

38

Spin entanglement, decoherence and Bohm's EPR paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain criteria for entanglement and the EPR paradox for spin-entangled particles and analyse the effects of decoherence caused by absorption and state purity errors. For a two qubit photonic state, entanglement can occur for all transmission efficiencies. In this case, the state preparation purity must be above a threshold value. However, Bohm's spin EPR paradox can be achieved only above a critical level of loss. We calculate a required efficiency of 58%, which appears achievable with current quantum optical technologies. For a macroscopic number of particles prepared in a correlated state, spin entanglement and the EPR paradox can be demonstrated using our criteria for efficiencies {\\eta} > 1/3 and {\\eta} > 2/3 respectively. This indicates a surprising insensitivity to loss decoherence, in a macroscopic system of ultra-cold atoms or photons.

E. G. Cavalcanti; P. D. Drummond; H. A. Bachor; M. D. Reid

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Evidence Against Klein Paradox in Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is demonstrated that both transmission and reflection coefficients associated to the Klein paradox at a step barrier are positive and less than unity, so that the particle-antiparticle pair creation mechanism commonly linked to this phenomenon is not necessary. Because graphene is a solid-state testing ground for quantum electrodynamics phenomena involving massless Dirac fermions we suggest that the transport characteristic through a p-n graphene junction can decide between the results obtained in this paper and the common Klein paradox theory, which imply negative transmission and higher-than-unity reflection coefficients. Recent experimental evidence supports our findings.

Daniela Dragoman

2007-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

Quantum, Photo-Electric Single Capacitor Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work single capacitor paradox (a variation of the remarkable two capacitor paradox) is considered in a new, quantum discrete form. Simply speaking we consider well-known usual, photoelectric effect experimental device, i.e. photo electric cell, where cathode and anode are equivalently charged but non-connected. It, obviously, represents a capacitor that initially, i.e. before action of the photons with individual energy equivalent to work function, holds corresponding energy of the electrical fields between cathode and anode. Further, we direct quantum discretely photons, one by one, toward cathode where according to photo-electrical effect electrons discretely, one by one, will be emitted and directed toward anode. It causes discrete discharge of the cell, i.e. capacitor and discrete decrease of the electrical field. Finally, total discharge of the cell, i.e. capacitor, and total disappearance of the electrical field and its energy will occur. Given, seemingly paradoxical, capacitor total energy loss can be simply explained without any dissipative effects (Joule heating or electromagnetic waves emission can be neglected as high order small corrections) by work done by the electrical field by movement of the electrons from cathode to anode. (Remarkable two capacitors paradox can be, obviously, formulated and explained in the completely analogous way.)

Darko Kapor; Vladan Pankovic

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

RESEARCH REPORTS Paradoxical Effects of Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH REPORTS Paradoxical Effects of Testing: Retrieval Enhances Both Accurate Recall, participants who had taken an initial test about a witnessed event were more likely than nontested participants (RES). Here, we sought to test the generality of RES and to further elucidate its underlying mechanisms

Chan, Jason C.K.

42

The information paradox: A pedagogical introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The black hole information paradox is a very poorly understood problem. It is often believed that Hawking's argument is not precisely formulated, and a more careful accounting of naturally occurring quantum corrections will allow the radiation process to become unitary. We show that such is not the case, by proving that small corrections to the leading order Hawking computation cannot remove the entanglement between the radiation and the hole. We formulate Hawking's argument as a `theorem': assuming `traditional' physics at the horizon and usual assumptions of locality we will be forced into mixed states or remnants. We also argue that one cannot explain away the problem by invoking AdS/CFT duality. We conclude with recent results on the quantum physics of black holes which show the the interior of black holes have a `fuzzball' structure. This nontrivial structure of microstates resolves the information paradox, and gives a qualitative picture of how classical intuition can break down in black hole physics.

Samir D. Mathur

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

43

Quantum mechanics and the time travel paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The closed causal chains arising from backward time travel do not lead to paradoxes if they are self consistent. This raises the question as to how physics ensures that only self-consistent loops are possible. We show that, for one particular case at least, the condition of self consistency is ensured by the interference of quantum mechanical amplitudes associated with the loop. If this can be applied to all loops then we have a mechanism by which inconsistent loops eliminate themselves.

David T. Pegg

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

44

Truth and Paradox: A Philosophical Sketch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents a philosophical sketch of truth and paradox. The focus in the chapter is on “dtrnth” where dtruth is essentially intersubstitutable. Because the logic of dtruth cannot be classical (assuming the language to be suitably resourceful), theories of dtruth are accordingly nonclassical. The chapter focuses largely on a few broad approaches to dtruth—namely, “paracomplete” and “paraconsistent.” The chapter discusses in detail dtruth and dtruth-theoretic paradox, in particular, Liars. It covers a few different “paracomplete” approaches to dtruth, beginning with a very informal, leisurely discussion of Kripke's nonclassical (least fixed point, empty ground model) proposal. The discussion continues with explaining “paraconsistent” (and, in particular, “dialetheic”) approaches. A brief discussion of validity and “dtruth-preservation” is presented. A few standard parametric and contextualist approaches are discussed, including the “indexiealist” idea, the “quantifier-variability” proposal, and “situational truth.” The chapter proceeds to sketch the basic “revision-theoretic” idea, and concludes with discussing “set”-theoretic paradox, its relation to semantics, and the concept of “revenge.”

JC Beall

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Russia in a European coat : the paradoxes of Peter Chaadaev.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??“What is Russia’s identity if it is not to follow the Western path?” Peter Chaadaev first posed this question. His paradoxical views of Russia led… (more)

Brandon, Kristina D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

File:EIA-UP-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 16.74 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:45, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:45, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (16.74 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

47

File:EIA-UP-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 16.91 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:45, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:45, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (16.91 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

48

File:EIA-UP-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 16.86 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Uinta-Piceance Basin By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:46, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:46, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (16.86 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

49

COMPUTER IMPLICATION AND CURRY'S PARADOX WAYNE AITKEN, JEFFREY A. BARRETT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPUTER IMPLICATION AND CURRY'S PARADOX WAYNE AITKEN, JEFFREY A. BARRETT Abstract. There are theoretical limitations to what can be implemented by a computer program. In this paper we are concerned with a limitation on the strength of computer implemented deduction. We use a version of Curry's paradox to arrive

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

50

The Level Paradox of E-Collaboration: Dangers and Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although e-collaboration phenomena are multilevel in nature, research to date has been conducted from an exclusively single-level focus. This has lead to the level paradox. The dangers of the level paradox are discussed, including the potential that ... Keywords: Analysis, Bias, Communication Media, Cumulative Knowledge, Mixed-Level, Multilevel, Single-Level, Virtual Team

Ana Ortiz de Guinea

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Mpemba paradox: Hydrogen bond memory and water-skin supersolidity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical reproduction of measurements, experimental evidence for skin super-solidity and hydrogen-bond memory clarified that Mpemba paradox integrates the heat emission-conduction-dissipation dynamics in the source-path-drain cycle system.

Chang Q Sun

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

52

LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONSTRAINTS, AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAH’S UINTA BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. Chief among the challenges facing prospective unconventional fuel developers is the ability to access these resources. Access is heavily dependent upon land ownership and applicable management requirements. Understanding constraints on resource access and the prospect of consolidating resource holdings across a fragmented management landscape is critical to understanding the role Utah’s unconventional fuel resources may play in our nation’s energy policy. This Topical Report explains the historic roots of the “crazy quilt” of western land ownership, how current controversies over management of federal public land with wilderness character could impact access to unconventional fuels resources, and how land exchanges could improve management efficiency. Upon admission to the Union, the State of Utah received the right to title to more than one-ninth of all land within the newly formed state. This land is held in trust to support public schools and institutions, and is managed to generate revenue for trust beneficiaries. State trust lands are scattered across the state in mostly discontinuous 640-acre parcels, many of which are surrounded by federal land and too small to develop on their own. Where state trust lands are developable but surrounded by federal land, federal land management objectives can complicate state trust land development. The difficulty generating revenue from state trust lands can frustrate state and local government officials as well as citizens advocating for economic development. Likewise, the prospect of industrial development of inholdings within prized conservation landscapes creates management challenges for federal agencies. One major tension involves whether certain federal public lands possess wilderness character, and if so, whether management of those lands should emphasize wilderness values over other uses. On December 22, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Order’s implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics — whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 — are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utah’s Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those resources found in the southern part of the state. Management requirements independent of l

Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

PERSPECTIVE Resolving the biodiversity paradox James S. Clark,1,2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDEA AND PERSPECTIVE Resolving the biodiversity paradox James S. Clark,1,2,3 * Mike Dietze,1 The paradox of biodiversity involves three elements, (i) mathematical models predict that species must differ-dimensional tradeoffs nor neutrality can resolve the biodiversity paradox, in part by showing that they do not properly

Agarwal, Pankaj K.

54

A Procedural Solution to the Unexpected Hanging and Sorites Paradoxes \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Procedural Solution to the Unexpected Hanging and Sorites Paradoxes \\Lambda Stuart C. Shapiro of Shapiro, Stuart C. A Procedural Solution to the Unexpected Hanging and Sorites Paradoxes. Mind 107, 428­mail: shapiro@cs.buffalo.edu October 26, 1998 Abstract The paradox of the Unexpected Hanging, related prediction

Shapiro, Stuart C.

55

1-D Dirac Equation, Klein Paradox and Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions of the one dimensional Dirac equation with piece-wise constant potentials are presented using standard methods. These solutions show that the Klein Paradox is non-existent and represents a failure to correctly match solutions across a step potential. Consequences of this exact solution are studied for the step potential and a square barrier. Characteristics of massless Dirac states and the momentum linear band energies for Graphene are shown to have quite different current and momentum properties.

S. P. Bowen

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

56

Thought Experiment to resolve the Black Hole Information Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a combination of two mechanisms that can resolve the black hole information paradox. The first process is that the black hole shrinks by a first order transition, since we assume the entropy is discontinuous. The black hole disappears. The second type of processes conserves unitarity. We assume that within the black hole micro-reversible quantum mechanical processes take place. These are ordinary particle processes, e.g. the decay of an electron and a positron into two photons.

Kay zum Felde

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

57

Nanotechnologies and Green Knowledge Creation: Paradox or Enhancer of Sustainable Solutions?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By exploring whether nanotechnologies have the potential to generate green innovations, we consider the paradox between the ... nanotechnologies. Starting from the conceptual framework of green product innovation...

Caroline Gauthier; Corine Genet

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Western consciousness, absurdity, and rebellion: the influence of paradox in the early works of Albert Camus.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis explores the paradoxical nature of Albert Camus's ideas of Western consciousness, absurdity, and rebellion. Camus believes that as members of the Occident, we… (more)

Lanier, Clinton David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A regional energy paradox—the case of Central Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Central Norway is expected to have a gap of 8 TWh in 2010 because of heavy investments in energy-intensive industries. The region has two landing sites for natural gas and a considerable potential for wind power to cover the gap. Small-scale hydropower and upgrading of existing hydropower plants also constitute a regional energy potential. Paradoxically, the most realistic investment prospect seems to be extensive investments in new transmission lines to cover the supply deficit. The aim of this paper is to present a problem of regional supply security and public intervention to illustrate and discuss the challenges of arriving at long-term capacity adequacy in deregulated electricity markets.

Maria Sandsmark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Monetary circulation, the paradox of profits, and the velocity of money1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monetary circulation, the paradox of profits, and the velocity of money1 Olivier ALLAIN Université of money is higher than one because some monetary units are used in several transactions of goods. Key words: paradox of profits, circulation, endogenous money, velocity of money, stock-flow consistent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Explanation of Feynman's paradox concerning low-pass filters Mathematics Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explanation of Feynman's paradox concerning low-pass filters A.G. Ramm Mathematics Department Kansas State University Manhattan, KS 66506 ramm@math.ksu.edu L. Weaver Physics Department Kansas State a positive real part. We explain the paradox, give the rate of convergence of the infinite sequence zn

62

BRAESS PARADOX IN DYNAMIC ROUTING FOR THE COHEN-KELLY Atsushi Inoie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BRAESS PARADOX IN DYNAMIC ROUTING FOR THE COHEN-KELLY NETWORK Atsushi Inoie Doctoral Program of dynamic routing in the Cohen-Kelly network is studied. Intuitively, we expect that adding capacity in which Cohen and Kelly discovered a paradox in static routing. We consider the dy- namic routing problems

Touati, Corinne

63

The double-slit and the EPR experiments: A paradox-free kinematic description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paradoxes of the double-slit and the EPR experiments with particles are shown to originate in the implicit assumption that the particles are always located in the classical space. It is demonstrated that there exists a natural substitute for this assumption that provides a method of resolving the paradoxes.

Alexey A. Kryukov

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

64

Linear Algebra as a Natural Language for Special Relativity and Its Paradoxes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

always run slower than stationary clocks. The TWIN PARADOX: One twin leaves Earth in a fast rocket ship cause time reversal in the sense that effect occurs before its cause #12;

Kaup, David J.

65

Western consciousness, absurdity, and rebellion: the influence of paradox in the early works of Albert Camus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the paradoxical nature of Albert Camus's ideas of Western consciousness, absurdity, and rebellion. Camus believes that as members of the Occident, we are the products of both the Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian cultures. We...

Lanier, Clinton David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

Uncertainty relations for the realisation of macroscopic quantum superpositions and EPR paradoxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a unified approach, based on the use of quantum uncertainty relations, for arriving at criteria for the demonstration of the EPR paradox and macroscopic superpositions. We suggest to view each criterion as a means to demonstrate an EPR-type paradox, where there is an inconsistency between the assumptions of a form of realism, either macroscopic realism (MR) or local realism (LR), and the completeness of quantum mechanics.

E. G. Cavalcanti; M. D. Reid

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Authors: Danielle Lehle and Michael D. Vanden Berg, Utah Geological Survey. Venue: Economic Geology of the Rocky Mountain Region session, May 11, 2009, Geological Society of America-Rocky Mountain Section annual meeting, Orem, Utah, May 11-13, 2009. http://www.geosociety.org/sectdiv/rockymtn/09mtg/index.htm [external site] Abstract: The upper Green River formation’s oil shale deposits located within the Uinta Basin of Utah and the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado contain remarkably similar stratigraphic sequences despite being separated by the Douglas Creek arch. Individual horizons, as well as individual beds, can be traced for hundreds of miles within and between the two basins. However, changes in the topography-controlled runoff patterns between the basins, as well as changes in localized climate conditions throughout upper Green River time, created significant differences between basin-specific deposits. These variations affected the richness and thickness of each oil shale zone, resulting in basin-specific preferred extraction techniques (i.e., in-situ in Colorado and mining/retort in Utah). Colorado’s oil-shale resource was mapped and quantified by the USGS in the late 1970s, whereas this study is the first attempt at quantifying Utah’s overall resource by specific oil shale horizon. This presentation focuses on the Mahogany zone (MZ) and the stratigraphically lower R-6 zone; subsequent work will define other important horizons.

68

'Burning for the Future'? A qualitative inquiry into the paradox of incineration as a waste management solution for "green" Denmark.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Paradoxically, despite its reputation as a “green” leader, Denmark has the highest levels of waste and incineration per capita, as well as low levels of… (more)

Husen, Betina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Quantifying the Fermi paradox in the local Solar neighborhood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Fermi paradox highlights the dichotomy between the lack of physical contact with other civilizations and the expectation that technological civilizations are assumed likely to evolve in many locations in the Milky Way galaxy, given the large number of planetary systems within this galaxy. Work by Landis and others has modeled this question in terms of percolation theory and cellular automata, using this method to parametrize our ignorance about possible other civilizations as a function of the probability of one system to colonize another, and the maximum number of systems reachable from each starting location (i.e. the degree in the network used for percolation). These models used a fixed lattice of sites to represent a stellar region, so the degree of all sites were identical. In this paper, the question is examined again, but instead of using a pre-determined lattice, the actual physical positions of all known star systems within 40 parsecs of the Solar System are used as percolation sites; in addition...

Cartin, Daniel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

Utah, University of

71

Geologic characterization report for the Paradox Basin Study Region, Utah Study Areas. Volume 6. Salt Valley  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface landforms in the Salt Valley Area are generally a function of the Salt Valley anticline and are characterized by parallel and subparallel cuestaform ridges and hogbacks and flat valley floors. The most prominent structure in the Area is the Salt Valley anticline. Erosion resulting from the Tertiary uplift of the Colorado Plateau led to salt dissolution and subsequent collapse along the crest of the anticline. Continued erosion removed the collapse material, forming an axial valley along the crest of the anticline. Paleozoic rocks beneath the salt bearing Paradox Formation consist of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, siltstone and shale. The salt beds of the Paradox Formation occur in distinct cycles separated by an interbed sequence of anhydrite, carbonate, and clastic rocks. The Paradox Formation is overlain by Pennsylvanian limestone; Permian sandstone; and Mesozoic sandstone, mudstone, conglomerate and shale. No earthquakes have been reported in the Area during the period of the historic record and contemporary seismicity appears to be diffusely distributed, of low level and small magnitude. The upper unit includes the Permian strata and upper Honaker Trail Formation. The current data base is insufficient to estimate ground-water flow rates and directions in this unit. The middle unit includes the evaporites in the Paradox Formation and no laterally extensive flow systems are apparent. The lower unit consists of the rocks below the Paradox Formation where permeabilities vary widely, and the apparent flow direction is toward the west. 108 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Paradoxes of cosmological physics in the beginning of the 21-st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the history of cosmology physical paradoxes played important role for development of contemporary world models. Within the modern standard cosmological model there are both observational and conceptual cosmological paradoxes which stimulate to search their solution. Confrontation of theoretical predictions of the standard cosmological model with the latest astrophysical observational data is considered. A review of conceptual problems of the Friedmann space expending models, which are in the bases of modern cosmological model, is discussed. The main paradoxes, which are discussed in modern literature, are the Newtonian character of the exact Friedmann equation, the violation of the energy conservation within any comoving local volume, violation of the limiting recession velocity of galaxies for the observed high redshift objects. Possible observational tests of the nature of the cosmological redshift are discussed

Yurij Baryshev

2015-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Colloquium: The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox: From concepts to applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Colloquium examines the field of the Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) gedanken experiment, from the original paper of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen, through to modern theoretical proposals of how to realize both the continuous-variable and discrete versions of the EPR paradox. The relationship with entanglement and Bell's theorem are analyzed, and the progress to date towards experimental confirmation of the EPR paradox is summarized, with a detailed treatment of the continuous-variable paradox in laser-based experiments. Practical techniques covered include continuous-wave parametric amplifier and optical fiber quantum soliton experiments. Current proposals for extending EPR experiments to massive-particle systems are discussed, including spin squeezing, atomic position entanglement, and quadrature entanglement in ultracold atoms. Finally, applications of this technology to quantum key distribution, quantum teleportation, and entanglement swapping are examined.

Reid, M. D.; Drummond, P. D.; Bowen, W. P.; Cavalcanti, E. G.; Lam, P. K.; Bachor, H. A.; Andersen, U. L.; Leuchs, G. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics and Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Melbourne, Victoria 3122 Australia (Australia); School of Physical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland 4111 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, Building 38, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Building 309, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Max-Planck Institute for the Science of Light and Department of Physics, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Paradoxes of cosmological physics in the beginning of the 21-st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the history of cosmology physical paradoxes played important role for development of contemporary world models. Within the modern standard cosmological model there are both observational and conceptual cosmological paradoxes which stimulate to search their solution. Confrontation of theoretical predictions of the standard cosmological model with the latest astrophysical observational data is considered. A review of conceptual problems of the Friedmann space expending models, which are in the bases of modern cosmological model, is discussed. The main paradoxes, which are discussed in modern literature, are the Newtonian character of the exact Friedmann equation, the violation of the energy conservation within any comoving local volume, violation of the limiting recession velocity of galaxies for the observed high redshift objects. Possible observational tests of the nature of the cosmological redshift are discussed

Baryshev, Yurij

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Late Paleozoic depositional controls in the Paradox basin, Colorado and Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox evaporite basin formed during the Desmoinesian to Wolfcampian intracratonic Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny in response to the Laurentia-Gondwana collision. Basin subsidence resulted from the southwestward thrusting and probably lateral movement on the Uncompahgre Fault along it's northeastern margin. This created a strongly asymmetrical basin that was similar in geometry to a foreland basin, with the Definace-Zuni and Piute platforms occupying the position of a foreland bulge. The evaporite basin was separated from its southeastern extension, the San Juan Trough, by the northeast-trending Hogback fault zone. An orthogonal pattern of northeast- and northwest-trending basement faults extends from the San Juan Basin into the Paradox Basin and can be shown to have exerted significant control on depositional patterns throughout the Phanerozoic. Paleogeographic and plate reconstructions indicate that the north-south-trending Uncompahgre and Front Range highlands lay at right angles to the prevailing easterly winds--thus removed most of the moisture and produced arid to semiarid conditions throughout the Paradox Basin and San Juan Trough. As many as 35 halite-bearing cycles have been identified in the Desmoinesian Paradox Formation. Each cycle is composed of a transgressive freshening phase and a regressive evaporitic phase with either halite or potash as the final product. All of the evaporite cycles are bounded by unconformities and can be divided into higher order sequences, particularly in the correlative carbonate shelf environments to the southwest.

Huffman, A.C. Jr. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Visualizing Statistical Mix Effects and Simpson's Paradox Zan Armstrong and Martin Wattenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visualizing Statistical Mix Effects and Simpson's Paradox Zan Armstrong and Martin Wattenberg Size is known to statis- · Zan Armstrong was with Google at the time of research, currently unaffiliated. E-mail: zan.armstrong@gmail.com. · Martin Wattenberg is with Google. E-mail: wattenberg@google.com. Manuscript

Cortes, Corinna

77

The Innovation Paradox: Reconciling Creativity & Discipline How Winning Organizations Combine Inspiration With Perspiration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microprocessor was designed by a handful of engineers; the Centrioo required several hundred.] Yet creativityThe Innovation Paradox: Reconciling Creativity & Discipline How Winning Organizations Combine products globally find that their very size inhibits the creativity needed to invent such products

Kolodny, Avinoam

78

PARADOXICAL ROLE OF ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 2 RECEPTORS IN RESISTANCE ARTERIES OF OLD RATS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARADOXICAL ROLE OF ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 2 RECEPTORS IN RESISTANCE ARTERIES OF OLD RATS. #Frederic vasodilatory and antitrophic properties are well accepted. Nevertheless, in hypertensive rats AT2R stimulation hypothesized that AT2R function might be altered in old rats resistance arteries. Mesenteric resistance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

79

Paradoxical persistence through mixed-system dynamics: towards a unified perspective of reversal behaviours in evolutionary ecology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the parrondian terminology does offer the advantage of providing...the possibility of a more fundamental commonality among the various...40 Gardiner, C. W. 1996 Handbook of stochastic methods. Berlin...deeper understanding of the fundamental principles governing paradoxical...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A Possible Resolution of the Tolman Paradox as a Quantum Superposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is an attempt to find a hidden virtue in Tolman's paradox by showing that it can give rise to quantum superposition. We consider tachyon exchange between two particles and show that it can generate superposition of eigenstates characterizing each particle, as well as the entangled state of the particle pair. The new possible aspect of quantum superposition reveals an unexpected connection with cosmological expansion of the Universe.

Moses Fayngold

2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Momentum-position realization of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a momentum-position realization of the EPR paradox using direct detection in the near and far fields of the photons emitted by collinear type-II phase-matched parametric downconversion. Using this approach we achieved a measured two-photon momentum-position variance product of $0.01\\hbar^2$, which dramatically violates the bounds for the EPR and separability criteria.

John C. Howell; Ryan S. Bennink; Sean J. Bentley; R. W. Boyd

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

On EPR Paradox, No Entanglement Theorem for Separate Particles and Consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPR paper contains an error. Its correction leads to a conclusion that position and momentum of a particle can be defined precisely simultaneously, EPR paradox does not exist and uncertainty relations have nothing to do with quantum mechanics. Logic of the EPR paper shows that entangled states of separated particles do not exist and therefore there are no nonlocality in quantum mechanics. Bell's inequalities are never violated, and results of experiments, proving their violation, are shown to be false. Experiments to prove absence of nonlocality are proposed where Bell's inequalities are replaced by precise prediction. Interpretation of quantum mechanics in terms of classical field theory is suggested. Censorship against this paper is demonstrated.

V. K. Igatovich

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Three-Box "Paradox" and Other Reasons to Reject the Counterfactual Usage of the ABL Rule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An apparent paradox proposed by Aharonov and Vaidman in which a single particle can be found with certainty in two (or more) boxes is analyzed by way of a simple thought experiment. It is found that the apparent paradox arises from an invalid counterfactual usage of the Aharonov-Bergmann-Lebowitz (ABL) rule, and effectively attributes conflicting properties not to the same particle but to different particles. A connection is made between the present analysis and the consistent histories formulation of Griffiths. Finally, a critique is given of some recent counterarguments by Vaidman against the rejection of the counterfactual usage of the ABL rule.

R. E. Kastner

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

Global Paradox  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the Publisher:In the tradition of his bestselling Megatrends books, John Naisbitt explores the new wave of global economic change predicted as a result of the breaking apart of the Soviet empire--and the opportunities and challenges for nations, ...

John Naisbitt

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Can a variable gravitational constant resolve the Faint Young Sun Paradox ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar models suggest that four billion years ago the young Sun was about 25% fainter than it is today, rendering Earth's oceans frozen and lifeless. However, there is ample geophysical evidence that Earth had a liquid ocean teeming with life 4 Gyr ago. Since ${\\cal L_\\odot} \\propto G^7M_\\odot^5$, the Sun's luminosity ${\\cal L_\\odot}$ is exceedingly sensitive to small changes in the gravitational constant $G$. We show that a percent-level increase in $G$ in the past would have prevented Earth's oceans from freezing, resolving the faint young Sun paradox. Such small changes in $G$ are consistent with observational bounds on ${\\Delta G}/G$. Since ${\\cal L}_{\\rm SNIa} \\propto G^{-3/2}$, an increase in $G$ leads to fainter supernovae, creating tension between standard candle and standard ruler probes of dark energy. Precisely such a tension has recently been reported by the Planck team.

Varun Sahni; Yuri Shtanov

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

86

REGIONAL PARADOX FORMATION STRUCTURE AND ISOCHORE MAPS, BLANDING SUB-BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field (figure 1). However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Consistent use of paradoxes in deriving constraints on the dynamics of physical systems and of no-go-theorems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The classical methods used by recursion theory and formal logic to block paradoxes do not work in quantum information theory. Since quantum information can exist as a coherent superposition of the classical ``yes'' and ``no'' states, certain tasks which are not conceivable in the classical setting can be performed in the quantum setting. Classical logical inconsistencies do not arise, since there exist fixed point states of the diagonalization operator. In particular, closed timelike curves need not be eliminated in the quantum setting, since they would not lead to any paradoxical outcome controllability. Quantum information theory can also be subjected to the treatment of inconsistent information in databases and expert systems. It is suggested that any two pieces of contradicting information are stored and processed as coherent superposition. In order to be tractable, this strategy requires quantum computation.

Karl Svozil

1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

88

Uinta Basin Oil and Gas Development Air Quality Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production EASTERN UTAH BLM Proposed Leasing for Oil Shale and Tar Sands Development "Indian Country" ­ Regulatory Authority Controlled by the Tribes and EPA Oil Shale Leasing Tar Sands Leasing "Indian Country

Utah, University of

89

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (40-80 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvania (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performances, and report associated validation activities.

Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project's primary objective was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (4-8 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performance(s), and report associated validation activities.

Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laural L.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

Deep brain stimulation of the inferior colliculus: A possible animal model to study paradoxical kinesia observed in some parkinsonian patients?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The inferior colliculus (IC) plays an important role in the normal processing of the acoustic message and is also involved in the filtering of acoustic stimuli of aversive nature. The neural substrate of the IC can also influence haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Considering that (i) paradoxical kinesia, observed in some parkinsonian patients, seems to be dependent of their emotional state and (ii) deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents an alternative therapeutic route for the relief of parkinsonian symptoms, the present study investigated the consequence of DBS at the IC on the catalepsy induced by haloperidol in rats. Additionally, we investigated if DBS of the IC can elicit motor responses in anesthetized rats and whether DBS elicits distinct neural firing patterns of activity at the dorsal cortex (DCIC) or central nucleus (CNIC) of the IC. A significant reduction of the catalepsy response was seen in rats previously given haloperidol and receiving DBS at the IC. In addition, electrical stimulation to the ventral part of the CNIC induced immediate motor responses in anesthetized rats. The neuronal spontaneous activity was higher at the ventral part of the CNIC than the dorsal part. DBS to the ventral part but not to the dorsal part of the CNIC increased the spike rate at neurons a few hundred microns away from the stimulation site. It is possible that the IC plays a role in the sensorimotor gating activated by emotional stimuli, and that DBS at the IC can be a promising new animal model to study paradoxical kinesia in rats.

Liana Melo-Thomas; Uwe Thomas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

CREATIC.ca : Solution pour faciliter une appropriation immdiate et pour pallier le paradoxe technico-pdagogique vcu par les futurs enseignants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CREATIC.ca : Solution pour faciliter une appropriation immédiate et pour pallier le paradoxe *Université de Moncton, Professeures, FSE de l'Université de Moncton, Moncton, Canada Courriel : isabelc@umoncton.ca /vezinan@umoncton.ca ** Chef de groupe, Apprentissage électronique, ITI, CNRC, 55, chemin Crowley Farm

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

93

The Cane Creek clastic interval of the Pennsylvanian Paradox formation - an exciting new horizontal target; Part I: Regional Geology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cane Creek is a fractured, abnormally pressured, self-sourcing reservoir, making it a good candidate for exploitation through horizontal technology. This concept was successfully applied to the Cane Creek in 1991 when Columbia Gas Development and Exxon Company USA, on an Enserch farmout, completed the Kane Springs Federal 27-1 for 914 BOPD. Since that time, two additional horizontal discoveries have potentialed for 1158 and 1325 BOPD, respectively. The Cane Creek was deposited in a partly restricted evaporitic environment in the Paradox basin during the Pennsylvanian. The Cane Creek consists of fifth-order shoaling-upward cycles within the transgressive to early highstand systems tracts. The reservoir comprises 20-30 ft of organic-rich, dolomitic siltstone and shale directly overlain and underlain by interbedded anhydrite, shale, and siltstone. In most areas, the Cane Creek is sealed above and below by halite, which maintains the abnormal pressure in the reservoir. Core information and reservoir engineering data indicate the Cane Creek produces from fracture porosity with minor contribution from the matrix. Initial fracture development may have occurred as a result of movement along basement-involved faults during the Pennsylvanian, followed by or coincident with salt mobilization from Pennsylvania-Jurassic. Hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring during maximum burial in the Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary created additional fractures or enhanced existing ones. The dominant fracture orientation is northeast-southwest to north-south, which is consistent with the regional stress regime during Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary.

Rawlins, D.M. (Exxon Company USA, Midland, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 30, 2013 | Release Date: January 31, January 30, 2013 | Release Date: January 31, 2013 | Next Release: February 7, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Natural gas dry production at selected points in the United States Rocky Mountain region have rebounded during the final two weeks of January, according to data from BENTEK Energy LLC (Bentek). Production declines took place in this region during the middle of the month, likely due to the effect of a cold front that moved into the region. The cold weather led to a number of reported wellhead freeze-offs, and correlated with production decreases in the San Juan, Green River, Uinta and Piceance basins, according to Bentek. This was particularly the case in the San Juan Basin, located in Colorado

95

Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas-Louisiana- Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin Appalachian Basin Wind River Basin Eastern Shelf NW Shelf Abo Sussex-Shannon Muddy J Mesaverde- Lance-Lewis Medina/Clinton-Tuscarora Bradford-Venango-Elk Berea-Murrysville Piceance Basin Bossier Williston Basin Ft Worth Basin Davis Bighorn Basin Judith River- Eagle Permian Basin Anadarko Basin Denver Basin San Juan Basin North-Central Montana Area Uinta Basin Austin Chalk Codell-Niobrara Penn-Perm Carbonate Niobrara Chalk Dakota Morrow Mesaverde Thirty- One Cleveland Ozona Canyon Wasatch- Mesaverde Red Fork Mesaverde Granite Wash Stuart City-Edwards Bowdoin- Greenhorn Travis Peak Olmos Cotton Valley Vicksburg Wilcox Lobo Pictured Cliffs Cretaceous Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Mancos- Dakota Gilmer Lime Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States

96

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Cold weather in December had significant effects on demand, supply, and prices across the country. Cold weather led to a net withdrawal of 285 billion cubic feet (Bcf) for the week ending Friday, December 13. This was the largest storage withdrawal since recordkeeping began in 1994. Another larger-than-normal storage withdrawal of 177 Bcf occurred the following week. Widespread freeze-offs occurred in December and disrupted production for several days in the Piceance Basin in Utah and Wyoming, the Uinta Basin in Utah, the San Joaquin Basin in California, and the Williston Basin in North Dakota. Imports from Canada helped mitigate the loss of supply. During the month, prices rose across most of the country, and the Henry Hub price averaged about $0.60/MMBtu higher than the previous month's average.

97

Results of hydraulic tests at Gibson Dome No. 1, Elk Ridge No. 1, and E. J. Kubat boreholes, Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic testing was conducted in three boreholes in southeastern Utah to provide a portion of the data needed to characterize the hydrogeology of the Elk Ridge and Gibson Dome areas of the western Paradox Basin, Utah. The tests at the E. J. Kubat borehole yielded representative values of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storativity, and potentiometric levels of the Leadville Limestone. Testing at Elk Ridge No. 1 provided values of similar parameters for the combined thickness of the upper Honaker Trail, Elephant Canyon, and Cedar Mesa formations. Composite transmissivities of similar zones from these borehole tests compared closely with the results of testing at borehole GD-1. A comparison of results from lab tests on core with results of extensive borehole testing at GD-1 indicates that short-term drill stem tests in a single well can provide representative estimates of bulk transmissivities and hydraulic conductivities in this field area for test zones that have a hydraulic conductivity of greater than about 1 x 10/sup -7/ cm/sec. However, lab tests produce more representative values of effective porosity and matrix permeability of individual strata. Results of lab tests and long-term borehole tests confirm that the lower Honaker Trail and upper Paradox formations have extremely low conductivities in the vicinity of the GD-1 borehole. The results of these tests were complete as of January 1981. 22 references, 29 figures, 5 tables.

Thackston, J.W.; Preslo, L.M.; Hoexter, D.E.; Donnelly, N.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

sciencesduvivant Le paradoxe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pour les plantes et les ani- maux terrestres. Les plantes et les animaux mi- croscopiques forment la phytoplancton) et d'ani- maux (le zooplancton) dont les formes sont extra- ordinairement variées. Ainsi, l

Dolan, John

99

HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing, vertical, field wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the third project year (April 6 through October 5, 2002). This work included capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and pore casting on selected samples from Cherokee and Bug fields, Utah. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found at these fields are indicators of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for enhanced oil recovery via horizontal drilling. The reservoir quality of Cherokee and Bug fields has been affected by multiple generations of dissolution, anhydrite plugging, and various types of cementation which act as barriers or baffles to fluid flow. The most significant diagenetic characteristics are microporosity (Cherokee field) and micro-boxwork porosity (Bug field), as shown from porethroat radii histograms, and saturation profiles generated from the capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, and identified by scanning electron microscopy and pore casting. These porosity types represent important sites for untapped hydrocarbons and primary targets for horizontal drilling. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, and publications. The project home page was updated for the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

STRATAL PATTERNS OF THE WILLIAMS FORK (HUNTER CANYON) FORMATION, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the style of accommodation. The Williams Fork Formation contains stratal packages and was chosen for detailed study because of extensive exposures and a noticeable vertical change in lithology and sandstone-to-shale (net-to-gross) ratios. Ages... by Hancock (1925) and then eventually traced from the Grand Hogback to the Colorado-Utah state line by Fisher et al. (1960) and Collins (1976). The Williams Fork Formation is a gas producing formation (Cumella and Ostby, 2003), and previous study has...

Ost, Rebekah Corrie

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercially Producing Oil Shale: World Oil, Vol. 190, No.A Tech~ nology Assessment. of Oil Shale Development,"13th Oil Shale Symposium Proceedings, Colorado School of

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

AN INVESTIGATION OF DEWATERING FOR THE MODIFIED IN-SITU RETORTING PROCESS, PICEANCE CREEK BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Cathedral Bluffs Shale Oil Company and Rio Blanco Oilfossil fuel) may make shale oil a cost-effective source ofthen pyrolyzed underground. The shale oil is pumped to the

Mehran, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A better understanding of a Uinta Basin channelized analog reservoir through geostatistics and reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the behavior of channelized oil and gas reservoirs. Results show that the number of channels in the model can have a significant effect on performance. The rock properties in these channels and the channel paths are also important factors that determine...

Robbana, Enis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION, SOUTHWEST UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reservoir simulations of different fields in the Green River Formation are reported. Most extensive simulations were performed on the Monument Butte Northeast unit. Log data were used to construct detailed geostatistical models, which were upscaled to obtain reasonable number of grid blocks for reservoir simulation. Porosities, permeabilities, and water saturations required for reservoir simulation were thus generated. Comparison of the production results with the field data revealed that there was a phenomenological deficiency in the model. This was addressed by incorporating hydraulic fractures into the models. With this change, much better agreement between simulation results and field data was obtained. Two other fields, Brundage Canyon and Uteland Butte, were simulated in primary production. Only preliminary simulations were undertaken since a number of critical data elements were missing and could not be obtained from the operators. These studies revealed that the production performance of the Brundage Canyon field is much better than what can be predicted from simulations of a typical non-fractured, undersaturated reservoir. Uteland Butte field performance was that of a typical undersaturated reservoir.

Milind D. Deo

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

MULTICOMPONENT SEISMIC ANALYSIS AND CALIBRATION TO IMPROVE RECOVERY FROM ALGAL MOUNDS: APPLICATION TO THE ROADRUNNER/TOWAOC AREA OF THE PARADOX BASIN, UTE MOUNTAIN UTE RESERVATION, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-02NT15451, ''Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado''. Optimizing development of highly heterogeneous reservoirs where porosity and permeability vary in unpredictable ways due to facies variations can be challenging. An important example of this is in the algal mounds of the Lower and Upper Ismay reservoirs of the Paradox Basin in Utah and Colorado. It is nearly impossible to develop a forward predictive model to delineate regions of better reservoir development, and so enhanced recovery processes must be selected and designed based upon data that can quantitatively or qualitatively distinguish regions of good or bad reservoir permeability and porosity between existing well control. Recent advances in seismic acquisition and processing offer new ways to see smaller features with more confidence, and to characterize the internal structure of reservoirs such as algal mounds. However, these methods have not been tested. This project will acquire cutting edge, three-dimensional, nine-component (3D9C) seismic data and utilize recently-developed processing algorithms, including the mapping of azimuthal velocity changes in amplitude variation with offset, to extract attributes that relate to variations in reservoir permeability and porosity. In order to apply advanced seismic methods a detailed reservoir study is needed to calibrate the seismic data to reservoir permeability, porosity and lithofacies. This will be done by developing a petrological and geological characterization of the mounds from well data; acquiring and processing the 3D9C data; and comparing the two using advanced pattern recognition tools such as neural nets. In addition, should the correlation prove successful, the resulting data will be evaluated from the perspective of selecting alternative enhanced recovery processes, and their possible implementation. The work is being carried out on the Roadrunner/Towaoc Fields of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, located in the southwestern corner of Colorado. Although this project is focused on development of existing resources, the calibration established between the reservoir properties and the 3D9C seismic data can also enhance exploration success. During the time period covered by this report, the majority of the project effort has gone into the permitting, planning and design of the 3D seismic survey, and to select a well for the VSP acquisition. The business decision in October, 2002 by WesternGeco, the projects' seismic acquisition contractor, to leave North America, has delayed the acquisition until late summer, 2003. The project has contracted Solid State, a division of Grant Geophysical, to carry out the acquisition. Moreover, the survey has been upgraded to a 3D9C from the originally planned 3D3C survey, which should provide even greater resolution of mounds and internal mound structure.

Paul La Pointe; Claudia Rebne; Steve Dobbs

2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Cultivating Sustainable Coffee: Persistent Paradoxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

survival and sustainable development processes will dependinclusive and sustainable rural development processes. Ininclusive sustainable rural devel- opment process (Miranda

Bacon, Christopher M.; Mendez, Ernesto; Fox, Jonathan A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Quark-gluon plasma paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on simple physics arguments it is shown that the concept of quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter consisting of uncorrelated quarks, antiquarks, and gluons, has a fundamental problem.

Dariusz Miskowiec

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

The time–emotion paradox  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...unusual or potentially dangerous events. The rapid detection...reject something bad for health (Rozin Fallon 1987...something potentially dangerous for health. It is therefore not...parental affection for health and psychological well-being...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Equity Oil Company BX in situ oil shale project, Piceance Basin, Colorado. Environmental quarter report, March 1-May 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been organized into three sections for ease of review. Section A - Air Resources covers data collected by the 100-foot tower between September and December 1980. Section B - Water Resources covers data collected since the last Quarterly Report. Section C - Aquatic Biology covers data collected since January 1981. Laboratory analysis results of all water samples show no significant changes from previous sample have occurred. The alluvial wells did exhibit slightly higher concentrations of phenols. Presently no baseline record exists for these wells to establish the normal levels of phenols in the alluvial ground water. Laboratory analysis of all sampling locations are presented in Appendix B. Aquatic biology covers data collected during the initial two aquatic biology field sampling trips of 1981. Benthic invertebrates, periphyton algae, and a fishery survey was conducted. Stream observations indicate that the stream habitat has remained unchanged since the August 1980 field visit. (ATT)

Not Available

1981-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Facies, stratigraphic architecture, and lake evolution of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Eastern Uinta Basin, Utah.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Lacustrine basin systems have historically been valued for their abundant conventional oil and gas reserves, but they also contain a vast potential for unconventional petroleum… (more)

Rosenberg, Morgan Joshua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Depositional environment of lower Green River Formation sandstones (Eocene), Red Wash field (Uinta Basin), Uintah County, Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control on reservoir properties, and predict reservoir geometry and morphology. This thesis follows the f'ormat and style nf the American Associa- tion of Petroleum Geolo ists Bulletin. WYOMING UTAH MO?T U i N T~ ~WASATCH MTS. /y 8'G ROOSEVELT...

McClain, Anthony Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity/PUMP 2 Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity/PUMP 2 DE-FC26-02NT15133 Goal The primary goal of this study is to increase recovery of oil reserves from existing reservoirs and from new discoveries by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. The overall objectives of this study are to: 1) increase recoverable oil from existing reservoirs, 2) add new discoveries, 3) prevent premature abandonment of numerous small fields, 4) increase deliverability through identifying the latest drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques, and 5) reduce development costs and risk. Performer Utah Geological Survey (UGS), Salt Lake City, UT

115

LNG -- A paradox of propulsion potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has been demonstrating its viability as a clean-burning alternative fuel for buses and medium- and heavy-duty trucks for the past 30 years. The first known LNG vehicle project began in San Diego in 1965, When San Diego Gas and Electric converted 22 utility trucks and three passenger vehicles to dedicated LNG. A surge in LNG vehicle project activity over the past five years has led to a fairly robust variety of vehicles testing the fuel, from Class 8 tractors, refuse haulers and transit buses to railroad locomotives and ferry boats. Recent technology improvements in engine design, cryogenic tanks, fuel nozzles and other related equipment have made LNG more practical to use than in the 1960s. LNG delivers more than twice the driving range from the same-sized fuel tank as a vehicle powered by compressed natural gas (CNG). Although technical and economic hurdles must be overcome before this fuel can achieve widespread use, various ongoing demonstration projects are showing LNG`s practicality, while serving the vital role of pinpointing those areas of performance that are the prime candidates for improvement.

McKay, D.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

THE BANACH-TARSKI PARADOX 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to the point where we are eventually writing out decompositions of the unit ball into 52 pieces. My second goal and that A and B are disjoint.) Now, consider the set S 1 ] C; it looks like some sort of wheel with an in#12;nite

Weston, Tom

117

THE BANACH-TARSKI PARADOX 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

writing out decompositions of the unit ball into 52 pieces. My second goal is to try to show.) Now, consider the set S1 C; it looks like some sort of wheel with an infinite number of spokes. (See

Weston, Tom

118

Autonomous Systems Design A Human Centric Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harrier VSTOL recovery to ship · Global Hawk strategic surveillance UAV · Rosetta comet interception-recovery to a Ship · Autonomous recovery and landing on a ship · Pilot initiates and gives permission to proceed

Cummings, Mary "Missy"

119

Genomic aggregation effects and Simpson's paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genomic studies have become commonplace, with thousands of gene expressions typically collected on single or multiple platforms and analyzed. Unaccounted time-ordered or epigenetic aspects of genetic expression may lead ...

Brimacombe, Michael

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

120

Paradoxical glomerular filtration of carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DOTATOC in rats: Influence of inhibitors of the organic ion transport and diuretics...N-acetylated low molecular weight chitosan . Mol Pharm 6 : 305 – 314...in 20.9 mL) of the OCT inhibitor cimetidine (Sigma-Aldrich...in 36.5 mL) of the OAT inhibitor probenecid (Sigma-Aldrich...

Alessandro Ruggiero; Carlos H. Villa; Evan Bander; Diego A. Rey; Magnus Bergkvist; Carl A. Batt; Katia Manova-Todorova; William M. Deen; David A. Scheinberg; Michael R. McDevitt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Automobiles - Particulate matter paradox ... | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Fuels, Engines and Emissions Research Center. GDI engines inject fuel directly into the cylinder, increasing efficiency and compatibility...

122

Open Access: From Myth to Paradox  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

True open access to scientific publications not only gives readers the possibility to read articles without paying subscription, but also makes the material available for automated ingestion and harvesting by 3rd parties. Once articles and associated data become universally treatable as computable objects, openly available to 3rd party aggregators and value-added services, what new services can we expect, and how will they change the way that researchers interact with their scholarly communications infrastructure? I will discuss straightforward applications of existing ideas and services, including citation analysis, collaborative filtering, external database linkages, interoperability, and other forms of automated markup, and speculate on the sociology of the next generation of users.

Paul Ginsparg

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

123

Asymptotic freedom: From paradox to paradigm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...It brings to mind the possibilities of nuclear reactors, or bombs. Stated as m = E/c 2 , Einstein's...it clear and tangible that the quantum vacuum is a dynamic medium, whose...operating at CERN in 2007, for this great accelerator will achieve the energies necessary to...

Frank Wilczek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Resolving a gravitational wave memory paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two different approaches to gravitational perturbation theory appear to give two different answers for the properties of gravitational wave memory. We show that this contradiction is only apparent and the two approaches actually agree.

David Garfinkle; Istvan Racz

2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

125

Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future projectspecific analyses. Additional information about the PEIS can be found at http://ostseis.anl.gov.

Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

126

Measurement and Modeling of Sorption-Induced Strain and Permeability Changes in Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strain caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A., and high-volatile bituminous coal from the Uinta-Piceance basin of Utah, U.S.A. using a newly developed strain measurement apparatus. The apparatus can be used to measure strain on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal strain. The swelling and shrinkage (strain) in the coal samples resulting from the adsorption of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, helium, and a mixture of gases was measured. Sorption-induced strain processes were shown to be reversible and easily modeled with a Langmuir-type equation. Extended Langmuir theory was applied to satisfactorily model strain caused by the adsorption of gas mixtures using the pure gas Langmuir strain constants. The amount of time required to obtain accurate strain data was greatly reduced compared to other strain measurement methods. Sorption-induced changes in permeability were also measured as a function of pres-sure. Cleat compressibility was found to be variable, not constant. Calculated variable cleat-compressibility constants were found to correlate well with previously published data for other coals. During permeability tests, sorption-induced matrix shrinkage was clearly demonstrated by higher permeability values at lower pore pressures while holding overburden pressure constant. Measured permeability data were modeled using three dif-ferent permeability models from the open literature that take into account sorption-induced matrix strain. All three models poorly matched the measured permeability data because they overestimated the impact of measured sorption-induced strain on permeabil-ity. However, by applying an experimentally derived expression to the measured strain data that accounts for the confining overburden pressure, pore pressure, coal type, and gas type, the permeability models were significantly improved.

Eric P. Robertson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Sequence-Stratigraphic Analysis of the Rollins and the Cozzette Sandstone Members, the Upper Cretaceous Mount Garfield Formation of the Piceance Basin, Colorado.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

based upon location and availability of gamma-ray, neutron and density (NPH-DPH) well logs. They were obtained from a State of Colorado sponsored website http://www.oil- gas.state.co.us. A high concentration of well logs exists in close proximity...OU) 17-8S96W ENCANA OIL &GAS INC USA#1-17 JC 17-9S98W MARALEX RESOSOURCES FEDERAL HARVEY#36-3 36-8S98W PIUTE ENERGY CO EXXON# GOV 33-22 22-7S96W WILLIAMSPRODUCTION RMT COMPANY EXXON# GOV 18-23 23-7S96W WILLIAMSPRODUCTION RMT COMPANY ZUPANCIS...

Ouaichouche, Fatma Zahra

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - akinbo shale eastern Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Uinta Basin, Utah. The vertical scale is in thousands of barrels of in-place shale oil... ......

129

Discussion on a Code Comparison Effort for the Geothermal Technologies...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

gas hydrate accumulations * Suboceanic gas hydrate accumulations * Piceance Basin oil shale * Enhanced oil recovery technologies Experimental Links * CCl 4 Migration and...

130

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research continued in the detection of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Tasks include modeling, data analysis, geologic assessment of the Piceance Basin, and remote sensing.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Climate Change Convention and Developing Countries: Fromand Climate Change: Perspectives from Developing Countries.developing countries by shift- ing the governance of climate change

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Sustainability and Market Conditions:The Resource Efficiency paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organizational capabilities, market conditions and resource efficiencyefficiency practices, and then develop hypotheses on how organizationalefficiency practices should increase in downturn market conditions, such practices require complementary capabilities, strategies and organizational

Delmas, Magali; Pekovic, Sanja

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Sustainability and Market Conditions:The Resource Efficiency paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability and Market Conditions energy conservation doand Market Conditions LITERATURE REVIEW Energy and resourcethe effect of market conditions on energy and resource

Delmas, Magali; Pekovic, Sanja

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Braess' Paradox in a simple electric power system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pricing in the restructured electricity industry. Using a small-scale test network and assuming DC load lines in the system are upgraded. In these systems, locational prices (as currently used

Blumsack, Seth

135

Device independent Schmidt rank witness by using Hardy paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schmidt rank of bipartite pure state serves as a testimony of entanglement. It is a monotone under local operation + classical communications (LOCC) and puts restrictions in LOCC convertibility of quantum states. Identifying the Schmidt rank of an unknown quantum state therefore seek importance from information theoretic perspective. In this work it is shown that a modified version of Hardy's argument, which reveals the contradiction of quantum theory with local realism, turns out to be useful for inspecting the minimal Schmidt rank of the unknown state and hence also the minimal dimension of the system. Use of Hardy's test in such task provides a practical advantage: the Schmidt rank can be determined without knowing the detailed functioning of the experimental devices i.e., Hardy's test suffices to be a device independent Schmidt rank witness.

Amit Mukherjee; Arup Roy; Some Sankar Bhattacharya; Subhadipa Das; Md. Rajjak Gazi; Manik Banik

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Paradoxical Success of Fuzzy Logic \\Lambda Charles Elkan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications of fuzzy logic in heuristic control have been highly successful, but which aspects of fuzzy logic of fuzzy logic have not been detrimental in control applications because current fuzzy controllers are far is that almost all the hundreds or thousands of successful fuzzy logic applications are embedded controllers

Wang, Deli

137

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pide tener en cuenta las emisiones per cápita para calcularapuesta por reducir las emisiones aunque no se apruebe el2008. Evolución de las emisiones de gases de efecto

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesendorf, Mark. 2003. Is “Clean Coal” an Oxymoron? Papercarbon sequestration and “clean coal” technology, for which149, 191, 206. See also clean coal Carr, Bob, 96 cars, 35,

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Classical geometric resolution of the Einstein—Podolsky—Rosen paradox  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mechanics as implying that "God plays dice"- or better...Nonrelativistic single- particle quantum mechanics is an approximation...in separating out a single particle. Einstein considered separability...the na- ture of the single-particle approximation (separability...

Yuval Ne'eman

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s Fourth National Communication on Climate Change. A Reportclimate change can be assessed using data from national communicationscommunication were also reflected in the working drafts of the Spanish Climate Change

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on International Emissions Trading. Global Envi- ronmentalTask Group on Emissions Trading. Final Report: Introductionand Crawshaw, David. 2006. Emissions Trading Inquiry a Joke:

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

From Visible to Invisible: Tunisia’s Gendered Democracy Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

described by a US Embassy official as “outstanding”.24 While only 55% of the total voting population registered to vote, and only 45% of those registered were women, 90% of registered voters turned up at the polls. The extraordinarily high voter turnout... , was the continual utilization of women’s rights as a mechanism of state power and consolidation, under the guise of modernism.2 Nonetheless, the political, social, and economic nature of the protests and the interim government’s passage of a gender parity law...

Petkanas, Zoe

143

Surrogacy marker paradox measures in meta-analytic settings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Michigan, School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights...outcome have been deleterious to health. Fleming and DeMets (1996...risk targets the particularly dangerous situation where the surrogate...protect against failures that put health at risk. To our knowledge......

Michael R. Elliott; Anna S.C. Conlon; Yun Li; Nico Kaciroti; Jeremy M.G. Taylor

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a subsidized growth path for renewable energy,” it wasgrowth strat- egies. Illustrative is the Plan for Developing Renewable Energies,renewable energy sources, and reforestation (ibid. , 331 – 32). Despite such high projected growth,

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Diesel Paradox: Why Dieselization Will Lead to Cleaner Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are challenges facing the U.S. and the world that are brought on by the growing demand for transporting people and goods. These include the growing consumption of petroleum, urban air pollution, and global climate change.

Eberhardt, James J.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Gasoline Prices, Fuel Economy, and the Energy Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is often asserted that consumers purchasing automobiles or other goods and services underweight the costs of gasoline or other "add-ons." We test this hypothesis in the US automobile market by examining the effects of ...

Wozny, Nathan

147

Solving the Capacitive Paradox of 2D MXene using Electrochemical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wileyonlinelibrary.com the Ti 3 C 2 T x electrode under study with that of a similar mass micro-mesoporous BP2000 composite carbon electrode. Although the specifi c gravimetric...

148

Sustainability and Market Conditions:The Resource Efficiency paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics 23, 1- 14. Sustainability and Market Conditionsof environmental sustainability. Management InternationalJournal 44, 170-179. Sustainability and Market Conditions

Delmas, Magali; Pekovic, Sanja

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the European Economic Commu- nity, European Coal and Steeleconomic diversity in many states, including the oil and coalcoal quadrupled (Robinson, Loughran, and Tranter 2000, 135 – 36). While its essence remained unchanged, the economic

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Paradoxical Republics: Tropes of Civic Longing in Postcolonial Caribbean Writing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

its legacies within a transatlantic and comparat ive frame.nations marked by the transatlantic slave trade and itsJanus-faced nature of the transatlantic republican project—

Ramos, Luis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewable energy, and reforming the production structure and transport system (IEA 1992). Many developing countries

Stevenson, Hayley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Dead ringers : globalization and the paradoxes of development and identity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X X X X X Hewlett Packard X HSBC X IBM X X X X X X X X X X Xexamples are the British banks HSBC and Barclays, which areoffices alike. I spoke with an HSBC call center employee at

Nadeem, Shehzad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

SciTech Connect: Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

154

U. S. monthly coal production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAPP), Northern Appalachia (NAPP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Powder River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States....

155

A Reaction-Transport-Mechanical Approach to Modeling the Interrelationships Among Gas Generation, Overpressuring, and Fracturing: Implications for the Upper Cretaceous Natural Gas Reservoirs of the Piceance Basin, Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in 1995. His current research interests...He has done internships and contract...Department of Energy's Multiwell...Wasatch and the Green River formations...mineralogy of the Green River Formation...in 1995. His current research interests...He has done internships and contract...

Dorothy F. Payne; Kagan Tuncay; Anthony Park; John B. Comer; Peter Ortoleva

156

ForestRangelandandWatershedStewardship 1472CampusDelivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons From 35 Years of Research on Oil Shale Lands in the Piceance Basin Fort Collins Fort Collins with oil shale extraction. The project involved approximately ten independent field studies, which were established on a 20-ha site located near what was then the focal point of oil shale activity in the Piceance

157

Production of Shale Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

Loper, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Microsoft Word - S07285_LTHMP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to fracture the tight, gas-bearing formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43-kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a...

159

LMS/RBL/S11219 Task Order LM00-502  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

fracture the tight, gas-bearing sandstone reservoirs in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. Art Kleinrath Control Number 14-0147 Page 2 The test involved the...

160

Microsoft Word - S06010_Ltr.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to fracture the tight, gas-bearing formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43 kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MEMO TO:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to fracture the tight, gas-bearing formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43-kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a...

162

Microsoft Word - S04902_LetterReport Cover Letter.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to fracture the tight gas-bearing sandstone formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43 kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a...

163

Microsoft Word - S08407_LTHMP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to fracture the tight, gas-bearing formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43-kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a...

164

Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identification method. ..................... 31 Fig. 3.4?Probability distribution at petroleum system level. ......................................... 34 Fig. 3.5?Example of generating probability distribution of qualitative parameter. ....... 34 Fig. 3....6?Example of generating probability distribution of quantitative parameter. ..... 35 Fig. 3.7?Probability distributions of kerogen type in San Juan and Piceance basin. ..... 38 Fig. 3.8?Probability distributions of porosity in San Juan and Piceance basin...

Wu, Wenyan 1983-

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

165

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects - Environmental  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah Last Reviewed 5/15/2012 DE-NT0005671 Goal The goal of this project is to overcome existing water-related environmental barriers to possible oil shale development in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Data collected from this study will help alleviate problems associated with disposal of produced saline water, which is a by-product of methods used to facilitate conventional hydrocarbon production. Performers Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84114 Collaborators Uinta Basin Petroleum Companies: Questar, Anadarko, Newfield, Enduring Resources, Bill Barrett, Berry Petroleum, EOG Resources, FIML, Wind River Resources, Devon, Rosewood, Flying J, Gasco, Mustang Fuel,

166

publications-archive | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water-Related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah PDF-99.3MB June, 2012: Final Project Report...

167

The Pliocene Paradox (Mechanisms for a Permanent El Nin~o)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to and also very different from the world of today. The intensity of sunlight inci- dent on Earth, the global geography, and the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (1) were close to what they are today Research Interpreta- tions and Synoptic Mapping Project (PRISM) (2). Although there are some

deMenocal, Peter B.

168

The political effectiveness of non-state violence : paradox, polarity, and the pursuit of power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When is non-state violence politically effective? Existing scholarship suggests that insurgency and terrorism are generally effective or ineffective based on the analysis of unitary non-state coercers operating solely at ...

Krause, Peter John Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Remediation of a large contaminated reactor cooling reservoir: Resolving and environmental/regulatory paradox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of a former reactor cooling water reservoir, PAR Pond, located Savannah River Site. PAR Pond, a 2640 acre, man-made reservoir was built in 1958 and until 1988, received cooling water from two DOE nuclear production reactors, P and R. The lake sediments were contaminated with low levels of radiocesium (CS-137) and transuranics in the late 1950s and early 1960s because of leaking fuel elements. Elevated levels of mercury accumulated in the sediments from pumping water from the Savannah River to maintain a full pool. PAR Ponds` stability, size, and nutrient content made a significant, unique, and highly studied ecological resource for fish and wildlife populations until it was partially drained in 1991 due to a depression in the downslope of the earthen dam. The drawdown, created 1340 acres of exposed, radioactively contaminated sediments along 33 miles of shoreline. This led US EPA to declare PAR Pond as a CERCLA operable unit subject to remediation. The drawdown also raised concerns for the populations of aquatic plants, fish, alligators, and endangered species and increased the potential for off-site migration of contaminated wildlife from contact with the exposed sediments. Applicable regulations, such as NEPA and CERCLA, require wetland loss evaluations, human health and ecological risk assessments, and remediation feasibility studies. DOE is committed to spending several million dollars to repair the dam for safety reasons, even though the lake will probably not be used for cooling purposes. At the same time, DOE must make decisions whether to refill and expend additional public funds to maintain a full pool to reduce the risks defined under CERCLA or spend hundreds of millions in remediation costs to reduce the risks of the exposed sediments.

Bowers, J.A.: Gladden, J.B.; Hickey, H.M.; Jones, M.P.; Mackey, H.E.; Mayer, J.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Doswell, A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Chronic Kidney Disease and Hypertension: The Paradox of Treating Patients with Spironolactone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Average costs of treatment with dialysis or renal transplant are $66,000 per patient per year b. Patients) or kidney failure are Texans 1. Number of dialysis patients in Texas has more than tripled since 1990 iii of heart disease or other cardiovascular complications before they reach ESRD ii. Awareness, treatment

Pillow, Jonathan

171

Holographic Thermalization, stability of AdS, and the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For a real massless scalar field in general relativity with a negative cosmological constant, we uncover a large class of spherically symmetric initial conditions that are close to AdS, but whose numerical evolution does not result in black hole formation. According to the AdS/CFT dictionary, these bulk solutions are dual to states of a strongly interacting boundary CFT that fail to thermalize at late times. Furthermore, as these states are not stationary, they define dynamical CFT configurations that do not equilibrate. We develop a two-timescale perturbative formalism that captures both direct and inverse cascades of energy and agrees with our fully nonlinear evolutions in the appropriate regime. We also show that this formalism admits a large class of quasi-periodic solutions. Finally, we demonstrate a striking parallel between the dynamics of AdS and the classic Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou problem.

Venkat Balasubramanian; Alex Buchel; Stephen R. Green; Luis Lehner; Steven L. Liebling

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

An institutional approach to understanding the green paradox of nuclear power.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis proposes that the range of institutional logics provided by both Friedland and Alford (1991) and Thornton, Ocasio and Lounsbury (2012) has overlooked the… (more)

Lloyd, Rhiannon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Paradox in South Asian summer monsoon circulation change: Lower tropospheric strengthening and upper tropospheric weakening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrological cycle to global warming, J. Clim. , 19, 5686–change in response to global warming, J. Clim. , 25, May,cycle in response to global warming, J. Clim. , 23, 4651–

Ma, Jian; Yu, Jin-Yi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Gassmann's fluid substitution paradox on carbonates: seismic and ultrasonic frequencies Ludmila Adam 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

response of carbonate rocks to porosity, permeability, texture, fluids and pressure. Velocities, in general of carbonate plugs of different porosity, permeability, mineralogy and texture are measured at seismic data on carbonate reservoir rocks have not been as thoroughly studied as clastic sedimentary reservoir

175

A new view of avian life-history evolution tested on an incubation paradox  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Aging physiology Animals Argentina Arizona Biological Evolution...phylogenetically and ecologically between Argentina and Arizona are longer in Argentina. Long incubation periods...Williams 1996) and increased energy expenditure can increase mortality...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

*** In Press at Cognition 1/16/2011 *** The Paradox of Moral Focus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phillips3 1 Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2 Department * Young and Phillips contributed equally to this manuscript. Address correspondence to Liane Young, Van Horn, Grafton, & Sinnott-Armstrong, 2006; Cushman, 2008; Malle, 2006; Mikhail, 2007; Young

Knobe, Joshua

177

A modest proposal to solve the "missing mass" problem and related cosmological paradoxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properly interpreted data from nearby galaxies $(z\\simeq 0.01)$ lead to $\\Omega \\simeq 0.082$. Data from farther away galaxies $(z\\simeq 1)$ with type Ia supernovae to $\\Omega =0.153$. Data to be expected from very high redshifted galaxies $(z\\simeq 10.1)$ to $\\Omega =0.500$. And actual data from the CBR, emitted at the time at which the universe became transparent $(z\\simeq 1422)$ to $\\Omega \\simeq 0.992$. All these data are simultaneously consistent with the standard big-bang picture (no inflation), in which $ \\Omega $ is time dependent and it is given by $\\Omega (y)=1/\\cosh ^{2}(y)$, being $y\\equiv \\sinh ^{-1}(T_{+}/T)^{1/2}$

J. A. Gonzalo

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

A paradox resolved: Sulfide acquisition by roots of seep tubeworms sustains net chemoautotrophy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...numbers indicate consumption and negative numbers...require sulfide to fuel autotrophic carbon...In the split-vessel respiration experiments...production to consumption) when sulfide...animal biomass to vessel volume necessitated...sulfide and oxygen consumption rates...

John K. Freytag; Peter R. Girguis; Derk C. Bergquist; Jason P. Andras; James J. Childress; Charles R. Fisher

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Role of Innate Immune Receptors in Paradoxical Caspofungin Activity In Vivo in Preclinical Aspergillosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...responses to therapy and study outcomes in clinical...fungal diseases: Mycoses Study Group and European Organization...Dis. 28 :717. 40. Wheeler, RT , and GR Fink...fungi from the immune system. PLoS Pathog. 2 :e35...aspergillosis. | This study investigated the possible...

Silvia Moretti; Silvia Bozza; Carmen D'Angelo; Andrea Casagrande; Maria Agnese Della Fazia; Lucia Pitzurra; Luigina Romani; Franco Aversa

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

180

Elevated Glutathione Biosynthetic Capacity in the Chloroplasts of Transgenic Tobacco Plants Paradoxically Causes Increased Oxidative Stress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ESSE at concentrations 10-fold in excess of those encountered in the cpGSHI...from deproteinized leaf extracts by lithium chloride precipitation, as described...peroxidase genes in Arabidopsis during excess light stress Law M.Y. Charles S...

Gary Creissen; John Firmin; Michael Fryer; Baldeep Kular; Nicola Leyland; Helen Reynolds; Gabriela Pastori; Florence Wellburn; Neil Baker; Alan Wellburn; Philip Mullineaux

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Narrative and (Meta)Physical Paradox in "Grande Sertao: Veredas" and "Pedro Paramo"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

respostas já conhece de antemão. Vim como combinamos porquecontei, remexer vivo o que vim dizendo. Porque não narreipreso. Diadorim e eu viemos, vim; de rota abatida. Mas,

Schneider, Caroline LeFeber

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Muon decays in the Earth's atmosphere, differential aging and the paradox of the twins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observation of the decay of muons produced in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic ray interactions provides a graphic illustration of the counter-intuitive space-time predictions of special relativity theory. Muons at rest in the atmosphere, decaying simultaneously, are subject to a universal time-dilatation effect when viewed from a moving frame and so are also observed to decay simultaneously in all such frames. The analysis of this example reveals the underlying physics of the differential aging effect in Langevin's travelling-twin thought experiment.

J. H. Field

2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

183

Narrative and (Meta)Physical Paradox in "Grande Sertao: Veredas" and "Pedro Paramo"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

humanistic geographer” 96 Edward Relph, concentrating on a “597-598. Print. RELPH, Edward. Place and Placelessness.

Schneider, Caroline LeFeber

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A paradox of state-dependent diffusion and how to resolve it  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...90987-X ) Gardiner, C. W. 2004 Handbook of stochastic methods for physics, chemistry and the natural...of statistical and thermal physics. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill...2007 Stochastic processes in physics and chemistry 3rd edn.North-Holland...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

English walnut rootstocks help avoid blackline disease, but produce less than ‘Paradox’ hybrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rootstock selection can help to prevent blackline infection.English walnut rootstocks help avoid blackline disease, but

Grant, Joseph A.; McGranahan, Gale H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The paradox of extreme high-altitude migration in bar-headed geese Anser indicus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...May), where arrows indicate wind speed and direction (largest...red colour denotes strongest wind speeds; see legend). Black...coincident temporal scale to winds. Acknowledgements: This work...Western Ecological and Patuxent Wildlife Research Centers and Avian Influenza...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The So-Called Allais Paradox and Rational Decisions under Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present memoir constitutes an extension of my 1952 study, The Foundations of a Positive Theory of Choice Involving Risk and a Criticism of the Postulates and Axioms of the American School (see Part II of this...

Maurice Allais

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A paradox in decision theory and some experimental results: The relative nature of decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple two-choice single outcome valued decision under risk is presented which should show up the limitations in the classical approach of von Neumann, its extensions and its alternatives. An empirical testi...

Iain Paterson; Andreas Diekmann

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Elevated Glutathione Biosynthetic Capacity in the Chloroplasts of Transgenic Tobacco Plants Paradoxically Causes Increased Oxidative Stress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conditions of severe necrosis in greenhouse-grown material did we observe...NN) were maintained in a greenhouse with supplementary lighting to provide an 18-hr day...plants were grown either in the greenhouse or in a controlled-environment...

Gary Creissen; John Firmin; Michael Fryer; Baldeep Kular; Nicola Leyland; Helen Reynolds; Gabriela Pastori; Florence Wellburn; Neil Baker; Alan Wellburn; Philip Mullineaux

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - apparent paradoxical vault Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: , vaults, manholes, boilers, tunnels, sewer and sump pits, large HVAC equipment, the Physics Department... -required confined spaces. Underground Electrical...

191

Paradox Farm cold climate greenhouse Photo: Sue Wika Section I: Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Sustainable Building Research (CSBR). We would also like to thank all those who participated in the online Sustainable Development Partnership Virajita Singh, Senior Research Fellow, Center for Sustainable Building Research Dan Handeen, Research Fellow, Center for Sustainable Building Research Jody Rader, Research

Netoff, Theoden

192

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Loss in the Ertan Hydropower Project). ? In Yingxiang17 Due to sensitivity of hydropower performance to seasonalwater resources for future hydropower development. Among 156

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

against soaring coal prices, the central government designedof power prices when coal prices increase more than 5 perthe mechanism even though coal prices increased more than 10

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zhongguo dianli chanye (China‘s Electricity Industry at themulti_page.pdf. State Electricity Regulatory Commission.The Annual Report on Electricity Regulation (2006). Beijing:

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the private-owned power plants that sell electricity to theElectricity Nominal IRA Ineffective Regulation Non-competitive Market Public & Privatein the private investors‘ inferiority. In the electricity

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Beyond the market : a case study of the downtown revitalization paradox in Framingham, Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. communities have a long history of implementing redevelopment projects based on the displacement of vulnerable minority groups, who have been blamed for physical blight, depression of property values, and stripping ...

Leit, Jonathan A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Measurement Process in Local Quantum Theory and the EPR Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe in a qualitative way a possible picture of the Measurement Process in Quantum Mechanics, which takes into account: 1. the finite and non zero time duration T of the interaction between the observed system and the microscopic part of the measurement apparatus; 2. the finite space size R of that apparatus; 3. the fact that the macroscopic part of the measurement apparatus, having the role of amplifying the effect of that interaction to a macroscopic scale, is composed by a very large but finite number N of particles. The conventional picture of the measurement, as an instantaneous action turning a pure state into a mixture, arises only in the limit in which N and R tend to infinity, and T tends to 0. We sketch here a proposed scheme, which still ought to be made mathematically precise in order to analyse its implications and to test it in specific models, where we argue that in Quantum Field Theory this picture should apply to the unique time evolution expressing the dynamics of a given theory, and should comply with the Principle of Locality. We comment on the Einstein Podolski Rosen thought experiment (partly modifying the discussion on this point in an earlier version of this note), reformulated here only in terms of local observables (rather than global ones, as one particle or polarisation observables). The local picture of the measurement process helps to make it clear that there is no conflict with the Principle of Locality.

Sergio Doplicher

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEPA SETC SERC SOE SGC SPCC UHV v CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION Aan ultra high voltage (UHV) transmission system; that is, tothrough long-distance UHV lines. The proponents propose that

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Paradox in South Asian summer monsoon circulation change: Lower tropospheric strengthening and upper tropospheric weakening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the intensities and trends of Hadley, Walker and monsoondominates the boreal summer Hadley circulation [Trenberth etStudies, MOHC = Met Of?ce Hadley Centre, INM = Instituto

Ma, Jian; Yu, Jin-Yi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

RESOLVING AMERICA’S HUMAN CAPITAL PARADOX: A PROPOSAL FOR A JOBS COMPACT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It’s generally understood that the United States can’t be competitive—and won’t be able to support high, and rising, living standards—without a well-trained, well-paid, and continuously improving workforce that can compete ...

Kochan, Thomas Anton

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Narrative and (Meta)Physical Paradox in "Grande Sertao: Veredas" and "Pedro Paramo"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exijo… Pero la tierra no es tuya. Te has puesto a trabajareverything; “la tierra no es tuya,” Galileo’s brother-in-law

Schneider, Caroline LeFeber

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Coal Mine Safety Telecom Economic Functional StateEconomic Functional Ministry of Transport Work Safety Social Coaleconomic lifeline?) industries: military engineering, electricity, oil and petrochemical, coal,

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Towards explaining the Nd paradox using reversible scavenging in an ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Piepgras et al., 1979; Goldstein and O'Nions, 1981; Frank, 2002; Tachikawa et al., 2003; Goldstein; Piepgras and Wasser- burg 1983; Jeandel,1993; Tachikawa et al.,1999; Tachikawa et al., 2003), long enough

Khatiwala, Samar

204

Narrative and (Meta)Physical Paradox in "Grande Sertao: Veredas" and "Pedro Paramo"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquele arraial tem um arruado só: é a rua da guerraO demônio na rua, no meio do redemunho O senhor não meacreditam. O demônio na rua, no meio do redemunho Falo!

Schneider, Caroline LeFeber

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Narrative and (Meta)Physical Paradox in "Grande Sertao: Veredas" and "Pedro Paramo"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spiritual realm, a kind of Hades or purgatory, airless forchurch, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it.the Underworld for a wife. Hades agreed to give Persephone

Schneider, Caroline LeFeber

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust belt play is divided into two subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust-Mesozoic-cored structures and (2) A

Thomas Chidsey

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Coalbed methane production potential in U. S. basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major emphasis of the U.S. DOE's coalbed methane research has been on estimating the magnitude of the resource and developing systems for recovery. Methane resource estimates for 16 basins show that the greatest potential is in the Piceance, Northern Appalachian, Central Appalachian, Powder River, and Greater Green River coal basins. Small, high-potential target areas have been selected for in-depth analysis of the resource. Industry interest is greatest in the Warrior, San Juan, Piceance, Raton Mesa, and Northern and Central Appalachian basins. Production curves for several coalbed methane wells in these basins are included.

Byer, C.W.; Mroz, T.H.; Covatch, G.L.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Release Date: November 16, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Estimated average rail transportation rates for coal originating in the Uinta Basin" 8. Estimated average rail transportation rates for coal originating in the Uinta Basin" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Transportation cost per short ton (real)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton",,"Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA",,"Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Year "," STB","EIA",,"STB","EIA",,,,"(nominal) EIA ","(real) EIA ",,,"STB ","EIA " 2001," $14.32"," -",," $15.78"," -",," - ",," - "," - "," - ",," 23.5%"," - "

209

A paradoxical improvement of misreaching in optic ataxia: new evidence for two separate neural systems for visual localization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the stimulation interfered with visually guided corrections during right-hand reaching movements made towards light emitting diode (LED) targets. The reaching move- ments were only a ected when the target position was shifted (unbeknown...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Paradox of Uranium Development: A Polanyian Analysis of Social Movements Surrounding the Piñon Ridge Uranium Mill.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Renewal of nuclear energy development has been proposed as one viable solution for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and impacts of climate change. This discussion… (more)

Malin, Stephanie Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Paradoxical Persistence of James Earle Fraser's End of the Trail: Nostalgia, Souvenirs, and the Politics of Pictorial Representation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cowboy Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City. Fig. 3. Cyrus ECowboy Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. The image becameNorman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1973): 8. 14 Tulare

Borrman, Kristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Apolipoprotein E Genotype-Dependent Paradoxical Short-Term Effects of {sup 56}Fe Irradiation on the Brain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In humans, apolipoprotein E (apoE) is encoded by three major alleles ({epsilon}2, {epsilon}3, and {epsilon}4) and, compared to apoE3, apoE4 increases the risk of developing Alzheimer disease and cognitive impairments following various environmental challenges. Exposure to irradiation, including that of {sup 56}Fe, during space missions poses a significant risk to the central nervous system, and apoE isoform might modulate this risk. Methods and Materials: We investigated whether apoE isoform modulates hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance starting 2 weeks after {sup 56}Fe irradiation. Changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect cognition and are induced by irradiation. Therefore, after cognitive testing, we assessed hippocampal ROS levels in ex vivo brain slices, using the ROS-sensitive fluorescent probe, dihydroethidium (DHE). Brain levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), extracellular SOD, and apoE were assessed using Western blotting analysis. Results: In the water maze, spatial memory retention was impaired by irradiation in apoE2 and apoE4 mice but enhanced by irradiation in apoE3 mice. Irradiation reduced DHE-oxidation levels in the enclosed blade of the dentate gyrus and levels of 3-NT and CuZnSOD in apoE2 but not apoE3 or apoE4 mice. Finally, irradiation increased apoE levels in apoE3 but not apoE2 or apoE4 mice. Conclusions: The short-term effects of {sup 56}Fe irradiation on hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retention are apoE isoform-dependent.

Haley, Gwendolen E. [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States) [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR (United States); Villasana, Laura; Dayger, Catherine; Davis, Matthew J. [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)] [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Raber, Jacob, E-mail: raberj@ohsu.edu [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States) [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR (United States); Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Joel Poinsett and the Paradox of Imperial Republicanism: Chile, Mexico, and the Cherokee Nation, 1810-1841 .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis examines the intersection of republicanism and imperialism in the early nineteenth-century Americas. I focus primarily on Joel Roberts Poinsett, a United States ambassador… (more)

Freed, Feather Crawford, 1971-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Paradox of Peroxy Defects and Positive Holes in Rocks Part II: Outflow of Electric Currents from Stressed Rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the electrical properties of rocks is of fundamental interest. We report on currents generated when stresses are applied. Loading the center of gabbro tiles, 30x30x0.9 cm$^3$, across a 5 cm diameter piston, leads to positive currents flowing from the center to the unstressed edges. Changing the constant rate of loading over 5 orders of magnitude from 0.2 kPa/s to 20 MPa/s produces positive currents, which start to flow already at low stress levels, <5 MPa. The currents increase as long as stresses increase. At constant load they flow for hours, days, even weeks and months, slowly decreasing with time. When stresses are removed, they rapidly disappear but can be made to reappear upon reloading. These currents are consistent with the stress-activation of peroxy defects, such as O$_3$Si-OO-SiO$_3$, in the matrix of rock-forming minerals. The peroxy break-up leads to positive holes h$^{\\bullet}$, i.e. electronic states associated with O$^-$ in a matrix of O$^{2-}$, plus electrons, e'. Propagating...

Scoville, John; Freund, Friedemann

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Paradoxical Persistence of James Earle Fraser's End of the Trail: Nostalgia, Souvenirs, and the Politics of Pictorial Representation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

End of the Trail, 1915, plaster sculpture. National CowboyProctor. Cowboy, 1893, plaster sculpture. ColumbianThe American Pioneer, 1915, plaster sculpture. Mooney Grove

Borrman, Kristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Volume 140, number 6 PHYSICSLETTERS A 2 October 1989 EINSTEIN-PODOLSKY-ROSEN PARADOX AND BELL'S INEQUALITY EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TennesseeSpace Institute, Tullahoma, TN 37388, USA Received28 June 1989; acceptedfor publication 26 July 1989 Communicated the full (1) = t (2)) and energy is conserved [5] (i.e., pump bandwidth. The parametric emissions (1

Davis, Lloyd M.

217

Dispersed concentration of high-tech jobs in the new economy : the paradox of new information and communication technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More high-tech firms are conducting their business over long distances due to the use of new information and communication technologies (ICT). However, regional scientists articulate that geographic proximity is still ...

Kang, Myoung-Gu, 1970-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Unraveling the paradoxes of HIV-associated psoriasis: A review of T-cell subsets and cytokine profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8. PubMed 28. Mallon E, Bunker CB. HIV-associated psoriasis.Easterbrook PJ, Newson R, Bunker CB. HLA-Cw*0602 and HIV-

Fife, Douglas J; Waller, Jeanette M; Jeffes, Edward W; Koo, John YM

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Recycling flows in eMergy evaluation: A Mathematical Paradox? N.Y. Amponsah, O. Le Corre1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 Recycling involving recycling or reuse of waste. If waste exergy (its residual usefulness) is not negligible, wastes could serve as input to another process or be recycled. In cases of continuous waste recycle or reuse

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

220

Reply to the comment of Y. Aharonov and L. Vaidman on ``Time asymmetry in quantum mechanics: a retrodiction paradox''  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the standard physical interpretation of quantum theory, prediction and retrodiction are not symmetric. The opposite assertion by some authors results from their use of non-standard interpretations of the theory.

Asher Peres

1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Scaled Brownian motion: a paradoxical process with a time dependent diffusivity for the description of anomalous diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anomalous diffusion is frequently described by scaled Brownian motion (SBM), a Gaussian process with a power-law time dependent diffusion coefficient. Its mean squared displacement is $\\langle x^2(t)\\rangle\\simeq\\mathscr{K}(t)t$ with $\\mathscr{K}(t)\\simeq t^{\\alpha-1}$ for $0does not exhibit a significant amplitude scatter of the time averaged mean squared displacement. More severely, we demonstrate that under confinement, the dynamics encoded by SBM is fundamentally different from both fractional Brownian motion and continuous time random walks. SBM is highly non-stationary and cannot provide a physical description for particles in a thermalised stationary system. Our findings have direct impact on the modelling of single particle tracking experiments, in particu...

Jeon, J -H; Metzler, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Wave function perturbations propagation in multi-particle systems, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox and entanglement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If a one-particle or multi-particle non-relativistic quantum system is initially in a stationary state, and its wave function field is locally perturbed, then according to classical Schr\\"odinger equation, the perturbation instantaneously affects all infinite region because, according to the equation, speed of the wave function perturbations propagation is infinite. This feature strongly influences all theoretical predictions for time evolution of the system and contradicts the natural limitation of the perturbations propagation speed by speed of light. We develop finite propagation speed concept for multi-particle non-relativistic quantum systems. It consists of (a) eikonal type equation for the wave function perturbation traveltime describing finite speed perturbation waves in hyperspace including coordinates of all paricles in the system; (b) modified multi-particle Schr\\"odinger equation with finite speed of the wave function perturbations propagation; and (c) hypothesis that speed of the wave function pe...

Shnaid, Isaac

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Paradoxical Association of Regression with a Poor Prognosis in Melanoma Contrasted with a Good Prognosis in Keratoacanthoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...threne-induced mouse sarcomas. J. Nati. Cancer Inst., 45: 1039 "1045, 1970. 29. Roholl, P. J. M., Rutgers, D. H., Rademakers, L. H. P. M., DeWeger, R. A., Elbers, J. R. J. and Van Unnik, J. A. M. Characterization of human soft tissue...

Richmond T. Prehn

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The local and global geometrical aspects of the twin paradox in static spacetimes: II. Reissner--Nordström and ultrastatic metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a consecutive paper on the timelike geodesic structure of static spherically symmetric spacetimes. First we show that for a stable circular orbit (if it exists) in any of these spacetimes all the infinitesimally close to it timelike geodesics constructed with the aid of the general geodesic deviation vector have the same length between a pair of conjugate points. In Reissner--Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole metric we explicitly find the Jacobi fields on the radial geodesics and show that they are locally (and globally) maximal curves between any pair of their points outside the outer horizon. If a radial and circular geodesics in R--N metric have common endpoints, the radial one is longer. If a static spherically symmetric spacetime is ultrastatic, its gravitational field exerts no force on a free particle which may stay at rest; the free particle in motion has a constant velocity (in this sense the motion is uniform) and its total energy always exceeds the rest energy, i.~e.~it has no gravitational energy. Previously the absence of the gravitational force has been known only for the global Barriola--Vilenkin monopole. In the spacetime of the monopole we explicitly find all timelike geodesics, the Jacobi fields on them and the condition under which a generic geodesic may have conjugate points.

Leszek M. Soko?owski; Zdzis?aw A. Golda

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

Correlation of Genomic and Physiological Traits of Thermoanaerobacter Species with Biofuel Yields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...supported by the Oklahoma Bioenergy Center (J.Z...Department of Energy Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI...long-term. Biomass Bioenergy 28 :384-410. 14...Liden. 2008. A short review on SSF-an interesting...from deep subsurface environments of the Piceance Basin...

Christopher L. Hemme; Matthew W. Fields; Qiang He; Ye Deng; Lu Lin; Qichao Tu; Housna Mouttaki; Aifen Zhou; Xueyang Feng; Zheng Zuo; Bradley D. Ramsay; Zhili He; Liyou Wu; Joy Van Nostrand; Jian Xu; Yinjie J. Tang; Juergen Wiegel; Tommy J. Phelps; Jizhong Zhou

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

Seismic characterization of multiple fracture sets at Rulison Field, Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...workshop demonstrated that current industry capabilities...scattering of elastic energy on the closely spaced...carried out during summer internship of Vasconcelos at Shell...fractures in the San Juan and Green River Basin, in Piceance...geology, geology of energy sources Applied geophysics...

Ivan Vasconcelos; Vladimir Grechka

227

Fuzzy Approach, Graded Truth, and Structures of Truth Values  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Paradoxes of vague terms. Human description of the world provides us with remarkable situations of a special kind. Consider the following form of the ancient sorites paradox (paradox of heap). “A h...

Radim B?lohlávek

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Predatory Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chain Store Paradox, Theory and Decision, 9 (2), 127-59, butChain Store Paradox, Theory and Decision, 9 (2), 127?59.  

Edlin, Aaron S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Generalized time-dependent density-functional-theory response functions for spontaneous density fluctuations and nonlinear response: Resolving the causality paradox in real time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalized time-dependent density-functional-theory response functions for spontaneous density shifted the focus of elec- tronic structure theory from the many-body wave function to the charge density response and spontaneous fluctuations of many-electron systems. The pth-order density response functions

Mukamel, Shaul

230

The evaluation of system-wide financial incentives in pipeline decisions in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry : the paradox of R&D spend Vs. new drug approvals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For several decades, the ascendancy of the Pharma & Biotech sector was largely driven by favorable macro-economic conditions combined with an astonishing level of innovation and a clear focus on addressing unmet medical ...

Swarna, Kailash, 1963-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The paradox of success: the roll of capital markets in determining British policy toward the European common currency, 1979-1996  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

That Britain, one of Europe's largest economies, has opted not to adopt the European common currency (Euro) has puzzled students of the European Union for some time. As recent referenda demonstrate, Britons remain mysteriously cautious of monetary...

Walker, Caton Montgomery

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

232

The effect of fast and slow motor unit activation on whole-muscle mechanical performance: the size principle may not pose a mechanical paradox  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thus consuming metabolic energy without significantly...cost, increasing the energy consumed to complete...on initial mechanical efficiency of mouse soleus muscles...distribution within a pool of 300 homonymous motoneurons...GV Lauder. 1994 How swimming fish use slow and fast...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Comment on "Holographic Thermalization, stability of AdS, and the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-Tsingou paradox" by V. Balasubramanian et al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We comment upon a numerical computation in a recent paper by Balasubramanian, Buchel, Green, Lehner, and Liebling.

Piotr Bizo?; Andrzej Rostworowski

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

234

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51 - 17860 of 28,905 results. 51 - 17860 of 28,905 results. Download Audit Report: IG-0490 Containers Suitable for Shipping Fissile Material http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-ig-0490 Page Web Policies Accessibility http://energy.gov/about-us/web-policies Download Chapter 37- Service Contracting http://energy.gov/management/downloads/chapter-37-service-contracting Download Evaluation of Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin The purpose of this paper is to provide the public and policy makers accurate estimates of energy efficiencies, water requirements, water availability, and CO2 emissions associated with the... http://energy.gov/fe/downloads/evaluation-production-oil-gas-oil-shale-piceance-basin Rebate Net Metering Note:... http://energy.gov/savings/net-metering-26

235

Quarterly Review of Methane from Coal-Seams Technology. Volume 8, Number 4, July 1991. Report for October-December 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents include reports on: Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana; Piceance Basin, Colorado; Raton Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Black Warrior Basin, Alabama; Coalbed Methane Development in the Appalachian Basin; Geologic Evaluation of Critical Production Parameters for Coalbed Methane Resources; Reservoir Engineering and Analysis; Coordinated Laboratory Studies in Support of Hydraulic Fracturing of Coalbed Methane; Physical Sciences Coalbed Methane Research; Coalbed Methane Opportunities in Alberta.

McBane, R.A.; Schwochow, S.D.; Stevens, S.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Later Tertiary Leporidae of North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saskatchewan. Generic characters. Compared with Megalagus brachyodon, cheek-teeth less hypsodont, molarization of premolars less advanced, molars less reduced, and maxilla and mandibular ramus narrower in premolar region; P3-P4 each having shallow hypostria... the Myton Pocket in Utah and M. wyomingensis from Badwater Creek, Wyoming, specimens from the Wagonhound member of the Uinta Eocene, the Duchesne River (Rand- lett horizon), and the Swift Current Creek beds of Saskatchewan have been referred to this genus...

Dawson, M. R.

1958-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

238

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

239

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Authors: Michael D. Vanden Berg, Stephanie Carney, Michael D. Laine, Craig D. Morgan, Utah Geological Survey; and Paul B. Anderson, consulting geologist. Venue: Poster Session: Responsible Development, Sustainability, and Climate Science—Groundwater and Site Remediation, June 9, 2009, American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual meeting, Denver, CO, June 7 to 10, 2009. http://www.aapg.org/denver/ [external site] Abstract: Saline water disposal is the single most pressing issue with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of Utah. Conventional oil and gas fields in the basin provide 67% of Utah’s total crude oil production and 71% of Utah’s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 175% in the last 10 years. As petroleum production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of fresh water sources. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that petroleum and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. Researchers have begun efforts to re-map the base of the moderately saline aquifer within the Uinta Basin using more robust data and more sophisticated GIS techniques than previous efforts. Below this base, they believe that saline water can be injected without damage to the overlying freshwater reservoirs. Water chemistry data are being collected from wells of operators and governmental agencies. These ground-truth data are supplemented with water chemistry information calculated from geophysical logs. In addition to the new GIS-based map, the researchers are constructing cross sections showing the stratigraphic position of the moderately saline to very saline transition and its relationship to potential seals and disposal zones in the Uinta Basin. A potentially suitable disposal zone for large volume saline water disposal is the fresh to slightly saline Bird’s-Nest aquifer. This aquifer is located in the oil shale zone of the Green River formation’s Parachute Creek member and is 200 to 300 ft above the kerogen-rich Mahogany zone. A significant concern is that saline water disposal into the Bird’s-Nest by conventional gas producers may hinder oil shale development by creating unforeseen economic and technical hurdles. With increased saline water disposal, the water quality in the Bird’s-Nest could degrade and create additional water disposal problems for oil shale development companies. Researchers have examined this aquifer in outcrop, core, and geophysical logs and have gained a better understanding of its areal extent, thickness, and zones of differing water chemistry

240

E-Print Network 3.0 - abuse control commission Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Paradox of the Exclusion of Exploitative Abuse W: www... .ccp.uea.ac.uk T: +44 (0)1603 593715 A: UEA, Norwich, NR4 7TJ The Paradox of the Exclusion of Exploitative Abuse......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Truth, Revenge, and Internalizability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although there has been a recent swell of interest in theories of truth that attempt solutions to the liar paradox ... and the other paradoxes affecting our concept of truth, many of these theories have been crit...

Kevin Scharp

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Field's Logic of Truth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saving Truth from Paradox is a re-exciting development. The 70s and 80s were a time of excitement among people working on the semantic paradoxes. There were continual formal developments, with the constant hope that these ...

McGee, Vann

243

Top Management Involvement in the Adoption of Energy Efficiency Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Efficiency Paradox: Bureaucratic and Organizationalenergy efficiency, including organizational and informationefficiency gap generally and the impact of organizational

Blass, Vered; Corbett, Charles J.; Delmas, Magali A; Muthulingam, Suresh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Genetic evidence that relative synaptic efficacy biases the outcome of synaptic competition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... -driven synapse elimination leads paradoxically to domination by inactive neurons. J. Neurosci. 19, 9975–9985 (1999)

Mario Buffelli; Robert W. Burgess; Guoping Feng; Corrinne G. Lobe; Jeff W. Lichtman; Joshua R. Sanes

2003-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

The role of neuronal identity in synaptic competition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... -driven synapse elimination leads paradoxically to domination by inactive neurons. J. Neurosci. 19, 9975–9985 (1999)

Narayanan Kasthuri; Jeff W. Lichtman

2003-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

What is philosophy? Peter G. Doyle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was `the alien banker's paradox'. This paradox, which apparently is quite well known, usually goes under, I'm going to call it the `alien banker's paradox. Here's how it goes. An alien comes down and amazes $100; the other box is opaque. Now the alien gives you a choice: You can keep the contents of either

Doyle, Peter

247

Semantic defectiveness and the liar Bradley Armour-Garb James A. Woodbridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the liar paradox should be available to other accounts of truth-talk with the same relevant consequences of the consequences of our pretense account of truth-talk is that any specification of M-conditions (that obtain to that paradox--one that is semantic, rather than logical. Keywords Truth Á Liar paradox Á Pretense Á

Ahmad, Sajjad

248

Quarterly review of methane from coal-seams technology. Volume 7, Number 3, July-September 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report contains: sources of coal well information; Powder River Basin, Wyoming; greater Green River coal region, Wyoming and Colorado; Piceance Basin, Colorado; San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Raton Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Black Warrior Basin, Alabama; the United States coalbed methane resource; western cretaceous coal seams project; multiple coal seams project; spalling and the development of a hydraulic fracturing strategy for coal; geologic evaluation of critical production parameters for coalbed methane resources; coalbed methane opportunities in Alberta; the coalbed methane forum; eastern coalbed methane forum.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A paradox resolved: Sulfide acquisition by roots of seep tubeworms sustains net chemoautotrophy John K. Freytag, Peter R. Girguis, Derk C. Bergquist, Jason P. Andras, James J. Childress, and Charles R.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. luymesi can be sufficient to fuel net autotrophic total dissolved inorganic carbon uptake. Hydrothermal to acquire sulfide at an average rate of 4.1 mol g 1 h 1. Net dissolved inorganic carbon uptake across conspicuous organisms at many of the hydrothermal vent sites in the eastern Pacific as well as many

Girguis, Peter R.

250

Coal - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Most Requested Most Requested Change category... Most Requested Consumption Environment Imports & Exports Industry Characteristics Prices Production Projections Reserves Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Reports Today in Energy - Coal Short, timely articles with graphs about recent coal issues and trends Coal News & Markets Summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAP), Northern Appalachia (NAP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Power River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. Weekly Coal Production Estimates of U.S. coal production by State based on railroad car loadings data. (archived versions) Archived Versions Weekly Coal Production - Archive Weekly NYMEX Coal Futures

251

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Annual report, September 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an annual summarization of an ongoing research in the field of modeling and detecting naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The current research is in the Piceance basin of Western Colorado. The aim is to use existing information to determine the most optimal zone or area of fracturing using a unique reaction-transport-mechanical (RTM) numerical basin model. The RTM model will then subsequently help map subsurface lateral and vertical fracture geometries. The base collection techniques include in-situ fracture data, remote sensing, aeromagnetics, 2-D seismic, and regional geologic interpretations. Once identified, high resolution airborne and spaceborne imagery will be used to verify the RTM model by comparing surficial fractures. If this imagery agrees with the model data, then a further investigation using a three-dimensional seismic survey component will be added. This report presents an overview of the Piceance Creek basin and then reviews work in the Parachute and Rulison fields and the results of the RTM models in these fields.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic fish hemoglobins Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: antarctic fish hemoglobins Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Is There an Answer? The Icefish Paradox.''...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - america genetic characterization Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the genetic... Paradox lost: genetic diversity and the success of ... Source: Roman, Joe - Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont; Vermont, University...

254

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and limestone; extensive halite beds in SE Black Mesa basindeposits include gypsum and halite. The fine-grained unitsParadox Formation shale, halite, and anhydrite serve as

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Feasibility/alternatives study for the planned replacement of Nuclear Material Safeguards System (NMSS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a study which describes the NMSS replacement alternatives and provides recommended solutions. It also describes a NMSS Paradox prototype.

McBride, K.C.; Russell, V.K.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal group-size distributions Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The group-size paradox: effects of learning and patch departure rules Summary: rule; optimal group size; simulation model; social foraging....

257

Int. J. Appl. Math. Sci. Vol. 1(2004), pp. 111-116 c GBS Publishers & Distributors India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explanation of Feynman's paradox concerning low-pass filters A.G. Ramm Mathematics Department Kansas State University Manhattan, KS 66506 ramm@math.ksu.edu L. Weaver Physics Department Kansas State University a positive real part. We explain the paradox, give the rate of convergence of the infinite sequence zn

258

Injection-Induced Earthquakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Seismicity near Paradox Valley, Colorado. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation...prevent its entry into the Colorado River system. Since 1996...shaking in the town of Paradox, Colorado (Fig. 5). As a consequence...is abandoned and allowed to flood (3, 4). The physical connection between...

William L. Ellsworth

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

259

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Barn Pole Paradox Barn Pole Paradox Name: Kwanalouie Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: TX Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: I do not see how this relativity problem is explained. Its a variation of the barn pole paradox. Can you offer insights? Replies: Kwanalouie, Einstein's special relativity theories apply to constant VELOCITY situations. This means no change of speed or direction. An observer on the ring is constantly changing direction. After half of a revolution, the observer's direction has exactly reversed. Length contraction is much more complex in such a situation. General relativity is needed for this situation. Dr. Ken Mellendorf Physics Instructor Illinois Central College You are mixing relative effects with non-relative effects to create the paradox. In creating what you think is a paradox, you are placing unrealistic constraints on the system (e.g. how do you decouple this massively energetic ring from the silo?).

260

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Project Rulison - CO 0-10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison - CO 0-10 Rulison - CO 0-10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PROJECT RULISON (CO.0-10) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Southwest limb of the Piceance Creek Basin , Garfield County , Colorado CO.0-10-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 CO.0-10-1 Site Operations: The project was a Plowshare experiment conducted from 1969-1971 to determine the commercial feasibility of nuclear stimulation of natural gas reservoirs. CO.0-10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria CO.0-10-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes CO.0-10-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: No Surface Contamination; Underground Detonation Circa 1969 CO.0-10-1 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring as well as periodic hydrologic surveillance CO.0-10-1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NETL: Shale Gas and Other Natural Gas Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas | Environmental | Other Natural Gas Related Resources | Completed NG Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10122-47 Predicting higher-than-average permeability zones in tight-gas sands, Piceance basin: An integrated structural and stratigraphic analysis Colorado School of Mines 10122-43 Diagnosis of Multi-Stage Fracturing in Horizontal Well by Downhole Temperature Measurement for Unconventional Oil and Gas Wells Texas A&M University 10122-42 A Geomechanical Analysis of Gas Shale Fracturing and Its Containment Texas A&M University 09122-02 Characterizing Stimulation Domains, for Improved Well Completions in Gas Shales Higgs-Palmer Technologies 09122-04 Marcellus Gas Shale Project Gas Technology Institute (GTI)

262

Evaluation of Energy Efficiency, Water Requirements and Availability, and CO  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

05/14/2012 1 05/14/2012 1 Evaluation of Energy Efficiency, Water Requirements and Availability, and CO 2 Emissions Associated With the Production of Oil & Gas From Oil Shale in the Piceance Basin of Western Colorado, Based on Shell's In-Situ Conversion Process (ICP) F. Dexter Sutterfield, Ph.D., INTEK Inc. Peter M. Crawford and Jeffrey Stone, INTEK Inc. James C. Killen, United States Department of Energy I. Summary A detailed description of background information, the purpose of this paper, methodologies and major assumptions, and results are provided below, beginning with Section II. A summary of this information follows: The United States has been endowed with vast oil shale resources in the Green River Formation in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming, about three-fourths of which are located on public lands. Green River

263

Compendium of basins for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geological and hydrological feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed formations in the San Juan, Powder River, Greater Green River, Piceance, Black Warrior, Appalachian and Michigan basins. Results from the surveys indicated that geology dominated research efforts for many of the basins. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the basins. All of the basins contain some potential for the use of Jack McIntyre`s patented production process. This process is designed specifically to separate produced water and produced gas in a downhole environment and may allow for more efficient and economical development of coalbed methane resources in this area.

Reed, P.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon depleted underground oil shale for the permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) generated during the oil shale extraction process. AMSO, which holds a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) lease from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for a 160-acre parcel of Federal land in northwest Colorado's oil-shale rich Piceance Basin, will provide technical assistance and oil shale core samples. If AMSO can demonstrate an economically viable and environmentally acceptable extraction process, it retains the right to acquire a 5,120-acre commercial lease. When subject to high temperatures and high pressures, oil shale (a sedimentary rock that is rich in hydrocarbons) can be converted into oil. Through mineralization, the CO 2 could be stored in the shale

265

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-004201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal Carbon Dioxide Storage CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 09/27/2010 Location(s): South Carolina Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 27, 2010 CX-004194: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cretaceous Mancos Shale Uinta Basin, Utah: Resource Potential and Best Practices For an Emerging Shale CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 09/27/2010 Location(s): Price, Utah Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 27, 2010 CX-004188: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation

266

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Duchesne and Uintah Counties, UT Duchesne and Uintah Counties, UT Basin-Scale Produced Water Management Tools and Options - Uinta Basin, Utah Sample key alluvial aquifer wells and springs, which will be identified during the course of the project, in order to help establish baseline water quality conditions in the alluvial aquifer. Gary L. Covatch Digitally signed by Gary L. Covatch DN: cn=Gary L. Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.09.06 08:49:06 -04'00' 09 06 2012 Jesse Garcia Digitally signed by Jesse Garcia DN: cn=Jesse Garcia, o=NETL, ou=ECD, email=jesse.garcia@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.09.11 09:01:20 -04'00' 09 11 2012 CX covers the field work which includes collecting water samples, GIS model development and geo-statistical analysis of produced water streams

267

Mountain Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Wind Mountain Wind Jump to: navigation, search Mountain Wind is a wind farm located in Uinta County, Wyoming. It consists of 67 turbines and has a total capacity of 140.7 MW. It is owned by Edison Mission Group.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Fort Bridger, its approximate coordinates are 41.318716°, -110.386418°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.res-americas.com/wind-farms/operational-/mountain-wind-i-wind-farm.aspx Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mountain_Wind&oldid=132229" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

268

EPA Notice of Availability of the Federal Draft Environmental Impact Statement and State of Montana Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. (MATL) 230-kV Transmission Line (02/08)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 Federal Register 9 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 32 / Friday, February 15, 2008 / Notices counties, UT, Montrose County, CO, and Uinta County, WY. Summary: EPA has environmental concerns about potential water quality impacts and recommends that the final EIS evaluate and compare the environmental impacts by alternative, of removing interim protections from the 86 eligible stream segments. Rating EC1. Final EISs EIS No. 20070530, ERP No. F-COE- E39071-00, Wolf Creek Dam/Lake Cumberland Project, Emergency Measures in Response to Seepage, Mississippi River, South Central Kentucky and Central Tennessee. Summary: EPA continues to have environmental concerns about water quantity and water quality impacts. EIS No. 20070556, ERP No. F-NGB- E11062-MS, Camp Shelby Joint Force

269

Seventh National Green Power Marketing Conference: Sept. 30-Oct. 2, 2002  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Overview for the Seventh National Green Power Conference Overview for the Seventh National Green Power Conference The Seventh National Green Power Marketing Conference was held in Washington D.C. on September 30 - October 2. Conference speakers reviewed the past year's green power highlights, analyzed utility green pricing programs, presented insights into how to target green power demand, examined green certificate trading and tracking mechanisms, and described the best ways to market and sell green power. In addition, Green Power Leadership Awards were presented to recognize those who are significantly advancing the development of renewable electricity sources in the marketplace. We thank the following conference sponsors: E Source, Green Mountain Energy Company, and Xenergy. Event sponsors included ComEd, Fetzer Vineyards, and Uinta Brewing Company.

270

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41 - 7950 of 28,905 results. 41 - 7950 of 28,905 results. Download CX-004188: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Integration in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Advanced Power Generation Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/27/2010 Location(s): University Park, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004188-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004194: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cretaceous Mancos Shale Uinta Basin, Utah: Resource Potential and Best Practices For an Emerging Shale CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 09/27/2010 Location(s): Price, Utah Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004194-categorical-exclusion-determination

271

Coal News and Markets - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal News and Markets Coal News and Markets Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 24, 2013 "Coal News and Markets Report" summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAPP), Northern Appalachia (NAPP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Powder River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. The report includes data on average weekly coal commodity spot prices, total monthly coal production, eastern monthly coal production, electric power sector coal stocks, and average cost of metallurgical coal at coke plants and export docks. The historical data for coal commodity spot market prices are proprietary and not available for public release. Average weekly coal commodity spot prices (dollars per short ton)

272

Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Colorado Plateau Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} "The Colorado Plateau is a high standing crustal block of relatively undeformed rocks surrounded by the highly deformed Rocky Mountains, and Basin and Range Provinces. The Uinta Mountains of Utah and Rocky Mountains of Colorado define the northern and northeastern boundaries of the Plateau. The Rio Grande Rift Valley in New Mexico defines the eastern boundary. The southern boundary is marked by the Mogollon Rim, an erosional cuesta that separates the Colorado Plateau from the extensively faulted Basin and Rang Province. To the west is a broad transition zone where the geologic

273

EPA Notice of Availability of the Orlando Gasification Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0383) (08/25/06)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11 Federal Register 11 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 165 / Friday, August 25, 2006 / Notices Summary: EPA was supportive of the selection of the Drainage Impaired Land Retirement Alternative, but expressed environmental concerns about treatment methods to remove selenium from drainage water and potential impacts to air quality. EPA requested additional analysis and monitoring commitments prior to implementation of any alternative and expressed continued objections if an out of valley alternative. EIS No. 20060259, ERP No. F-BLM- J02042-UT, Uinta Basin Natural Gas Project, Proposal to Produce and Transport Natural Gas in the Atchee Wash Oil and Gas Production Region, Resource Development Group, Right- of-Way Grant, U.S. COE Section 404 Permit and Endangered Species Act

274

Step-by-Step Instructions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Wyoming and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Wyoming, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 7 Lincoln Sublette Teton CLIMATE ZONE 6 Albany Fremont Park Big Horn Hot Springs Sheridan Campbell Johnson Sweetwater Carbon Laramie Uinta Converse Natrona Washakie Crook Niobrara Weston CLIMATE ZONE 5

275

www.ianrowland.com > Items To Buy > Diana Deutsch CDs Home Items To Buy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.ianrowland.com > Items To Buy > Diana Deutsch CDs Home Items To Buy Items To Buy > Auditory Illusions CDs by Diana Deutsch published by Philomel Records Actual titles: Musical Illusions and Paradoxes

276

American Liberation Mythologies: Democracy and Domination in U.S. Visual Culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

themes of liberty and democracy, this project enacts thethis project, intently focused on the paradox of liberty andproject in which I investigate visuals and performances of liberation and democratization as a means to ascertain the functional meanings of liberty

Williams, Kathleen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Science at the Edge Traditionally distinct scientific disciplines are merging to create new  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lattice Engineering for Solar Cells - Addressing the High-Efficiency Low-Cost Paradox for PhotovoltaicGrange, Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Imaging Rapid, Irreversible

278

Changing Places: How Communities Will Improve the Health of Boys of Color  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States, has implications for health. In 2006 approximatelyHealth Paradoxes: Empirical Evidence, Explanations, Future Research, and Implications. ”color has implications for the overall health and well-being

Edley, Christopher; Ruiz de Velasco, Jorge

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The ambivalence of gentrifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the paradox faced by 25-34 year-old, White, well-educated persons who choose to live in predominantly low-income neighborhoods. In particular, this thesis asks if gentrifiers are aware of gentrification ...

Novak, Alison Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A review of "The Senses in Religious Communities, 1600-1800: Early Modern 'Convents of Pleasure'" by Nicky Hallett  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of religious paradoxes: there is unity in diversity. Nicky Hallett. The Senses in Religious Communities, 1600-1800: Early Modern “Convents of Pleasure.” Farnham, Surrey, England: Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. xii+249. $109.95. Review by elena levy...

Levy-Navarro, Elena

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A review of "Religious Diversity and Early Modern English Texts: Catholic, Judaic, Feminist, and Secular Dimensions" edited by Arthur F. Marotti and Chanita Goodblatt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

echoes one of the most traditional of religious paradoxes: there is unity in diversity. Nicky Hallett. The Senses in Religious Communities, 1600-1800: Early Modern “Convents of Pleasure.” Farnham, Surrey, England: Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. xii+249...

Bentley, Greg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Implications of fragile X expression in normal males for the nature of the mutation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... offspring of daughters of transmitting males12. This observation has been referred to as the 'Sherman paradox'21 and must be explained by any model addressing inheritance of fragile X. ...

David H. Ledbetter; Susan A. Ledbetter; Robert L. Nussbaum

1986-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

283

Heat transport by residual gases in multilayer vacuum insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of an experimental investigation of residual gas heat-transfer in multilayer vacuum insulation are reported. The “thermal paradox” observed ... variation of the residual gas pressure in the insulation

R. S. Mikhal'chenko; A. G. Gerzhin; V. T. Arkhipov…

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Planar graphene-narrow-gap semiconductor-graphene heterostructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A planar heterostructure composed of two graphene films between which a narrow-gap semiconductor ... paradox is absent when conical points of the graphene Brillouin zone are in the band gap...

P. V. Ratnikov; A. P. Silin

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A review of "Shifting Priorities: Gender and Genre in Seventeenth-Century Dutch Painting." by Nanette Salomon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of thought or nothingness, Colie found the paradox resolved in copiousness and pleni- tude. Nanette Salomon. Shifting Priorities: Gender and Genre in Seventeenth-Century Dutch Painting. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2004. 163 pp. + 98 illus. $65...

Ellen Konowitz

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Evolutionary tradeoffs can select against nitrogen fixation and thereby maintain nitrogen limitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. evolutionary ecology model Biological nitrogen (N) fixation--the conversion of atmo- spheric N2 gas) but is equally important to explaining the paradox of N limitation. Unlike the successional question

Menge, Duncan

287

The Environmental Impacts of Logistics Systems and Options for Mitigation Nakul Sathaye, Yuwei Li, Arpad Horvath and Samer Madanat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Transportation Sustainability and Green Logistics ................................................3 1 .....................................................................................3 1.2. Considering Green Logistics with Industry Perspectives...................................................................................................................44 #12;2 Table of Tables Table 1 ­ Paradoxes of Green Logistics

California at Berkeley, University of

288

A review of "Literature and Religious Culture in Seventeenth-Century England." by Reid Barbour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The community at Great Tew prized reason, censured violence, defended doubt and even dissent, and embraced a universalist soteriology. Barbour shows that Great Tew and REVIEWS 163 Little Gidding, paradoxically, both challenged and helped to sustain the court...

Holly Faith Nelson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Overseas investment key to chemical trade surplus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Paradoxically, investing in new plants overseas can go a long way toward maintaining the U.S. chemical trade surplus, according to a report written by the Commerce Department's Office of Technology Policy and the Chemical Manufacturers Association (CMA)."...

1995-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ecology, 91(5), 2010, pp. 12691275 2010 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Evolutionary Biology, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 USA 2 Unit for Marine and Coastal paradox; invasive species; marine conservation; nonlinear ecological interactions. INTRODUCTION generate positive relation- ships between native diversity and invasibility in natural systems that should

Bertness, Mark D.

291

Life in the woods : production and consumption of the urban forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of wood is fraught with paradox. Wood as a building material is embraced for its naturalness, while the cutting of trees is indicted as a destruction of nature. Wood is lauded for its structural properties and ...

Volicer, Nadine (Nadine M.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A Bird’s Eye View of Human Language Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative studies of linguistic faculties in animals pose an evolutionary paradox: language involves certain perceptual and motor abilities, but it is not clear that this serves as more than an input–output channel for ...

Berwick, Robert C.

293

Logic Without Truth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stephen Read's criticism of Buridan's solution of the Liar Paradox is based on the charge that while this solution may avoid inconsistency, it does so at the expense of failing to provide a theory of truth. This ...

Gyula Klima

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Revised: November 2013 Eric J. Belasco  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a Determinant of Cancer Mortality and the Hispanic Paradox in Texas, USA." International Journal for Equity of Heterogeneous Households to Delineate Housing Submarkets." Journal of Real Estate Research. Vol. 34, No. 4 (2012

Dyer, Bill

295

The Attack on Mead  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Kroeber was in such state-ments proposing the...and ultra-paradoxical states ofbrain activity, these...Studies in Polynesia and Micronesia: Stability and Change...physical anthropology in the United States-Hrdlicka, based at...

ROBERT I. LEVY

1983-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

296

R E V I E W : C L I M A T O L O G Y The Sun's Role in Climate Variations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or it is of no consequence whatsoever. The reality is that Earth's atmosphere, land surface, and oceans are not passive by observing the response to increased green- house gases. Eons and the Faint Sun Paradox The concept is well

297

On the Anistropy of the Speed of Light on a Rotating Platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper discusses a recently posed paradox in relativity concerning the speed of light as measured by an observer on board ... the theoretical prediction of an anisotropy in the speed of light in a reference fr...

S. K. Ghosal; Biplab Raychaudhuri; Anjan Kumar Chowdhury…

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as “baseline data” for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a “baseline” data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and visualization techniques of the Piceance Basin structure spatial distribution of the oil shale resources. The sur- face water/groundwater models quantify the water shortage and better understanding the spatial distribution of the available water resources. The energy resource development systems model reveals the phase shift of water usage and the oil shale production, which will facilitate better planning for oil shale development. Detailed descriptions about the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research will be given in the sec- tion of “ACCOMPLISHMENTS, RESULTS, AND DISCUSSION” of this report.

Zhou, Wei (Wendy) [Wendy; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

NORTH HILL CREEK 3-D SEISMIC EXPLORATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind River Resources Corporation (WRRC) received a DOE grant in support of its proposal to acquire, process and interpret fifteen square miles of high-quality 3-D seismic data on non-allotted trust lands of the Uintah and Ouray (Ute) Indian Reservation, northeastern Utah, in 2000. Subsequent to receiving notice that its proposal would be funded, WRRC was able to add ten square miles of adjacent state and federal mineral acreage underlying tribal surface lands by arrangement with the operator of the Flat Rock Field. The twenty-five square mile 3-D seismic survey was conducted during the fall of 2000. The data were processed through the winter of 2000-2001, and initial interpretation took place during the spring of 2001. The initial interpretation identified multiple attractive drilling prospects, two of which were staked and permitted during the summer of 2001. The two initial wells were drilled in September and October of 2001. A deeper test was drilled in June of 2002. Subsequently a ten-well deep drilling evaluation program was conducted from October of 2002 through March 2004. The present report discusses the background of the project; design and execution of the 3-D seismic survey; processing and interpretation of the data; and drilling, completion and production results of a sample of the wells drilled on the basis of the interpreted survey. Fifteen wells have been drilled to test targets identified on the North Hill Creek 3-D Seismic Survey. None of these wildcat exploratory wells has been a dry hole, and several are among the best gas producers in Utah. The quality of the data produced by this first significant exploratory 3-D survey in the Uinta Basin has encouraged other operators to employ this technology. At least two additional 3-D seismic surveys have been completed in the vicinity of the North Hill Creek Survey, and five additional surveys are being planned for the 2004 field season. This project was successful in finding commercial oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids production on a remote part of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation. Much of the natural gas and natural gas liquids are being produced from the Wingate Formation, which to our knowledge has never produced commercially anywhere. Another large percentage of the natural gas is being produced from the Entrada Formation which has not previously produced in this part of the Uinta Basin. In all, at least nine geologic formations are contributing hydrocarbons to these wells. This survey has clearly established the fact that high-quality data can be obtained in this area, despite the known obstacles.

Marc T. Eckels; David H. Suek; Denise H. Harrison; Paul J. Harrison

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

300

Preliminary resource assessment of coalbed methane in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary results of the DOE Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project reveal that many of the coal regions in the United States have significant volumes of coalbed methane. These results show that 45 cooperative wells drilled to date have helped to update the estimates of methane in the various coal regions. The most promising coal region is in the Green River Basin where preliminary estimates show that the methane potential may be over 23 trillion cubic feet. Another area of considerable interest is in the Arkoma Basin where the methane content of coal samples ranged from 200 to 400 cubic feet per ton (cf/ton) of coal. The methane estimte in this basin is between 1.6 to 3.6 trillion cubic feet. The Piceance Creek coal region is an area presently generating considerable interest and industry activity. The methane content of the coal samples extracted from this basin averaged over 100 cf/ton. The Northern Appalachian region also shows considerable promise.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fluorescence analysis can identify movable oil in self-sourcing reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent surge of activity involving self-sourcing reservoirs and horizontal drilling recognizes a little tapped niche in the domestic energy mix. Such prolific pays as the Cretaceous Bakken and Austin Chalk have drawn research interest and large amounts of investment capital. Fluorescence analysis can discern movable oil--as opposed to exhausted source rock--in such reservoirs with an inexpensive test. Other potential targets are the Cretaceous Mesaverde in the Piceance basin, Devonian New Albany shale in Kentucky, Devonian Antrim shale in the Michigan basin, and the Cretaceous Niobrara, Mancos, and Pierre formations in Colorado and New Mexico. To insure success in this niche this key question must be answered positively: Is movable oil present in the reservoir? Even if tectonic studies verify a system of open fractures, sonic logs confirm overpressuring in the zone, and resistivity logs document the maturity of the source, the ultimate question remains: Is movable oil in the fractures available to flow to the borehole? The paper explains a technique that will answer these questions.

Calhoun, G.G. [Calhoun (Gerry G.), Midland, TX (United States)

1995-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

304

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1992-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

305

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

1993-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Application of horizontal drilling to tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical fractures and lithologic heterogeneity are extremely important factors controlling gas flow rates and total gas recovery from tight (very low permeability) reservoirs. These reservoirs generally have in situ matrix permeabilities to gas of less than 0.1 md. Enhanced gas recovery methods have usually involved hydraulic fracturing; however, the induced vertical hydraulic fractures almost always parallel the natural fracture and may not be an efficient method to establish a good conduit to the wellbore. Horizontal drilling appears to be an optimum method to cut across many open vertical fractures. Horizontal holes will provide an efficient method to drain heterogeneous tight reservoirs even in unfractured rocks. Although many horizontal wells have now been completed in coalbed methane and oil reservoirs, very few have been drilled to exclusively evaluate tight gas reservoirs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded some horizontal and slanthole drilling in order to demonstrate the applicability of these techniques for gas development. Four DOE holes have been drilled in Devonian gas shales in the Appalachian basin, and one hole has been drilled in Upper Cretaceous tight sandstones in the Piceance basin of Colorado. The Colorado field experiment has provided valuable information on the abundance and openness of deeply buried vertical fractures in tight sandstones. These studies, plus higher gas prices, should help encourage industry to begin to further utilize horizontal drilling as a new exploitation method for tight gas reservoirs.

Spencer, C.W. (U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (United States)); Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Brown, C.A. (Synder Oil Co., Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Unproved technically recoverable resource assumptions by basin 4. Unproved technically recoverable resource assumptions by basin Basin AEO2006 (as of 1/1/2004) AEO2007 (as of 1/1/2005) AEO2008 (as of 1/1/2006) AEO2009 (as of 1/1/2007) AEO2010 (as of 1/1/2008) AEO2011 (as of 1/1/2009) AEO2012 (as of 1/1/2010) Shale Gas (trillion cubic feet) Appalachian 15 15 14 51 59 441 187 Fort Worth 40 39 38 60 60 20 19 Michigan 11 11 11 10 10 21 18 San Juan 10 10 10 10 10 12 10 Illinois 3 3 3 4 4 11 11 Williston 4 4 4 4 4 7 3 Arkoma -- 42 42 49 45 54 27 Anadarko -- 3 3 7 6 3 13 TX-LA-MS Salt -- -- -- 72 72 80 66 Western Gulf -- -- -- -- 18 21 59 Columbia -- -- -- -- 51 41 12 Uinta -- -- -- -- 7 21 11 Permian -- -- -- -- -- 67 27 Greater Green River -- -- -- -- -- 18 13

309

 

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0, 2012 0, 2012 Research Projects to Address Technical Challenges Facing Small Oil and Natural Gas Producers Selected by DOE for Further Development Washington, DC - Nine new research projects aimed at extending the life of mature oil and natural gas fields, while simultaneously reducing the environmental footprint of production operations and minimizing environmental risks, have been selected to receive a total of $8.5 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). Research needs addressed by the projects include the development of "green" fracturing fluids, a non-chemical ultrasonic method for reducing paraffin deposits in wellbore tubulars, and an innovative multiphase compressor that can help reduce fugitive methane emissions. Other projects will focus on enhancing recovery from mature oil fields, developing digital produced-water management tools to facilitate more efficient regulatory decisions related to unconventional gas development in the Uinta Basin, and furthering the development of a solar-powered humidification-dehumidification method to treat produced water.

310

Reserve estimates in western basins: Unita Basin. Final report, Part III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde group and Wasatch formation in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Total in-place resource is estimated at 395.5 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 3.8 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Two plays were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources; in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. About 82.1% of the total evaluated resource is contained within sandstones that have extremely poor reservoir properties with permeabilities considered too low for commerciality using current frac technology.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Survey of tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, and shallow light oil fields of the United States for underground coal gasification applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature survey was conducted to identify areas of the United States where tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, or shallow light oil fields might be suitably associated with coal deposits for production of oil by in situ thermal recovery methods using heat derived from underground coal gasification (UCG) processes. The survey is part of a Department of Energy-sponsored program to develop new applications for UCG technology in utilizing coal resources that are unattractive for mining. Results from the survey indicate tar sand deposits, heavy oil fields, or light oil fields are probably or possibly located within 5 miles of suitable coal in 17 states (Table 1). Especially promising areas are in the Uinta Basin of Utah; the North Slope of Alaska; the San Miguel deposit in southwest Texas; the Illinois-Eastern Interior Basin area of western Kentucky, southwestern Indiana and Illinois; the tri-state area of Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma; and the northern Appalachian Basin in eastern Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania. The deposits in these areas warrant further evaluation. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Trudell, L.G.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Hydrotreating the native bitumen from the Whiterocks tar sand deposit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit in the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah was hydrotreated in a fixed-bed reactor to determine the extent of upgrading as a function of process operating variables. The process variables investigated included reactor pressure (11.2--16.7 MPa); reactor temperature (641--712 K) and liquid hourly space velocity (0.19--0.77 h{sup {minus}1}). The hydrogen/oil ratio, 890 m{sup 3} m{sup {minus}3} was fixed in all experiments. A sulphided Ni-Mo on alumina hydrodenitrogenation catalyst was used in these studies. The deactivation of the catalyst, 0.2 {degree}C/day, was monitored by thedecline in the API gravity of the total liquid product with time on-stream at a standard set of conditions. The effect of temperature, WHSV, and pressure on denitrogenation, desulphurization, and metals removalwere studied and apparent kinetic parameters determined. The effect of process variables on residue conversion and Conradson carbon residue reduction were also investigated.

Longstaff, D.C.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Billiard in the space with a time machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a system of an elastic ball moving in the non-relativistic spacetime with a nontrivial causal structure produced by a wormhole-based time machine. For such a system it is possible to formulate a simple model of the so-called `grandfather paradox': for certain `paradoxical' initial conditions the standard straight trajectory of the ball would self-collide inconsistently. We analyze globally consistent solutions of local equations of motion, namely, we find all trajectories with one self-collision. It is demonstrated that all standard initial conditions have a consistent evolution, including those `paradoxical' ones, for which the inconsistent collision-free trajectory is superseded by a special consistent self-colliding trajectory. Moreover, it is shown that for a wide class of initial conditions more than one globally consistent evolution exist. The nontrivial causal structure thus breaks the uniqueness of the classical theory even for locally deterministic physical laws.

Jindrich Dolansky; Pavel Krtous

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

An electromagnetic perpetuum mobile?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A charge moving freely in orbit around the Earth radiates according to Larmor's formula. If the path is closed, it would constitute a perpetuum mobile. The solution to this energy paradox is found in an article by C. M. DeWitt and B. DeWitt from 1964. The main point is that the equation of motion of a radiating charge is modified in curved spacetime. In the present article we explain the physics behind this modification, and use the generalized equation to solve the perpetuum mobile paradox.

Øyvind Grøn; Sigurd Kirkevold Næss

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

R. Y. Chiao

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

316

Gene galaxies in the maize genome Virginia Walbot* and Dmitri A. Petrov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commentary Gene galaxies in the maize genome Virginia Walbot* and Dmitri A. Petrov Department of higher eukary- otic genomes yielded the surprise that despite hundreds of millions of years in gene number, eukaryotic genome size varies over 5 orders of magnitude (4), a paradoxical feature

Petrov, Dmitri

317

Scholars from northeast Brazil, Costa Rica, southeast Mexico, Nicaragua, Italy, and the United States gathered for a think-tank international week April 18-22, 2011 to examine Latin America's equity-gap challenges using a community engagement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scholars from northeast Brazil, Costa Rica, southeast Mexico, Nicaragua, Italy, and the United. The keynote address--Brazil's Unified Health System May Promote Social Inequality: Paradox or dialectic/northeastern Brazil constitute nadirs of economic and health inequality. The stunting rates among children

Liu, Taosheng

318

Published in The Philosophical Quarterly 54 (2004), 604-13. SOME RECENT WORK IN EPISTEMOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-called `McKinsey paradox' concerning the putative incompatibility of content externalism and privileged self: Blackwell, 2003. Pp. xii + 240. Price £50.00 h/b, £16.99 p/b). New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self content externalism and self-knowledge that is the #12;2 focus of the volume of essays edited by Susana

Edinburgh, University of

319

Page 1 of 3 DRAFT Minutes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this rulemaking. Sarah ­ in Paradox valley we have a proposed uranium mill with a surface mining operation that in Subpart W should take into consideration the radon from uranium mines in the vicinity of the uranium mill (Strathmore) Sarah Fields (Uranium Watch) Steve Brown (SENES) Jan Johnson (Tetratech) Travis Stills, Energy

320

A Semi-Analytic Solution for Flow in Finite-Conductivity Vertical Fractures Using Fractal Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................ 1 1.2 Research Objectives .................................................................................................................... 2 2. LITERATURE REVIEW...) ................................................................................. 4 Figure 2.2 — The coast of Lake Mead (Moran 2010). The "coastline paradox" is the counterintuitive observation that the coastline of a landmass does not have a well- defined length. This results from the fractal-like properties of coastlines...

Cossio Santizo, Manuel

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Problems with modelling closed timelike curves as post-selected teleportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this comment on S.Lloyd, et al, Phys.Rev.Lett. 106, 040403 (2011), we show that modelling closed timelike curves (CTCs) as post-selected teleportation allows signalling to past times before the creation of the CTC and allows information paradoxes to form.

T. C. Ralph

2011-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

322

To link to this article: DOI:10.1016/j.electacta.2013.02.063 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.electacta.2013.02.063  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Corrosion Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM) SIMS Aluminium alloys Hydrogen embrittlement a b s t r a c. This paradoxical concomitance suggested a combination of corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) phenom spectrometry for hydrogen detection in corroded 2024 aluminium alloy Electrochimica Acta. (2013) Vol. 110. pp

Mailhes, Corinne

323

WEAK MEASUREMENT IN QUANTUM MECHANICS ABRAHAM NEBEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WEAK MEASUREMENT IN QUANTUM MECHANICS ABRAHAM NEBEN PHYS 342 Final Project March 10, 2011 Contents of Postselection 4 4. Impossible Spin Measurements 5 5. Hardy's Paradox 5 6. Controversy over Weak Measurement 8 7 of a Measurement of a Component of the Spin of a Spin-1/2 Particle Can Turn Out to be 100." [1] The topic

Rosner, Jonathan L.

324

TWRS information locator database system administrator`s manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a guide for use by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Locator Database (ILD) System Administrator. The TWRS ILD System is an inventory of information used in the TWRS Systems Engineering process to represent the TWRS Technical Baseline. The inventory is maintained in the form of a relational database developed in Paradox 4.5.

Knutson, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

325

Proof within the Western and the Eastern cultural traditions: Implications for mathematics education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

education (Plenary Panel at the 19th ICMI Study, Taipei, May 2009) Presentation by SIU, Man Keung Liar Paradox, embodied in the terse but intriguing remark "I am a liar", is ascribed to the 4th century the term "mao dun", literally "halberd and shield", is used to mean "contradiction". Indeed, Hon Fei Zi

Siu, M.K.

326

On P vs. NP and Geometric Complexity Theory Dedicated to Sri Ramakrishna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is generally believed that resolution of this self referential paradox is the root di#culty underneath this problem; cf. the survey [2] and the references therein. A formal strategy of GCT to resolve this self, that are easy to verify and construct. Section 2 explains in what sense an explicit proof resolves the self

Mulmuley, Ketan

327

On P vs. NP and Geometric Complexity Theory Dedicated to Sri Ramakrishna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problems focussing on its main complexity theoretic results. These are: (1) two concrete lower bounds. determinant problems, (2) the Flip Theorem, which formalizes the self referential paradox in the P vs. NP. determinant problems into subproblems without self referen- tial difficulty, consisting of positivity

Mulmuley, Ketan

328

The Two-Higgs-Doublet Model: Past, Present and Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barroso Fest #12;Outline · A (biased) history of the two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM) · The paradox of tan; and Gunion and Haber. #12;Contributions to 2HDM Physics by A. Barroso and collaborators · R. Santos and A. Barroso, Renormalization of two-Higgs-doublet models, Phys. Rev. D56, 5366 (1997). Renormalization

California at Santa Cruz, University of

329

Introduction to Ethical Concepts ENGR 295 Lecture Notes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it in the light of the attempt to answer two questions: 1 What is the good life for humankind? 2 How ought humans

Oughstun, Kurt

330

Decision-support for the management of traumatically injured limb A project funded by under EPSRC's KTA Scheme ImpactQM, Sept 2010-Aug 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of limb injuries due to the nature of contemporary blast munitions, plus paradoxical improvements where the injury pattern falls to one extreme (mild limb injury, no case for amputation) or the other (severe injury, no choice BUT amputation). However, in other situations, the injured limb falls

Roelleke, Thomas

331

2010 Ambert et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the noncompetitive antagonist, memantine, is paradoxically beneficial in mild to moder- ateAlzheimer's disease (AD sites for the agonist (glutamate) and coagonist (glycine), channel blockers, such as memantine and memantine inhibition of NMDARs. Our results indicated that the inhibitory effects of AP5 were not strongly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

Political Theology of the Ordinary: On Bonnie Honig's Emergency Politics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Political Theology of the Ordinary: On Bonnie Honig's Emergency Politics Bonnie Honig, Emergency Politics: Paradox, Law, Democracy. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2009. If Carl Schmitt offers a Christian political theology, what would a Jewish political theology look like? Instead

Doyle, Robert

333

Biodiversity research sets sail: showcasing the diversity of marine life  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and innovative conservation action. The paradox...continues to expand its energy use (fisheries...private benefits and public costs of degrading...private profits and public costs, problems...if it remains in communication with the land...valuation for the conservation of marine biodiversity...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Physics and Biology of Strongly Fluctuating Proteins Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on dynamic protein disorder, one molecule at a time Insight into the molecular origins of the internal Break Intrinsic Disorder can Mediate Allostery in an Ensemble Specificity and Promiscuity in Small Molecule Binding to Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions: the Birthday Paradox Lunch break / Poster

Maryland at College Park, University of

335

A Network Modeling Approach Optimization of Internet-Based Advertising Strategies and Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Network Modeling Approach for the Optimization of Internet-Based Advertising Strategies and evaluation of optimal Internet mar- keting strategies when a firm is advertising on multiple websites examples are constructed that demonstrate two paradoxes: (1). that advertising on more websites may reduce

Nagurney, Anna

336

This article was downloaded by:[American Museum of Natural History] On: 22 July 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713658732 Resolution of a Supertree/Supermatrix Paradox John Gatesy a ; Conrad Matthee b ; Rob DeSalle c, USA. First Published on: 01 July 2002 To cite this Article: Gatesy, John, Matthee, Conrad, De for geography, endemism and taxonomic af lation. Ecography 21: 181­203. FREY, J. K. 1992. Response

DeSalle, Rob

337

Changing patent laws could be a healthy move  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

products. This investment is usually protected for 15 years after patent acceptance. However, by the time to address this paradox without a lateral approach, such as altering patent laws internationally and reducingChanging patent laws could be a healthy move to combat resistance Sir -- A contradiction exists

Fischer, Daniel

338

Preprint of paper which appeared in the Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the Support Technologies for Mobile Machines FigurePreprint of paper which appeared in the Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots and the Support Technologies for Mobile Machines EXPLORING THE LOMBARD PARADOX

Stryk, Oskar von

339

To appear in S. Wermter, J. Austin &D. Willshaw (eds.) Emergent neural computational architectures based on neuroscience. Springer-Verlag. Plasticity and nativism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.marcus@nyu.edu Abstract: Recent research in brain development and cognitive development leads to an apparent paradox. One for analyzing the world; another set of recent experiments suggests that brain development is extremely flexible structured in advance of experience. Another strand of contemporary scientific research suggests that brain

Marcus, Gary F.

340

Large eddy simulation for aerodynamics: status and perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...RANS-LES is the main strategy to drastically reduce...appear paradoxal since the development of advanced methods is...2.85 2.85-10 1 gas turbine Medic et al. (2008...computation of an entire gas turbine jet engine. In 45th...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Man-Up: A Men's Leadership Program Friday, March 14, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

let us know when you register and what school district you are in. You must have your Professional prevention education. He is co-founder of Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP), the most widely utilized and the U.S. military. He is the creator of the film Tough Guise 2, and author of The Macho Paradox

Sibille, Etienne

342

THE EFFECTS OF COUNTERFEIT ON LUXURY BRAND BUYING BEHAVIOR, IN TERMS OF CONSUMPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and exclusive brand image of their products, all the while limiting accessibility. It is paradoxicalTHE EFFECTS OF COUNTERFEIT ON LUXURY BRAND BUYING BEHAVIOR, IN TERMS OF CONSUMPTION EXPERIENCE COLLOQUIUM MARKETING TRENDS PARIS, JANUARY 20-22 2011 THE EFFECTS OF COUNTERFEIT ON LUXURY BRAND BUYING

Boyer, Edmond

343

Ratcheting up energy by means of measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The destruction of quantum coherence can pump energy into a system. For our examples this is paradoxical since the destroyed correlations are ordinarily considered negligible. Mathematically the explanation is straightforward and physically one can identify the degrees of freedom supplying this energy. Nevertheless, the energy input can be calculated without specific reference to those degrees of freedom.

L. S. Schulman; B. Gaveau

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

P. Kotz et al. (Eds.): INTERACT 2013, Part II, LNCS 8118, pp. 380394, 2013. IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system or programming infusion pumps. However, human error is inevitable. Paradoxically, results from: Human error, cognition, data-entry, presentation quality, number- entry, infusion pump, perception amounts of sensitive data in electronic health records (EHRs) and to program drug infusion pumps

Cairns, Paul

345

Regulation of metabolism during lactation in the rat D. H. WILLIAMSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the lactose and protein and a high proportion of the lipid con- tained in rat milk are synthesized within, in particular, milk production, appears to depend on two hormo- nes, prolactin and insulin. Secretion responsible for regula- tion of insulin secretion from the pancreas. The apparent paradox in lactation

Boyer, Edmond

346

NUEL D. BELNAP, JR. GUPTA'S RULE OF REVISION THEORY OF TRUTH l  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

build on Tarski) in order to permanently deepen our understanding of truth, of paradox (and of a predicate deriving its meaning by way of a Rule of Revision ought to impact significantly on the philosophy, as Gupta himself does, to the fact that he does not argue that we should take as a "fact" that truth

Belnap, Nuel

347

Clim. Past, 4, 205213, 2008 www.clim-past.net/4/205/2008/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precipitation as snowfall. (2) An intensification of the winter meridional insolation gradient strengthens zonal precipitation. (3) An increase in the summer meridional in- solation gradient enhances summer eddy activity this paradox, two types of hypotheses have been proposed, (i) those that are generally consistent

Poulsen, Chris J.

348

Zeno, Achilles and the turtle Not very far from Crotona (now in Italy, but back then it was a Greek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zeno, Achilles and the turtle Not very far from Crotona (now in Italy, but back then it was a Greek of "infinite divisibility" of time and space. The paradox most often quoted concerns Achilles and a turtle: Achilles, the swiftest runner in Greece, can never catch a turtle that has been given a head start. For

De Carli, Laura

349

The Tunneling Transform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We supplement the Lorentz transform $L(v)$ with a new "Tunneling" transform $T(v)$. Application of this new transform to elementary quantum mechanics offers a novel, intuitive insight into the nature of quantum tunneling; in particular, the so called "Klein Paradox" is discussed.

Robert Hipple

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

350

Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. ISSN 0077-8923 ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Cognitive Neuroscience The emotion paradox in the aging brain Mara Mather The USC Davis School Mather, Ph.D., The USC Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, 3715 Mc questions about which aspects of these age-related changes in emotional processing can be accounted

Mather, Mara

351

Participating in civil society: the case of networked communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......married with children under 18 at home, retired) affect community involvement (Janowitz...sampling is at the household level, our unit of analysis is the individual. We conducted...Bonka B., Cummings J., Helgeson V., Crawford A. Internet paradox revisited. Journal......

Andrea Kavanaugh; John M. Carroll; Mary Beth Rosson; Debbie D. Reese; Than T. Zin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Fondation Maison des sciences de l'homme -190 avenue de France -75013 Paris -France http://www.msh-paris.fr -FMSH-WP-2013-37  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.msh-paris.fr - FMSH-WP-2013-37 Working Papers Series The Coal Renaissance and Cosmopolitized Low-Carbon Societies paradox: the `phenomenal' and `histori- cally incredible' resurgence of coal. Exploration of the source transition. C o s m o p o l i t a n risk communities halshs-00842922,version1-9Jul2013 #12;The Coal

Boyer, Edmond

353

http://crg.polytechnique.fr/v2/aegis.html#libellio Le Libellio d' AEGIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

perform the economy. Rather our aim is to refine the theory, to pinpoint some paradoxes related, performativity is opposed to embeddedness, to the idea that economy is embedded in a social world that determines it. What seems interesting to Michel Callon is not how the economy is embedded, but how it succeeds

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

354

Departments of Chemistry and Pharmacology Center for Structural Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;6 December 2011 © Jens Meiler 2 Schedule for Lecture 7 De Novo Protein Fold Prediction with Rosetta) Protein Folding Problem Holy Grail of Comp. Struct. Biology Given a protein's AA sequence, what is its 3 than 1010 years old. Cyrus Levinthal's paradox of protein folding,1968. 6 December 2011 © Jens Meiler

Meiler, Jens

355

DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CIRCULAR 1 CIRCULAR 1 2 CENTER FOR WATER R E S ~ U R C E ~ REHiARCH GROUND-WATER SERIES C - 1 GEOHYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE PICEANCE CREEK B A S I N BETWEEN THE WHITE AND COLQRAD.0 RIVERS, NORTHWESTERN COLORADO D . L. C o f f i n , F . A. W e l d e r , R . K. G l a n z m a n , and X. W. D u t t o n U n i t e d S t a t e s G e o l o g i c a l Survey Prepared by T h e U n i t e d S t a t e s G e o l o g i c a l Survey i n c o o p e r a t i o n w i t h . 1 he C o l o r a . d o W a . t e r C o n s e r v a t i o n B o a r d D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o . 1 9 6 8 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. CONTENTS Page I n t r o d u c t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Well-numbering s y s t e m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . Aqui'fer t e s t of t h d a l l u v i u m a l o n g P i c e a n c e Creek 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . Geology o f t h e pumping-test s

356

Shale oil players struggle to make gamble pay off  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Green River shale formation, which covers 16,500 square miles in Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah, contains the richest shale deposits in the US, eighty percent of which is on federal lands. By far the richest deposits are in Colorado's Piceance Creek Basin and most of the mining rights there are owned by the major oil companies. A few projects are moving ahead and new developers, local citizens, and state and federal entities are struggling to strike a bargain that protects all players' interests. At stake is a resource equal to 1.8 trillion barrels of petroleum. Carving out the huge underground mines and building the retorts to cook the kerogen will require imposing support facilities for thousands of workers on open range country where the population of towns is counted in the hundreds. Compounding the problems, the shale is under environmentally fragile canyons that states want to protect. The federal government is also a major player, leasing some of the richest shale deposits and stimulating the market by offering loan guarantees and other aid through the Synthetic Fuels Corp. Many oil companies are undecided whether to undertake commercial-sized projects. To soften the impact of shale-oil related growth, some developers have agreed to a host of arrangements, including prepaying taxes, building schools and housing, even expanding local police force. There are at least 13 projects planned or under way on private land and another three on the federal tracts. Of the nonfederal land projects Clear Creek Shale Oil Project and Paraho-Ute Project are moving ahead. On federal lease tracts, progress has been mixed. (DP).

Not Available

1982-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Volumetric strain associated with methane desorption and its impact on coalbed gas production from deep coal seams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For deep coal seams, significant reservoir pressure drawdown is required to promote gas desorption because of the Langmuir-type isotherm that typifies coals. Hence, a large permeability decline may occur because of pressure drawdown and the resulting increase in effective stress, depending on coal properties and the stress field during production. However, the permeability decline can potentially be offset by the permeability enhancement caused by the matrix shrinkage associated with methane desorption. The predictability of varying permeability is critical for coalbed gas exploration and production-well management. We have investigated quantitatively the effects of reservoir pressure and sorption-induced volumetric strain on coal-seam permeability with constraints from the adsorption isotherm and associated volumetric strain measured on a Cretaceous Mesaverde Group coal (Piceance basin) and derived a stress-dependent permeability model. Our results suggest that the favorable coal properties that can result in less permeability reduction during earlier production and an earlier strong permeability rebound (increase in permeability caused by coal shrinkage) with methane desorption include (1) large bulk or Young's modulus; (2) large adsorption or Langmuir volume; (3) high Langmuir pressure; (4) high initial permeability and dense cleat spacing; and (5) low initial reservoir pressure and high in-situ gas content. Permeability variation with gas production is further dependent on the orientation of the coal seam, the reservoir stress field, and the cleat structure. Well completion with injection of N2 and displacement of CH{sub 4} only results in short-term enhancement of permeability and does not promote the overall gas production for the coal studied.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Earth & Ocean Science

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Author: Thomas C. Chidsey, Petroleum Section Chief, Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT. Venue: International Oil Scouts Association’s 84th annual meeting, Stein Eriksen Lodge, Park City, UT, June 17–20, 2007, (http://www.oilscouts.com/index-main.html [external site]). Abstract: Utah’s natural gas and oil exploration history extends back more than 100 years, fluctuating greatly due to discoveries, price trends, and changing exploration targets. During the boom period of the early 1980s, activity peaked at over 500 wells per year. After slowing in the 1990s, drilling activity has again increased, reaching an all-time peak of 1,058 wells spudded and over 2,000 APDs (application for permit to drill) filed in 2006. This increase in activity has been spurred by high prices for both natural gas and oil and by the perception that Utah is highly prospective and underexplored. In recent years, the proportion of new wells exploring for gas has increased greatly. Total cumulative natural gas production from Utah fields now exceeds 8 Tcf. Recent successful drilling has been expanding reserves by about 10 percent per year, one of the highest rates of gas reserves increase in the country. Although gas production from some fields declined during the late 1990s, two factors caused overall gas production to increase. The development of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) accumulations in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone play, in particular Drunkards Wash field in central Utah, has increased the State’s annual gas production by 20–30 percent. Also, deeper exploratory and development drilling in the eastern and southern Uinta Basin during the past 5 years has led to discoveries of substantial gas accumulations in tight-sand reservoirs of the Tertiary Wasatch Formation, Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, and Jurassic Entrada and Wingate Sandstones. Significant potential exists for other coalfields (Book Cliffs, Sego, and Wasatch Plateau) around the Uinta Basin to yield CBNG, and the extent of deeper conventional and tight-gas plays remains to be explored. In addition, shale gas reservoirs in the Mississippian Manning Canyon Shale, Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group, and Cretaceous Mancos Shale of central, southeastern, and northeastern Utah, respectively, have tremendous untapped potential. Utah oilfields have produced a cumulative total of 1.3 billion barrels (bbl) of oil. Although annual production decreased from a peak of 41 million bbl in 1985 to 13 million bbl in 2003, the trend has since reversed, and 2005 production reached nearly 17 million bbl. A component (about one-third of the increase) of this turnaround has been the 2004 discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah thrust belt, or "Hingeline." This new field has already produced 3 million bbl of Mississippian-sourced oil from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in a thrusted anticline formed during the Sevier orogeny. This new oil play is the focus of extensive leasing and exploration activity—comparable to the late 1970s and early 1980s in the Utah-Wyoming salient of the thrust belt to the north.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

B  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B B l a c k H i l l s R e g io n Northern Anthracite Field S o u t h e r n A n t h r a c i t e F i e l d E. Middle Anthracite F ield Rhode Island Meta-Anthrac ite Terling ua Coal Field Coos Bay Coal Field Turtle Montain Coal Field North Central Coal Region San Juan Basin G u l f C o a s t C o a l R e g i o n Ft. Union Coal Re gion (Willist on Basin) Northern Appalachian Ba sin Powder Rive r Ba sin Uinta Basin Cheroke e P la tform Ce nt ra l Appalachian Ba sin Gr ea te r Gr ee n Ri ve r Ba si n T e r t i a r y L a k e B e d s R e g i o n Arkom a Ba sin Pic eance Ba sin Big Horn Ba sin Wind River Ba sin R a to n B as in Black Mesa Basin Taylorville Basin D e e p R i v e r B a s i n N. & Mid. Park Basins C u l p e p p e r B a s in Ha nna -Carbon Ba sin J a c k s o n H o le C o a l F ie ld He nr y Mo u nta ins Co al F iel d Rock Creek Coal Field Glacier Coal Field Goshen Hole Coal Field D a n R i v e r - D a n v i l l e B a s i n Goose Creek Field

362

Stratigraphy, coal occurrence, and depositional history of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Sand Wash basin, northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fort Union Formation in the Sand Wash basin is divided into the massive Cretaceous and Tertiary (K/T) sandstone unit, lower coal-bearing unit, gray-green mudstone unit, basin sandy unit, and upper shaly unit. Lithofacies and coal-occurrence maps of the stratigraphic units indicate that sandstone bodies and coal beds occur along south-north oriented, intermontane fluvial systems. Net-sandstone-thickness trends of the massive K/T sandstone unit reveal laterally extensive channel-fill sandstones formed in north-flowing fluvial systems. The massive K/T sandstone unit's dominant source was in the Sawatch Range. Sandstones within the lower coal-bearing unit consist of similar north-flowing fluvial systems, but they are laterally discontinuous and have several tectonically active source areas, including the Uinta and Sierra Madre-Park uplifts, and Sawatch Range. Coal-occurrence maps of the lower coal-bearing unit indicate that maximum coal-bed thicknesses are greatest along the south-north-oriented fluvial axes. Coal beds thin and split to the east and west, confirming a direct relation between the position of thick, fluvial-sandstone bodies, which form a stable platform for peat accumulation, and the location of the thick coal beds. Above the lower coal-bearing unit, the gray-green mudstone unit forms north-trending belts centered R91W and R100W. The gray-green mudstone thins to the north and into the basin center and probably is lacustrine in origin, reflecting tectonic quiescence and cessation of coarse clastic sedimentation. The basin sandy unit is best developed in the central parts of the basin, where its fluvial depositional axis is oriented south-north. The upper shaly unit directly overlies the basin sandy unit and includes a thin Cherokee coal zone. The upper shaly unit has variable thicknesses due to erosion at the base of the Wasatch Formation and lateral facies changes.

Tyler, R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

File:EIA-PSJ-SE-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PSJ-SE-GAS.pdf PSJ-SE-GAS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 13.13 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

364

 

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Green Racing Paradox The Green Racing Paradox By Forrest Jehlik, Principal Mechanical Engineer Forrest Jehlik and crew Argonne researcher Forrest Jehlik (second from right) with the Dalton Zehr Racing crew. Left to right: chief crew mechanic Mark Jones, team owner Marty Zehr, driver Dalton Zehr, Circle Track magazine editor Robert Fisher, Jehlik and Argonne electrical engineer Danny Bocci. Let's talk about stereotypes. When you think about automotive racing and environmentalism, it presents a potential battle royale of stereotypes. On the green side, picture a stereotypical environmentalist: a Birkenstock-wearing hippy armed with a polished rant about polar bears and melting ice caps. On the racing side, the clichéd race fan: a blue-collar gearhead who wrenches on a hot rod and

365

File:EIA-PSJ-NW-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File File Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:EIA-PSJ-NW-GAS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 11.69 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

366

File:EIA-PSJ-NW-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PSJ-NW-LIQ.pdf PSJ-NW-LIQ.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 11.68 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

367

Electron kinetics inferred from observations of microwave bursts during edge localised modes in the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent measurements of microwave and X-ray emission during edge localised mode (ELM) activity in tokamak plasmas provide a fresh perspective on ELM physics. It is evident that electron kinetics, which are not incorporated in standard (fluid) models for the instability that drives ELMs, play a key role in the new observations. These effects should be included in future models for ELMs and the ELM cycle. The observed radiative effects paradoxically imply acceleration of electrons parallel to the magnetic field combined with rapid acquisition of perpendicular momentum. It is shown that this paradox can be resolved by the action of the anomalous Doppler instability which enables fast collective radiative relaxation, in the perpendicular direction, of electrons accelerated in the parallel direction by inductive electric fields generated by the initial ELM instability.

Freethy, S J; Chapman, S C; Dendy, R O; Lai, W N; Pamela, S J P; Shevchenko, V F; Vann, R G L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

EPR-Steering measure for two-mode continuous variable states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steering is a manifestation of quantum correlations that embodies the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox. While there have been recent attempts to quantify steering, continuous variable systems remained elusive. We introduce a steering measure for two-mode continuous variable systems that is valid for arbitrary states. The measure is based on the violation of an optimized variance test for the EPR paradox, and admits a computable and experimentally friendly lower bound only depending on the second moments of the state, which reduces to a recently proposed quantifier of steerability by Gaussian measurements. We further show that Gaussian states are extremal with respect to our measure, minimizing it among all continuous variable states with fixed second moments. As a byproduct of our analysis, we generalize and relate well-known EPR-steering criteria. Finally an operational interpretation is provided, as the proposed measure is shown to quantify the optimal guaranteed key rate in semi-device independent qua...

Kogias, Ioannis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Multipartite Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering and genuine tripartite entanglement with optical networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox established a link between entanglement and nonlocality in quantum mechanics. EPR steering is the nonlocality associated with the EPR paradox and has traditionally only been investigated between two parties. Here, we present the first experimental observations of multipartite EPR steering, and of the genuine tripartite continuous variable entanglement of three mesoscopic optical systems. We explore different linear optics networks - each one with optimised asymmetries - that create multipartite steerable states containing different numbers of quantised optical modes (qumodes). By introducing asymmetric loss on a 7-qumode state, we characterize 8 regimes of directional steering, showing that N + 1 regimes exist for an N-qumode state. Further, we reveal the directional monogamy of steering, and experimentally demonstrate continuous variable one-sided semi device-independent quantum secret sharing. Our methods establish principles for the development of multiparty quantum communication protocols with asymmetric observers, and can be extended to qubits, whether photonic, atomic, superconducting, or otherwise.

Seiji Armstrong; Meng Wang; Run Yan Teh; Qihuang Gong; Qiongyi He; Jiri Janousek; Hans-Albert Bachor; Margaret D. Reid; Ping Koy Lam

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

370

EPR-Steering measure for two-mode continuous variable states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steering is a manifestation of quantum correlations that embodies the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox. While there have been recent attempts to quantify steering, continuous variable systems remained elusive. We introduce a steering measure for two-mode continuous variable systems that is valid for arbitrary states. The measure is based on the violation of an optimized variance test for the EPR paradox, and admits a computable and experimentally friendly lower bound only depending on the second moments of the state, which reduces to a recently proposed quantifier of steerability by Gaussian measurements. We further show that Gaussian states are extremal with respect to our measure, minimizing it among all continuous variable states with fixed second moments. As a byproduct of our analysis, we generalize and relate well-known EPR-steering criteria. Finally an operational interpretation is provided, as the proposed measure is shown to quantify the optimal guaranteed key rate in semi-device independent quantum key distribution.

Ioannis Kogias; Gerardo Adesso

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

371

File:EIA-PSJ-SE-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File File Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:EIA-PSJ-SE-LIQ.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 13.12 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona

372

File:EIA-PSJ-SE-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SE-BOE.pdf SE-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 13.15 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Southeast Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

373

File:EIA-PSJ-NW-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NW-BOE.pdf NW-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 11.69 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Paradox-San Juan Basin, Northwest Part By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

374

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado Multicomponent seismic analysis and calibration to improve recovery from algal mounds: application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado DE-FG26-02NT15451 Project Goal The project is designed to: Promote development of both discovered and undiscovered oil reserves contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute, Southern Ute, and Navaho native-controlled lands. Promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American oil exploration corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other tribes. Develop the most cost-effective approach to using non-invasive seismic imaging to reduce the risk in exploration and development of algal mound reservoirs on surrounding Native American lands.

375

A review of "The Politics of Liberty in England and Revolutionary America." by Lee Ward  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEWS 183 Lee Ward. The Politics of Liberty in England and Revolutionary America. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. x + 459 pp. $90.00. Review by GEOFFREY M. VAUGHAN, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY. This is first... of the Whig politics of liberty in the absolutist arguments of Hugo Grotius and Thomas Hobbes (12). The second paradox lies in a much more political and historical prob- lem: ?British and American Whigs interpreted the same events and institutions in Anglo...

Geoffrey M. Vaughan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

1 Why and How to be Ambidextrous? The Relationship between Environmental Factors, Innovation Strategy and Organizational Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

“Organizational ambidexterity ” has become an emerging research trend in both the organizational management and knowledge management field (Gibson & Birkinshaw, 2004; He & Wong, 2004). The central theme on organizational ambidexterity is about organizational capability to simultaneously deal with paradoxical or conflicting activities such as organizational alignment and adaptation; evolutionary and revolutionary change; manufacturing efficiency and flexibility; strategic alliance formation; and even strategic renewal (Adler, Goldoftas, & Levine,

Pei-wen Huang

377

Inverse Square Law of Gravitation in (2+1)-Dimensional Space-Time as a Consequence of Casimir Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational effect of vacuum polarization in space exterior to a particle in (2+1)-dimensional Einstein theory is investigated. In the weak field limit this gravitational field corresponds to an inverse square law of gravitational attraction, even though the gravitational mass of the quantum vacuum is negative. The paradox is resolved by considering a particle of finite extension and taking into account the vacuum polarization in its interior.

H. H. Soleng

1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

378

Mechanisms of Disease: General Anesthesia, Sleep, and Coma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...partially due to cholinergic activation of pontomedullary networks, resulting in glycine-mediated inhibition of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, whereas during paradoxical excitation, motor tone is preserved. There is similarity between the EEG patterns seen in slow-wave sleep and those seen in phase... This review discusses the clinical and neurophysiological features of general anesthesia and their relationships to sleep and coma, focusing on the neural mechanisms of unconsciousness induced by selected intravenous anesthetic drugs.

Brown E.N.Lydic R.Schiff N.D.

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

A review of "Selfish Gifts: The Politics of Exchange and English Courtly Literature, 1580-1628" by Alison V. Scott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

good model for an intensive study of a broader range of travel narratives. Alison V. Scott. Selfish Gifts: The Politics of Exchange and English Courtly Literature, 1580 ? 1628. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2006. $55....00. Review by THOMAS P. ANDERSON, MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY. Alison Scott?s informative study of the paradoxical nature of gift ex- change and the quest for patronage in early modern England emphasizes the complex economy involving emerging market...

Anderson, Thomas P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Revised Born-Oppenheimer approach and a reprojection method for inelastic collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantum reprojection method within the standard adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approach is derived for multielectron collision systems. The method takes nonvanishing asymptotic nonadiabatic couplings into account and distinguishes asymptotic currents in molecular-state channels and in atomic-state channels. The method is demonstrated for the example of low-energy inelastic Li + Na collisions for which the conventional application of the standard adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approach fails and leads to paradoxes such as infinite inelastic cross sections.

Belyaev, Andrey K. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Herzen University, St. Petersburg 191186 (Russian Federation) and Department of Chemistry, University of Rome 'La Sapienza', I-00185 Rome (Italy)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Efficiency of some heat engines at maximum?power conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper a simple model is presented for a heat engine where the power output is limited by the rate of heat supply (and/or heat release). The model leads to a variety of results. Some of them are established laws such as the Carnot law the Curzon–Ahlborn efficiency and the Castañs efficiency. Other results are new and are related to phenomena as different as geothermal energy conversion and the Penfield paradox of electric circuits.

Alexis De Vos

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

News  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

open meetings at MLA 2009 (see item 5 above). 3. The James Holly Hanford Award for a distinguished book recognized the excellence of Gordon Campbell, Thomas N. Corns, John K. Hale, and Fiona J. Tweedie, Milton and the Manuscript of De Doctrina... the excellence of Milton and Toleration, ed. Sharon Achinstein and Elizabeth Sauer Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007). 5. The James Holly Hanford Essay Awards recognize the excel- lence of John Creaser, ??Service is Perfect Freedom?: Paradox and Prosodic...

Dickson, Donald et. al

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

2005 clean coal and power conference. Conference proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theme of the conference was 'The paradox: today's coal technologies versus tomorrow's promise'. The sessions covered: today's technologies, tomorrow's potential; economic stability; energy security; transition to sustainable energy future; new coal power technologies leading to zero emission coal; existing power plants - improved performance through use of new technology; and carbon capture and storage R & D - challenges and opportunities. Some of the papers only consist of the viewgraphs/overheads.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Analysis of Free Will and Determinism in Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is considered the study of determinism in the theories of physics. Based on fundamental postulates of physics, it is proved that the evolution of the universe is univocally determined, proving ultimately that free will does not exist. In addition, it is presented some contradictions and weaknesses of quantum mechanics, suggesting paradoxes in the theory. It is also analyzed some consequences of the postulates in justice and ethics.

Edgar Jose Candales Dugarte

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

Analysis of Free Will and Determinism in Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is considered the study of determinism in the theories of physics. Based on fundamental postulates of physics, it is proved that the evolution of the universe is univocally determined, proving ultimately that free will does not exist. In addition, it is presented some contradictions and weaknesses of quantum mechanics, suggesting paradoxes in the theory. It is also analyzed some consequences of the postulates in justice and ethics.

Dugarte, Edgar Jose Candales

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

ccsd00000553 L'ARGUMENT EINSTEIN PODOLSKY ROSEN (EPR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd­00000553 (version 1) : 29 Aug 2003 L'ARGUMENT EINSTEIN PODOLSKY ROSEN (EPR) : PARADOXE'article EPR (A. Einstein, B. Podolsky, N. Rosen, #19;ecrit en 1935), qui est #18;a l'origine de l'aujourd'hui, est analys#19;e. Avec Schrodinger, Bohr, Wigner et jusqu'#18;a aujourd'hui, la r#19;eponse #18;a EPR

387

ccsd-00000553(version1):29Aug2003 L'ARGUMENT EINSTEIN PODOLSKY ROSEN (EPR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd-00000553(version1):29Aug2003 L'ARGUMENT EINSTEIN PODOLSKY ROSEN (EPR) : PARADOXE, ALTERNATIVE montre clairement. On ne doit pas aujourd'hui lui faire dire le contraire. L'article EPR (A. Einstein, B, Wigner et jusqu'`a aujourd'hui, la r´eponse `a EPR a ´et´e le recours renouvel´e `a l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

388

Nano and viscoelastic Beck's column on elastic foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beck's type column on Winkler type foundation is the subject of the present analysis. Instead of the Bernoulli-Euler model describing the rod, two generalized models will be adopted: Eringen non-local model corresponding to nano-rods and viscoelastic model of fractional Kelvin-Voigt type. The analysis shows that for nano-rod, the Herrmann-Smith paradox holds while for viscoelastic rod it does not.

Atanackovic, Teodor M; Zorica, Dusan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Sympathy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Sympathy MARTIN J. MATUSTIK Fordham University Merleau-Ponty never wrote a phenomenology of sympathy. But his use of sympathy in accounting for human relationships parallels in intent and manner his treatment... of perception in the Phenomenology.} In addressing the paradox of alterity, he draws an analogy between perception and sympathy: just as perceptual consciousness founds intersubjective thematic experience, in the same way pre-personal sympathy accounts...

Matustik, Martin J.

390

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1- 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

391

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Reserve Class Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1- 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

392

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques The Use of Epifluorescence Techniques to Determine Potential Oil-Prone Areas in the Mississippian Leadville Limestone, Northern Paradox Basin, Utah Authors: David E. Eby, Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr., and Craig D. Morgan Venue: Rocky Mountain Section AAPG Conference, Colorado Convention Center, July 9-11, 2008, http://www.aapg.org/ Abstract: Potential oil-prone areas for the Mississippian Leadville Limestone were identified in the northern Paradox Basin (Paradox fold and fault belt), Utah, based on hydrocarbon shows using low-cost epifluorescence techniques. The trapping mechanisms for Leadville producing fields are usually anticlines bounded by large, basement-involved normal faults. Epifluorescence microscopy is a technique used to provide information on diagenesis, pore types, and organic matter (including “live” hydrocarbons) within sedimentary rocks. It is a rapid, non-destructive procedure that uses a petrographic microscope equipped with reflected-light capabilities, a Hg-vapor light, and appropriate filtering.

393

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Reserve Class Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1- 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

394

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Authors: Paul La Pointe, FracMan Technology Group, Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, WA; Robert D. Benson, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; and Claudia Rebne, Legacy Energy, Denver, CO. Venue: American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Rocky Mountain Section Annual Meeting in Snowbird, UT, October 7-9, 2007. Abstract: A 3D9C survey was carried out over a 6 square mile portion of the Roadrunner and Towaoc fields on the Ute Mountain Ute reservation in southwestern Colorado. This survey was jointly funded by DOE and the Southern Ute tribe’s Red Willow Corporation to promote development of Ismay algal mound plays in the Paradox Basin within Ute Mountain Tribal lands and elsewhere in the Paradox Basin. Multicomponent data were utilized to better delineate the external mound geometry as well as to estimate internal mound reservoir parameters such as matrix permeability, saturation, and porosity. Simple cross-plotting of various multicomponent attributes against reservoir properties did not provide the desired predictive accuracy, in part due to sub-optimal frequency content in components derived from the shear wave data. However, a multivariate statistical analysis greatly improved the predictive accuracy. These multivariate regressions were then used to prescribe reservoir properties for a static reservoir model, which in turn formed the basis for a dynamic reservoir simulation model of the project area to assess the usefulness of the multivariate relations developed. This poster presentation will illustrate the workflow used to carry out the multivariate modeling, key maps of the reservoir properties that were derived, the static model, and results from the dynamic simulation used to assess the usefulness of the approach. Results from wells drilled based on the seismic data also will be presented.

395

Multi-Site Application of the Geomechanical Approach for Natural Fracture Exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to predict the nature and distribution of natural fracturing, Advanced Resources Inc. (ARI) incorporated concepts of rock mechanics, geologic history, and local geology into a geomechanical approach for natural fracture prediction within mildly deformed, tight (low-permeability) gas reservoirs. Under the auspices of this project, ARI utilized and refined this approach in tight gas reservoir characterization and exploratory activities in three basins: the Piceance, Wind River and the Anadarko. The primary focus of this report is the knowledge gained on natural fractural prediction along with practical applications for enhancing gas recovery and commerciality. Of importance to tight formation gas production are two broad categories of natural fractures: (1) shear related natural fractures and (2) extensional (opening mode) natural fractures. While arising from different origins this natural fracture type differentiation based on morphology is sometimes inter related. Predicting fracture distribution successfully is largely a function of collecting and understanding the available relevant data in conjunction with a methodology appropriate to the fracture origin. Initially ARI envisioned the geomechanical approach to natural fracture prediction as the use of elastic rock mechanics methods to project the nature and distribution of natural fracturing within mildly deformed, tight (low permeability) gas reservoirs. Technical issues and inconsistencies during the project prompted re-evaluation of these initial assumptions. ARI's philosophy for the geomechanical tools was one of heuristic development through field site testing and iterative enhancements to make it a better tool. The technology and underlying concepts were refined considerably during the course of the project. As with any new tool, there was a substantial learning curve. Through a heuristic approach, addressing these discoveries with additional software and concepts resulted in a stronger set of geomechanical tools. Thus, the outcome of this project is a set of predictive tools with broad applicability across low permeability gas basins where natural fractures play an important role in reservoir permeability. Potential uses for these learnings and tools range from rank exploration to field-development portfolio management. Early incorporation of the permeability development concepts presented here can improve basin assessment and direct focus to the high potential areas within basins. Insight into production variability inherent in tight naturally fractured reservoirs leads to improved wellbore evaluation and reduces the incidence of premature exits from high potential plays. A significant conclusion of this project is that natural fractures, while often an important, overlooked aspect of reservoir geology, represent only one aspect of the overall reservoir fabric. A balanced perspective encompassing all aspects of reservoir geology will have the greatest impact on exploration and development in the low permeability gas setting.

R. L. Billingsley; V. Kuuskraa

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work plan for October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998 consisted of investigation of a number of topical areas. These topical areas were reported in four quarterly status reports, which were submitted to DOE earlier. These topical areas are reviewed in this volume. The topical areas covered during the year were: (1) Development of preliminary tests of a production method for determining areas of natural fracturing. Advanced Resources has demonstrated that such a relationship exists in the southern Piceance basin tight gas play. Natural fracture clusters are genetically related to stress concentrations (also called stress perturbations) associated with local deformation such a faulting. The mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is that deformation generally initiates at regions where the local stress field is elevated beyond the regional. (2) Regional structural and geologic analysis of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Application of techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project for sweet-spot delineation were demonstrated in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-typeUpper Cretaceous reservoirs of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). The effort included data acquisition/processing, base map generation, geophysical and remote sensing analysis and the integration of these data and analyses. (3) Examination of the Table Rock field area in the northern Washakie Basin of the Greater Green River Basin. This effort was performed in support of Union Pacific Resources- and DOE-planned horizontal drilling efforts. The effort comprised acquisition of necessary seismic data and depth-conversion, mapping of major fault geometry, and analysis of displacement vectors, and the development of the natural fracture prediction. (4) Greater Green River Basin Partitioning. Building on fundamental fracture characterization work and prior work performed under this contract, namely structural analysis using satellite and potential field data, the GGRB was divided into partitions that will be used to analyze the resource potential of the Frontier and Mesaverde Upper Cretaceous tight gas play. A total of 20 partitions were developed, which will be instrumental for examining the Upper Cretaceous play potential. (5) Partition Analysis. Resource assessment associated with individual partitions was initiated starting with the Vermilion Sub-basin and the Green River Deep (which include the Stratos well) partitions (see Chapter 5). (6) Technology Transfer. Tech transfer was achieved by documenting our research and presenting it at various conferences.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

High-Cost Generic Drugs — Implications for Patients and Policymakers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known that new brand-name drugs are often expensive, but U.S. health care is also witnessing a lesser-known but growing and seemingly paradoxical phenomenon: certain older drugs, many of which are generic and not protected by patents or market exclusivity, are now also extremely expensive... Some older generic drugs have become very expensive, owing to factors including drug shortages, supply disruptions, and consolidations in the generic-drug industry. But generics manufacturers that legally obtain a market monopoly can also unilaterally raise prices.

Alpern J.D.Stauffer W.M.Kesselheim A.S.

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

398

TREKisM At Length 9: Tales From the Fourth Year Issue 9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Florida ihe /nysTERy How separate the dancer from the dance? ^ Riley was at a loss even to contemplate the question. These paradoxical people had solved the age-old conundrum that Yeats had not dared to answer. In the perfect grace of this mysterious woman... and her acolytes, dancer and dance became one. She sprang between her crouching partners and unfolded toward the ceiling in an acropetal spin, clay on the potter's wheel finding its shape, and stopped the spin cold in mid-air as if the unseen hand from...

Willment, A.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Making American: Constitutive Rhetoric in the Cold War  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, claiming that his behavior was directly opposed to everything America stood for. At the heart of so much of the rhetorical bullying was this idea of ?American.? Nobody could decide what it meant or who had the most of it. Was it more American... Rhetoric Reconsidered: Constitutive Paradoxes in G.W. Bush?s Iraq War Speeches.? Zagacki focuses on the idea of ?prophetic dualism? that he claims guided Bush?s rhetoric to the American people in an attempt to create identification between Americans...

Thorpe, Martha

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

400

Scattering theory with localized non-Hermiticities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the context of the recent interest in solvable models of scattering mediated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians (cf. H. F. Jones, Phys. Rev. D 76, 125003 (2007)) we show that the well-known variability of the ad hoc choice of the metric {theta} which defines the physical Hilbert space of states can help us to clarify several apparent paradoxes. We argue that with a suitable {theta}, a fully plausible physical picture of the scattering can be recovered. Quantitatively, our new recipe is illustrated on an exactly solvable toy model.

Znojil, Miloslav [Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

On the Superluminal Quantum Tunneling and "Causality Violation"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is an analysis of some aspects of an old but still controversial topic, superluminal quantum tunneling. Some features of quantum tunneling described in literature, such as definition of the tunneling time and a frequency range of a signal, are discussed. The argument is presented that claim of superluminal signaling allegedly observed in frustrated internal reflection experiment was based on the wrong interpretation of the tunneling process. A thought experiment similar to that in the Tolman paradox is discussed. It shows that a new factor, attenuation, comes in the interplay between tunneled signals and macroscopic causality.

Moses Fayngold

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

402

Superluminal, subluminal, and negative velocities in free-space electromagnetic propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this Chapter the time-domain analysis of the velocity of the electromagnetic field pulses generated by a spatially compact source in free space is presented. Recent simulations and measurements of anomalous superluminal, subluminal, and negative velocities are discussed. It is shown that such velocities are local and instantaneous in nature and do not violate either causality or special relativity. Although these effects are mainly confined to the near- and intermediate-field zones, some of them seem paradoxical and still lack adequate physical interpretation.

Budko, Neil V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Earth's extensive entropy bound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility of planetary mass black hole production by crossing entropy limits is addressed. Such a possibility is given by pointing out that two geophysical quantities have comparable values: first, Earth's total negative entropy flux integrated over geological time and, second, its extensive entropy bound, which follows as a tighter bound to the Bekenstein limit when entropy is an extensive function. The similarity between both numbers suggests that the formation of black holes from planets may be possible through a strong fluctuation toward thermodynamic equilibrium which results in gravothermal instability and final collapse. Briefly discussed are implications for the astronomical observation of low mass black holes and for Fermi's paradox.

A. M. Lisewski

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Information loss and anomalous scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The approach of 't Hooft to the puzzles of black hole evaporation can be applied to a simpler system with analogous features. The system is (1+1)-dimensional electrodynamics in a linear dilation background. Analogues of black holes, Hawking radiation, and evaporation exist in this system. In perturbation theory there appears to be an information paradox but this gets resolved in the full quantum theory and there exists an exact S matrix, which is fully unitary and information conserving. 't Hooft's method gives the leading terms in a systematic approximation to the exact result.

Amanda Peet; Leonard Susskind; Lárus Thorlacius

1992-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Time machines and traversable wormholes in modified theories of gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent work on wormhole geometries in the context of modified theories of gravity, in particular, in f(R) gravity and with a nonminimal curvature-matter coupling, and in the recently proposed hybrid metric-Palatini theory. In principle, the normal matter threading the throat can be shown to satisfy the energy conditions and it is the higher order curvatures terms that sustain these wormhole geometries. We also briefly review the conversion of wormholes into time-machines, explore several of the time travel paradoxes and possible remedies to these intriguing side-effects in wormhole physics.

Francisco S. N. Lobo

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

406

Magnetism of a relativistic degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetization and magnetic susceptibility of a degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field in which electrons are located on the ground Landau level and the electron gas has the properties of a nonlinear paramagnet have been calculated. The paradoxical properties of the electron gas under these conditions-a decrease in the magnetization with the field and an increase in the magnetization with the temperature-have been revealed. It has been shown that matter under the corresponding conditions of neutron stars is a paramagnet with a magnetic susceptibility of {chi} {approx} 0.001.

Skobelev, V. V., E-mail: v.skobelev@inbox.ru [Moscow State Industrial University (Russian Federation)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hydrogen storage by spillover on graphene as a phase nucleation process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen chemisorption on graphene receptor-substrate is of great interest for energy storage. However, it is difficult to reconcile with a single H atom binding to carbon being weaker than it is within initial molecular H2. This paradox is resolved by presenting the process as phase nucleation in the reaction Recsolid+H2gas?(H?Rec)solid, with the nucleus’ energy separable into the Gibbs formation potential and the interface part. Atomistic calculations bridge remarkably with the macroscopic-continuum description and show a feasible path to 7.7?wt?% H content at nearly ambient conditions.

Yu Lin; Feng Ding; Boris I. Yakobson

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

Directed transport as a mechanism for protein folding in vivo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a model for protein folding in vivo based on a Brownian-ratchet mechanism in the multidimensional energy landscape space. The device is able to produce directed transport taking advantage of the assumed intrinsic asymmetric properties of the proteins and employing the consumption of energy provided by an external source. Through such a directed transport phenomenon, the polypeptide finds the native state starting from any initial state in the energy landscape with great efficacy and robustness, even in the presence of different type of obstacles. This model solves Levinthal's paradox without requiring biased transition probabilities but at the expense of opening the system to an external field.

Ernesto Gonzalez-Candela; Victor Romero-Rochin

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

409

The first law of thermodynamics for auxetic materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The author has shown previously that the first law of thermodynamics must be modified for materials with negative thermal expansion and for auxetic materials. In this paper, those earlier results have been developed and improved and a paradox stemming from the previous findings has been solved. It is shown that in thermodynamic equations, the motive force of the process must be written on the left-hand side and its effect must be written on the right-hand side. Consequently, the first law of thermodynamics for heat exchange and compression has different signs. This result is of importance for the entire field of thermodynamics.

I.A. Stepanov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Unified criteria for multipartite quantum nonlocality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wiseman and co-workers [H. M. Wiseman, S. J. Jones, and A. C. Doherty, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 140402, (2007)] proposed a distinction among the nonlocality classes of Bell's nonlocality, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox or steering, and entanglement based on whether or not an overseer trusts each party in a bipartite scenario where they are asked to demonstrate entanglement. Here we extend that concept to the multipartite case and derive inequalities that progressively test for those classes of nonlocality, with different thresholds for each level. This framework includes the three classes of nonlocality above in special cases and introduces a family of others.

Cavalcanti, E. G. [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland 4111 (Australia); He, Q. Y.; Reid, M. D. [Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Centre for Quantum-Atom Optics (Australian Research Council), Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Wiseman, H. M. [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland 4111 (Australia); Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (Australian Research Council), Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland 4111 (Australia)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

GZK Violation - a Tempest in a (Magnetic) Teapot?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The apparent lack of suitable astrophysical sources for the observed highest energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within $\\approx 20$ Mpc is the "GZK Paradox". We constrain representative models of the extra-galactic magnetic field structure by Faraday Rotation measurements; limits are at the $\\mu$G level rather than the nG level usually assumed. In such fields, even the highest energy cosmic rays experience large deflections. This allows nearby AGNs (possibly quiet today) or GRBs to be the source of ultra-high energy cosmic rays without contradicting the GZK distance limit.

Glennys R. Farrar; Tsvi Piran

1999-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

412

Violation of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin Cutoff: A Tempest in a (Magnetic) Teapot? Why Cosmic Ray Energies above 1020 eV May Not Require New Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The apparent lack of suitable astrophysical sources for the observed highest energy cosmic rays within ?20 Mpc is the “Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) paradox.” We constrain representative models of the extragalactic magnetic field structure by Faraday rotation measurements; limits are at the ?G level rather than the nG level usually assumed. In such fields, even the highest energy cosmic rays experience large deflections. This allows nearby active galactic nuclei (possibly quiet today) or gamma ray bursts to be the source of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays without contradicting the GZK distance limit.

Glennys R. Farrar and Tsvi Piran

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

413

Fermi 3/29/02  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24, 2002 24, 2002 Number 9 f I N S I D E : 2 Ti m e f o r C o m m u n i c a t o r s t o C a t c h U p 4 B e a m M e U p 8 T h o s e ' D a m ' B e a v e r s 1 4 F e r m i l a b A r t s S e r i e s Photo by Reidar Hahn DIGGING IN 10 DIGGING IN 10 Communicators Communicating particle physics in the 21 st century INTERACTIONS INTERACTIONS Respond online at www.fnal.gov/pub/ferminews/ interactions/index.html or send email to ferminews@fnal.gov TIME for Communicators If large collaborations can achieve one goal, why can't labs speak in harmony? TO CATCH UP 2 FERMINEWS Friday, May 24, 2002 MENLO PARK, Calif.-In high-energy physics, we are accustomed to dealing with paradoxes. We build huge detectors for tiny particles. Studying the infinitesimally small contributes to our understanding of the farthest reaches of the universe. But we have created for ourselves a paradox

414

A New Look at the Position Operator in Quantum Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The postulate that coordinate and momentum representations are related to each other by the Fourier transform has been accepted from the beginning of quantum theory by analogy with classical electrodynamics. As a consequence, an inevitable effect in standard theory is the wave packet spreading (WPS) of the photon coordinate wave function in directions perpendicular to the photon momentum. This leads to the following paradoxes: if the major part of photons emitted by stars are in wave packet states (what is the most probable scenario) then we should see not separate stars but only an almost continuous background from all stars; no anisotropy of the CMB radiation should be observable; data on gamma-ray bursts, signals from directional radio antennas (in particular, in experiments on Shapiro delay) and signals from pulsars show no signs of WPS. In addition, a problem arises why there are no signs of WPS for protons in the LHC ring. We argue that the above postulate is based neither on strong theoretical arguments nor on experimental data and propose a new consistent definition of the position operator. Then WPS in directions perpendicular to the particle momentum is absent and the paradoxes are resolved. Different components of the new position operator do not commute with each other and, as a consequence, there is no wave function in coordinate representation. Implications of the results for entanglement, quantum locality and the problem of time in quantum theory are discussed.

Felix M. Lev

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

415

Skyrmion semiclassical quantization in the presence of an isospin chemical potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The semiclassical description of Skyrmions at small isospin chemical potential {mu}{sub I} is carefully analyzed. We show that when the calculation of the energy of a nucleon is performed using the straightforward generalization of the vacuum sector techniques ({mu}{sub I}=0), together with the 'natural' assumption {mu}{sub I}=O(N{sub c}{sup 0}), the proton and neutron masses are nonlinear in {mu}{sub I} in the regime |{mu}{sub I}|paradox is achieved by studying the realization of the large N{sub c} limit of QCD in the Skyrme model at finite {mu}{sub I}. This is done in a simplified context devoid of the technical complications present in the Skyrme model but which fully displays the general scaling behavior with N{sub c}. The analysis shows that the paradoxical result appears as a symptom of using the semiclassical approach beyond its regime of validity and that, at a formal level, the standard methods for dealing with the Skyrme model are only strictly justified for states of high isospin, I{approx}N{sub c}.

Cohen, Thomas D.; Ponciano, Juan A.; Scoccola, Norberto N. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (United States) and CEFIMAS, Aveniada Santa Fe 1145, 1059 Buenos Aires (Argentina) and CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina) and Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Physics Department, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina) and Universidad Favaloro, Solis 453, 1078 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Minturn Formation of Eagle basin: an exploration frontier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eagle basin, a predominantly Desmoinesian evaporite basin in northwestern Colorado, contains many targets for oil and gas reserves. Facies patterns of the Minturn Formation of the Eagle basin are strikingly similar to those of the prolific Paradox Formation of the Paradox basin. Both basins and formations also contain lens-shaped carbonate algal-bioherms. These algal-bioherms are particularly attractive reservoirs where they flank halite-basin margins, the areas of optimum dolomitization. The Minturn formation has been subdivided into individual rock packages using subsurface control. Facies maps constructed for individual units indicate the Eagle basin is a series of smaller basins, each having served as a center for halite deposition. Data support a deep-water model for the deposition of halite; however, a sabkhalike environment existed between the halite basins and the normal marine facies. Halite depocenters appear to have been structurally controlled. The Minturn Formation is very thick and may contain multiple prospective zones at any one location. Within the past year, two and possibly three Minturn discoveries have been made in northwestern Colorado.

Dodge, C.J.N.; Bartleson, B.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Quantum decision theory as quantum theory of measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a general theory of quantum information processing devices, that can be applied to human decision makers, to atomic multimode registers, or to molecular high-spin registers. Our quantum decision theory is a generalization of the quantum theory of measurement, endowed with an action ring, a prospect lattice and a probability operator measure. The algebra of probability operators plays the role of the algebra of local observables. Because of the composite nature of prospects and of the entangling properties of the probability operators, quantum interference terms appear, which make actions noncommutative and the prospect probabilities non-additive. The theory provides the basis for explaining a variety of paradoxes typical of the application of classical utility theory to real human decision making. The principal advantage of our approach is that it is formulated as a self-consistent mathematical theory, which allows us to explain not just one effect but actually all known paradoxes in human decision making. Being general, the approach can serve as a tool for characterizing quantum information processing by means of atomic, molecular, and condensed-matter systems.

V. I. Yukalov; D. Sornette

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

Black Holes, Firewalls and Chaos from Gravitational Collapse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most spectacular predictions of the general theory of relativity is the black hole, an object that plays a central role in modern physics [1,2,3] and astrophysics [4,5]. Black holes are, however, plagued by fundamental paradoxes that remain unresolved to this day. First, the black hole event horizon is teleological in nature [6], which means that we need to know the entire future space-time of the universe to determine the current location of the horizon. This is essentially impossible. Second, any information carried by infalling matter is lost once the material falls through the event horizon. Even though the black hole may later evaporate by emitting Hawking radiation [7], the lost information does not reappear, which has the rather serious and disturbing consequence that quantum unitarity is violated [8]. Here we propose that the above paradoxes are restricted to a particular idealized model of collapse first studied in the 1930s [9, 10] in which the event horizon, which defines the boundary of...

Joshi, Pankaj S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Firewall Phenomenology with Astrophysical Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most fundamental features of a black hole in general relativity is its event horizon: a boundary from which nothing can escape. There has been a recent surge of interest in the nature of these event horizons and their local neighbourhoods. In an attempt to resolve black hole information paradox(es), and more generally, to better understand the path towards quantum gravity, firewalls have been proposed as an alternative to black hole event horizons. In this letter, we explore the phenomenological implications of black holes possessing a surface or firewall. We predict a potentially detectable signature of these firewalls in the form of a high energy astrophysical neutrino flux. We compute the spectrum of this neutrino flux in different models and show that it is a possible candidate for the source of the PeV neutrinos recently detected by IceCube. We further show that, independent of the generation mechanism, IceCube data can be explained (at $1\\sigma$ confidence level) by conversion of accretion on...

Afshordi, Niayesh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Bound on viscosity and the generalized second law of thermodynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a new paradox for ideal fluids. It arises in the accretion of an ideal fluid onto a black hole, where, under suitable boundary conditions, the flow can violate the generalized second law of thermodynamics. The paradox indicates that there is in fact a lower bound to the correlation length of any real fluid, the value of which is determined by the thermodynamic properties of that fluid. We observe that the universal bound on entropy, itself suggested by the generalized second law, puts a lower bound on the correlation length of any fluid in terms of its specific entropy. With the help of a new, efficient estimate for the viscosity of liquids, we argue that this also means that viscosity is bounded from below in a way reminiscent of the conjectured Kovtun-Son-Starinets lower bound on the ratio of viscosity to entropy density. We conclude that much light may be shed on the Kovtun-Son-Starinets bound by suitable arguments based on the generalized second law.

Fouxon, Itzhak; Betschart, Gerold; Bekenstein, Jacob D. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Bound on viscosity and the generalized second law of thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a new paradox for ideal fluids. It arises in the accretion of an ideal fluid onto a black hole, where, under suitable boundary conditions, the flow can violate the generalized second law of thermodynamics. The paradox indicates that there is in fact a lower bound to the correlation length of any real fluid, the value of which is determined by the thermodynamic properties of that fluid. We observe that the universal bound on entropy, itself suggested by the generalized second law, puts a lower bound on the correlation length of any fluid in terms of its specific entropy. With the help of a new, efficient estimate for the viscosity of liquids, we argue that this also means that viscosity is bounded from below in a way reminiscent of the conjectured Kovtun-Son-Starinets lower bound on the ratio of viscosity to entropy density. We conclude that much light may be shed on the Kovtun-Son-Starinets bound by suitable arguments based on the generalized second law.

Itzhak Fouxon; Gerold Betschart; Jacob D. Bekenstein

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Geometry of the Infalling Causal Patch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The firewall paradox states that an observer falling into an old black hole must see a violation of unitarity, locality, or the equivalence principle. Motivated by this remarkable conflict, we analyze the causal structure of black hole spacetimes in order to determine whether all the necessary ingredients for the paradox fit within a single observer's causal patch. We particularly focus on the question of whether the interior partner modes of the outgoing Hawking quanta can, in principle, be measured by an infalling observer. Since the relevant modes are spread over the entire sphere, we answer a simple geometrical question: can any observer see an entire sphere behind the horizon? We find that for all static black holes in 3+1 and higher dimensions, with any value of the cosmological constant, no single observer can see both the early Hawking radiation and the interior modes. We present a detailed description of the causal patch geometry of the Schwarzschild black hole in 3+1 dimensions, where an infalling o...

Freivogel, Ben; Kabir, Laurens; Yang, I-Sheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Doppler effect in the oscillator radiation process in the medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the radiation process of the charged particle passing through an external periodic field in a dispersive medium. In the optical range of spectrum we will consider two cases: first, the source has not eigenfrequency, and second, the source has eigenfrequency. In the first case, when the Cherenkov radiation occurs, the non-zero eigenfrequency produces a paradox for Doppler effect. It is shown that the absence of the eigenfrequency solves the paradox known in the literature. The question whether the process is normal (i.e. hard photons are being radiated under the small angles) or anomalous depends on the law of the medium dispersion. When the source has an eigenfrequency the Doppler effects can be either normal or anomalous. In the X-ray range of the oscillator radiation spectrum we have two photons radiated under the same angle- soft and hard. In this case the radiation obeys to so-called complicated Doppler effect, i.e. in the soft photon region we have anomalous Doppler effect and in the hard photon region we have normal Doppler effect.

Lekdar Gevorgian; Valeri Vardanyan

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

424

Volume 9: A Review of Socioeconomic Impacts of Oil Shale Development WESTERN OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT: A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of an oil shale industry in northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah has been forecast at various times since early this century, but the comparatively easy accessibility of other oil sources has forestalled development. Decreasing fuel supplies, increasing energy costs, and the threat of a crippling oil embargo finally may launch a commercial oil shale industry in this region. Concern for the possible impacts on the human environment has been fostered by experiences of rapid population growth in other western towns that have hosted energy resource development. A large number of studies have attempted to evaluate social and economic impacts of energy development and to determine important factors that affect the severity of these impacts. These studies have suggested that successful management of rapid population growth depends on adequate front-end capital for public facilities, availability of housing, attention to human service needs, long-range land use and fiscal planning. This study examines variables that affect the socioeconomic impacts of oil shale development. The study region is composed of four Colorado counties: Mesa, Moffat, Garfield and Rio Blanco. Most of the estimated population of 111 000 resides in a handful of urban areas that are separated by large distances and rugged terrain. We have projected the six largest cities and towns and one planned company town (Battlement Mesa) to be the probable centers for potential population impacts caused by development of an oil shale industry. Local planners expect Battlement Mesa to lessen impacts on small existing communities and indeed may be necessary to prevent severe regional socioeconomic impacts. Section II describes the study region and focuses on the economic trends and present conditions in the area. The population impacts analyzed in this study are contingent on a scenario of oil shale development from 1980-90 provided by the Department of Energy and discussed in Sec. III. We recognize that the rate of development, the magnitude of development, and the technology mix that will actually take place remain uncertain. Although we emphasize that other energy and mineral resources besides oil shale may be developed, the conclusions reached in this study reflect only those impacts that would be felt from the oil shale scenario. Socioeconomic impacts in the region reflect the uneven growth rate implied by the scenario and will be affected by the timing of industry developments, the length and magnitude of the construction phase of development, and the shift in employment profiles predicted in the scenario. The facilities in the southern portion of the oil shale region, those along the Colorado River and Parachute Creek, show a peak in the construction work force in the mid-1980s, whereas those f acil it i es in the Piceance Creek Bas into the north show a construction peak in the late 1980s. Together, the facilities will require a large construction work force throughout the decade, with a total of 4800 construction workers required in 1985. Construction at the northern sites and second phase construction in the south will require 6000 workers in 1988. By 1990, the operation work force will increase to 7950. Two important characteristics of oil shale development emerge from the work force estimates: (1) peak-year construction work forces will be 90-120% the size of the permanent operating work force; and (2) the yearly changes in total work force requirements will be large, as much as 900 in one year at one facility. To estimate population impacts on individual communities, we devised a population distribution method that is described in Sec. IV. Variables associated with the projection of population impacts are discussed and methodologies of previous assessments are compared. Scenario-induced population impacts estimated by the Los Alamos method are compared to projections of a model employed by the Colorado West Area Council of Governments. Oil shale development in the early decade, as defined by the scenario, will produce growth primarily

Rotariu,, G. J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Assessment of CO2 Sequestration and ECBM Potential of U.S. Coalbeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October, 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy, through contractor Advanced Resources International, launched a multi-year government-industry R&D collaboration called the Coal-Seq project. The Coal-Seq project is investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coalseams, by performing detailed reservoir studies of two enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) field projects in the San Juan basin. The two sites are the Allison Unit, operated by Burlington Resources, and into which CO{sub 2} is being injected, and the Tiffany Unit, operating by BP America, into which N{sub 2} is being injected (the interest in understanding the N{sub 2}-ECBM process has important implications for CO{sub 2} sequestration via flue-gas injection). The purposes of the field studies are to understand the reservoir mechanisms of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} injection into coalseams, demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the ECBM and sequestration processes, an engineering capability to simulate them, and to evaluate sequestration economics. In support of these efforts, laboratory and theoretical studies are also being performed to understand and model multi-component isotherm behavior, and coal permeability changes due to swelling with CO{sub 2} injection. This report describes the results of an important component of the overall project, applying the findings from the San Juan Basin to a national scale to develop a preliminary assessment of the CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery potential of U.S. coalbeds. Importantly, this assessment improves upon previous investigations by (1) including a more comprehensive list of U.S. coal basins, (2) adopting technical rationale for setting upper-bound limits on the results, and (3) incorporating new information on CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} replacement ratios as a function of coal rank. Based on the results of the assessment, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) The CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of U.S. coalbeds is estimated to be about 90 Gt. Of this, about 38 Gt is in Alaska (even after accounting for high costs associated with this province), 14 Gt is in the Powder River basin, 10 Gt is in the San Juan basin, and 8 Gt is in the Greater Green River basin. By comparison, total CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation plants is currently about 2.2 Gt/year. (2) The ECBM recovery potential associated with this sequestration is estimated to be over 150 Tcf. Of this, 47 Tcf is in Alaska (even after accounting for high costs associated with this province), 20 Tcf is in the Powder River basin, 19 Tcf is in the Greater Green River basin, and 16 Tcf is in the San Juan basin. By comparison, total CBM recoverable resources are currently estimated to be about 170 Tcf. (3) Between 25 and 30 Gt of CO{sub 2} can be sequestered at a profit, and 80-85 Gt can be sequestered at costs of less than $5/ton. These estimates do not include any costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and transportation, and only represent geologic sequestration. (4) Several Rocky Mountain basins, including the San Juan, Raton, Powder River and Uinta appear to hold the most favorable conditions for sequestration economics. The Gulf Coast and the Central Appalachian basin also appear to hold promise as economic sequestration targets, depending upon gas prices. (5) In general, the 'non-commercial' areas (those areas outside the main play area that are not expected to produce primary CBM commercially) appear more favorable for sequestration economics than the 'commercial' areas. This is because there is more in-place methane to recover in these settings (the 'commercial' areas having already been largely depleted of methane).

Scott R. Reeves

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

CX-002920: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

20: Categorical Exclusion Determination 20: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002920: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reclamation Projects in Jo Dandy Lease Tract C-JD-7, Uranium Leasing Program CX(s) Applied: B1.28, B1.3 Date: 06/25/2010 Location(s): Naturita, Colorado Office(s): Legacy Management The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) proposes to close a mine portal and the related vent located on the Aztec Claim on Lease Tract C-JD-7. Independent contractors associated with Cotter Corporation, the leaseholder, would complete all work within an expected 2 days. The abandoned mine features, which DOE inherited when lease tract boundaries were reconfigured in 2007, are a public safety concern. The lease tract is in the Paradox Valley in western Montrose

427

Fermilab Today  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4, 2006 4, 2006 Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO Calendar Thurs., December 14 12:00 p.m. Special Particle Astrophysics Seminar - The Dark Side (WH-6W) (NOTE DATE, TIME, LOCATION) Speaker: D. Stojkovic, Case Western Reserve University Title: Black Hole Formation, Evaporation and the Information Loss Paradox 1:00 p.m. ALCPG ILC Physics and Detector Seminar - Hornets Nest (WH-8XO) Speaker: R. Raja, Fermilab Title: The MIPP Experiment Upgrade and Hadronic Shower Simulations 2:30 p.m. Theoretical Physics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: G. Kozlov, JINR, Dubna Title: Lepton-Flavor Violation, Extra Gauge Bosons and New Physics Scale 3:30 p.m. Director's Coffee Break - 2nd Floor Crossover 4:00 p.m. Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - 1 West

428

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11 - 4620 of 26,777 results. 11 - 4620 of 26,777 results. Download CX-000434: Categorical Exclusion Determination Near-Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready Carbon-14 Isotopic Analyzer (Paradox Basin) CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 01/04/2010 Location(s): Utah Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000434-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005769: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dismantle and Removal (D&R) and Enhance Chemical Cleaning (ECC) on Waste Tank 8F (General) CX(s) Applied: B1.28 Date: 04/19/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005769-categorical-exclusion-determination

429

Hammerhead Ribozyme  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scott Research Scott Research UCSC Press Release Additional Materials Lightsources.Org 30 August 2006 The Elusive Active Fold of a Catalytic RNA Genes, which are made of nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) contain the instructions for how to make proteins, but still enzymes made of proteins are needed to replGenes, which are made of nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) contain the instructions for how to make proteins, but still enzymes made of proteins are needed to replicate the genes. This paradox was addressed ~20 years ago with the realization that some kinds of RNA can act as enzymes. These RNA enzymes, or ribozymes, are accordingly made of the genetic RNA material, but they act as chemical catalysts. This means that ribozymes would have enabled the first self-replicating molecules, also made of RNA, to copy themselves.

430

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41 - 1250 of 28,905 results. 41 - 1250 of 28,905 results. Download CX-000436: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow Carbon Dioxide Injection CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 11/19/2009 Location(s): Greene County, Missouri Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000436-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000434: Categorical Exclusion Determination Near-Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready Carbon-14 Isotopic Analyzer (Paradox Basin) CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 01/04/2010 Location(s): Utah Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000434-categorical-exclusion-determination

431

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aneth Aneth Project Overview DE- FC26-05NT42591 James Rutledge Lianjie Huang Julianna Fessenden Los Alamos National Laboratory October 6-8, 2008 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Southwest Phase II - Aneth Project Paradox Basin, Utah: 150,000 tons/year Enhanced oil recovery with sequestration CO 2 Injection started in August, 2007 - 08/2007 12/2007 04/2008 - 05/2011 Aneth Unit Injection Schedule Sections 13 and 14 - Demonstration Study Area * 3D seismic over entire Unit * CO 2 soil flux measurements * Downhole geophone array deployment * Time-lapse VSP * Microseismic monitoring * SWD wells - one completed * Core well E-418 * Includes Gothic and Desert Creek * Tracer Test * Produced water sampling * UGS compiled all log data and mapped surface fractures * UU-EGI subsurface modeling and simulation Geophone cable deployment -

432

SWP.Aneth.factsheet.919  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name Paradox Basin, Utah: Aneth EOR-Sequestration Test Location Near Bluff, Utah Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source 150,000 tons/year; CO 2 sourced from McElmo Dome, CO Resolute Natural Resources Company Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Navajo Nation Oil and Gas Company Summary of Field Test Site and Operations General Geology and Target Reservoirs: The Aneth oil field, discovered in 1956, is one of the largest in the nation. Because the field is on Navajo Nation land, mineral royalties go to the Navajo Nation and are utilized in many ways, including a broad scholarship fund. Aneth is located on the McElmo-Cortez CO

433

EA-1037-FEA-1995.pdf  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7; Final Environmental Assessment for the Uranium Lease 7; Final Environmental Assessment for the Uranium Lease Management Program July 1995 (DOE/EA-1037) Table of Contents Glossary 1.0 Introduction 2.0 Purpose and Need for Action 3.0 Description of Alternatives 4.0 Affected Environment 5.0 Environmental Impacts 6.0 List of Persons Consulted 7.0 References Figures Figure 1. Uranium Lease Management Program Lease Tract Map Figure 2. Transportation Haul Routes Figure 3. Uravan Lease Tract Area Figure 4. Paradox Valley Lease Tract Area Figure 5. Slick Rock Lease Tract Area Tables Table 1. Cross Reference Numbers for DOE Lease Tracts Table 2A. Summary of Lease Tract Information Table 2B. Summary of Lease Tract Information (cont.) Table 3. Threatened and Endangered Species That Could Occur on DOE Lease Tracts Table 4. Summary of Environmental Impacts

434

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stacking Samples: General Considerations Stacking Samples: General Considerations Stacking Samples: The Paradoxical Effect of Shielding Samples on a Table (or The Advantages of Foam Sample Holders) Stacking Samples: General Considerations When planning beam time requests, an important consideration is how many samples can be exposed at the same time. The large beam spot with uniform illumination (about 20 x 20 cm2) allows for as many as four T75 flasks or six T25 flasks to be contained within the beam center. Under certain conditions it is possible to stack multiple samples along the beam direction. The effect of stacked samples can either increase the dose or decrease the dose depending on the heavy ion being used, the beam energy, and other considerations. The details of dose delivery need careful consideration before sample stacking is utilized.

435

Climate Instability and Public Health  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate Instability and Public Health Climate Instability and Public Health Speaker(s): Paul Epstein Date: August 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Evan Mills Climate restricts the range of infectious diseases, while weather affects the timing and intensity of outbreaks. The ranges of several key diseases or their vectors are changing, along with shifts in plant communities and the retreat of alpine glaciers. In addition, extreme weather events associated with warming create conditions conducive to "clusters" of disease outbreaks. The rapid spread of West Nile virus in the Americas is related, paradoxically, to drought and its impact on wildlife (230 species of animals, 138 species of birds) could alter the ratios of predator birds to their prey (including rodents) and thus have implications for human

436

Pauli matrices and 2D electron gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present paper it will be argued that transport in a 2D electron gas can be implemented as 'local hidden instrument based' variables. With this concept of instrumentalism it is possible to explain the quantum correlation, the particle-wave duality and Wheeler's 'backward causation of a particle'. In the case of quantum correlation the spin measuring variant of the Einstein Podolsky and Rosen paradox is studied. In the case of particle-wave duality the system studied is single photon Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometry with a phase shift size $\\delta$. The idea that the instruments more or less neutrally may show us the way to the particle will be replaced by the concept of laboratory equipment contributing in an unexpected way to the measurement.

J. F. Geurdes

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

437

Physics of Psychophysics: it is critical to sense  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been known for about a century that psychophysical response curves (perception of a given physical stimulus vs. stimulus intensity) have a large dynamic range: many decades of stimulus intensity can be appropriately discriminated before saturation. This is in stark contrast with the response curves of sensory neurons whose dynamic range is small usually covering only about one decade. We claim that this paradox can be solved by means of a collective phenomenon. By coupling excitable elements with small dynamic range the collective response function shows a much larger dynamic range due to the amplification mediated by excitable waves. Moreover the dynamic range is optimal at the phase transition where self?sustained activity becomes stable providing a clear example of a biologically relevant quantity being optimized at criticality. We present a pedagogical account of these ideas which are illustrated with a simple mean field model.

Mauro Copelli

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fluctuation-dissipation theorem in general relativity and the cosmological constant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuum fluctuations are an essential feature of quantum field theory. Yet, the smallness of the scalar curvature of our universe suggests that the zero-point energy associated with these fluctuations does not curve spacetime. A possible way out of this paradox is suggested by the fact that microscopic fluctuations are generally accompanied by dissipative behavior in macroscopic systems. The intimate relation between the two is expressed by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem which extends to general relativity. The connection between quantum fluctuations and dissipation suggests a mechanism for the conversion of coherent stresses in the curvature of space into ordinary matter or radiation, thereby relaxing the effective cosmological ``constant`` to zero over time. The expansion of the universe may be the effect of this time-asymmetric relaxation process.

Mottola, E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Fluctuation-dissipation theorem in general relativity and the cosmological constant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuum fluctuations are an essential feature of quantum field theory. Yet, the smallness of the scalar curvature of our universe suggests that the zero-point energy associated with these fluctuations does not curve spacetime. A possible way out of this paradox is suggested by the fact that microscopic fluctuations are generally accompanied by dissipative behavior in macroscopic systems. The intimate relation between the two is expressed by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem which extends to general relativity. The connection between quantum fluctuations and dissipation suggests a mechanism for the conversion of coherent stresses in the curvature of space into ordinary matter or radiation, thereby relaxing the effective cosmological constant'' to zero over time. The expansion of the universe may be the effect of this time-asymmetric relaxation process.

Mottola, E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

A Zero Knowledge Protocol For Nuclear Warhead Verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The verification of nuclear warheads for arms control faces a paradox: International inspectors must gain high confidence in the authenticity of submitted items while learning nothing about them. Conventional inspection systems featuring ''information barriers'', designed to hide measurments stored in electronic systems, are at risk of tampering and snooping. Here we show the viability of fundamentally new approach to nuclear warhead verification that incorporates a zero-knowledge protocol, designed such that sensitive information is never measured so does not need to be hidden. We interrogate submitted items with energetic neutrons, making in effect, differential measurements of neutron transmission and emission. Calculations of diversion scenarios show that a high degree of discrimination can be achieved while revealing zero information. Timely demonstration of the viability of such an approach could be critical for the nexxt round of arms-control negotiations, which will likely require verification of individual warheads, rather than whole delivery systems.

Glaser, Alexander [Princeton, Univ., NJ (United States). Program on Science and Global Security] [Princeton, Univ., NJ (United States). Program on Science and Global Security; Goldston, Robert J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uinta piceance paradox" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Reply to “Comment on ‘Heat transfer and fluid flow in microchannels and nanochannels at high Knudsen number using thermal lattice-Boltzmann method”’  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this reply to the Comment by Li-Shi Luo, we discuss the results of the lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) model for high-Knudsen-number (Kn) flow and heat transfer, in the range of Kn?1. We present various studies employing the LBGK model for high-Kn flow and heat transfer simulations. It is concluded that, with the use of the LBGK model in the thermal lattice Boltzmann method for Kn?0.8, some approximations appear in the negative pressure deviation from the linear distribution along the channel. But for Kn<0.8, the velocity and temperature profiles, compressibility effects, Knudsen layer capturing, and Knudsen paradox phenomenon can be predicted by the LBGK model. We also reject Li-Shi Luo’s claim about the nonconvergence of our numerical scheme by presenting a velocity profile across the channel corresponding to three different high-resolution meshes.

J. Ghazanfarian and A. Abbassi

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

442

Three +1 Faces of Invariance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A careful look at an allegedly well-known century-old concept reveals interesting aspects in it that have generally avoided recognition in literature. There are four different kinds of physical observables known or proclaimed as relativistic invariants under space-time rotations. Only observables in the first three categories are authentic invariants, whereas the single "invariant" - proper length - in the fourth category is actually not an invariant. The proper length has little is anything to do with proper distance which is a true invariant. On the other hand, proper distance, proper time, and rest mass have more in common than usually recognized, and particularly, mass - time analogy opens another view of the twin paradox.

Moses Fayngold

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

A model of virtual interference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We set up an experiment with two independent laser beams that cross at a small angle, spatially separate, and end at detectors in front of each beam. The setup allows us to obtain maximum path or which-way information, K=1. However, when we scan a thin wire across the beam intersection the which-way information drops to K=0.985. The thin wire serves to verify the presence of an interference pattern with visibility, V=0.833, at the beam intersection. Our results appear to be in conflict with the complementarity inequality, V^2+K^2 smaller or equal to 1. We introduce a model that describes a virtual interference pattern. We resolve our paradoxical findings by proposing that the complementarity inequality does not apply to virtual interference patterns but only to physically real ones. We find that the interference pattern in our setup is virtual.

Flores, Eduardo V; Scaturro, Jeffrey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A Realist Interpretation of the Quantum Measurement Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new, realist interpretation of the quantum measurement processes is given. In this scenario a quantum measurement is a non-equilibrium phase transition in a ``resonant cavity'' formed by the entire physical universe including all its material and energy content. Both the amplitude and the phase of the quantum mechanical wavefunction acquire substantial meaning in this picture, and the probabilistic element is removed from the foundations of quantum mechanics, its apparent presence in the quantum measurement process is viewed as a result of the sensitive dependence on initial/boundary conditions of the non-equilibrium phase transitions in a many degree-of-freedom system. The implications of adopting this realist ontology to the clarification and resolution of lingering issues in the foundations of quantum mechanics, such as wave-particle duality, Heisenberg's uncertainty relation, Schrodinger's Cat paradox, first and higher order coherence of photons and atoms, virtual particles, the existence of commutation relations and quantized behavior, etc., are also presented.

Xiaolei Zhang

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

445

Surely You Must All be Joking: An Outsider's Critique of Quantum Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A critique of the state of current quantum theory in physics is presented, based on a perspective outside the normal physics training. From this perspective, the acceptance of quantum nonlocality seems unwarranted, and the fundamental assumptions that give rise to it in the first place seem questionable, based on the current status of the quantum theory of light. The relevant data can instead be accounted for using physically motivated local models, based on detailed properties of the experimental setups. The semiclassical approach, particularly in the form of the fully coupled Maxwell-Dirac equations with a pure wave ontology, seems to provide a satisfying, local, paradox-free physical model of the quantum world, that appears consistent with known phenomena. It is unclear why this approach is not pursued more vigorously in the field, given its clear potential to resolve all the conundrums that have perplexed generations of physicists.

Randall C. O'Reilly

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

446

On the exploitability of thermo-charged capacitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently [Physics Letters A, 374, (2010) 1801] the concept of vacuum capacitor spontaneously charged harnessing the heat from a single thermal reservoir at room temperature has been introduced, along with a mathematical description of its functioning and a discussion on the main paradoxical feature that seems to violate the Second Law of Thermodynamics. In the present paper we investigate the theoretical and practical possibility of exploiting a such thermo-charged capacitor as voltage/current generator: we show that if very weak provisos on the physical characteristics of the capacitor are fulfilled, then a non-zero current should flow across the device, allowing the generation of potentially usable voltage, current and electric power out of a single thermal source at room temperature. Preliminary results show that the power output is tiny but non-zero.

Germano D'Abramo

2009-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

447

Internalizing Null Extraterrestrial "Signals": An Astrobiological App for a Technological Society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the beneficial outcomes of searching for life in the Universe is that it grants greater awareness of our own problems here on Earth. Lack of contact with alien beings to date might actually comprise a null "signal" pointing humankind toward a viable future. Astrobiology has surprising practical applications to human society; within the larger cosmological context of cosmic evolution, astrobiology clarifies the energetic essence of complex systems throughout the Universe, including technological intelligence that is intimately dependent on energy and likely will be for as long as it endures. The "message" contained within the "signal" with which today's society needs to cope is reasonably this: Only solar energy can power our civilization going forward without soiling the environment with increased heat yet robustly driving the economy with increased per capita energy usage. The null "signals" from extraterrestrials also offer a rational solution to the Fermi paradox as a principle of cosmic selection l...

Chaisson, Eric J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Anthropic decision theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper sets out to solve the Sleeping Beauty problem and various related anthropic (self-locating belief) problems, not through the calculation of anthropic probabilities, but through finding the correct decision to make. Given certain simple assumptions, it turns out to be possible to do so without knowing the underlying anthropic probabilities. Most common anthropic problems are underspecified from the decision perspective, and this can explain some of the differing intuitions in the subject: selfless and selfish agents, total and average utilitarians, will all reach different decisions in the same problem. These results are formalised into an anthropic decision theory, that is then used to solve many anthropic problems and paradoxes, such as the Presumptuous Philosopher, Adam and Eve, and Doomsday problems.

Stuart Armstrong

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

Processing Information in Quantum Decision Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A survey is given summarizing the state of the art of describing information processing in Quantum Decision Theory, which has been recently advanced as a novel variant of decision making, based on the mathematical theory of separable Hilbert spaces. This mathematical structure captures the effect of superposition of composite prospects, including many incorporated intended actions. The theory characterizes entangled decision making, non-commutativity of subsequent decisions, and intention interference. The self-consistent procedure of decision making, in the frame of the quantum decision theory, takes into account both the available objective information as well as subjective contextual effects. This quantum approach avoids any paradox typical of classical decision theory. Conditional maximization of entropy, equivalent to the minimization of an information functional, makes it possible to connect the quantum and classical decision theories, showing that the latter is the limit of the former under vanishing interference terms.

V. I. Yukalov; D. Sornette

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

450

Head, Henry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract English neurologist Sir Henry Head (1861–1940) conducted pioneering clinical studies of the somatosensory system, in addition to conducting important neurophysiological studies of respiratory control mechanisms. Head has been considered as one of the great English clinical neurologists and was a teacher of ‘infectious enthusiasm and vitality.’ Although some of Head's conceptual contributions have not stood the test of time, his diverse contributions were very influential. Among his many contributions were Head's paradoxical reflex (a positive feedback mechanism, which is inter alia important for the first breath of babies), the first reasonably accurate dermatomal map (Head–Campbell dermatomal map), description of the process of recovery from experimental peripheral nerve transection (in himself), the Head–Riddoch syndrome of autonomic dysreflexia, the mass reflex with recovery from spinal shock after spinal cord transection, and the clinically useful distinction between body schema and body image.

D.J. Lanska

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (1/3)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

452

Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (3/3)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

453

Tracking tropical cloud systems - Observations for the diagnosis of simulations by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To aid in improving model parameterizations of clouds and convection, we examine the capability of models, using explicit convection, to simulate the life cycle of tropical cloud systems in the vicinity of the ARM Tropical Western Pacific sites. The cloud life cycle is determined using a satellite cloud tracking algorithm (Boer and Ramanathan, 1997), and the statistics are compared to those of simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. Using New York Blue, a Blue Gene/L supercomputer that is co-operated by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, simulations are run at a resolution comparable to the observations. Initial results suggest a computational paradox where, even though the size of the simulated systems are about half of that observed, their longevities are still similar. The explanation for this seeming incongruity will be explored.

Vogelmann, A.M.; Lin, W.; Cialella, A.; Luke, E.; Jensen, M.; Zhang, M.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Solid Waste Forecast Database: User`s guide (Version 1.5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Forecast Database (SWFD) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) specifically to address Hanford solid waste management issues. This document is one of a set of documents supporting the SWFD system and providing instructions in the use and maintenance of SWFD components. This manual contains instructions for using Version 1.5 of the SWFD, including system requirements and preparation, entering and maintaining data, and performing routine database functions. This document supports only those operations that are specific to SWFD menus and functions and does not provide instruction in the use of Paradox, the database management system in which the SWFD is established.

Bierschbach, M.C.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Transport Phenomena and Light Element Abundances in the Sun and Solar Type Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observations of light elements in the Sun and Solar type stars give special clues for understanding the hydrodynamical processes at work in stellar interiors. In the Sun 7Li is depleted by 140 while 3He has not increased by more than 10% in 3 Gyrs. Meanwhile the inversion of helioseismic modes lead to a precision on the sound velocity of about .1%. The mixing processes below the solar convection zone are constrained by these observations. Lithium is depleted in most Pop I solar type stars. In halo stars however, the lithium abundance seems constant in the "spite plateau" with no observed dispersion, which is difficult to reconcile with the theory of diffusion processes. In the present paper, the various relevant observations will be discussed. It will be shown that the mu-gradients induced by element settling may help solving the "lithium paradox".

Sylvie Vauclair

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

456

Cleantech Niche Development: a small business perspective on climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mitigation of climate change enables and requires a number of new companies and businesses to emerge. This paper investigates what it takes for a niche company in these emerging cleantech businesses to be able to act and grow using transition theory. A company that manages to perform successful Cleantech Niche Development (CND) will be able to have an environmentally and financially sustainable business, enabling it to compete against companies from the dominant fossil fuel regime. By combining theory and empirical material gathered through interviews and desk research, CND is found to be distinctive in five respects: marketing, political and government aspects, networking, strategising and social relations. Cleantech leaders should master acting in a world of chaos upon the paradoxical and complex surroundings, while creating meaning for their colleagues and business network.

Christian Koch; Bettina Foged Sørensen; Merete Wildner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Paraxial Light Beams with Angular Momentum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamental and applied concepts concerning the ability of light beams to carry a certain mechanical angular momentum with respect to the propagation axis are reviewed and discussed. Following issues are included: Historical reference; Angular momentum of a paraxial beam and its constituents; Spin angular momentum and paradoxes associated with it; Orbital angular momentum; Circularly-spiral beams: examples and methods of generation; Orbital angular momentum and the intensity moments; Symmetry breakdown and decomposition of the orbital angular momentum; Mechanical models of the vortex light beams; Mechanical action of the beam angular momentum; Rotational Doppler effect, its manifestation in the image rotation; Spectrum of helical harmonics and associated problems; Non-collinear rotational Doppler effect; Properties of a beam forcedly rotating around its own axis. Research prospects and ways of practical utilization of optical beams with angular momentum.

A. Bekshaev; M. Soskin; M. Vasnetsov

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

ER=EPR, GHZ, and the Consistency of Quantum Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper illustrates various aspects of the ER=EPR conjecture.It begins with a brief heuristic argument, using the Ryu-Takayanagi correspondence, for why entanglement between black holes implies the existence of Einstein-Rosen bridges. The main part of the paper addresses a fundamental question: Is ER=EPR consistent with the standard postulates of quantum mechanics? Naively it seems to lead to an inconsistency between observations made on entangled systems by different observers. The resolution of the paradox lies in the properties of multiple black holes, entangled in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger pattern. The last part of the paper is about entanglement as a resource for quantum communication. ER=EPR provides a way to visualize protocols like quantum teleportation. In some sense teleportation takes place through the wormhole, but as usual, classical communication is necessary to complete the protocol.

Leonard Susskind

2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

459

ER=EPR, GHZ, and the Consistency of Quantum Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper illustrates various aspects of the ER=EPR conjecture.It begins with a brief heuristic argument, using the Ryu-Takayanagi correspondence, for why entanglement between black holes implies the existence of Einstein-Rosen bridges. The main part of the paper addresses a fundamental question: Is ER=EPR consistent with the standard postulates of quantum mechanics? Naively it seems to lead to an inconsistency between observations made on entangled systems by different observers. The resolution of the paradox lies in the properties of multiple black holes, entangled in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger pattern. The last part of the paper is about entanglement as a resource for quantum communication. ER=EPR provides a way to visualize protocols like quantum teleportation. In some sense teleportation takes place through the wormhole, but as usual, classical communication is necessary to complete the protocol.

Susskind, Leonard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Wigner-function description of EPR experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide a detailed description of the EPR paradox (in the Bohm version) for a two qubit-state in the discrete Wigner function formalism. We compare the probability distributions for two qubit relevant to simultaneously-measurable observables (computed from the Wigner function) with the probability distributions representing two perfectly-correlated classic particles in a discrete phase-space. We write in both cases the updating formulae after a measure, thus obtaining a mathematical definition of \\textit{classic collapse} and \\textit{quantum collapse}. We study, with the EPR experiment, the joint probability distributions of Alice's and Bob's qubit before and after the measure, analyzing the non-local effects. In particular, we give a more precise definition of locality, which we call m-locality: we show that quantum systems may violate this kind of locality, thus preserving, in an EPR-like argument, the completeness of Quantum Mechanics.

Riccardo Franco

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Finite-time Lyapunov exponent for a random Ehrenfest gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the motion of a system of free particles moving in a plane with hard scatterers of regular polygonal shape arranged in a random manner. Calling this the Ehrenfest gas which is known to be pseudo-integrable, we propose a finite-time Lyapunov exponent characterizing the dynamics. In the limit of large number of vertices, where polygon tends to a circle, we recover the Lyapunov exponent for the Lorentz gas. To obtain this result, we generalized the reflection law of a pencil of rays incident on a polygonal scatterer in a way that the formula for the circular scatterer is recovered in the limit of infinite vertices. Thus, seemingly paradoxically, chaos seems to emerge from pseudo-chaos.

Sanjay Moudgalya; Sarthak Chandra; Sudhir R. Jain

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

462

Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (2/3)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

463

U.S.A.I.D. Higher Education Summit for Global Development | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A.I.D. Higher Education Summit for Global Development A.I.D. Higher Education Summit for Global Development U.S.A.I.D. Higher Education Summit for Global Development April 30, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis Remarks as Prepared For Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you Henrietta, for that introduction. It is a pleasure to be here to talk about education, a subject that is near and dear to my heart. And I was pleased to see Dr. Bement here. When it comes to science and science education, we are faced with a remarkable paradox. On the one hand, the world is more dependent than ever before on science and technological innovation to provide the solutions to the challenges ahead, especially in the energy arena. At the same time, it seems as though support for basic physical science research and the interest young people are taking in math and science seem

464

Relativistic elasticity of rigid rods and strings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the equation of motion for a rigid one-dimensional elastic body (i.e. a rod or string whose speed of sound is equal to the speed of light) in a two-dimensional spacetime is simply the wave equation. We then solve this equation in a few simple examples: a rigid rod colliding with an unmovable wall, a rigid rod being pushed by a constant force, a rigid string whose endpoints are simultaneously set in motion (seen as a special case of Bell's spaceships paradox), and a radial rigid string that has partially crossed the event horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole while still being held from the outside.

Jose Natario

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

465

Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography Title Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hussey, Daniel S., Dusan Spernjak, Adam Z. Weber, Rangachary Mukundan, Joseph Fairweather, Eric L. Brosha, John Davey, Jacob S. Spendelow, David L. Jacobson, and Rodney L. Borup Journal Journal of Applied Physics Volume 112 Issue 10 Pagination 104906 Date Published 2012 ISSN 00218979 Keywords electrolyte fuel-cells, in-situ, liquid water, microchannel plate detectors, model, nafion, polymer electrolytes, schroeders-paradox, transport, x-ray-scattering Abstract The water sorption of proton-exchange membranes (PEMs) was measured in situ using high-resolution neutron imaging in small-scale fuel cell test sections. A detailed characterization of the measurement uncertainties and corrections associated with the technique is presented. An image-processing procedure resolved a previously reported discrepancy between the measured and predicted membrane water content. With high-resolution neutron-imaging detectors, the water distributions across N1140 and N117 Nafion membranes are resolved in vapor-sorption experiments and during fuel cell and hydrogen-pump operation. The measured in situ water content of a restricted membrane at 80 degrees C is shown to agree with ex situ gravimetric measurements of free-swelling membranes over a water activity range of 0.5 to 1.0 including at liquid equilibration. Schroeder's paradox was verified by in situ water-content measurements which go from a high value at supersaturated or liquid conditions to a lower one with fully saturated vapor. At open circuit and during fuel cell operation, the measured water content indicates that the membrane is operating between the vapor-and liquid-equilibrated states.

466

PRODUCTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

CARBON AND OXYGEN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS: BUG, CHEROKEE, AND PATTERSON CANYON FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Stephen T. Nelson

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

CAPILLARY PRESSURE/MERCURY INJECTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

THIN SECTION DESCRIPTIONS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

GEOPHYSICAL WELL LOG/CORE DESCRIPTIONS, CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

CROSS SECTIONS AND FIELD MAPS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND PORE CASTING: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Louis H. Taylor

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

POROSITY/PERMEABILITY CROSS-PLOTS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Quaternary faults of the central Rocky Mountains, Colorado: A new seismotectonic evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quaternary faults in the central Rocky Mountain of CO exhibit normal displacement, are generally parallel to the strike of pre-existing Larmide structures, and typically occur in the hanging walls of Laramide thrust faults. These observations are consistent with models in which Mesozoic thrust faults are being reactivated as normal faults in the contemporary extensional tectonic setting. To assess the seismogenic potential of these faults, the authors evaluated the recency of fault movement and style of deformation via aerial reconnaissance, interpretation of aerial photography and field mapping of selected sites. The 82-km-long Red Rocks-Climarron fault zone shows evidence of late Quaternary displacement and may be capable of producing an M[>=]6.75 earthquake based on its total fault length and inferred fault width. Earthquake hypocenters indicate that the thickness of the seismogence crust in CO is similar to much of the western US (ca. 15 km). In additional to tectonic deformation, numerous faults and lineaments have been identified in the Paradox Basin and along the southern Grand Hogback monocline that are active due to diapiric movement of halite. In particular, active deformation along the Grand Hogback is limited to portions of the structure underlain by a 3-km-deep Pennsylvania halite basin. Because Quaternary deformation along and near these large Laramide structures is due to the movement of halite rather than deep-seated tectonism, the maximum size of a potential earthquake is limited by the down-dip width and lateral extent of fault planes within brittle rocks overlying the halite. The authors infer that the maximum depth of brittle faulting due to diapiric halite flow is 6 km, and the earthquakes larger than M 5 are unlikely to occur on faults associated with the Grand Hogback and salt anticlines of the Paradox Basin. The 1984 Carbondale earthquake swarm (M[<=]3.2) may have been the result of such faulting.

Unruh, J.R.; Noller, J.S.; Lettis, W.R. (William Lettis and Association, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)); Wong, I.G.; Sawyer, T.L.; Bott, J.D.J. (Woodward-Clyde Federal Services, Oakland, CA (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Exploring the science–policy interface for Integrated Coastal Management in New Zealand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Integrated Coastal Management has seen an on-going debate on the best way of integrating knowledge with political decision-making across the so-called ‘science–policy interface’. This paper engages with this debate by presenting an empirical study into practice at the science–policy interface supporting coastal management in New Zealand. The research takes as its point of departure a notional dichotomy in the Integrated Coastal Management literature between two broad traditions; one espousing a ‘science-based interface’, the other a ‘participatory interface’. Structured according to this conceptual framework, the research describes and analyses the diverse ways in which these two traditions have found practical expression across New Zealand, both at the national scale and according to a comprehensive survey of coastal managers across all 16 regional councils. The analysis extends to the relationship between these two traditions, and how this relationship has determined the evolution of the science–policy interface. This paper describes the traditional dominance of science-based coastal management in New Zealand, but highlights an important paradox; while science is valorised as the most robust knowledge for decision-making under the statutory decision-making process, there are pervasive financial, procedural and institutional barriers to its collection, meaning that many decisions are made under significant uncertainty. Against the background of this paradox, local government has increasingly departed from the statutory process, according to a philosophy of co-management. This extends to new strategies for mobilising knowledge, both through knowledge partnerships to generate more science, and participatory approaches to mobilise other forms of traditional and local knowledge. These participatory interfaces take many forms, but typically see scientists engaged alongside other knowledge holders within an inclusive decision-making process. All knowledge systems form a common pool of evidence on which to base decisions, and science is used strategically to fill knowledge gaps identified by a participatory process. Therefore, while science-based coastal management remains dominant in New Zealand, it is increasingly couched within a participatory tradition that valorises other knowledge systems as well.

Scott Bremer; Bruce Glavovic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATION FORM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DE-FE0001116 DE-FE0001116 Planetary Emissions Management, Inc. FE Sequestration 2009 Bruce W. Lani December 1,2009-November 30,2013 NEAR-SURFACE LEAKAGE MONITORING FOR THE VERIFICATION AND ACCOUNTING OF GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION USING A FIELD READY 14C ISOTOPIC ANALYZER Design, construction, and field evaluation of 14C gas analyzers that detect CO2 from the combustion of fossil fuels for sequestration leak studies. Paradox Basin is field evaluation site. Bruce W. Lani Digitally signed by Bruce W. Lani DN: cn=Bruce W. Lani, o=USDOE-NETL, ou=Sequestration Division, email=lani@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2009.12.01 15:00:22 -05'00' 12 01 2009 Mark Lusk Digitally signed by Mark Lusk DN: cn=Mark Lusk, o=NETL-DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=mark.lusk@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.01.04 10:00:02 -05'00'

477

Effects of abnormal conditions on accuracy of orifice measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The orifice meter is a remarkable paradox. Despite its incredible longevity and simple appearance, we`ve only begun to truly understand how its installation affects its performance. Hundreds of thousands of orifice meters are used for custody transfer around the world and every resulting transaction implies a base level of trust in the technology. Over the last 10 to 15 years we`ve learned more about the physics of flow measurement in {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}non-ideal{close_quotes} flow conditions. In many cases, the laboratory work confirms the experience of industry but there have been a few interesting surprises, too. The intended audience of this paper are users and/or designers of orifice meter facilities who want to know more about the contemporary issues, terminology, and results of research into abnormal metering conditions. Because of its introductory nature, this paper doesn`t attempt to squeeze twenty years if scientific data into five pages, but may lead the measurement aficionado toward specific areas of interest.

Peterson, W.B. [NOVA Gas Transmission Ltd., Calgary (Canada)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Emergence of interest groups on hazardous waste siting: how do they form and survive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the two components of the facilitative setting that are important for group formation. The first component, the ideological component, provides the basic ideas that are adopted by the emerging group. The ideological setting for group formation is produced by such things as antinuclear news coverage and concentration of news stories on hazardous waste problems, on ideas concerning the credibility of the federal government, and on the pervasivensee of ideas about general environmental problems. The organizational component of the facilitative setting provides such things as leadership ability, flexible time, resources, and experience. These are important for providing people, organization, and money to achieve group goals. By and large, the conditions conducive to group formation, growth, and survival are outside the control of decision-makers. Agencies and project sponsors are currently caught in a paradox. Actively involving the public in the decision-making process tends to contribute to the growth and survival of various interest groups. Not involving the public means damage to credibility and conflict with values concerning participatory democracy. Resolution in this area can only be achieved when a comprehensive, coordinated national approach to hazardous waste management emerges. 26 refs.

Williams, R.G.; Payne, B.A.

1985-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Dark Matter in Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions with a Stable Vacuum and the "Right" Higgs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent discovery of a Higgs boson with mass of about 125 GeV, along with its striking similarity to the prediction from the Standard Model, informs and constrains many models of new physics. The Higgs mass exhausts one out of three input parameters of the minimal, five-dimensional version of universal extra dimension models, the other two parameters being the Kaluza-Klein (KK) scale and the cut-off scale of the theory. The presence of KK fermions with large coupling to the Higgs implies a short-lived electro-weak vacuum, unless the cut-off scale is at most a few times higher than the KK mass scale, providing an additional tight constraint to the theory parameter space. Here, we focus on the lightest KK particle as a dark matter candidate, and investigate the regions of parameter space where such particle has a thermal relic density in accord with the cosmological dark matter density. We find the paradoxical result that, for low enough cutoff scales consistent with vacuum stability, larger than previously thought KK mass scales become preferred to explain the dark matter abundance in the universe. We explain this phenomenon by pinpointing the additional particles which, at such low cutoffs, become close enough in mass to the dark matter candidate to coannihilate with it. We make predictions for both collider and direct dark matter searches that might soon close in on all viable theory parameter space.

Jonathan M. Cornell; Stefano Profumo; William Shepherd

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Renewable energy subsidies: Second-best policy or fatal aberration for mitigation?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the consequences of renewable energy policies on welfare and energy prices in a world where carbon pricing is imperfect and the regulator seeks to limit emissions to a (cumulative) target. The imperfectness of the carbon price is motivated by political concerns regarding distributional effects of increased energy prices. Hence, carbon prices are considered to be temporarily or permanently absent or endogenously constrained by their effect on energy prices. We use a global general equilibrium model with an intertemporal fossil resource sector and calculate intertemporally optimal policies from a broad set of policy instruments including carbon taxes, renewable energy subsidies and feed-in-tariffs, among others. If carbon pricing is permanently missing, mitigation costs increase by a multiple (compared to the optimal carbon pricing policy) for a wide range of parameters describing extraction costs, renewable energy costs, substitution possibilities and normative attitudes. Furthermore, we show that small deviations from the second-best subsidy can lead to strong increases in emissions and consumption losses. This confirms the rising concerns about the occurrence of unintended side effects of climate policy – a new version of the green paradox. Smart combinations of carbon prices and renewable energy subsidies, however, can achieve ambitious mitigation targets at moderate additional costs without leading to high energy price increases.

Matthias Kalkuhl; Ottmar Edenhofer; Kai Lessmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Quantum dynamics and state-dependent affine gauge fields on CP(N-1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gauge fields frequently used as an independent construction additional to so-called wave fields of matter. This artificial separation is of course useful in some applications (like Berry's interactions between the "heavy" and "light" sub-systems) but it is restrictive on the fundamental level of "elementary" particles and entangled states. It is shown that the linear superposition of action states and non-linear dynamics of the local dynamical variables form an oscillons of energy representing non-local particles - "lumps" arising together with their "affine gauge potential" agrees with Fubini-Study metric. I use the conservation laws of local dynamical variables (LDV's) during affine parallel transport in complex projective Hilbert space $CP(N-1)$ for twofold aim. Firstly, I formulate the variation problem for the ``affine gauge potential" as system of partial differential equations \\cite{Le1}. Their solutions provide embedding quantum dynamics into dynamical space-time whose state-dependent coordinates related to the qubit spinor subjected to Lorentz transformations of "quantum boosts" and "quantum rotations". Thereby, the problem of quantum measurement being reformulated as the comparison of LDV's during their affine parallel transport in $CP(N-1)$, is inherently connected with space-time emergences. Secondly, the important application of these fields is the completeness of quantum theory. The EPR and Schr\\"odinger's Cat paradoxes are discussed from the point of view of the restored Lorentz invariance due to the affine parallel transport of local Hamiltonian of the soliton-like field.

Peter Leifer

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

483

A comparative appraisal of the use of rainwater harvesting in single and multi-family buildings of the Metropolitan Area of Barcelona (Spain): social experience, drinking water savings and economic costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many urban areas suffer water scarcity but paradoxically, a local source of water such as rainwater is mostly treated as a risk rather than as a valuable resource. Scepticism regarding the use of rainwater harvesting technologies still prevails today, particularly in low precipitation areas. However, some regions such as the Metropolitan Area of Barcelona (MAB) have started to promote the use of rainwater through specific regulations and incentives. This paper aims to examine the use of rainwater harvesting in the two main types of buildings prevalent in the MAB by analysing users’ practices and perceptions, drinking water savings and economic costs. Despite low precipitation inputs and a high variability of precipitation, daily balances show that toilet flushing demand of a single family house can be practically met with a relatively small tank. Rooftop rainwater can also meet more than 60% of the landscape irrigation demand in both single and multi-family buildings. The main drawback is the long pay-back period that rainwater harvesting systems present today. Nevertheless, it is remarkable that in multi-family buildings residents usually take no notice of the costs associated with the system. In contrast, benefits for the whole society are usually much more appreciated. Users’ reactions and their level of satisfaction towards rainwater harvesting systems suggest that both regulations and subsidies are good strategies to advocate and expand rainwater harvesting technologies in residential areas. However, a multidirectional learning environment needs to be promoted to ensure a proper use of rainwater harvesting systems and risk minimisation.

Laia Domènech; David Saurí

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Thermoelectric recovery of waste heat -- Case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of waste heat as an energy source for thermoelectric generation largely removes the constraint for the wide scale application of this technology imposed by its relatively low conversion efficiency (typically about 5%). Paradoxically, in some parasitic applications, a low conversion efficiency can be viewed as a distinct advantage. However, commercially available thermoelectric modules are designed primarily for refrigerating applications and are less reliable when operated at elevated temperatures. Consequently, a major factor which determines the economic competitiveness of thermoelectric recovery of waste heat is the cost per watt divided by the mean-time between module failures. In this paper is reported the development of a waste, warm water powered thermoelectric generator, one target in a NEDO sponsored project to economically recover waste heat. As an application of this technology case studies are considered in which thermoelectric generators are operated in both active and parasitic modes to generate electrical power for a central heating system. It is concluded that, in applications when the supply of heat essentially is free as with waste heat, thermoelectrics can compete economically with conventional methods of electrical power generation. Also, in this situation, and when the generating system is operated in a parasitic mode, conversion efficiency is not an important consideration.

Rowe, M.D.; Min, G.; Williams, S.G.K.; Aoune, A. [Cardiff School of Engineering (United Kingdom). Div. of Electronic Engineering; Matsuura, Kenji [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Kuznetsov, V.L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Fu, L.W. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Microelectronics Inst.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Manifestations of topological effects in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene is a monoatomic layer of graphite with Carbon atoms arranged in a two dimensional honeycomb lattice configuration. It has been known for more than sixty years that the electronic structure of graphene can be modelled by two-dimensional massless relativistic fermions. This property gives rise to numerous applications, both in applied sciences and in theoretical physics. Electronic circuits made out of graphene could take advantage of its high electron mobility that is witnessed even at room temperature. In the theoretical domain the Dirac-like behavior of graphene can simulate high energy effects, such as the relativistic Klein paradox. Even more surprisingly, topological effects can be encoded in graphene such as the generation of vortices, charge fractionalization and the emergence of anyons. The impact of the topological effects on graphene's electronic properties can be elegantly described by the Atiyah-Singer index theorem. Here we present a pedagogical encounter of this theorem and review its various applications to graphene. A direct consequence of the index theorem is charge fractionalization that is usually known from the fractional quantum Hall effect. The charge fractionalization gives rise to the exciting possibility of realizing graphene based anyons that unlike bosons or fermions exhibit fractional statistics. Besides being of theoretical interest, anyons are a strong candidate for performing error free quantum information processing.

Jiannis K. Pachos

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

486

Uncatalyzed assembly of spherical particles from SV40 VP1 pentamers and linear dsDNA incorporates both low and high cooperativity elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capsid of SV40 virion is comprised of 72 pentamers of the major capsid protein, VP1. We examined the synergism between pentamer-pentamer interaction and pentamer-DNA interaction using a minimal system of purified VP1 and a linear dsDNA 600-mer, comparing electrophoresis with electron microscopy and size exclusion chromatography. At low VP1/DNA ratios, large tubes were observed that apparently did not survive native agarose gel electrophoresis. As the VP1 concentration increased, electrophoretic migration was slower and tubes were replaced by 200 A diameter particles and excess free pentamer. At high VP1/DNA ratios, a progressively larger fraction of particles was similar to 450 A diameter virions. VP1 association with DNA is very strong compared to the concentrations in these experiments yet, paradoxically, stable complexes appear only at high ratios of VP1 to DNA. These data suggest a DNA saturation-dependent nucleation event based on non-specific pentamer-DNA interaction that controls assembly and the ultimate capsid geometry.

Mukherjee, Santanu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States); Kler, Stanislav; Oppenheim, Ariella [Department of Hematology, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, 91120 Jerusalem (Israel); Zlotnick, Adam, E-mail: azlotnic@indiana.ed [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47401 (United States)

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

487

Coordinated studies in support of hydraulic fracturing of coalbed methane. Annual report, January 1993-April 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of natural gas from coal typically requires stimulation in the form of hydraulic fracturing and, more recently, cavity completions. The results of hydraulic fracturing treatments have ranged from extremely successful to less than satisfactory. The purpose of this work is to characterize common and potential fracturing fluids in terms of coal-fluid interactions to identify reasons for less than satisfactory performance and to ultimately devise alternative fluids and treatment procedures to optimize production following hydraulic fracturing. The laboratory data reported herein has proven helpful in designing improved hydraulic fracturing treatments and remedial treatments in the Black Warrior Basin. Acid inhibitors, scale inhibitors, additives to improve coal relative permeability to gas, and non-damaging polymer systems for hydraulic fracturing have been screened in coal damage tests. The optimum conditions for creating field-like foams in the laboratory have been explored. Tests have been run to identify minimum polymer and surfactant concentrations for applications of foam in coal. The roll of 100 mesh sand in controlling leakoff and impairing conductivity in coal has been investigated. The leakoff and proppant transport of fluids with breaker has been investigated and recommendations have been made for breaker application to minimize damage potential in coal. A data base called COAL`S has been created in Paradox (trademark) for Windows to catalogue coalbed methane activities in the Black Warrior and San Juan Basins.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Sub-second Morphological Changes in Nafion during Water Uptake Detected by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of Nafion® membrane to absorb water rapidly and create a network of hydrated interconnected water domains provides this material with an unmatched ability to conduct ions through a chemically and mechanically robust membrane. The morphology and composition of these hydrated membranes significantly affects their transport properties and performance. This work demonstrates that differences in interfacial interactions between the membranes exposed to vapor or liquid water can cause significant changes in kinetics of water uptake. In-situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments captured the rapid swelling of the membrane in liquid water with nanostructure rearrangement on the order of seconds. For membranes in contact with water vapor, morphological changes are four-orders-of-magnitude slower than in liquid water, suggesting that interfacial resistance limits the penetration of water into the membrane. Also, upon water absorption from liquid water, a structural rearrangement from a distribution of spherical and cylindrical domains to exclusively cylindrical-like domains is suggested. These differences in water-uptake kinetics and morphology provide a new perspective into Schroeder’s Paradox, which dictates different water contents for vaporand liquid-equilibrated ionomers at unit activity. The findings of this work provide critical insights into the fast kinetics of water absorption of Nafion membrane, which can aid in the design of energy conversion devices that operate under frequent changes in environmental conditions.

Kusoglu, Ahmet; Modestino, Miguel A.; Hexemer, Alexander; Segalman, Rachel A.; Weber, Adam Z.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

489

Evolution of a wave packet scattered by a one-dimensional potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the evolution of a wave packet that is made up of a group of the wave functions describing the stationary scattering process and tunnels through a one-dimensional potential of arbitrary form. As the main characteristics of the time difference of the tunnelling process, use is made of the propagation speed of the wave-packet maximum. We show that the known Hartman formula for the tunnelling time corresponds to the wave packet with a wavenumber-uniform spectral composition in the case, when the phase and transmission coefficient modulus dispersions are taken into account only in the linear approximation. The amplitude of the main peak of the transmitted wave intensity is proven to be independent of the tunnelling time and is determined by the transmission coefficient of the spectral component at the carrier frequency and the spectral width of the wave packet. In the limit of an infinitely wide potential barrier the amplitude of the wave-packet maximum is shown to tend to zero slower than the tunnelling time tends to its asymptotic value, i.e., indeed we deal with the paradox of an infinitely large propagation speed of a wave disturbance through the barrier. (propagation of wave fronts)

Khachatrian, A Zh; Alexanyan, Al G; Khoetsyan, V A; Alexanyan, N A

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

490

Life in the salinity gradient: Discovering mechanisms behind a new biodiversity pattern  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A recently discovered paradoxical maximum of planktonic protistan species in the salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea revealed an inverse trend of species number/salinity relation in comparison to the previously accepted species-minimum model for macrozoobenthos. Here, we review long-term data on organisms of different size classes and ecological groups to show that eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbes in plankton demonstrate a maximum species richness in the challenging zone of the critical salinity 5–8, where the large-bodied bottom dwellers (macrozoobenthos, macroalgae and aquatic higher plants) experience large-scale salinity stress which leads to an impoverished diversity. We propose a new conceptual model to explain why the diversity of small, fast-developing, rapidly evolving unicellular plankton organisms benefits from relative vacancy of brackish-water ecological niches and impaired competitiveness therein. The ecotone theory, Hutchinson's Ecological Niche Concept, species–area relationships and the Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis are considered as a theoretical framework for understanding extinctions, speciation and variations in the evolution rates of different aquatic species in ecosystems with the pronounced salinity gradient.

Irena Telesh; Hendrik Schubert; Sergei Skarlato

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Nature of time and causality in Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conceptual definition and understanding of the nature of time, both qualitatively and quantitatively is of the utmost difficulty and importance, and plays a fundamental role in physics. Physical systems seem to evolve in paths of increasing entropy and of complexity, and thus, the arrow of time shall be explored in the context of thermodynamic irreversibility and quantum physics. In Newtonian physics, time flows at a constant rate, the same for all observers; however, it necessarily flows at different rates for different observers in special and general relativity. Special relativity provides important quantitative elucidations of the fundamental processes related to time dilation effects, and general relativity provides a deep analysis to effects of time flow, such as in the presence of gravitational fields. Through the special theory of relativity, time became intimately related with space, giving rise to the notion of spacetime, in which both parameters cannot be considered as separate entities. As time is incorporated into the proper structure of the fabric of spacetime, it is interesting to note that general relativity is contaminated with non-trivial geometries that generate closed timelike curves, and thus apparently violates causality. The notion of causality is fundamental in the construction of physical theories; therefore time travel and its associated paradoxes have to be treated with great caution. These issues are briefly analyzed in this review paper.

Francisco S. N. Lobo

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

492

Mechanism of Cd[superscript 2+] Coordination during Slow Inactivation in Potassium Channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In K{sup +} channels, rearrangements of the pore outer vestibule have been associated with C-type inactivation gating. Paradoxically, the crystal structure of Open/C-type inactivated KcsA suggests these movements to be modest in magnitude. In this study, we show that under physiological conditions, the KcsA outer vestibule undergoes relatively large dynamic rearrangements upon inactivation. External Cd{sup 2+} enhances the rate of C-type inactivation in an cysteine mutant (Y82C) via metal-bridge formation. This effect is not present in a non-inactivating mutant (E71A/Y82C). Tandem dimer and tandem tetramer constructs of equivalent cysteine mutants in KcsA and Shaker K{sup +} channels demonstrate that these Cd{sup 2+} metal bridges are formed only between adjacent subunits. This is well supported by molecular dynamics simulations. Based on the crystal structure of Cd{sup 2+}-bound Y82C-KcsA in the closed state, together with electron paramagnetic resonance distance measurements in the KcsA outer vestibule, we suggest that subunits must dynamically come in close proximity as the channels undergo inactivation.

Raghuraman, H.; Cordero-Morales, Julio F.; Jogini, Vishwanath; Pan, Albert C.; Kollewe, Astrid; Roux, Benoît; Perozo, Eduardo (Freiburg); (UC)

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

493

Magnetic reconnection in space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models of magnetic reconnection in space plasmas generally consider only a segment of the magnetic field lines. The consideration of only a segment of the lines is shown to lead to paradoxical results in which reconnection can be impossible even in a magnetic field constrained to be curl free or can be at an Alfven rate even when the plasma is a perfect conductor. A model of reconnecting magnetic fields is developed which shows the smallness of the interdiffusion distance {delta}{sub d} of magnetic field lines does not limit the speed of reconnection but does provide a reconnection trigger. When the reconnection region has a natural length L{sub r}, the spatial scale of the gradient of magnetic field across the magnetic field lines must reach L{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 0.3L{sub r}/ln(L{sub r}/{delta}{sub d}) for fast reconnection to be triggered, which implies a current density j Almost-Equal-To B/{mu}{sub 0}L{sub g} that is far lower than that usually thought required for fast reconnection. The relation between magnetic reconnection in space and in toroidal laboratory plasmas is also discussed.

Boozer, Allen H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

494

Why Hawking Radiation Cannot Be Decoded  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the great difficulties in the theory of black hole evaporation is that the most decisive phenomena tend to occur when the black hole is extremely hot: that is, when the physics is most poorly understood. Fortunately, a crucial step in the Harlow-Hayden approach to the firewall paradox, concerning the time available for decoding of Hawking radiation emanating from charged AdS black holes, can be made to work without relying on the unknown physics of black holes with extremely high temperatures; in fact, it relies on the properties of cold black holes. Here we clarify this surprising point. The approach is based on ideas borrowed from applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence to the quark-gluon plasma. Firewalls aside, our work presents a detailed analysis of the thermodynamics and evolution of evaporating charged AdS black holes with flat event horizons. We show that, in one way or another, these black holes are always eventually destroyed in a time which, while long by normal standards, is short relat...

Ong, Yen Chin; Chen, Pisin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Mathematical Structure of Quantum Decision Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most complex systems is the human brain whose formalized functioning is characterized by decision theory. We present a "Quantum Decision Theory" of decision making, based on the mathematical theory of separable Hilbert spaces. This mathematical structure captures the effect of superposition of composite prospects, including many incorporated intentions, which allows us to explain a variety of interesting fallacies and anomalies that have been reported to particularize the decision making of real human beings. The theory describes entangled decision making, non-commutativity of subsequent decisions, and intention interference of composite prospects. We demonstrate how the violation of the Savage's sure-thing principle (disjunction effect) can be explained as a result of the interference of intentions, when making decisions under uncertainty. The conjunction fallacy is also explained by the presence of the interference terms. We demonstrate that all known anomalies and paradoxes, documented in the context of classical decision theory, are reducible to just a few mathematical archetypes, all of which finding straightforward explanations in the frame of the developed quantum approach.

V. I. Yukalov; D. Sornette

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Why Hawking Radiation Cannot Be Decoded  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the great difficulties in the theory of black hole evaporation is that the most decisive phenomena tend to occur when the black hole is extremely hot: that is, when the physics is most poorly understood. Fortunately, a crucial step in the Harlow-Hayden approach to the firewall paradox, concerning the time available for decoding of Hawking radiation emanating from charged AdS black holes, can be made to work without relying on the unknown physics of black holes with extremely high temperatures; in fact, it relies on the properties of cold black holes. Here we clarify this surprising point. The approach is based on ideas borrowed from applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence to the quark-gluon plasma. Firewalls aside, our work presents a detailed analysis of the thermodynamics and evolution of evaporating charged AdS black holes with flat event horizons. We show that, in one way or another, these black holes are always eventually destroyed in a time which, while long by normal standards, is short relative to the decoding time of Hawking radiation.

Yen Chin Ong; Brett McInnes; Pisin Chen

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

497

Improving exploration with geographical information system (GIS) technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Timely reliable access to data is required by Earth Scientists and Engineers evaluating geology, facilities, environment, and new business opportunities. Geographical Information System (GIS) technology has been recently implemented to provide efficient and comprehensive access to data for exploration work in Venezuela. The GIS allows rapid comparisons, queries, sorting, and evaluation of data that in the past required multiple hardware platforms, multiple software packages, paper plots, spreadsheets, and time. A vendor GIS database package formed the foundation. This GIS provided regional coverage for the entire country of Venezuela at a scale of 1:250,000. It included 36,000 wells and associated attributes, facilities, geologic maps, potential field data, and transportation networks. Essential with GIS, all of the data were transformed from multiple cartographic datums to a single map projection. Proprietary and other tabular databases were incorporated into the vendor GIS by Chevron, significantly upgrading the value of the system for company exploration. Tabular databases were either imported, linked or converted to the GIS. They included Nomad, Paradox, Oracle, Openworks, and PC-based spreadsheets containing wells, seismic, and geochemistry data. Nontabular data types incorporated into the GIS included digital outcrop log and paleosections, maps, other GIS data, Global Positioning System control points, satellite imagery and scanned photographs. The enhanced GIS has proven valuable for facilitating access to, and rapid and accurate evaluation of, large geographic areas with multiple data sources and types.

Goodwin, P.B.; Choiniere, M.R.; Harris, F.W. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

498

Revisiting Directed Polymers with heavy-tailed disorder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this mostly numerical study, we revisit the statistical properties of the ground state of a directed polymer in a $d=1+1$ "hilly" disorder landscape, i.e. when the quenched disorder has power-law tails. When disorder is Gaussian, the polymer minimizes its total energy through a collective optimization, where the energy of each visited site only weakly contributes to the total. Conversely, a hilly landscape forces the polymer to distort and explore a larger portion of space to reach some particularly deep energy sites. As soon as the fifth moment of the disorder diverges, this mechanism radically changes the standard "KPZ" scaling behaviour of the directed polymer, and new exponents prevail. After confirming again that the Flory argument accurately predicts these exponent in the tail-dominated phase, we investigate several other statistical features of the ground state that shed light on this unusual transition and on the accuracy of the Flory argument. We underline the theoretical challenge posed by this situation, which paradoxically becomes even more acute above the upper critical dimension.

Thomas Gueudré; Pierre Le Doussal; Jean-Philippe Bouchaud; Alberto Rosso

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

499

Perception and acceptable risks – the union of decision-theory, behaviour and the brain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acceptability and perception drive risky environmental heath and safety decisions: protecting against nearly infinitesimal risks can involve expenditures of millions or billions of dollars. Societal decision-makers and individual taxpayers are asked to understand numbers that span over more than 15 orders of magnitude, numbers with which most individuals lack experience. For example, we perceived real estate values will continue to rise, and lenders, in part misperceiving the potential risks of defaults, lent to more than 7 million high-risk borrowers: more than a trillion dollars were involved in the sub-prime loans market disaster. Even when public agencies or industry perform a health or safety assessment and demonstrate low risk, such assertions are not sufficient justification for those at risk to accept as minimal guarantees of safety, as the Challenger disaster shows. However, to assert that a risk is correctly perceived and acceptable requires understanding of 'acceptable risk' numbers, otherwise any 'acceptable risk criterion' to justify a choice can hardly be meaningful. This paper's synthesis of theoretical and experimental aspects integrates decision-theoretic, behavioural and neurological results, including surprising or paradoxical choices.

Paolo F. Ricci

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Smooth horizons and quantum ripples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Black Holes are unique objects which allow for meaningful theoretical studies of strong gravity and even quantum gravity effects. An infalling and a distant observer would have very different views on the structure of the world. However, a careful analysis has shown that it entails no genuine contradictions for physics, and the paradigm of observer complementarity has been coined. Recently this picture was put into doubt. In particular, it was argued that in old Black Holes a firewall must form in order to protect the basic principles of quantum mechanics. This AMPS paradox has already been discussed in a vast number of papers with different attitudes and conclusions. Here we want to argue that a possible source of confusion is neglection of quantum gravity effects. Contrary to widespread perception, it does not necessarily mean that effective field theory is inapplicable in rather smooth neighbourhoods of large Black Hole horizons. The real offender might be an attempt to consistently use it over the huge distances from the near-horizon zone of old Black Holes to the early radiation. We give simple estimates to support this viewpoint and show how the Page time and (somewhat more speculative) scrambling time do appear.

Alexey Golovnev

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z