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1

NREL: Biomass Research - Lintao Bu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modules Translation on Cellulose Surface." In Computational Modeling in Lignocellulosic Biofuel Production. Bu, L.; Beckham, G. T.; Crowley, M. F.; Chang, C. H.; Matthews, J. F.;...

2

Haskel/BuTech/PPI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation Presentation For Argonne National Laboratory Haskel/BuTech/PPI Products * 100,000psi Liquid Pumps * 37,000psi Gas Boosters * 15,000psi Diaphragm Comp * 4,500psi Air Amplifiers * 150,000psi Valves, Fittings, and Tubing * 15,000psi Sub-Sea Valves (1" orifice) * Air Pilot Switches & Relief Valves Valves, Fittings & Tubing Pumps, Boosters, & Diaphragm Compressors & Systems Hydraulic Gas Booster Challenges * Global Material Regulations - KHK Japan recommends A286 & 316 SS with high nickel content - Europe recommends 316SS - North America does not appear to regulate * Global Certifications - CE & ATEX * Low Inlet vs. High Outlet (Suction vs Discharge) - Multiple compression stages - Elevated temperatures

3

SN2002bu -- Another SN2008S-like Transient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We observed SN2002bu in the near-IR with the Hubble Space Telescope, the mid-IR with the Spitzer Space Telescope and in X-rays with Swift 10 years after the explosion. If the faint L_H\\sim100 Lsun HST near-IR source at the transient position is the near-IR counterpart of SN2002bu, then the source has dramatically faded between 2004 and 2012, from L\\sim10^6.0 Lsun to L\\sim10^4.5 Lsun. It is still heavily obscured, tau_V\\sim5 in graphitic dust models, with almost all the energy radiated in the mid-IR. The radius of the dust emission is increasing as R\\simt^(0.7+/-0.4) and the optical depth is dropping as tau_V\\simt^(-1.3+/-0.4). The evolution expected for an expanding shell of material, tau_V\\sim1/t^2, is ruled out at approximately 2 sigma while the tau_V\\simt^(-0.8) to t^(-1) optical depth scaling for a shock passing through a pre-existing wind is consistent with the data. If the near-IR source is a chance superposition, the present day source can be moderately more luminous, significantly more obscured and ev...

Szczygiel, D M; Dai, X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN ON A ALBANY CAT RON CREEK DALEY BU LL CREEK LEE C HAPEL AR Y ROT HWELL MEAD OW CR EEK HOL LY CREEK CON CORD TAU LBEE KH...

5

Me[subscript 3](OMe)tBuXPhos: A Surrogate Ligand for Me[subscript 4]tBuXPhos in Palladium-Catalyzed C-N and C-O Bond-Forming Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new biarylphosphine ligand, Me[subscript 3](OMe)tBuXPhos (L3), was designed as a surrogate for Me[subscript 4]tBuXPhos (L1). The Me[subscript 3](OMe)tBuXPhos could be prepared in a chromatography-free manner from inexpensive ...

Ueda, Satoshi

6

Rgysa bzang Tibetan Village: Tshon dpona nor bu bzang po ( A Story)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track Rgysa bzang Tibetan Village: Tshon dpona nor bu bzang po ( A Story) Translation of title Description (to be used in archive entry) Ge tes zla bo (Mchas ba bkra shis; b.~1945...

G.yung, 'brug

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Using the Expertise Web Site http://www.bumc.bu.edu/expertise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;_________________________________Search Term Enter your search term in this textbox Using the Expertise Web Site : Basic Search http searches are project terms from NIH Reporter data and are BU specific Using the Expertise Web Site a Basic Search Updating your Expertise Profile Performing an Advanced Search #12

Spence, Harlan Ernest

8

Using the Expertise Web Site http://www.bumc.bu.edu/expertise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;_________________________________Search Term Enter your search term in this textbox Using the Expertise Web Site : Basic Search http searches are project terms from NIH Reporter data and are BU specific Using the Expertise Web Site a Basic Search Establishing and Updating your Expertise Profile Performing an Advanced Search #12

Spence, Harlan Ernest

9

RCRA Part A permit characterization plan for the U-2bu subsidence crater. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan presents the characterization strategy for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 109, U-2bu Subsidence Crater (referred to as U-2bu) in Area 2 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The objective of the planned activities is to obtain sufficient characterization data for the crater soils and observed wastes under the conditions of the current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A permit. The scope of the characterization plan includes collecting surface and subsurface soil samples with hand augers and for the purpose of site characterization. The sampling strategy is to characterize the study area soils and look for RCRA constituents. Observable waste soils and surrounding crater soils will be analyzed and evaluated according to RCRA closure criteria. Because of the status of the crater a RCRA Part A permit site, acquired radionuclide analyses will only be evaluated in regards to the health and safety of site workers and the disposition of wastes generated during site characterization. The U-2bu Subsidence Crater was created in 1971 by a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground nuclear test, event name Miniata, and was used as a land-disposal unit for radioactive and hazardous waste from 1973 to 1988.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

SN 2002bu-ANOTHER SN 2008S-LIKE TRANSIENT  

SciTech Connect

We observed supernova (SN) 2002bu in the near-IR with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the mid-IR with the Spitzer Space Telescope, and in X-rays with Swift 10 years after the explosion. If the faint L {sub H} {approx} 10{sup 2} L {sub Sun} HST near-IR source at the transient position is the near-IR counterpart of SN 2002bu, then the source has dramatically faded between 2004 and 2012, from L {approx_equal} 10{sup 6.0} L {sub Sun} to L {approx_equal} 10{sup 4.5} L {sub Sun }. It is still heavily obscured, {tau} {sub V} {approx_equal} 5 in graphitic dust models, with almost all the energy radiated in the mid-IR. The radius of the dust emission is increasing as R{proportional_to}t {sup 0.7{+-}0.4} and the optical depth is dropping as {tau} {sub V}{proportional_to}t {sup -1.3{+-}0.4}. The evolution expected for an expanding shell of material, {tau} {sub V}{proportional_to}t {sup -2}, is ruled out at approximately 2{sigma}, while the {tau} {sub V}{proportional_to}t {sup -0.8} to t {sup -1} optical depth scaling for a shock passing through a pre-existing wind is consistent with the data. If the near-IR source is a chance superposition, the present-day source can be moderately more luminous, significantly more obscured and evolving more slowly. While we failed to detect X-ray emission, the X-ray flux limits are consistent with the present-day emissions being powered by an expanding shock wave. SN 2002bu is clearly a member of the SN 2008S class of transients, but continued monitoring of the evolution of the spectral energy distribution is needed to conclusively determine the nature of the transient.

Szczygiel, D. M.; Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Dai, X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration BIG PINEY TIP TOP BIR D CANYON SWAN FONTEN ELL E LABARGE...

12

BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline ID The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy.

13

Tetrabutylammonium cation in a homoleptic environment of borohydride ligands: [(n-Bu){sub 4}N][BH{sub 4}] and [(n-Bu){sub 4}N][Y(BH{sub 4}){sub 4}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel solvent-free dual-cation organic-inorganic derivative, tetrabutylammonium yttrium borohydride (TBAYB), has been prepared for the first time and structurally characterized together with its organic precursor, tetrabutylammonium borohydride (TBAB). Both compounds crystallize in monoclinic unit cells (TBAYB: P2{sub 1}/c, TBAB: P2/c) and they contain [(n-Bu){sub 4}N]{sup +} in a homoleptic environment consisting of BH{sub 4}{sup -} ligands. Presence of large and lightweight Bu{sub 4}N{sup +} cations results in loose packing and low densities of both solids close to 1 g cm{sup -3}. TBAB melts at ca. 130 Degree-Sign C and it decomposes thermally above 160 Degree-Sign C while TBAYB melts at temperature as low as 78 Degree-Sign C, and the melt is stable over an appreciable temperature range of ca. 150 Degree-Sign C. The low melting point of TBAYB is the second lowest among derivatives of yttrium rendering this compound a new ionic liquid above 78 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: A novel organic-inorganic hybrid material for hydrogen storage, where (n-Bu){sub 4}N{sup +} cation is found in homoleptic environment of BH{sub 4}{sup -} ligands, was synthesised. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel organic-inorganic hybrid material for hydrogen storage was synthesised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (n-Bu){sub 4}N{sup +} cation is found in a homoleptic environment of BH{sub 4}{sup -} ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TBAYB derivative is a novel ionic liquid with melting point of 78 Degree-Sign C..

Jaron, T., E-mail: tjaron@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Wegner, W.; Cyranski, M.K.; Dobrzycki, L. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Grochala, W., E-mail: wg22@cornell.edu [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); CENT, University of Warsaw, Zwirki i Wigury 93, 02089 Warsaw (Poland)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

1197 South Lumpkin Street Athens Georgia 30602-3603 weddings@georgiacenter.uga.edu 706.542.2654 The minimum charge For a lunch BuFFeT is $650.00.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Fashioned Picnic BuFFeT [3066] All Beef Frankfurters, Grilled Hamburgers with Garnish, Baked Beans, Potato Chips

Arnold, Jonathan

15

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record #13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Date: 09/05/2013 7 Date: 09/05/2013 Title: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) Originators: Pete Devlin, Jim Alkire, Sara Dillich, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Approved by: Rick Farmer and Sunita Satyapal Date: 09/09/13 Item: Table 1: Number of fuel cells deployments (current and planned) for applications in backup power. The funding of 903 Department of Energy (DOE) fuel cell backup power systems has led to over 3,500 industry installations and on-order backup power units with no DOE funding. Data/Assumptions/Calculations: The manufacturers providing the fuel cells for the deployments (current and planned) mentioned in Table 1 above are: Altergy Ballard / Ida Tech Hydrogenics ReliOn, Inc. Total DOE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) investment for these fuel cell

16

GL Report BU 355  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DSW DSW BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT ($ IN THOUSANDS) DSW DSW BUDGET BUDGET FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 Total DESCRIPTION ACTIVITY ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP O&M Power Billing N/FGCR BILLM 217 $ 170 $ 250 $ 205 $ 231 $ - $ 130 $ 130 $ 12 $ 23 $ 36 $ 44 $ 56 $ 69 $ 77 $ 100 $ 111 $ 116 $ 121 $ 130 $ Conserv & Renew Energy N/FGCR CAREM 21 $ 3 $ 4 $ 3 $ 4 $ - $ 3 $ 3 $ - $ 1 $ 1 $ 1 $ 1 $ 1 $ 2 $ 3 $ 3 $ 3 $ 3 $ 3 $ Communications & Control

17

GL Report BU 355  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMMM 1,346 1,857 1,873 1,580 2,068 155 1,832 1,987 113 267 358 456 568 718 886 1,048 1,234 1,331 1,493 1,987 Data NFJCR DATAM 238 264...

18

GL Report BU 355  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MC MC BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT ($ IN THOUSANDS) CRSP MC CRSP MC BUDGET BUDGET FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 TOTAL DESCRIPTION ACTIVITY ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP O&M N/FLCR ANLVM 100 $ - $ 539 $ 354 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ Power Billing N/FLCR BILLM - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ Conserv & Renew Energy N/FLCR CAREM 159 $ 118

19

Comparison of Cobalt and Nickel Complexes with Sterically Demanding Cyclic Diphosphine Ligands: Electrocatalytic H2 Production by [Co(PtBu2NPh2)(CH3CN)3](BF4)2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cyclic diphosphine ligands PtBu2NPh2 and PtBu2NBz2 have been synthesized and used to prepare new complexes of Co(II) and Ni(II) with the formula [M(PtBu2NR2)(CH3CN)n](BF4)2 (n = 2, 3). The products have been characterized by variable temperature NMR data, X-ray diffraction studies, and cyclic voltammetry, and properties of the new complexes have been compared with previously studied complexes containing PPh2NR2 ligands. The variation of either phosphorus or nitrogen substituents in these ligands can result in significant differences in the structure, electrochemistry and reactivity of the metal complexes. [Co(PtBu2NPh2)(CH3CN)3](BF4)2 is found to be an effective electrocatalyst for the formation of hydrogen using bromoanilinium tetrafluoroborate as the acid, with a turnover frequency of 62 s-1 and an overpotential of 160 mV, and these cobalt derivatives are a promising class of catalysts for further study and optimization. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

Wiedner, Eric S.; Yang, Jenny Y.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Bullock, R. Morris; Rakowski DuBois, Mary; DuBois, Daniel L.

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

20

Developed by Wendy Coster, PhD. Since these websites for library searches often change, please notify Wendy Coster at wjcoster@bu.edu if any of the directions appear to need updating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the main search page. Enter the term exactly into the search box, and then from the drop down menu, select keywords. This makes my search more efficient and effective! Remember, the terms used to describe topics at wjcoster@bu.edu if any of the directions appear to need updating. 2) Enter your topic term

Guenther, Frank

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uff bu rly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

bu.edu/eng26 Managing Multiple,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the workload for human operators of semi-autonomous underwater, ground and aerial vehicles in military's computer code can follow, and thus survey a defined space. ROBOTICS #12;27 A persistent surveillance scenario in which multiple agents coordinate to survey a complex scene with areas weighted by importance

Goldberg, Bennett

22

Rituels aux divinites locales de Kheng 'Bu li (Bhoutan central)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rituels sont plus généralement appelés dpa'bo, dpa' mo, *neldjom (rnal 'byor ma) ou pha jo. Ce dernier terme est surtoututilisé dans la région occidentale de Shar où l'activité ancienne des gter stonbon po est attestée.35Tous ces officiants ont une...

Pommaret, Françoise

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

for Enclosed Bu()yant Convection in Two Dimensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ( 8Ui 8Ui) 8p 82Ui (1) +--pki9 = pv- 8t :J 8xj 8Xi 8x~ (aT 8T) 82T pCp 8t +Uj8xj ... HUMBER OF PRINTED PAGES 39 15. PRICE A03 Page 35. , b ili I'" "'I

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

24

GL Report BU 355 CRSP CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP JUNE 2013 ( IN THOUSANDS) FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 13 REGION ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET ACTUALS ACTUAL TARGET O&M...

25

Combined Transistor Sizing with Bu er Insertion for Timing Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. on CAD, vol. CAD-2, pp. 202 211, July 1983. 8 K. O. Jeppson, Modeling the in uence of the transistor gain

Sapatnekar, Sachin

26

RAWLS COLLEGE OF BuSinESS 237 Economics Major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Gas Law I 3 ENCO 3385, Petroleum Land Mgmt. 3 ENCO 3376, Exploration & Prod.Techniques 3 BLAW 3391 3386, Oil & Gas Agreements 3 ENCO 3386, Oil & Gas Agreements 3 or ENCO 4396, Oil & Gas Law II or ENCO 4396, Oil & Gas Law II ENCO 4362, U.S. Energy Policy & Reg. 3 ENCO 4399, Sr. Seminar in Energy Comm. 3

Rock, Chris

27

.l . Plusma Piyslcs (199()).lvl. J.ii4.ytrt !. pp.2}l-|tl} Printcil in (lrcut Rrituin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma Research Laboratorv. ResearchSchool of PhvsicalSr,iences.TheAustralian )?;ifl,,:rli,"Jsitv. G

Dewar, Robert L.

28

Boston University, Sargent College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences 635 Commonwealth Avenue E-mail: scnc@bu.edu www.bu.edu/scnutrition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precede the grain. Wheat flour, enriched wheat flour and unbleached wheat flour are not whole grain of these essential oils to increase flavor and satisfaction. Whole Grains Whole grain breads Whole wheat English muffins Whole wheat bagels, mini bagels Whole wheat or corn tortillas Whole wheat pitas Cereal

29

TRANSFORMING impact ANNUAL REPORT ON REsEARch ANd cREATivE AcTiviTy AT ThE UNivERsiTy AT bUffALO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of protein found in breast milk oPenInG DooR to CHInA Kristin stapleton: Extending UB's asian expertise-fabrication techniques create metamaterials IDentIFYInG neW DRUGs matthew Disney: Chemicals that deactivate rna

Krovi, Venkat

30

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Reserve Class Liquids Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

31

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

32

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Reserve Class Gas Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

33

Le manuscrit Stein 4226 Taiping bu juan di er dans l'histoire du taosme mdival  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a permis la consultation du manuscrit original, ainsi que MM. Jean- Pierre Drège et John Lagerwey pour leur (Chinese texts other than Buddhist scriptures), vol. 6, p. 1-8 (reproduction également en noir et blanc). 8 Fujieda Akira, « The Tunhuang Manuscripts : A General Description (Part I) », p. 18. 10 Par exemple, le

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

34

ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DANFORT H HILL S WIN TER C AM P BIG RID GEC O DRY FORKC O DRY FORKC O PR ICKLY PEAR BOOK CLIFF S COYOTE BASIN COON H OLL OW DRY CR EEKUT WEAVER RID GE ASBUR Y CREEK SKIN NER...

35

Interleaving Bu er Insertion and Transistor Sizing into a Single Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diagnos, säger Marianne Jeppson, studievägledare och sammanhållande för nätverket som startade för fyra år

Sapatnekar, Sachin

36

MEMS spatial light modulators with integrated electronics Thomas Becker, tbecker@bu.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND ELECTROMECHANICAL MODEL A mathematical model of the proposed actuator was developed to assist in design studies anchored flexure arms, modeled as fixed-guided cantilever beams; the actuator plate is assumed to be rigid. Modeling the actuator/mirror as a simple mass-spring system, this proposed geometry yields a natural

37

GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

OWN OAKFORD TWENTY-MILE CR EEK CARMICH AELS GOULD KAN ZIGG H ILL CADIZ LEOPOLD MT DAVIS BEARSVILLE AU GU STA FAYETT E C ITY FINK CR EEK HEADSVILLE CAMERON-GARNER TERRA ALTA...

38

Search for b-->u transitions in B- --> DK- and B- --> D*K- Decays  

SciTech Connect

We report results from an updated study of the suppressed decays B{sup -} --> DK{sup -} and B{sup -} --> D*K{sup -} followed by D --> K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, where D{sup (*)} indicates a D{sup (*)0} or a {anti D}{sup (*)0} meson, and D{sup *} --> D{tau}{sup 0} or D{sup *} --> D{gamma}. These decays are sensitive to the CKM unitarity triangle angle {gamma} due to interference between the b --> c transition B{sup -} --> D{sup (*)0}K{sup -} followed by the double Cabibbo-suppressed decay D{sup 0} --> K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and the b --> u transition B{sup -} --> {anti D}{sup (*)0}K{sup -} followed by the Cabibbo-favored decay {anti D}{sup 0} --> K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. We also report an analysis of the decay B{sup -} --> D{sup (*)}{pi}{sup -} with the D decaying into the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed mode D --> K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Our results are based on 467 million {Upsilon}(4S) --> B{anti B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC. We measure the ratios R{sup (*)} of the suppressed ([K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}]{sub D}K{sup -}/{pi}{sup -}) to favored ([K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}]{sub D}K{sup -}/{pi}{sup -}) branching fractions as well as the CP asymmetries A{sup (*)} of those modes. We see indications of signals for the B{sup -} --> DK{sup -} and B{sup -} --> D{sup *}{sub D{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -} suppressed modes, with statistical significances of 2.1 and 2.2{sigma}, respectively, and we measure: R{sub DK} = (1.1 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup -2}, A{sub DK} = -0.86 {+-} 0.47 {sup +0.12}{sub -0.16}, R{sup *}{sub (D{pi}{sup 0})K} = (1.8 {+-} 0.9 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -2}, A{sup *}{sub (D{pi}{sup 0})K} = +0.77 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 0.12, R{sup *}{sub (D{gamma})K} = (1.3 {+-} 1.4 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup -2}, A{sup *}{sub (D{gamma})K} = +0.36 {+-} 0.94 {sup +0.25}{sub -0.41}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. we use a frequentist approach to obtain the magnitude of the ratio r{sub B} {equivalent_to} {vert_bar}A(B{sup -} --> {anti D}{sup 0}K{sup -})/A(B{sup -} --> D{sup 0}K{sup -}){vert_bar} = (9.5{sup +5.1}{sub -4.1})%, with r{sub B} < 16.7% at 90% confidence level. In the case of B{sup -} --> D{sup *}K{sup -} we find r{sup *}{sub B} {equivalent_to} {vert_bar}A(B{sup -} --> {anti D}{sup *0}K{sup -})/A(B{sup -} --> D{sup *0}K{sup -}){vert_bar} = (9.6{sup +3.5}{sub 5.1})%, with r{sup *}{sub B} < 15.0% at 90% confidence level.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

39

Search for b-->u transitions in B--->DK- and D*K- decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results from an updated study of the suppressed decays B--->DK- and B--->D*K- followed by D-->K+pi-, where D(*) indicates a D(*)0 or a D[over-bar] (*)0 meson, and D*-->Dpi0 or D*-->Dgamma. These decays are sensitive ...

Sciolla, Gabriella

40

.PEFMJOH #FIBWJPSBM %FTJHO 1 BU U FSOT PG $ POD V SSFOU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$POUFOUT Introduction Background Behavioral Patterns Constructing CPN Models from UML Validation Conclusion Future Works system ­ Being rapidly adopted ­ Focused on the creation of static class models ­ Dynamic models are constructed using ad hoc technique · With little consideration of performance and reliability · Hard

Bae, Doo-Hwan

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Le'u gsum pa _'phags pa shA ri'i bu dang 'phags pa mo'u 'gal gyi bu gnyis khyim nas khyim med par rab tu byung ba'i lo rgyus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

{ ~ f:! ~ !":1 ~ LI :- [j' , Ll ~ . ~ y- . ~ , ~ ~ :-.... ~ ci19 Ll "to t{ ~ !":1 [( ~ ~ t6' ~ ~ ~ !O f:! ET y- LI 4! to I.ltf fit> iJ ~~ !O LI , Ll • ~ c!fJI ~ Ier- I~ Ll fi1 6~ t6' @ ~? rn . Ll y- ~ ~ ~ @ ~ ~ !f6"- i... Ll ~ !O IF" u:-­fT- P 17""- v-- W v-- LI iJ c~ ~ LI I~ t{ • • [j' 1!":1 ' iJ 4! ~ /:Zl ~ • 1>:'"" .... ~ ~ "-I • 6fT ~ i7~' LI t{ fl W ffii?'~ ~ t{ LI !":1 W {~ t~ ~ ,W- fT iLl 6f:! lr I :-::= (!Ii' rn t'}f ~ ,:.". rn r.::l LI . • II:[) ~ Ll...

Lepcha, Samten Gyatso

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Dynamic transcriptomes during neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells revealed by short,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expression 1.85E-02 DDD DDF DDU DFD DFF DFU DUD DUUDUF FDD FDF FDU FFD FFF FFU FUD FUUFUF UDD UDF UDU UFD UFF

Gerstein, Mark

43

Optimization Online - A Robust Branch-Cut-and-Price Algorithm for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 21, 2007 ... A Robust Branch-Cut-and-Price Algorithm for the Heterogeneous Fleet Vehicle Routing Problem. Artur Pessoa (artur ***at*** producao.uff.br)

44

Synthesis, Characterization, and Luminescent Properties of Dinuclear Gold(I) Xanthate Complexes: X-ray Structure of [Au2(nBu-xanthate)2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

state at 77 K produces a strong red emission at ca. 690 nm with a broad asymmetric profile tailing.; Meng, X. U.S Patent 5114687, 1992; 5 pp. (c) Wing, R. E.; Doane, W. M. U.S. Patent 695617, 1976; 37 pp

Abdou, Hanan E.

45

Proceedings: 15th International American Coal Ash Association Symposium on Management and Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs): Bu ilding Partnerships for Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theme of the symposium is "building partnerships for sustainability." Topics discussed at the 15th International Symposium on Management and Use of CCPs included fundamental coal combustion product (CCP) use research, product marketing, applied research, CCP management and environmental issues, and commercial uses. There is a continuing international research interest in CCP use because of the prospects of avoiding disposal costs, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and generating revenue from CCP sales.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

Proceedings: 15th International American Coal Ash Association Symposium on Management and Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs): Bu ilding Partnerships for Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics discussed at the 15th International American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) Symposium, "Management and Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs)," included fundamental CCP use, research, product marketing, applied research, CCP management and environmental issues, and commercial uses. There is a continuing international research interest in CCP use because of its commercial value and its environmental benefits, such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions, reducing landfill needs, and utilizing recycled ma...

2003-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

47

Table 1. Canola 2010 large-plot variety and systems trial at Roseau. Yield, Lb/Acre at Test Wt, Lb/Bu at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. Canola 2010 large-plot variety and systems trial at Roseau. Yield, Lb/Acre at Test Wt, Lb Ready, LL = LibertyLink and CL = Clearfield. 51 Varietal Trials Results Canola Canola (Brassica napus and B. rapa) is a crop developed from oilseed rape by Canadian plant breeders; the first canola variety

Thomas, David D.

48

Robust, accurate, and non-contacting vibration measurement systems: Summary of comparison measurements of the robust laser interferometer and typical accelerometer systems. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epoch Engineering, Incorporated (EEI) has completed a series of vibration measurements comparing their newly-developed Robust Laser Interferometer (RLI) with accelerometer-based instrumentation systems. EEI has successfully demonstrated, on several pieces of commonplace machinery, that non-contact, line-of-sight measurements are practical and yield results equal to or, in some cases, better than customary field implementations of accelerometers. The demonstration included analysis and comparison of such phenomena as nonlinearity, transverse sensitivity, harmonics, and signal-to-noise ratio. Fast Fourier Transformations were performed on the accelerometer and the laser system outputs to provide a comparison basis. The RLI was demonstrated, within the limits of the task, to be a viable, line-of-sight, non-contact alternative to accelerometer systems. Several different kinds of machinery were instrumented and compared, including a small pump, a gear-driven cement mixer, a rotor kit, and two small fans. Known machinery vibration sources were verified and RLI system output file formats were verified to be compatible with commercial computer programs used for vibration monitoring and trend analysis. The RLI was also observed to be less subject to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and more capable at very low frequencies.

Goodenow, T.C.; Shipman, R.L.; Holland, H.M. [Epoch Engineering, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Robust, accurate, and non-contacting vibration measurement systems: Supplemental appendices presenting comparison measurements of the robust laser interferometer and typical accelerometer systems. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epoch Engineering, Incorporated (EEI) has completed a series of vibration measurements comparing their newly-developed Robust Laser Interferometer (RLI) with accelerometer-based instrumentation systems. EEI has successfully demonstrated, on several pieces of commonplace machinery, that non-contact, line-of-sight measurements are practical and yield results equal to or, in some cases, better than customary field implementations of accelerometers. The demonstration included analysis and comparison of such phenomena as nonlinearity, transverse sensitivity, harmonics, and signal-to-noise ratio. Fast Fourier Transformations were performed on the accelerometer and the laser system outputs to provide a comparison basis. The RLI was demonstrated, within the limits o the task, to be a viable, line-of-sight, non-contact alternative to accelerometer systems. Several different kinds of machinery were instrumented and. compared, including a small pump, a gear-driven cement mixer, a rotor kit, and two small fans. Known machinery vibration sources were verified and RLI system output file formats were verified to be compatible with commercial computer programs used for vibration monitoring and trend analysis. The RLI was also observed to be less subject to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and more capable at very low frequencies. This document, Volume 2, provides the appendices to this report.

Goodenow, T.C.; Shipman, R.L.; Holland, H.M. [Epoch Engineering, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

B i n g h a m t o n U n i v e r s i t y S c h o l a r s P r o g r a mBU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(XCEL) can help you get involved AND get your ready for an interview or class presentation! (http://xcel

Suzuki, Masatsugu

51

OIL and GAS ENGINEERING Page 1 of 3 2009/2010 Curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of unconventional resources (blue) Figure 1 helps make clear why the tar sands and other unconventional fossil fuels are important. The purple bars show the total emissions to date from the conventional fossil fuels (oil, gas of the CO2 increase from 280 to 391 ppm. The blue bar is 50% of known unconventional fossil fuel (UFF

Calgary, University of

52

TOSHIYUKI SUGAWA ## KYOTO UNIVERSITY Abstract. ###############################  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ############################### ##### ############ 1. ###### R # ##### ######### R ##### (1=2, 1=2)-## oeR # R ### ####### ##### R ######## z = z(p) : U ! V C #### oeR = oeR (z)|dz| ###### oeR (z) # V = z(U) ####################### Remark. #### oeR (z) ### z ################### ####### ########## #################### ('ff: Uff

Sugawa, Toshiyuki

53

TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These include safe driving, violence prevention, BU specific OSHA requirements and safe patient handling procedures. ...

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

Final Scientific/Technical Report Grant title: Use of ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction This is a collaborative project with the NASA GSFC project of Dr. A. Marshak and W. Wiscombe (PIs). This report covers BU activities from February 2011 to June 2011 and BU "Â?no-cost extension" activities from June 2011 to June 2012. This report summarizes results that complement a final technical report submitted by the PIs in 2011.  

SciTech Connect

Main results are summarized for work in these areas: spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer; spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths; seasonal changes in leaf area of Amazon forests from leaf flushing and abscission; and Cloud droplet size and liquid water path retrievals from zenith radiance measurements.

Knyazikhin, Y

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Computer  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

I J K L M N O P Q R S I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Haack, Jeff (Jeff Haack) - Department of Mathematics, University of Texas at Austin Haagerup, Uffe (Uffe Haagerup) - Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Southern Denmark Haak, Bernhard (Bernhard Haak) - Institut de Mathematiques de Bordeaux, Université Bordeaux Haas, Bénédicte (Bénédicte Haas) - Centre De Recherche en Mathématiques de la Décision, Université Paris-Dauphine Haas, Ruth (Ruth Haas) - Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Smith College Haasdonk, Bernard (Bernard Haasdonk) - Fachbereich Mathematik, Universität Stuttgart Haase, Markus (Markus Haase) - Elektrotechniek, Wiskunde en Informatica, Technische Universiteit Delft Habegger, Nathan (Nathan Habegger) - Laboratoire de Mathématiques

56

"Sabiha Gök?cen's 80-year-old secret" : Kemalist nation formation and the Ottoman Armenians  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ve sevilen bir ki?idir. Aile çok say?da ö?retim üyesi, ?air,sebebiyet verilmek az, çok lehimize bir cereyan getirenprotestolar? bu hususta cok karakteristiktir. Bu bedbahtlar?

Ulgen, Fatma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Splitting a C-O bond in dialkylethers with bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl) cerium-hydride does not occur by a sigma-bond metathesis pathway: a combined experimental and DFT computational study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and propane or Cp’ 2 Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively.CeD, the propane and butane contain deuterium predominantlysites of (n-Bu) 2 O, but the butane produced by the reaction

Werkema, Evan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Dinitrogen fixation chemistry of a molybdenum trisanilide system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dinitrogen cleavage by Mo(N[t-Bu]Ar)3 (Ar = 3,5-C6H3Me2) proceeds through the intermediate ([mu]-N2)[Mo(N[t-Bu]Ar)3]2 before forming N=Mo(N[t-Bu]Ar)3 as the product. Both the intermediate bridging N2 complex and the nitride ...

Curley, John Joseph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Nitride, imide, and azide chemistry of anilide-supported tungsten and uranium complexes by Alexander Ray Fox.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The uranium(III) tris(anilide) complex (THF)U(N[t-Bu]Ar) 3 reacts with MN 3 (M = Na, [N(n-Bu) 4]) to form the bimetallic diuranium(IV/IV) salts M[(p-N)(U(N[t-Bu]Ar) 3)2]. The stability of the U=N=U core across multiple ...

Fox, Alexander Ray, 1979-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

herbicides, burning, and high-density loblolly pine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kudzu is an aggressive, nonnative vine that currently dominates an estimated 810,000 ha of mesic forest communities in the eastern United States. To test an integrated method of weed control, abundances of kudzu and other plant species were compared during 4 yr after six herbicide treatments (clopyralid, triclopyr, metsulfuron, picloram 1 2,4-D, tebuthiuron, and a nonsprayed check), in which loblolly pines were planted at three densities (0, 1, and 4 seedlings m22) to induce competition and potentially delay kudzu recovery. This split-plot design was replicated on each of the four kudzu-dominated sites near Aiken, SC. Relative light intensity (RLI) and soil water content (SWC) were measured periodically to identify mechanisms of interference among plant species. Two years after treatment (1999), crown coverage of kudzu averaged , 2% in herbicide plots compared with 93% in the nonsprayed check, and these differences were maintained through 2001, except in clopyralid plots where kudzu cover increased to 15%. In 2001, pine interference was associated with 33, 56, and 67% reductions in biomass of kudzu, blackberry, and herbaceous vegetation, respectively. RLI in kudzu-dominated plots (4 to 15% of full sun) generally was less than half that of herbicide-treated plots. SWC was greatest in tebuthiuron plots, where total vegetation cover averaged 26% compared with 77 to 111% in other plots. None of the treatments eradicated kudzu, but combinations of herbicides and induced pine competition delayed its recovery.

T.B. Harrington; L.T. Rader-Dixon; J.W. Taylor, Jr.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uff bu rly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to qualified industrial and commercial customers that, with some exceptions, have a peak electricity demand of 150 kilowatts ... http:energy.govsavingsnew-jersey-smartstart-bu...

62

Eosinophil and T cell markers predict functional decline in COPD patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E Walter 6 , Christine H Wendt 3 , Gail G Weinmann 10 ,walterb@bu.edu; Christine H Wendt - wendt005@tc.umn.edu;

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

C:\\LRC\\WORK\\^PDFMAKE\\USC05.03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the Federal Bu- reau of Investigation pertaining to foreign intel- ligence or counterintelligence, or international terrorism, and the existence of the records is classified...

64

BlackBerry Torch 9800 Smartphone - Güvenlik ve Ürün ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Bu ortamlar aras?nda benzin istasyonlar?; teknelerin alt güverteleri; yak?t ya da kimyasal madde ta??ma ya da depolama tesisleri; LPG (propan ya da ...

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

otherwise taking bundled service under Schedule B-U, subject to the established Terms and Conditions of the Cooperative. OpenEIUtilityRateEnergyRateStructurePeriod 1 +...

66

High-megawatt Electric Drive Motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 2. © ABB BU Machines April 10, 2009 | Slide 2 High-megawatt Electric Drive Motors ... motor concept ... A selection of compressor motors >30MW. ...

2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

67

T O T Section 7. Total Energy L E N E R G Y Total Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector Solar thermal direct use energy and photovoltaic electricity net generation ... dent population as published by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bu-

68

Bayesian Models of Object Perception  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understanding by categorizing Bayesian problems with graphs,29. Geisler WS, Diehl RL: Bayesian natural selection and theBu lthoff HH, Yuille A: Bayesian models for seeing surfaces

Daniel Kersten; Alan Yuille

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics Project and SCience Gateway at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics QCD-BU.jpg Key Challenges: Although the QCD theory has been extensively tested at at high energies, at low energies or...

70

Theory of Metastability in Simple Metal Nanowires J. Burki, C. A. Stafford, and D. L. Stein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theory of Metastability in Simple Metal Nanowires J. Bu¨rki, C. A. Stafford, and D. L. Stein. Stafford, H. Grabert, and R. E. Goldstein, Nonlinearity 14, 167 (2001). [9] C.-H. Zhang, F. Kassubek, and C. A. Stafford, Phys. Rev. B 68, 165414 (2003). [10] J. Bu¨rki, R. E. Goldstein, and C. A. Stafford

Stafford, Charles

71

Synthesis and Reversible Reductive Coupling of Cationic, Dinitrogen-Derived Diazoalkane Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of cationic diazoalkane complexes [4-RC6H4C(H)NNMo(N[t-Bu]Ar)3][AlCl4] 4-RC subscript 6 H subscript 4 C(H)NNMo(N[t-Bu]Ar) subscript 3] [AlCl subscript 4

Curley, John J.

72

Niobium-mediated generation of P-P multiply bonded intermediates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The diphosphaazide complex (MesNPP)Nb(N[CH2 tBu]Ar)3, 1 (Mes = 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl, Ar = 3,5-dimethylphenyl), releases a P2 unit upon heating to form MesNNb(N[CH2 tBu]Ar)3, 2, in a first-order process. The chemistry ...

Piro, Nicholas A. (Nicholas Anthony)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

*- - *- - ~Lull-- " --- .lUI -4 ru a rlyA IgjUU Z JEf 1325.8 (6-89) EFG (07.90) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: SEP 2 2 2003 REPLY TO: IG-34 (A03TG049) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-21 sueJEcT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program-2003" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) cyber security program. The evaluation was initiated in July 2003, and our fieldwork was conducted through September 2003. Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As with other Federal organizations, the Commission is increasing its focus on the

74

The Honorable Robert Mort&s,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

, , Department of Energy. ,. Wzishington, DC 20585 fJEC 01 1394 ," The Honorable Robert Mort&s, 7501 Meyer Road ~' Spring Frove, Illinois '60081 Dear MayorMortens: , Secretary of Energy Hazel O'i@ari has announced a new approach to bpenness in the Departhent,of Energy (DOE) and its communications with the public. _ In support of,this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed~ information related to the former,Xnternational Register site in your jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecessor agencies. This information i's .provided,for your~information, use, and retention. DOE's Formi?rly Utilized Sit&s Remedial Action Program is responsible for. identification of sites used by DOE's predecessor agencies, detehmihing their

75

untitled  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Report Report Development of a 2 MW CW Waterload for Electron Cyclotron Heating Systems Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. 690 Port Drive San Mateo, CA 94404 (650) 312-9575, Fax: (650) 312-9536 RLI@CalCreek.com Principal Investigator: Dr. R. Lawrence Ives Topic Number: 56 Subtopic Number: b Grant Number: DE-SC0001930 No confidential or proprietary information is contained in this report 2 Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. Development of a 2 MW CW Waterload Topic 56b for Electron Cyclotron Heating Systems 1. Introduction This program developed an RF load capable of dissipating 2 MW of CW RF power for developing and testing gyrotrons for electron cyclotron heating of tokamak plasmas. Prior to this development, the only load available for dissipating CW RF power exceeding 1 MW was the Calabazas Creek

76

Interim Models Developed to Predict Key Hanford Waste Glass Properties Using Composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several years the amount of waste glass property data available in the open literature has increased markedly. We have compiled the data from over 2000 glass compositions, evaluated the data for consistency, and fit glass property models to portions of this database.[1] The properties modeled include normalized releases of boron (rB), sodium (rNa), and lithium (rLi) from glass exposed to the product consistency test (PCT), liquidus temperature (TL) of glasses in the spinel and zircon primary phase field, viscosity (?) at 1150°C (?1150) and as a function of temperature (?T), and molar volume (V). These models were compared to some of the previously available models and were found to predict the properties of glasses not used in model fitting better and covered broader glass composition regions than the previous ones. This paper summarizes the data collected and the models that resulted from this effort.

Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

Electrochemical studies of the automotive lubricant additive zinc n-dibutyldithiophosphate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc dialkyldithiophosphates (ZDTPs) are widely incorporated in lubricant formulations as antioxidant and antiwear additives. Using the model compound zinc n-dibutyldithiophosphate (Bu-ZDTP) in dimethylformamide (DMF) solution, cyclic voltammetry is applied to a detailed study of Bu-ZDTP electro-oxidation. Bu-ZDTP is shown to be oxidized in a chemically irreversible electron transfer process under diffusion-limited conditions. A similar study of Bu-ZDTP reduction revealed nucleation of zinc at the electrode surface. A chronoamperometric investigation of zinc deposition classified the nucleation according to a progressive mechanism with the diffusion coefficient for Bu-ZDTP in DMF solution as 6.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 2}/s. By comparison with diffusion coefficients obtained via Levich analysis of Bu-ZDTP oxidation, the oxidation process is assigned as a two-electron transfer. The use of atomic force microscopy as a means of directly visualizing zinc nuclei formed as a result of Bu-ZDTP reduction is described.

Jacob, S.R.; Compton, R.G. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Lab.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Experiments Simulating ITER Rampdown and Startup Scenarios in the DIII-D Tokamak (A26479)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 36th EPS Conference On Controlled Fusion And Plasma Physics, Sofia, Bulgaria (2009)36th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics Sofia, BU, 2009999616235

Jackson, G.L.

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Polygons in Buildings and their Refined Side Lengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1999. [Bro] K. Brown, Buildings, Springer, 1989. [BuBI] D.AMS, 2001. [D] M. Davis, Buildings are CAT(0), in “Geometryat Springerlink.com POLYGONS IN BUILDINGS AND THEIR REFINED

Kapovich, Michael; Leeb, Bernhard; Millson, John J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Adaptive Transit: Enhancing Suburban Transit Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an the push to introduce CNG (compressednatural gas) buses.Adelaide has the largest CNG fleet in Australia- 110 of theplus bus fleet are currently CNG bu~ vehicles, with plans to

Cervero, Robert; Beutler, John

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uff bu rly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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81

Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sulfur) ICEV, natural gas (CNG) ICEV, LPG (P95/BU5) ICEV,Methanol Ethanol Methane (CNG, LNG) Propane (LPG) Hydrogen (M85 (wood) Natural gas CNG (wood) Note: percentage changes

Delucchi, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Monthly Mean Wind Stress and Sverdrup Transports in the North Atlantic: A Comparison of the Hellerman–Rosenstein and Isemer–Hasse Climatologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The monthly mean wind stress climatology of Hellerman and Rosenstein (HR) is compared with the climatology of Isemer and Hasse (IH), which represents a version of the Bunker atlas (BU) for the North Atlantic based on revised parameterizations. ...

Claus W. Böning; Ralf Döscher; Hans-Jörg Isemer

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Outreach Statements QNet 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to be held for the first time March 6, 1999. Thirty-five students from local high-schools will come to BU for a program introducing them to recent discoveries in high-energy...

84

Automated Battery Swap and Recharge to Enable Persistent UAV Missions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces a hardware platform for automated battery changing and charging for multiple UAV agents. The automated station holds a bu er of 8 batteries in a novel dual-drum structure that enables a "hot" battery ...

Toksoz, Tuna

85

An Improved Synthesis of BrettPhos- and RockPhos-Type Biarylphosphine Ligands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved processes for the preparation of biphenyl-based phosphine ligands t-BuBrettPhos, RockPhos, and BrettPhos are presented. The new methods, featuring the use of Grignard reagents and catalytic amounts of copper, are ...

Hoshiya, Naoyuki

86

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of charcoal from biomass combustion (g-CO 2 /bu-crop) WB,Aerosols from biomass combustion have constituents otheris about 0.06) Coke combustion Biomass fuel combustion

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

View  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G as a road system, T as petrol stations and a driver who wants to go from u to v. Then B(u, v) is ..... [9] (gas distribution) provide instances where almost all ...

88

Synthesis and small molecule chemistry of the niobaziridine-hydride functional group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1. Synthesis and Divergent Reactivity of the Niobaziridine-Hydride Functional Group The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of the niobaziridine-hydride complex Nb(H)([eta]²-t- ]Bu(H)C=NAr)(N[Np]Ar)? (la-H; ...

Figueroa, Joshua S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

MaintenanceRecords  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8BU100815 Maintenance Sheet for 2011 Chevrolet Volt Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity HEV Fleet Testing Date Mileage Description Cost 882012 17,160 Changed oil and filter and...

90

EARTH SCIENCES DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ethane Propane Normal-butane, is0bu t ane X Normal-pentane,the mole fraction of normal-butane. Because a binary mixtureof the mole fraction of normal-butane. The discrep- ancy is

Authors, Various

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

VEHICLE DETAILS AND BATTERY SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 VEHICLE DETAILS AND BATTERY SPECIFICATIONS 1 Vehicle Details Base Vehicle: 2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN: 1G1RD6E48BU100815 Propulsion System: Multi-Mode PHEV (EV, Series, and...

92

Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

RED HOUSE DOR R RU N MILLWOOD TIME GREENSBORO FREEMANS CR EEK FISHER SLIGO BAR BER RIDGE HOM EST EAD TAN NER RICHAR DSON BU RGET TST OWN BR NT H SE-LCRN E MEH AFF Y WEBSTER...

93

Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OlL3109 RQ,RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TYPE B(U) PACKAGE, FISSLE 7, UN3328, PU-239 From B&W Pemex DOE Acceptance Stamp to be in this approximate location on the Primary Shipping Label....

94

Compilation Techniques for Embedded Data Parallel Languages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POBME $IBJ $ ISJTUPQIFS #BU UFO %BWJE $IJOOFSZ BOE %PVH %GSPN UIF FODMPTJOH IPTU DPEF XSJU UFO JO 1ZUIPO *U JT BMTPSFRVJSFT PO UIF PSEFS PG UFO TFDPOET XIJMF UIF QSPDFEVSF

Catanzaro, Bryan Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Agreement between the California State Employees Association (CSEA), Bargaining Unit 17 (Registered Nurse) and the State of California, 1999-2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

employees of the State of California in Bargaining Unit 17shall mean the State of California. BU 17 4. "Gross Income."17 by the State of California as defined in the Internal

California State Employees Association (CSEA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Charge-Separation in Uranium Diazomethane Complexes Leading to C-H Activation and Chemical Transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charge-Separation in Uranium Diazomethane Complexes Leading to C-H Activation and Chemical of diphenyldiazomethane with [((t-Bu ArO)3tacn)UIII ] (1) results in an 2 -bound diphenyldiazomethane uranium complex-shell ligand, [((t-Bu ArO)3tacn)UIV (2 -NNCPh2)] (2). Treating Ph2CN2 with a uranium complex that contains

Meyer, Karsten

97

Stabilization of Nickel Complexes with Ni0•••H-N Bonding Interactions Using Sterically Demanding Cyclic Diphosphine Ligands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The series of complexes Ni(P{sub 2}{sup tBu}N{sub 2}{sup R}), [Ni(P{sub 2}{sup tBu}N{sub 2}{sup R}){sub 2}]BF{sub 4}, [HNi(P{sub 2}{sup tBu}N{sub 2}{sup Ph}){sub 2}]BF{sub 4}, and [Co(P{sub 2}{sup tBu}N{sub 2}{sup Ph}){sub 2}]BF{sub 4} (P{sub 2}{sup tBu}N{sub 2}{sup R} = 1,5-dialkyl-3,7-tert-butyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; alkyl (R) = phenyl, benzyl) have been synthesized and characterized. Spectroscopic, electrochemical, and X-Ray diffraction studies indicate these complexes are stable as a result of the tetrahedral arrangement of the two diphosphine ligands. Electrochemical oxidation of [HNi(P{sub 2}{sup tBu}N{sub 2}{sup Ph}){sub 2}]BF{sub 4} results in rapid proton transfer from nickel at a rate faster that can be observed on the CV timescale. Double protonation of Ni(P{sub 2}{sup tBu}N{sub 2}{sup BN}){sub 2} forms the endo-endo, endo exo, and exo-exo isomers of [Ni(P{sub 2}{sup tBu}N{sup BN}HN{sup BN}){sub 2}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}, which were found to be more stable towards loss of H{sub 2} than previously observed for similar complexes. The presence of Ni{sup 0} {hor_ellipsis} HN bonds at the endo-protonation sites of [Ni(P{sub 2}{sup tBu}N{sup Bn}HN{sup BN}){sub 2}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} results in significant differences in the Ni(I/0) oxidation potentials of each of the isomers. The differences in E{sub 1/2}(I/0) values correspond to bond free energies of 7.4 and 3.7 kcal/mol for the first and second Ni{sup 0} {hor_ellipsis} HN bonds of the endo-exo and endo-endo isomers, respectively. Computational studies of related model complexes reproduce these Ni{sup 0} {hor_ellipsis} HN bonds within 1-2 kcal/mol.

Wiedner, Eric S.; Yang, Jenny Y.; Chen, Shentan; Raugei, Simone; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Helm, Monte L.; Bullock, R. Morris; Rakowski DuBois, Mary; DuBois, Daniel L.

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

98

Book Reviews  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

great doctors to his Court: from India Bharadhaja. from China Han-wang­ Hang and from Persia Doctor GJlenos. Each translated a book in their own way into Tibetan. The Indian doctor's texts were called hBu-shag-ma Bu-Chee-chhung (Big and Small Louse... of Main Additions) and The Treatment for Cock. Peacock and Parrot. And from the discussion between the three doctors they composed a medical text called Mi-hjigs-pa'i mTs'on-chha (The Weapon of the Fearless One), comprising seven chapters...

Sinha, Nirmal Chandra

99

Z .Synthetic Metals 100 1999 195204 Microstructure and electrochemical properties of some synthetic carbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactive than the double bonds in coordination polymeriza- tion pathway while double bonds are more 1467 1.775 4 d eZ . Z .poly PyPDO TaCl P n-Bu Sn 0.5 16.7 16.7 97 insol ­5 4 eZ .PHDO TaCl P n-Bu Sn 0.5 16.7 16.7 90 insol ­5 4 a Z . Z .Polymerized in chlorobenzene at 808C for 24 h in Ar atmosphere

Kwak, Juhyoun

100

C NMR Spectra (see p S10)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S31 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S10) NHBn Me Ph 10 #12;S32 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S10) NHBn Me Ph 11 #12;S33 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S11) NH-i-Pr n-Bu NH-i-Pr n-Bu 12 Me Me 13 #12;S34 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S11)NH-i-Pr Me Ph 14 #12;S35 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S11

Collum, David B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uff bu rly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CILJCU~ATI, QUO J. A. Qu~glw, M  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

lo&&-, lo&&-, : i e r : gtdlm FILLS March 12, 1956 ~'RII~~~~~I~~D~.,A~ICAW~~TMDRLBS, CILJCU~ATI, QUO J. A. Qu~glw, M .D. c. E. aahwun ObJcrativr oi THpt On !iUesd8y, Fabmerg 28,19!36, th@ lILQMetallurgMalD@p~rtJmnt beipn bzdquotting green ult-ll( blend on e 350 ton hydmulla prau 8t the Ura &i&nnrlug DivUiou of Ameria8n Steel muUdPae8, c&alMatl, Ohio. Approll'tely a,ooo pound8 of greeu ult ub briqumtte4 bw13ry 8 -rioa of mvea day,. Par the pwpou ofwalutlngexpo88mmmafpemmm8 linrelvmd in U&la PFWOU, UI ludsaatrSa1. hyglmm v uua 6unduutSa during the 8tut4p. 8everrl meahmlaal cUff% m ltlas were anoauatered 088 the f%rataud maond drfs,rRtinh~ewl~ted& t&U oithree trip8 in order te obtrfn auffioiem~ eqranum ata. All tap8 we= mde In uv at lritn e. ubilrr 0f ttr, rab

102

ENVIRONMENTA L REVI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTA ENVIRONMENTA L REVI EW for CATECORI CAL EXCLUSI ON DETE RM I NATION Rocky Mountain Region, Weste rn Area Po\\ cr Administra ti on Erosion Co ntrol Meas u res Structure No. 20-1 East Morrill Ta p to Lyma n 34.SkV Tra nsmission Line, Scotts Bl uff Co un ty, NE A. Brief Desc ripti on of Proposa l: Western Area Pov"er Administration (Western) will repair erosion damage at Structure No. 20-1 orlhe East Morrill Tap to Lyman 34.5kV transmission line near the town of Morrill in Scott Bluffs County. Nebraska. Flood flows along the North Platte River in 2011 migrated the active channel bank towards Structure No. 20-1. The river channel erosion has undennined the guy wire supports of the 3-polc wood structure. Western proposes to construct an in-ground modular block retaining wall along the perimeter orlhe structure to serve as a protecti,e

103

On-Going Research on Address Bus Encoding for Low Power: A Status Report L. Benjni. G. De Midleli s c. Silvaoo.D. Sciuto SE.Macii. M . Poncino s. Quer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 82, U~a, IL, March 1997. [8) L. BeDini, G. De Midleli, B. M8cii, D. Sciuto, C. Siivano, -Ad- dr.88 BU'-a- Cion Con/-, ~Idorf, GennaD)', November ltt7, Sub- lnitted for Pub\\ica&ion. [7) L. BeDini, G. De

De Micheli, Giovanni

104

FranklinAvenue SouthDepysterStreet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grille F10 Pita Pit F11 Bu alo Wild Wings F12 College Creamery F13 Euro Gyro F14 College Coneys F15 Taco (one way tra c) foottraconlyfoottraconly SouthWaterStreetNorthWaterStreet Red listings, see map

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

105

Case Study 5: Replacement and Capacity Expansion Decisions at an Airplane Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a designed annual capacity of 1,300,000 compressor blades and 12,000 disks. The 700,000 square foot facility the machining and bu ng handling capacity to 600,000 airfoils per year. As this bottleneck problem remains. With this con guration the spindle/vibratory machinery can be used in a pure spindle mode at no additional cost

Colton, Jonathan S.

106

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Enolizations: Solvent-Dependent Mixed Aggregation Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Enolizations: Solvent-Dependent Mixed Aggregation Effects Xiufeng spectroscopic investigations of lithium diisopropylamide-mediated ester enolization in THF, t-BuOMe, HMPA that the metalations by lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) homonuclear dimers proceed at nearly solvent-independent rates

Collum, David B.

107

Appendix B:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CApture teChnology SheetS Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS nAtionAl energy teChnology lABorAtory pre-ComBuStion SolventS B-6 SRI International - CO 2 Capture...

108

The Synthesis of Novel Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles with Applications Towards Catalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the rhodium source [(COD)Rh(NCCH 3 ) 2 ]BF 4 , and theof the reactants [(COD)Rh(NCCH 3 ) 2 ] BF 4 , (Bu 4 N) 2 HPOThe rhodium precursor chosen was [(COD)RhCl] 2 (COD = 1,5-

McMurdo, Meredith Joanne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Synonymous Codon Usage in Escherichia coli: Selection for Translational Nina Stoletzki* and Adam Eyre-Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usage. Genetics. 129:897­907. Bu¨rger R, Willensdorfer M, Nowak MA. 2006. Why are pheno- typic mutationSynonymous Codon Usage in Escherichia coli: Selection for Translational Accuracy Nina Stoletzki that produce non- or misfunctional proteins are costly to the cell because they consume amino acids and energy

Eyre-Walker, Adam

110

Spatial interactions in the superior colliculus predict saccade behavior in a neural field model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During natural vision, eye movements are dynamically controlled by the combinations of goal-related top-down (TD) and stimulus-related bottom-up (BU) neural signals that map onto objects or locations of interest in the visual world. In primates, both ...

Robert A. Marino; Thomas P. Trappenberg; Michael Dorris; Douglas P. Munoz

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fall 2011 ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics ENG ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fall 2011 ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics ENG ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics Instructor: M. S. Howe EMA 218 mshowe@bu.edu This course is intended to consolidate your knowledge of fluid mechanics specialized courses on fluid mechanics, acoustics and aeroacoustics. Outline syllabus: Equations of motion

112

Impacts of Biofuel Produc3on on Minnesota Agricultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethanol is compePPve with US gasoline when corn is $4.00 a bu and crude oilPon) · Other by-products include corn oil and CO2 4 #12;Ethanol In the US'S TOPICS 2 · Ethanol In Minnesota and the US · The Blend Wall, Renewable

Minnesota, University of

113

Continuous Flow Oxidation of Alcohols and Aldehydes Utilizing Bleach and Catalytic Tetrabutylammonium Bromide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a method for the oxidation of a range of alcohols and aldehydes utilizing a simple flow system of alcohols in EtOAc with a stream of 12.5% NaOCl and catalytic Bu[subscript 4]NBr. Secondary alcohols are oxidized ...

Leduc, Andrew B.

114

Synthesis and study of ligands for Pd-catalyzed C-O and C-N coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new ligand, AdBrettPhos, was synthesized and its use, along with tBuBrettPhos, in C-O coupling reactions at low temperatures was investigated. Using Pd catalysts containing these ligands, electron-neutral aryl bromides ...

Davis, Nicole R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

ME/SE 765 Syllabus, Fall 2012 Page 1 BOSTON UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, (processing, storage, material handling, repair capability) layout, and production management policies at remote sites will meet with the instructor either during a visit by the instructor at the remote site or a specially scheduled ICV session. Of course, remote site students are welcome to visit the BU campus

116

6 References Allen, D. B, B. J. Flatter, and K. Fite. 1996. Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Bruneau area, Owyhee County, Southwestern Idaho. Water Resoources Investigations, U. S. Geological Survey in Southern Owyhee County, Idaho. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Idaho Bureau of Land Management Technical County, Idaho. Idaho Bu American Ornithologists' Union. 1957. Check-list of North American Birds. 5th

117

Tibetan Technology and the West  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.cit., p. 228. 9. See Inventioni (Parma, I S79) by G.B. Isaachi. 10. Needham, op.cit., pp.231 and 236. I I. For a reference to the literature on the iron bridge builder (~"l~' 31l'l) ~q·lqll~·~~·~"'Ei. (q8S-1464) see The Life ?f Bu ston Rin po che...

Aris, Michael

1969-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

118

New 3-MCPD (glycidol ester) method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A direct method for the determination of fatty acid esters of both 3-MCPD and glyci¬dol has been published in the Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society (JAOCS). New 3-MCPD (glycidol ester) method inform Magazine algae algal AOCS biomass bu

119

Our department hosted its sixth alumni reunion on Sept. 21 & 22, 2012. The event began with a barbecue on Friday the 21st on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Assistant Professor at Suffolk University), Gary Garber (MA 1999; Physics instructor at BU Academy students and staff; (3rd left) Haris Kudrolli (PhD 2001; Senior scientist at Radiation Monitoring Devices, undergoing test-run employment interviews. These panelists provided many useful pointers for CV preparation

Goldberg, Bennett

120

? ? ? ??? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?!?#" ? $ %&(')')&1032 4656 7809'A ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

%&(')')&1032 4656 7809'A@B0DC. EGFIH?0QPSRT2 FQUVR WIX` Y 0VRba?Fc2 0dRb&fehg. iBU9&Ap?FQPqgr&ARsC WIX` tu')'v&wUxWy&?g# 0VR iBP!

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uff bu rly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

dI UNIVERSITY OF NEV\\DA SYSTEM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

concentration at equilibrium 137gs 661.6 0.2 PgA gain calibration - rmply r.'orldwide fallout* 221pg 911.1 0.6 rnpry 23216 concentration* 214gi 1120.4 j.4 Imply 226Ra ad 23BU...

122

From the activation of tetraphosphorus to the chemistry of diphosphorus and beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The niobium-phosphorus triple bond in [P=-Nb(N[Np]Ar)3]- (Np = CH2tBu; Ar = 3,5-Me2C6H3) has produced the first case of P4 activation by a metal-ligand multiple bond. Treatment of P4 with the sodium salt of the niobium ...

Tofan, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Improved location management scheme based on autoconfigured logical topology in HMIPv6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though some studies involving general micro-mobility exist, micro-mobility research concerning a mobile node (MN) moving between Mobile Anchor Points (MAP) is lacking. In Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6), a MN sends a binding update (BU) message to ...

Jongpil Jeong; Hyunsang Youn; Hyunseung Choo; Eunseok Lee

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

JournalofLow TemperaturePhysics, VoL3, No. 5, 1970 Phonons in bcc 4He  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Canada, Ltd., Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Chalk River, Ontario, Canada (Received August 10, 1970 in the Breuckner theory.7'a The total wave function is, then, q', = Ful~bu> and the energy of the crystal in state, q, 0], the cubic term changes the crystal isotropy significantly. No multiple peaks in S(Q, co) were

Glyde, Henry R.

125

Development of the Smart Grid: Missing Elements in the Policy Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of the Smart Grid: Missing Elements in the Policy Process Richard D. Tabors Geoffrey@crai.com gparker@tulane.edu mcaraman@bu.edu Abstract This paper seeks to frame one aspect of the Smart Grid focused Smart Grid attention on the technologies and on technical interoperability, there has been, we

Caramanis, Michael

126

IEEE Communications Magazine August 2012 530163-6804/12/$25.00 2012 IEEE CYBER SECURITY FOR SMART GRID COMMUNICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOR SMART GRID COMMUNICATIONS Daojing He, Chun Chen, and Jiajun Bu, Zhejiang University Sammy Chan, City University Secure Service Provision in Smart Grid Communications INTRODUCTION An increasing demand grids. As the world's largest engineered system, the smart grid will expand the current capabilities

Zhang, Yan

127

Le nom des naksatrani en tibetain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drug ma drug bu, mang po skyes k?ttik?s agni ? maewX? *mmru? 2 snar ma skye dguvi bdag po, dal bavi lha ldan ma, bi rdzi rohi?? (br?hm?) praj?- pati ? pjit ? *pit 3 mgo mgo skyes, smal bo, zla skyes, ri dwags mgo m?ga?iras (?grah?ya??) soma ? tsje... gi lha mo sv?t? v?yu ? khangH ? *kkha?-s 14 sa ga brgyad ldan ma, dbang povi lha ldan vi??khe (r?dh?) indr?gn? ? tej ? *ttij 15 lhamtshams mdza bo anur?dh?s mitra ? bjang ? *ba? Revue d’Etudes Tibétaines 6 16 snron gang bu, ldevu, lha ldan, lha...

Jacques, Guillaume

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A & N Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coop Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name A & N Electric Coop Place Maryland Utility Id 84 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Service - Retail Access - Schedule B-U-RA Multi-Phase Commercial Commercial Service - Retail Access - Schedule B-U-RA Single Phase Commercial Commercial Service - Schedule B-U Single Phase Commercial Commercial Service- Schedule B-U Multi-Phase Commercial Energy for Tomorrow Rider Residential Farm and Home Service - Retail Access - Schedule A-U-RA Residential Farm and Home Service - Schedule A-U Residential Former Delmarva Power Territory: General Service - Primary Rate Industrial

129

Bulk Gold-Catalyzed Reactions of Isocyanides, Amines, and Amine N-Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk gold powder (5–50 ?m particles) catalyzes the reactions of isocyanides with amines and amine N-oxides to produce ureas. The reaction of n-butyl isocyanide (nBu–N?C) with di-n-propylamine and N-methylmorpholine N-oxide in acetonitrile, which was studied in the greatest detail, produced 3-butyl-1,1-dipropylurea (O?C(NHnBu)(NnPr2)) in 99% yield at 60 °C within 2 h. Sterically and electronically different isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides react successfully under these conditions. Detailed studies support a two-step mechanism that involves a gold-catalyzed reaction of adsorbed isocyanide with the amine N-oxide to form an isocyanate (RN?C?O), which rapidly reacts with the amine to give the urea product. These investigations show that bulk gold, despite its reputation for poor catalytic activity, is capable of catalyzing these reactions.

Klobukowski, Erik; Angelici, Robert; Woo, Keith L.

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

Revelation Between Orality and Writing in Early Imperial China: The Epistemology of the Taiping jing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to thank John Lagerwey for his help in preparing this article. 1. References to the chapters of the TPJ yuyan yan- jiusuo jikan 18 (1948): 375-84; Li Gang , "Ye lun Taiping jing chao `jia bu' ji qi yu dao was gradually fixed in a written form,18 if not merely lost--and this is why so many texts in the Taoist Canon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

131

Low-Cost NIALMS Technology: Market Issues & Product Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-Intrusive Appliance Load Monitoring System (NIALMS) provides the ability to submeter residential loads from the meter, without intruding into the home. It utilizes a meter recorder installed between the meter socket and a meter, eliminating the need for additional sensors and dataloggers. NIALMS is now a commercially available product, used primarily for load research by utilities. The issues surrounding the proliferation of NIALMS in the meter industry have always involved cost and functionality. Bu...

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nation Weekly June 6, 2004, Volume 1, Number 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ec ted c o- or din ate s yo u wi ll f ind u nli mi ted p os sib ilit y f or yo ur lim ite d bu dg et. Sp re ad y ou r n et at th e Te x-W or ld an d sp en d so me qu ite h ou rs fi sh ing th ro ug h ou r c oll ec tio n yo u wi ll...

Upadhyay, Akhilesh

133

Auswahlbibliographie zur Geschichte der SuUB 1 Auswahlbibliographie zur SuUB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ Müller, Maria Elisabeth / Staroske, Uwe (Hrsg.) (2010): Vom Katharinen- Kloster zum Hochschul, Thomas (Hrsg.):Auf den Spuren der Eigentümer. Erwerb und Rückgabe von Büchern jüdischer Eigentümer am, verschiedene Wege. In: BuB 55, S. 74­79. Elsmann, Thomas (Hrsg.) (2004): Auf den Spuren der Eigentümer. Erwerb

Pawelzik, Klaus

134

GUIDE TO GRADUATE STUDIES AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Astro M.S. Students 17 sample: AERO/ASTRO MASTER'S PROGRAM PROPOSAL 18 DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE g. Th e Office Coordin ator at th e fron t desk, Liza J u lian , will be able to an swer m an y ran d an d its facilities after bu sin ess h ou rs. Academ ic qu estion s an d m atters of stu den

Alonso, Juan J.

135

Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system safety analysis report for packaging. Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This SARP describes the RTG Transportation System Package, a Type B(U) packaging system that is used to transport an RTG or similar payload. The payload, which is included in this SARP, is a generic, enveloping payload that specifically encompasses the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) RTG payload. The package consists of two independent containment systems mounted on a shock isolation transport skid and transported within an exclusive-use trailer.

Ferrell, P.C.

1996-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

136

Burnup Credit — Technical Basis for Spent-Fuel Burnup Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Present regulatory practices provide as much burnup credit flexibility as can be currently expected. Further progress is achievable by incorporating the negative reactivity effects of a subset of neutron-absorbing fission-product isotopes, and by optimizing the procedural approach for establishing the burnup characteristics of the spent fuel to be loaded in burnup-credit-designed storage and transportation systems. This report describes progress toward developing a technical basis for a cost-effective bu...

2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

Conceptual Design Review for Biomass Repowering at Plant Sweatt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Company and its subsidiary Mississippi Power have identified Plant Sweatt as a potential opportunity for biomass repowering. Plant Sweatt is located in Meridian, Mississippi, and became commercially operational in 1953. The facility is capable of generating up to 96 MW of electricity (gross), operating on natural gas. Net generation at full load is about 92 MW. With a relatively high heat rate for a premium fuel, the plant is rarely dispatched. Modifying one of the boilers at Plant Sweatt to bu...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

SciTech Connect

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

Vapor pressure measurements on non-aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 2. Tetraalkylammonium salts in methanol. Activity coefficients of various 1-1 electrolytes at high concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Precise vapor pressure data for solutions of Et/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/Nl, Bu/sub 4/NClO/sub 4/, and Am/sub 4/NBr in methanol at 25/sup 0/C in the concentration range 0.04 < m(mol-(kg of solvent)/sup -1/) < 1.6 are communicated and discussed. Polynomials in molalities are given which may be used for calculating precise vapor pressure depressions of these solutions. Osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of methanol vapor. Discussion of the data at low concentrations is based on the chemical model of electrolyte solutions taking into account non-coulombic interactions; ion-pair association constants are compared to those of conductance measurements. Pitzer equations are used to reproduce osmotic and activity coefficient at high concentrations; the set of Pitzer parameters b = 3.2, ..cap alpha../sub 1/ = 2.0 and ..cap alpha../sub 2/ = 20.0 is proposed for methanol solutions.

Barthel, J.; Lauermann, G.; Neueder, R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON STATE LINE ALLEN CHUR CHVILLE BATH ATT ICA ELLI COT VILLE ROU LETT E BR ADFORD BU FFALO CREEK PEN N YAN N BEECH HILL-INDEPENDENC E GERRY-CH ARLOTTE STAGECOACH CHIPMUN K HEBRON VIN CENT BALD WI NSVILLE AKELEY OLEAN COWLESVILLE AN NIN SMET HPORT BR ADLEY BR OOK BU STI FIVE MILE BLOOMFIELD W SEN EC A FALLS NILE STAGECOACH LEWIS R UN BR ADFORD CAMDEN VAN ETT EN ROAN OKE SH ARON RICHBU RG FULTON N FINN EGAN H ILL TONAWANDA

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141

Alternative fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A DOE/PETC funded study was conducted to examine the use of a liquid phase mixed alcohol synthesis (LPMAS) plant to produce gasoline blending ethers. The LPMAS plant was integrated into three utilization scenarios: a coal fed IGCC power plant, a petroleum refinery using coke as a gasification feedstock, and a standalone natural gas fed partial oxidation plant. The objective of the study was to establish targets for the development of catalysts for the LPMAS reaction. In the IGCC scenario, syngas conversions need only be moderate because unconverted syngas is utilized by the combined cycle system. A once through LPMAS plant achieving syngas conversions in the range of 38--49% was found to be suitable. At a gas hourly space velocity of 5,000 sL/Kg-hr and a methanol:isobutanol selectivity ratio of 1.03, the target catalyst productivity ranges from 370 to 460 g iBuOH/Kg-hr. In the petroleum refinery scenario, high conversions ({approximately}95%) are required to avoid overloading the refinery fuel system with low Btu content unconverted syngas. To achieve these high conversions with the low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas, a recycle system was required (because of the limit imposed by methanol equilibrium), steam was injected into the LPMAS reactor, and CO{sub 2} was removed from the recycle loop. At the most economical recycle ratio, the target catalyst productivity is 265 g iBuOH/Kg-hr. In the standalone LPMAS scenario, essentially complete conversions are required to achieve a fuel balanced plant. At the most economical recycle ratio, the target catalyst productivity is 285 g iBuOH/Kg-hr. The economics of this scenario are highly dependent on the cost of the natural gas feedstock and the location of the plant. For all three case scenarios, the economics of a LPMAS plant is marginal at current ether market prices. Large improvements over demonstrated catalyst productivity and alcohol selectivity are required.

Unknown

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

131I-Anti-CD45 Antibody Plus Busulfan and Cyclophosphamide before Allogeneic Hematophoietic Cell Transplantation for Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First Remission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to improve outcomes for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), we conducted a Phase I/II study in which targeted irradiation delivered by 131I-anti-CD45 antibody was combined with targeted busulfan (BU; area-under-curve, 600-900 ng/ml) and cyclophosphamide (CY; 120 mg/kg). Fifty-two of 59 patients (88%) receiving a trace 131I-labeled dose of 0.5 mg/kg anti-CD45 murine antibody had higher estimated absorbed radiation in bone marrow and spleen than in any other organ. Forty-six patients were treated with 102-298 mCi 131I delivering an estimated 5.3-19 (mean 11.3) Gy to marrow, 17-72 (mean 29.7) Gy to spleen, and 3.5 Gy (n=4) to 5.25 Gy (n=42) to the liver. The estimated 3-year non-relapse mortality and disease-free survival (DFS) were 21% and 61%, respectively. These results were compared to those from 509 similar International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry patients transplanted using BU/CY alone. After adjusting for differences in age and cytogenetics-risk, the hazard of mortality among all antibody-treated patients was 0.65 times that of the Registry patients (95% CI 0.39-1.08; p=.09). The addition of targeted hematopoietic irradiation to conventional BU/CY is feasible and well tolerated, and Phase II results are sufficiently encouraging to warrant further study.

Pagel, John M.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Eary, Janet F.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gooley, Ted; Ruffner, Katherine; Nemecek, Eneida; Sickle, Eileen; Durack, Larry; Carreras, Jeanette; Horowitz, Mary; Press, Oliver W.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, Paul J.; Bernstein, Irwin D.; Matthews, Dana C.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Controlled Synthesis of Polyenes by Catalytic Methods. Progress Report, December 1, 1989 -- November 30, 1992  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A more direct approach to polyenes by the direct polymerization of acetylenes has been achieved. We were able to show that polymerization of acetylene itself can be controlled with a well- characterized alkylidene catalyst, but only if a base such as quinuclidine is present in order to slow down the rate of propagation relative to initiation. (Quinuclidine may also stabilize vinylalkylidene intermediates formed in the reaction). Unfortunately, living polyenes were no more stable than isolated polyenes, and so this approach had its limitations. Direct polymerization of acetylene by Mo(CH-t-Bu)(NAr)(O-t-Bu){sub 2} was more successful, but inherent polyene instability was still a problem. The most important result of the past grant period is the finding that dipropargyl derivatives (HC=CCH{sub 2}XCH{sub 2}C=CH; X = CH{sub 2}, C(CO{sub 2}R){sub 2}, SiR{sub 2}, etc.), which have been reported to be cyclopolymerized by various classical catalysts by as yet unknown mechanisms, are polymerized by Mo(CH-t-Bu)(NAr)[OCMe(CF{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2} in dimethoxyethane. We speculate that intramolecular formation of a five-membered ring in the product of {alpha} addition is fast enough to yield another terminal alkylidene on the time scale of the polymerization reaction, while a six-membered ring is formed in a reaction involving a more reaction terminal alkylidene. Either intermediate alkylidene, but most likely the terminal alkylidene, could react with additional monomer to lead to growth of a chain having dangling triple bonds that eventually could be employed to form crosslinks.

Schrock, R. R.

1992-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

144

Removal of technetium from alkaline nuclear-waste media by a solvent-extraction process using crown ethers  

SciTech Connect

Crown ethers dissolved in suitably modified aliphatic kerosene diluents can be employed to extract technetium as pertechnetate anion (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) with good extraction ratios from realistic simulants of radioactive alkaline nitrate waste. The modifiers utilized are non-halogenated and non-volatile, and the technetium can be removed from the solvent by stripping using water. The crown ethers bis-4,4{prime}(5{prime})[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6 (di-t-BuCH18C6) and dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) provide stronger TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} extraction than dicyclohexano-21-crown-7 and 4-tert-butylcyclohexano 15-crown-5. Whereas DCH18C6 provides somewhat higher TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} extraction ratios than the more lipophilic di-t-BuCH18C6 derivative, the latter was selected for further study owing to its lower distribution to the aqueous phase. Particularly good extraction and stripping results were obtained with di-t-BuCH 18C6 at 0.02 M in a 2:1 vol/vol blend of tributyl phosphate and Isopar{reg_sign} M. Using this solvent, 98.9% of the technetium contained (at 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M) in a Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) Hanford tank waste simulant was removed following two cross-current extraction contacts. Two cross-current stripping contacts with deionized water afforded removal of 99.1% of the technetium from the organic solvent.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Presley, D.J.; Haverlock, T.J.; Moyer, B.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Department Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department Codes Department Codes Code Organization BO Bioscience Department BU Business Development & Analysis Office DI Business Operations NC Center for Functional Nanomaterials CO Chemistry Department AD Collider Accelerator Department PA Community, Education, Government and Public Affairs CC Computational Science Center PM Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department CI Counterintelligence AE Department of Energy DC Directorate - Basic Energy Sciences DK Directorate - CEGPA DE Directorate - Deputy Director for Operations DO Directorate - Director's Office DH Directorate - Environment, Safety and Health DF Directorate - Facilities and Operations DA Directorate - Global and Regional Solutions DB Directorate - Nuclear and Particle Physics DL Directorate - Photon Sciences

146

HPC Code Center Request Form | Computatioinal Scince Center, Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HPC Code Center Request Form HPC Code Center Request Form All fields are required unless marked as optional. Full Name Institution/Company Email Address Telephone Number Department * Basic Energy Sciences Directorate (DC) Bioscience Department (BO) Business Development & Analysis Office (BU) Business Operations (DI) CEGPA Directorate (DK) Center for Functional Nanomaterials (NC) Chemistry Department (CO) Collider Accelerator Department (AD) Community, Education, Government and Public Affairs (PA) Computational Science Center (CC) Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department (PM) Counterintelligence (CI) Department of Energy (AE) Deputy Director for Operations Directorate (DE) Director's Office Directorate (DO) Diversity Office (DV) Energy & Utilities Division (EU) Environment, Safety and Health

147

JGI - LSP Small-Scale Sequencing Plans for 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Science Program Laboratory Science Program Small-Scale Sequencing Plans For status information, see the Genome Projects section. Organism Proposer Affiliation Five Archaea (Methanohalobium evestigatum, Methanobacterium formicicum, Halococcoides, Ferroglobus placidus, and Acidianus sp. JP7) Kyrpides LBNL Aspergillus terreus EST Baker PNNL Avena Barbata ESTs Anderson BNL Burkholderia cepacia Bu72 van der Lelie BNL ChIP-enriched binding sequences Stubbs LLNL CRISPR loci of Leptospirillum Banfield Cochliobolus heterostrophus Turgeon Cornell University Columbia River Microbiota Magnuson PNNL Dehalococcoides Brodie LBNL Etolico Lagoon in Greece Kyrpides LBNL Fungal comparative genomics (Orpinomyces) Baker PNNL Hypersaline microbial mat Raymond LLNL Leonotis nepetifolia Shanklin BNL

148

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 24 Number 3 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

") philosophy known as amanasikara. His usage of this term will be explored in context of the translation of another of his works. 5 13 The Tibetan redactor Bu-ston Rin-chen-grub, in his analytic .list of works that eXPQund the Amanasikar2. system... -gnyer can-ma/Bal-sa). must be invited. Then only car. the religion flourish in that country." "To the north of Central Tibet. you should take birth in a noble family whom everyone can respect and bless your emanHtion to invite me to Tibet from India...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

1988-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment, Burn-up and Cooling Time of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument  

SciTech Connect

An outline of this presentation of what a Differential Die-Away (DDA) instrument can do are: (1) Principle of operation of DDA instrument; (2) Determination of initial enrichment (IE) ({sigma} < 5%); (3) Determination of burn up (BU) ({sigma} {approx} 6%); (4) Determination of cooling time (CT) ({sigma} {approx} 20-50%); and (5) DDA instrument as a standalone device. DDA response (fresh fuel vs. spent fuel) is: (1) Fresh fuel => DDA response increases (die-away time is longer) with increasing fissile content; and (2) Spent fuel => DDA response decreases (die-away time is shorter) with higher burn-up (i.e. more neutron absorbers present).

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ris National Laboratory Technical University of Denmark November 2007 Ris Energy Report 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EtHaNoL FoR tRaNSPoRt 49 7.6 tHERmaL FuEL CoNVERSIoN ­ PyRoLySIS, gaSIFICatIoN aND ComBuStIoN 54 7.7 Nu. biomass can also be used for heating, replacing oil or natural gas that can be used as motor fuel. Coal is comparable to its proposal of a 15% reduction by 2010 for the 1997 kyoto negotiations, if we take into ac

151

Nostratic Dictionary - Third Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Gwd ?apu!yya, Gln ?api!yya, Brj abuy?ya2 'maternal uncle' ¶ Bl. 1OO, 112, 174, Ss. PEC 15, Ss. B 21, Hn. S 51, PG 58, Grg. 4, Brl. 2-3, Hw. A 336, Oo. 67, HL 59, AMS 31 (Dl apu!yya ± api!yya 'avunculus' interpreted as 'weiblicher Vater', sc... . (after Böhtlingk) tried to explain the Yk word as a loan from M bicin ? becin , but the latter word means 'ape, monkey', and hence the hyp. is untenable || HS : ?? S *°?bÎX > Ar baÎaX-, buÎX- 'lamb' (if *-ÎX- < *-TX-) ¶ BK I 1OO ?? ECh: Ll {Grgs} bi...

Dolgopolsky, Aharon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Positive solutions of nonlinear m-point boundary value problems on time scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, by using fixed point theorems in a cone and the associated Green's function, we study the existence of at least two and three positive solutions to the m-point boundary value problem (BVP) on time scales, u^@D^@?(t)+f(t,u(t))=0,t@?[0,1]@?T,@bu(0)-@cu^@D(0)=0,u(1)=@?i=1m-2@a"iu(@e"i),m>=3, ... Keywords: 34B10, 34B18, 39A10, Fixed-point theorems, Positive solutions, Time scales, m-point boundary value problems

N. Aykut Hamal; Fulya Yoruk

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hermeneutique des Tantra : les Six extremes (ou possibilites alternatives) (satkoti ; mtha' drug). A propos d'un exemple de pregnance des modeles exegetiques des sutra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deux ornements ont pour fonction assignée, selon Tsong kha pa (1357-1419), de “commenter la pensée [ou l’intention (dgongs pa ; abhipråya)] du tantra-racine”12. Mais, alors que les“Quatre modes d’explication” sont exclusivement utilisés pour les tantra... , Collège de France, Institut de Civilisation Indienne, 1978, p. 15). Bu ston rin chen grub (1290-1364) et Tsong kha pa (1357-1419) utilisent cette “grille” pour commenter le troisième et le quatrième ornement (v. A. Wayman, The Buddhist Tantras, Light...

Arenes, Pierre

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Regmi Research Series ,Year 21, January, 1989  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-9, ev~-ry nat¥~l obstacle 11es In. ~s_se;~; a nd of the til,even ·.rildogn'ised passes, 'only three adad t of beasts of bu-rden , the ''Test are f1 t tor f oo t passengers ODly... £~:;:,:$:':"'~" : -:" '"?~: Regml Research (private) Ltd . , . 2 . 3. Contents SoIlS Guthl :&.8 tbmandu: June 1989 , Bii ted By .M.ahe'sh C:-, Regm.1 Bndcwm8nts A ' 943 (Samvat ) MiscellaDY Trade . . ._--. Between British rrici:1.e and Nepal...

Regmi, Mahesh C

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Angular Distribution of Charming B -> V V Decays and Time Evolution Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Angular distributions of a B meson decaying into two vector mesons are discussed with emphasis on time evolution effects on the complete set of amplitude bilinears. Time integrated quantities are suggested to observe substantial CP violation in decays with charm quarks in the final state particles. Relations among the nine observables at $t=0$ are found to be useful for a consistency check of experimentally extracted quantities. Numerical estimates of the nine observables are made using form factor models and the assumption of the factorization hypothesis. Branching ratio asymmetries for B_u^+ -> D^{*+} \\bar D^{*0} and B_d -> D^{*+} D^{*-} can be as large as -3% and -4%, respectively.

Cheng-Wei Chiang

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

156

Biomimetic oxidation studies. 11: Alkane functionalization in aqueous solution utilizing in situ formed [Fe{sub 2}O({eta}{sup 1}-H{sub 2}O)({eta}{sup 1}-OAc)(TPA){sub 2}]{sup 3+}, as an MMO model precatalyst, embedded in surface-derivatized silica and contained in micelles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biomimetic, methane monooxygenase enzyme (MMO) precatalyst, [Fe{sub 2}O({eta}{sup 1}-H{sub 2}O)({eta}{sup 1}-OAc)(TPA){sub 2}]{sup 3+} (TPA = tris[(2-pyridyl)methyl]amine), 1, formed in situ at pH 4.2 from [Fe{sub 2}O({mu}-OAc)(TPA){sub 2}]{sup 3+}, 2, was embedded in an amorphous silicate surface modified by a combination of hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) and hydrophobic poly(propylene oxide). The resulting catalytic assembly was found to be a biomimetic model for the MMO active site within a hydrophobic macroenvironment, allowing alkane functionalization with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP)/O{sub 2} in an aqueous reaction medium (pH 4.2). For example, cyclohexane was oxidized to a mixture of cyclohexanone, cyclohexanol, and cyclohexyl-tert-butyl peroxide, in a ratio of {approximately}3:1:2. The balance between poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide), tethered on the silica surface, was crucial for maximizing the catalytic activity. The silica-based catalytic assembly showed reactivity somewhat higher in comparison to an aqueous micelle system utilizing the surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium hydrogen sulfate at its critical micelle concentration, in which functionalization of cyclohexane with TBHP/O{sub 2} in the presence of 1 was also studied at pH 4.2 and was found to provide similar products: cyclohexanol, cyclohexanone, and cyclohexyl-tert-butyl peroxide, in a ratio of {approximately}2:3:1. Moreover, the mechanism for both the silica-based catalytic assembly and the aqueous micelle system was found to occur via the Haber-Weiss process, in which redox chemistry between 1 and TBHP provides both the t-BuO{sup {sm_bullet}} and t-BuOO{sup {sm_bullet}} radicals. The t-BuO{sup {sm_bullet}} radical initiates the C-H functionalization reaction to form the carbon radical, followed by O{sub 2} trapping, to provide cyclohexyl hydroperoxide, which produces the cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone in the presence of 1, whereas the coupling product emanates from t-BuOO{sup {sm_bullet}} and cyclohexyl radicals. A discussion concerning both approaches for alkane functionalization in water will be presented.

Neimann, K.; Neumann, R. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel); Rabion, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Groupement de Recherche de Lacq, Artix (France); Buchanan, R.M. [Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Fish, R.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

157

Reaction pathway in vapour phase hydrogenation of maleic anhydride and its esters to {gamma}-butyrolactone  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic reactivity of maleic anhydride (MA), succinic anhydride (SA) and their dimethyl esters (dimethyl maleate and dimethyl succinate) in the vapour phase hydrogenation to {gamma}-butyrolacetone (GBL) was investigated. In order to obtain general data, both a multicomponent catalyst (CAT 1: Cu/Zn/Mg/Cr = 40:5:5:50, atomic ratio %), obtained by reduction of a nonstoichiometric spinel-type precursor, and a commercial catalyst (CAT 2: Cu/Mn/Ba/Cr = 44:8:1:47, atomic ratio %) were used. The MA/GBL solution exhibited the highest GBL production, while the SA/GBL solution was converted only partially due to a competitive adsorption of GBL on the active sites, as evidenced by the similar reactivities observed with pure anhydrides. The best carbon balances were observed with the esters, probably the result of lowest light hydrocarbon synthesis and tar formation. With all the feedstocks, the activity of CAT 2 is higher than that of CAT 1, which, however, gives the best yield in GBL due its lower activity in the overhydrogenation and hydrogenolysis reaction. It was found that n-butanol (BuOH) and butyric acid (BuA) derived mainly from GBL. On this basis, the reactivities of the main products observed were investigated separately, confirming the stability of tetrahydrofuran (THF), which reacted only at high temperature with low conversions to ethanol. On the other hand, GBL gave rise to overhydrogenation and/or hydrogenolysis, with high conversion (mainly with CAT 2), confirming its key role in both reactions. Furthermore, the formation in the catalytic tests with BuA and BuOH of n-butanal, notwithstanding the high H{sub 2}/organic ratio, implies that it is the main intermediate in the hydrogenolysis reactions. A new reaction scheme is proposed, pointing out the key role of GBL as the {open_quotes}intersection{close_quotes} of two possible reaction pathways, giving rise to THF or overhydrogenation and hydrogenolysis products, respectively. 44 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Messori, M.; Vaccari, A. [Universita degli Studi di Bologna (Italy)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Folk Song 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ yang gcig gis nyon/ 'dir 'tsogs kyis nyon dang nga glu bas len/ 1rta 'do ba skyes sa spang lung khug/ 2rgyugs gom lag ngoms sa rta mang gras// O ye/ yang gcig gis nyon/ 'dir 'tsogs kyis nyon dang nga glu bas len/ 3stag shar ba skes sa na zl'i dkyil... // 4gzugs lhu drug ngoms sa khrom p'i gral// O ye/ yang gcig gis nyon/ 'dir 'tsogs kyis nyon dang nga glu bas len/ last updated by World Oral Literature Project staff on Wednesday, Tuesday, June 8, 2010 5sman bu mo skyes sa pha m'i rtsibs// 6lag...

Tshe ring bsam 'grub

159

C NMR Spectra C NMR Spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S16 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S3) Me N-i-Pr #12;S17 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S3) Me NBn #12;S18 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S4) NBn #12;S19 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S4) NBn Me Me Me #12;S20 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra (see p S4) N-n-Bu Me Me Me #12;S21 1 H and 13 C NMR Spectra

Collum, David B.

160

Lamps in the Leaping Over  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

‘dusgser gyi nya mo ‘khor lo bskor ba’i rgyud chen po: /rang byung lhun grub ‘bras bu n/ /gdod naslhun grub rang ‘char bas/ /’byung ba lnga la rag ma pas/ /sku gsung thugs la rten mi ‘cha’/ /gsalbyed rig pa’i sgron ma yi s/ /gter khyim phung po gsal byed... / /longs sku dang nisprul pa’i sku/ /chu shel sgron ma’i dpes mtshon kyang/da lta rang la ‘byung ma srid/ /khyung sgoma chag ‘phur mi nus/.14 See TTT 54, p. 504, eigthth chapter of the Byang chub kyi sems rin chen ‘khor lo: /sems nyid rigpa’i sgron ma yis...

Scheidegger, Daniel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MCKEESPORT MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE WALBORN RESERVOIR YOUN GSVILLE RPD-LORAIN -1 INGOMAR-GRUBBS BIG MEADOWS GARD EN ISLE TURT LE CREEK LEWIST ON E BR USH CR EEK FOOT VILLE BU LL CREEK BESSEMER EAGLEVILLE LIVER POOL E RIDGEVILLE E EVANS CIT Y GUIT ONVILLE WOLF S COR NERS WIN DFALL ABBEYVILLE ROC K CAMP LEATH ER WOOD AR COLA CR EEK MEC HANICST OWN NINE MILE RU N WALKCHALK RENFR EW-MCCALMONT BU FFALO N VALENCIA WELLIN GT ON

162

BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RU RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE MAYFIELD VANDERGRIF T GIRT Y SAY NEW SALEM WET MOR E COWANSHAN NOC K ST ILLWAT ER ELD ERS RIDGE BLAIR CARROLLT OWN BU RNIN G WELL COOKPORT MCCREA FU RNACE RIDGWAY NEW ALEXANDR IA IRISH RU N WILC OX PLU M CREEK PADDYTOWN KEATING HOR TON GUF FEY WH ITESBURG BET ULA SMELTZ ER ODONN ELL DECAT UR W HAZELHU RST ST RONGSTOWN COL EGROVE SH EFFIELD WERT Z H OLLOW RED HILL ULYSSES PLATT SVIL LE BR ANCH W LATR OBE LEID Y TRIU

163

Technical Cross-Cutting Issues for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's Spent Fuel Nondestructive Assay Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ever since there has been spent fuel (SF), researchers have made nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of that fuel to learn about its content. In general these measurements have focused on the simplest signatures (passive photon and total neutron emission) and the analysis has often focused on diversion detection and on determining properties such as burnup (BU) and cooling time (CT). Because of shortcomings in current analysis methods, inspectorates and policy makers are interested in improving the state-of-the-art in SF NDA. For this reason the U.S. Department of Energy, through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), targeted the determination of elemental Pu mass in SF as a technical goal. As part of this research effort, 14 nondestructive assay techniques were studied . This wide range of techniques was selected to allow flexibility for the various needs of the safeguards inspectorates and to prepare for the likely integration of one or more techniques having complementary features. In the course of researching this broad range of NDA techniques, several cross-cutting issues were. This paper will describe some common issues and insights. In particular we will describe the following: (1) the role of neutron absorbers with emphasis on how these absorbers vary in SF as a function of initial enrichment, BU and CT; (2) the need to partition the measured signal among different isotopic sources; and (3) the importance of the “first generation” concept which indicates the spatial location from which the signal originates as well as the isotopic origins.

Tobin, S. J.; Menlove, H. O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Blanc, P.; Burr, T.; Evans, L. G.; Favalli, A.; Fensin, M. L.; Freeman, C. R.; Galloway, J.; Gerhart, J.; Rajasingam, A.; Rauch, E.; Sandoval, N. P.; Trellue, H.; Ulrich, T. J.; Conlin, J. L.; Croft, S.; Hendricks, John; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Eigenbrodt, J. M.; Koehler, W. E.; Lee, D. W.; Lee, T. H.; Lafleur, A. M.; Schear, M. A.; Humphrey, M. A.; Smith, Leon E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Campbell, Luke W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Shaver, Mark W.; Misner, Alex C.; Amber, S. D.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Quiter, B.; Solodov, Alexander; Charlton, W.; Stafford, A.; Romano, C.; Cheatham, J.; Ehinger, Michael; Thompson, S. J.; Chichester, David; Sterbentz, James; Hu, Jianwei; Hunt, A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Richard, J. G.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment and Burn-up of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument  

SciTech Connect

A key objective of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is to utilize non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to determine the elemental plutonium (Pu) content in a commercial-grade nuclear spent fuel assembly (SFA). In the third year of the NGSI Spent Fuel NDA project, the research focus is on the integration of a few NDA techniques. One of the reoccurring challenges to the accurate determination of Pu content has been the explicit dependence of the measured signal on the presence of neutron absorbers which build up in the assembly in accordance with its operating and irradiation history. The history of any SFA is often summarized by the parameters of burn-up (BU), initial enrichment (IE) and cooling time (CT). While such parameters can typically be provided by the operator, the ability to directly measure and verify them would significantly enhance the autonomy of the IAEA inspectorate. Within this paper, we demonstrate that an instrument based on a Differential Die-Away technique is in principle capable of direct measurement of IE and, should the CT be known, also the BU.

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advances in Development of the Fission Product Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fission Product Extraction (FPEX) Process is being developed as part of the United States Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative for the simultaneous separation of cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel. Separation of the Cs and Sr will reduce the short-term heat load in a geological repository, and when combined with the separation of americium (Am) and curium (Cm), could increase the capacity of the geological repository by a factor of approximately 100. The FPEX process is based on two highly specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-Di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and Calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. Results of flowsheet testing of the FPEX process with a simulated feed solution in 3.3-cm centrifugal contactors are detailed. Removal efficiencies, distribution coefficient data, coextraction of metals, and process hydrodynamic performance are discussed along with recommendations for future flowsheet testing with actual spent nuclear fuel.

JAck D. Law

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Simultaneous separation of cesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel using the fission-product extraction process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fission-Product Extraction (FPEX) Process is being developed as part of the United States Department of Energy Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) for the simultaneous separation of cesium and strontium from spent LWR fuel. Separation of the Cs and Sr will reduce the short-term heat load in a geological repository and, when combined with the separation of Am and Cm, could increase the capacity of the geological repository by a factor of approximately 100. The FPEX process is based on two highly-specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-di-(t-butyl-dicyclohexano)- 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and calix[4]arene-bis-(t-octyl-benzo-crown-6 ) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium, and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. Results of flowsheet testing of the FPEX process with simulated and actual spent-nuclear-fuel feed solution in centrifugal contactors are detailed. Removal efficiencies, co-extraction of metals, and process hydrodynamic performance ar e discussed along with recommendations for future flowsheet testing with actual spent nuclear fuel. Recent advances in the evaluation of alternative calixarenes with increased solubility and stability are also detailed. (authors)

Law, J.D.; Peterman, D.R.; Riddle, C.L.; Meikrantz, D.A.; Todd, T.A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-3870 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Numerical study of the disordered Poland-Scheraga model of DNA denaturation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We numerically study the binary disordered Poland-Scheraga model of DNA denaturation, in the regime where the pure model displays a first order transition (loop exponent $c=2.15>2$). We use a Fixman-Freire scheme for the entropy of loops and consider chain length up to $N=4 \\cdot 10^5$, with averages over $10^4$ samples. We present in parallel the results of various observables for two boundary conditions, namely bound-bound (bb) and bound-unbound (bu), because they present very different finite-size behaviors, both in the pure case and in the disordered case. Our main conclusion is that the transition remains first order in the disordered case: in the (bu) case, the disorder averaged energy and contact densities present crossings for different values of $N$ without rescaling. In addition, we obtain that these disorder averaged observables do not satisfy finite size scaling, as a consequence of strong sample to sample fluctuations of the pseudo-critical temperature. For a given sample, we propose a procedure to identify its pseudo-critical temperature, and show that this sample then obeys first order transition finite size scaling behavior. Finally, we obtain that the disorder averaged critical loop distribution is still governed by $P(l) \\sim 1/l^c$ in the regime $l \\ll N$, as in the pure case.

Thomas Garel; Cecile Monthus

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

168

Volunteer corn in soybeans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volunteer corn is a highly visible weed in Nebraska soybean fields. Most soybean fields in the state are affected to some degree. The problem generally is worse in fields that receive tillage during the spring. We are concerned that soybean producers are not adequately considering the negative consequences of uncontrolled volunteer corn growth in soybean. Impact of volunteer corn on soybean yield Volunteer corn is an extremely competitive weed in soybean. It grows taller than soybean early in the season, and in addition to shading surrounding soybean plants, it competes for nutrient and water resources. The yield effect of volunteer corn depends on its density. South Dakota State University conducted studies in 2007 and 2008 where they established volunteer corn densities of 0 up to 17,800 plants/A in soybean (Alms et al. 2008). The corn was allowed to compete for the entire growing season and soybean yields were measured. A density of 5,000 volunteers/A reduced soybean yield approximately 20%, or a 12 bu/A yield loss in 60 bu/A soybean. With a density of 5,000 plants/A, there would be a volunteer corn

Mark Bernards; Lowell S; Bob Wright

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Impact of the Soak and the Malt on the Physicochemical Properties of the Sorghum Starches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Starches were isolated from soaked and malted sorghum and studied to understand their physicochemical and functional properties. The swelling power (SP) and the water solubility index (WSI) of both starches were nearly similar at temperatures below 50 °C, but at more than 50 °C, the starch isolated from malted sorghum showed lower SP and high WSI than those isolated from raw and soaked sorghum. The pasting properties of starches determined by rapid visco-analyzer (RVA) showed that malted sorghum starch had a lower viscosity peak value (86 BU/RVU) than raw sorghum starch (454 BU/RVU). For both sorghum, X-ray diffractograms exhibited an A-type diffraction pattern, typical of cereal starches and the relative degrees of crystallinity ranged from 9.62 to 15.50%. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed that raw sorghum starch showed an endotherm with a peak temperature (Tp) at 78.06 °C and gelatinization enthalpies of 2.83 J/g whereas five-day malted sorghum starch had a Tp at 47.22 °C and gelatinization enthalpies of 2.06 J/g. Storage modulus (G?) and loss modulus (G?) of all starch suspensions increased steeply to a maximum at 70 °C and then decreased with continuous heating. The structural analysis of malted sorghum starch showed porosity on the granule’sInt. J. Mol. Sci. 2010, 11 3003

Irakoze Pierre Claver; Haihua Zhang; Qin Li; Kexue Zhu; Huiming Zhou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

New Designs of Rigid Pincer Complexes with PXP Ligands and Late Transition Metals and sp3 C-F Bond Activation with Silylium and Alumenium Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, catalytic C-F bond activation mediated by alumenium and silylium species, improved methods for the synthesis of highly chlorinated carboranes and dodecaborates, new type of P2Si= pincer silylene Pt complexes and PBP pincer Rh complexes are presented. In Chapter II, the design and synthesis of P2Si= and PBP ligand precursors is described. BrC6H4PR2 is shown to be a useful building block for PXP type of ligands with o-arylene backbone. RLi reagents displayed high chemoselectivity towards electrophiles, such as Si(OEt)4 and BX3 (X = Hal). In Chapter III, new chlorination methods to synthesize [HCB11Cl11]- and [B12Cl12]2- are presented. [HCB11Cl11]- was obtained via reactions of Cs[HCB11H11] with SbCl5 or via reactions of Cs[HCB11H11] with Cl2 in acetic acid and triflic acid. Heating Cs2[B12H12] in mixtures of SO2Cl2 and MeCN led to the isolation of Cs2[B12Cl12] in high yield. In Chapter IV, Et2Al[HCB11H5Br6] or Ph3C[HCB11H5Br6] were shown to be robust catalysts for sp3 C-F bond activation with trialkylaluminum as the stoichiometric reagent. Trialkylaluminum compounds were also shown to be able to be used as “clean-up” reagent for the C-F bond activation reactions, which led to ultra high TON for the catalytic reactions. In Chapter V, a series of (TPB)M complexes (M = Ni, Pd, Pt) were synthesized and characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The resulting metal complexes displayed strong dative M?B interaction and unusual tetrahedral geometry for four-coordinate 16? species, due to the cage structure of the ligand. In Chapter VI, (PSiHP)PtCl was synthesized via the reaction of the ligand precursor and Pt(COD)Cl2, which was used to obtain a series of (PSiHP)PtX complexes(X= I, OTf, Me, Ph, Mes). After hydride abstraction by Ph3C[HCB11Cl11], the X ligand (X= I, OTf, Me, Ph) migrated from the Pt center to silicon center to give a cationic pincer silyl species. The migration was not observed when mesityl was used as the X ligand, which resulted in the first known pincer complex with central silylene donor. Our approaches towards PNP pincer boryl Rh complexes were summarized in Chapter VII. (PBPhP)Rh pivalate complex underwent C-Ph bond activation to yield the pivalate-bridging Rh borane complex.

Gu, Weixing

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

This  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To To be published in Proceedings of 3rd Annual International Conference & Exposition on Surface Mount Technology, San Jose, California August 29-September 2, 1993 t ttt t l tl tt t i, Rechargeable Thin-Film Lithium Batteries J. B. Bates, G. R. Gruzalski, N. J. Dudney, C. F. Luck, and Xioohua Yu Solid State Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37830 ! o-- g _ _ "= ._ contractor ofthe U.S. Government und= conu_ct _o _ No. DE-AC05-840R2t400. Accordingly, the U,S. = _ _ "_ _ Government retains. nonexolusive,royalty-free ,..: = _ _ _ license to publish or reproduce the published form ;_""=g_o ,, ,, ,, of_, ooo_bu_o., o,._o. o_,.. ,o_0,o,f0, o "=__ _ o ,_. U.S. Government p_." _=_. ... W '_ ,._u=,_'_"''°"_'_i _°_= . - SOLIDSTATEDIVISION o = _ .-._-- OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY _,_ _ ° _ -a =_ .== o Managed by ._ _ _ .. _ MARTIN MARIETTA

172

Was  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Was Was hington , DC 20585 Jun e 7, 2 012 MEMORANDUM FOR DAVID W. GEISER DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT FROM: BARBARA McNEAL LLOYD;3~r- DIRECTOR, OFFICE oF BuS.:r4E:ss OPERATioNs, OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT __ ~ / ' THOMAS C. PAULING DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF SITE OPERATIO SUBJECT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT Declaration that the Office of Legacy Management' s Joint Environmental Management System is "Fully Implemented" By this memorandum, it is declared that the joint Environmental Management System (EMS) for the Office of Legacy Management is "fully implemented" and conforms to the ISO 14001 :2004 Standard, consistent with the requirements of DOE Order (0) 436.1 , Departmental Sustainability. In particular: (a) A formal audit of the EMS was conducted from March 5-

173

A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coop (Virginia) Coop (Virginia) Jump to: navigation, search Name A & N Electric Coop Place Virginia Utility Id 84 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1]Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Service - Retail Access - Schedule B-U-RA Multi-Phase Commercial Commercial Service - Retail Access - Schedule B-U-RA Single Phase Commercial Commercial Service - Schedule B-U Single Phase Commercial

174

Data:Ff112f50-2f79-4c56-8b8b-b2fd0ea12086 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0-2f79-4c56-8b8b-b2fd0ea12086 0-2f79-4c56-8b8b-b2fd0ea12086 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Adel, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting Service 1000 W MH Sector: Lighting Description: To unmetered dusk-down electric service provided bu high pressure sodium vapor luminaries supported by short brackets and mounted on either the city's existing wood poles or poles owned by the customer which conform to the city's specifications. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

175

Data:4b0ecef5-ec8d-4f6c-8443-bb732fdf3456 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ecef5-ec8d-4f6c-8443-bb732fdf3456 ecef5-ec8d-4f6c-8443-bb732fdf3456 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Adel, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting Service 250 W HPSV Sector: Lighting Description: To unmetered dusk-down electric service provided bu high pressure sodium vapor luminaries supported by short brackets and mounted on either the city's existing wood poles or poles owned by the customer which conform to the city's specifications. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

176

Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W W aste Bu reau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Buitding 1 San ta Fe. New Mexico 87505-6303 FEB 1 3 20j~ Subject: Notification of Cla ss 1 Permit Modification to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Number: NM4890139088-TSDF De ar Mr. Kieling : Enclosed is the Class 1 Permit Modification Notification listed below: * Change in th e Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office Manager We certify under penalty of law that this document and th e enclos ure were prepared under OUf direction or supervision in accordance with a system designed to assure that qualified personnel properly gather and eva luate th e information submitted. Based on our inquiry of the person or pe rso ns who manage the system , or those persons directly responsible for gathering the

177

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Las Vegas City of Las Vegas Page 1 of2 STATE: NV PROJECf TITL.E : RECOVERY ACT: CITY OF LAS VEGAS , NV ENERGY EFFICI ENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE· FQA-OOOOO13 DE-EE0000683.001 GFO-O000683-OO1 EE Based on my review of the information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A),1 have made the following determination : ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 5.16 Solar photoYoltaic system s The installation, modification, operation, and removal of commercially available solar photoYoltaic systems located on a buHding or other structure (such as rooftop, parking lot or facility, and mounted to signage,

178

Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improvement Improvement Initiative (PPII) CONTACTS Brad Tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PARTNER Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Garden City, KS Sunflower's 360 MWe Wall-fired Holcomb Station Achieving new Source PerformAnce StAndArdS (nSPS) through integrAtion of Low-no X BurnerS with An oPtimizAtion PLAn for BoiLer comBuStion (comPLeted) A unique combination of high-tech combustion modifications and sophisticated control systems was planned to be tested on a coal-fired boiler at Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Power Station in Finney County, Kansas, to demonstrate how new technology can reduce air emissions and save costs for ratepayers. However, due to larger than anticipated costs

179

Data:A65b294d-ef33-4e22-9246-9b152b0ef245 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d-ef33-4e22-9246-9b152b0ef245 d-ef33-4e22-9246-9b152b0ef245 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: A & N Electric Coop Effective date: 2006/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Service - Retail Access - Schedule B-U-RA Single Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Availability: Available to customers otherwise taking bundled service under Schedule B-U, subject to the established Terms and Conditions of the Cooperative. Source or reference: http://www.anec.com/yourbill/rate_pdfs/B_U_RA.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

180

Georgia Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Georgia Power Co Georgia Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Georgia Power Co Place Georgia Utility Id 7140 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png BU-9 - Back Up Service DSM-R-4 - Demand Side Management Residential Residential Irrigation Off-Peak Service Commercial Off-Peak Service Rider - Schedule: OP-5 PLL-7 (Power and Light Large) Commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uff bu rly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Alternative Energy Finance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finance Finance Place London, United Kingdom Zip NW11 8BU Sector Renewable Energy Product String representation "Alternative Ene ... orms of energy." is too long. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

MEPleRANDUM TO: FILE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MEPleRANDUM MEPleRANDUM ( TO: FILE , , ------ --------iS"I;=~:ta,,,-;onFa;tedl/~~-r*z .-+a~* & 0 no; TYV= OF CP==ATION ---=-------aY----- 0 8:esearch & Develoyent B Facility Type Q Other information BU I~LDINGS EQUIl=MENT ORE' OR RAW MATL FINAL PRODUCT WASTE & PESIDLIE

183

MEilORANDLlM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J abET/ J abET/ 1+9/s flM, 17 ., MEilORANDLlM MM, )7-1 TO: FILE ALTERNATE NAME:_________------------- TYE OF CPEP4TION ------- ----_I----- q FIesearch ?< Development 0 Facility Type F'roduction scale testing Filot Scale Bench Scalr rrocesis Theoretical Stc?dies Sample 84 Analysis 0 F'roduction Cl Dieposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT --------1------?. 0 Prime q Subccntractor 0 Purchase.Order Contract/Purchase Manufacturing University Research Drganiration 0 Other information (i.e.,,cost + fixed fee, unit price, time 3. material, etc) _----____~~~___----_________ Order # _----___-~____-----_________ _-_-____--______-________________ CONTRACTING PERIOD: -&-kC%s-------___ QldB~~Sfjl~: LANDS ~0 63 BU 1,LDINGS 0, EQUIPMENT 0 ORE OR RAW MATL 0 E : Cl FINAL PRODUCT q

184

Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Al Al b any, OR * Mo rg antow n , WV * Pitt, bu rg h , PA August 12, 20 II Dear Reader: The enclosed document, Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment for General Motors LLC Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative (supplemental EA; DOElEA- I 723S), was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500 to 1508) and DOE NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). DOE prepared this supplemental EA to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of providing financial assistance under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act; Public Law 111-5, 123 Stat. liS) to General Motors Limited Liability Company (GM) for its proposed project

185

2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN 0815 Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), including testing the PHEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 12,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Chevrolet Volt PHEV (VIN 1G1RD6E48BU100815). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec) dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

U.S. DEPARThmNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETElUlINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

,~ .".fI~; U.S. DEPARThmNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETElUlINATION RECIPIENT: Universily of Maine AEWC Advanced Structures and Composites Center Page 1 of3 STATE: ME PROJECT TITI.E : Recovery Act: DeepCwind Consortium National Research Program: Validation of Coupled Models and Optimization of Materials for Offshore Wind Structures Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Pro<:ureml'nt Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE·FOA-0000090 DE-EEOOO2981 GFO·10-121 EE2981 Bued on my review orlhe inrormatlon concerning the proposed aclion, as N[PA Compliance Ofrleer (authori1.ed under DOt: Order 451.IA), 1 have m idI' the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (induding, but not limited to. literature surveys, inventories. audits), dala analysis (induding

187

TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~~~~;.Offi~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~;.Offi~~~~~~~~~~~ ,/-; l UNITED STh , :__ .~. :__ .~. , , TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA Health and Safet Division pa& 1 Ps B.- Klevin :mL -y!yG hMBOL: HSH:PBK hMBOL: HSH:PBK : 1. Purpose of Visit >.. a. To study operations planned by~Bu.reau of Ea: factors for Be, II, thorium, zirconium, etc, i b. ,'To explain to Bureauof Mines' personnel tl in handling any of the aforementioned mate] 2. Scope of Work The Bureau of l&s'mill make a'study of the k several materials specified by-the New York 0p1 1 The study mill include the following tests for .a. Ignition~temperature~of a cloud. b. Determine the amount of inert required to L propagation in any of these materials.

188

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-.. -.. 37qg: MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE =b-- FROM: ---L- _------__ u . SUBJECT: SITE ACl= ALTERNATE NAME: -_______-~-----------------NA~E:__( CITY:--~---------_-STATE:-~~ (2 OWNE!sI_SL f Past- L&cl= w ------------------- ----- Current- w buL.r - ------------ ownq cm-ltacted 0 yes @ "no; if yes, data cnntacte TYPE OF OPERATION -------------_~-~ q Research & Development 0 Production %.cale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample 84 Analysis 0 Production i2 Disposal/Storage 0 Facility T 0 Hanufac 0 Univerrj 0 .R esearc 0 Governm 14 Other 1 I lil IrJ y,/3 Prime 0 Other infcrkion Subcwkractbr (i.e., ?bst + fixed fee! &nit price, Cl Purchase Order time & mate

189

Data:1b63a97d-771e-48f9-9b06-62964f9fb11e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a97d-771e-48f9-9b06-62964f9fb11e a97d-771e-48f9-9b06-62964f9fb11e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: A & N Electric Coop Effective date: 2006/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Service - Retail Access - Schedule B-U-RA Multi-Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Availability: Available to customers otherwise taking bundled service under Schedule B-U, subject to the established Terms and Conditions of the Cooperative. Source or reference: http://www.anec.com/yourbill/rate_pdfs/B_U_RA.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

190

Microsoft Word - Poster Abstract_2010_Boston U.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure, Surface Chemistry and Oxygen Reduction. Lincoln J. Miara 1 , L. F. J. Piper 2 , Jacob N. Davis 1 , Laxmikant Saraf 3 , Tiffany Kaspar 3 , Soumendra N. Basu 1,4 , K. E. Smith 1,2 , K. Ludwig 1,2 , Uday Pal 1,4 , and Srikanth Gopalan 1,4* 1 Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University College of Engineering, Brookline, MA 02446 2 Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Ave.,, Boston, MA 02215 3 Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 4 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University College of Engineering, Boston, MA 02215 *corresponding author: email - sgopalan@bu.edu, ph. (617) 358-2297 In the pursuit of a complete understanding of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operation, the complex

191

Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Gasification Technologies contacts Gary J. stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Jenny tennant Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov David Rue Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Road Des Plaines, IL 60018 847-768-0508 david.rue@gastechnology.org Real Time Flame moniToRing oF gasiFieR BuRneR and injecToRs Description Combustion scientists and engineers have studied radiant emissions of various flames for many years. For some time, technologists have understood the rich potential for

192

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CoDyBa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CoDyBa CoDyBa CoDyBa logo CoDyBa is a design tool on classical PC for buildings dynamic performance simulation. It is intended for design offices, teaching, and research organizations. The new CoDyBa version is called KoZiBu. A prototype can be downloaded for free. CoDyBa is used to analyze dynamic hygrothermal performance of building elements when subjected to any kind of climate conditions. The tool helps the user conduct studies of heating and cooling strategies, air conditioning or ventilation options, and insulating materials. The main objective is to forecast the energy consumption, temperature, and humidity evolution range. It enables the user to estimate the instant heating or cooling powers needed to maintain a given set point, or to calculate the indoor

193

Research Statements QNet 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Statements from Successful QuarkNet Proposals Research Statements from Successful QuarkNet Proposals February, 1999       Boston University This is the Boston University part of a proposal for a joint site with Northeastern University. We outline two possible projects, which will be chosen according to the interests and time constraints of the teacher. The primary mentor for the teacher assigned to BU will be Prof. U. Heintz. Mentoring responsibilities at Fermilab will be shared with Prof. D. Wood from Northeastern University. Project 1: ========== Experience & skills: some experience with instrumentation and the use of a computer is useful. The teacher will be instructed in the use of the software emplyed to control the instrumentation. Project title: Irradiation Studies of Silicon Microstrip Detectors

194

JGI - FY2004 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Sequencing for the 4 Sequencing for the DOE Microbial Genome Program For status information, see the Genome Projects section. For more information about the DOE Office of Science's Microbial Genome Program, see http://microbialgenomics.energy.gov/. For more information about microbial sequencing at JGI, contact David Bruce. Chlorobia (avg:~2.4Mb) Organism Genome Size Chlorobium ferrooxidans DSM 13031 2.40 Mb Chlorobium limicola DSMZ 245 2.4 Mb Chlorobium phaeobacteroides BS1 2.4 Mb Chlorobium phaeobacteroides DSM 266 2.3 Mb Pelodictyon luteolum DSMZ 273 2.3 Mb Pelodictyon phaeoclathratiforme BU-1 (DSM 5477) 2.4 Mb Prosthecochloris aestuarii DSM 271 2.4 Mb Prosthecochloris vibrioformis DSM 265 2.4 Mb Chlorobaculum parvum n/a Chloroherpeton thalassium n/a Model Syntrophic Consortium

195

Data:B164fbdc-5c3b-4227-8279-721aa9e9e390 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fbdc-5c3b-4227-8279-721aa9e9e390 fbdc-5c3b-4227-8279-721aa9e9e390 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: A & N Electric Coop Effective date: 2004/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Service- Schedule B-U Multi-Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Availability: Available to business, commercial, and industrial uses other than irrigation pumping loads (regular and seasonal) not exceeding 50 kW demand, subject to the established terms and conditions of the cooperative. Tiered Rates = Energy Delivery Charges + Electricity Supply Service Charge. Source or reference: http://www.anec.com/yourbill/rate_pdfs/B_U.pdf

196

Data:31d344d5-c890-4f46-962c-f9cfcc620802 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c890-4f46-962c-f9cfcc620802 c890-4f46-962c-f9cfcc620802 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Adel, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting Service 150 W HPSV Sector: Lighting Description: To unmetered dusk-down electric service provided bu high pressure sodium vapor luminaries supported by short brackets and mounted on either the city's existing wood poles or poles owned by the customer which conform to the city's specifications. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

197

For Physicists  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Winners Award Winners 2013 (for 2012 thesis) Angelo Di Canto (University of Pisa, CDF) "Measurement of CP-Violating Asymmetries in D0→π+π- and D0→K+K- Decays at CDF" Advisor: Giovanni Punzi Thesis Available Online 2012 (for 2011 thesis) Alexander Himmel (Caltech, MINOS) "Antineutrino Oscillations in the Atmospheric Sector" Advisor: Harvey Newman Thesis Available Online 2011 (for 2010 thesis) Jointly awarded to: Xuebing Bu (University of Science and Technology of China, D0) "Higgs to gamma gamma Search and Direct Photon Pair Production Differential Cross-Section Measurement at D0" Advisers: Liang Han and Yanwen Liu Thesis Available Online and Simone Pagan Griso (Universita Degli Studi di Padova, CDF) "Searches for a High-Mass Higgs Boson Produced in p-pbar Collisions at

198

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlHINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

f3 f3 https:/lwww.eere-pmc.energy.govINEPNNepa_cf2a.aspX?Key=10357 u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlHINATION RECIPIENT:Flathead Electric Cooperative ST ATE: MT PROJECT TITLE .. . : Facdity HVAC System Conversion to Ground Source Heat Pump (Phase 1 Modification) Funding OpportUDity AnaouDcement NumMr OE-FOA-EEOOOO116 Procuremen11ns1nJmcn1 Number DE-EEOOO2816 NEPA Control NumMr GFO-10-162-OO1 CIDNumMr G02816 Bued on my review oflbe infonna1ion concerning tbe proposed ac1ton, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4S1.1A), I han made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 63.7 Siting, construction, and operation of new infill exploratory and experimental (test) oil, gas, and geothermal wells, which

199

Fermilab Users' Executive Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outreach Subcommittee Outreach Subcommittee Purpose: Work with Fermilab and with external institutions to increase public awareness of the physics being done at Fermilab. Subcommittee Members 2012-2013 Name Organization Email Mandy Rominsky, Chair Fermilab rominsky AT fnal.gov Mary Anne Cummings Muons, Inc macc AT fnal.gov Daniel Kaplan Illinois Institute of Technology kaplan AT iit.edu Ryan Patterson California Institute of Technology rbpatter AT caltech.edu Breese Quinn University of Mississippi quinn AT phy.olemiss.edu Lee Roberts Boston University roberts AT bu.edu Nikos Varelas (ex-officio) University of Illinois at Chicago varelas AT uic.edu Fermilab User University Profiles Fermilab Outreach Fermilab Office of Communication Fermilab Guided Tours Ask a Scientist Program Physics for Everyone Lecture Series

200

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes: Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes: Unraveling the Relationship among Structure, Surface Chemistry, and Oxygen Reduction-Boston University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture The Boston University (BU) project was competitively selected to acquire the fundamental

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uff bu rly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently rtxpeetlng pemlasion to !wu mpmaentatfoee of Uallinckrodt visit 03% to review rare earth smparatlon tmkniquas. Their lntsmst In purev binstrIal In that they hop to indsti- preilnotlon '- emparntlon of thssae elwnts., Dr. %odnUf oheckad ritli Paul -1. : '/I .._ ,,,. . . w!w was will- to ao"rrlon~vit~~'thoir,Pisiffirg.~e Laboratory sliax he did not feel that it lzpliad 8.pmferentia.l tmabmnt of KalllncJwodt. Subsquently, Dr. %odmfP check~wlth Dr. Davidmnof the Office of Industrial Developmemtuho aleodid Mt objsctbutpointed Out that the Vick Chezdcal Company of 122 East l&xi Btmot, f&w PO* 17, N. ,P., had also expressed an intereat ir.having their mbsidi.arg, the J. T. Baker Chemical Coqany, get into the field. BU aeked

202

Data:0daf063d-7ce4-4f50-90e6-f663a88b2283 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

daf063d-7ce4-4f50-90e6-f663a88b2283 daf063d-7ce4-4f50-90e6-f663a88b2283 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: A & N Electric Coop Effective date: 2004/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Service - Schedule B-U Single Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Availability: Available to business, commercial, and industrial uses other than irrigation pumping loads (regular and seasonal) not exceeding 50 kW demand, subject to the established terms and conditions of the cooperative. Tiered Rates= Energy Delivery Charges + Electricity Service Charge. Source or reference: http://www.anec.com/yourbill/rate_pdfs/B_U.pdf

203

An Assessment of Technologies to Provide Extended Sludge Retrieval from Underground Storage Tanks at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to identify sludge mobilization technologies that can be readily installed in double-shell tanks along with mixer pumps to augment mixer pump operation when mixer pumps do not adequately mobilize waste. The supplementary technologies will mobilize sludge that may accumulate in tank locations out-of-reach of the mixer-pump jet and move the sludge into the mixer-pump range of operation. The identified technologies will be evaluated to determine if their performances and configurations are adequate to meet requirements developed for enhanced sludge removal systems. The study proceeded in three parallel paths to identify technologies that: (1) have been previously deployed or demonstrated in radioactive waste tanks, (2) have been specifically evaluated for their ability to mobilize or dislodge waste simulants with physical and theological properties similar to those anticipated during waste retrieval, and (3) have been used in similar industrial conditions, bu t not specifically evaluated for radioactive waste retrieval.

JA Bamberger

2000-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

204

Construction of. gamma pi. /sup 0/ spectrometer and photon tagging facility at Bates Linear Accelerator. Final report, July 31, 1979-July 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The funds provided under Contract No. DE-AC02-79ER10486 were totally expended for hardware and supplies required by two related devices at the Bates Linear Accelerator. These were a photon tagging facility and a ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer in Beam Line C of the new South Experimental Hall. Construction was begun in November of 1979 and both systems became fully operational in the summer of 1981. Preliminary data was taken in 1980 with a prototype ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer will be carried out in the fall of 1981 and spring of 1982. The photon tagging system has been used successfully to calibrate the ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer for the BU - MIT collaboration and to test a lead glass detector system for Brandeis University.

Booth, E.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Single and double stereoselective fluorination of (E)-allylsilanes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solution of ethyl-(E)-2-methyl-3-trimethylsilylhex-4-enoate (2.052g, 9.0mmol) in THF (4.5ml) was added via a syringe. The temperature was gradually raised to -40°C over a period of 2hrs. After which time iodomethane (0.735ml, 11.8mmol, 1.3 eq) was added... was added n-BuLi (2.5M, 2.9ml, 7.2mmol, 1.2eq.), the reaction was allowed to stir for 30 min. The solution was cooled to -78°C and a solution of ethyl-(E)-3-trimethylsilylhex-4-enoate (1.28g, 6.0mmol) in THF (5ml) was added via a syringe. The light yellow...

Sawicki, Marcin; Kwok, Angela; Tredwell, Matthew; Gouverneur, Veronique

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

206

Efficient One-Step Electrolytic Recycling of Low-Grade and Post-Consumer Magnesium Scrap  

SciTech Connect

Metal Oxygen Separation Technologies, Inc. (abbreviated MOxST, pronounced most) and Boston University (BU) have developed a new low-cost process for recycling post-consumer co-mingled and heavily-oxidized magnesium scrap, and discovered a new chemical mechanism for magnesium separations in the process. The new process, designated MagReGenTM, is very effective in laboratory experiments, and on scale-up promises to be the lowest-cost lowest-energy lowest-impact method for separating magnesium metal from aluminum while recovering oxidized magnesium. MagReGenTM uses as little as one-eighth as much energy as today's methods for recycling magnesium metal from comingled scrap. As such, this technology could play a vital role in recycling automotive non-ferrous metals, particularly as motor vehicle magnesium/aluminum ratios increase in order to reduce vehicle weight and increase efficiency.

Adam C. Powell, IV

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

H1616 Shipping Container Radiographic Inspection Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HI616 shipping container is a certified type B(U) packaging used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship tritium in support of defense programs. During the 1997 recertification of the container, DOE became concerned about the possible cracking of the polyurethane foam in the overpacks of the 2300 containers currently in service. In response, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) initiated a radiographic inspection program to determine if cracking of the foam was occurring in the H1616 overpacks. SNL developed the radiographic technique for inspecting the foam and contracted the Savannah River Site's Tritium Engineering division to inspect a representative sample of overpacks in service. This report details the development process and the results of all of the radiography performed both at SNL and Savannah River.

Tipton, D.G.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Silica SiO2-TiO2 Antireflective Thin Films for Glass Based Solar Panels  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of SiO2-TiO2 thin films employing [[(tBuO)3Si]2O-Ti(OiPr)2], which can be prepared from commercially available materials, results in antireflective thin films on float glass under industrially relevant manufacturing conditions. It was found that while the deposition temperature had an effect on the SiO2:TiO2 ratio, the thickness was dependent on the time of deposition. This study shows that it is possible to use APCVD employing a single source precursor containing titanium and silicon to produce thin films on float glass with high SiO2:TiO2 ratios.

Klobukowski, Erik R [ORNL; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E [ORNL; McCamy, James [PPG; Harris, Caroline [PPG; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hydrogen Oxidation Catalysis by a Nickel Diphosphine Complex with Pendant tert-Butyl Amines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A bis-diphosphine nickel complex with t-butyl functionalized pendant amines [Ni(PCy2Nt-Bu2)2]2+ has been synthesized. It is a highly active electrocatalyst for the oxidation of hydrogen in the presence of base. The turn-over rate of 50 s 1 under 1.0 atm H2 at a potential of –0.77 V vs the ferrocene couple is 5 times faster than the rate reported heretofore for any other molecular H2 oxidation catalyst. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. Computational resources were provided by the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Yang, Jenny Y.; Chen, Shentan; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Bullock, R. Morris; DuBois, Daniel L.; Raugei, Simone; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dupuis, Michel; Rakowski DuBois, Mary

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

210

A combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process  

SciTech Connect

A new solvent extraction process for the simultaneous extraction of cesium and strontium from acidic nitrate media is described. This process uses a solvent formulation comprised of 0.05 M di-t-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6), 0.1 M Crown 100{prime} (a proprietary, cesium-selective derivative of dibenzo-18-crown-6), 1.2 M tributyl phosphate (TBP), and 5% (v/v) lauryl nitrile in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. Distribution ratios for cesium and strontium from 4 M nitric acid are 4.13 and 3.46, respectively. A benchtop batch countercurrent extraction experiment indicates that >98% of the cesium and strontium initially present in the feed solution can be removed in only four extraction stages. Through proper choice of extraction and strip conditions, extracted cesium and strontium can be recovered either together or individually.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Jensen, M.P.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

CRC handbook of neurohypophyseal hormone analogs. Volume I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book is discussed in two parts. Part one discusses Introductory Remarks. Nomenclature. Natural Forms of Neurohypophyseal Hormones. Synthesis, Purification, and Stability of the Neurohypophyseal Hormone Analogs. Isotopically Modified Analogs. Studies of Analogs Using Physiocochemical and Theoretical Methods. Conformational properties of Neurohypophyseal Hormone Analogs in Solution as Determined bu NMR and Laser Raman Spectroscopies. Other Methods used in the Investigation of Neurohypophyseal Hormone Analog Conformations. Conformation Properties of Analogs in Solution as Revealed by Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy. Conformational Energy Calculations. Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships. References. Part 2 discusses The Use of Neurohypophyseal Hormone Analogs in the Study of Neurophysin-Hormone Interactions. Enzymatic Inactivation. Immunochemistry. Studies of Neurohypopophyseal Hormone Activities at the Cellular Level. Fundamental Biological Evaluation. Important Structural Modifications. Noncoded Amino Acids. Modification of ..cap alpha..-Amino Group; 1-Deamino and 1-Hydroxy Analogs. Modifications in the Issulfide Bridge (Carba-Analogs). Modification of Other Functional Groups. Changes in the Backbone. References. Index.

Jost, K.; Lebl, M.; Brtnik, F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Envirocapital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Envirocapital Envirocapital Jump to: navigation, search Name Envirocapital Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC4M 8BU Sector Renewable Energy Product Provides corporate finance advice to the renewable energy and environmental sector. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

213

New 2005 Survey.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

filed in 2005 filed in 2005 2005 NEPA Case Dispositions Lead Defendant Cases Filed Injunctions - Remands Gov't Agency FERC 4 0 Judgment for defendant 94 Navy 1 1 Adverse dispositions: 101 NRC 0 0 TRO 1 DOI - BLM 12 4 Preliminary Injunction 18 - FWS 3 1 Permanent Injunction 7 - BuRec 3 0 Remand 23 - NPS 4 0 Dismissal w/ settlement 24 - BIA/NIGC 2 0 Dismissal w/o settlement 24 - MMS 1 1 Case pending, NEPA 204 - OSM 1 0 USDA - FS 50 26 - APHIS 3 1 DOC - NOAA 3 2 Basis for NEPA Dispositions Army - COE 8 4 Gov't Agency Army 1 0 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 2 DOT - FHWA 5 1 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 25 - FTA 2 0 NEPA - Not required 9 - FAA 3 0 NEPA - Is required 4 - MARAD 2 0 CE - Adequate 10 - SLSC 0 0 CE - Not Adequate 2 DOE 3 0 EA - Adequate* 24 EPA 2 0 EA - Not Adequate*

214

Data:641d4b53-e98b-4fe4-b19a-8a7eba877027 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b53-e98b-4fe4-b19a-8a7eba877027 b53-e98b-4fe4-b19a-8a7eba877027 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Acworth, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting Service 400 W HPSV Sector: Lighting Description: To unmetered dusk-down electric service provided bu high pressure sodium vapor luminaries supported by short brackets and mounted on either the city's existing wood poles or poles owned by the customer which conform to the city's specifications. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

215

U.S. DI!PARThlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA Dl1TImfiNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARThlENT OF ENERGY PARThlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA Dl1TImfiNATION RECIPIENT: BeIi Geospace, Inc Page 1 of2 STATE: TX PROJECT TITLE: Geothermal Technology Advancement for Rapid Development of Resources in the U.S. Funding OpportunUy Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE·FQA'()()()()S22 OE-EEOOO5515 GF0-0005515-001 G05515 Bued on my review oftbe information concerning the proposro action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Ordtr 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description : A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits. and audits), data analysis

216

Les bKa'brgyad - Sources canoniques et tradition de Nyangral Nyima 'od zer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

la Pensée, lié à la famille du bouddha Ak?obhya (Thugs Mi bskyod pa'i rigs) nommé dPal Heruka snying rje rol pa'i rgyud (?r?-heruka-karu??kr??ita-tantra), établi par l'?c?rya H??- kara12 , venu de l'Inde de l'est, près de Zahor (Est du Bengale) (r... mi tra, Pra chen ha ti, Rum bu ghu ya dhe ba, Dha na sang tri, Shan ting ghar ba. 21 'Ju mi pham (s.d., vol. 21 : 15) mentionne également cette neuvième cassette, dont les autres gter ston qui ont découvert des cycles de bKa' brgyad ne parlent pas...

Sampel, Tenzin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Development and Pilot Manufacture of Pseudo-Electric Double Layer Capacitors  

SciTech Connect

Binghamton University carried out basic studies on thermal characteristics of the current ELDC design and characterization of current active and conductive carbon materials used to fabricate ELDC and p-ELDC. Multi physics approach was take for thermal modeling to understand the temperature distribution of an individual cell as well as multi-cell systems, which is an important factor to the reliability of ELDC?s and p-ELDC?s. Structure and properties were characterized for various raw active carbon materials which can be used as electrode to look into potential cost reduction opportunity without degrading the performance. BU team also performed experiments for compositional optimization studies for active carbon, conductive carbon, and binder formulation. A few laboratory instruments were installed for this project at BU. These instruments will continued to be used to carry out further research and development tasks relevant to ELDC and p-ELDC. Project subawardee, Ioxus, Inc., successfully created, enhanced, and then generated a product line of hybrid capacitors which now range in size from 220 Farads (F) to 1000F. These products have been proven to work as the primary energy storage method for LED lighting applications, and two significant commercial applications are evaluating these devices for use. Both of these applications will be used in LED lighting, which replaces traditional batteries and allows for a very fast charge and a high cycle life, over a wide temperature range. This will lead to a significant reduction of waste that ends up in landfills. These products are 70% recyclable, with a 10 year life. In one both applications, it is expected that the hybrid capacitor will power the LED lights for the life of the product, which would have required at least 10 battery changes.

Dae Young Jung,

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

Alkaline-side extraction of technetium from tank waste using crown ethers and other extractants  

SciTech Connect

The chemical development of a new crown-ether-based solvent-extraction process for the separation of (Tc) from alkaline tank-waste supernate is ready for counter-current testing. The process addresses a priority need in the proposed cleanup of Hanford and other tank wastes. This need has arisen from concerns due to the volatility of Tc during vitrification, as well as {sup 99}Tc`s long half-life and environmental mobility. The new process offers several key advantages that direct treatability--no adjustment of the waste composition is needed; economical stripping with water; high efficiency--few stages needed; non-RCRA chemicals--no generation of hazardous or mixed wastes; co-extraction of {sup 90}Sr; and optional concentration on a resin. A key concept advanced in this work entails the use of tandem techniques: solvent extraction offers high selectivity, while a subsequent column sorption process on the aqueous stripping solution serves to greatly concentrate the Tc. Optionally, the stripping solution can be evaporated to a small volume. Batch tests of the solvent-extraction and stripping components of the process have been conducted on actual melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) waste as well as simulants of MVST and Hanford waste. The tandem process was demonstrated on MVST waste simulants using the three solvents that were selected the final candidates for the process. The solvents are 0.04 M bis-4,4{prime}(5{prime})[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6 (abbreviated di-t-BuCH18C6) in a 1:1 vol/vol blend of tributyl phosphate and Isopar{reg_sign} M (an isoparaffinic kerosene); 0.02 M di-t-BuCH18C6 in 2:1 vol/vol TBP/Isopar M and pure TBP. The process is now ready for counter-current testing on actual Hanford tank supernates.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Moyer, B.A.; Presley, D.J.; Armstrong, V.S.; Haverlock, T.J.; Counce, R.M.; Sachleben, R.A.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, October--December 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. Our current targets for isobutanol-producing catalysts are to produce an equimolar mixture of methanol and isobutanol with a productivity for isobutanol of > 50 g/Kg-hr. Reactor system modifications, undertaken to improve data quality, have been completed. The changes should help eliminate differences between the two reactors and allow for more accurate determination of higher molecular weight products. To calibrate our new reactor system, we have retested our ``best`` isobutanol catalyst, 10-DAN-54 (a promoted Zn/Cr/Mn spinel oxide). Under standard test conditions (400{degrees}C, 1000 psi, 12000 GHSV and syngas ratio = 1:1), this catalyst produces 200--252 g/kg-hr of total alcohols (total alcohol selectivities of 57--68%) with an isobutanol rate of 94--130 g/kg-hr and a MeOH/i-BuOH product mole ratio of 3. These results compare with a productivity of 112 g/kg-hr of total alcohols (total alcohol selectivity of 86%) with an isobutanol rate of 38 g/kg-hr and a MeOH/i-BuOH product mole ratio of 3 observed in the original microreactor system configuration. It should be remembered that the test apparatus is designed for screening only. Detailed, more reliable data for kinetic modeling must be generated using larger catalyst charges (> 10g) and in larger scale test equipment.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Twelfth quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project are to discover and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalysts for conversion of syngas to oxygenates having use as fuel enhancers, to explore novel reactor and process concepts applicable in this process, and to develop the best total process for converting syngas to liquid fuels. The authors have prepared an improved version of 10-DAN-54, a Zn/Cr/Mn spinel oxide promoted with Pd and K. This material (16-DMM-68) has acceptable elemental analysis for the expected composition and possesses the desired high surface area of >80 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst has extra added potassium vs. the standard catalyst, 10-DAN-54, as previous work had indicated that more potassium is required for optimal performance. In tests under standard conditions (400 C, 1,000 psi, GHSV = 12,000, syngas ratio = 1), this catalyst shows a selectivity to total alcohols of 84% and produces > 100 g/kg/hr of isobutanol with a MeOH/i-BuOH mole ratio = 4.7. The authors have tested 16-DMM-68 at temperatures above 400 C and pressures up to 1,500 psi (GHSV = 12,000, syngas ratio = 1). At 440 C and 1500 psi, this catalyst shows a selectivity to total alcohols of 64% and produces 179 g/kg/hr of isobutanol with a MeOH/i-BuOH mole ratio = 2.2. This is their best overall performance to data. The catalyst operates at syngas conversions up to 28% with good selectivity to total alcohols due to the extra added alkali. This performance can be compared with 10-DAN-54, which could only operate up to 20% conversion before hydrocarbon formation became a serious inefficiency.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Impacts of Mid-level Biofuel Content in Gasoline on SIDI Engine-Out and Tailpipe Particulate Matter Emissions: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influences of ethanol and iso-butanol blended with gasoline on engine-out and post Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) particle size distribution and number concentration were studied using a GM 2.0L turbocharged Spark Ignition Direct Injection (SIDI) engine. The engine was operated using the production ECU with a dynamometer controlling the engine speed and the accelerator pedal position controlling the engine load. A TSI Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) spectrometer was used to measure the particle size distribution in the range from 5.6 to 560 nm with a sampling rate of 1 Hz. US federal certification gasoline (E0), two ethanol-blended fuels (E10 and E20), and 11.7% iso-butanol blended fuel (BU12) were tested. Measurements were conducted at ten selected steady-state engine operation conditions. Bi-modal particle size distributions were observed for all operating conditions with peak values at particle sizes of 10 nm and 70 nm. Idle and low speed / low load conditions emitted higher total particle numbers than other operating conditions. At idle, the engine-out Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were dominated by nucleation mode particles, and the production TWC reduced these nucleation mode particles by more than 50%, while leaving the accumulation mode particle distribution unchanged. At engine load higher than 6 bar NMEP, accumulation mode particles dominated the engine-out particle emissions and the TWC had little effect. Compared to the baseline gasoline (E0), E10 does not significantly change PM emissions, while E20 and BU12 both reduce PM emissions under the conditions studied. Iso-butanol was observed to impact PM emissions more than ethanol, with up to 50% reductions at some conditions. In this paper, the issues related to PM measurement using FMPS are also discussed. While some uncertainties are due to engine variation, the FMPS must be operated under careful maintenance procedures in order to achieve repeatable measurement results.

He, X.; Ireland, J. C.; Zigler, B. T.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Knoll, K. E.; Alleman, T. L.; Tester, J. T.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Regeneration of ammonia borane spent fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A necessary target in realizing a hydrogen (H{sub 2}) economy, especially for the transportation sector, is its storage for controlled delivery, presumably to an energy producing fuel cell. In this vein, the U.S. Department of Energy's Centers of Excellence (CoE) in Hydrogen Storage have pursued different methodologies, including metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents, for the expressed purpose of supplanting gasoline's current > 300 mile driving range. Chemical H{sub 2} storage has been dominated by one appealing material, ammonia borane (H{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3}, AB), due to its high gravimetric capacity of H{sub 2} (19.6 wt %) and low molecular weight (30.7 g mol{sup -1}). In addition, AB has both hydridic and protic moieties, yielding a material from which H{sub 2} can be readily released in contrast to the loss of H{sub 2} from C{sub 2}H{sub 6} which is substantially endothermic. As such, a number of publications have described H{sub 2} release from amine boranes, yielding various rates depending on the method applied. The viability of any chemical H{sub 2} storage system is critically dependent on efficient recyclability, but reports on the latter subject are sparse, invoke the use of high energy reducing agents, and suffer from low yields. Our group is currently engaged in trying to find and fully demonstrate an energy efficient regeneration process for the spent fuel from H{sub 2} depleted AB with a minimum number of steps. Although spent fuel composition depends on the dehydrogenation method, we have focused our efforts on the spent fuel resulting from metal-based catalysis, which has thus far shown the most promise. Metal-based catalysts have produced the fastest rates for a single equivalent of H{sub 2} released from AB and up to 2.5 equiv. of H{sub 2} can be produced within 2 hours. While ongoing work is being carried out to tailor the composition of spent AB fuel, a method has been developed for regenerating the predominant product, polyborazylene (PB) which can be obtained readily from the decomposition of borazine or from nickel carbene catalyst dehydrogenation. In this cycle, the PB is digested with benzenedithiol to yield two products which can both be converted to AB using Bu{sub 3}SnH and BU{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} as reductants. However, in a real world situation the process becomes more complicated for several reasons. Bu{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} is thermally unstable and therefore not viable in a process scale operation. This has led to the development of Bu{sub 3}SnH as the sole reductant although this requires an additional amine exchange step in order to facilitate the reduction to an amine-borane which can then be converted to AB. The tin by-products also need to be recycled in order to maximize the overall energy efficiency and therefore minimize the overall cost of the process. In addition, on an industrial scale, the mass of the tin reductant generates significant cost due to the manipulation of the relatively large quantities involved so reducing the mass at this stage would be of vast significance. We will discuss further developments made to the tin recycle component of the cycle (including methods to minimize tin usage) and investigate new methods of reduction of the digested products, primarily focusing on lighter reductants, including lighter analogs of Bu{sub 2}SnH{sub 2} and Bu{sub 3}SnH. These advances will have a significant impact on the cost of production and therefore the viability of AB as a fuel. Minimization of tin reagents and their recycle will contribute to reduction of the overall cost of AB regeneration and all stages of AB regeneration have been demonstrated.

Sutton, Andrew David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davis, Benjamin L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Synthesis and electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a series of binuclear and trinuclear ruthenium and palladium complexes based on a new bridging ligand containing terpyridyl and catechol binding sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ligand 4{prime}-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine (L{sup 2}), containing a terpyridyl binding site and a masked catechol binding site, was prepared by a standard Kroehnke-type synthesis. From this the complexes [Ru(terpy)-(L{sup 2})][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (1) and [Ru(L{sup 2}){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (2), containing one and two dimethoxyphenyl substituents, were prepared: demethylation with BBr{sub 3} afforded [Ru(terpy)(H{sub 2}L{sup 1})][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (3) and [Ru(H{sub 2}L{sup 1}){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (4), respectively, which have one or two free catechol binding sites pendant from the [Ru(terpy){sub 2}]{sup 2+} core. Binuclear complexes (based on 3) and trinuclear complexes (based on 4) were then prepared by attachment of other metal fragments at the catechol sites. In [Ru(terpy)({mu}-L{sup 1})Ru(bipy){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 3} (5) and [Ru({mu}-L{sup 1}){sub 2}(Ru(bipy){sub 2}){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 4} (6) the pendant (Ru(bipy){sub 2}(O-O)){sup n+} sites (O-O = catecholate, n = 0; o-benzosemiquinone, n = 1; o-benzoquinone, n = 2) are redox active and may be reversibly interconverted between the three oxidation levels. In [Ru(terpy)({mu}-L{sup 1})Pd(bipy)][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (7), [Ru({mu}-L{sup 1}){sub 2}(Pd(bipy)){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (8), [Ru(terpy)({mu}-L{sup 1})Pd(4,4{prime}-{sup t}Bu{sub 2}-bipy)][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (9), and [Ru({mu}-L{sup 1}){sub 2}(Pd(4,4{prime}-{sup t}Bu{sub 2}-bipy)){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2} (10) the pendant (Pd(bipy)(catecholate)) fragments are known to be photocatalysts for production of {sup 1}O{sub 2} in their own right. Electrochemical and UV/vis studies were performed on all complexes and consistently indicate the presence of interactions between the components in 5-10. The EPR spectrum of 6 (which contains two semiquinone radicals) shows that the two spins are coupled by an exchange interaction.

Whittle, B.; Everest, N.S.; Howard, C.; Ward, M.D. [Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom)

1995-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

224

Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to dose-limiting toxicities. Future efforts will focus on whether further dose escalation with CY/VP16 is safe, with the goal of improving disease control in this high-risk population.

Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)] [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States) [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)] [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Photonics Research and Development  

SciTech Connect

During the period August 2005 through October 2009, the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF), a non-profit affiliate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), in collaboration with UNLVâ??s Colleges of Science and Engineering; Boston University (BU); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Sunlight Direct, LLC, has managed and conducted a diverse and comprehensive research and development program focused on light-emitting diode (LED) technologies that provide significantly improved characteristics for lighting and display applications. This final technical report provides detailed information on the nature of the tasks, the results of the research, and the deliverables. It is estimated that about five percent of the energy used in the nation is for lighting homes, buildings and streets, accounting for some 25 percent of the average homeâ??s electric bill. However, the figure is significantly higher for the commercial sector. About 60 percent of the electricity for businesses is for lighting. Thus replacement of current lighting with solid-state lighting technology has the potential to significantly reduce this nationâ??s energy consumption â?? by some estimates, possibly as high as 20%. The primary objective of this multi-year R&D project has been to develop and advance lighting technologies to improve national energy conversion efficiencies; reduce heat load; and significantly lower the cost of conventional lighting technologies. The UNLVRF and its partners have specifically focused these talents on (1) improving LED technologies; (2) optimizing hybrid solar lighting, a technology which potentially offers the benefits of blending natural with artificial lighting systems, thus improving energy efficiency; and (3) building a comprehensive academic infrastructure within UNLV which concentrates on photonics R&D. Task researchers have reported impressive progress in (1) the development of quantum dot laser emitting diodes (QDLEDs) which will ultimately improve energy efficiency and lower costs for display and lighting applications (UNLV College of Engineering); (2) advancing green LED technology based on the Indium-Gallium-Nitride system (BU), thus improving conversion efficiencies; (3) employing unique state-of-the-art X-ray, electron and optical spectroscopies with microscopic techniques to learn more about the electronic structure of materials and contacts in LED devices (UNLV College of Science); (4) establishing a UNLV Display Lighting Laboratory staffed with a specialized team of academic researchers, students and industrial partners focused on identifying and implementing engineering solutions for lighting display-related problems; and (5) conducting research, development and demonstration for HSL essential to the resolution of technological barriers to commercialization.

Pookpanratana, Sujitra; Shlayan, Neveen; Venkat, Rama; Das, Bisjwajit; Boehm, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Fraser, Donald; Moustakas, Theodore

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

New 2003 Survey.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Lead Defendant Cases Filed Injunctions - Remands NEPA Case Dispositions - 2003 FERC 0 0 pre-2003 2003 All Navy 0 0 Judgment for defendant 46 3 49 NRC 1 0 TRO 2 2 4 DOI - BLM 15 1 Preliminary injunction 7 4 11 - FWS 2 3 Permanent injunction 5 2 7 - BuRec 11 0 Remand 14 2 16 - NPS 1 1 Dismissal w/ settlement 19 3 22 - BIA/NIGC 2 1 Dismissal w/o settlement 24 5 29 - MMS 0 0 Other action 23 10 33 - OSM 1 0 Pending 107 96 205 USDA - FS 66 14 - APHIS 3 0 DOC - NOAA 6 3 Army - COE 12 4 Plaintiffs Army 2 0 Public Interest groups 191 DOT - FHWA 6 2 Individual/Citizen assoc. 82 - FTA 2 0 State government 8 - FAA 3 1 Local government 16 - MARAD 1 0 Business groups 28 - FMCSA 1 0 Property owners/residents 5 DOE 1 2 Indian tribes 9 EPA 0 0 Combination plaintiffs* 42 HUD 1 0 * i.e. local government AND individuals;

227

L AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

L L _ AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 25 7 See Block 16C 6 . 1SSUED BY CODE 0500 8 NNSA/ Oa kridge Site Office u.s. De pa rtment of Energ y NNSA/ Y-12 S it e Offic e P. O. Box 2 05 0 Bu ilding 97 0 4- 2 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8 . NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county. state and ZIP Code) ABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL B A t t n: W ILLIE J. W I LSON PO BOX 2009 SERVICES Y- 12 , LLC ,1 . CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 1 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REO. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) coDE lo5008 NNSA/ Oakridg e Site Office u. s . Department o f Energ y NNSA/ Y-12 Site Of fi ce P. O. Bo x 2050 Building 9704 -2 Oak Ridge TN 37831 (x) 9A AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO.

228

2007 NEPA Survey 7.17.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Navy 1 0 Adverse dispositions: 95 NRC 0 1 TRO 2 DOI - BLM 7 8 Preliminary Injunction 10 - FWS 3 1 Permanent Injunction 18 - BuRec 3 0 Remand 23 - NPS 2 1 Dismissal w/ settlement 15 - BIA/NIGC 2 0 Dismissal w/o settlement 27 - MMS 2 0 Case pending, NEPA 168 - OSM 1 0 USDA - FS 40 23 - APHIS 1 4 DOC - NOAA 2 2 Army - COE 1 3 Gov't Agency Army 0 2 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 3 DOT - FHWA 4 0 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 12 - FTA 2 0 NEPA - Not required 10 - FAA 5 1 NEPA - Is required 4 DOE 1 0 CE - Adequate 7 EPA 2 1 CE - Not Adequate 6 HUD 0 0 EA - Adequate* 14 Air Force 0 1 EA - Not Adequate* 15 TVA 1 1 EIS - Adequate* 29 FCC 0 0 EIS - Not Adequate* 35 GSA 0 0 SEIS - Needed* 9 Ex-Im Bank (OPEC) 0 0 SEIS -Not Needed* 6 USPS 1 0 HHS-FDA 1 0 -NIH 0 0 VA 0 0 DHS - CBP 1 0 - CG 1

229

HEALTH AhO SAFETY DIVISION Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ALYTICAL DATA SHEET ALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhO SAFETY DIVISION Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. m 1956 w I. H.# 7g2 Semplb Nos l2 Date Collected- 512 by RlX -----Route to EA LocetionKN(U[YTr-r-ETyp of Sample ~hd%---Analyzed for F Alphaxx Rema&mre t&n from the furnace and from U= Beta JOC slap ladles. No, Ro Oil PH Be Th Nc0 NO 8506 BcA-j &A- ii \JC cL"w-- Anolyticol Chemistry Secrion: Date Received--!b4-56 by Lab* Date Reported 6-X-66 bu I&b , Method of Analyair Vluarima4rFpt trio I APC&r BGM#2 . ~ Counting Date: BKGD GE0 G .H 1 K L M N slag from bottom of slag ladle Slag from bottom of slag ladle (Heat #8)) Refractory Wick from top ofc furnace I Slag from heat 1423 I Slag from heat #8 - top of slag ladle Slag lining from inside of arcfurnace (nprth fmce)

230

Simonis Sa7; and Steel. Company Occu?atisnal Exposure to Radioactive Eust  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

pff!' pff!' ;-g / (. _ ' /' :ze Simonis Sa7; and Steel. Company . Occu?atisnal Exposure to Radioactive Eust STisit 0' Cctober 27, 1948 by LL%AEC, NY-00 -.- .^ -___ .~.~ .___--.__ y ii . 8;' ' j _ ii* .$@!w- mqa yq 1 -9. c--t c! ;i.s -1 .;- 8. ,3' .$ !, ., ,:' S ' -4 - ;,.j j ;j Y 3 :;.% ,y :; -' ,C-, .,.; sL;./, &j ;d J .&; i: 7;: j:c; G Lj _ , ,.A: :' .i TIiBU OP cc>:m;~s A,. P*zyoaa of rbpo*rt 3, iitzm iLt=P 02 St-&J c* zz@fi&. of s+xdy I, op~~",io~b IIzrp~ii~ 3t xo11ing 3i3119 1X6. Jc;b ?2cmakion and Elr3ddtm 1:i.x,. Sob -b&lyai;;r Shska - FtTijoBo D*. i-l 43 WA.3 3 I c-a xw 39.3~:~ I - s!q.h.% ETqmmr95 by (-.kxxp-bSm IX, 3t.v-.. 1 "*pa* 9 __. . . . .f' 1 .>.> 1-%2 . c- ,.", 1 :. , ' I, J -; .,,- ' ( 7 L $2 _ ,;&&$&q&~&*~&*:

231

New 2002 Survey.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Lead Defendant Cases Filed Injunctions - Remands NEPA Case Dispositions - 2002 FERC 0 0 pre-2002 2002 All Navy 3 1 Judgment for defendant 33 16 49 NRC 0 0 TRO 1 1 2 DOI - BLM 18 1 Preliminary injunction 4 4 8 - FWS 12 2 Permanent injunction 11 8 19 - BuRec 2 0 Remand 12 3 15 - NPS 4 1 Dismissal w/ settlement 18 4 22 - BIA/NIGC 3 1 Dismissal w/o settlement 26 26 52 - MMS 0 0 Other action 36 17 53 - OSM 0 0 Pending 107 61 168 USDA - FS 40 14 - APHIS 0 0 DOC - NOAA 10 6 Army - COE 13 2 Plaintiffs Army 0 0 Public Interest groups 229 DOT - FHWA 10 5 Individual/Citizen assoc. 142 - FTA 7 2 State government 16 - FAA 16 3 Local government 50 - MARAD 0 0 Business groups 64 - FMCSA 1 0 Property owners/residents 19 DOE 4 1 Indian tribes 18 EPA 1 1 Combination plaintiffs* 84 HUD 1 0 * i.e. local government AND individuals;

232

New 2004 Survey.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Lead Defendant Cases Filed Injunctions - Remands NEPA Case Dispositions - 2004 FERC 2 0 pre-2004 2004 All Navy 2 2 Judgment for defendant 42 8 50 NRC 2 0 TRO 2 2 4 DOI - BLM 19 5 Preliminary injunction 9 6 15 - FWS 5 0 Permanent injunction 6 1 7 - BuRec 1 0 Remand 17 0 17 - NPS 4 2 Dismissal w/ settlement 23 5 28 - BIA/NIGC 0 2 Dismissal w/o settlement 26 15 41 - MMS 0 0 Other action 0 0 0 - OSM 0 0 Pending 126 125 251 USDA - FS 76 12 - APHIS 3 0 DOC - NOAA 15 1 Army - COE 13 1 Plaintiffs Army 1 0 Public Interest groups 232 DOT - FHWA 11 2 Individual/Citizen assoc. 83 - FTA 0 0 State government 11 - FAA 2 1 Local government 21 - MARAD 0 0 Business groups 27 - SLSC 0 0 Property owners/residents 11 DOE 4 2 Indian tribes 13 EPA 6 0 Combination plaintiffs* 9 HUD 0 0 * i.e. local government AND individuals;

233

8p Fermi 8/20/99  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab-Serving Researchers, Fermilab-Serving Researchers, Serving Science 8 Future Cool 10 How Hot Was It? 13 Talk of the Lab Keeping Fermilab Cool 6 F E R M I L A B A U .S. D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y L A B O R A T O R Y F N E E R W M S I Volume 22 Friday, August 20, 1999 Number 16 f Photo by Reidar Hahn "A high-energy accelerator is like the 'Field of Dre a m s, ' " s a i d a F e r m i l a b p h y s i c i s t . "I f you bu i l d i t , they will come. " A nd, indeed, they have. According to the latest statistics, more than 2,000 physicists and graduate students from nearly 200 research institutions in the U.S. and around the world come here to advance the understanding of the building blocks of matter. They are called "users" in the Fermilab vernacular. From its inception, Fermilab was intended to be a "truly national" laboratory

234

Air Shipment of Highly Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Romania  

SciTech Connect

Romania safely air shipped 23.7 kilograms of Russian origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel from the VVR S research reactor at Magurele, Romania, to the Russian Federation in June 2009. This was the world’s first air shipment of spent nuclear fuel transported in a Type B(U) cask under existing international laws without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. This shipment was coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), in cooperation with the Romania National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), and the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom. The shipment was transported by truck to and from the respective commercial airports in Romania and the Russian Federation and stored at a secure nuclear facility in Russia where it will be converted into low enriched uranium. With this shipment, Romania became the 3rd country under the RRRFR program and the 14th country under the GTRI program to remove all HEU. This paper describes the work, equipment, and approvals that were required to complete this spent fuel air shipment.

K. J. Allen; I. Bolshinsky; L. L. Biro; M. E. Budu; N. V. Zamfir; M. Dragusin

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The 2008/2009 World Economic Crisis: What It Means for U.S. Agriculture  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook for Biofuel Feedstock Supply Outlook for Biofuel Feedstock Supply Tom Capehart Senior Economist, USDA-ERS Biofuels in AEO2013 Workshop U.S. Energy Information Administration March 20, 2013 Introduction * Ethanol is a Major Use for Corn * The U.S. corn market has been transformed by ethanol. * This season, projected corn for ethanol, accounts for 40.0% of the total use. * Feed and residual, historically the leading use for corn, is projected at 40.4%. * Current tight corn supply is expected to ease in coming years with increased corn production. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 1985/86 88/89 91/92 94/95 97/98 2000/01 03/04 06/07 09/10 12/13 Feed and residual Exports FSI less ethanol Ethanol Ending stocks Source: USDA, World Agricultural Outlook Board, WASDE. U.S. corn utilization Bil. bu 0 1,000 2,000 3,000

236

Lawrence Co. Scioto Co. Greenup Co. Jack  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

COWEN COWEN BELLS F OR D FREDVILLE BIG CH IMNEY ALVIN N RPD-LAWRENC E-2 PEYTONA-EMMON S TOM PR ICE SCHOOL NE BREEDEN MAR E CREEK SCHOOL FAR LEY C HUR CH W LON G R UN LICKBURG RPD-GALLIA-1 MIMA LEF T F OR K RPD-MASON-1 MABSCOT T-CBM CON LEY MEAD E BR ANCH PET ERSBURG VAN LEAR SILVERTON RPD-SC IOT O-2 HURR ICANE CR EEK OT TER ROAD BRANCH SH AVERS FORK HAGERH ILL KEEL FORK CRAGER FORK CON TRARY BRAN CH HUNN EWELL S DUMPS CREEK DOBSON SCH OOL BU LAN DANIEL HINDMAN N LAU REL HILL CROOK PYR AMI D AU XIER LEF T F OR K B CUCU MBER CRK CHANEY CREEK DINGUS RPD-SC IOT O-3 MOORE BRANC H RPD-TAZ EWELL-1 PORT ER CAMP MOU SIE WILD CAT HOLLOW SPR ING CREEK RACCOON SCHOOL ALVIN W ROSC OE GEORGES F ORK DAVISPOR T N LEATH ER BAR K CRK MOON N RPD-673 RPD-678 RPD-520 RPD-334 RPD-335 RPD-510 RPD-100 RPD-333 RPD-509 RPD-280 MAL DEN SALYERSVILLE FAR LEY C HUR CH CEREDO LINCOLN ST RAT TON KNOB SALLY BR ANCH

237

New 2001 Survey.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Lead Defendant Cases Filed Injunctions - Remands NEPA Case Dispositions - 2001 FERC 0 0 pre-2001 2001 All Navy 2 1 Judgment for defendant 41 20 66 NRC 0 0 TRO 2 3 5 DOI - BLM 20 2 Preliminary injunction 4 5 6 - FWS 17 1 Permanent injunction 7 0 9 - BuRec 1 0 Remand 8 8 18 - NPS 7 2 Dismissal w/ settlement 16 8 24 - BIA/NIGC 3 0 Dismissal w/o settlement 23 23 41 - MMS 0 0 Other action 9 4 15 - OSM 0 0 Pending 135 USDA - FS 40 15 - APHIS 2 1 DOC - NOAA 8 3 Army - COE 7 2 Plaintiffs Army 0 0 Public Interest groups 175 DOT - FHWA 3 2 Individual/Citizen assoc. 95 - FTA 13 1 State government 11 - FAA 7 0 Local government 37 - MARAD 0 0 Business groups 52 - SLSC 0 0 Property owners/residents 15 DOE 2 0 Indian tribes 11 EPA 4 0 Combination plaintiffs* 63 HUD 0 0 * i.e. local government AND individuals;

238

Fermilab Users' Executive Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012-2013 UEC and GSA Members at October meeting 2012-2013 UEC and GSA Members at October meeting Current Members of the Fermilab Users Executive Committee 2012-2013 Name and Organization Term Email Nikos Varelas, Chair University of Illinois at Chicago 9/11 - 8/13 varelas AT uic.edu Mary Anne Cummings Muons, Inc. 9/12 - 8/14 macc AT fnal.gov Craig Group University of Virginia 9/12 - 8/14 group AT fnal.gov Sergo Jindariani Fermilab 9/11 - 8/13 sergo AT fnal.gov Daniel Kaplan Illinois Institute of Technology 9/11 - 8/13 kaplan AT iit.edu Ryan Patterson California Institute of Technology 9/11 - 8/13 rbpatter AT caltech.edu Greg Pawloski University of Minnesota 9/11 - 8/13 pawloski AT umn.edu Breese Quinn University of Mississippi 9/12 - 8/14 quinn AT phy.olemiss.edu Lee Roberts Boston University 9/12 - 8/14 roberts AT bu.edu Mandy Rominsky

239

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Dis tri bu tion Cate gory UC-950 In ter na tional En ergy Out look 1998 April 1998 En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion Of fice of In te grated Analy sis and Fore cast ing U.S. De part ment of En ergy Wash ing ton, DC 20585 This re port was pre pared by the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion, the in de pend ent sta tis ti cal and ana lyti cal agency within the De part ment of En ergy. The in for ma tion con tained herein should be at trib uted to the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion and should not be con strued as ad vo cat ing or re flect ing any pol icy po si tion of the De part ment of En ergy or of any other or gani za tion. Con tacts The Inter na tional Energy Out look is pre pared by the Energy Infor ma tion Admin istra tion (EIA). Gen eral

240

2006 NEPA Survey.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Navy 1 0 Adverse dispositions: 120 NRC 3 1 TRO 1 DOI - BLM 21 14 Preliminary Injunction 8 - FWS 6 3 Permanent Injunction 16 - BuRec 0 1 Remand 48 - NPS 0 3 Dismissal w/ settlement 13 - BIA/NIGC 1 0 Dismissal w/o settlement 34 - MMS 0 0 Case pending, NEPA 195 - OSM 0 0 USDA - FS 30 33 - APHIS 2 1 DOC - NOAA 4 4 Army - COE 25 7 Gov't Agency Army 0 2 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 13 DOT - FHWA 7 1 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 14 - FTA 1 0 NEPA - Not required 4 - FAA 3 0 NEPA - Is required 0 - MARAD 0 0 CE - Adequate 9 - SLSC 0 0 CE - Not Adequate 4 DOE 0 1 EA - Adequate* 27 EPA 2 0 EA - Not Adequate* 23 HUD 0 0 EIS - Adequate* 29 Air Force 0 1 EIS - Not Adequate* 26 TVA 0 0 SEIS - Needed* 14 NSF 0 0 SEIS -Not Needed* 4 FCC 0 0 GSA 0 0 FDA 0 0 Total 108 72 27 Public Interest groups

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241

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated: January 2013 Updated: January 2013 Page 1 APPENDIX A CRUDE STREAM CODES COUNTRY Stream Code Stream Name Gravity Sulfur Abu Dhabi UA008 Al Bunduq 38.5 1.1 UA009 Mubarraz 38.1 0.9 UA010 Murban 40.5 0.8 UA011 Zakum (Lower Zakum/Abu Dhabi Marine) 40.6 1 UA012 Umm Shaif (Abu Dhabi Marine) 37.4 1.5 UA013 Arzanah 44 0 UA018 Abu Al Bu Khoosh 31.6 2 UA020 Murban Bottoms 21.4 NA UA021 Top Murban 21 NA UA022 Upper Zakum 34.4 1.7 UA299 Abu Dhabi Miscellaneous NA NA Algeria AG020 Arzew 44.3 0.1 AG021 Hassi Messaoud 42.8 0.2 AG022 Zarzaitine 43 0.1 AG023 Algerian 44 0.1 AG024 Skikda 44.3 0.1 AG025 Saharan Blend 45.5 0.1 AG026 Hassi Ramal 60 0.1 AG027 Algerian Condensate 64.5 NA AG028 Algerian Mix 45.6 0.2

242

Data:A0339e99-b97a-41ba-bebf-8b8294737f66 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

39e99-b97a-41ba-bebf-8b8294737f66 39e99-b97a-41ba-bebf-8b8294737f66 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Newport, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial GSA Sector: Commercial Description: * Customer Charge: A flat charge billed each month to recover the cost NU incurs whether power is consumed or not. This includes items such as a pole, transformer, service line, meter, and monthly bill. Energy Charge: The per kwh charged for each kwh consumed. The fuel charges each month. TVA determines what the fuel costs are each month and provides this information to BU so that we can update the Energy and Fuel Charge accordingly prior to NU calculating your bill.

243

Lead Defendant Cases Filed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 0 Judgment for defendant 77 Navy 1 3 Adverse dispositions: 73 NRC 3 0 TRO 0 DOI - BLM 14 3 Preliminary Injunction 6 - FWS 6 0 Permanent Injunction 10 - BuRec 1 0 Remand 19 - NPS 6 1 Dismissal w/ settlement 26 - BIA/NIGC 3 0 Dismissal w/o settlement 12 - MMS 0 2 Case pending, NEPA 233 - OSM 1 0 USDA - FS 46 13 - APHIS 3 5 DOC - NOAA 8 0 Army - COE 15 5 Gov't Agency Army 2 0 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 1 DOT - FHWA 9 1 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 27 - FTA 1 0 NEPA - Not required 3 - FAA 0 0 NEPA - Is required 0 DOE 6 0 CE - Adequate 5 EPA 1 0 CE - Not Adequate 3 HUD 1 0 EA - Adequate* 14 Air Force 0 0 EA - Not Adequate* 9 TVA 1 1 EIS - Adequate* 21 FCC 0 1 EIS - Not Adequate* 15 GSA 1 0 SEIS - Needed* 1 Ex-Im Bank (OPEC) 0 0 SEIS -Not Needed* 8 USPS 0 0 HHS-FDA 0 0 -NIH 0 0 VA Pending

244

Records Schedule-UMTRA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WEQh!?ST FOP. RECOhD WEQh!?ST FOP. RECOhD ' 3ISPOSITIQN AClT H O R l N - - . (See Insrru~t,ons on reverse) 'c NATIOKAL ARCMVES and RECORDS ADMINISTRATION (MR) WASHINGTON, DC 20408 I . FROM ( A g e n c y or e s t a b l ~ s h m e n t ) , U. S . Denar-merit o f Enercy 2. MAJOR SU8OlVlSiON i 51 bu~uerque $net a t i i o n s O f ?ice (kL9 j 3. MINOR SUBDIVISION Urani urn !

245

I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

?am-3 . ,' .*. . - yp: -.* : .- ., ._ ' Yi * <. ? :+". thfa prcbputir. 80,UUU lb. of tmmiuu, J.m,cDu lb. of 3wukdlw crper' tiwu 5.8 t&i8 l atr:irur ral u&d i.Wttd&?# Bir;n8 i;orammant end rUl rid nrtrlcial by uo&utboFlwd putqlm. ). The ~&&a, ' 8m ;altielJ 79 p-rmlt arrgora ted and ttw tap t.ha aikalini~, . L pokotlal brlf)r, bU88M 8-i .ii.i co# sat8 awtaet wltb the mBtmtl8a. aada q*iast fb a8v0-*..u @ow +.ta p-?Y h&al. . .; . ' 6 G.. ..*... . ,,z.. ,. ..*,:: I c,; i ; ' . Total oont of= oc.rLpl.cu~ed Jo); 8 War Ilsp3~-Zz,-i !- . 2.7 -,I -,:,JI:' :' ---- - 2OCCI.3 y- . . i_;: ,.+-a,., ;: s;,!z ; . 5;1 :. ,' ' ;. I &. , I "1 .~ : .. . '. :, :1' 5 .j. j' . ,*,' jF,-,',' , .: . '5 i- t 3 1 . _? ., \ i : ' .

246

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

247

Application of solar energy to industrial drying of soybeans: Phase III, performance evaluation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15-month performance evaluation was conducted on a solar system designed and constructed to augment the industrial drying of soybeans at the Gold Kist, Inc., extraction plant in Decatur, Alabama. The plant employs three oil-fired, continuous-flow dryers of 3,000 bu/hr each. The solar system consists of 672 Solaron air collectors that temper the airflow into the existing dryers. Since the requirement for energy exceeds the peak solar system capacity, no storage is provided. The interface with the existing facility is simply accomplished by three ducts that release the solar heated air directly adjacent to the dryer air intakes, and no mechanical coupling is needed. The solar system was operated for 1,752 hr on 290 days during the 15-month period without a single failure sufficient to cause shutdown. No interference with normal plant operations was experienced. Maintenance of the solar system, consisting of service to the air handling unit, cleaning of collector glazing, and minor duct repair, totaled $1,564. System utilization was only 46.3%. This was primarily due to daytime routine maintenance performed on the conventional drying and processing equipment. The solar fraction was not large enough to justify maintenance shift changes. An average collector efficiency of 26.2% was experienced. Contamination caused by the local plant environment reduced the average collector efficiency by 9.3 percentage points. A prototype of an automatic cleaning system was constructed and tested.

Hall, B.R.

1979-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Effects of ancillary ligands on selectivity of protein labeling with platinum(II) chloro complexes  

SciTech Connect

Potassium (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylato)chloroplatinate(II) was synthesized. The molecular structure of the complex in (n-Bu){sub 4}N(Pt(dipic)Cl){center dot}0.5H{sub 2}O was determined by x-ray crystallography. The (Pt(dipic)Cl){sup {minus}} is essentially planar and contains a Pt(II) atom, a tridentate dipicolinate dianion ligand, and a unidentate Cl{sup {minus}} ligand. The bis(bidentate) complex trans-(Pt(dipic){sub 2}){sup 2{minus}} was also observed by {sup 1}H NMR. A red gel-like substance was observed when the yellow aqueous solution of K(Pt(dipic)Cl) was cooled or concentrated. The K(Pt(dipic)Cl) molecules form stacks in the solid state and gel-like substance but remain monomeric over a wide range of concentrations and temperatures. The reactivity and selectivity of(Pt(dipic)Cl){sup {minus}} toward cytochromes c from horse and tuna were studied. The new transition-metal reagent is specific for methionine residues. Di(2-pyridyl-{beta}-ethyl)sulfidochloroplatinum(II) chloride dihydrate was also synthesized. This complex labels histidine and methionine residues in cytochrome c. The ancillary ligands in these platinum(II) complexes clearly determine the selectivity of protein labeling. 106 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Zhou, Xia-Ying.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V.; Smirnov, I.; Babain, V.; Zaitsev, B.; Esimantovskiy, V.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Peculiarly Narrow SED of GRB 090926B with MAXI and Fermi/GBM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The monitor of all-sky X-ray image (MAXI) Gas Slit Camera (GSC) on the International Space Station (ISS) detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB) on 2009, September 26, GRB\\,090926B. This GRB had extremely hard spectra in the X-ray energy range. Joint spectral fitting with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope shows that this burst has peculiarly narrow spectral energy distribution and is represented by Comptonized blackbody model. This spectrum can be interpreted as photospheric emission from the low baryon-load GRB fireball. Calculating the parameter of fireball, we found the size of the base of the flow $r_0 = (4.3 \\pm 0.9) \\times 10^{9} \\, Y^{\\prime \\, -3/2}$ cm and Lorentz factor of the plasma $\\Gamma = (110 \\pm 10) \\, Y^{\\prime \\, 1/4}$, where $Y^{\\prime}$ is a ratio between the total fireball energy and the energy in the blackbody component of the gamma-ray emission. This $r_0$ is factor of a few larger, and the Lorentz factor of 110 is smaller by also factor of a few than other bu...

Serino, Motoko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Nakagawa, Yujin E; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Mihara, Tatehiro; Nakahira, Satoshi; Eguchi, Satoshi; Hiroi, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Masaki; Isobe, Naoki; Kimura, Masashi; Kitayama, Hiroki; Kohama, Mitsuhiro; Matsumura, Takanori; Matsuoka, Masaru; Morii, Mikio; Nakajima, Motoki; Negoro, Hitoshi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Sootome, Tetsuya; Sugimori, Kousuke; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Suwa, Fumitoshi; Toizumi, Takahiro; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Usui, Ryuichi; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamazaki, Kyohei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Safety analysis report vitrified high level waste type B shipping cask  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Safety Analysis Report describes the design, analyses, and principle features of the Vitrified High Level Waste (VHLW) Cask. In preparing this report a detailed evaluation of the design has been performed to ensure that all safety, licensing, and operational goals for the cask and its associated Department of Energy program can be met. The functions of this report are: (1) to fully document that all functional and regulatory requirements of 10CFR71 can be met by the package; and (2) to document the design and analyses of the cask for review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The VHLW Cask is the reusable shipping package designed by GNSI under Department of Energy contract DE-AC04-89AL53-689 for transportation of Vitrified High Level Waste, and to meet the requirements for certification under 10CFR71 for a Type B(U) package. The VHLW cask has been designed as packaging for transport of canisters of Vitrified High Level Waste solidified at Department of Energy facilities.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirement s. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A. (INEEL); Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N. (V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute); Logunov, M.V. (MAYAK Production Association)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of a Novel Bi-Directional Isolated Multiple-Input DC-DC Converter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is vital need for a compact, lightweight, and efficient energy-storage system that is both affordable and has an acceptable cycle life for the large-scale production of electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Most of the current research employs a battery-storage unit (BU) combined with a fuel cell (FC) stack in order to achieve the operating voltage-current point of maximum efficiency for the FC system. A system block diagram is shown in Fig.1.1. In such a conventional arrangement, the battery is sized to deliver the difference between the energy required by the traction drive and the energy supplied by the FC system. Energy requirements can increase depending on the drive cycle over which the vehicle is expected to operate. Peak-power transients result in an increase of losses and elevated temperatures which result in a decrease in the lifetime of the battery. This research will propose a novel two-input direct current (dc) dc to dc converter to interface an additional energy-storage element, an ultracapacitor (UC), which is shown in Fig.1.2. It will assist the battery during transients to reduce the peak-power requirements of the battery.

Li, H.

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

254

New Single-Stage PFC Regulator Using the Sheppard-Taylor Topology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a new usage of the dc/dc converter developed by D. I. Sheppard and B. E. Taylor in 1983 for achieving high power factor and output regulation. This converter may be viewed as a cascade of a modified boost stage and a buck stage, with the two stages sharing the same active switch. Two possible operation regimes are described. In the first regime, the converter's input part, which is a modified boost converter, operates in discontinuous mode, and the output part, which is a buck converter, operates in continuous mode. In this regime, high power factor is naturally achieved, and the output voltage is regulated by duty-cycle modulation via a simple output feedback. In the second regime, the input part operates in continuous mode, and the output part operates in discontinuous mode, with duty-cycle modulation maintaining a high power factor and frequency modulation regulating the output. Some comparisons between the Sheppard-Taylor converter and conventional boost and bu...

C. K. Tse; Senior Member; M. H. L. Chow

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evidence of Pressure Dependent Permeability in Long-Term Shale Gas Production and Pressure Transient Responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current state of shale gas reservoir dynamics demands understanding long-term production, and existing models that address important parameters like fracture half-length, permeability, and stimulated shale volume assume constant permeability. Petroleum geologists suggest that observed steep declining rates may involve pressure-dependent permeability (PDP). This study accounts for PDP in three potential shale media: the shale matrix, the existing natural fractures, and the created hydraulic fractures. Sensitivity studies comparing expected long-term rate and pressure production behavior with and without PDP show that these two are distinct when presented as a sequence of coupled build-up rate-normalized pressure (BU-RNP) and its logarithmic derivative, making PDP a recognizable trend. Pressure and rate field data demonstrate evidence of PDP only in Horn River and Haynesville but not in Fayetteville shale. While the presence of PDP did not seem to impact the long term recovery forecast, it is possible to determine whether the observed behavior relates to change in hydraulic fracture conductivity or to change in fracture network permeability. As well, it provides insight on whether apparent fracture networks relate to an existing natural fracture network in the shale or to a fracture network induced during hydraulic fracturing.

Vera Rosales, Fabian 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Splitting a C-O bond in dialkylethers with bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl) cerium-hydride does not occur by a sigma-bond metathesis pathway: a combined experimental and DFT computational study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Addition of diethylether to [1,2,4(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH, abbreviated Cp'2CeH, gives Cp'2CeOEt and ethane. Similarly, di-n-propyl- or di-n-butylether gives Cp'2Ce(O-n-Pr) and propane or Cp'2Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively. Using Cp'2CeD, the propane and butane contain deuterium predominantly in their methyl groups. Mechanisms, formulated on the basis of DFT computational studies, show that the reactions begin by an alpha or beta-CH activation with comparable activation barriers but only the beta-CH activation intermediate evolves into the alkoxide product and an olefin. The olefin then inserts into the Ce-H bond forming the alkyl derivative, Cp'2CeR, that eliminates alkane. The alpha-CH activation intermediate is in equilibrium with the starting reagents, Cp'2CeH and the ether, which accounts for the deuterium label in the methyl groups of the alkane. The one-step sigma-bond metathesis mechanism has a much higher activation barrier than either of the two-step mechanisms.

Werkema, Evan; Yahia, Ahmed; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

| | DOE/EA - 0881 ! ! I ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT I TANK 241-C-103 I ORGANIC VAPOR AND LIQUID CHARACTERIZATION i AND SUPPORTING ACTIVITIES I I HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ! I I August10, 1993 I I I ! I DI6TFtlBU'TION OF TI--.tlS DOCUMENT 18 UNLIMI_ Y ! ! ! This page intentionally left blank, i I ! R ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! I U.S. Department of Energy Executive Summary I Executive Sununary ! i The action proposed is to sample the vapor space and liquid waste and perform other supporting activities in Tank 241-C-103 located in the 241-C Tank Farm on the I Hartford Site. Operations at Tank 241-C-103 are curtailed because of an unreviewed safety I question (USQ) concerning flammability issues of the organic waste in the tank. This USQ must be resolved before normal operation and surveillance of the tank can resume. In I addition to the USQ, Tank 241-C-103 is thought to be involved

258

Endophytic bacteria improve phytoremediation of Ni and TCE co-contamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this work was to investigate if engineered endophytes can improve phytoremediation of co-contaminations by organic pollutants and toxic metals. As a model system, yellow lupine was inoculated with the endophyte Burkholderia cepacia VM1468 possessing (a) the pTOM-Bu61 plasmid, coding for constitutive trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation, and (b) the ncc-nre Ni resistance/sequestration system. Plants were exposed to Ni and TCE and (a) Ni and TCE phytotoxicity, (b) TCE degradation and evapotranspiration, and (c) Ni concentrations in the roots and shoots were determined. Inoculation with B. cepacia VM1468 resulted in decreased Ni and TCE phytotoxicity, as measured by 30% increased root biomass and up to 50% decreased activities of enzymes involved in anti-oxidative defence in the roots. In addition, TCE evapotranspiration showed a decreasing trend and a 5 times higher Ni uptake was observed after inoculation. Engineered endophytes can improve phytoremediation of mixed contaminations via enhanced degradation of organic contaminants and improved metal uptake and translocation.

Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Croes, S.; Dupae, J.; Newman, L.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE SUPPLIES OF BIOENERGY FEEDSTOCK AND ENHANCED SOIL QUALITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agriculture can simultaneously address global food, feed, fiber, and energy challenges provided our soil, water, and air resources are not compromised in doing so. As we embark on the 19th Triennial Conference of the International Soil and Tillage Research Organization (ISTRO), I am pleased to proclaim that our members are well poised to lead these endeavors because of our comprehensive understanding of soil, water, agricultural and bio-systems engineering processes. The concept of landscape management, as an approach for integrating multiple bioenergy feedstock sources, including biomass residuals, into current crop production systems, is used as the focal point to show how these ever-increasing global challenges can be met in a sustainable manner. Starting with the 2005 Billion Ton Study (BTS) goals, research and technology transfer activities leading to the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Revised Billion Ton Study (BT2) and development of a residue management tool to guide sustainable crop residue harvest will be reviewed. Multi-location USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Renewable Energy Assessment Project (REAP) team research and on-going partnerships between public and private sector groups will be shared to show the development of landscape management strategies that can simultaneously address the multiple factors that must be balanced to meet the global challenges. Effective landscape management strategies recognize the importance of nature’s diversity and strive to emulate those conditions to sustain multiple critical ecosystem services. To illustrate those services, the soil quality impact of harvesting crop residues are presented to show how careful, comprehensive monitoring of soil, water and air resources must be an integral part of sustainable bioenergy feedstock production systems. Preliminary analyses suggest that to sustain soil resources within the U.S. Corn Belt, corn (Zea mays L.) stover should not be harvested if average grain yields are less than 11 Mg ha-1 (175 bu ac-1) unless more intensive landscape management practices are implemented. Furthermore, although non-irrigated corn grain yields east and west of the primary Corn Belt may not consistently achieve the 11 Mg ha-1 yield levels, corn can still be part of an overall landscape approach for sustainable feedstock production. Another option for producers with consistently high yields (> 12.6 Mg ha-1 or 200 bu ac-1) that may enable them to sustainably harvest even more stover is to decrease their tillage intensity which will reduce fuel use, preserve rhizosphere carbon, and/or help maintain soil structure and soil quality benefits often attributed to no-till production systems. In conclusion, I challenge all ISTRO scientists to critically ask if your research is contributing to improved soil and crop management strategies that effectively address the complexity associated with sustainable food, feed, fiber and fuel production throughout the world.

Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth, Jr.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The ultimate ethanol: Technoeconomic evaluation of ethanol manufacture, comparing yeast vs Zymomonas bacterium fermentations. [Zymomonas mobilis:a5; Saccharomyces cerevisiae:a6  

SciTech Connect

If ethanol could be produced at a low enough price to serve as the precursor to ethylene and butadiene, it and its derivatives could account for 159 billion lb, or 50% of the US production of 316 billion lb of synthetic organic chemicals, presently valued at $113 billion. This use would consume 3.4 billion bu of corn, or {approximately}40% of the corn crop. This study evaluates advance process engineering and genetic engineering techniques that could generate savings and reduce production costs. The most rewarding development strategy appears to be to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of immobilized Zymomonas mobilis bacteria in a fluidized-bed bioreactor operating in a continuous mode over an extended period of time. Throughput should be adjusted to control product concentration at {approximately}100 g/L (i.e., as close to the threshold of inhibition as possible). There appears to be no inherent design limitation to effect the engineering improvements required in the advanced process operation. The above scenario assumes that the presently available, product-inhibited organisms would be used. In a longer-term, more difficult research effort, it might be possible to reduce or eliminate product inhibition. As a result, price would be reduced further to $1.75 for the Zymomonas system or $1.85 for the yeast fermentation. It is recommended that the engineering proveout of the advanced process be continued at a pilot scale and that a laboratory program aimed at reducing product inhibition and/or increasing specific productivity be initiated. 49 refs., 11 figs., 19 tabs.

Busche, R.M. (Bio En-Gene-Er Associates, Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States)); Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Lynd, L.R. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With this testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137 Cs and 90 Sr to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Brewer, Ken Neal; Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm-diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With the testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for Cs-137, Sr-90, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of Cs-137 and Sr-90 to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent with actinides and metals (Zr, Fe, and Mo). Also, the carryover of aqueous solution (flooding) with the solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (>6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

B. N. Zaitsev (Khlopin Radium Institute); D. J. Wood (INEEL); I. V. Smirnov; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst; T. A. Todd; V. A. Babain; V. M. Esimantovskiy; V. N. Romanovskiy

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Modeling the Geometric Electronic and Redox Properties of Iron(lll)-Containing Amphiphiles with Asymmetric [NNO] Headgroups  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two iron(III)-containing amphiphiles 1 and 2 have been synthesized with the [NN'O] ligands HL{sup tBu-ODA} (2-((octadecyl(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)methyl)-4,6-di-tert-butylphenol) and HL{sup I-ODA} (2-((octadecyl(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)methyl)-4,6-diiodophenol), respectively. Compound 1 is monometallic, whereas EXAFS data suggest that 2 is a mixture of mono- and bimetallic species. The archetypical [Fe{sup III}(L{sup NN'O}){sub 2}]{sup +} complexes 3-9 have been isolated and characterized in order to understand the geometric, electronic, and redox properties of the amphiphiles. Preference for a monometallic or bimetallic nuclearity is dependent on (i) the nature of the solvent used for synthesis and (ii) the type of the substituent in the phenol moiety. In methanol, the tert-butyl-, methoxy-, and chloro-substituted 3, 4, and 5 are monometallic species, whereas the bromo- and iodo-substituted 6 and 7 form bimetallic complexes taking advantage of stabilizing methoxo bridges generated by solvent deprotonation. In dichloromethane, the bromo- and iodo-substituted 8 and 9 are monometallic species; however, these species favor meridional coordination in opposition to the facial coordination observed for the tert-butyl- and methoxy-substituted compounds. Molecular structures for species 5, 7, 8, and 9 have been solved by X-ray diffraction. Furthermore, the electronic spectrum of the amphiphile 1 was expected to be similar to those of facial/cis archetypes with similar substituents, but close resemblance was observed with the profile for those meridional/cis species, suggesting a similar coordination mode. This trend is discussed based on DFT calculations, where preference for the meridional/cis coordination mode appears related to the presence of tertiary amine nitrogen on the ligand, as when a long alkyl chain is attached to the [NN'O] headgroup.

R Shakya; M Allard; M Johann; M Heeg; E Rentschler; J Shearer; B McGarvey; C Verani

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Air Shipment of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Romania to Russia  

SciTech Connect

Romania successfully completed the world’s first air shipment of spent nuclear fuel transported in Type B(U) casks under existing international laws and without shipment license special exceptions when the last Romanian highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel was transported to the Russian Federation in June 2009. This air shipment required the design, fabrication, and licensing of special 20 foot freight containers and cask tiedown supports to transport the eighteen TUK 19 shipping casks on a Russian commercial cargo aircraft. The new equipment was certified for transport by road, rail, water, and air to provide multi modal transport capabilities for shipping research reactor spent fuel. The equipment design, safety analyses, and fabrication were performed in the Russian Federation and transport licenses were issued by both the Russian and Romanian regulatory authorities. The spent fuel was transported by truck from the VVR S research reactor to the Bucharest airport, flown by commercial cargo aircraft to the airport at Yekaterinburg, Russia, and then transported by truck to the final destination in a secure nuclear facility at Chelyabinsk, Russia. This shipment of 23.7 kg of HEU was coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR), as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), in close cooperation with the Rosatom State Atomic Energy Corporation and the International Atomic Energy Agency, and was managed in Romania by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). This paper describes the planning, shipment preparations, equipment design, and license approvals that resulted in the safe and secure air shipment of this spent nuclear fuel.

Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Lucian Biro; Alexander Buchelnikov

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

AIR SHIPMENT OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL FROM ROMANIA AND LIBYA  

SciTech Connect

In June 2009 Romania successfully completed the world’s first air shipment of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel transported in Type B(U) casks under existing international laws and without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. Special 20-foot ISO shipping containers and cask tiedown supports were designed to transport Russian TUK 19 shipping casks for the Romanian air shipment and the equipment was certified for all modes of transport, including road, rail, water, and air. In December 2009 Libya successfully used this same equipment for a second air shipment of HEU spent nuclear fuel. Both spent fuel shipments were transported by truck from the originating nuclear facilities to nearby commercial airports, were flown by commercial cargo aircraft to a commercial airport in Yekaterinburg, Russia, and then transported by truck to their final destinations at the Production Association Mayak facility in Chelyabinsk, Russia. Both air shipments were performed under the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) as part of the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Romania air shipment of 23.7 kg of HEU spent fuel from the VVR S research reactor was the last of three HEU fresh and spent fuel shipments under RRRFR that resulted in Romania becoming the 3rd RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. Libya had previously completed two RRRFR shipments of HEU fresh fuel so the 5.2 kg of HEU spent fuel air shipped from the IRT 1 research reactor in December made Libya the 4th RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. This paper describes the equipment, preparations, and license approvals required to safely and securely complete these two air shipments of spent nuclear fuel.

Christopher Landers; Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Stanley Moses

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Improved Synthesis of [Si6Cl14]2-Salts as Precursors for Si6H12and other Novel Silanes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of excess HSiCl{sub 3} with the aforementioned triamines led to the formation of [Si{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}]{sup 2-} containing salts in all instances. The isolated complex salts were characterized using FT-IR and elemental analysis. IR spectra of these compounds showed characteristic Si-H stretching modes around 2100cm{sup -1} due to the hexacoordinate silane cation and Si-Cl active modes near 528cm{sup -1} as a result of the cyclic dianion. Reaction yields and elemental analysis (CHN) of the salts are summarized in a table. The reaction of peralkylated triamines with HSiCl{sub 3} in dry CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} gives ionic compounds based upon the tetradecachlorocyclohexasilane dianion. Several substituted triamines(R{sub 2}NC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NR{prime}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}NR{sub 2}where R = R{prime} = Et, {sup n}Pr; R = Et, R{prime}= {sup n}Bu, {sup n}Hexyl, Benzyl) were examined for this reaction and N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetraethyl-N{sup {double_prime}}-benzyl-diethylenetriamine produced the best yields of [Si{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}]{sup 2-} salt at 23% based on the amine reagent. This improvement in yield could be attributed to the decreased nucleophilicity of the central amine through increased steric hindrance of the alkyl substituents. The overall consequence of this substituent variation study has revealed new reagents for the synthesis of [Si{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}]{sup 2-} salts and further demonstrated the ability of triamines to efficiently dismutate, complex, and condense chlorosilanes. The increased production of these salts has also opened a route for the study of Si{sub 6}X{sub 12} and its Lewis acid/base adducts.

Kenneth Anderson; Xuliang Dai; Kendric Nelson; Doug Schulz; Philip Boudjouk

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

267

Second Annual Maintenance, Inspection, and Test Report for PAS-1 Cask Certification for Shipping Payload B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Packaging, Inc. (NuPac), PAS-1 cask is required to undergo annual maintenance and inspections to retain certification in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Certificate of Compliance USA/9184B(U) (Appendix A). The packaging configuration being tested and maintained is the NuPac PAS-1 cask for Payload B. The intent of the maintenance and inspections is to ensure the packaging remains in unimpaired physical condition. Two casks, serial numbers 2162-026 and 2162-027, were maintained, inspected, and tested at the 306E Development, Fabrication, and Test Laboratory, located at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. Waste Management Federal Services, Inc. (WMFS), a subsidiary of GTS Duratek, was in charge of the maintenance and testing. Cogema Engineering Corporation (Cogema) directed the operations in the test facility. The maintenance, testing, and inspections were conducted successfully with both PAS-1 casks. The work conducted on the overpacks included weighing, gasket replacement, and plastic pipe plug and foam inspections. The work conducted on the secondary containment vessel (SCV) consisted of visual inspection of the vessel and threaded parts (i.e., fasteners), visual inspection of sealing surfaces, replacement of O-ring seals, and a helium leak test. The work conducted on the primary containment vessel (PCV) consisted of visual inspection of the vessel and threaded parts (i.e., fasteners), visual inspection of sealing surfaces, replacement of O-ring seals, dimensional inspection of the vessel bottom, a helium leak test, and dye penetrant inspection of the welds. The vermiculite material used in the cask rack assembly was replaced.

KELLY, D.J.

2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Net Effect of Exchange Rates on Agricultural Inputs and Outputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For more than thirty years, studies about the effect of the exchange rate on exports have been conducted. However, few have considered the combined effect of the exchange rate on imported inputs into the agricultural system and the exports of final agricultural products those inputs produce. This work contributes to the agricultural economics literature by combining those effects. A current concern is for the net effect as the total value and quantity of inputs imported has increased. This research examines the effect of the exchange rate on imported inputs into the corn, wheat, and beef cattle production systems, breaking it down to a producer's budget, examining how the exchange rate affects profitability. Vector Autoregression (VAR) and Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimates (BACE) models were estimated to evaluate the effects. Daily and weekly price data were used for corn, wheat, feeder steers, ethanol, diesel, ammonia, urea, di-ammonium phosphate, and the exchange rate. A VAR model was estimated to model the relationship between the variables. After having incongruous test results in determining the lag length structure it was decided that a BACE model would be approximated. After estimating the BACE model, the price responses of the commodities to the exchange rates were estimated. The price responses were used in demonstrating the effect of the exchange rate on a producer's profitability. It was determined that, generally, a strengthening exchange rate has a negative impact on prices. It was also found that the exchange rate has a greater impact on prices now than it did 14 years ago, implying that the exchange rate now has a greater affect on profitability. A one percent increase in the value of the dollar led to a decline in profitability ranging from $0.02/bu in wheat to $0.56/cwt in feeder steers. However, agricultural producers should not be overly concerned about a lower valued dollar from the perspective of their agricultural business.

Johnson, Myriah D.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Substituents Dependent Capability of bis(ruthenium-dioxolene-terpyridine)Complexes Toward Water Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bridging ligand, 1,8-bis(2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyrid-4'-yl)anthracene (btpyan) was synthesized by the Miyaura-Suzuki cross coupling reaction of anthracenyl-1,8-diboronic acid and 4'-triflyl-2,2':6'-2{double_prime}-terpyridine in the presence of Pd(PPh{sub 3}){sub 4} (5 mol%) with 68% in yield. Three ruthenium-dioxolene dimers, [Ru{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(dioxolene){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} (dioxolene = 3,6-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzosemiquinone ([1]{sup 0}), 3,5-dichloro-1,2-benzosemiquinone ([2]{sup 0}) and 4-nitro-1,2-benzosemiquinone ([3]{sup 0})) were prepared by the reaction of [Ru{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}(btpyan)]{sup 0} with the corresponding catechol. The electronic structure of [1]{sup 0} is approximated by [Ru{sub 2}{sup II}(OH){sub 2}(sq){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} (sq = semiquinonato). On the other hand, the electronic states of [2]{sup 0} and [3]{sup 0} are close to [Ru{sub 2}{sup III}(OH){sub 2} (cat){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} (cat = catecholato), indicating that a dioxolene having electron-withdrawing groups stabilizes [Ru{sub 2}{sup III}(OH){sub 2}(cat){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} rather than [Ru{sub 2}{sup II}(OH){sub 2}(sq){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} as resonance isomers. No sign was found of deprotonation of the hydroxo groups of [1]{sup 0}, whereas [2]{sup 0} and [3]{sup 0} showed an acid-base equilibrium in treatments with t-BuOLi followed by HClO{sub 4}. Furthermore, controlled potential electrolysis of [1]{sup 0} deposited on an ITO (indium-tin oxide) electrode catalyzed the four-electron oxidation of H{sub 2}O to evolve O{sub 2} at potentials more positive than +1.6 V (vs. SCE) at pH 4.0. On the other hand, the electrolysis of [2]{sup 0} and [3]{sup 0} deposited on ITO electrodes did not show catalytic activity for water oxidation under similar conditions. Such a difference in the reactivity among [1]{sup 0}, [2]{sup 0} and [3]{sup 0} is ascribed to the shift of the resonance equilibrium between [Ru{sub 2}{sup II}(OH){sub 2}(sq){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} and [Ru{sub 2}{sup III}(OH){sub 2}(cat){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0}.

Wada, T.; Muckerman, J.; Fujita, E.; Tanaka, K.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

271

Type B package for the transport of large medical and industrial sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AREVA Federal Services LLC, under contract to the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Offsite Source Recovery Project, is developing a new Type B(U)-96 package for the transport of unwanted or abandoned high activity gamma and neutron radioactive sealed sources (sources). The sources were used primarily in medical or industrial devices, and are of domestic (USA) or foreign origin. To promote public safety and mitigate the possibility of loss or misuse, the Offsite Source Recovery Project is recovering and managing sources worldwide. The package, denoted the LANL-B, is designed to accommodate the sources within an internal gamma shield. The sources are located either in the IAEA's Long Term Storage Shield (LTSS), or within intact medical or industrial irradiation devices. As the sources are already shielded separately, the package does not include any shielding of its own. A particular challenge in the design of the LANL-B has been weight. Since the LTSS shield weighs approximately 5,000 lb [2,270 kg], and the total package gross weight must be limited to 10,000 lb [4,540 kg], the net weight of the package was limited to 5,000 lb, for an efficiency of 50% (i.e., the payload weight is 50% of the gross weight of the package). This required implementation of a light-weight bell-jar concept, in which the containment takes the form of a vertical bell which is bolted to a base. A single impact limiter is used on the bottom, to protect the elastomer seals and bolted joint. A top-end impact is mitigated by the deformation of a tori spherically-shaped head. Impacts in various orientations on the bottom end are mitigated by a cylindrical, polyurethane foam-filled impact limiter. Internally, energy is absorbed using honeycomb blocks at each end, which fill the torispherical head volumes. As many of the sources are considered to be in normal form, the LANL-B package offers leak-tight containment using an elastomer seal at the joint between the bell and the base, as well as on the single vent port. Leak testing prior to transport may be either using helium mass spectrometry or the pressure-rise concept.

Brown, Darrell Dwaine [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Noss, Philip W [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

INTERSPECIFIC AND INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION OF COMMON SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L.) IN FIELD CORN (ZEA MAYS L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common sunflower is a competitive annual native dicot found in disturbed areas, on roadsides, dry prairies, and in row crops. Common sunflower is a competitive weed, but little data exist on interference, economic impacts, and competition in field corn. Field studies were conducted in 2006 and 2007 to 1) define the density-dependent effects of common sunflower competition with corn; 2) define the necessary weed-free periods of common sunflower in corn; 3) evaluate common sunflower control with herbicides; 4) and define the economic impact of common sunflower interference with corn. Corn grain yield was significantly reduced when common sunflower densities reached 1 plant/m of row and potentitially damaging common sunflower densities occurred if allowed to compete for more than 2 to 4 wk after planting for maximum corn yield. No significant corn yield reduction occurred if common sunflowers emerged 8 wk after planting. Growing degree day (GDD) heat units for corn showed that the critical point for control of common sunflower was approximately 300 GDD. Atrazine applied PRE, atrazine followed by (fb) glyphosate or halosulfuron POST, glyphosate POST, halosulfuron POST, and halosulfuron plus nicosulfuron POST controlled >87% of common sunflower. Atrazine applied PRE in a 30-cm band, nicosulfuron POST, and atrazine broadcast plus S-metolachlor PRE showed significantly lower common sunflower control and corn grain yield, when compared to atrazine PRE fb glyphosate POST. Economic impact of one sunflower/6 m of crop row caused a yield loss of 293 kg/ha. Various corn planting densities showed that corn yield can be reduced 1990 kg/ha with common sunflower competition. Corn planting densities of 49400 and 59300 plants/ha provided the greatest net returns with or without the presence of common sunflower competition. The highest net returns occurred with no common sunflower competition in 2006 and 2007, at $3,046/ha and $2,687/ha, respectively, when net corn prices were $0.24/kg ($6.00/bu). Potential control costs of various herbicide treatments revealed net returns of $1,156 to $1,910/ha in 2006 and $1,158 to $1,943/ha in 2007. Determining the economic impact of common sunflower interference in field corn allows producers to estimate the overall net return based upon density and duration of common sunflower interference, while considering varying net corn prices, crop planting density, and herbicide application costs.

Falkenberg, Nyland R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Metal-Catalyzed Carbon-Carbon Bond Forming Reactions for the Synthesis of Significant Chiral Building Blocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Morita Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reaction a carbon-carbon bond forming reaction between an ?,?-unsaturated carbonyl and aldehydes or activated ketones in the presence of a nucleophilic catalyst. The MBH reaction is an atom-economical method of rapid increase of molecular complexity. The development of this process has received considerable attention in recent years. This dissertation presents the development of a new catalytic system for the symmetric and asymmetric MBH reaction. The new system for the racemic version of this reaction was accomplished employing a 1:1:1 ratio of catalytic amounts (10 mol%) of MgI2, TMEDA and DMAP and proved to be highly effective. For the asymmetric version was developed a highly enantio-selective system based on Fu’s planar chiral DMAP derivative (II) with ee´s up to 98%. Abnormal MBH adducts are obtained employing either ethyl 2,3-butadienoate or ethyl propiolate in good yields, in the presence if MgI2 and either a tertiary amine or phosphine as the nucleophile. The ?,?-unsaturated carbonyls where prepared by a modified direct ?- methylenation using paraformaldehyde, diisopropylammonium trifluoroacetate, and catalytic acid or base with excellent yields for several carbonyls compounds. The Negishi cross-coupling reaction is the Pd or Ni-catalyzed stereoselective cross-coupling or organozincs and aryl-, alkenyl-, or alkynyl halides. Enantioselective Negishi cross-coupling of aryl zincs and ?-bromo ketones was accomplished employing a NCN Pincer complex as the catalyst with ee´s up 99%. The required pincer complexes have been prepared by the oxidative addition of pincer ligands with palladium or nickel. Additionally, It has been developed a direct and highly active, (NCN)-Pd catalytic system for the ?-arylation of ketones with a variety of aryl bromides using the air and moisture stable [t-BuPheBox-Me2]PdBr (XVI) as the catalyst. The adducts are obtained in excellent yields (92% average for 20 examples) in only 1 hour using 1 mol% of catalyst loading. Perhaps more importantly, the work described here shows that XVI is highly reactive, highly selective, even on substrates bearing challenging functional groups such alkenes.

Bugarin Cervantes, Alejandro

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Catalytic activity of a series of Zn(II) phenoxides for the copolymerization of epoxides and carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of zinc phenoxides of the general formula (2,6-R{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}O){sub 2}Zn(base){sub 2} [R = Ph, {sup t}Bu, {sup i}Pr, base = Et{sub 2}O, THF, or propylene carbonate] and (2,4,6-Me{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 2}O){sub 2}Zn(pyridine){sub 2} have been synthesized and characterized in the solid state by X-ray crystallography. All complexes crystallized as four-coordinate monomers with highly distorted tetrahedral geometry about the zinc center. The angles between the two sterically encumbering phenoxide ligands were found to be significantly more obtuse than the corresponding angles between the two smaller neutral base ligands, having average values of 140{degree} and 95{degree}, respectively. In a noninteracting solvent such as benzene or methylene chloride at ambient temperature, the ancillary base ligands are extensively dissociated from the zinc center, with the degree of dissociation being dependent on the base as well as the substituents on the phenolate ligands. That is, stronger ligand binding was found in zinc centers containing electron-donating tert-butyl substituents as opposed to electron-withdrawing phenyl substituents. In all instances, the order of ligand binding was pyridine > THF > epoxides. These bis(phenoxide) derivatives of zinc were shown to be very effective catalysts for the copolymerization of cyclohexene oxide and CO{sub 2} in the absence of strongly coordinating solvents, to afford high-molecular-weight polycarbonate (M{sub w} ranging from 45 x 10{sup 3} to 173 x 10{sup 3} Da) with low levels of polyether linkages. However, under similar conditions, these zinc complexes only coupled propylene oxide and CO{sub 2} to produce cyclic propylene carbonate. Nevertheless, these bis(phenoxide) derivatives of zinc were competent at terpolymerization of cyclohexene oxide/propylene oxide/CO{sub 2} with little cyclic propylene carbonate formation at low propylene oxide loadings. While CO{sub 2} showed no reactivity with the sterically encumbered zinc bis(phenoxides), e.g., (2,6-di-tert-butylphenoxide){sub 2}Zn(pyridine){sub 2} to provide the corresponding aryl carbonate zinc derivative. At the same time, both sterically hindered and sterically nonhindered phenoxide derivatives of zinc served to ring-open epoxide, i.e., were effective catalysts for the homopolymerization of epoxide to polyethers. The relevance of these reactivity patterns to the initiation step of the copolymerization process involving these monomeric zinc complexes is discussed.

Darensbourg, D.J.; Holtcamp, M.W.; Struck, G.E.; Zimmer, M.S.; Niezgoda, S.A.; Rainey, P.; Robertson, J.B.; Draper, J.D.; Reibenspies, J.H.

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mechanistic studies of the metal catalyzed formation of polycarbonates and their thermoplastic elastomers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies concerning the formation of industrially useful polycarbonates are the focus of this dissertation. Of particular importance is the biodegradable polymer, poly(trimethylene carbonate) which has a wide range of medical applications. The production of polycarbonates can be achieved by the ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonate, or the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and oxiranes or oxetanes. For the production of polycarbonates from these monomers, Schiff base metal complexes have been designed, synthesized, and optimized as catalysts. Detailed kinetic and mechanistic studies have been performed for the ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates, as well as the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and oxiranes or oxetane. In addition, the copolymerization of cyclic carbonates and cyclic esters to modify the mechanical and biodegradable properties of materials used for medical devices has been studied using biocompatible metal complexes. In the process for ring-opening polymerizations of trimethylene carbonate or lactides, Schiff base metal complexes (metal = Ca(II), Mg(II) and Zn(II)) have been shown to be very effective catalysts to produce high molecular weight polymers with narrow polydispersities. Kinetic studies demonstrated the polymerization reactions to proceed via a mechanism first order in [monomer], [catalyst], and [cocatalyst] if an external cocatalyst is applied, and to involve ring-opening by way of acyl-oxygen bond cleavage. The activation parameters (?H?, ?S? and ?G?) were determined for ringopening polymerization of trimethylene carbonate, ring-opening polymerization of lactides, and copolymerization of trimethylene carbonate and lactide. In the process for copolymerization of carbon dioxide and oxetane, metal salen derivatives of Cr(III) and Al(III) along with cocatalyst such as n-Bu4NX or PPNX (PPN = bis(triphenylphosphine)iminium, and X = Br, Cl and N3) have been shown to be effective catalysts to provide poly(trimethylene carbonate) with only trace amount of ether linkages. The formation of copolymer is proposed not to proceed via the intermediacy of trimethylene carbonate, which was observed as a minor product of the coupling reaction. To support this conclusion, ring-opening polymerization of trimethylene carbonate has been performed and kinetic parameters have been compared with those from the copolymerization of carbon dioxide and oxetane.

Choi, Wonsook

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Pressure Transient Analysis and Production Analysis for New Albany Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas has become increasingly important to United States energy supply. During recent decades, the mechanisms of shale gas storage and transport were gradually recognized. Gas desorption was also realized and quantitatively described. Models and approaches special for estimating rate decline and recovery of shale gas wells were developed. As the strategy of the horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures (MTFHW) was discovered and its significance to economic shale gas production was understood, rate decline and pressure transient analysis models for this type of well were developed to reveal the well behavior. In this thesis, we considered a “Triple-porosity/Dual-permeability” model and performed sensitivity studies to understand long term pressure drawdown behavior of MTFHWs. A key observation from this study is that the early linear flow regime before interfracture interference gives a relationship between summed fracture half-length and permeability, from which we can estimate either when the other is known. We studied the impact of gas desorption on the time when the pressure perturbation caused by production from adjacent transference fractures (fracture interference time) and programmed an empirical method to calculate a time shift that can be used to qualify the gas desorption impact on long term production behavior. We focused on the field case Well A in New Albany Shale. We estimated the EUR for 33 wells, including Well A, using an existing analysis approach. We applied a unified BU-RNP method to process the one-year production/pressure transient data and performed PTA to the resulting virtual constant-rate pressure drawdown. Production analysis was performed meanwhile. Diagnosis plots for PTA and RNP analysis revealed that only the early linear flow regime was visible in the data, and permeability was estimated both from a model match and from the relationship between fracture halflength and permeability. Considering gas desorption, the fracture interference will occur only after several centuries. Based on this result, we recommend a well design strategy to increase the gas recovery factor by decreasing the facture spacing. The higher EUR of Well A compared to the vertical wells encourages drilling more MTFHWs in New Albany Shale.

Song, Bo

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates: Catalysts for asymmetric olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research presented and discussed in this dissertation involves the synthesis of transition metal complexes of oxazolinylboranes and cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates, and their application in catalytic enantioselective olefin hydroamination and acceptorless alcohol decarbonylation. Neutral oxazolinylboranes are excellent synthetic intermediates for preparing new borate ligands and also developing organometallic complexes. Achiral and optically active bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are synthesized by reaction of 2-lithio-2-oxazolide and 0.50 equiv of dichlorophenylborane. These bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes are oligomeric species in solid state resulting from the coordination of an oxazoline to the boron center of another borane monomer. The treatment of chiral bis(oxazolinyl)phenylboranes with sodium cyclopentadienide provide optically active cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borates H[PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}] [Ox{sup R} = Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4R-iPr,Me2}, Ox{sup 4S-tBu]}. These optically active proligands react with an equivalent of M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) to afford corresponding cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 complexes {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup R}){sub 2}}M(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} in high yields. These group 4 compounds catalyze cyclization of aminoalkenes at room temperature or below, providing pyrrolidine, piperidine, and azepane with enantiomeric excesses up to 99%. Our mechanistic investigations suggest a non-insertive mechanism involving concerted C?N/C?H bond formation in the turnover limiting step of the catalytic cycle. Among cyclopentadienyl-bis(oxazolinyl)borato group 4 catalysts, the zirconium complex {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup 4S-iPr,Me2}){sub 2}}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} ({S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}) displays highest activity and enantioselectivity. Interestingly, {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} also desymmetrizes olefin moieties of achiral non-conjugated aminodienes and aminodiynes during cyclization. The cyclization of aminodienes catalyzed by {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} affords diastereomeric mixture of cis and trans cylic amines with high diasteromeric ratios and excellent enantiomeric excesses. Similarly, the desymmetrization of alkyne moieties in {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-catalyzed cyclization of aminodiynes provides corresponding cyclic imines bearing quaternary stereocenters with enantiomeric excesses up to 93%. These stereoselective desymmetrization reactions are significantly affected by concentration of the substrate, temperature, and the presence of a noncyclizable primary amine. In addition, both the diastereomeric ratios and enantiomeric excesses of the products are markedly enhanced by N-deuteration of the substrates. Notably, the cationic zirconium-monoamide complex [{S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2})][B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}] obtained from neutral {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} cyclizes primary aminopentenes providing pyrrolidines with S-configuration; whereas {S-2}Zr(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2} provides R-configured pyrrolidines. The yttrium complex {S-2}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} also affords S-configured pyrrolidines by cyclization of aminopentenes, however the enantiomeric excesses of products are low. An alternative optically active yttrium complex {PhB(C{sub 5}H{sub 4})(Ox{sup 4S-tBu}){sub 2}}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} ({S-3}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3}) is synthesized, which displays highly enantioselective in the cyclization of aminoalkenes at room temperature affording S-configured cyclic amines with enantiomeric excesses up to 96%. A noninsertive mechanism involving a six-membered transition state by a concerted C?N bond formation and N?H bond cleavage is proposed for {S-3}YCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3} system based on the kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical features. In the end, a series of bis- and tris(oxazolinyl)borato iridium and rhodium complexes are synthesized with bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborane [PhB(Ox{sup Me2}){sub 2}]{sub n}, tris(oxazolinyl)borane [B(Ox{sup Me2}){sub 3}]n, and tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate [To{sup M}]{sup ?}. All these new an

Manna, Kuntal [Ames Laboratory

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

278

Enhancing Magnetic Properties of Molecular Magnetic Materials: The Role of Single-Ion Anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable efforts are being devoted to designing enhanced molecular magnetic materials, in particular single molecule magnets (SMMs) that can meet the requirements for future technologies such as quantum computing and spintronics. A current trend in the field is enhancing the global anisotropy in metal complexes using single-ion anisotropy. The work in this dissertation is devoted to the synthesis and characterization of new building blocks of the highly anisotropic early transition metal ion V(III) with the aim of incorporating them into heterometallic molecular materials. The results underscore the importance of tuning the local coordination environments of metal ions in order to ensure enhanced single ion anisotropy. A family of mononuclear axially distorted vanadium (III) compounds, A[L_(3)VX_(3)] (3-9) (X = F, Cl or Br, A^(+) = Et_(4)N^(+), nBu_(4)N^(+) or PPN^(+) , L_(3) = Tp or Tp* (Tp = tris(-1-pyrazolyl)borohydride), Tp* = tris(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)borohydride)), and [Tp*V(DMF)_(3)](PF_(6))_(2) were studied. Replacement of the Tp ligand in 3 with the stronger ?-donor Tp* results in a near doubling of the magnitude of the axial zero-field splitting parameter D_(z) (D_(z) = -16.0 cm^(-1) in 3, and -30.0 cm^(-1) in 4) as determined by magnetic measurements. Such findings support the idea that controlling the axial crystal field distortion is an excellent way to enhance single-ion anisotropy. High Field-High Frequency EPR measurements on 4 revealed an even higher D value, -40.0 cm^(-1). Interestingly, compound 4 exhibits evidence for an out-of-phase ac signal under dc field. In another effort, a new series of vanadium cyanide building blocks, PPN[V(acac)_(2)(CN)_(2)]?PPNCl (13) (acac = acetylacetonate), A[V(L)(CN)_(2)] (A^(+) = Et_(4)N^(+), L = N,N'-Ethylenebis(salicylimine) (14), A = PPN^(+), L = N,N'-Ethylenebis(salicylimine) (15), L = N,N'-Phenylenebis(salicylimine) (16), and L = N,N'-Ethylenebis(2-methoxysalicylimine) (17)) were synthesized. Magnetic studies revealed moderate Dz values (-10.0, 5.89, 3.7, 4.05 and 4.36 cm^(-1) for 13-17 respectively). The first family of cyanide-bridged lanthanide containing molecules with a trigonal bipyramidal (TBP) geometry, (Et_(4)N)_(2)[(Re(triphos)(CN)_(3))_(2)(Ln(NO_(3))_(3))_(3)]-?4CH_(3)CN (19-27 with Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy and Ho) were prepared using the [(triphos)Re(CN)_(3)]^(-) building block, results that add valuable information to our database of compounds with a TBP geometry. Magnetic studies revealed diverse magnetic responses including slow relaxation of the magnetization at zero field for 25 and 26 , an indication of SMM behavior.

Saber, Mohamed Rashad Mohamed

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, the bu

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Bootstrapping a Sustainable North American PEM Fuel Cell Industry: Could a Federal Acquisition Program Make a Difference?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The North American Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell industry may be at a critical juncture. A large-scale market for automotive fuel cells appears to be several years away and in any case will require a long-term, coordinated commitment by government and industry to insure the co-evolution of hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicles (Greene et al., 2008). The market for non-automotive PEM fuel cells, on the other hand, may be much closer to commercial viability (Stone, 2006). Cost targets are less demanding and manufacturers appear to be close, perhaps within a factor of two, of meeting them. Hydrogen supply is a significant obstacle to market acceptance but may not be as great a barrier as it is for hydrogen-powered vehicles due to the smaller quantities of hydrogen required. PEM fuel cells appear to be potentially competitive in two markets: (1) Backup power (BuP) supply, and (2) electrically-powered MHE (Mahadevan et al., 2007a, 2007b). There are several Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) of PEM fuel cell systems for these applications but production levels have been quite low (on the order of 100-200 per year) and cumulative production experience is also limited (on the order of 1,000 units to date). As a consequence, costs remain above target levels and PEM fuel cell OEMs are not yet competitive in these markets. If cost targets can be reached and acceptable solutions to hydrogen supply found, a sustainable North American PEM fuel cell industry could be established. If not, the industry and its North American supply chain could disappear within a year or two. The Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested a rapid assessment of the potential for a government acquisition program to bootstrap the market for non-automotive PEM fuel cells by driving down costs via economies of scale and learning-by-doing. The six week study included in-depth interviews of three manufacturers, visits to two production facilities, review of the literature on potential markets in North America and potential federal government procurements, development of a cost model reflecting economies of scale and learning-by-doing, and estimation of the impact of federal PEM fuel cell procurements on fuel cell system costs and the evolution of private market demand. This report presents the findings of that study. Section 2 outlines the status of the industry and describes potential markets based on interviews of manufacturers and the existing literature. Section 3 describes the modeling methodology including key premises and assumptions, and presents estimates of market evolution under four scenarios: (1) Base Case with no federal government procurement program, (2) Scenario 1, an aggressive program beginning with less than 200 units procured in 2008 ramping up to more than 2,000 units in 2012, (3) Scenario 2 which is identical to Scenario 1 except that the private market is assumed to be twice as sensitive to price, and (4) Scenario 3, a delayed, smaller federal procurement program beginning in 2011 increasing to a maximum of just over 1,000 units per year in 2012. The analysis suggests that the aggressive program of Scenario 1 would likely stimulate a sustainable, competitive North American non-automotive PEM fuel cell industry. Given plausible assumptions about learning rates and scale economies, the procurements assumed in Scenario 1 appear to be sufficient to drive down costs to target levels. These findings are conditional on the evolution of acceptable hydrogen supply strategies, which were not explicitly analyzed in this study. Success is less certain under Scenarios 2 and 3, and there appears to be a strong probability that existing OEMs would not survive until 2011. In the Base Case, no program, a viable North American industry does not emerge before 2020.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Duleep, Dr. K. G. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Mechanisms of growth inhibition induced by methylene-substituted and ring-substituted dims in breast cancer cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States and estrogen receptor (ER) status largely influences the type and subsequent success of treatment employed. Although ER-positive breast cancer can be treated with endocrine therapy, the more invasive ER-negative breast cancer is non-responsive to this therapy and cytotoxic agents are often utilized which are associated with many adverse side effects. Consequently, there is a genuine need to develop more effective, less toxic treatments for invasive breast cancer. Indole-3-carbinol is a phytochemical found in cruciferous vegetables and one of its major metabolites, 3,3’-diindolylmethane (DIM), exhibits a broad range of anticancer and antitumorigenic activities. ER-negative MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cell growth was inhibited after treatment with a novel series of methylenesubstituted DIMs (C-DIMs), namely 1,1-bis(3’-indolyl)-1-(p-substitutedphenyl) methanes containing trifluoromethyl (DIM-C-pPhCF3), t-butyl (DIM-C-pPhtBu) and phenyl (DIM-C-pPhC6H5) groups. In addition, DIM-C-pPhC6H5 (40 mg/kg/d) inhibited tumor growth in nude mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cells as xenografts. Treatment of breast cancer cells with C-DIMs lead to downregulation of cyclin D1 and induction of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-activated gene 1. Detection of necrosis, caspasedependent or caspase-independent apoptosis were not observed in breast cancer cells treated with C-DIMs, however autophagic cell death was induced by C-DIMs. DIM and ring-substituted DIMs have exhibited antitumorigenic activity in tumor murine mammary models. An investigation into the mechanism of cell death induced by DIM and 5,5’-dibromoDIM (5,5’-diBrDIM) in both ER-positive (MCF-7) and ERnegative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells revealed modulation of several key signaling pathways involved in growth control. Both DIM and 5,5’-diBrDIM downregulated cyclin D1, although only 5,5’-diBrDIM induced a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. In addition, apoptosis was observed in MCF-7 cells treated with 5,5’-diBrDIM but not MDA-MB-231 cells. In summary, C-DIMs may represent new mechanism-based agents for treatment of breast cancer through induction of autophagic cell death. The ring-substituted DIMs correspond to a novel class of uncharged mitochondrial poisons that are also highly effective in inhibiting breast cancer cell growth. Results of this research provide evidence for the potential role of two new series of DIM analogs for the treatment of highly aggressive breast cancer.

Vanderlaag, Kathryn Elisabeth

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING  

SciTech Connect

A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials. This paper also discusses the results from testing of the BTSP to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Condition events. The programmatic need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship bulk quantities of tritium has been satisfied since the late 1970s by the UC-609 shipping package. The current Certificate of Conformance for the UC-609, USA/9932/B(U) (DOE), will expire in late 2011. Since the UC-609 was not designed to meet current regulatory requirements, it will not be recertified and thereby necessitates a replacement Type B shipping package for continued DOE tritium shipments in the future. A replacement tritium packaging called the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) is currently being designed and tested by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The BTSP consists of two primary assemblies, an outer Drum Assembly and an inner Containment Vessel Assembly (CV), both designed to mitigate damage and to protect the tritium contents from leaking during the regulatory Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). During transport, the CV rests on a silicone pad within the Drum Liner and is covered with a thermal insulating disk within the insulated Drum Assembly. The BTSP packaging weighs approximately 500 lbs without contents and is 50-1/2 inches high by 24-1/2 inches in outside diameter. With contents the gross weight of the BTSP is 650 lbs. The BTSP is designed for the safe shipment of 150 grams of tritium in a solid or gaseous state. To comply with the federal regulations that govern Type B shipping packages, the BTSP is designed so that it will not lose tritium at a rate greater than the limits stated in 10CFR 71.51 of 10{sup -6} A2 per hour for the 'Normal Conditions of Transport' (NCT) and an A2 in 1 week under 'Hypothetical Accident Conditions' (HAC). Additionally, since the BTSP design incorporates a valve as part of the tritium containment boundary, secondary containment features are incorporated in the CV Lid to protect against gas leakage past the valve as required by 10CFR71.43(e). This secondary containment boundary is designed to provide the same level of containment as the primary containment boundary when subjected to the HAC and NCT criteria.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

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Lawrence Livermore National Security Cost Model Functional Management Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of the Functional Management Assessment of the cost model included a review of the plan and progress of the Cost Model Review Team. The review focused on processes in place to ensure simplicity, compliance with cost accounting standards and indirect cost allocation methodology, and the change management plan. This was intended to be a high-level initial review in order to provide recommendations for a subsequent more comprehensive review. The single document reviewed by the team during the assessment was the Indirect Cost Recovery Model Review, which describes how the indirect rate restructure and new organizational structure have resulted in streamlined charging practices to better understand and strategically manage costs. ISSUE 1: The cost model focuses heavily on rate structure but not on cost management. Significant progress has been made to simplify the rate structure. The number of indirect rates has been reduced from 67 different indirect rates used under the prior contract to 32 rates in the first year of the LLNS contract, with a goal of further reduction to 16 for FY09. The reductions are being recommended by a broad-based Working Group driven by Lab leadership desiring a simplified rate structure that would make it easier to analyze the true cost of overhead, be viewed as equitable, and ensure appropriate use of Service, i.e., operations, Centers. This has been a real challenge due to the significant change in approach from one that previously involved a very complex rate structure. Under this prior approach, the goal was to manage the rates, and rates were established at very detailed levels that would 'shine the light' on pools of overhead costs. As long as rates stayed constant or declined, not as much attention tended to be given to them, particularly with so many pools to review (184 indirect rate pools in FY05). However, as difficult and important as simplifying the rate structure has been, the fundamental reason for the simplification is to make it easier to analyze the true cost of overhead so the costs can be effectively managed. For the current year, the overall the goal of keeping the total cost of an FTE to FY07 levels. This approach reflects the past practice of managing to rates rather than focusing on costs, although streamlined with the more simplified rate structure. Given all the challenges being faced with the contract transition, this was a reasonable interim tactic for dealing with the known cost increases such as fees and taxes. Nonetheless, in order to take full advantage of the opportunities that exist for making sound decisions for further reducing the rates themselves, the Laboratory needs to implement an ongoing and disciplined approach to understanding and managing overhead cost. ISSUE 2: The NIF has a significantly different rate structure than other Laboratory work. Because of its significant size and unique organizational structure as a major construction project, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has indirect charges that vary from the norm. These variations were reviewed and approved by and disclosed to the NNSA in the Laboratory's past annual Disclosure Statements. In mid-FY 09, NIF will begin transition from a construction line item to an operational center. The reallocation of costs when this occurs could significantly impact the Laboratory's rates and rate structure planning for that transition from a cost- and rate- impact standpoint should begin soon. ISSUE 3: The new rate model must be finalized shortly in order to implement the model beginning in FY 09. As noted in Issue No.1, a Working Group has developed a simplified rate structure for the Lab to use for FY09. The Working Group has evaluated the cost impacts of the simplified rate structure at the major program level and identified a disparate impact in the Safeguards and Security area where a substantial increase in overhead cost allocation may need to be mitigated. The simplified rate structure will need to be approved by the Laboratory Director and issued within the Laboratory to formulate detailed bu

Tevis, J; Hirahara, J; Thomas, B; Mendez, M

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z