National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for uf6 environmental risks

  1. Method and apparatus for measuring enrichment of UF6

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Thomas Roy; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov

    2011-06-07

    A system and method are disclosed for determining the enrichment of .sup.235U in Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) utilizing synthesized X-rays which are directed at a container test zone containing a sample of UF6. A detector placed behind the container test zone then detects and counts the X-rays which pass through the container and the UF6. In order to determine the portion of the attenuation due to the UF6 gas alone, this count rate may then be compared to a calibration count rate of X-rays passing through a calibration test zone which contains a vacuum, the test zone having experienced substantially similar environmental conditions as the actual test zone. Alternatively, X-rays of two differing energy levels may be alternately directed at the container, where either the container or the UF6 has a high sensitivity to the difference in the energy levels, and the other having a low sensitivity.

  2. NGSI: IAEA Verification of UF6 Cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2012-06-05

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is often ignorant of the location of declared, uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders following verification, because cylinders are not typically tracked onsite or off. This paper will assess various methods the IAEA uses to verify cylinder gross defects, and how the task could be ameliorated through the use of improved identification and monitoring. The assessment will be restricted to current verification methods together with one that has been applied on a trial basis—short-notice random inspections coupled with mailbox declarations. This paper is part of the NNSA Office of Nonproliferation and International Security’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) program to investigate the concept of a global monitoring scheme that uniquely identifies and tracks UF6 cylinders.

  3. Integrating UF6 Cylinder RF Tracking With Continuous Load Cell...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is demonstrating the integration of UF6 cylinder tracking, using RF technology, with continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) at mock UF6 feed and withdrawal (F&W) stations. ...

  4. Adsorptive Films in Support of In-field UF6 Destructive Assay Sample Collection and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Christopher A.; Martinez, Alonzo; McNamara, Bruce K.; Cannon, Bret D.; Anheier, Norman C.

    2014-07-20

    International Atom Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguard verification measures in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) rely on environmental sampling, non-destructive assay (NDA), and destructive assay (DA) sampling and analysis to determine uranium enrichment. UF6 bias defect measurements are made by DA sampling and analysis to assure that enrichment is consistent with declarations. DA samples are collected from a limited number of cylinders for high precision, offsite mass spectrometer analysis. Samples are typically drawn from a sampling tap into a UF6 sample bottle, then packaged, sealed, and shipped under IAEA chain of custody to an offsite analytical laboratory. Future DA safeguard measures may require improvements in efficiency and effectiveness as GCEP capacities increase and UF6 shipping regulations become increasingly more restrictive. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) DA sampler concept and Laser Ablation Absorption Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) assay method are under development to potentially provide DA safeguard tools that increase inspection effectiveness and reduce sample shipping constraints. The PNNL DA sampler concept uses a handheld sampler to collect DA samples for either onsite LAARS assay or offsite laboratory analysis. The DA sampler design will use a small sampling planchet that is coated with an adsorptive film to collect controlled quantities of UF6 gas directly from a cylinder or process sampling tap. Development efforts are currently underway at PNNL to enhance LAARS assay performance to allow high-precision onsite bias defect measurements. In this paper, we report on the experimental investigation to develop adsorptive films for the PNNL DA sampler concept. These films are intended to efficiently capture UF6 and then stabilize the collected DA sample prior to onsite LAARS or offsite laboratory analysis. Several porous material composite films were investigated, including a film designed to maximize the chemical adsorption

  5. A Laser-Based Method for On-Site Analysis of UF6 at Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Martinez, Alonzo; Barrett, Christopher A.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Smith, Leon E.

    2014-11-23

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) long-term research and development plan calls for more cost-effective and efficient safeguard methods to detect and deter misuse of gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The IAEA’s current safeguards approaches at GCEPs are based on a combination of routine and random inspections that include environmental sampling and destructive assay (DA) sample collection from UF6 in-process material and selected cylinders. Samples are then shipped offsite for subsequent laboratory analysis. In this paper, a new DA sample collection and onsite analysis approach that could help to meet challenges in transportation and chain of custody for UF6 DA samples is introduced. This approach uses a handheld sampler concept and a Laser Ablation, Laser Absorbance Spectrometry (LAARS) analysis instrument, both currently under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A LAARS analysis instrument could be temporarily or permanently deployed in the IAEA control room of the facility, in the IAEA data acquisition cabinet, for example. The handheld PNNL DA sampler design collects and stabilizes a much smaller DA sample mass compared to current sampling methods. The significantly lower uranium mass reduces the sample radioactivity and the stabilization approach diminishes the risk of uranium and hydrogen fluoride release. These attributes enable safe sample handling needed during onsite LAARS assay and may help ease shipping challenges for samples to be processed at the IAEA’s offsite laboratory. The LAARS and DA sampler implementation concepts will be described and preliminary technical viability results presented.

  6. Neutron spectrometry for UF6 enrichment verification in storage cylinders

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Kiff, Scott D.

    2015-01-29

    Verification of declared UF6 enrichment and mass in storage cylinders is of great interest in nuclear material nonproliferation. Nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are commonly used for safeguards inspections to ensure accountancy of declared nuclear materials. Common NDA techniques used include gamma-ray spectrometry and both passive and active neutron measurements. In the present study, neutron spectrometry was investigated for verification of UF6 enrichment in 30B storage cylinders based on an unattended and passive measurement approach. MCNP5 and Geant4 simulated neutron spectra, for selected UF6 enrichments and filling profiles, were used in the investigation. The simulated neutron spectra were analyzed using principalmore » component analysis (PCA). The PCA technique is a well-established technique and has a wide area of application including feature analysis, outlier detection, and gamma-ray spectral analysis. Results obtained demonstrate that neutron spectrometry supported by spectral feature analysis has potential for assaying UF6 enrichment in storage cylinders. The results from the present study also showed that difficulties associated with the UF6 filling profile and observed in other unattended passive neutron measurements can possibly be overcome using the approach presented.« less

  7. Two photon spectroscopy of UF6 in the near ultraviolet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, E.R.; Kennedy, P.M.

    1981-03-01

    The two photon excited fluorescence excitation spectrum of UF6 was observed in the region 410 to 315 nm. The spectrum was virtually indistinguishable from the one photon absorption in this region. No vibronic structure was observed in absorption or dispersed emission. These data indicate a high density of u and g states for UF6 in this energy range and facile photochemical decomposition. Emission intensity was found to be proportional to laser power to the 3.0 to 3.6 power.

  8. Integrating UF6 Cylinder RF Tracking With Continuous Load Cell Monitoring for Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krichinsky, Alan M; Miller, Paul; Pickett, Chris A; Richardson, Dave; Rowe, Nathan C; Whitaker, J Michael; Younkin, James R

    2009-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is demonstrating the integration of UF6 cylinder tracking, using RF technology, with continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) at mock UF6 feed and withdrawal (F&W) stations. CLCM and cylinder tracking are two of several continuous-monitoring technologies that show promise in providing integrated safeguards of F&W operations at enrichment plants. Integrating different monitoring technologies allows advanced, automated event processing to screen innocuous events thereby minimizing false alerts to independent inspectors. Traditionally, international inspectors rely on batch verification of material inputs and outputs derived from operator declarations and periodic on-site inspections at uranium enrichment plants or other nuclear processing facilities. Continuously monitoring F&W activities between inspections while providing filtered alerts of significant operational events will substantially increase the amount of valuable information available to inspectors thereby promising to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards and to improve efficiency in conducting on-site inspections especially at large plants for ensuring that all operations are declared.

  9. Onsite Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plant UF6 Cylinder Destructive Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong; Carter, Jennifer C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Phillips, Jon R.; Curtis, Michael M.

    2012-07-17

    The IAEA safeguards approach for gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) includes measurements of gross, partial, and bias defects in a statistical sampling plan. These safeguard methods consist principally of mass and enrichment nondestructive assay (NDA) verification. Destructive assay (DA) samples are collected from a limited number of cylinders for high precision offsite mass spectrometer analysis. DA is typically used to quantify bias defects in the GCEP material balance. Under current safeguards measures, the operator collects a DA sample from a sample tap following homogenization. The sample is collected in a small UF6 sample bottle, then sealed and shipped under IAEA chain of custody to an offsite analytical laboratory. Current practice is expensive and resource intensive. We propose a new and novel approach for performing onsite gaseous UF6 DA analysis that provides rapid and accurate assessment of enrichment bias defects. DA samples are collected using a custom sampling device attached to a conventional sample tap. A few micrograms of gaseous UF6 is chemically adsorbed onto a sampling coupon in a matter of minutes. The collected DA sample is then analyzed onsite using Laser Ablation Absorption Ratio Spectrometry-Destructive Assay (LAARS-DA). DA results are determined in a matter of minutes at sufficient accuracy to support reliable bias defect conclusions, while greatly reducing DA sample volume, analysis time, and cost.

  10. Advancements of the Hybrid Method UF6 Container Inspection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, Emily K.; Orton, Christopher R.; Jordan, David V.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Smith, Leon E.

    2011-07-17

    Safeguards inspectors currently visit uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are performed with handheld high-resolution detectors on a limited number of cylinders taken to be representative of the plant’s cylinder inventory. These enrichment assay methods interrogate only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume, and are time-consuming and expensive to execute. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an automated UF6 cylinder verification station concept based on the combined collection of traditional enrichment-meter data (186 keV photons from 235U) and non-traditional, neutron-induced, high-energy gamma-ray signatures (3-8 MeV) with an array of collimated, medium-resolution scintillators. Previous work at PNNL (2010) demonstrated proof-of-principle that this hybrid method yields accurate, full-volume assay of the cylinder enrichment, reduces systematic errors when compared to several other enrichment assay methods, and provides simplified instrumentation and algorithms suitable for long-term, unattended operations. This system aims to increase the number of inspected cylinders at higher accuracy and with lower cost than when compared to inspectors with hand-held instruments. Several measurement campaigns of 30B cylinder populations and a refined MCNP model will be reported. The MCNP model consists of per-gram basis vectors for the different uranium isotopes and several fill geometries, enabling fast generation of any UF6 enrichment level and multiple configurations. The refined model was used to optimize collimator design and detector configuration for the hybrid method. In addition, a new field prototype based on model results was utilized in a set of field measurements.

  11. Radiation-Triggered Surveillance for UF6 Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper recommends the use of radiation detectors, singly or in sets, to trigger surveillance cameras. Ideally, the cameras will monitor cylinders transiting the process area as well as the process area itself. The general process area will be surveyed to record how many cylinders have been attached and detached to the process between inspections. Rad-triggered cameras can dramatically reduce the quantity of recorded images, because the movement of personnel and equipment not involving UF6 cylinders will not generate a surveillance review file.

  12. A "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Technologies for UF6 Cylinder Tracking at Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Chris A; Younkin, James R; Kovacic, Donald N; Dixon, E. T.; Martinez, B.

    2007-01-01

    This effort describes how radio-frequency (RF) technology can be integrated into a uranium enrichment facility's nuclear materials accounting and control program to enhance uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinder tracking and thus provide benefits to both domestic and international safeguards. Approved industry-standard cylinders are used to handle and store UF6 feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. In the international arena, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming manual cylinder inventory and tracking techniques to verify operator declarations and to detect potential diversion of UF6. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant process for tracking and monitoring UF6 cylinders would greatly reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a "proof-of concept" system that was designed show the feasibility of using RF based technologies to track individual UF6 cylinders throughout their entire life cycle, and thus ensure both increased domestic accountability of materials and a more effective and efficient method for application of IAEA international safeguards at the site level. The proposed system incorporates RF-based identification devices, which provide a mechanism for a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant tracking network. We explore how securely attached RF tags can be integrated with other safeguards technologies to better detect diversion of cylinders. The tracking system could also provide a foundation for integration of other types of safeguards that would further enhance detection of undeclared activities.

  13. A Mock UF6 Feed and Withdrawal System for Testing Safeguards...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    System for Testing Safeguards Monitoring Systems and Strategies Intended for ... Title: A Mock UF6 Feed and Withdrawal System for Testing Safeguards Monitoring Systems and ...

  14. Enrichment Assay Methods for a UF6 Cylinder Verification Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Jordan, David V.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.; Orton, Christopher R.

    2010-11-30

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These enrichment assay methods interrogate only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume, and are time-consuming and expensive to execute for inspectors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an unattended measurement system capable of automated enrichment measurements over the full volume of Type 30B and Type 48 cylinders. This Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) could be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. The focus of this paper is the development of nondestructive assay (NDA) methods that combine “traditional” enrichment signatures (e.g. 185-keV emission from U-235) and more-penetrating “non-traditional” signatures (e.g. high-energy neutron-induced gamma rays spawned primarily from U-234 alpha emission) collected by medium-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers (i.e. sodium iodide or lanthanum bromide). The potential of these NDA methods for the automated assay of feed, tail and product cylinders is explored through MCNP modeling and with field measurements on a cylinder population ranging from 0.2% to 5% in U-235 enrichment.

  15. Model for Simulating Dispersion due to Atmospheric Release of UF6

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    HGSYSTEMUF6 is a suite of models designed for use in estimating consequences associated with accidental, atmospheric release of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) and its reaction products, namely Hydrogen Fluoride (HF), and other non-reactive contaminants which are either negatively, neutrally, or positively buoyant. It is based on HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 of Shell Research LTD., and contains specific algorithms for the treatment of UF6 chemistry and thermodynamics. HGSYSTEMUF6 contains algorithms for the treatment of dense gases, dry andmore » wet deposition, effects due to the presence of buildings (canyon and wake), plume lift-off, and the effects of complex terrain. The models components of the suite include (1) AEROPLUME/RK, used to model near-field dispersion from pressurized two-phase jet releases of UF6 and its reaction products, (2) HEGADAS/UF6 for simulating dense, ground based release of UF6, (3) PGPLUME for simulation of passive, neutrally buoyant plumes (4) UF6Mixer for modeling warm, potentially reactive, ground-level releases of UF6 from buildings, and (5) WAKE, used to model elevated and ground-level releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant.« less

  16. HGSYSTEMUF6. Model for Simulating Dispersion due to Atmospheric Release of UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, G; Chang, J.C.; Zhang, J.X.; Bloom, S.G.; Goode, W.D. Jr; Lombardi, D.A.; Yambert, M.W.

    1998-08-01

    HGSYSTEMUF6 is a suite of models designed for use in estimating consequences associated with accidental, atmospheric release of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) and its reaction products, namely Hydrogen Fluoride (HF), and other non-reactive contaminants which are either negatively, neutrally, or positively buoyant. It is based on HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 of Shell Research LTD., and contains specific algorithms for the treatment of UF6 chemistry and thermodynamics. HGSYSTEMUF6 contains algorithms for the treatment of dense gases, dry and wet deposition, effects due to the presence of buildings (canyon and wake), plume lift-off, and the effects of complex terrain. The models components of the suite include (1) AEROPLUME/RK, used to model near-field dispersion from pressurized two-phase jet releases of UF6 and its reaction products, (2) HEGADAS/UF6 for simulating dense, ground based release of UF6, (3) PGPLUME for simulation of passive, neutrally buoyant plumes (4) UF6Mixer for modeling warm, potentially reactive, ground-level releases of UF6 from buildings, and (5) WAKE, used to model elevated and ground-level releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant.

  17. Development of a portal monitor for UF6 cylinder verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Curtis, Michael M.; Shaver, Mark W.; Benz, Jacob M.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.; Jordan, David V.; Noss, Daniel; Ford, Herbert

    2009-10-06

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s operations. As additional enrichment plans come online to support the expansion of nuclear power, reducing person-days of inspection will take on greater importance. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a concept to automate the verification of enrichment plant cylinders to enable 100% product-cylinder verification and potentially, mass-balance calculations on the facility as a whole (by also measuring feed and tails cylinders). The Automated Cylinder Enrichment Verification System (ACEVS) would be located at key measurement points and will positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the data along with operator inputs in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. Given the potential for reduced inspector presence, the operational and manpower-reduction benefits of the portal concept are clear. However, it is necessary to assess whether the cylinder portal concept can meet, or potentially improve upon, today’s U-235 enrichment assay performance. PNNL’s ACEVS concept utilizes sensors that could be operated in an unattended mode: moderated He-3 neutron detectors and large NaI(Tl) scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy. The medium-resolution NaI(Tl) scintillators are a sacrifice in energy resolution but do provide high collection efficiency for signatures above 1 MeV. The He-3/NaI sensor combination allows the exploitation of additional, more-penetrating signatures than those currently utilized: Neutrons produced from F-19(μ,n) reactions (spawned primarily from U-234 alpha emission) and high-energy gamma rays (extending up to 10 MeV) induced by

  18. Conceptual Ideas for New Nondestructive UF6 Cylinder Assay Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A.

    2012-05-02

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of uranium cylinders play an important role in helping the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguard uranium enrichment plants. Traditionally, these measurements have consisted of a scale or load cell to determine the mass of UF{sub 6} in the cylinder combined with a gamma-ray measurement of the 186 keV peak from {sup 235}U to determine enrichment. More recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed systems that exploit the passive neutron signal from UF{sub 6} to determine uranium mass and/or enrichment. These include the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM), and the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The purpose of this report is to provide the IAEA with new ideas on technologies that may or may not be under active development but could be useful for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay. To begin, we have included two feasibility studies of active interrogation techniques. There is a long history of active interrogation in the field of nuclear safeguards, especially for uranium assay. Both of the active techniques provide a direct measure of {sup 235}U content. The first is an active neutron method based on the existing PNEM design that uses a correlated {sup 252}Cf interrogation source. This technique shows great promise for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay and is based on advanced technology that could be implemented in the field in the near term. The second active technique is nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF). In the NRF technique, a bremsstrahlung photon beam could be used to illuminate the cylinder, and high-resolution gamma-ray detectors would detect the characteristic de-excitation photons. The results of the feasibility study show that under certain measurement geometries, NRF is impractical for UF6 cylinder assay, but the 'grazing transmission' and 'secant transmission' geometries have more potential

  19. Neutron spectrometry for ${\\rm UF}_6$ enrichment verification in storage cylinders

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Kiff, Scott D.

    2015-01-29

    Verification of declared UF6 enrichment and mass in storage cylinders is of great interest in nuclear material nonproliferation. Nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are commonly used for safeguards inspections to ensure accountancy of declared nuclear materials. Common NDA techniques used include gamma-ray spectrometry and both passive and active neutron measurements. In the present study, neutron spectrometry was investigated for verification of UF6 enrichment in 30B storage cylinders based on an unattended and passive measurement approach. MCNP5 and Geant4 simulated neutron spectra, for selected UF6 enrichments and filling profiles, were used in the investigation. The simulated neutron spectra were analyzed using principalmorecomponent analysis (PCA). The PCA technique is a well-established technique and has a wide area of application including feature analysis, outlier detection, and gamma-ray spectral analysis. Results obtained demonstrate that neutron spectrometry supported by spectral feature analysis has potential for assaying UF6 enrichment in storage cylinders. The results from the present study also showed that difficulties associated with the UF6 filling profile and observed in other unattended passive neutron measurements can possibly be overcome using the approach presented.less

  20. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies of UF5 ? and UF6 ?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dau, Phuong D.; Su, Jing; Liu, Hong-Tao; Huang, Dao-Ling; Wei, Fan; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai S.

    2012-05-17

    The UF5 ? and UF6 ? anions are produced using electrospray ionization and investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry. An extensive vibrational progression is observed in the spectra of UF5 ?, indicating significant geometry changes between the anion and neutral ground state. Franck-Condon factor simulations of the observed vibrational progression yield an adiabatic electron detachment energy of 3.82 0.05 eV for UF5 ?. Relativistic quantum calculations using density functional and ab initio theories are performed on UF5 ? and UF6 ? and their neutrals. The ground states of UF5 ? and UF5 are found to have C4v symmetry, but with a large U?F bond length change. The ground state of UF5 ? is a triplet state (3B2) with the two 5f electrons occupying a 5fz3-based 8a1 highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the 5fxyz-based 2b2 HOMO-1 orbital. The detachment cross section from the 5fxyz orbital is observed to be extremely small and the detachment transition from the 2b2 orbital is more than ten times weaker than that from the 8a1 orbital at the photon energies available. The UF6 ? anion is found to be octahedral, similar to neutral UF6 with the extra electron occupying the 5fxyz-based a2u orbital. Surprisingly, no photoelectron spectrum could be observed for UF6 ? due to the extremely low detachment cross section from the 5fxyz-based HOMO of UF6 ?.

  1. UF6 overfilling prevention at Eurodif production Georges Besse plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reneaud, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    Risk of overfilling exists on different equipments of Georges BESSE Plant: cylinders, desublimers and intermediate tanks. The preventive measures are composed of technical devices: desublimers weighing, load monitoring alarms, automatic controls ... and procedures, training, safety organization. In thirteen years of operation, some incidents have occurred but none of them has caused any personal injuries. They are related and discussed. The main factors involved in the Sequoyah fuel facility accident on 1/4/1986 have been analyzed and taken into account.

  2. Summary of Field Measurement on UF6 Cylinders Using Electro-Mechanically Cooled Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, Brent R; Smith, Steven E; Solodov, Alexander A; Whitaker, J Michael; Morgan, James B; MayerII, Richard L.; Montgomery, J. Brent

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the enrichment of solid state UF6 stored within large metal cylinders is a task commonly performed by plant operators and inspectors. The measurement technologies typically used range from low-resolution, high-efficiency sodium iodide detectors to high-resolution, moderate-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The technology used and methods deployed are dependent upon the material being measured, environmental conditions, time constraints, and measurement-precision requirements. Operators and inspectors typically use specially designed, HPGe detectors that are cooled with liquid nitrogen in situations where high-resolution measurements are required. However, the requirement for periodically refilling the system with liquid nitrogen makes remote usage cumbersome and slow. The task of cooling the detector reduces the available time for the inspector to perform other safeguards activities while on site. If the inspector has to reduce the count time for each selected cylinder to ensure that all preselected cylinders are measured during the inspection, the resulting measurement uncertainties may be increased, making it more difficult to detect and verify potential discrepancies in the operator's declarations. However, recent advances in electromechanically cooled HPGe detectors may provide the inspector with an improved verification tool by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen. This report provides a summary of test results for field measurements performed using electromechanically cooled HPGe detectors on depleted, natural, and low-enriched uranium cylinders. The results of the study provide valuable information to inspectors and operators regarding the capabilities and limitations of electromechanically cooled systems based on true field-measurement conditions.

  3. Determination of the 235U Mass and Enrichment within Small UF6 Cylinders via a Neutron Coincidence Well Counting System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, Robert Dennis; Croft, Dr. Stephen; Young, Brian M; Venkataraman, Ram

    2011-01-01

    The construction of three new uranium enrichment facilities in the United States has sparked renewed interest in the development and enhancement of methods to determine the enrichment and fissile mass content of UF6 cylinders. We describe the design and examine the expected performance of a UF6 bottle counter developed for the assay of Type 5A cylinders. The counter, as designed and subsequently constructed, is a tall passive neutron well counter with a clam-shell configuration and graphite end plugs operated in fast neutron mode. Factory performance against expectation is described. The relatively high detection efficiency and effectively 4 detection geometry provide a near-ideal measurement configuration, making the UF6 bottle counter a valuable tool for the evaluation of the neutron coincidence approach to UF6 cylinder assay. The impacts of non-uniform filling, voids, enrichment, and mixed enrichments are examined

  4. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  5. Thermo-mechanical study of bare 48Y UF6 containers exposed to the regulatory fire environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Douglas James; Lopez, Carlos; Morrow, Charles; Korbmacher, Tim; Charette, Marc-Andre

    2010-11-01

    Most of the regulatory agencies world-wide require that containers used for the transportation of natural UF6 and depleted UF6 must survive a fully-engulfing fire environment for 30 minutes as described in 10CFR71 and in TS-R-1. The primary objective of this project is to examine the thermo-mechanical performance of 48Y transportation cylinders when exposed to the regulatory hypothetical fire environment without the thermal protection that is currently used for shipments in those countries where required. Several studies have been performed in which UF6 cylinders have been analyzed to determine if the thermal protection currently used on UF6 cylinders of type 48Y is necessary for transport. However, none of them could clearly confirm neither the survival nor the failure of the 48Y cylinder when exposed to the regulatory fire environment without the additional thermal protection. A consortium of five companies that move UF6 is interested in determining if 48Y cylinders can be shipped without the thermal protection that is currently used. Sandia National Laboratories has outlined a comprehensive testing and analysis project to determine if these shipping cylinders are capable of withstanding the regulatory thermal environment without additional thermal protection. Sandia-developed coupled physics codes will be used for the analyses that are planned. A series of destructive and non-destructive tests will be performed to acquire the necessary material and behavior information to benchmark the models and to answer the question about the ability of these containers to survive the fire environment. Both the testing and the analysis phases of this project will consider the state of UF6 under thermal and pressure loads as well as the weakening of the steel container due to the thermal load. Experiments with UF6 are also planned to collect temperature- and pressure-dependent thermophysical properties of this material.

  6. Modified biokinetic model for uranium from analysis of acute exposure to UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, D.R.; Kathren, R.L.; Swint, M.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Urinalysis measurements from 31 workers acutely exposed to uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and its hydrolysis product UO2F2 (during the 1986 Gore, Oklahoma UF6-release accident) were used to develop a modified recycling biokinetic model for soluble U compounds. The model is expressed as a five-compartment exponential equation: yu(t) = 0.086e-2.77t + 0.0048e-0.116t + 0.00069e-0.0267t + 0.00017 e-0.00231t + 2.5 x 10(-6) e-0.000187t, where yu(t) is the fractional daily urinary excretion and t is the time after intake, in days. The excretion constants of the five exponential compartments correspond to residence half-times of 0.25, 6, 26, 300, and 3,700 d in the lungs, kidneys, other soft tissues, and in two bone volume compartments, respectively. The modified recycling model was used to estimate intake amounts, the resulting committed effective dose equivalent, maximum kidney concentrations, and dose equivalent to bone surfaces, kidneys, and lungs.

  7. Prototype Radiation Detector Positioning System For The Automated Nondestructive Assay Of Uf6 Cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.

    2011-08-07

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming, expensive, and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of efficiency and assay accuracy. This paper describes an approach denoted the Integrated Cylinder Verification Station (ICVS) that supports 100% cylinder verification, provides volume-averaged cylinder enrichment assay, and reduces inspector manpower needs. To allow field measurements to be collected to validate data collection algorithms, a prototype radiation detector positioning system was constructed. The system was designed to accurately position an array of radiation detectors along the length of a cylinder to measure UF6 enrichment. A number of alternative radiation shields for the detectors were included with the system. A collimated gamma-ray spectrometer module that allows translation of the detectors in the surrounding shielding to adjust the field of view, and a collimating plug in the end to further reduce the low-energy field of view, were also developed. Proof-of-principle measurements of neutron and high-energy gamma-ray signatures, using moderated neutron detectors and large-volume spectrometers in a fixed-geometry, portal-like configuration, supported an early assessment of the viability of the concept. The system has been used successfully on two testing campaigns at an AREVA fuel fabrication plant to scan over 30 product cylinders. This paper will describe the overall design of the detector positioning system and

  8. Remote Monitoring and Tracking of UF6 Cylinders Using Long-Range Passive Ultra-wideband (UWB) RFID Tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F

    2007-06-06

    An IAEA Technical Meeting on Techniques for IAEA Verification of Enrichment Activities identified 'smart tags' as a technology that should be assessed for tracking and locating UF6 cylinders. Although there is vast commercial industry working on RFID systems, the vulnerabilities of commercial products are only beginning to emerge. Most of the commercially off-the-shelf (COTS) RFID systems operate in very narrow frequency bands, making them vulnerable to detection, jamming and tampering and also presenting difficulties when used around metals (i.e. UF6 cylinders). Commercial passive RFID tags have short range, while active RFID tags that provide long ranges have limited lifetimes. There are also some concerns with the introduction of strong (narrowband) radio frequency signals around radioactive and nuclear materials. Considering the shortcomings of commercial RFID systems, in their current form, they do not offer a promising solution for continuous monitoring and tracking of UF6 cylinders. In this paper, we identify the key challenges faced by commercial RFID systems for monitoring UF6 cylinders, and introduce an ultra-wideband approach for tag/reader communications that addresses most of the identified challenges for IAEA safeguards applications.

  9. Technology Assessment for Proof-of-Concept UF6 Cylinder Unique Identification Task 3.1.2 Report – Survey and Assessment of Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wylie, Joann; Hockert, John

    2014-04-24

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security’s (NA-24) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the nuclear industry have begun to develop approaches to identify and monitor uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders. The NA-24 interest in a global monitoring system for UF6 cylinders relates to its interest in supporting the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in deterring and detecting diversion of UF6 (e.g., loss of cylinder in transit) and undeclared excess production at conversion and enrichment facilities. The industry interest in a global monitoring system for UF6 cylinders relates to the improvements in operational efficiencies that such a system would provide. This task is part of an effort to survey and assess technologies for a UF6 cylinder to identify candidate technologies for a proof-of-concept demonstration and evaluation for the Cylinder Identification System (CIS).

  10. Automated Nondestructive Assay of UF6 Cylinders: Detector Characterization and Initial Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, Emily K.; Smith, Leon E.

    2011-10-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders assumed to be representative of the facility's entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of manpower and assay accuracy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) intended for this purpose and has developed a field prototype of the nondestructive assay (NDA) components of an ICVS. The nondestructive assay methods would combine the 'traditional' enrichment-meter signature (i.e. 186-keV emission from 235U) as well as 'non-traditional' high-energy photon signatures derived from neutrons produced primarily by 19F({alpha},n) reactions. This paper describes the design, calibration and characterization of the NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) spectrometers utilized in the field prototype. An overview of a recent field measurement campaign is then provided, supported by example gamma-ray pulse-height spectra collected on cylinders of known enrichment.

  11. Hybrid Enrichment Assay Methods for a UF6 Cylinder Verification Station: FY10 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing the concept of an automated UF6 cylinder verification station that would be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until the arrival of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. At the center of this unattended system is a hybrid enrichment assay technique that combines the traditional enrichment-meter method (based on the 186 keV peak from 235U) with non-traditional neutron-induced high-energy gamma-ray signatures (spawned primarily by 234U alpha emissions and 19F(alpha, neutron) reactions). Previous work by PNNL provided proof-of-principle for the non-traditional signatures to support accurate, full-volume interrogation of the cylinder enrichment, thereby reducing the systematic uncertainties in enrichment assay due to UF6 heterogeneity and providing greater sensitivity to material substitution scenarios. The work described here builds on that preliminary evaluation of the non-traditional signatures, but focuses on a prototype field system utilizing NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) spectrometers, and enrichment analysis algorithms that integrate the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Results for the assay of Type-30B cylinders ranging from 0.2 to 4.95 wt% 235U, at an AREVA fuel fabrication plant in Richland, WA, are described for the following enrichment analysis methods: 1) traditional enrichment meter signature (186 keV peak) as calculated using a square-wave convolute (SWC) algorithm; 2) non-traditional high-energy gamma-ray signature that provides neutron detection without neutron detectors and 3) hybrid algorithm that merges the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Uncertainties for each method, relative to the declared enrichment for each cylinder, are calculated and compared to the uncertainties from an attended

  12. Signatures and Methods for the Automated Nondestructive Assay of UF6 Cylinders at Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Mace, Emily K.; Misner, Alex C.; Shaver, Mark W.

    2010-08-08

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming, expensive, and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of manpower and assay accuracy. Such a station would use sensors that can be operated in an unattended mode at an industrial facility: medium-resolution scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy (e.g., NaI(Tl)) and moderated He-3 neutron detectors. This sensor combination allows the exploitation of additional, more-penetrating signatures beyond the traditional 185-keV emission from U-235: neutrons produced from F-19(α,n) reactions (spawned primarily from U 234 alpha emission) and high-energy gamma rays (extending up to 8 MeV) induced by neutrons interacting in the steel cylinder. This paper describes a study of these non-traditional signatures for the purposes of cylinder enrichment verification. The signatures and the radiation sensors designed to collect them are described, as are proof-of-principle cylinder measurements and analyses. Key sources of systematic uncertainty in the non-traditional signatures are discussed, and the potential benefits of utilizing these non-traditional signatures, in concert with an automated form of the traditional 185-keV-based assay, are discussed.

  13. MODEL AND ALGORITHM EVALUATION FOR THE HYBRID UF6 CONTAINER INSPECTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Benjamin S.; Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.; Smith, Leon E.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2011-06-14

    ABSTRACT Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an automated UF6 cylinder verification station concept based on the combined collection of traditional enrichment-meter (186 keV photons from U-235) data and non-traditional, neutron-induced, high-energy gamma-signatures (3-8.5 MeV) with an array of collimated, medium-resolution scintillators. Previous (2010) work at PNNL demonstrated proof-of-principle that this hybrid method yields accurate, full-volume assay of the cylinder enrichment, reduces systematic errors when compared to several other enrichment assay methods, and provides simplified instrumentation and algorithms suitable for long-term unattended operations. We used Monte Carlo modeling with MCNP5 to support system design (e.g., number and configuration of detector arrays, and design of iron/poly collimators for enhanced (n,γ) conversion) and enrichment algorithm development. We developed a first-generation modeling framework in 2010. These tools have since been expanded, refined and benchmarked against field measurements with a prototype system of a 30B cylinder population (0.2 to 4.95 weight % U-235). The MCNP5 model decomposes the radiation transport problem into a linear superposition of “basis spectra” representing contributions from the different uranium isotopes and gamma-ray generation mechanisms (e.g. neutron capture). This scheme accommodates fast generation of “virtual assay signatures” for arbitrary enrichment, material age, and fill variations. Ongoing (FY-2011) refinements to the physics model include accounting for generation of bremsstrahlung photons, arising primarily from the beta decay of Pa-234m, a U-238 daughter. We are using the refined model to optimize collimator design for the hybrid method. The traditional assay method benefits from a high degree of collimation (to isolate each detector’s field-of-view) and relatively small detector area, while the non-traditional method benefits from a wide field

  14. Automated UF6 Cylinder Enrichment Assay: Status of the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA) Project: POTAS Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Smith, Leon E.

    2012-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) intends to automate the UF6 cylinder nondestructive assay (NDA) verification currently performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at enrichment plants. PNNL is proposing the installation of a portal monitor at a key measurement point to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the data along with operator inputs in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until inspector arrival. This report summarizes the status of the research and development of an enrichment assay methodology supporting the cylinder verification concept. The enrichment assay approach exploits a hybrid of two passively-detected ionizing-radiation signatures: the traditional enrichment meter signature (186-keV photon peak area) and a non-traditional signature, manifested in the high-energy (3 to 8 MeV) gamma-ray continuum, generated by neutron emission from UF6. PNNL has designed, fabricated, and field-tested several prototype assay sensor packages in an effort to demonstrate proof-of-principle for the hybrid assay approach, quantify the expected assay precision for various categories of cylinder contents, and assess the potential for unsupervised deployment of the technology in a portal-monitor form factor. We refer to recent sensor-package prototypes as the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The report provides an overview of the assay signatures and summarizes the results of several HEVA field measurement campaigns on populations of Type 30B UF6 cylinders containing low-enriched uranium (LEU), natural uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). Approaches to performance optimization of the assay technique via radiation transport modeling are briefly described, as are spectroscopic and data-analysis algorithms.

  15. An Operator Perspective from a Facility Evaluation of an RFID-Based UF6 Cylinder Accounting and Tracking System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martyn, Rose; Fitzgerald, Peter; Stehle, Nicholas D; Rowe, Nathan C; Younkin, James R

    2011-01-01

    An operational field test of a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) system for tracking and accounting UF6 cylinders was conducted at the Global Nuclear Fuel Americas (GNF) fuel fabrication plant in 2009. The Cylinder Accountability and Tracking System (CATS) was designed and deployed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and evaluated in cooperation with GNF. The system required that passive RFID be attached to several UF6 30B cylinders as they were received at the site; then the cylinders were tracked as they proceeded to interim storage, to processing in an autoclave, and eventually to disposition from the site. This CATS deployment also provided a direct integration of scale data from the site accountability scales. The integration of this information into the tracking data provided an attribute for additional safeguards for evaluation. The field test provided insight into the advantages and challenges of using RFID at an operating nuclear facility. The RFID system allowed operators to interact with the technology and demonstrated the survivability of the tags and reader equipment in the process environment. This paper will provide the operator perspective on utilizing RFID technology for locating cylinders within the facility, thereby tracking the cylinders for process and for Material Control & Accounting functions. The paper also will present the operator viewpoint on RFID implemented as an independent safeguards system.

  16. Results of Continuous Load Cell Monitoring Field Trial for UF6 Withdrawals at an Operating Industrial Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krichinsky, Alan M; Bell, Lisa S; Conchewski, Curtis A; Peters, Benjamin R; Pickett, Chris A; Richardson, Dave; Rowe, Nathan C; Younkin, James R

    2010-01-01

    Continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) has been implemented and tested for use as a safeguards tool during a 2009 field trial in an operating UF6 transfer facility. The transfer facility is part of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio, operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. During the field trial, two process scales for UF{sub 6} cylinders were continuously monitored for a 6-month period as cylinders were being filled. The collected CLCM data were used in testing an event processor serving as a filter for highlighting measurements representing significant operational activities that are important in verifying declared operations. The collection of CLCM data, coupled with rules-based event processing, can provide inspectors with knowledge of a facility's feed and withdrawal activities occurring between site visits. Such process knowledge promises to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards by enabling inspectors to quantitatively compare declared activities directly with process measurements. Selected results of the field trial and event processing will be presented in the context of their value to an independent inspector and a facility operator.

  17. RESULTS FROM A DEMONSTRATION OF RF-BASED UF6 CYLINDER ACCOUNTING AND TRACKING SYSTEM INSTALLED AT A USEC FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Chris A; Kovacic, Donald N; Morgan, Jim; Younkin, James R; Carrick, Bernie; Ken, Whittle; Johns, R E

    2008-09-01

    Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for storing and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants and processing facilities. To verify that no diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material involving UF{sub 6} cylinders at the facility has occurred, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts periodic, labor-intensive physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identities, and cylinder weights. A reliable cylinder monitoring system that would improve overall inspector effectiveness would be a significant improvement to the current international safeguards inspection regime. Such a system could include real-time unattended monitoring of cylinder movements, situation-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of safeguards technologies. This type of system could provide timely detection of abnormal operational activities that may be used to ensure more appropriate and efficient responses by the IAEA. A system of this type can reduce the reliance on paper records and have the additional benefit of facilitating domestic safeguards at the facilities at which it is installed. A radio-frequency (RF)-based system designed to track uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders during processing operations was designed, assembled, and tested at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) facility in Portsmouth, Ohio, to determine the operational feasibility and durability of RF technology. The overall objective of the effort was to validate the robustness of RF technology for potential use as a future international safeguards tool for tracking UF6 cylinders at uranium-processing facilities. The results to date indicate that RF tags represent a feasible technique for tracking UF{sub 6} cylinders in operating facilities. Additional work will be needed to improve the operational robustness of the tags for repeated autoclave processing and to

  18. Risk communication in environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahm-Crites, L.

    1996-08-26

    Since the enactment of NEPA and other environmental legislation, the concept of `risk communication` has expanded from simply providing citizens with scientific information about risk to exploring ways of making risk information genuinely meaningful to the public and facilitating public involvement in the very processes whereby risk is analyzed and managed. Contemporary risk communication efforts attempt to find more effective ways of conveying increasingly complex risk information and to develop more democratic and proactive approaches to community involvement, in particular to ensuring the participation of diverse populations in risk decisions. Although considerable progress has been made in a relatively short time, risk communication researchers and practitioners currently face a number of challenges in a time of high expectations, low trust, and low budgets.

  19. Thermal Reactions of Uranium Metal, UO2, U3O8, UF4, and UO2F2 with NF3 to Produce UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Edwards, Matthew K.

    2009-11-01

    he objective of this paper is to demonstrate that NF3 fluorinates uranium metal, UO2, UF4, UO3, U3O8, and UO2F22H2O to produce the volatile UF6 at temperatures between 100 and 500?C. Thermogravimetric reaction profiles are described that reflect changes in the uranium oxidation state and discrete chemical speciation. Differences in the onset temperatures for each system indicate that NF3-substrate interactions are important for the temperature at which NF3 reacts: U metal > UO3 > UO2 > UO2F2 > UF4 and in fact may indicate different fluorination mechanisms for these various substrates. These studies demonstrate that NF3 is a potential replacement fluorinating agent in the existing nuclear fuel cycle and in oft-proposed actinide volatility reprocessing.

  20. EO 13045: Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks (1997) (As Amended by EO 13229 (2001) and EO 13296 (2003)) EO 13045: Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and ...

  1. A Mock UF6 Feed and Withdrawal System for Testing Safeguards Monitoring Systems and Strategies Intended for Nuclear Fuel Enrichment and Processing Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krichinsky, Alan M; Bates, Bruce E; Chesser, Joel B; Koo, Sinsze; Whitaker, J Michael

    2009-12-01

    This report describes an engineering-scale, mock UF6 feed and withdrawal (F&W) system, its operation, and its intended uses. This system has been assembled to provide a test bed for evaluating and demonstrating new methodologies that can be used in remote, unattended, continuous monitoring of nuclear material process operations. These measures are being investigated to provide independent inspectors improved assurance that operations are being conducted within declared parameters, and to increase the overall effectiveness of safeguarding nuclear material. Testing applicable technologies on a mock F&W system, which uses water as a surrogate for UF6, enables thorough and cost-effective investigation of hardware, software, and operational strategies before their direct installation in an industrial nuclear material processing environment. Electronic scales used for continuous load-cell monitoring also are described as part of the basic mock F&W system description. Continuous monitoring components on the mock F&W system are linked to a data aggregation computer by a local network, which also is depicted. Data collection and storage systems are described only briefly in this report. The mock UF{sub 6} F&W system is economical to operate. It uses a simple process involving only a surge tank between feed tanks and product and withdrawal (or waste) tanks. The system uses water as the transfer fluid, thereby avoiding the use of hazardous UF{sub 6}. The system is not tethered to an operating industrial process involving nuclear materials, thereby allowing scenarios (e.g., material diversion) that cannot be conducted otherwise. These features facilitate conducting experiments that yield meaningful results with a minimum of expenditure and quick turnaround time. Technologies demonstrated on the engineering-scale system lead to field trials (described briefly in this report) for determining implementation issues and performance of the monitoring technologies under plant

  2. Evaluation of a RF-Based Approach for Tracking UF6 Cylinders at a Uranium Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Chris A; Younkin, James R; Kovacic, Donald N; Laughter, Mark D; Hines, Jairus B; Boyer, Brian; Martinez, B.

    2008-01-01

    Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally to handle and store uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming physical inspections to verify operator declarations and detect possible diversion of UF{sub 6}. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant system for near real-time tracking and monitoring UF{sub 6} cylinders (as they move within an enrichment facility) would greatly improve the inspector function. This type of system can reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a proof-of-concept approach that was designed to evaluate the feasibility of using radio frequency (RF)-based technologies to track individual UF{sub 6} cylinders throughout a portion of their life cycle, and thus demonstrate the potential for improved domestic accountability of materials, and a more effective and efficient method for application of site-level IAEA safeguards. The evaluation system incorporates RF-based identification devices (RFID) which provide a foundation for establishing a reliable, automated, and near real-time tracking system that can be set up to utilize site-specific, rules-based detection algorithms. This paper will report results from a proof-of-concept demonstration at a real enrichment facility that is specifically designed to evaluate both the feasibility of using RF to track cylinders and the durability of the RF equipment to survive the rigors of operational processing and handling. The paper also discusses methods for securely attaching RF devices and describes how the technology can effectively be layered with other safeguard systems and approaches to build a robust system for detecting cylinder diversion. Additionally

  3. Environmental risk and the business bottom line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, N.H.

    1996-12-31

    Demands for the integration of environmental considerations into the business priorities of leading companies are gathering momentum. Potentially devastating financial losses linked to environmental problems or mismanagement and perceptions of environmental issues, has alarmed the public, financial and insurance sectors together with key stakeholders. Expensive lessons have been learned in recent years - poor environmental design and management can undoubtedly lead to escalation of overall costs to meet changing standards and end of life cycle decommissioning bills. Environmental impact not only damages profitability but erodes the corporate asset base. Even suspicion of land contamination can wipe out market values of real estate. Comprehensive screening of business portfolios, investment plans, and existing assets for sources of environmental risk from concept to divestment, is crucial to ensure environmentally sound investment, to protect assets and minimize both environmental impact and future liability. Today`s key stakeholders and financial sectors are looking beyond the existing balance sheets of companies and now scrutinise their environmental credentials to ensure wise investment. Recent developments in environmental risk as a tool for placing environment on the balance sheet of private and public companies will be presented, using selected examples geared to the exploration and production business, together with the needs for a common, international framework for environmental risk strategies.

  4. Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Priorities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015.

  5. Environmental radiation standards and risk limitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission have established environmental radiation standards for specific practices which correspond to limits on risk to the public that vary by several orders of magnitude and often are much less than radiation risks that are essentially unregulated, e.g., risks from radon in homes. This paper discusses a proposed framework for environmental radiation standards that would improve the correspondence with limitation of risk. This framework includes the use of limits on annual effective dose equivalent averaged over a lifetime, rather than limits on dose equivalent to whole body or any organ for each year of exposure, and consideration of exposures of younger age groups as well as adults; limits on annual effective dose equivalent averaged over a lifetime no lower than 0.25 mSv (25 mrem) per practice; maintenance of all exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA); and establishment of a generally applicable de minimis dose for public exposures. Implications of the proposed regulatory framework for the current system of standards for limiting public exposures are discussed. 20 refs.

  6. Nuclear Risk Assessment for the Mars 2020 Mission Environmental...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Nuclear Risk Assessment for the Mars 2020 Mission Environmental Impact Statement Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Risk Assessment for the Mars ...

  7. Environmental Risk Assessment | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Justice Documents Environmental Justice Documents Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Environmental Justice Implementation Progress Report (May 2016) Environmental Justice Five-Year Implementation Plan - Third and Fourth Annual Progress Reports (December 2013) Environmental Justice Five-Year Implementation Plan - Second Annual Progress Report (August 2011) Environmental Justice Five-Year Implementation Plan First Annual Progress Report (December 2009) Environmental Justice Five-Year Implementation Plan

  8. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-27

    Measurements of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the {sup 226}Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 76.8 Bq m{sup ?3} to 571.1 251.4 Bq m{sup ?3}, 101.0 41.0 Bq m{sup ?3} to 245.3 100.2 Bq m{sup ?3}, 53.1 7.5 Bq m{sup ?3} to 181.8 9.7 Bq m{sup ?3}, 256.1 59.3 Bq m{sup ?3} to 652.2 222.2 Bq m{sup ?3} and 164.5 75.9 Bq m{sup ?3} to 653.3 240.0 Bq m{sup ?3}, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 194.3 Bq m{sup ?3}, 192.1 75.4 Bq m{sup ?3}, 176.1 85.9 Bq m{sup ?3} and 28.4 5.7 Bq m{sup ?3}, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m

  9. Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Each Federal agency: (a) shall make it a high priority to identify and assess environmental health risks and safety risks that may disproportionately affect children; and (b) shall ensure that its...

  10. Environmental Enterprise Risk Management Benefits for a Government Contractor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linda Guinn

    2012-05-01

    An often overlooked advantage that an Environmental Enterprise Risk Management System (ERMS) has to organizations is the added protection from the Civil False Claims Act (FCA) for activities under a government contract.

  11. Needs for Risk Informing Environmental Cleanup Decision Making - 13613

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Ming; Moorer, Richard

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses the needs for risk informing decision making by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The mission of the DOE EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from the nation's five decades of nuclear weapons development and production and nuclear energy research. This work represents some of the most technically challenging and complex cleanup efforts in the world and is projected to require the investment of billions of dollars and several decades to complete. Quantitative assessments of health and environmental risks play an important role in work prioritization and cleanup decisions of these challenging environmental cleanup and closure projects. The risk assessments often involve evaluation of performance of integrated engineered barriers and natural systems over a period of hundreds to thousands of years, when subject to complex geo-environmental transformation processes resulting from remediation and disposal actions. The requirement of resource investments for the cleanup efforts and the associated technical challenges have subjected the EM program to continuous scrutiny by oversight entities. Recent DOE reviews recommended application of a risk-informed approach throughout the EM complex for improved targeting of resources. The idea behind this recommendation is that by using risk-informed approaches to prioritize work scope, the available resources can be best utilized to reduce environmental and health risks across the EM complex, while maintaining the momentum of the overall EM cleanup program at a sustainable level. In response to these recommendations, EM is re-examining its work portfolio and key decision making with risk insights for the major sites. This paper summarizes the review findings and recommendations from the DOE internal reviews, discusses the needs for risk informing the EM portfolio and makes an attempt to identify topics for R and D in integrated

  12. Sitewide risk perspectives for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, S.J.; Foppe, T.L.

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently finalized a closure plan (originally called the Ten Year Plan) for closure and environmental cleanup of previous nuclear weapons facilities. The DOE Rocky Flats Field Office has established priorities for risk reduction work to Support closure activities, as well as addressing those hazards associated with storage and management of radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. To provide information for future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) or other regulatory assessments of specific risk reduction projects identified in the Closure Plan, a risk assessment of normal operations and potential accidents was recently prepared to provide an updated baseline of the cumulative impacts to the worker, public and environment due to the Site`s operations, activities, and environmental conditions in light of the Site`s change in mission, and of future closure projects. This paper summarizes the risk assessment approach, results, and conclusions.

  13. Assessment of UF6 Equation of State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, P; Chand, K; Warren, D; Vandersall, J

    2009-02-11

    A common assumption in the mathematical analysis of flows of compressible fluids is to treat the fluid as a perfect gas. This is an approximation, as no real fluid obeys the perfect gas relationships over all temperature and pressure conditions. An assessment of the validity of treating the UF{sub 6} gas flow field within a gas centrifuge with perfect gas relationships has been conducted. The definition of a perfect gas is commonly stated in two parts: (1) the gas obeys the thermal equation of state, p = {rho}RT (thermally perfect), and, (2) the gas specific heats are constant (calorically perfect). Analysis indicates the thermally perfect assumption is valid for all flow conditions within the gas centrifuge, including shock fields. The low operating gas pressure is the primary factor in the suitability of the thermally perfect equation of state for gas centrifuge computations. UF{sub 6} is not calorically perfect, as the specific heats vary as a function of temperature. This effect is insignificant within the bulk of the centrifuge gas field, as gas temperatures vary over a narrow range. The exception is in the vicinity of shock fields, where temperature, pressure, and density gradients are large, and the variation of specific heats with temperature should be included in the technically detailed analyses. Results from a normal shock analysis incorporating variable specific heats is included herein, presented in the conventional form of shock parameters as a function of inlet Mach Number. The error introduced by assuming constant specific heats is small for a nominal UF{sub 6} shock field, such that calorically perfect shock relationships can be used for scaling and initial analyses. The more rigorous imperfect gas analysis should be used for detailed analyses.

  14. Conceptual Model of Offshore Wind Environmental Risk Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Hamilton, Erin L.

    2010-06-01

    In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of offshore wind energy generation projects. The development of ERES for offshore wind is closely allied to a concurrent process undertaken to examine environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy generation, although specific risk-relevant attributes will differ between the MHK and offshore wind domains. During FY10, a conceptual design of ERES for offshore wind will be developed. The offshore wind ERES mockup described in this report will provide a preview of the functionality of a fully developed risk evaluation system that will use risk assessment techniques to determine priority stressors on aquatic organisms and environments from specific technology aspects, identify key uncertainties underlying high-risk issues, compile a wide-range of data types in an innovative and flexible data organizing scheme, and inform planning and decision processes with a transparent and technically robust decision-support tool. A fully functional version of ERES for offshore wind will be developed in a subsequent phase of the project.

  15. Risk management considerations for cost-effective environmental decisionmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, M.A.

    1995-09-14

    Scientific publications and media reports continually remind us about the environmental hazards that surround us. We are appraised of the environmental legacies left by chemical industries, the defense complex, and even our local dry cleaning establishments. Governmental regulations have dictated that industry provide detailed listings of their input materials, wastes, and emissions to the public and perform risk assessments to demonstrate compliance with standards. These regulations were designed to make industry more accountable and to give the public information that would allow them to understand risks and either work for change or accept their living conditions. This process would appear to be rational, fair, and acceptable to both industry and the public. However, our inability to reach agreement on questions such as ``How Clean is Clean?`` or ``Is It Safe?`` after more than ten years of scientific and public discussions, coupled with the frequency of environmental demonstrations throughout the world, serves as evidence that ``acceptable risk`` has not yet been defined.

  16. Chasing a specter: Risk management for global environmental change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Riordan, T. ); Rayner, S. )

    1989-10-01

    Global environmental change is both a concept and a process that changes in meaning with scientific discovery, public concern, and political responsiveness. It is the relationship between the problems as perceived and the various institutions that help shape and adapt to such problems that defines global environmental change. There is a kind of race between scientific detective work and political adjustment to lessen the likely impacts that predictive science is trying to verify. Risk analysis, because of its capacity to recognize this relationship in many spheres of problem identification, can contribute to the political debate, mostly by proposing institutional redesign of the relationship among scientific research, public entry, and experimental readjustments to consensus formation and international action. This paper discusses the factors involved in global environmental change, the risk management involved, the holistic interpretation, and the environmental impacts. 21 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. The effect of bright lines in environmental risk communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, K.N.; Desvousges, W.H.; Smith, K.V.; Payne, J. )

    1993-01-01

    Bright lines in environmental risk communication refer to the specific levels at which an environmental risk becomes a serious health threat and action should be taken to mitigate its effects. This study examined the effect of bright lines'' in risk communication by emphasizing the radon exposure threshold level of 4 picocuries per liter. Specifically, the authors developed a computer-assisted interview containing bright-line versions of risk information. The bright-line version contained a range of possible radon levels, the corresponding number of estimated lung cancer cases, the relative health risk from radon compared to other health risks, and the EPA guidelines for mitigating levels above 4 picocuries in the home. The non-bright line version was identical to the bright-line version, except it did not include the EPA's mitigation recommendations. Effect measures included respondents' change in perceived risk after reading their materials, intended testing behavior, and advice to their neighbor for a specified radon level either above or below the 4 picocury threshold level. This paper discusses broader policy implications for designing effective risk communication programs.

  18. TECHNICAL RISK RATING OF DOE ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS - 9153

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cercy, M; Ronald Fayfich, R; Steven P Schneider, S

    2008-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. The scope of work is diverse, with projects ranging from single acquisitions to collections of projects and operations that span several decades and costs from hundreds of millions to billions US$. The need to be able to manage and understand the technical risks from the project to senior management level has been recognized as an enabler to successfully completing the mission. In 2008, DOE-EM developed the Technical Risk Rating as a new method to assist in managing technical risk based on specific criteria. The Technical Risk Rating, and the criteria used to determine the rating, provides a mechanism to foster open, meaningful communication between the Federal Project Directors and DOE-EM management concerning project technical risks. Four indicators (technical maturity, risk urgency, handling difficulty and resolution path) are used to focus attention on the issues and key aspects related to the risks. Pressing risk issues are brought to the forefront, keeping DOE-EM management informed and engaged such that they fully understand risk impact. Use of the Technical Risk Rating and criteria during reviews provides the Federal Project Directors the opportunity to openly discuss the most significant risks and assists in the management of technical risks across the portfolio of DOE-EM projects. Technical Risk Ratings can be applied to all projects in government and private industry. This paper will present the methodology and criteria for Technical Risk Ratings, and provide specific examples from DOE-EM projects.

  19. Technical Risk Rating of DOE Environmental Projects - 9153

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cercy, Michael; Fayfich, Ronald; Schneider, Steven

    2009-02-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. The scope of work is diverse, with projects ranging from single acquisitions to collections of projects and operations that span several decades and costs from hundreds of millions to billions US$. The need to be able to manage and understand the technical risks from the project to senior management level has been recognized as an enabler to successfully completing the mission. In 2008, DOE-EM developed the Technical Risk Rating as a new method to assist in managing technical risk based on specific criteria. The Technical Risk Rating, and the criteria used to determine the rating, provides a mechanism to foster open, meaningful communication between the Federal Project Directors and DOE-EM management concerning project technical risks. Four indicators (technical maturity, risk urgency, handling difficulty and resolution path) are used to focus attention on the issues and key aspects related to the risks. Pressing risk issues are brought to the forefront, keeping DOE-EM management informed and engaged such that they fully understand risk impact. Use of the Technical Risk Rating and criteria during reviews provides the Federal Project Directors the opportunity to openly discuss the most significant risks and assists in the management of technical risks across the portfolio of DOE-EM projects. Technical Risk Ratings can be applied to all projects in government and private industry. This paper will present the methodology and criteria for Technical Risk Ratings, and provide specific examples from DOE-EM projects.

  20. Approach on environmental risk assessment of nanosilver released from textiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voelker, Doris; Schlich, Karsten; Hohndorf, Lars; Koch, Wolfgang; Kuehnen, Ute; Polleichtner, Christian; Kussatz, Carola; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin

    2015-07-15

    Based on the increased utilization of nanosilver (silver nanomaterials=AgNM) as antibacterial agent, there is the strong need to assess the potential environmental implication associated with its new application areas. In this study an exemplary environmental risk assessment (ERA) of AgNM applied in textiles was performed. Environmental exposure scenarios (via municipal sewage treatment plant (STP)) with wastewater supply from domestic homes) were developed for three different types of textiles equipped with AgNM. Based on these scenarios predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) were deduced for STPs and for the environmental compartments surface water, sediment as well as soil. These PECs were related to PNECs (predicted no effect concentrations). PNECs were deduced from results of ecotoxicity tests of a selected AgNM (NM-300K). Data on ecotoxicology were derived from various tests with activated sludge, cyanobacteria, algae, daphnids, fish, duckweed, macrophytes, chironomids, earthworms, terrestrial plants as well as soil microorganisms. Emission data for the AgNM NM-300K from textiles were derived from washing experiments. The performed ERA was based on the specifications defined in the ECHA Guidances on information requirements and chemical safety assessment. Based on the chosen scenarios and preconditions, no environmental risk of the AgNM NM-300K released from textiles was detected. Under conservative assumptions a risk quotient for surface water close to 1 indicated that the aquatic compartment may be affected by an increased emission of AgNM to the environment due to the high sensitivity of aquatic organisms to silver. Based on the successful retention of AgNM in the sewage sludge and the still ongoing continual application of sewage sludge on farmland it is recommended to introduce a threshold for total silver content in sewage sludge into the respective regulations. Regarding potential risk mitigation measures, it is emphasized to preferably directly

  1. Health Safety & Environmental Protection Committee Site Risks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Environmental Protection Committee Site Risks:  Radiation - alpha, gamma, beta, neutrons o Plutonium (joint w/ TWC) - IM: Becky, Tom  What is the possibility of criticality?  Sludge samples - is disturbance allowed?  How many tanks are affected?  How is plutonium being monitored? o Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) - IM: Tom o RAD Con program - IM: Tom  Chemical o Beryllium - IM: Keith, Mike  continue to monitor o Chemical vapors: IM: Tom  Concern that Industrial

  2. Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

  3. Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems: Modeling Individual Steps of a Risk Assessment Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Anuj; Castleton, Karl J.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.

    2004-06-01

    The study of the release and effects of chemicals in the environment and their associated risks to humans is central to public and private decision making. FRAMES 1.X, Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems, is a systems modeling software platform, developed by PNNL, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, that helps scientists study the release and effects of chemicals on a source to outcome basis, create environmental models for similar risk assessment and management problems. The unique aspect of FRAMES is to dynamically introduce software modules representing individual components of a risk assessment (e.g., source release of contaminants, fate and transport in various environmental media, exposure, etc.) within a software framework, manipulate their attributes and run simulations to obtain results. This paper outlines the fundamental constituents of FRAMES 2.X, an enhanced version of FRAMES 1.X, that greatly improve the ability of the module developers to “plug” their self-developed software modules into the system. The basic design, the underlying principles and a discussion of the guidelines for module developers are presented.

  4. Environmental restoration risk-based prioritization work package planning and risk ranking methodology. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, J.L.; Nanstad, L.D.; White, R.K.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the risk-based prioritization methodology developed to evaluate and rank Environmental Restoration (ER) work packages at the five US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-ORO) sites [i.e., Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12)], the ER Off-site Program, and Central ER. This prioritization methodology was developed to support the increased rigor and formality of work planning in the overall conduct of operations within the DOE-ORO ER Program. Prioritization is conducted as an integral component of the fiscal ER funding cycle to establish program budget priorities. The purpose of the ER risk-based prioritization methodology is to provide ER management with the tools and processes needed to evaluate, compare, prioritize, and justify fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste management activities. The methodology provides the ER Program with a framework for (1) organizing information about identified DOE-ORO environmental problems, (2) generating qualitative assessments of the long- and short-term risks posed by DOE-ORO environmental problems, and (3) evaluating the benefits associated with candidate work packages designed to reduce those risks. Prioritization is conducted to rank ER work packages on the basis of the overall value (e.g., risk reduction, stakeholder confidence) each package provides to the ER Program. Application of the methodology yields individual work package ``scores`` and rankings that are used to develop fiscal budget requests. This document presents the technical basis for the decision support tools and process.

  5. Proposed framework for the Western Area Power Administration Environmental Risk Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glantz, C.S.; DiMassa, F.V.; Pelto, P.J.; Brothers, A.J.; Roybal, A.L.

    1994-12-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) views environmental protection and compliance as a top priority as it manages the construction, operation, and maintenance of its vast network of transmission lines, substations, and other facilities. A recent Department of Energy audit of Western`s environmental management activities recommends that Western adopt a formal environmental risk program. To accomplish this goal, Western, in conjunction with Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is in the process of developing a centrally coordinated environmental risk program. This report presents the results of this design effort, and indicates the direction in which Western`s environmental risk program is heading. Western`s environmental risk program will consist of three main components: risk communication, risk assessment, and risk management/decision making. Risk communication is defined as an exchange of information on the potential for threats to human health, public safety, or the environment. This information exchange provides a mechanism for public involvement, and also for the participation in the risk assessment and management process by diverse groups or offices within Western. The objective of risk assessment is to evaluate and rank the relative magnitude of risks associated with specific environmental issues that are facing Western. The evaluation and ranking is based on the best available scientific information and judgment and serves as input to the risk management process. Risk management takes risk information and combines it with relevant non-risk factors (e.g., legal mandates, public opinion, costs) to generate risk management options. A risk management tool, such as decision analysis, can be used to help make risk management choices.

  6. WM2014 Conference- Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions - 14575

  7. A macro environmental risk assessment methodology for establishing priorities among risks to human health and the environment in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gernhofer, S.; Oliver, T.J.; Vasquez, R.

    1994-12-31

    A macro environmental risk assessment (ERA) methodology was developed for the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) as part of the US Agency for International Development Industrial Environmental Management Project. The DENR allocates its limited resources to mitigate those environmental problems that pose the greatest threat to human health and the environment. The National Regional Industry Prioritization Strategy (NRIPS) methodology was developed as a risk assessment tool to establish a national ranking of industrial facilities. The ranking establishes regional and national priorities, based on risk factors, that DENR can use to determine the most effective allocation of its limited resources. NRIPS is a systematic framework that examines the potential risk to human health and the environment from hazardous substances released from a facility, and, in doing so, generates a relative numerical score that represents that risk. More than 3,300 facilities throughout the Philippines were evaluated successfully with the NRIPS.

  8. United States Environmental Protection Agency: Use of risk assessment and risk management methodologies. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamuro, R.J.

    1992-09-30

    Make a full investigation of the policy implications and appropriate uses of risk assessment and risk management in regulatory programs under various Federal laws to prevent cancer and other chronic health effects which may result from exposure to hazardous substances. This is the primary mission of the Risk Assessment and Management Commission (Risk Commission). The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), created the Risk Commission reflecting Congress' concern over agency use of risk assessment and risk management techniques and methodologies to implement federal laws protective of human health. The Risk Commission is to consider: methods for measuring and describing risks of chronic health effects from hazardous substances; methods to reflect uncertainties associated with estimation techniques, and whether it is possible or desirable to develop a consistent risk assessment methodology or a consistent standard of acceptable risk for various federal programs.

  9. Information resources used in health risk assessment by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, G.B.; Baratta, M.; Wolfson, S.; McGeorge, L.

    1990-12-31

    The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection`s responsibilities related to health-based risk assessment are described, including its research projects and its development of health based compound specific standards and guidance levels. The resources used by the agency to support health risk assessment work are outlined.

  10. Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Fiscal Year 2011 Report Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-11-01

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and avian and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2011, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists adapted and applied the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), first developed to examine the effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy devices on aquatic environments, to offshore wind development. PNNL scientists conducted a risk screening analysis on two initial OSW cases: a wind project in Lake Erie and a wind project off the Atlantic coast of the United States near Atlantic City, New Jersey. The screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two OSW cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device, such as alterations in bottom habitats. Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted during FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an assessment of the vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with OSW installations; a probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. As more data become available that document effects of offshore wind farms on specific receptors in U.S. coastal and Great Lakes waters, probability analyses will be performed.

  11. Developing guidelines for improved assessment of risk to environmental receptors in NEPA documents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, M.; Abbott, L.; Berger, J.

    1995-12-01

    NAEP`s NEPA Practice Committee has formed several subcommittees to develop guidelines, and ultimately standards, for conducting various analyses to meet the letter and spirit of NEPA. The authors comprise the Ecological Risk Assessment Subcommittee, and our purpose is to identify those aspects of ecological risk assessment of potentially greatest use in analyses for NEPA documents and to make this information available to NAEP members and other NEPA practioners. Our task is to identify procedures and techniques commonly used in ecological risk assessment for CERCLA and RCRA compliance that are useful directly, or in modified form, to improve the estimation of risk to environmental receptors in NEPA analyses. Environmental receptors include biota and media such as air and water. Our approach is to focus first on the practical aspects of environmental assessment for NEPA that we identify as needing improvement. These include: (1) knowing when a quantitative risk assessment is warranted; (2) assigning significance of potential harm; (3) how to assess cumulative risk; (4) how to cope with missing information and knowing when surrogate information is available and appropriate to use; (5) efficiency in analysis - lack of explicit screening steps; and (6) biodiversity-related effects assessment. Specific steps to help environmental professionals prepare NEPA documents to address these issues will be presented, including references to NEPA documents that employ explicit risk estimation.

  12. EO 13045: Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks (1997) (As Amended by EO 13229 (2001) and EO 13296 (2003))

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Each Federal agency: (a) shall make it a high priority to identify and assess environmental health risks and safety risks that may disproportionately affect children; and (b) shall ensure that its...

  13. Benefits of an International Database for UF6 Cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babcock, R A; Whitaker, J M; Murphy, J; Oakberg, J

    2008-06-30

    A reasonable expectation regarding the nuclear energy renaissance is that the location of fuel cycle nuclear materials throughout the world will be known. We ask--would an international system for uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders provide the effective assurances expected for international fuel supply and of the international fuel centers? This paper introduces the question and discusses the potential benefits of tracking UF{sub 6} cylinders through the development of an international database. The nonproliferation benefits of an international database for UF{sub 6} cylinders being used in the fuel cycle include an enhanced capability to reconcile nuclear material imports and exports. Currently, import and export declarations only require the reporting of total 'rolled up' quantities of nuclear materials contained in all items--not the quantities of materials in individual items like individual UF{sub 6} cylinders. The database could provide supplier countries with more assurance on the location of the UF{sub 6} cylinders they export. Additionally, a comprehensive database on all declared cylinders would be a valuable resource in detecting and recognizing undeclared cylinders. The database could potentially be administered by the IAEA and be accessible to authorized countries around the world. During the nuclear renaissance, the general public, as well as the participants will expect transparency and quality information about movement of nuclear fuel cycle nuclear materials. We will discuss the potential benefits of such a database for the suppliers, inspectorates, and general public.

  14. Supplemental Systems for Unattended UF6 Cylinder Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2010-08-11

    Cylinder assay and mass measurements, the mainstay of enrichment plant verification efforts have historically been performed by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors using portable equipment. For the sake of efficiency, accuracy, and timeliness, such equipment is being supplanted by unattended measurement stations. Ancillary systems must be employed with such stations to ensure that measured parameters are properly recorded, cylinders are positively identified, operations occur according to procedure, and no tampering takes place in the inspectors’ absence. Depending on the facility, it may prove feasible to track cylinders from the measurement vicinity to their storage locations using surveillance. This paper will provide a cursory description of the various subsystems associated with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Integrated Cylinder Verification Station and how inattention to the requirements of such systems could seriously diminish the capability of the integrated whole.

  15. Materials Data on UF6 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Enhanced Algorithm for Traceability Measurements in UF6 Flow Pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copinger, Thomas E; March-Leuba, Jose A; Upadhyaya, Belle R

    2007-01-01

    The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) is used to continually assess the mixing and downblending of highly enriched uranium (HEU) with low-enriched uranium (LEU). This is accomplished by measuring the enrichment and the fissile mass flow rate of the UF{sub 6} gas located in each process pipe of the system by inducing the fission of the {sup 235}U contained in the gas. Measurements are taken along this process route to trace the HEU content all the way to the product stream, ensuring that HEU was down blended. A problem associated with the current traceability measuring algorithm is that it does not account for the time-varying background that is introduced to the system by the movement of the shutter located at the HEU leg of the process. The current way of dealing with that problem is to discard the data for periods when the HEU shutter is open (50% of overall data) because it correlates with the same timeframe in which the direct contribution to background from the HEU shutter was seen. The advanced algorithm presented in this paper allows for continuous measurement of traceability (100%) by accurately accounting for the varying background during the shutter-movement cycle. This algorithm utilizes advanced processing techniques that identify and discriminate the different sources of background radiation, instead of grouping them into one background group for the whole measurement cycle. By using this additional information, the traceability measurement statistics can achieve a greater number of values, thus improving the overall usefulness of these measurements in the BDMS. The effectiveness of the new algorithm was determined by modeling it in a simulation and ensuring that it retained its integrity through a large number of runs, including various shutter-failure conditions. Each run was performed with varying amounts of background radiation from each individual source and with varying traceability counts. The simulations documented in this paper prove that the algorithm can stand up to various transients introduced into the system, such as failure of shutter movement.

  17. Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergenback, B.; Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

  18. A review of plutonium environmental data with a bibliography for use in risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartram, B.W.; Wilkinson, M.J.

    1983-06-15

    Plutonium fueled radioisotopic heat sources find space, terrestrial, and undersea applications to generate electrical power. Such systems under postulated accident conditions could release radioactivity into the environment resulting in risks to the general population in the form of radiological doses and associated health effects. The evaluation of the radiological impact of postulated scenarios involving releases of activity into the environment includes identification of postulated accident release modes, including the probability of release and the release location; source term definition, including the activity of each radionuclide released and the corresponding chemical form and particle size distribution; analysis of the environmental behavior of the released radioactivity to determine the concentrations in environmental media (air, soil, and water) as a function of time; and analysis of the interaction between the environmental concentrations and man, leading to ingestion, inhalation, and external doses through each environmental exposure pathway. 443 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Baxter, S.L.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Rowe, M.D.; Sun, C.; Anspaugh, L.; Layton, D.

    1993-03-01

    Two important environmental problems at the USDOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) facility in Fernald, Ohio were studied in this human health risk assessment. The problems studied were radon emissions from the K-65 waste silos, and offsite contamination of ground water with uranium. Waste from the processing of pitchblende ore is stored in the K-65 silos at the FEMP. Radium-226 in the waste decays to radon gas which escapes to the outside atmosphere. The concern is for an increase in lung cancer risk for nearby residents associated with radon exposure. Monitoring data and a gaussian plume transport model were used to develop a source term and predict exposure and risk to fenceline residents, residents within 1 and 5 miles of the silos, and residents of Hamilton and Cincinnati, Ohio. Two release scenarios were studied: the routine release of radon from the silos and an accidental loss of one silo dome integrity. Exposure parameters and risk factors were described as distributions. Risks associated with natural background radon concentrations were also estimated.

  20. Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

  1. Nuclear Risk Assessment for the Mars 2020 Mission Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Daniel J.; Bignell, John; Jones, Christopher A.; Rohe, Daniel P.; Flores, Gregg J.; Bartel, Timothy J.; Gelbard, Fred; Le, San; Morrow, Charles W.; Potter, Donald L.; Young, Larry W.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2020, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) plans to launch a spacecraft as part of the Mars 2020 mission. One option for the rover on the proposed spacecraft uses a Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) to provide continuous electrical and thermal power for the mission. An alternative option being considered is a set of solar panels for electrical power with up to 80 Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs) for local component heating. Both the MMRTG and the LWRHUs use radioactive plutonium dioxide. NASA is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act. The EIS will include information on the risks of mission accidents to the general public and on-site workers at the launch complex. This Nuclear Risk Assessment (NRA) addresses the responses of the MMRTG or LWRHU options to potential accident and abort conditions during the launch opportunity for the Mars 2020 mission and the associated consequences. This information provides the technical basis for the radiological risks of both options for the EIS.

  2. Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) for Offshore Wind - Mock-Up of ERES, Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-11-01

    The Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) has been created to set priorities among the environmental risks from offshore wind development. This report follows the conceptual design for ERES and shows what the system would look like, using a web interface created as part of a Knowledge Management System (KMS) for offshore wind. The KMS, called Zephyrus, and ERES for offshore wind, will be populated and made operational in a later phase of the project.

  3. Hanford Site Environmental Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk management summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-05-12

    The Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Budget-Risk Management Summary report is prepared to support the annual request to sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex by DOE, Headquarters. The request requires sites to provide supplementary crosscutting information related to ES&H activities and the ES&H resources that support these activities. The report includes the following: (1) A summary status of fiscal year (FY) 1999 ES&H performance and ES&H execution commitments; (2)Status and plans of Hanford Site Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup activities; (3) Safety and health (S&H) risk management issues and compliance vulnerabilities of FY 2001 Target Case and Below Target Case funding of EM cleanup activities; (4) S&H resource planning and crosscutting information for FY 1999 to 2001; and (5) Description of indirect-funded S&H activities.

  4. A joint discussion model for assessing safety, health, and environmental risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Industries competing in the global marketplace constantly evaluate potential opportunities for joint ventures and partnerships all over the world. In the petroleum industry, these prospects to explore for and produce oil and gas range geographically from densely populated areas, to offshore, to the remote reaches of a tropical rainforest. There are numerous risks associated with these prospects which must be assessed so that the best investments are selected. The risk categories include: commercial, technical geological, political and safety, health and environmental (SHE). SHE risks are sometimes the most difficult to assess within businesses because they do not allow an easy evaluation of economic impact or other quantification. Additionally, these issues are often not familiar to business development personnel and consequently are not evaluated on an equal basis with other risk criteria. This paper presents a joint discussion model that facilitates the communication between SHE personnel and other members of the multi-disciplinary teams responsible for evaluating and selecting the most attractive prospects. This tool uses a simple approach in contrast to the many quantitative decision-making software products currently available. It provides a set of questions related to relevant SHE issues, establishes a way to approximate the level of uncertainty in the answers, and sums the results so that a comparison among prospects is possible. In the end, a more rigorous, consistent SHE assessment of all prospects is made, and the rationale for each decision is archived so that improvement in the process over time is made easier.

  5. Status of Environmental Management Initiatives to Accelerate the Reduction of Environmental Risks and Challenges Posed by the Legacy of the Cold War

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Report to Congress was prepared pursuant to section 3130 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2008, and summarized the EM program and initiatives to accelerate the reduction of environmental risks and challenges posed by the legacy of the Cold War.

  6. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Holly M.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  7. Improved Radiation Dosimetry/Risk Estimates to Facilitate Environmental Management of Plutonium-Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Bobby R.; Tokarskaya, Zoya B.; Zhuntova, Galina V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Syrchikov, Victor A., Belyaeva, Zinaida D.

    2007-12-14

    This report summarizes 4 years of research achievements in this Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project. The research described was conducted by scientists and supporting staff at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI)/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI). All project objectives and goals were achieved. A major focus was on obtaining improved cancer risk estimates for exposure via inhalation to plutonium (Pu) isotopes in the workplace (DOE radiation workers) and environment (public exposures to Pu-contaminated soil). A major finding was that low doses and dose rates of gamma rays can significantly suppress cancer induction by alpha radiation from inhaled Pu isotopes. The suppression relates to stimulation of the body's natural defenses, including immunity against cancer cells and selective apoptosis which removes precancerous and other aberrant cells.

  8. Managing the global environmental risks in Russia: The missing links and external influences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, V.

    1996-12-31

    Based on analysis of management history of three global environmental issues in Russia--climate change, ozone depletion and acid rains--the author suggests a few explanations of failure to build-up the nationwide strategy to manage global risks. Among them are specific factors related to the science-policy relationship on global changes processes and impacts. Particular attention is given to such internal factors as: the monopolization of these issues by the single state agency Hydromet until the late 1980s; the interest of the Soviet military in global atmospheric issues; the absence of any major input from the public or the media; and the manner in which the discussion of these issues was nested within the Soviet government`s broader foreign policy agenda.

  9. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk through Stakeholder Involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William T. Hartwell

    2007-05-21

    The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Integration of a near real-time communications system, a public web site, training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs all help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

  10. Degradation and environmental risk of surfactants after the application of compost sludge to the soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, M.M.; Martin, J.; Camacho-Munoz, D.; Santos, J.L.; Aparicio, I.

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation of surfactants in soil amended with sewage sludge during 100 days. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature influences on the degradation of the studied compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overall, the LAS degradation is faster than the NP compounds degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Therefore, the LAS presented lower environmental risk than the NP compounds. - Abstract: In this work, the degradation of anionic and non-ionic surfactants in agricultural soil amended with sewage sludge is reported. The compounds analysed were: linear alkylbenzene sulphonates (LAS) with a 10-13 carbon alkylic chain, and nonylphenolic compounds (NPE), including nonylphenol (NP) and nonylphenol ethoxylates with one and two ethoxy groups (NP1EO and NP2EO). The degradation studies were carried out under winter (12.7 Degree-Sign C) and summer (22.4 Degree-Sign C) conditions in Andalusia region. The concentration of LAS was reduced to 2% of the initial concentration 100 day after sludge-application to the soil. The half-life time measured for LAS homologues were ranged between 4 and 14 days at 12.7 Degree-Sign C and between 4 and 7 days at 22.4 Degree-Sign C. With regard to NPE compounds, after 8 and 4 days from the beginning of the experiment at 12.7 and 22.4 Degree-Sign C, respectively, their concentration levels were increased to 6.5 and 13.5 mg/kg dm (dry matter) as consequence of the degradation of nonylphenol polyethoxylates. These concentration levels were reduced to 5% after 63 and 70 days for 12.7 Degree-Sign C and 22.4 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The half-life times measured for NPEs were from 8 to 16 days at 12.7 Degree-Sign C and from 8 to 18 days at 22.4 Degree-Sign C. Environmental risk assessment revealed that for LAS homologues no environment risk could be expected after 7 and 8 days of sludge application to the soil for 22.4 and 12.7 Degree-Sign C, respectively; however, potential toxic effects could be

  11. Health, safety, and environmental risks from energy production: A year-long reality check

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-04-01

    Large-scale carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) offers the benefit of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions and thereby mitigating climate change risk, but it will also bring its own health, safety, and environmental risks. Curtis M. Oldenburg, Editor-in-Chief, considers these risks in the context of the broader picture of energy production. Over the last year, there have been major acute health, safety, and environmental (HSE) consequences related to accidents involving energy production from every major primary energy source. These are, in chronological order: (i) the Upper Big Branch (coal) Mine disaster, (ii) the Gulf of Mexico Macondo (oil) well blowout, (iii) the San Bruno (natural gas) pipeline leak and explosion, and (iv) the Fukushima (nuclear) reactor radioactivity releases. Briefly, the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster occurred in West Virginia on April 5, 2010, when natural methane in the mine ignited, causing the deaths of 29 miners, the worst coal mine disaster in the USA since 1970. Fifteen days later, the Macondo oil well in the Gulf of Mexico suffered a blowout, with a gas explosion and fire on the floating drilling platform that killed 11 people. The oil and gas continued to flow out of the well at the seafloor until July 15, 2010, spilling a total of approximately 5 million barrels of oil into the sea. On September 9, 2010, a 30-inch (76-cm) buried, steel, natural gas pipeline in San Bruno, California, leaked gas and exploded in a residential neighborhood, killing 8 people in their homes and burning a total of 38 homes. Flames were up to 1000 ft (300 m) high, and the initial explosion itself reportedly measured 1.1 on the Richter scale. Finally, on March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan's main island, Honshu, caused a tsunami that crippled the backup power and associated cooling systems for six reactor cores and their spent fuel storage tanks at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. At time of writing, workers trying to bring

  12. Status of Environmental Management Initiatives to Accelerate the Reduction of Environmental Risks and Challenges Posed by the Legacy of the Cold War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years of nuclear weapons production and energy research in the United States during the Cold War generated large amounts of radioactive wastes, spent nuclear fuel (SNF), excess plutonium and uranium, thousands of contaminated facilities, and contaminated soil and groundwater. During most of that half century, the Nation did not have the environmental regulatory structure or nuclear waste cleanup technologies that exist today. The result was a legacy of nuclear waste that was stored and disposed of in ways now considered unacceptable. Cleaning up and ultimately disposing of these wastes is the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In 1989, DOE established the Office of Environmental Management (EM) to solve the large scale and technically challenging risks posed by the world's largest nuclear cleanup. This required EM to build a new nuclear cleanup infrastructure, assemble and train a technically specialized workforce, and develop the technologies and tools required to safely decontaminate, disassemble, stabilize, disposition, and remediate unique radiation hazards. The sites where nuclear activities produced legacy waste and contamination include the original Manhattan Project sites--Los Alamos, New Mexico; Hanford, Washington; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee--as well as major Cold War sites, such as Savannah River Site, South Carolina; the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Rocky Flats Plant, Colorado; and Fernald, Ohio. Today EM has responsibility for nuclear cleanup activities at 21 sites covering more than two million acres in 13 states, and employs more than 30,000 Federal and contractor employees, including scientists, engineers and hazardous waste technicians. This cleanup poses unique, technically complex problems, which must be solved under the most hazardous of conditions, and which will require billions of dollars a year for several more decades. The EM program focus during its first 10 years was on managing the most urgent risks and

  13. ABSTRACT: The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk Through Stakeholder Involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Hartwell

    2007-02-28

    Between 1951 and 1992, 928 nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), including 100 atmospheric and 828 underground tests. Initial public reaction to the tests was largely supportive, but by the late 1950s this began to change, largely as a result of fear of the potential for adverse health effects to be caused by exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from the tests. The nuclear power plant accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 served to heighten these fears, as well as foster a general distrust of the federal agencies involved and low public confidence in monitoring results. Modeled after a similar program that involved the public in monitoring activities around the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the NTS since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah, and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Since assuming administration of the program in 2000, DRI has accomplished significant enhancements to the network's data collection and transmission capabilities. A robust datalogging and communications system allows for the near real-time transmission of data to a platform maintained by DRI's Western Regional Climate Center, where the data are uploaded and displayed on a publicly accessible web site (http://cemp.dri.edu/). Additionally, the CEMP can serve as part of an emergency response network in the event of an unplanned radiological release from the NTS, and also provides an excellent platform for testing new environmental sensor technologies

  14. Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-04-01

    low-carbon energy is considered cheap enough to replace fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one such bridging technology (1). CCS has been the focus of an increasing amount of research over the last 15-20 years and is the subject of a comprehensive IPCC report that thoroughly covers the subject (1). CCS is currently being carried out in several countries around the world in conjunction with natural gas extraction (e.g., 2, 3) and enhanced oil recovery (17). Despite this progress, widespread deployment of CCS remains the subject of research and future plans rather than present action on the scale needed to mitigate emissions from the perspective of climate change. The reasons for delay in deploying CCS more widely are concerns about cost (18), regulatory and legal uncertainty (19), and potential environmental impacts (21). This chapter discusses the long-term (decadal) sustainability and environmental hazards associated with the geologic CO{sub 2} storage (GCS) component of large-scale CCS (e.g., 20). Discussion here barely touches on capture and transport of CO{sub 2} which will occur above ground and which are similar to existing engineering, chemical processing, and pipeline transport activities and are therefore easier to evaluate with respect to risk assessment and feasibility. The focus of this chapter is on the more uncertain part of CCS, namely geologic storage. The primary concern for sustainability of GCS is whether there is sufficient capacity in sedimentary basins worldwide to contain the large of amounts of CO{sub 2} needed to address climate change. But there is also a link between sustainability and environmental impacts. Specifically, if GCS is found to cause unacceptable impacts that are considered worse than its climate-change mitigation benefits, the approach will not be widely adopted. Hence, GCS has elements of sustainability insofar as capacity of the subsurface for CO{sub 2} is concerned, and also in terms of whether the

  15. Environmental Risk Evaluation System – An Approach to Ranking Risk of Ocean Energy Development on Coastal and Estuarine Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Deployment and operation of ocean energy devices does not represent the first foray into industrialization of the oceans; shipping, nearshore development, waste disposal, subsea mining, oil and gas extraction, and large-scale commercial fishing all coexist in various states of equilibrium with the marine environment. In most cases these industries were developed without a clear understanding of the likely outcomes of large-scale development. In virtually every country where the harvest of ocean energy is emerging, regulators and stakeholders require that the industry examine potential effects of devices, minimize the footprint of effects, and provide management measures that either avoid the impacts or mitigate to further reduce the residual impacts. The ERES analysis is based on scenarios that are consistent with sequences of events that lead to adverse impacts, distinguishing between episodic, intermittent, and chronic risks. In the context of ocean energy development, an episodic scenario might involve the exceedingly rare but potentially devastating event of an oil spill from vessels caused by the presence of the device, while vulnerable receptors are present; understanding the risk of such a scenario involves determining the probability of the occurrence by examining factors such as the petroleum content of ocean energy devices, the vessel traffic volume and the proximity of shipping lanes to the ocean energy devices, the reliability of the control measures to avoid an episodic event, and the likely presence of seabirds, marine mammals, or fish that may be affected by oil. In contrast, chronic risk scenarios involve events or circumstances that are continuous, so that risk characterization involves assessing only the severity of the consequences. An example of a chronic risk scenario might be the toxicity to marine organisms due to low-level chemical releases from anti-biofouling paints and coatings that may be used on devices, and the effect that the level of

  16. The RACER (risk analysis, communication, evaluation, and reduction) stakeholder environmental data transparency project for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echohawk, John Chris; Dorries, Alison M; Eberhart, Craig F; Werdel, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    The RACER (Risk Analysis, Communication, Evaluation, and Reduction) project was created in 2003, as an effort to enhance the Los Alamos National Laboratory's ability to effectively communicate the data and processes used to evaluate environmental risks to the public and the environment. The RACER project staff consists of members of Risk Assessment Corporation, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). RACER staff worked closely with members of the community, tribal governments, and others within NMED and LANL to create innovative tools and a process that could provide information to regulators, LANL and the community about the sources of public health risk and ecological impact from LAN L operations. The RACER Data Analysis Tool (DA T) provides the public with webbased access to environmental measurement data collected in and around the LANL site. Its purpose is to provide a 'transparent' view to the public of all data collected by LANL and NMED regarding the LANL site. The DAT is available to the public at 'www.racernm.com'.

  17. Human health risks from TNT, RDX, and HMX in environmental media...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    discharge of HE-contaminated waste water, resulting in contaminated environmental media (e.g., ground water, soil, and perhaps even edible vegetation) near residential areas. ...

  18. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P.

    2013-09-15

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on augmentation of weight of evidence using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards integration of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for expansion of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual reorientation of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  19. State and national energy environmental risk analysis systems for underground injection control. Final report, April 7, 1992--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this effort is to develop and demonstrate the concept of a national Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis System that could support DOE policy analysis and decision-making. That effort also includes the development and demonstration of a methodology for assessing the risks of groundwater contamination from underground injection operations. EERAS is designed to enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities by working with DOE`s existing resource analysis models for oil and gas. The full development of EERAS was not planned as part of this effort. The design and structure for the system were developed, along with interfaces that facilitate data input to DOE`s other analytical tools. The development of the database for EERAS was demonstrated with the input of data related to underground injection control, which also supported the risk assessment being performed. The utility of EERAS has been demonstrated by this effort and its continued development is recommended. Since the absolute risk of groundwater contamination due to underground injection is quite low, the risk assessment methodology focuses on the relative risk of groundwater contamination. The purpose of this methodology is to provide DOE with an enhanced understanding of the relative risks posed nationwide as input to DOE decision-making and resource allocation. Given data problems encountered, a broad assessment of all oil reservoirs in DOE`s resource database was not possible. The methodology was demonstrated using a sample of 39 reservoirs in 15 states. While data difficulties introduce substantial uncertainties, the results found are consistent with expectations and with prior analyses. Therefore the methodology for performing assessments appears to be sound. Recommendations on steps that can be taken to resolve uncertainties or obtain improved data are included in the report.

  20. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Overview and Policy Context of UF6 Cylinder Tracking Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian D; Whitaker, J. Michael; White-Horton, Jessica L.; Durbin, Karyn R.

    2012-07-12

    Thousands of cylinders containing uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) move around the world from conversion plants to enrichment plants to fuel fabrication plants, and their contents could be very useful to a country intent on diverting uranium for clandestine use. Each of these large cylinders can contain close to a significant quantity of natural uranium (48Y cylinder) or low-enriched uranium (LEU) (30B cylinder) defined as 75 kg {sup 235}U which can be further clandestinely enriched to produce 1.5 to 2 significant quantities of high enriched uranium (HEU) within weeks or months depending on the scale of the clandestine facility. The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) kicked off a 5-year plan in April 2011 to investigate the concept of a unique identification system for UF{sub 6} cylinders and potentially to develop a cylinder tracking system that could be used by facility operators and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The goal is to design an integrated solution beneficial to both industry and inspectorates that would improve cylinder operations at the facilities and provide enhanced capabilities to deter and detect both diversion of low-enriched uranium and undeclared enriched uranium production. The 5-year plan consists of six separate incremental tasks: (1) define the problem and establish the requirements for a unique identification (UID) and monitoring system; (2) develop a concept of operations for the identification and monitoring system; (3) determine cylinder monitoring devices and technology; (4) develop a registry database to support proof-of-concept demonstration; (5) integrate that system for the demonstration; and (6) demonstrate proof-of-concept. Throughout NNSA's performance of the tasks outlined in this program, the multi-laboratory team emphasizes that extensive engagement with industry stakeholders, regulatory authorities and inspectorates is essential to its success.

  1. Status Report on the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) for UF6 Cylinder Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Marlow, Johnna B.

    2012-05-02

    The Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) is a nondestructive assay (NDA) system being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). It was designed to determine {sup 235}U mass and enrichment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in product, feed, and tails cylinders (i.e., 30B and 48Y cylinders). These cylinders are found in the nuclear fuel cycle at uranium conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication facilities. The PNEM is a {sup 3}He-based neutron detection system that consists of two briefcase-sized detector pods. A photograph of the system during characterization at LANL is shown in Fig. 1. Several signatures are currently being studied to determine the most effective measurement and data reduction technique for unfolding {sup 235}U mass and enrichment. The system collects total neutron and coincidence data for both bare and cadmium-covered detector pods. The measurement concept grew out of the success of the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), which is an operator system at Rokkasho Enrichment Plant (REP) that uses total neutron counting to determine {sup 235}U mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The PNEM system was designed with higher efficiency than the UCAS in order to add coincidence counting functionality for the enrichment determination. A photograph of the UCAS with a 48Y cylinder at REP is shown in Fig. 2, and the calibration measurement data for 30B product and 48Y feed and tails cylinders is shown in Fig. 3. The data was collected in a low-background environment, meaning there is very little scatter in the data. The PNEM measurement concept was first presented at the 2010 Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) Annual Meeting. The physics design and uncertainty analysis were presented at the 2010 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Symposium, and the mechanical and electrical designs and characterization measurements were published in the ESARDA Bulletin in 2011.

  2. Results of Continuous Load Cell Monitoring Field Trial for UF6...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; MONITORING; PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT; PROCESSING; SAFEGUARDS; TESTING ...

  3. Field Trial of LANL On-Line Advanced Enrichment Monitor for UF6 GCEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Lombardi, Marcie; MacArthur, Duncan W.; Parker, Robert F.; Smith, Morag K.; Keller, Clifford; Friend, Peter; Dunford, Andrew

    2012-07-13

    The outline of this presentation is: (1) Technology basis of on-line enrichment monitoring; (2) Timescale of trial; (3) Description of installed equipment; (4) Photographs; (5) Results; (6) Possible further development; and (7) Conclusions. Summary of the good things about the Advanced Enrichment Monitor (AEM) performance is: (1) High accuracy - normally better than 1% relative, (2) Active system as accurate as passive system, (3) Fast and accurate detection of enrichment changes, (4) Physics is well understood, (5) Elegant method for capturing pressure signal, and (6) Data capture is automatic, low cost and fast. A couple of negative things are: (1) Some jumps in measured passive enrichment - of around +2% relative (due to clock errors?); and (2) Data handling and evaluation is off-line, expensive and very slow. Conclusions are: (1) LANL AEM is being tested on E23 plant at Capenhurst; (2) The trial is going very well; (3) AEM could detect production of HEU at potentially much lower cost than existing CEMO; (4) AEM can measure {sup 235}U assay accurately; (5) Active system using X-Ray source would avoid need for pressure measurement; (6) Substantial work lies ahead to go from current prototype to a production instrument.

  4. Ultra-low field NMR for detection and characterization of 235 UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espy, Michelle A; Magnelind, Per E; Matlashov, Andrei N; Urbaitis, Algis V; Volegov, Petr L

    2009-01-01

    We have demonstrated the first ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), both depleted and 70% enriched, which is used in the uranium enrichment process. A sensitive non-invasive detection system would have an important role in non-proliferation surveillance. A two-frequency technique was employed to remove the transients induced by rapidly switching off the 50 mT pre-polarization field. A mean transverse relaxation time T{sub 2} of 24 ms was estimated for the un-enriched UF{sub 6} sample measured at a mean temperature of 80 C. Nuclear magnetic resonance at ULF has several advantages including the ability to measure through metal, such as pipes, and simple magnetic field generation hardware. We present here recent data and discuss the potential for non-proliferation monitoring of enrichment and flow velocity.

  5. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  6. Preliminary investigation of steel compatibility with potential materials of construction for UF6 cylinder chocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawel, S.J.; Ziehlke, K.T.; Swindeman, C.J.

    1992-12-01

    A set of compatibility experiments was performed to assess corrosion susceptibility of mild steel in long term contact with UF{sub 6} cylinder chocking materials and the atmosphere. Chock materials considered included concrete, pressure-treated wood, and creosote-treated wood. Immersion tests (panels partially submerged, 1000 h, 38 C), resistance probe measurements (600 h, ambient), and cyclic polarization tests on steel in leachate solutions generated from each chock material were performed. Results indicate that the long term corrosion susceptibility of mild steel in contact with concrete and the atmosphere is at least the equivalent of -- and under some conditions superior to -- that for steel in contact with pressure-treated or creosote-treated wood. No corrosion-related limitation for concrete chocks for long term support of mild steel UF{sub 6} cylinders was identified.

  7. Accident Conditions versus Regulatory Test for NRC-Approved UF6 Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLS, G. SCOTT; AMMERMAN, DOUGLAS J.; LOPEZ, CARLOS

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approves new package designs for shipping fissile quantities of UF{sub 6}. Currently there are three packages approved by the NRC for domestic shipments of fissile quantities of UF{sub 6}: NCI-21PF-1; UX-30; and ESP30X. For approval by the NRC, packages must be subjected to a sequence of physical tests to simulate transportation accident conditions as described in 10 CFR Part 71. The primary objective of this project was to relate the conditions experienced by these packages in the tests described in 10 CFR Part 71 to conditions potentially encountered in actual accidents and to estimate the probabilities of such accidents. Comparison of the effects of actual accident conditions to 10 CFR Part 71 tests was achieved by means of computer modeling of structural effects on the packages due to impacts with actual surfaces, and thermal effects resulting from test and other fire scenarios. In addition, the likelihood of encountering bodies of water or sufficient rainfall to cause complete or partial immersion during transport over representative truck routes was assessed. Modeled effects, and their associated probabilities, were combined with existing event-tree data, plus accident rates and other characteristics gathered from representative routes, to derive generalized probabilities of encountering accident conditions comparable to the 10 CFR Part 71 conditions. This analysis suggests that the regulatory conditions are unlikely to be exceeded in real accidents, i.e. the likelihood of UF{sub 6} being dispersed as a result of accident impact or fire is small. Moreover, given that an accident has occurred, exposure to water by fire-fighting, heavy rain or submersion in a body of water is even less probable by factors ranging from 0.5 to 8E-6.

  8. Report: Removal of EM Projects from the GAO High Risk List: Strategies for Improving the Effectiveness of Project and Contract Management in the Office of Environmental Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Removal of EM Projects from the GAO High Risk List: Strategies for Improving the Effectiveness of Project and Contract Management in the Office of Environmental Management Submitted by the EMAB Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee December 5, 2011 Introduction: This report provides a comprehensive summary of the work performed by the Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee (APMS) of the

  9. Ecological function and resilience: Neglected criteria for environmental impact assessment and ecological risk analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, J. Jr.; Niederlehner, B.R. . Univ. Center for Environmental and Hazardous Materials Studies)

    1993-01-01

    The importance of establishing methods for determining ecological function and resilience transcends scientific interest; these methods are important to sustained societal use of ecosystems and long-term productivity. Essential services that ecosystems provide to human society include water purification, oxygen production, carbon storage, climate regulation, and production of food, wood, and medicinal drugs. Although man is dependent upon these services, human understanding of the dynamics of ecosystem function is limited. Man can detect gross impairment of ecosystem function or resilience after the fact. However, protecting ecosystem health necessitates detecting adverse trends in ecological function, rather than reacting when the system collapses. The information to date is inadequate for predicting subtle changes or incremental trends. Once ecosystems are damaged and therefore providing diminished services, it is important to determine when they will be restored to an approximation of their predisturbance condition. For those ecosystems unlikely to recover on their own, management techniques may enhance recovery processes. Information about response of ecosystem function to human actions and relative resilience of alternative ecosystems can facilitate decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  10. Digital I&C systems in nuclear power plants. Risk-screening of environmental stressors and a comparison of hardware unavailability with an existing analog system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, M.; Vesely, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    In this report, we present a screening study to identify environmental stressors for digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP) which can be potentially risk-significant, and compare the hardware unavailability of such a system with that of its existing analog counterpart. The stressors evaluated are temperature, humidity, vibration, radiation, electro-magnetic interference (EMI), and smoke. The results of risk-screening for an example plant, subject to some bounding assumptions and based on relative changes in plant risk (core damage frequency impacts of the stressors), indicate that humidity, EMI from lightning, and smoke can be potentially risk-significant. Risk from other sources of EMI could not be evaluated for a lack of data. Risk from temperature appears to be insignificant as that from the assumed levels of vibrations. A comparison of the hardware unavailability of the existing analog Safety Injection Actuation System (SIAS) in the example plant with that of an assumed digital upgrade of the system indicates that system unavailability may be more sensitive to the level of redundancy in elements of the digital system than to the environmental and operational variations involved. The findings of this study can be used to focus activities relating to the regulatory basis for digital I&C upgrades in NPPs, including identification of dominant stressors, data-gathering, equipment qualification, and requirements to limit the effects of environmental stressors. 30 refs., 8 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR RADIOECOLOGY: A NETWORK OF EXCELLENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND HUMAN RADIATION RISK REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.

    2013-01-09

    Radioecology in the United States can be traced back to the early 1950s when small research programs were established to address the fate and effects of radionuclides released in the environment from activities at nuclear facilities. These programs focused primarily on local environmental effects, but global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing and the potential for larger scale local releases of radioisotopes resulted in major concerns about the threat, not only to humans, but to other species and to ecosystems that support all life. These concerns were shared by other countries and it was quickly recognized that a multi-disciplinary approach would be required to address and understand the implications of anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment. The management, clean-up and long-term monitoring of legacy wastes at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-regulated facilities continues to be of concern as long as nuclear operations continue. Research conducted through radioecology programs provides the credible scientific data needed for decision-making purposes. The current status of radioecology programs in the United States are: fragmented with little coordination to identify national strategies and direct programs; suffering from a steadily decreasing funding base; soon to be hampered by closure of key infrastructure; hampered by aging and retiring workforce (loss of technical expertise); and in need of training of young scientists to ensure continuation of the science (no formal graduate education program in radioecology remaining in the U.S.). With these concerns in mind, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) took the lead to establish the National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE) as a network of excellence of the remaining radioecology expertise in the United States. As part of the NCoRE mission, scientists at SRNL are working with six key partner universities to re-establish a

  12. Preliminary Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System: Task 2.1.1: Evaluating Effects of Stressors – Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-11-15

    Possible environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term effects. An understanding of risk associated with likely interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help reduce the level of uncertainty and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases - a tidal project in Puget Sound using Open Hydro turbines, a wave project off the coast of Oregon using Ocean Power Technologies point attenuator buoys, and a riverine current project in the Mississippi River using Free Flow turbines. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in all three cases were the effects of the dynamic physical presence of the device (e.g., strike), accidents, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the four highest tiers of risk were dominated by marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and birds (diving and non-diving); only the riverine case (Free Flow) included different receptors in the third tier (fish) and the fourth tier (benthic invertebrates). Although this screening analysis provides a preliminary analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis, especially of risk associated with chemical toxicity and accidents such as oil spills or lost gear, will be necessary to further understand high-priority risks. Subject matter expert review of this process and results is required and is

  13. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment to Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. P. Blanchard; R. W. Youngblood

    2014-06-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway of the DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program focuses on advancing the state of the art in safety analysis and risk assessment to support decision-making on nuclear power plant operation well beyond the originally designed lifetime of the plants (i.e., beyond 60 years). Among the issues being addressed in RISMC is the significance of SSC aging and how confident we are about our understanding of its impact on the margin between the loads SSCs are expected to see during normal operation and accident conditions, and the SSC capacities (their ability to resist those loads) as the SSCs age. In this paper, a summary is provided of a case study that examines SSC aging from an environmental qualification (EQ) perspective. The case study illustrates how the state of knowledge regarding SSC margin can be characterized given the overall integrated plant design, and was developed to demonstrate a method for deciding on which cables to focus, which cables are not so important from an environmental qualification margin standpoint, and what plant design features or operating characteristics determine the role that environmental qualification plays in establishing a safety case on which decisions regarding margin can be made. The selection of cables for which demonstration of margin with respect to aging and environmental challenges uses a technique known as Prevention Analysis. Prevention Analysis is a Boolean method for optimal selection of SSCs (that is, those combinations of SSCs both necessary and sufficient to meet a predetermined selection criterion) in a manner that allows demonstration that plant-level safety can be demonstrated by the collection of selected SSCs alone. Choosing the set of SSCs that is necessary and sufficient to satisfy the safety objectives, and demonstrating that the safety objectives can be met effectively, determines where resources are best allocated to assure SSC

  14. Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks Each Federal ...

  15. Understanding and managing health and environmental risks of CIS, CGS, and CdTe photovoltaic module production and use: A workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Zweibel, K.; DePhillips, M.P.

    1994-04-28

    Environmental, health and safety (EH&S) risks presented by CIS, CGS and CdTe photovoltaic module production, use and decommissioning have been reviewed and discussed by several authors. Several EH&S concerns exit. The estimated EH&S risks are based on extrapolations of toxicity, environmental mobility, and bioavailability data for other related inorganic compounds. Sparse data, however, are available for CIS, CGS or CdTe. In response to the increased interest in these materials, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been engaged in a cooperative research program with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the Fraunhofer Institute for Solid State Technology (IFT), the Institute of Ecotoxicity of the GSF Forschungszentrum fair Umwelt und Gesundheit, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) to develop fundamental toxicological and environmental data for these three compounds. This workshop report describes the results of these studies and describes their potential implications with respect to the EH&S risks presented by CIS, CGS, and CdTe module production, use and decommissioning.

  16. Toxicity Bioassays for Ecological Risk Assessment in Arid and Semiarid Ecosystems. Reviews Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 168:43-98.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markwiese, J.T.; Ryti, R.T.; Hooten, M.M.; Michael, D.I.; Hlohowskyj, I.

    2001-02-01

    This paper discusses current limitations for performing ecological risk assessments in dry environments (i.e., ecosystems that are characteristic of many DOE Facilities) and presents novel approaches to addressing ecological risk in such systems.

  17. Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Task 2.1.1.2: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.; Zdanski, Laura C.; Gill, Gary A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

    2011-09-01

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases. During FY 2011, two additional cases were added: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two FY 2011 cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted in early FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. “Risk” has two components: (1) The likelihood, or “probability”, of the occurrence of a given interaction or event, and (2) the potential “consequence” if that interaction or event were to occur. During FY 2011, the ERES screening

  18. Risk-based Prioritization of Facility Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration Projects in the National Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program at the Chalk River Laboratory - 13564

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Jerel G.; Kruzic, Michael; Castillo, Carlos; Pavey, Todd; Alexan, Tamer; Bainbridge, Ian

    2013-07-01

    Chalk River Laboratory (CRL), located in Ontario Canada, has a large number of remediation projects currently in the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), including hundreds of facility decommissioning projects and over one hundred environmental remediation projects, all to be executed over the next 70 years. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) utilized WorleyParsons to prioritize the NLLP projects at the CRL through a risk-based prioritization and ranking process, using the WorleyParsons Sequencing Unit Prioritization and Estimating Risk Model (SUPERmodel). The prioritization project made use of the SUPERmodel which has been previously used for other large-scale site prioritization and sequencing of facilities at nuclear laboratories in the United States. The process included development and vetting of risk parameter matrices as well as confirmation/validation of project risks. Detailed sensitivity studies were also conducted to understand the impacts that risk parameter weighting and scoring had on prioritization. The repeatable prioritization process yielded an objective, risk-based and technically defendable process for prioritization that gained concurrence from all stakeholders, including Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) who is responsible for the oversight of the NLLP. (authors)

  19. Use of Biostratigraphy to Increase Production, Reduce Operating Costs and Risks and Reduce Environmental Concerns in Oil Well Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Marks

    2005-09-09

    out at the top of the late Miocene, early Mohnian: Bolivina aff hughesi, Rotalia becki, Suggrunda californica, Virgulina grandis, Virgulina ticensis, Bulimina ecuadorana, Denticula lauta and Nonion medio-costatum. Please see Appendix B, Fig. 1, Neogene Zones, p. 91 and Appendix C, chart 5, p. 99 By the use of Stratigraphy, employing both Paleontology and Lithology, we can increase hydrocarbon production, reduce operating costs and risks by the identification of the productive sections, and reduce environmental concerns by drilling less dry holes needlessly.

  20. Enforcement Letter, NEL-2011-01- March 31, 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Issued to LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC, regarding work control issues that resulted in the release of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

  1. Phase 1 data summary report for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation: Health risk and ecological risk screening assessment. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, R.B.; Adams, S.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Blaylock, B.G.; Brandt, C.C.; Ford, C.J.; Frank, M.L.; Gentry, M.J.; Holladay, S.K.; Hook, L.A.; Levine, D.A.; Longman, R.C.; McGinn, C.W.; Skiles, J.L.; Suter, G.W.; Williams, L.F.

    1992-12-01

    The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants released from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. The contaminants released since the early 1940s include a variety of radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of Phase 1 of the CRRI. Phase 1 was designed to (1) obtain high-quality data to confirm existing historical data for contaminant levels in fish, sediment, and water from the CR/WBR; (2) determine the in the range of contaminant concentrations present river-reservoir system; (3) identify specific contaminants of concern; and (4) establish the reference (background) concentrations for those contaminants.

  2. (Environmental toxicology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, C.C.

    1988-11-28

    The traveler attended an International Seminar on Environmental Toxicology sponsored by Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn of Thailand. The objective of the seminar was to provide technical knowledge in the area of environmental toxicology to participants from developing countries in Asia. Priorities identified at the workshop which would aid in the application of environmental toxicology principles in developing countries were: a data base on toxicological properties of chemicals, increased research support in all aspects of science and technology in developing countries, increased public awareness and participation in the risk management process, and an increased number of training courses held in third world countries to facilitate exchange of experience and techniques.

  3. Compliance & Risk Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    environmental hazards and risks to protect human health and safety and the environment. ... Plans. Risk evaluation tools such as the Human Health and Ecological Risk Methods ...

  4. Global strategies for environmental issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This is the 19th Annual NAEP conference proceedings, containing abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions. Broad areas covered include the following: Environmental Management; Biodiversity/sustainable development; Gulf Regional Issues; Environmental ethics/equity; NEPA workshop and symposium; International environmental issues; global Environmental Effects; Risk Assessment; and Environmental effects of nuclear waste management.

  5. Environmental Survey preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

  6. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level waste (LLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLW. Included are definition of the LLW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of WM LLW, an overview of the risk assessment method, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLW alternative considered.

  7. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level mixed waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Chen, S.Y.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers both the radioactive and chemical hazards associated with LLMW transportation. Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment methods and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS. This report presents additional information that is not included in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLMW. Included are definitions of the LLMW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS; data related to the inventory and to the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of WM LLMW; an overview of the risk assessment methods; and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLMW case considered.

  8. Two-Stage, Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: An Approach for Sustainable Energy Production, CO2-Sequestration Security, and Reduced Environmental Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, T A; Chen, M; Sun, Y; Hao, Y; Elliot, T R

    2012-02-02

    We introduce a hybrid two-stage energy-recovery approach to sequester CO{sub 2} and produce geothermal energy at low environmental risk and low cost by integrating geothermal production with CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in saline, sedimentary formations. Our approach combines the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck et al. (2011b), which uses brine as the working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation CCS by Randolph and Saar (2011a). During stage one of our hybrid approach, formation brine, which is extracted to provide pressure relief for CO{sub 2} injection, is the working fluid for energy recovery. Produced brine is applied to a consumptive beneficial use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water to be injected into a neighboring reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there is often a shortage of a working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find economically feasible disposition options to reduce the volume of brine requiring reinjection in the integrated geothermal-CCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a). During stage two, which begins as CO{sub 2} reaches the production wells; coproduced brine and CO{sub 2} are the working fluids. We present preliminary reservoir engineering analyses of this approach, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable CO{sub 2} storage formation/geothermal reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess both the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity and geothermal energy production potential as a function of well spacing between CO{sub 2} injectors and brine/CO{sub 2} producers for various well patterns and for a range of subsurface conditions.

  9. Multimedia-Modeling Environmental Database Editor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-05-09

    MMEDE is a software tool designed by Battelle, PNL to support the maintenance of an environmental risk computation database.

  10. Environmental Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Tour Sampling for known and unexpected contaminants

  11. EPA`s risk assessment guidelines: Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, D.E.

    1990-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment guidelines for cancer, quantification, and exposure issues are discussed.

  12. The political and socioeconomic predicates of risk analysis: Integration of natural and social science in anticipating the environmental consequences of development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, T.P.

    1995-12-31

    The fundamental origins of industrial development and land-use changes that generate physical and chemical threats to biological natural resources are social, political, and economic forces. Two new international economic trade treaties, NAFTA in North America and MERCOSUR in South America, are major forces inducing a complex of changes and regional economic developments that will pose new regional treats to natural resources. Current strategies of ecological risk assessment rarely include an analysis of social, political, or economic factors in any systematic form. Nor are these social sciences integrated with natural sciences in performing a comprehensive risk analysis. A suggested strategy is delineated here that would incorporate social sciences in risk analysis for large programs like NAFTA and MERCOSUR. This strategy would also be applicable in regional risk analysis to estimate the probability and location of development of certain types of industrial development and large scale land-use change. The implications of projected regional economic growth and the development of specific types of industries and land-use changes stimulated by these or other social, political, or economic forces could be addressed using more traditional forms of evaluation and ecological risk analysis. Ultimately, a more comprehensive and synthetic definition and delineation of the procedures of risk analysis must evolve to include aspects of both natural and social sciences.

  13. Environmental Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Cleanup Tour Environmental Cleanup See how LANL is cleaning up the environmental legacy of the Manhattan Project and Cold War

  14. USING RISK-BASED CORRECTIVE ACTION (RBCA) TO ASSESS (THEORETICAL) CANCER DEATHS AVERTED COMPARED TO THE (REAL) COST OF ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M. L.; Hylko, J. M.

    2002-02-25

    In 1978, on the basis of existing health studies at the time, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project legislation was proposed that would authorize remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites and vicinity properties. The cost of the program to the Federal Government was expected to be $180 million. With the completion of this project, approximately 1300 theoretical cancer deaths were prevented in the next 100 years at a cost of $1.45 billion, based on the Fiscal Year 1998 Federal UMTRA budget. The individual site costs ranged from $0.2 million up to $18 billion spent per theoretical cancer death averted over the next 100 years. Resources required to sustain remediation activities such as this are subject to reduction over time, and are originally based on conservative assumptions that tend to overestimate risks to the general public. This evaluation used a process incorporating risk-based corrective action (RBCA); a three-tiered, decision-making process tailoring corrective action activities according to site-specific conditions and risks. If RBCA had been applied at the start of the UMTRA Project, and using a criterion of >1 excess cancer death prevented as justification to remediate the site, only 50% of the existing sites would have been remediated, yielding a cost savings of $303.6 million to the Federal Government and affected States, which share 10% of the cost. This cost savings equates to 21% of the overall project budget. In addition, only 22% of the vicinity properties had structural contamination contributing to elevated interior gamma exposure and radon levels. Focusing only on these particular properties could have saved an additional $269.3 million, yielding a total savings of $573 million; 40% of the overall project budget. As operational experience is acquired, including greater understanding of the radiological and nonradiological risks, decisions should be based on the RBCA process, rather than relying on conservative

  15. Environmental Stewardship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stewardship community-environmentassetsimagesiconearthday.jpg Environmental Stewardship Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will clean up contamination from the...

  16. Environmental Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feature Stories community-environmentassetsimagesicon-environment.jpg Environmental Protection Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will cleanup contamination...

  17. EA-1290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to transport up to an average of 9,000 metric tons per year of natural uranium as uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from the United...

  18. Federal Register

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Web site at http: www.eh.doe.govnepa and on the Depleted UF 6 Management Information Network Web site at http: web.ead.anl.govuranium. ...

  19. Ex-Im Bank Environmental Export Finance Program | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Environmental Export Financing Webpage 1 "Ex-Im Bank's financing helps mitigate risk for U.S. environmental companies and also offers competitive financing terms to...

  20. Geographic information system for Long Island: An epidemiologic systems approach to identify environmental breast cancer risks on Long Island. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, H.C. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    BNL is developing and implementing the project ``Geographic Information System (GIS) for Long Island`` to address the potential relationship of environmental and occupational exposures to breast cancer etiology on Long Island. The project is divided into two major phases: The four month-feasibility project (Phase 1), and the major development and implementation project (Phase 2). This report summarizes the work completed in the four month Phase 1 Project, ``Feasibility of a Geographic Information System for Long Island.`` It provides the baseline information needed to further define and prioritize the scope of work for subsequent tasks. Phase 2 will build upon this foundation to develop an operational GIS for the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP).

  1. Environmental Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Cleanup Tour Environmental Cleanup See how LANL is cleaning up the environmental legacy of the Manhattan Project and Cold War Open full screen to view more You are...

  2. Environmental challenges: The next 20 years. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This report presents details obtained from the conference on Environmental Challenges. Topics discussed include: Risk assessment; public and stakeholder involvement; global challenges; problems facing environmental professionals; sustainable development; ecosystem development; pollution prevention; hazardous materials; environmental impacts; and environmental policy. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the databases.

  3. Environmental Outreach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the Los Alamos site, its cleanup and stewardship programs, current environmental issues, and our long-term environmental stewardship sustainability strategy. Attend meetings...

  4. Environmental Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Tour Sampling for known and unexpected contaminants Open full screen to view more You are running an unsupported browser, some...

  5. Environmental Perspective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    left environmental impacts, which we are committed to remedying Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505)...

  6. Environmental Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental Analysis is used by the Program to quantify the environmental impacts of hydrogen technologies. Specifically, life cycle assessment is used to identify and evaluate the emissions,...

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS; CONTAMINATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    audit of SRP radioactive waste Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS; CONTAMINATION; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; HIGH-LEVEL...

  8. Defining the needs for non-destructive assay of UF6 feed, product, and tails at gas centrifuge enrichment plants and possible next steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian D; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Moran, Bruce W; Lebrun, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to detect undeclared LEU production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of UF{sub 6} bulk material used in the process of enrichment at GCEPS. The inspectors also take destructive assay (DA) samples for analysis off-site which provide accurate, on the order of 0.1 % to 0.5% uncertainty, data on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, DA sample taking is a much more labor intensive and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of the results and contains the possibility of the loss of the continuity of knowledge of the samples during the storage and transit of the material. Use of the IAEA's inspection sampling algorithm shows that while total sample size is fixed by the total population of potential samples and its intrinsic qualities, the split of the samples into NDA or DA samples is determined by the uncertainties in the NDA measurements. Therefore, the larger the uncertainties in the NDA methods, more of the sample taken must be DA samples. Since the DA sampling is arduous and costly, improvements in NDA methods would reduce the number of DA samples needed. Furthermore, if methods of on-site analysis of the samples could be developed that have uncertainties in the 1-2% range, a lot of the problems inherent in DA sampling could be removed. The use of an unattended system that could give an overview of the entire process giving complementary data on the enrichment process as well as accurate measures of enrichment and weights of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product would be a major step in enhancing the ability of NDA beyond present attended systems. The possibility of monitoring the feed, tails, and product header pipes in such a way as to gain safeguards relevant flow and enrichment information without compromising the intellectual property of the operator including proprietary equipment and operational parameters would be a huge step forward. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including such process monitoring and possible on-site analysis of DA samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector measurements reducing the difference between the operator's and inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GeEPs safeguards.

  9. A more accurate and penetrating method to measure the enrichment and mass of UF6 storage containers using passive neutron self-interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Miller, Karen A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an unattended mode neutron measurement that can provide the enrichment of the uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The new passive neutron measurement provides better penetration into the uranium mass than prior gamma-ray enrichment measurement methods. The Passive Neutron Enrichment Monitor (PNEM) provides a new measurement technique that uses passive neutron totals and coincidence counting together with neutron self-interrogation to measure the enrichment in the cylinders. The measurement uses the neutron rates from two detector pods. One of the pods has a bare polyethylene surface next to the cylinder and the other polyethylene surface is covered with Cd to prevent thermal neutrons from returning to the cylinder. The primary neutron source from the enriched UF{sub 6} is the alpha-particle decay from the {sub 234}U that interacts with the fluorine to produce random neutrons. The singles neutron counting rate is dominated by the {sub 234}U neutrons with a minor contribution from the induced fissions in the {sub 235}U. However, the doubles counting rate comes primarily from the induced fissions (i.e., multiplication) in the {sub 235}U in enriched uranium. The PNEM concept makes use of the passive neutrons that are initially produced from the {sub 234}U reactions that track the {sub 235}U enrichment during the enrichment process. The induced fission reactions from the thermal-neutron albedo are all from the {sub 235}U and provide a measurement of the {sub 235}U. The Cd ratio has the desirable feature that all of the thermal-neutron-induced fissions in {sub 235}U are independent of the original neutron source. Thus, the ratio is independent of the uranium age, purity, and prior reactor history.

  10. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6 Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.

    2000-04-01

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of -11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  11. Results from a "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Tracking of UF6 Cylinders during a Processing Operation at a Uranium Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Chris A; Kovacic, Donald N; Whitaker, J Michael; Younkin, James R; Hines, Jairus B; Laughter, Mark D; Morgan, Jim; Carrick, Bernie; Boyer, Brian; Whittle, K.

    2008-01-01

    Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for processing, storing, and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants. To ensure that cylinder movements at enrichment facilities occur as declared, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) must conduct time-consuming periodic physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identity, and containment. By using a robust system design that includes the capability for real-time unattended monitoring (of cylinder movements), site-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of monitoring technologies, one can build a system that will improve overall inspector effectiveness. This type of monitoring system can provide timely detection of safeguard events that could be used to ensure more timely and appropriate responses by the IAEA. It also could reduce reliance on facility records and have the additional benefit of enhancing domestic safeguards at the installed facilities. This paper will discuss the installation and evaluation of a radio-frequency- (RF-) based cylinder tracking system that was installed at a United States Enrichment Corporation Centrifuge Facility. This system was installed primarily to evaluate the feasibility of using RF technology at a site and the operational durability of the components under harsh processing conditions. The installation included a basic system that is designed to support layering with other safeguard system technologies and that applies fundamental rules-based event processing methodologies. This paper will discuss the fundamental elements of the system design, the results from this site installation, and future efforts needed to make this technology ready for IAEA consideration.

  12. LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

    2010-08-06

    Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6

  13. Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN Why DOE-EM Did...

  14. Environmental Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Federal environmental laws apply to DOE Loans and Loan Guarantees. The Loan Programs Offices (LPOs) Environmental Compliance Division is responsible for overseeing LPOs compliance with...

  15. Environmental Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal environmental laws apply to DOE Loans and Loan Guarantees. The Loan Programs Office’s (LPO’s) Environmental Compliance Division is responsible for overseeing LPO’s compliance with...

  16. Environmental Justice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to promoting environmental justice in all its activities in keeping with Executive Order (EO) 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in...

  17. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-11-28

    This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF{sub 6} from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (United States Code, Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a Federal Register Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; from the transportation of all ETTP cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF6

  18. Environmental Microbiology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Microbiology Environmental Microbiology Los Alamos working to identify genetic regulatory systems in single microorganisms. Contact Us Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Srinivas Iyer Bioscience Division Leader Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email Examining the soil beneath our feet Environmental microbiology Read caption + Many environmental molecular biology studies begin with purified DNA and RNA extracted from the

  19. Environmental Stewardship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tours Value of the River Hydropower Transmission Environmental Stewardship Fish Renewables Irrigation, Navigation Flood Control and Recreation Energy Efficiency...

  20. Environmental Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainability community-environmentassetsimagesiconearthday.jpg Environmental Sustainability: Creating the Future Exercising our commitment to operating a sustainable site...

  1. Environmental Outreach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Outreach Environmental Outreach Our vision is to operate a proactive and interactive environmental communication and public involvement program that is inclusive and responsive to communities, tribes, agencies, and federal and state governments. May 30, 2012 An example of environmental outreach at LANL Interested citizens examine a storm water monitoring station in DP Canyon. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216

  2. PRELIMINARY ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT ON THE INTEGRATION OF A PROCESS UTILIZING LOW-ENERGY SOLVENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE ENABLED BY A COMBINATION OF ENZYMES AND VACUUM REGENERATION WITH A SUBCRITICAL PC POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, David; Vidal, Rafael; Russell, Tania; Babcock, Doosan; Freeman, Charles; Bearden, Mark; Whyatt, Greg; Liu, Kun; Frimpong, Reynolds; Lu, Kunlei; Salmon, Sonja; House, Alan; Yarborough, Erin

    2014-12-31

    The results of the preliminary environmental, health and safety (EH&S) risk assessment for an enzyme-activated potassium carbonate (K2CO3) solution post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) plant, integrated with a subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant, are presented. The expected emissions during normal steady-state operation have been estimated utilizing models of the PCC plant developed in AspenTech’s AspenPlus® software, bench scale test results from the University of Kentucky, and industrial experience of emission results from a slipstream PCC plant utilizing amine based solvents. A review of all potential emission species and their sources was undertaken that identified two credible emission sources, the absorber off-gas that is vented to atmosphere via a stack and the waste removed from the PCC plant in the centrifuge used to reclaim enzyme and solvent. The conditions and compositions of the emissions were calculated and the potential EH&S effects were considered as well as legislative compliance requirements. Potential mitigation methods for emissions during normal operation have been proposed and solutions to mitigate uncontrolled releases of species have been considered. The potential emissions were found to pose no significant EH&S concerns and were compliant with the Federal legislation reviewed. The limitations in predicting full scale plant performance from bench scale tests have been noted and further work on a larger scale test unit is recommended to reduce the level of uncertainty.

  3. Basic research for environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a major environmental restoration effort to reduce the health and environmental risks resulting from past waste management and disposal practices at DOE sites. This report describes research needs in environmental restoration and complements a previously published document, DOE/ER-0419, Evaluation of Mid-to-Long Term Basic Research for Environmental Restoration. Basic research needs have been grouped into five major categories patterned after those identified in DOE/ER-0419: (1) environmental transport and transformations; (2) advanced sampling, characterization, and monitoring methods; (3) new remediation technologies; (4) performance assessment; and (5) health and environmental effects. In addition to basic research, this document deals with education and training needs for environmental restoration. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. (Environmental technology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, H.L.

    1990-10-12

    The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

  5. Keys to improving environmental performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreau, R.L.; Raught, D.L.

    1996-11-01

    Environmental protection is a mainstream issue in today`s society. Both internal and external drivers motivate the oil and ms industry to continuously improve environmental performance. Companies are integrating environmental considerations into their business plans to a greater extent, and are directing proportionally more resources toward managing these issues. This paper addresses several environmental management focus areas in Exxon`s domestic E&P sector to: (1) manage risks, (2) ensure compliance, (3) improve performance, and (4) assist in the development of balanced legislation and regulations. Specific examples of Production Department programs are discussed, along with keys to success for continued progress in improving performance.

  6. The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and Impact Statements (DOE, 2005) The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and Impact Statements (DOE, ...

  7. The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and Impact Statements The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and Impact Statements A writing guide ...

  8. Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart The Status Chart provides the ...

  9. Environmental Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Cleanup Environmental Cleanup Learn more about the history, cleanup activities and possible future uses of the Hanford Site, a 586-square-mile government site in southeast Washington State. | Video courtesy of the Energy Department. The Energy Department is committed to a safe, complete cleanup of the environmental legacy of five decades of government-sponsored nuclear weapons development and nuclear energy research. As part of this mission, we safely and cost-effectively transport

  10. Environmental Microbiology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Microbiology Examining the soil beneath our feet Read caption + Many environmental molecular biology studies begin with purified DNA and RNA extracted from the soil. Overview of Research and Highlights Learning about microorganisms-bacteria, algae, and fungi-is essential to understanding how living things interact with their environments. Exploration of environmental microbiology at Los Alamos crosses broad scales of investigation that span from identification of genetic regulatory

  11. Environmental Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feature Stories Environmental Protection Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will cleanup contamination from the past, minimize impacts for current environmental operations, and create a sustainable future. Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo taken during well construction in 2011. Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume The chromium originated from cooling towers at a

  12. Information needs for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRosa, C.T.; Choudhury, H.; Schoeny, R.S.

    1990-12-31

    Risk assessment can be thought of as a conceptual approach to bridge the gap between the available data and the ultimate goal of characterizing the risk or hazard associated with a particular environmental problem. To lend consistency to and to promote quality in the process, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published Guidelines for Risk Assessment of Carcinogenicity, Developmental Toxicity, Germ Cell Mutagenicity and Exposure Assessment, and Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures. The guidelines provide a framework for organizing the information, evaluating data, and for carrying out the risk assessment in a scientifically plausible manner. In the absence of sufficient scientific information or when abundant data are available, the guidelines provide alternative methodologies that can be employed in the risk assessment. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Environmental Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will be an environmental technical expert and advisor to integrate science and engineering principles to improve the natural environment and direct and...

  14. Environmental Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental-Review Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance...

  15. Site Environmental Report for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.

    1999-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site external radiation monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California's Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of hazardous materials in groundwater, stormwater, and sewage. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment. Chapter 3, ''Compliance Summary,'' reviews the site's various environmental protection activities and compliance status with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1998 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public.

  16. Air Risk Information Support Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J.

    1990-12-31

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  17. Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

  18. Information needs for risk management/communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D.A.

    1990-12-31

    The hazardous waste cleanup program under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (Superfund) is delegated to the ten Regions of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and has, to date, identified more than 33,000 sites for consideration. The size and complexity of the program places great demands on those who would provide information to achieve national consistency in application of risk assessment while meeting site-specific needs for risk management and risk communication.

  19. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2001-07-09

    From mid-April through the end of June 2001, a Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment (FEVA) was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary goal of this FEVA was to establish an environmental vulnerability baseline at ORNL that could be used to support the Laboratory planning process and place environmental vulnerabilities in perspective. The information developed during the FEVA was intended to provide the basis for management to initiate immediate, near-term, and long-term actions to respond to the identified vulnerabilities. It was expected that further evaluation of the vulnerabilities identified during the FEVA could be carried out to support a more quantitative characterization of the sources, evaluation of contaminant pathways, and definition of risks. The FEVA was modeled after the Battelle-supported response to the problems identified at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This FEVA report satisfies Corrective Action 3A1 contained in the Corrective Action Plan in Response to Independent Review of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Tritium Leak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) ORNL Site Office Manager on April 16, 2001. This assessment successfully achieved its primary goal as defined by Laboratory management. The assessment team was able to develop information about sources and pathway analyses although the following factors impacted the team's ability to provide additional quantitative information: the complexity and scope of the facilities, infrastructure, and programs; the significantly degraded physical condition of the facilities and infrastructure; the large number of known environmental vulnerabilities; the scope of legacy contamination issues [not currently addressed in the Environmental Management (EM) Program]; the lack of facility process and environmental pathway analysis performed by the accountable line management or facility owner; and poor

  20. Environmental Stewardship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Parties agree to settle stormwater lawsuit LANL announced it has reached a settlement that will result in the dismissal of a 2008 environmental lawsuit by nine citizens groups and ...

  1. Environmental decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C.

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

  2. Environmental Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@ 010764 Health & Environmental Research Summary of Accomplishments Prepared by Office of Energy Research /U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Reprinted April 1984 Published by Technical Information Center/U.S. Department of Energy The purpose of this brief narrative is to foster an awareness of a publicly funded health and environmental research program chartered nearly forty years ago, of its contributions toward the national goal of safe and

  3. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    728D Environmental Assessment Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 Approved for Public Release; Further Disseminat ion Uillimited June 2011 DOE/EA-1728D June 2011 1 2 3 4 5 6 This page intentionally left blank. 7 8 U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA-1728D Draft Environmental Assessment iii June 2011 CONTENTS 1 2 1.0 INTRODUCTION

  4. Environmental Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy and Assistance Environmental Policy and Assistance The Department of Energy’s (DOE) goal is to carry out all cleanup operations in a manner that protects the public and the environment. The Department of Energy's (DOE) goal is to carry out all cleanup operations in a manner that protects the public and the environment. DOE Headquarters works with field offices to foster continuous improvement in environmental protection before incidents occur. Headquarters provides corporate

  5. Environmental Radiochemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental radiochemistry Environmental Radiochemistry AMS as a tool for monitoring the fate and transport of radionuclides in the environment The production and testing of nuclear weapons, nuclear accidents, and authorized discharges have all contributed to a global legacy of radioactive contamination in the environment. While radionuclides with relatively short half-lives present the most immediate impact to surrounding ecosystems and human health, long-lived species are also a major

  6. Environmental Stewardship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science & Innovation » Science & Technology » Environmental Science Environmental Science A revolutionary new turbine technology for hydropower plants is one step closer to its first commercial deployment. At peak performance, an Alden turbine should convert about 94 percent of the water’s energy into usable electricity, comparable or superior to the efficiency of traditional turbines; the overall wildlife survival rate should be over 98 percent, up from 80-85 percent for a

  7. Partnering Policy for the Office of Environmental Management | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Policy for the Office of Environmental Management Partnering Policy for the Office of Environmental Management Partnering Policy for the Office of Environmental Management (448.69 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Project Management Risk Committee (PMRC) SOP Microsoft Word - ADR Revised Policy82508Reformatted.doc OMB and CEQ Joint Memorandum on Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution (CEQ, 2012)

  8. Risk Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Almost any new technology involves some risk. Risks involved in working with hydrogen can be minimized through adherence to standard design parameters for equipment and procedures. The Fuel Cell...

  9. Report to the Environmental Management Advisory Board

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Environmental Management Advisory Board Evaluation of the United States Department of Energy Environmental Management Strategic Planning Communication Tool Submitted by the Risk Communications Subcommittee September 2015 Additional Evaluations: In addition to the evaluation of the strategic planning tool, the EMAB Risk Communications Subcommittee had presentations of other studies and tools currently in use or under development at various DOE cleanup sites to understand their current or

  10. Site environmental report for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brekke, D.D.; Holland, R.C.; Gordon, K.W.

    1995-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally-produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1994 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. A summary of the findings is provided below.

  11. Environmental Management

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-07

    Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

  12. Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-12

    Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

  13. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of performance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activities throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National

  14. The risk assessment information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, S.B.; Bonczek, R.R.; McGinn, C.W.; Land, M.L.; Bloom, L.D.; Sample, B.E.; Dolislager, F.G.

    1998-06-01

    In an effort to provide service-oriented environmental risk assessment expertise, the Department of Energy (DOE) Center for Risk Excellence (CRE) and DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) are sponsoring Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a web-based system for disseminating risk tools and information to its users. This system, the Risk Assessment Information System (RAIS), was initially developed to support the site-specific needs of the DOE-ORO Environmental Restoration Risk Assessment Program. With support from the CRE, the system is currently being expanded to benefit all DOE risk information users and can be tailored to meet site-specific needs. Taking advantage of searchable and executable databases, menu-driven queries, and data downloads, using the latest World Wide Web technologies, the RAIS offers essential tools that are used in the risk assessment process or anywhere from project scoping to implementation. The RAIS tools can be located directly at http://risk.lsd.ornl.gov/homepage/rap{_}tool.htm or through the CRE`s homepage at http://www.doe.gov/riskcenter/home.html.

  15. Relative Hazard and Risk Measure Calculation Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Elder, Matthew S.

    2004-03-20

    The relative hazard (RH) and risk measure (RM) methodology and computer code is a health risk-based tool designed to allow managers and environmental decision makers the opportunity to readily consider human health risks (i.e., public and worker risks) in their screening-level analysis of alternative cleanup strategies. Environmental management decisions involve consideration of costs, schedules, regulatory requirements, health hazards, and risks. The RH-RM tool is a risk-based environmental management decision tool that allows managers the ability to predict and track health hazards and risks over time as they change in relation to mitigation and cleanup actions. Analysis of the hazards and risks associated with planned mitigation and cleanup actions provides a baseline against which alternative strategies can be compared. This new tool allows managers to explore “what if scenarios,” to better understand the impact of alternative mitigation and cleanup actions (i.e., alternatives to the planned actions) on health hazards and risks. This new tool allows managers to screen alternatives on the basis of human health risk and compare the results with cost and other factors pertinent to the decision. Once an alternative or a narrow set of alternatives are selected, it will then be more cost-effective to perform the detailed risk analysis necessary for programmatic and regulatory acceptance of the selected alternative. The RH-RM code has been integrated into the PNNL developed Framework for Risk Analysis In Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES) to allow the input and output data of the RH-RM code to be readily shared with the more comprehensive risk analysis models, such as the PNNL developed Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) model.

  16. 19th Annual conference & exposition: Global strategies for environmental issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The 19th Annual conference and exposition on Global Strategies for Environmental Issues was held June 12-15, 1994 in New Orleans, Louisiana. This volume contains abstracts of the oral presentations. They are organized into the following sections: Environmental Management; Biodiversity/sustainable Development; Gulf Regional Issues; Environmental Ethics/Equity; NEPA Symposium; International Environmental Issues; Global Environmental Effects; and, Risk Assessment. Abstracts of poster sessions are also included.

  17. Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ASSESSMENT (EA) FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SOUTH ACCESS ROAD (CR 802) IN SUPPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT (WIPP) IN EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO NEPA #: DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE P. O. BOX 2078 CARLSBAD, NM 88221-2078 PREPARED BY: OWEN W. LOFTON SUPERVISORY MULTI RESOURCES SPECIALIST BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE 620 EAST GREENE CARLSBAD, NM 88220 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

  18. M E Environmental Management Environmental Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration, EM-10 Office of D&D and Facility Engineering, EM-13 Facility Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) D&D Program Map Addendum: Impact of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) on EM's D&D

  19. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Brookhaven Site Office (BHSO) BHSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Brookhaven Site Office U.S. Department of Energy PO Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973 P: (631) 344-3425 E: Email Us National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Environmental

  20. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Princeton Site Office (PSO) PSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information Princeton Site Office U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 102 Princeton, NJ 08543 P: (609) 243-3700 F: (609) 243-2032 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Environmental

  1. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) SLAC Site Office (SSO) SSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information SLAC Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Bldg 41, M/S 08A 2575 Sand Hill Road Menlo Park, CA 94025 P: (650) 926-2505 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents Environmental

  2. Obeying Environmental Laws

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stewardship Environmental Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Obeying Environmental Laws LANL complies with more than 30 state and federal regulations and policies to...

  3. Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F. M.

    2003-06-03

    An environmental risk assessment associated with the disposal of projected Immobilized Low-Activity Waste, solid wastes and failed or decommissioned melters in an Integrated Disposal Facility was performed. Based on the analyses all performance objectives associated with the groundwater, air, and intruder pathways were met.

  4. Council on Environmental Quality - Guidance for Environmental...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Council on Environmental Quality - Guidance for Environmental Assessments of Forest Health...

  5. Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation Environmental...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation Environmental Notice Bulletin Abstract This bulletin provides the public with...

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5 audit of SRP radioactive waste Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; HIGH-LEVEL...

  7. Summer Undergraduate Research Program: Environmental studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillan, J.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. The students are offered research topics at the Medical University in the scientific areas of pharmacology and toxicology, epidemiology and risk assessment, environmental microbiology, and marine sciences. Students are also afforded the opportunity to work with faculty at the University of Charleston, SC, on projects with an environmental theme. Ten well-qualified students from colleges and universities throughout the eastern United States were accepted into the program.

  8. Environmental laws regulating chemicals: Uses of information in decision making under environmental statutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaba, J.M.

    1990-12-31

    Three areas are addressed in this paper: generic issues that arise simply in the process of decision-making under environmental statutes; different decision-making standards under various environmental statutes; and efforts to legislate a {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}acceptable{close_quotes} risk from exposure to carcinogenic chemicals.

  9. Risk Code?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identify the Task Risk Code >2 Determine if a Work Control Document is needed What is the Unmitigated Risk Code? Rev.1 09/05/14 Read and Agree to Comply with appropriate mitigation and sign Work Control Documents Is there an approved Work Control Document (WCD)? WORK PLANNING, CONTROL AND AUTHORIZATION FLOW DIAGRAM 1. Define Scope of Work 2. Analyze Hazards 3. Develop and Implement Hazard Controls 4. Perform Work Within Controls 5. Feedback and Continuous Improvement Analyze Hazards and

  10. Environmental Biosciences Quarterly Report, September - December, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2006-01-31

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  11. Environmental Biosciences Program Report for Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

    2005-10-15

    In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

  12. Environmental Cleanup Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanup Feature Stories community-environmentassetsimagesicon-environment.jpg Environmental Cleanup Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: clean up the past,...

  13. Site environmental report for 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, K.W.; Brekke, D.D.; Holland, R.C.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program, conducted in conjunction with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the general environment in the area. This monitoring effort ensures that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of the Environmental Monitoring Program, an ambient environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally-produced food stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions.

  14. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David; Poff, Ben; Hjeresen, Denny; Isaacson, John; Johnson, Scot; Morgan, Terry; Paulson, David; Salzman, Sonja; Rogers, David

    2010-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) environmental organization, as required by US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2009. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (air in Chapter 4; water and sediments in Chapters 5 and 6; soils in Chapter 7; and foodstuffs and biota in Chapter 8) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. The new Chapter 10 describes the Laboratory’s environmental stewardship efforts and provides an overview of the health of the Rio Grande. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical

  15. Environmental Management System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental Management System is a systematic method for assessing mission activities, determining the environmental impacts of those activities, prioritizing improvements, and measuring results. May 30, 2012 The continuous improvement cycle Our Environmental Management System encourages continuous improvement of our environmental performance. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM

  16. QER- Comment of Environmental Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis, I lead a series of annual environmental policy forums that target the leaders within the Minnesota environmental and energy policy community (http://www.environmental-initiative.org/projects/policy-forum-series), and our next forum (on Sept. 24th) will be focused on the risks and rewards associated with fuel transport to/through Minnesota, as well as what policy decisions and trade-offs we are facing as a state. I am looking for a speaker to open the four-hour forum who can provide broader context on the issue of fuel transport infrastructure, as well as speak to federal vs. state jurisdiction and both the big-picture/long-term and the immediate on-the-ground trade-offs.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF EM Recovery NEWS FLASH RECOVERY.GOV March 10, 2011 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Payments Surge Past $4 Billion U.S. Depar tment of Energy | Office of Environmental Management For More Information on EM Recovery Act Work, Visit Us on the Web: http://www.em.doe.gov/emrecovery/ FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS * More than $4 BILLION in Recovery Act payments are accelerating environmental cleanup

  18. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Argonne Site Office (ASO) ASO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Argonne Site Office U.S. Department of Energy 9800 South Cass Avenue Building 201 Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-8637 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents

  19. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Berkeley Site Office (BSO) BSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Berkeley Site Office U.S. Department of Energy One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 P: (510) 486-5784 E: Email Us National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documents

  20. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Fermi Site Office U.S. Department of Energy MS 118 P.O. Box 2000 Kirk Road and Pine Street Batavia, IL 60510 P: (630) 840-3281 F: (630) 840-3285 National Environmental Policy Act

  1. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Office (OSO) OSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Office U.S. Department of Energy Post Office Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6269 P: (865) 576-0710 National Environmental Policy Act

  2. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Thomas Jefferson Site Office (TJSO) TJSO Home About Projects Contract Management NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Resources Contact Information Thomas Jefferson Site Office U.S. Department of Energy 12000 Jefferson Avenue Newport News, VA 23606 P: (757) 269-7140 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

  3. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David; Gallagher, Pat; Hjeresen, Denny; Isaacson, John; Johson, Scot; Morgan, Terry; Paulson, David; Rogers, David

    2009-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) Environmental Programs Directorate, as required by US Department of Energy Order 450.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2007. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, air; Chapters 5 and 6, water and sediments; Chapter 7, soils; and Chapter 8, foodstuffs and biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information.

  4. Integrated risk information system (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuxen, L.

    1990-12-31

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is an electronic information system developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing information related to health risk assessment. IRIS is the Agency`s primary vehicle for communication of chronic health hazard information that represents Agency consensus following comprehensive review by intra-Agency work groups. The original purpose for developing IRIS was to provide guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This original purpose for developing IRIS was to guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This role has expanded and evolved with wider access and use of the system. IRIS contains chemical-specific information in summary format for approximately 500 chemicals. IRIS is available to the general public on the National Library of Medicine`s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and on diskettes through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS).

  5. Mathematical models for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaikin, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    The use of mathematical models in risk assessment results in the proper understanding of many aspects of chemical exposure and allows to make more actual decisions. Our project ISCRA (Integrated Systems of Complex Risk Assessment) has the aim to create integrated systems of algorythms for prediction of pollutants` exposure on human and environmental health and to apply them for environmental monitoring, and decision-making. Mathematical model {open_quotes}MASTER{close_quotes} (Mathematical Algorythm of SimulaTion of Environmental Risk) represents the complex of algorythmical blocks and is intended for the prediction of danger of pollutants` exposure for human and environmental risk. Model LIMES (LIMits EStimation) is developed for prognosis of safety concentrations of pollutants in the environment both in the case of isolated exposure and in the case of complex exposure for concrete location. Model QUANT (QUANtity of Toxicant) represents the multicompartmental physiological pharmacokinetic model describing absorption, distribution, fate, metabolism, and elimination of pollutants in the body of different groups of human population, as a result of the different kind of exposure. Decision support system CLEVER (Complex LEVE1 of Risk) predicts the probability and the degree of development of unfavourable effects as result of exposure of pollutant on human health. System is based on the data of epidemiological and experimental researches and includes several mathematical models for analysis of {open_quotes}dose-time-response{close_quotes} relations and information about clinical symptoms of diseases. Model CEP (Combination Effect Prognosis) contains probabilistic algorythms for forecasting the effect of simultaneous impact of several factors polluting the environment. The result of the program work is the prediction of an independent exposure of two or more factors, and intensification or weakening of exposure in depending on factors` interactions.

  6. EM Risk and Cleanup Decision Making Presentation by Mark Gilbertson

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RISK AND CLEANUP DECISION MAKING www.em.doe.gov 1 Mark Gilbertson Deputy Assistant Secretary for Site Restoration Office of Environmental Management May 31, 2012 Presented to Environmental Management Advisory Board Topics * How we got to where we are * Existing environment and health risk www.em.doe.gov 2 * Existing environment and health risk analysis to support decision-making * Considerations going forward The Past Five Years * FY2008 budget assumed ~$6 billion escalated for inflation over

  7. Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butt, Talib E. Lockley, Elaine; Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K.

    2008-07-01

    A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

  8. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gash, A E

    2006-07-07

    The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The

  9. Environmental protection Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. Holland

    1999-12-01

    This ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California's commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities.

  10. Environmental Surveillance - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Safety and Resource Protection (PSRP) Environmental Surveillance Public Safety and Resource Protection (PSRP) Public Safety and Resource Protection Home Cultural Resource Program and Curation Services Ecological Monitoring Environmental Surveillance Meteorology and Climatology Services Seismic Monitoring Environmental Surveillance Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Environmental Monitoring The MSA project conducts environmental monitoring to

  11. Emerging trends in environmental consultant liability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witkin, J.B.

    1995-12-01

    Two federal district judges have recently opened the door for negligence suits aimed specifically an environmental consultants. In William Levy and Harper Realty, Inc. v. Versar, Inc., the respective courts allowed negligence-based claims to survive motions to dismiss, suggesting environmental consultants who fail to discover and/or disclose contamination on the properties they are investigating may be liable for considerable damages, including remediation costs and the economic losses suffered as a result of a claimant`s reliance on the environmental consultant`s work product. These cases poses great concern for environmental consultants. This paper will review these cases in detail, and other legal issues of concern to environmental consultants. It will also review the steps consultants can take to limit their liability, including obtaining errors and omissions insurance, using properly drafted environmental services agreements, properly training their employees, effectively communicating about risks with their clients, and other risk management techniques. In light of the exorbitant costs of environmental clean up, and the expansive breadth of liability imposed by federal environmental laws, consultants need to understand the potential causes of action that can be brought against them. Two federal district judges from Illinois have recently opened the door for negligence suits aimed specifically at environmental consultants, in William Levy and Harper Realty, Inc. v. Versar Inc. This paper will analyze the versar and Mobil Oil cases in detail. It will also explore other issues on professional liability generally of concern to environmental consultants. Finally, suggestion are briefly offered to guide environmental consultants as they embark on clean up activities, to reduce their potential liability to third parties.

  12. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Safety and Security Policy (SSP) SSP Home About Frequently Used Resources NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Continuity of Operations (COOP) Implementation Plan Contact Information Safety and Security Policy U.S. Department of Energy SC-31/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P:

  13. Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) NBL Program Office NBL PO Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) NEPA Documents Categorical Exclusion Determinations Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements News Safety Data Sheets (SDS) for NBL Program Office Certified Reference Materials (CRM) Contact Information NBL Program Office U.S. Department of Energy Building 201 9800 South Cass Avenue

  14. HUD's Environmental Review Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An environmental review is the process of reviewing a project and its potential environmental impacts to determine whether it meets  federal, state, and local environmental standards. The...

  15. Environmental Justice: Guidance Under the National Environmental Policy Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental JusticeGuidance Under the National Environmental Policy ActCouncil on Environmental Quality (December 1997) 

  16. Environmental Science - Electro Lesson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan, remediating the Nuclear Weapons Complex, August 1995, environmental_restoration_strategic_plan.pdf Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan (1.46 MB) More Documents & Publications FOIA Requests received by DOE Headquarters (HQ) since December 31, 2008 Audit Report: IG-0528 Office of Information Resources (MA-90)

    Liz Hudd Unit Title: Subject: Environmental Science

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), conducted September 14 through 25, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Fermilab. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at Fermilab, and interviews with site personnel. 110 refs., 26 figs., 41 tabs.

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), conducted December 14 through 18, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with SERI. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SERI, and interviews with site personnel. 33 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.

  19. Environmental Impact Statement Explained

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires Federal agencies to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for all major Federal actions that may significantly affect the quality of...

  20. Environmental Cleanup Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our environmental stewardship commitment: clean up the past, minimize environmental impacts, and create a sustainable future. A telescoping crane hoists a spider excavator over Los ...

  1. Environmental Management System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental Management System (EMS) is a set of processes and practices that enable an organization to reduce its...

  2. Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EES Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Sustainable energy, climate impacts, nuclear threat detection, and environmental management are primary focus areas of earth and...

  3. Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents (EPA, 1993)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Environmental Protection Agency document is designed to assist NEPA reviewers in evaluation the ecological risks associated with the impacts of federal activities.

  4. Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Protection Agency document is designed to assist NEPA reviewers in evaluation the ecological risks associated with the impacts of federal activities.

  5. Environmental management system objectives & targets results summary :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2014-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexicos (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System is the integrated approach for members of the workforce to identify and manage environmental risks. Each Fiscal Year (FY) SNL/NM performs an analysis to identify environmental aspects, and the environmental programs associated with them are charged with the task of routinely monitoring and measuring the objectives and targets that are established to mitigate potential impacts of SNL/NMs operations on the environment. An annual summary of the results achieved towards meeting established Sandia Corporation and SNL/NM Site-specific objectives and targets provides a connection to, and rational for, annually revised environmental aspects. The purpose of this document is to summarize the results achieved and documented in FY2013.

  6. Verbal risk in communicating risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, J.C.; Reno, H.W.

    1993-03-01

    When persons in the waste management industry have a conversation concerning matters of the industry, thoughts being communicated are understood among those in the industry. However, when persons in waste management communicate with those outside the industry, communication may suffer simply because of poor practices such as the use of jargon, euphemisms, acronyms, abbreviations, language usage, not knowing audience, and public perception. This paper deals with ways the waste management industry can communicate risk to the public without obfuscating issues. The waste management industry should feel obligated to communicate certain meanings within specific contexts and, then, if the context changes, should not put forth a new, more appropriate meaning to the language already used. Communication of the waste management industry does not have to be provisional. The authors suggest verbal risks in communicating risk can be reduced significantly or eliminated by following a few basic communication principles. The authors make suggestions and give examples of ways to improve communication with the general public by avoiding or reducing jargon, euphemisms, and acronyms; knowing the audience; avoiding presumptive knowledge held by the audience; and understanding public perception of waste management issues.

  7. National Environmental Research Parks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The National Environmental Research Parks are outdoor laboratories that provide opportunities for environmental studies on protected lands that act as buffers around Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The research parks are used to evaluate the environmental consequences of energy use and development as well as the strategies to mitigate these effects. They are also used to demonstrate possible environmental and land-use options. The seven parks are: Fermilab National Environmental Research Park; Hanford National Environmental Research Park; Idaho National Environmental Research Park; Los Alamos National Environmental Research Park; Nevada National Environmental Research Park; Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park; and Savannah River National Environmental Research Park. This document gives an overview of the events that led to the creation of the research parks. Its main purpose is to summarize key points about each park, including ecological research, geological characteristics, facilities, and available databases.

  8. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  9. Qualitative methods for assessing risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahn, J.A.; Hannaman, G.W.; Kryska, P.

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

  10. (Validity of environmental transfer models)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Gardner, R.H.

    1990-11-07

    BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) is an international cooperative study initiated in 1985 by the Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection to test models designed to calculate the environmental transfer and bioaccumulation of radionuclides and other trace substances. The objective of the symposium and workshop was to synthesize results obtained during Phase 1 of BIOMOVS (the first five years of the study) and to suggest new directions that might be pursued during Phase 2 of BIOMOVS. The travelers were an instrumental part of the development of BIOMOVS. This symposium allowed the travelers to present a review of past efforts at model validation and a synthesis of current activities and to refine ideas concerning future development of models and data for assessing the fate, effect, and human risks of environmental contaminants. R. H. Gardner also visited the Free University, Amsterdam, and the National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (RIVM) in Bilthoven to confer with scientists about current research in theoretical ecology and the use of models for estimating the transport and effect of environmental contaminants and to learn about the European efforts to map critical loads of acid deposition.