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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Disposal  

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Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Disposal A discussion of the environmental impacts...

2

Environmental Risks Associated with Conversion of Depleted UF6  

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Conversion Conversion Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Conversion A general discussion of the potential environmental impacts associated with depleted UF6 conversion activities. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The potential environmental impacts associated with conversion activities will be evaluated in detail as part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride management program after a contract is awarded for conversion services. This page discusses in general the types of impacts that might be associated with the conversion process based on the PEIS analysis. The PEIS evaluated the potential environmental impacts for representative conversion facilities. Conversion to uranium oxide and uranium metal were considered. Potential impacts were evaluated for a representative site, and

3

Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6-related Manufacturing Activities  

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and operation of a facility to fabricate representative products containing depleted uranium. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS evaluated the general environmental impacts...

4

Depleted UF6 Health Risks  

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(depleted UF6) is released to the atmosphere, the uranium compounds and hydrogen fluoride (HF) gas that are formed by reaction with moisture in the air can be chemically...

5

Health Risks Associated with Conversion of Depleted UF6  

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Conversion Conversion DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Conversion A discussion of health risks associated with conversion of depleted UF6 to another chemical form. General Health Risks of Conversion The potential environmental impacts, including potential health risks, associated with conversion activities will be evaluated in detail as part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride management program after a contract is awarded for conversion services. This section discusses in general the types of health risks associated with the conversion process. The conversion of depleted UF6 to another chemical form will be done in an industrial facility dedicated to the conversion process. Conversion will involve the handling of depleted UF6 cylinders. Hazardous chemicals, such

6

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix D: Environmental Synopsis for the Depleted UF6 Conversion Project  

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Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX D: ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT Environmental Synopsis D-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT (Solicitation No. DE-RP05-01OR22717) October 2002 Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Prepared for Office of Site Closure - Oak Ridge Office (EM-32) Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. October 2002 iii CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 1 2 BACKGROUND.............................................................................................................

7

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix D: Environmental Synopsis for the Depleted UF6 Conversion Project  

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Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX D: ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT Environmental Synopsis D-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS ENVIRONMENTAL SYNOPSIS FOR THE DEPLETED UF 6 CONVERSION PROJECT (Solicitation No. DE-RP05-01OR22717) October 2002 Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Prepared for Office of Site Closure - Oak Ridge Office (EM-32) Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. October 2002 iii CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................... 1 2 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................. 3 3

8

Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

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Hexafluoride (UF6) Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Physical and chemical properties of UF6, and its use in uranium processing. Uranium Hexafluoride and Its Properties Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine. It is the chemical form of uranium that is used during the uranium enrichment process. Within a reasonable range of temperature and pressure, it can be a solid, liquid, or gas. Solid UF6 is a white, dense, crystalline material that resembles rock salt. UF6 crystals in a glass vial image UF6 crystals in a glass vial. Uranium hexafluoride does not react with oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or dry air, but it does react with water or water vapor. For this reason,

9

Properties of UF6  

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such as water vapor in the air, the UF6 and water react, forming corrosive hydrogen fluoride (HF) and a uranium-fluoride compound called uranyl fluoride (UO2F2). For more...

10

Depleted UF6 Overview Presentation  

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Information network Web Site. The presentation covers the following topics: The uranium mining and enrichment processes - how depleted UF6 is created, How and where...

11

Health Effects Associated with Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

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Hexafluoride (UF6) UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Health Effects Associated with Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium...

12

Depleted UF6 Internet Resources  

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DUF6 Guide DU Uses DUF6 Management and Uses DUF6 Conversion EIS Documents News FAQs Internet Resources Glossary Home Internet Resources Depleted UF6 Internet Resources Links...

13

Production and Handling Slide 19: UF6  

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Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents UF6 Refer to caption below for image description Uranium hexafluoride UF6...

14

Method and apparatus for measuring enrichment of UF6  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are disclosed for determining the enrichment of .sup.235U in Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) utilizing synthesized X-rays which are directed at a container test zone containing a sample of UF6. A detector placed behind the container test zone then detects and counts the X-rays which pass through the container and the UF6. In order to determine the portion of the attenuation due to the UF6 gas alone, this count rate may then be compared to a calibration count rate of X-rays passing through a calibration test zone which contains a vacuum, the test zone having experienced substantially similar environmental conditions as the actual test zone. Alternatively, X-rays of two differing energy levels may be alternately directed at the container, where either the container or the UF6 has a high sensitivity to the difference in the energy levels, and the other having a low sensitivity.

Hill, Thomas Roy (Santa Fe, NM); Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

15

Depleted UF6 Management Program Overview Presentation  

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Depleted UF6 Management Program Overview Presentation Cylinders Photo Next Screen A Legacy of Uranium Enrichment...

16

Depleted UF6 Conversion facility EIS Topics  

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Topics Topics Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EIS Topics A listing of topics included in the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs. DOE addressed the following environmental issues when assessing the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives in the two site-specific EISs. DOE solicited comment from the Federal agencies, Native American tribes, state and local governments, and the general public on these and any other issues as part of the public scoping process: Potential impacts on health from DUF6 conversion activities, including potential impacts to workers and the public from exposure to radiation and chemicals during routine and accident conditions for the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of DUF6 conversion facilities.

17

Production and Handling Slide 22: UF6 Phase Diagram  

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UF6 Phase Diagram Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents UF6 Phase Diagram Refer to caption below for image...

18

Depleted UF6 Production and Handling Slide Presentation  

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Production and Handling Depleted UF6 Production and Handling Slide Presentation An online slide presentation about production and handling of depleted UF6, from mining of uranium...

19

Production and Handling Slide 31: Certification of UF6 Cylinder...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UF6 Cylinder Volume Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Certification of UF6 Cylinder Volume The cylinder...

20

NGSI: IAEA Verification of UF6 Cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is often ignorant of the location of declared, uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders following verification, because cylinders are not typically tracked onsite or off. This paper will assess various methods the IAEA uses to verify cylinder gross defects, and how the task could be ameliorated through the use of improved identification and monitoring. The assessment will be restricted to current verification methods together with one that has been applied on a trial basis—short-notice random inspections coupled with mailbox declarations. This paper is part of the NNSA Office of Nonproliferation and International Security’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) program to investigate the concept of a global monitoring scheme that uniquely identifies and tracks UF6 cylinders.

Curtis, Michael M.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Method And Apparatus For Measuring Enrichment Of UF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Measuring Enrichment Of UF6 A system and method are disclosed for determining the enrichment of .sup.235U in Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) utilizing synthesized X-rays which...

22

Production and Handling Slide 33: Density of UF6  

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of UF6 Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Density of UF6 Refer to caption below for image description The...

23

Production and Handling Slide 20: Advantages of UF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UF6 Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Advantages of UF6 Only one isotope of F2 Can be handled at reasonable...

24

Unsubscribe from the Depleted UF6 E-mail List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Unsubscribe Unsubscribe from the Depleted UF6 E-mail List This form allows you to remove yourself from the Depleted UF6 e-mail list. Type your e-mail address here:...

25

FAQ 8-What is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)?  

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is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? What is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine. It is the chemical form of uranium that is used during the uranium enrichment process. Within a reasonable range of temperature and pressure, it can be a solid, liquid, or gas. Solid UF6 is a white, dense, crystalline material that resembles rock salt. Liquid UF6 is formed only at temperatures greater than 147° F (64° C) and at pressures greater than 1.5 times atmospheric pressure (22 psia). At atmospheric pressure, solid UF6 will transform directly to UF6 gas (sublimation) when the temperature is raised to 134° F (57° C), without going through a liquid phase.

26

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MEASURING ENRICHMENT OF UF6 - Energy ...  

A system and method are disclosed for determining the enrichment of .sup.235U in Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) utilizing synthesized X-rays which are ...

27

Production and Handling Slide 29: UF6 Cylinder Fill Limit Criteria  

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Criteria Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents UF6 Cylinder Fill Limit Criteria No UF6 cylinder shall be filled...

28

Integrating UF6 Cylinder RF Tracking With Continuous Load Cell Monitoring for Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is demonstrating the integration of UF6 cylinder tracking, using RF technology, with continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) at mock UF6 feed and withdrawal (F&W) stations. CLCM and cylinder tracking are two of several continuous-monitoring technologies that show promise in providing integrated safeguards of F&W operations at enrichment plants. Integrating different monitoring technologies allows advanced, automated event processing to screen innocuous events thereby minimizing false alerts to independent inspectors. Traditionally, international inspectors rely on batch verification of material inputs and outputs derived from operator declarations and periodic on-site inspections at uranium enrichment plants or other nuclear processing facilities. Continuously monitoring F&W activities between inspections while providing filtered alerts of significant operational events will substantially increase the amount of valuable information available to inspectors thereby promising to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards and to improve efficiency in conducting on-site inspections especially at large plants for ensuring that all operations are declared.

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Miller, Paul [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Production and Handling Slide 35: UF6 Cylinder Data Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UF6 Cylinder Data Summary UF6 Cylinder Data Summary Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents UF6 Cylinder Data Summary Cylinder Model Nominal Diam. (in.) Material of Construction Minimum Volume Approximate Tare Weight Without Valve Protector Maximum Enrichment Uranium-235 Shipping Limit Maximum, a UF6 ft3 liters lb kg Weight % lb kg 1S 1.5 Nickel 0.0053 0.15 1.75 0.79 100.00 1.0 0.45 2S .5 Nickel 0.026 0.74 4.2 1.91 100.00 4.9 2.22 5A 5 Monel 0.284 8.04 55 25 100.00 55 24.95 5B 5 Nickel 0.284 8.04 55 25 100.00 55 24.95 8A 8 Monel 1.319 37.35 120 54 12.5 255 115.67 12A 12 Nickel 2.38 67.4 185 84 5.0 460 208.7 12B 12 Monel 2.38 67.4 185 84 5.0 460 208.7 308c 30 Steel 26.0 736.0 1,400 635 5.0b 5,020 2,277 48A 48 Steel 108.9 3,.84 4,500 2,041 4.5b 21,030 9,539 48Xd 48 Steel 108.9 3,084 4,500 2,041 4.5b,g 21,030 9,539 48F 48 Steel

30

Advancements of the Hybrid Method UF6 Container Inspection System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safeguards inspectors currently visit uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are performed with handheld high-resolution detectors on a limited number of cylinders taken to be representative of the plant’s cylinder inventory. These enrichment assay methods interrogate only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume, and are time-consuming and expensive to execute. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an automated UF6 cylinder verification station concept based on the combined collection of traditional enrichment-meter data (186 keV photons from 235U) and non-traditional, neutron-induced, high-energy gamma-ray signatures (3-8 MeV) with an array of collimated, medium-resolution scintillators. Previous work at PNNL (2010) demonstrated proof-of-principle that this hybrid method yields accurate, full-volume assay of the cylinder enrichment, reduces systematic errors when compared to several other enrichment assay methods, and provides simplified instrumentation and algorithms suitable for long-term, unattended operations. This system aims to increase the number of inspected cylinders at higher accuracy and with lower cost than when compared to inspectors with hand-held instruments. Several measurement campaigns of 30B cylinder populations and a refined MCNP model will be reported. The MCNP model consists of per-gram basis vectors for the different uranium isotopes and several fill geometries, enabling fast generation of any UF6 enrichment level and multiple configurations. The refined model was used to optimize collimator design and detector configuration for the hybrid method. In addition, a new field prototype based on model results was utilized in a set of field measurements.

Mace, Emily K.; Orton, Christopher R.; Jordan, David V.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Smith, Leon E.

2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

31

A "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Technologies for UF6 Cylinder Tracking at Centrifuge Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This effort describes how radio-frequency (RF) technology can be integrated into a uranium enrichment facility's nuclear materials accounting and control program to enhance uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinder tracking and thus provide benefits to both domestic and international safeguards. Approved industry-standard cylinders are used to handle and store UF6 feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. In the international arena, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming manual cylinder inventory and tracking techniques to verify operator declarations and to detect potential diversion of UF6. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant process for tracking and monitoring UF6 cylinders would greatly reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a "proof-of concept" system that was designed show the feasibility of using RF based technologies to track individual UF6 cylinders throughout their entire life cycle, and thus ensure both increased domestic accountability of materials and a more effective and efficient method for application of IAEA international safeguards at the site level. The proposed system incorporates RF-based identification devices, which provide a mechanism for a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant tracking network. We explore how securely attached RF tags can be integrated with other safeguards technologies to better detect diversion of cylinders. The tracking system could also provide a foundation for integration of other types of safeguards that would further enhance detection of undeclared activities.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL; Dixon, E. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Martinez, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

News Media Exits for Depleted Uranium and Depleted UF6 Articles  

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line line Archived News and Events News Media Links News Media Exits for Depleted Uranium and Depleted UF6 Articles Online editions of newspapers that cover Depleted Uranium...

33

Production and Handling Slide 38: 48G Depleted UF6 Storage Cylinder  

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48G Depleted UF6 Storage Cylinder Refer to caption below for image description After enrichment, depleted uranium hexafluoride is placed in large steel cylinders for storage....

34

Production and Handling Slide 30: UF6 Cylinder Fill Limit Weights  

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Weights Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents UF6 Cylinder Fill Limit Weights A minimum volume, stated in cubic...

35

Enrichment Assay Methods for a UF6 Cylinder Verification Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These enrichment assay methods interrogate only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume, and are time-consuming and expensive to execute for inspectors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an unattended measurement system capable of automated enrichment measurements over the full volume of Type 30B and Type 48 cylinders. This Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) could be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. The focus of this paper is the development of nondestructive assay (NDA) methods that combine “traditional” enrichment signatures (e.g. 185-keV emission from U-235) and more-penetrating “non-traditional” signatures (e.g. high-energy neutron-induced gamma rays spawned primarily from U-234 alpha emission) collected by medium-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers (i.e. sodium iodide or lanthanum bromide). The potential of these NDA methods for the automated assay of feed, tail and product cylinders is explored through MCNP modeling and with field measurements on a cylinder population ranging from 0.2% to 5% in U-235 enrichment.

Smith, Leon E.; Jordan, David V.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.; Orton, Christopher R.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Conceptual Ideas for New Nondestructive UF6 Cylinder Assay Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of uranium cylinders play an important role in helping the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguard uranium enrichment plants. Traditionally, these measurements have consisted of a scale or load cell to determine the mass of UF{sub 6} in the cylinder combined with a gamma-ray measurement of the 186 keV peak from {sup 235}U to determine enrichment. More recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed systems that exploit the passive neutron signal from UF{sub 6} to determine uranium mass and/or enrichment. These include the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM), and the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The purpose of this report is to provide the IAEA with new ideas on technologies that may or may not be under active development but could be useful for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay. To begin, we have included two feasibility studies of active interrogation techniques. There is a long history of active interrogation in the field of nuclear safeguards, especially for uranium assay. Both of the active techniques provide a direct measure of {sup 235}U content. The first is an active neutron method based on the existing PNEM design that uses a correlated {sup 252}Cf interrogation source. This technique shows great promise for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay and is based on advanced technology that could be implemented in the field in the near term. The second active technique is nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF). In the NRF technique, a bremsstrahlung photon beam could be used to illuminate the cylinder, and high-resolution gamma-ray detectors would detect the characteristic de-excitation photons. The results of the feasibility study show that under certain measurement geometries, NRF is impractical for UF6 cylinder assay, but the 'grazing transmission' and 'secant transmission' geometries have more potential for this application and should be assessed quantitatively. The next set of techniques leverage scintillator detectors that are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. The first is the BC-523A capture-gated organic liquid scintillator. The detector response from several different neutron energies has been characterized and is included in the study. The BC-523A has not yet been tested with UF{sub 6} cylinders, but the application appears to be well suited for this technology. The second detector type is a relatively new inorganic scintillator called CLYC. CLYC provides a complementary detection approach to the HEVA and PNEM systems that could be used to determine uranium enrichment in UF{sub 6} cylinders. In this section, the conceptual idea for an integrated CLYC-HEVA/PNEM system is explored that could yield more precision and robustness against systemic uncertainties than any one of the systems by itself. This is followed by a feasibility study on using alpha-particle-induced reaction gamma-rays as a way to estimate {sup 234}U abundance in UF{sub 6}. Until now, there has been no readily available estimate of the strength of these reaction gamma-rays. Thick target yields of the chief reaction gammas are computed and show that they are too weak for practical safeguards applications. In special circumstances where long count times are permissible, the 1,275 keV F({alpha},x{gamma}) is observable. Its strength could help verify an operator declaration provided other knowledge is available (especially the age). The other F({alpha},x{gamma}) lines are concealed by the dominant uranium line spectrum and associated continuum. Finally, the last section provides several ideas for electromagnetic and acoustic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. These can be used to measure cylinder wall thickness, which is a source of systematic uncertainty for gamma-ray-based NDA techniques; characterize the UF{sub 6} filling profile inside the cylinder, which is a source of systematic uncertainty for neutron-based NDA techniques; locate hidden objects inside the cylinder; a

Miller, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

37

Summary of Field Measurement on UF6 Cylinders Using Electro-Mechanically Cooled Systems  

SciTech Connect

Measurement of the enrichment of solid state UF6 stored within large metal cylinders is a task commonly performed by plant operators and inspectors. The measurement technologies typically used range from low-resolution, high-efficiency sodium iodide detectors to high-resolution, moderate-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The technology used and methods deployed are dependent upon the material being measured, environmental conditions, time constraints, and measurement-precision requirements. Operators and inspectors typically use specially designed, HPGe detectors that are cooled with liquid nitrogen in situations where high-resolution measurements are required. However, the requirement for periodically refilling the system with liquid nitrogen makes remote usage cumbersome and slow. The task of cooling the detector reduces the available time for the inspector to perform other safeguards activities while on site. If the inspector has to reduce the count time for each selected cylinder to ensure that all preselected cylinders are measured during the inspection, the resulting measurement uncertainties may be increased, making it more difficult to detect and verify potential discrepancies in the operator's declarations. However, recent advances in electromechanically cooled HPGe detectors may provide the inspector with an improved verification tool by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen. This report provides a summary of test results for field measurements performed using electromechanically cooled HPGe detectors on depleted, natural, and low-enriched uranium cylinders. The results of the study provide valuable information to inspectors and operators regarding the capabilities and limitations of electromechanically cooled systems based on true field-measurement conditions.

McGinnis, Brent R [ORNL; Smith, Steven E [ORNL; Solodov, Alexander A [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Morgan, James B [ORNL; MayerII, Richard L. [USEC; Montgomery, J. Brent [U.S. Enrichment Corporation Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Modelling environmental risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As environmental issues have become increasingly important in economic research and policy for sustainable development, firms in the private sector have introduced environmental and social issues in conducting their business activities. Such behaviour ... Keywords: Asymmetry, Conditional volatility, Dow Jones Sustainability Indexes, Environmental risk, Environmental sustainability index, GARCH, GJR, Log-moment condition, Moment condition, Persistence, Shocks

Suhejla Hoti; Michael McAleer; Laurent L. Pauwels

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Determination of the 235U Mass and Enrichment within Small UF6 Cylinders via a Neutron Coincidence Well Counting System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of three new uranium enrichment facilities in the United States has sparked renewed interest in the development and enhancement of methods to determine the enrichment and fissile mass content of UF6 cylinders. We describe the design and examine the expected performance of a UF6 bottle counter developed for the assay of Type 5A cylinders. The counter, as designed and subsequently constructed, is a tall passive neutron well counter with a clam-shell configuration and graphite end plugs operated in fast neutron mode. Factory performance against expectation is described. The relatively high detection efficiency and effectively 4 detection geometry provide a near-ideal measurement configuration, making the UF6 bottle counter a valuable tool for the evaluation of the neutron coincidence approach to UF6 cylinder assay. The impacts of non-uniform filling, voids, enrichment, and mixed enrichments are examined

McElroy, Robert Dennis [ORNL; Croft, Dr. Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Young, Brian M [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT; Venkataraman, Ram [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

DUF6 Environmental Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risks A discussion of the potential environmental impacts associated with depleted uranium handling or processing facilities. Impacts Considered in the PEIS Depleted uranium...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Prototype Radiation Detector Positioning System For The Automated Nondestructive Assay Of Uf6 Cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming, expensive, and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of efficiency and assay accuracy. This paper describes an approach denoted the Integrated Cylinder Verification Station (ICVS) that supports 100% cylinder verification, provides volume-averaged cylinder enrichment assay, and reduces inspector manpower needs. To allow field measurements to be collected to validate data collection algorithms, a prototype radiation detector positioning system was constructed. The system was designed to accurately position an array of radiation detectors along the length of a cylinder to measure UF6 enrichment. A number of alternative radiation shields for the detectors were included with the system. A collimated gamma-ray spectrometer module that allows translation of the detectors in the surrounding shielding to adjust the field of view, and a collimating plug in the end to further reduce the low-energy field of view, were also developed. Proof-of-principle measurements of neutron and high-energy gamma-ray signatures, using moderated neutron detectors and large-volume spectrometers in a fixed-geometry, portal-like configuration, supported an early assessment of the viability of the concept. The system has been used successfully on two testing campaigns at an AREVA fuel fabrication plant to scan over 30 product cylinders. This paper will describe the overall design of the detector positioning system and provide an overview of the Integrated Cylinder Verification Station (ICVS) approach.

Hatchell, Brian K.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.

2011-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Automated Nondestructive Assay of UF6 Cylinders: Detector Characterization and Initial Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders assumed to be representative of the facility's entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of manpower and assay accuracy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) intended for this purpose and has developed a field prototype of the nondestructive assay (NDA) components of an ICVS. The nondestructive assay methods would combine the 'traditional' enrichment-meter signature (i.e. 186-keV emission from 235U) as well as 'non-traditional' high-energy photon signatures derived from neutrons produced primarily by 19F({alpha},n) reactions. This paper describes the design, calibration and characterization of the NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) spectrometers utilized in the field prototype. An overview of a recent field measurement campaign is then provided, supported by example gamma-ray pulse-height spectra collected on cylinders of known enrichment.

Mace, Emily K.; Smith, Leon E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hybrid Enrichment Assay Methods for a UF6 Cylinder Verification Station: FY10 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing the concept of an automated UF6 cylinder verification station that would be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until the arrival of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. At the center of this unattended system is a hybrid enrichment assay technique that combines the traditional enrichment-meter method (based on the 186 keV peak from 235U) with non-traditional neutron-induced high-energy gamma-ray signatures (spawned primarily by 234U alpha emissions and 19F(alpha, neutron) reactions). Previous work by PNNL provided proof-of-principle for the non-traditional signatures to support accurate, full-volume interrogation of the cylinder enrichment, thereby reducing the systematic uncertainties in enrichment assay due to UF6 heterogeneity and providing greater sensitivity to material substitution scenarios. The work described here builds on that preliminary evaluation of the non-traditional signatures, but focuses on a prototype field system utilizing NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) spectrometers, and enrichment analysis algorithms that integrate the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Results for the assay of Type-30B cylinders ranging from 0.2 to 4.95 wt% 235U, at an AREVA fuel fabrication plant in Richland, WA, are described for the following enrichment analysis methods: 1) traditional enrichment meter signature (186 keV peak) as calculated using a square-wave convolute (SWC) algorithm; 2) non-traditional high-energy gamma-ray signature that provides neutron detection without neutron detectors and 3) hybrid algorithm that merges the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Uncertainties for each method, relative to the declared enrichment for each cylinder, are calculated and compared to the uncertainties from an attended HPGe verification station at AREVA, and the IAEA’s uncertainty target values for feed, tail and product cylinders. A summary of the major findings from the field measurements and subsequent analysis follows: • Traditional enrichment-meter assay using specially collimated NaI spectrometers and a Square-Wave-Convolute algorithm can achieve uncertainties comparable to HPGe and LaBr for product, natural and depleted cylinders. • Non-traditional signatures measured using NaI spectrometers enable interrogation of the entire cylinder volume and accurate measurement of absolute 235U mass in product, natural and depleted cylinders. • A hybrid enrichment assay method can achieve lower uncertainties than either the traditional or non-traditional methods acting independently because there is a low degree of correlation in the systematic errors of the two individual methods (wall thickness variation and 234U/235U variation, respectively). This work has indicated that the hybrid NDA method has the potential to serve as the foundation for an unattended cylinder verification station. When compared to today’s handheld cylinder-verification approach, such a station would have the following advantages: 1) improved enrichment assay accuracy for product, tail and feed cylinders; 2) full-volume assay of absolute 235U mass; 3) assay of minor isotopes (234U and 232U) important to verification of feedstock origin; single instrumentation design for both Type 30B and Type 48 cylinders; and 4) substantial reduction in the inspector manpower associated with cylinder verification.

Smith, Leon E.; Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Signatures and Methods for the Automated Nondestructive Assay of UF6 Cylinders at Uranium Enrichment Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming, expensive, and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of manpower and assay accuracy. Such a station would use sensors that can be operated in an unattended mode at an industrial facility: medium-resolution scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy (e.g., NaI(Tl)) and moderated He-3 neutron detectors. This sensor combination allows the exploitation of additional, more-penetrating signatures beyond the traditional 185-keV emission from U-235: neutrons produced from F-19(?,n) reactions (spawned primarily from U 234 alpha emission) and high-energy gamma rays (extending up to 8 MeV) induced by neutrons interacting in the steel cylinder. This paper describes a study of these non-traditional signatures for the purposes of cylinder enrichment verification. The signatures and the radiation sensors designed to collect them are described, as are proof-of-principle cylinder measurements and analyses. Key sources of systematic uncertainty in the non-traditional signatures are discussed, and the potential benefits of utilizing these non-traditional signatures, in concert with an automated form of the traditional 185-keV-based assay, are discussed.

Smith, Leon E.; Mace, Emily K.; Misner, Alex C.; Shaver, Mark W.

2010-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

MODEL AND ALGORITHM EVALUATION FOR THE HYBRID UF6 CONTAINER INSPECTION SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an automated UF6 cylinder verification station concept based on the combined collection of traditional enrichment-meter (186 keV photons from U-235) data and non-traditional, neutron-induced, high-energy gamma-signatures (3-8.5 MeV) with an array of collimated, medium-resolution scintillators. Previous (2010) work at PNNL demonstrated proof-of-principle that this hybrid method yields accurate, full-volume assay of the cylinder enrichment, reduces systematic errors when compared to several other enrichment assay methods, and provides simplified instrumentation and algorithms suitable for long-term unattended operations. We used Monte Carlo modeling with MCNP5 to support system design (e.g., number and configuration of detector arrays, and design of iron/poly collimators for enhanced (n,?) conversion) and enrichment algorithm development. We developed a first-generation modeling framework in 2010. These tools have since been expanded, refined and benchmarked against field measurements with a prototype system of a 30B cylinder population (0.2 to 4.95 weight % U-235). The MCNP5 model decomposes the radiation transport problem into a linear superposition of “basis spectra” representing contributions from the different uranium isotopes and gamma-ray generation mechanisms (e.g. neutron capture). This scheme accommodates fast generation of “virtual assay signatures” for arbitrary enrichment, material age, and fill variations. Ongoing (FY-2011) refinements to the physics model include accounting for generation of bremsstrahlung photons, arising primarily from the beta decay of Pa-234m, a U-238 daughter. We are using the refined model to optimize collimator design for the hybrid method. The traditional assay method benefits from a high degree of collimation (to isolate each detector’s field-of-view) and relatively small detector area, while the non-traditional method benefits from a wide field-of-view, i.e. less collimation and larger detectors. We implement the enrichment-meter method by applying a square-wave digital filter to a raw spectrum and extracting the 186-keV peak area directly from the convolute spectrum. Ongoing enhancements to this approach include mitigating a systematic peak-area measurement deficit arising from curvature in the spectrum continuum shape. An optimized system prototype based on model results is utilized in a new set of 2011 field measurements, and model and measurement enrichment assay uncertainties are compared.

McDonald, Benjamin S.; Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.; Smith, Leon E.; Wittman, Richard S.

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

Automated UF6 Cylinder Enrichment Assay: Status of the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA) Project: POTAS Phase II  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) intends to automate the UF6 cylinder nondestructive assay (NDA) verification currently performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at enrichment plants. PNNL is proposing the installation of a portal monitor at a key measurement point to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the data along with operator inputs in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until inspector arrival. This report summarizes the status of the research and development of an enrichment assay methodology supporting the cylinder verification concept. The enrichment assay approach exploits a hybrid of two passively-detected ionizing-radiation signatures: the traditional enrichment meter signature (186-keV photon peak area) and a non-traditional signature, manifested in the high-energy (3 to 8 MeV) gamma-ray continuum, generated by neutron emission from UF6. PNNL has designed, fabricated, and field-tested several prototype assay sensor packages in an effort to demonstrate proof-of-principle for the hybrid assay approach, quantify the expected assay precision for various categories of cylinder contents, and assess the potential for unsupervised deployment of the technology in a portal-monitor form factor. We refer to recent sensor-package prototypes as the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The report provides an overview of the assay signatures and summarizes the results of several HEVA field measurement campaigns on populations of Type 30B UF6 cylinders containing low-enriched uranium (LEU), natural uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). Approaches to performance optimization of the assay technique via radiation transport modeling are briefly described, as are spectroscopic and data-analysis algorithms.

Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Smith, Leon E.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Environmental Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Concerns about CO2 transmission ... A single CO 2 release has insignificant environmental impact ... may harm people and the environment ...

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

An Operator Perspective from a Facility Evaluation of an RFID-Based UF6 Cylinder Accounting and Tracking System  

SciTech Connect

An operational field test of a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) system for tracking and accounting UF6 cylinders was conducted at the Global Nuclear Fuel Americas (GNF) fuel fabrication plant in 2009. The Cylinder Accountability and Tracking System (CATS) was designed and deployed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and evaluated in cooperation with GNF. The system required that passive RFID be attached to several UF6 30B cylinders as they were received at the site; then the cylinders were tracked as they proceeded to interim storage, to processing in an autoclave, and eventually to disposition from the site. This CATS deployment also provided a direct integration of scale data from the site accountability scales. The integration of this information into the tracking data provided an attribute for additional safeguards for evaluation. The field test provided insight into the advantages and challenges of using RFID at an operating nuclear facility. The RFID system allowed operators to interact with the technology and demonstrated the survivability of the tags and reader equipment in the process environment. This paper will provide the operator perspective on utilizing RFID technology for locating cylinders within the facility, thereby tracking the cylinders for process and for Material Control & Accounting functions. The paper also will present the operator viewpoint on RFID implemented as an independent safeguards system.

Martyn, Rose [Global Nuclear Fuels; Fitzgerald, Peter [Global Nuclear Fuels; Stehle, Nicholas D [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Results of Continuous Load Cell Monitoring Field Trial for UF6 Withdrawals at an Operating Industrial Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) has been implemented and tested for use as a safeguards tool during a 2009 field trial in an operating UF6 transfer facility. The transfer facility is part of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio, operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. During the field trial, two process scales for UF{sub 6} cylinders were continuously monitored for a 6-month period as cylinders were being filled. The collected CLCM data were used in testing an event processor serving as a filter for highlighting measurements representing significant operational activities that are important in verifying declared operations. The collection of CLCM data, coupled with rules-based event processing, can provide inspectors with knowledge of a facility's feed and withdrawal activities occurring between site visits. Such process knowledge promises to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards by enabling inspectors to quantitatively compare declared activities directly with process measurements. Selected results of the field trial and event processing will be presented in the context of their value to an independent inspector and a facility operator.

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Bell, Lisa S [ORNL; Conchewski, Curtis A [ORNL; Peters, Benjamin R [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

RESULTS FROM A DEMONSTRATION OF RF-BASED UF6 CYLINDER ACCOUNTING AND TRACKING SYSTEM INSTALLED AT A USEC FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for storing and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants and processing facilities. To verify that no diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material involving UF{sub 6} cylinders at the facility has occurred, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts periodic, labor-intensive physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identities, and cylinder weights. A reliable cylinder monitoring system that would improve overall inspector effectiveness would be a significant improvement to the current international safeguards inspection regime. Such a system could include real-time unattended monitoring of cylinder movements, situation-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of safeguards technologies. This type of system could provide timely detection of abnormal operational activities that may be used to ensure more appropriate and efficient responses by the IAEA. A system of this type can reduce the reliance on paper records and have the additional benefit of facilitating domestic safeguards at the facilities at which it is installed. A radio-frequency (RF)-based system designed to track uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders during processing operations was designed, assembled, and tested at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) facility in Portsmouth, Ohio, to determine the operational feasibility and durability of RF technology. The overall objective of the effort was to validate the robustness of RF technology for potential use as a future international safeguards tool for tracking UF6 cylinders at uranium-processing facilities. The results to date indicate that RF tags represent a feasible technique for tracking UF{sub 6} cylinders in operating facilities. Additional work will be needed to improve the operational robustness of the tags for repeated autoclave processing and to add tamper-indicating and data authentication features to some of the pertinent system components. Future efforts will focus on these needs along with implementing protocols relevant to IAEA safeguards. The work detailed in this report demonstrates the feasibility of constructing RF devices that can survive the operational rigors associated with the transportation, storage, and processing of UF6 cylinders. The system software specially designed for this project is called Cylinder Accounting and Tracking System (CATS). This report details the elements of the CATS rules-based architecture and its use in safeguards-monitoring and asset-tracking applications. Information is also provided on improvements needed to make the technology ready, as well as options for improving the safeguards aspects of the technology. The report also includes feedback from personnel involved in the testing, as well as individuals who could utilize an RF-based system in supporting the performance of their work. The system software was set up to support a Mailbox declaration, where a declaration can be made either before or after cylinder movements take place. When the declaration is made before cylinders move, the operators must enter this information into CATS. If the IAEA then shows up unexpectedly at the facility, they can see how closely the operational condition matches the declaration. If the declaration is made after the cylinders move, this provides greater operational flexibility when schedules are interrupted or are changed, by allowing operators to declare what moves have been completed. The IAEA can then compare where cylinders are with where CATS or the system says they are located. The ability of CATS to automatically generate Mailbox declarations is seen by the authors as a desirable feature. The Mailbox approach is accepted by the IAEA but has not been widely implemented (and never in enrichment facilities). During the course of this project, we have incorporated alternative methods for implementation.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL; Morgan, Jim [Innovative Solutions; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Carrick, Bernie [USEC; Ken, Whittle [USEC; Johns, R E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

FAQ 35-What are the potential health risks from disposal of depleted...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health risks from disposal of depleted uranium as an oxide? Once depleted uranium has been converted from UF6 to the oxide form, the risk associated with handling at a disposal...

53

FAQ 33-What are the potential health risks from storage of depleted...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health risks from storage of depleted uranium as an oxide? Once depleted uranium has been converted from UF6 to the oxide form, the risk associated with storage and handling is...

54

FAQ 36-What are the potential health risks from transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

occurred, potential health risks would be associated with inhalation of HF and uranyl fluoride generated from the reaction of UF6 with moisture in the air. At high exposure levels,...

55

A Mock UF6 Feed and Withdrawal System for Testing Safeguards Monitoring Systems and Strategies Intended for Nuclear Fuel Enrichment and Processing Plants  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an engineering-scale, mock UF6 feed and withdrawal (F&W) system, its operation, and its intended uses. This system has been assembled to provide a test bed for evaluating and demonstrating new methodologies that can be used in remote, unattended, continuous monitoring of nuclear material process operations. These measures are being investigated to provide independent inspectors improved assurance that operations are being conducted within declared parameters, and to increase the overall effectiveness of safeguarding nuclear material. Testing applicable technologies on a mock F&W system, which uses water as a surrogate for UF6, enables thorough and cost-effective investigation of hardware, software, and operational strategies before their direct installation in an industrial nuclear material processing environment. Electronic scales used for continuous load-cell monitoring also are described as part of the basic mock F&W system description. Continuous monitoring components on the mock F&W system are linked to a data aggregation computer by a local network, which also is depicted. Data collection and storage systems are described only briefly in this report. The mock UF{sub 6} F&W system is economical to operate. It uses a simple process involving only a surge tank between feed tanks and product and withdrawal (or waste) tanks. The system uses water as the transfer fluid, thereby avoiding the use of hazardous UF{sub 6}. The system is not tethered to an operating industrial process involving nuclear materials, thereby allowing scenarios (e.g., material diversion) that cannot be conducted otherwise. These features facilitate conducting experiments that yield meaningful results with a minimum of expenditure and quick turnaround time. Technologies demonstrated on the engineering-scale system lead to field trials (described briefly in this report) for determining implementation issues and performance of the monitoring technologies under plant operating conditions. The ultimate use of technologies tested on the engineering-scale test bed is to work with safeguards agencies to install them in operating plants (e.g., enrichment and fuel processing plants), thereby promoting new safeguards measures with minimal impact to operating plants. In addition, this system is useful in identifying features for new plants that can be incorporated as part of 'safeguards by design,' in which load cells and other monitoring technologies are specified to provide outputs for automated monitoring and inspector evaluation.

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Bates, Bruce E [ORNL; Chesser, Joel B [ORNL; Koo, Sinsze [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Evaluation of a RF-Based Approach for Tracking UF6 Cylinders at a Uranium Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally to handle and store uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming physical inspections to verify operator declarations and detect possible diversion of UF{sub 6}. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant system for near real-time tracking and monitoring UF{sub 6} cylinders (as they move within an enrichment facility) would greatly improve the inspector function. This type of system can reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a proof-of-concept approach that was designed to evaluate the feasibility of using radio frequency (RF)-based technologies to track individual UF{sub 6} cylinders throughout a portion of their life cycle, and thus demonstrate the potential for improved domestic accountability of materials, and a more effective and efficient method for application of site-level IAEA safeguards. The evaluation system incorporates RF-based identification devices (RFID) which provide a foundation for establishing a reliable, automated, and near real-time tracking system that can be set up to utilize site-specific, rules-based detection algorithms. This paper will report results from a proof-of-concept demonstration at a real enrichment facility that is specifically designed to evaluate both the feasibility of using RF to track cylinders and the durability of the RF equipment to survive the rigors of operational processing and handling. The paper also discusses methods for securely attaching RF devices and describes how the technology can effectively be layered with other safeguard systems and approaches to build a robust system for detecting cylinder diversion. Additionally, concepts for off-site tracking of cylinders are described.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; Hines, Jairus B [ORNL; Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Martinez, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Human Health Risk & Environmental Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to examine the interplay between human health and environmental risks associated with energy production, hazardous waste, national security and natural disasters. Research...

58

Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk Management Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk Management Services November 2009 Version 1 receive health & safety training specific to the hazards present in the lab. Where a laboratory or core of Environmental Health & Safety Risk Management Services November 2009 Version 1 January 2012 Version 2

Machel, Hans

59

Environmental Enterprise Risk Management Benefits for a Government Contractor  

SciTech Connect

An often overlooked advantage that an Environmental Enterprise Risk Management System (ERMS) has to organizations is the added protection from the Civil False Claims Act (FCA) for activities under a government contract.

Linda Guinn

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Sitewide risk perspectives for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently finalized a closure plan (originally called the Ten Year Plan) for closure and environmental cleanup of previous nuclear weapons facilities. The DOE Rocky Flats Field Office has established priorities for risk reduction work to Support closure activities, as well as addressing those hazards associated with storage and management of radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. To provide information for future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) or other regulatory assessments of specific risk reduction projects identified in the Closure Plan, a risk assessment of normal operations and potential accidents was recently prepared to provide an updated baseline of the cumulative impacts to the worker, public and environment due to the Site`s operations, activities, and environmental conditions in light of the Site`s change in mission, and of future closure projects. This paper summarizes the risk assessment approach, results, and conclusions.

Olinger, S.J. [Dept. of Energy, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Field Office; Foppe, T.L. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

62

Conceptual Model of Offshore Wind Environmental Risk Evaluation System  

SciTech Connect

In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of offshore wind energy generation projects. The development of ERES for offshore wind is closely allied to a concurrent process undertaken to examine environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy generation, although specific risk-relevant attributes will differ between the MHK and offshore wind domains. During FY10, a conceptual design of ERES for offshore wind will be developed. The offshore wind ERES mockup described in this report will provide a preview of the functionality of a fully developed risk evaluation system that will use risk assessment techniques to determine priority stressors on aquatic organisms and environments from specific technology aspects, identify key uncertainties underlying high-risk issues, compile a wide-range of data types in an innovative and flexible data organizing scheme, and inform planning and decision processes with a transparent and technically robust decision-support tool. A fully functional version of ERES for offshore wind will be developed in a subsequent phase of the project.

Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Hamilton, Erin L.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system`s design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system's design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Risk-based priority scoring for Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental restoration programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the process of estimating the risk associated with environmental restoration programs under the Brookhaven National Laboratory Office of Environmental Restoration. The process was part of an effort across all Department of Energy facilities to provide a consistent framework to communicate risk information about the facilities to senior managers in the DOE Office of Environmental Management to foster understanding of risk activities across programs. the risk evaluation was a qualitative exercise. Categories considered included: Public health and safety; site personnel safety and health; compliance; mission impact; cost-effective risk management; environmental protection; inherent worker risk; environmental effects of clean-up; and social, cultural, political, and economic impacts.

Morris, S.C.; Meinhold, A.F.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County --  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Title Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2003 Authors Erdmann, Christine A., Georgianna Farren, Kimberly Baltzell, Terri Chew, Cynthia Clarkson, Ruth Fleshman, Colin Leary, Mary Mizroch, Fern Orenstein, Marion L. Russell, Virginia Souders-Mason, and Margaret Wrensch Abstract The purpose of the Personal Environmental Risk Factor Study (PERFS) pilot project was to develop methodologies and a questionnaire for a future population-based case-control study to investigate the role of selected environmental exposures in breast cancer development. Identification of etiologically relevant exposures during a period of potential vulnerability proximate to disease onset offers the possibility of clinical disease prevention even when disease initiation may have already occurred many years earlier. Certain personal environmental agents or combinations of agents may influence disease promotion. Therefore, this pilot study focused on exposures that occurred during the ten-year period prior to diagnosis for cases and the last ten years for controls, rather than more historic exposures. For this pilot study, we used a community-based research approach. In our collaborative efforts, community members participated with academic researchers in all phases of the research, including research question identification, study design, development of research tools, development of the human subjects protocol, and report writing. Community member inclusion was based upon the concept that community participation could improve the relevance of scientific studies and ultimate success of the research by encouraging an ongoing dialogue between community members and academic representatives. Early activities of this project focused on the collection of input from the community regarding the possible role of environmental factors in the incidence of breast cancer in Marin County. The intent was to inform the scientists of community concerns, enhance the research team's understanding of the community being studied, and provide interested community members with a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional research methods through active participation in the research process. This pilot study identified specific testable hypotheses through review of the literature and consultation with relevant experts and the affected community. Initially, the study was to focus on modifiable personal environmental exposures that are associated with breast tumor promotion and higher socioeconomic status (SES). However, little information was available in the scientific literature regarding the putative mechanism by which some of the suspected environmental factors may act (i.e., initiator vs. promoter). Likewise, little is known about the distribution of personal environmental risk factors by socioeconomic status. Therefore, tumor promotion involvement and association with SES were not very useful as selection criteria, and selection of topics was based primarily on published scientific findings of human studies and community input. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at the University of California at San Francisco (Committee on Human Research) and at the University of California at Berkeley (Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects)

67

Conversion of Yellow Cake to UF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yellow cake is converted to uranium hexafluoride through a multi-step chemical process using nitric acid, ammonium hydroxide, hydrogen, hydrofluoric acid (HF) and fluorine (F2)....

68

Assessment of UF6 Equation of State  

SciTech Connect

A common assumption in the mathematical analysis of flows of compressible fluids is to treat the fluid as a perfect gas. This is an approximation, as no real fluid obeys the perfect gas relationships over all temperature and pressure conditions. An assessment of the validity of treating the UF{sub 6} gas flow field within a gas centrifuge with perfect gas relationships has been conducted. The definition of a perfect gas is commonly stated in two parts: (1) the gas obeys the thermal equation of state, p = {rho}RT (thermally perfect), and, (2) the gas specific heats are constant (calorically perfect). Analysis indicates the thermally perfect assumption is valid for all flow conditions within the gas centrifuge, including shock fields. The low operating gas pressure is the primary factor in the suitability of the thermally perfect equation of state for gas centrifuge computations. UF{sub 6} is not calorically perfect, as the specific heats vary as a function of temperature. This effect is insignificant within the bulk of the centrifuge gas field, as gas temperatures vary over a narrow range. The exception is in the vicinity of shock fields, where temperature, pressure, and density gradients are large, and the variation of specific heats with temperature should be included in the technically detailed analyses. Results from a normal shock analysis incorporating variable specific heats is included herein, presented in the conventional form of shock parameters as a function of inlet Mach Number. The error introduced by assuming constant specific heats is small for a nominal UF{sub 6} shock field, such that calorically perfect shock relationships can be used for scaling and initial analyses. The more rigorous imperfect gas analysis should be used for detailed analyses.

Brady, P; Chand, K; Warren, D; Vandersall, J

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Environmental restoration risk-based prioritization work package planning and risk ranking methodology. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the risk-based prioritization methodology developed to evaluate and rank Environmental Restoration (ER) work packages at the five US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-ORO) sites [i.e., Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12)], the ER Off-site Program, and Central ER. This prioritization methodology was developed to support the increased rigor and formality of work planning in the overall conduct of operations within the DOE-ORO ER Program. Prioritization is conducted as an integral component of the fiscal ER funding cycle to establish program budget priorities. The purpose of the ER risk-based prioritization methodology is to provide ER management with the tools and processes needed to evaluate, compare, prioritize, and justify fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste management activities. The methodology provides the ER Program with a framework for (1) organizing information about identified DOE-ORO environmental problems, (2) generating qualitative assessments of the long- and short-term risks posed by DOE-ORO environmental problems, and (3) evaluating the benefits associated with candidate work packages designed to reduce those risks. Prioritization is conducted to rank ER work packages on the basis of the overall value (e.g., risk reduction, stakeholder confidence) each package provides to the ER Program. Application of the methodology yields individual work package ``scores`` and rankings that are used to develop fiscal budget requests. This document presents the technical basis for the decision support tools and process.

Dail, J.L.; Nanstad, L.D.; White, R.K.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A green wireless sensor network for environmental monitoring and risk identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sensor-based community network for environmental data gathering and predictive analysis has been developed. A mesh network of wireless sensors reports data to a central site for environmental monitoring and risk identification. Data analysis and ...

Patricia Morreale; Feng Qi; Paul Croft

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Breast cancer risk and environmental exposures. Environ Health Perspect 105:891–896  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although environmental contaminants have potential to affect breast cancer risk, explicit environmental links to this disease are limited. The most well-defined environmental risk factors are radiation exposure and alcohol ingestion. Diet is clearly related to the increased incidence of breast cancer in developed countries, but its precise role is not yet established. Recent studies have implicated exposure to organochlorines including DDT as a risk factor for breast cancer in

Mary S. Wolff; Ainsley Weston

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Modern risk control techniques for improving the environmental management system in Romanian HV installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental protection keeps on being one of the main concerns of our company, together with the economic efficiency and providing of high quality energy services. The general goal of the environmental policy consists in improving the environmental ... Keywords: biological risk, cumulative exposure, environmental impact, magnetic field, monitoring system, research project

Stefania Popadiuc; Bogdan Popa; Frangiskos Topalis; Cristiana Geambasu

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Proposed framework for the Western Area Power Administration Environmental Risk Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) views environmental protection and compliance as a top priority as it manages the construction, operation, and maintenance of its vast network of transmission lines, substations, and other facilities. A recent Department of Energy audit of Western`s environmental management activities recommends that Western adopt a formal environmental risk program. To accomplish this goal, Western, in conjunction with Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is in the process of developing a centrally coordinated environmental risk program. This report presents the results of this design effort, and indicates the direction in which Western`s environmental risk program is heading. Western`s environmental risk program will consist of three main components: risk communication, risk assessment, and risk management/decision making. Risk communication is defined as an exchange of information on the potential for threats to human health, public safety, or the environment. This information exchange provides a mechanism for public involvement, and also for the participation in the risk assessment and management process by diverse groups or offices within Western. The objective of risk assessment is to evaluate and rank the relative magnitude of risks associated with specific environmental issues that are facing Western. The evaluation and ranking is based on the best available scientific information and judgment and serves as input to the risk management process. Risk management takes risk information and combines it with relevant non-risk factors (e.g., legal mandates, public opinion, costs) to generate risk management options. A risk management tool, such as decision analysis, can be used to help make risk management choices.

Glantz, C.S.; DiMassa, F.V.; Pelto, P.J.; Brothers, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Roybal, A.L. [Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Quantitative application of biodegradation data to environmental risk and exposure assessments  

SciTech Connect

Biodegradation is an important removal mechanism for natural and synthetic organic chemicals released to aquatic, benthic, and terrestrial ecosystems. It results in a decrease in the overall mass or load of chemicals present in the environment and is key in preventing the accumulation and persistence of chemicals in specific environmental compartments. Although biodegradation is an important process for minimizing potential adverse impacts on environmental systems, it has not been traditionally considered in a quantitative fashion in environmental risk assessments. This article outlines an approach and provides simple kinetic criteria for incorporating biodegradation rate data into environmental exposure and risk assessments. The approach is a generic one that relates biodegradation half-lives to chemical residence times in specific environmental compartments. It is broadly applicable to any organic chemical in a range of environmental compartments and has potential use as a technical and regulatory tool to better quantify environmental exposure and risk.

Larson, R.J.; Cowan, C.E. [Procter and Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Environmental Science Dept.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The framework and tools for the Western Area Power Administration`s Environmental Risk Management Program  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is working with various government agencies to develop and implement environmental risk management programs. One such program is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Western Area Power Administration (Western). In this paper, we describe the risk framework and assessment tools being developed by Western and PNL to help Western`s management staff make effective and defensible decisions on issues that involve environmental risk.

Di Massa, F.V.; Glantz, C.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Roybal, A.L. [Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Communicating risks from the environmental mangaement program of the United States Department of Energy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the inception of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program, the need for better communication of the Department's environmental risks was highlighted. A number of database systems were used to describe the EM program's risk with limited success. Then in December 1997, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management charged the DOE operations and field offices and the Center for Risk Excellence (CRE) to work together to create 'Risk Profiles' or 'Risk Stories.' The purpose of the Profiles is to increase effective communication of risks at a national level for DOE sites by creating a common sense approach to describing risks. This paper describes the progress to date and looks at the plans for future activities. Abbreviations. BGRR: Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor; CERCLA: Comprehensive Response, Compensation and Liability Act; CRE: Center for Risk Excellence; DOE: U.S. Department of Energy; EM: environmental management; ORNL: Oak Ridge National Laboratory; PBSs: Project Baseline Summaries; PtC: Paths to Closure; RDSs: Risk Data Sheets; RH: relative hazard; SRS CAB: Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board; VOCs: volatile organic compounds.

Bollinger, M. E.; Stenner, R.; Picel, K.; McGinn, W.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; ORNL

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Life cycle cost and risk estimation of environmental management options  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation process is demonstrated in this paper through comparative analysis of two alternative scenarios identified for the management of the alpha-contaminated fixed low-level waste currently stored at INEL. These two scenarios, the Base Case and the Delay Case, are realistic and based on actual data, but are not intended to exactly match actual plans currently being developed at INEL. Life cycle cost estimates were developed for both scenarios using the System Cost Model; resulting costs are presented and compared. Life cycle costs are shown as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Although there are some short-term cost savings for the Delay Case, cumulative life cycle costs eventually become much higher than costs for the Base Case over the same period of time, due mainly to the storage and repackaging necessary to accommodate the longer Delay Case schedule. Life cycle risk estimates were prepared using a new risk analysis method adapted to the System Cost Model architecture for automated, systematic cost/risk applications. Relative risk summaries are presented for both scenarios as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Relative risk of the Delay Case is shown to be higher than that of the Base Case. Finally, risk and cost results are combined to show how the collective information can be used to help identify opportunities for risk or cost reduction and highlight areas where risk reduction can be achieved most economically.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A Small-Area Study of Environmental Risk Assessment of Outdoor Falls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Falls in public places are an issue of great health concern especially for the elderly. Falls among the elderly is also a major health burden in many countries. This study describes a spatial approach to assess environmental causes of outdoor falls using ... Keywords: Environmental risk assessment, GIS, Outdoor falls, Small-area study, Spatial clustering

Poh-Chin Lai; Wing-Cheung Wong; Chien-Tat Low; Martin Wong; Ming-Houng Chan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Fiscal Year 2011 Report Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect

Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and avian and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2011, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists adapted and applied the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), first developed to examine the effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy devices on aquatic environments, to offshore wind development. PNNL scientists conducted a risk screening analysis on two initial OSW cases: a wind project in Lake Erie and a wind project off the Atlantic coast of the United States near Atlantic City, New Jersey. The screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two OSW cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device, such as alterations in bottom habitats. Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted during FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an assessment of the vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with OSW installations; a probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. As more data become available that document effects of offshore wind farms on specific receptors in U.S. coastal and Great Lakes waters, probability analyses will be performed.

Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Xavier University CERE Program [Consortium for Environmental Risk Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The workshop provided training for 20 environmental professionals and educators. The focus of instruction for two days was the use of the Internet as a communcation tool. Instructors introduced participants to email, designing and building Web pages, and conducting research using search engines. The focus for three days was learning how Geographical Information Systems (GIS) can be used in the classroom and the workplace. Participants were introducted to the GIS on the Internet and Use of ArcView software.

O'Connor, Sally

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The increasing importance of risk assessment and management in environmental decision-making  

SciTech Connect

Because environmental problems are growing and resources for dealing with them are shrinking, the environmental movement is witnessing an evolutionary shift toward greater emphasis on the use of risk assessment and management tools in setting environmental standards, determining levels of cleanup and deciding environmental program funding priorities. This change has important ramifications for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its national laboratories in terms of the costs of weapons facilities cleanup, the types of cleanup technology that will be emphasized and the way the DOE programs will be run. Other Federal agencies responsible for cleanup operations [e.g., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Defense (DOD)] will be similarly affected. This paper defines risk management and risk assessment and explains why these concepts will be of growing importance in the 1990s. It also defines other relevant terms. The paper develops a rationale for why risk assessment and management will be of increasing importance in environmental decision-making in the 1990s and beyond.

Jaksch, J.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

[Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Environmental risk management Advisory Committee handbook  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook contains information about the objectives of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program, the make-up of the Advisory Committee and Advisory Committee procedures. Functions of the Advisory Committee are outlined, along with guidelines for meetings and establishing agendas.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

2-D Numerical Multimedia Environmental Analysis System (NMEAS) for pollution and risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All pollution issues involve potential impacts on the surrounding interconnected air, water, and soil (i.e., multimedia) environment. Effectively addressing a wide range of multimedia pollution problems is of crucial importance to major socioeconomic ... Keywords: Air emission, Environmental multimedia modeling, Fate of contaminants, Leachate, Numerical analysis, Pollution, Risk assessment, Spill of contaminants

Jing Yuan; Maria Elektorowicz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Bayesian Networks and Geographical Information Systems for Environmental Risk Assessment for Oil and Gas Site Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a Bayesian Network (BN) model to produce environmental risk maps for oil and gas site developments and to demonstrate the model’s scalability from a point to a collection of points. To reach this objective, a benchmark BN model was formulated as a “proof of concept” using Aquifers, Ecoregions and Land Use / Land Cover maps as local and independent input variables. This model was then used to evaluate the probabilistic geographical distribution of the Environmental Sensibility of Oil and Gas (O&G) developments for a given study area. A Risk index associated with the development of O&G operation activities based on the spatial environmental sensibility was also mapped. To facilitate the Risk assessment, these input variables (maps) were discretized into three hazard levels: high, moderate and low. A Geographical Information System (GIS) platform was used (ESRI ArcMap 10), to gather, modify and display the data for the analysis. Once the variables were defined and the hazard data was included on feature classes (layer shapefile format), Python 2.6 software was used as the computational platform to calculate the probabilistic state of all the Bayesian Network’s variables. This allowed to define Risk scenarios both on prognostic and diagnostic analysis and to measure the impact of changes or interventions in terms of uncertainty. The resulting Python – ESRI ArcMap computational script was called “BN+GIS, which populated maps describing the spatial variability of the states of the Environmental Sensibility and of the corresponding Risk index. The latter in particular, represents a tool for decision makers to choose the most suitable location for placing a drilling rig, since it integrates three fundamental environmental variables. Also, results show that is possible to back propagate the information from the Environmental Sensibility to define the inherent triggering scenarios (hazard variables). A case of study is presented to illustrate the applicability of the proposed methodology on a specific geographical setting. The Barnett Shale was chosen as a benchmark study area because sufficient information on this region was available, and the importance that it holds on the latest developments of unconventional plays in the country. The main contribution of this work relies in combining Bayesian Networks and GIS to define environmental Risk scenarios that can facilitate decision-making for O&G stakeholders such as land owners, industry operators, regulators and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), before and during the development of a given site.

Varela Gonzalez, Patricia Ysolda

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A review of plutonium environmental data with a bibliography for use in risk assessments  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium fueled radioisotopic heat sources find space, terrestrial, and undersea applications to generate electrical power. Such systems under postulated accident conditions could release radioactivity into the environment resulting in risks to the general population in the form of radiological doses and associated health effects. The evaluation of the radiological impact of postulated scenarios involving releases of activity into the environment includes identification of postulated accident release modes, including the probability of release and the release location; source term definition, including the activity of each radionuclide released and the corresponding chemical form and particle size distribution; analysis of the environmental behavior of the released radioactivity to determine the concentrations in environmental media (air, soil, and water) as a function of time; and analysis of the interaction between the environmental concentrations and man, leading to ingestion, inhalation, and external doses through each environmental exposure pathway. 443 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Bartram, B.W.; Wilkinson, M.J.

1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Name of Candidate: Adriana Downie School: School of Materials Science and Engineering Title of Thesis: Biochar production and use: environmental risks and rewards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Thesis: Biochar production and use: environmental risks and rewards Report Due Date: 21 June 2011 A After

Blennerhassett, Peter

90

Risk information in support of cost estimates for the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Section 1  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(1) effort on the overall Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR) project consists of four installation-specific work components performed in succession. These components include (1) development of source terms, 92) collection of data and preparation of environmental settings reports, (3) calculation of unit risk factors, and (4) utilization of the unit risk factors in Automated Remedial Action Methodology (ARAM) for computation of target concentrations and cost estimates. This report documents work completed for the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for components 2 and 3. The product of this phase of the BEMR project is the development of unit factors (i.e., unit transport factors, unit exposure factors, and unit risk factors). Thousands of these unit factors are gene rated and fill approximately one megabyte of computer information per installation. The final unit risk factors (URF) are transmitted electronically to BEMR-Cost task personnel as input to a computer program (ARAM). Abstracted files and exhibits of the URF information are included in this report. These visual formats are intended to provide a sample of the final task deliverable (the URF files) which can be easily read without a computer.

Gelston, G.M.; Jarvis, M.F.; Warren, B.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Von Berg, R. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Depleted UF6 Management Information Network - A resource for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an online repository of information about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), a product of the uranium enrichment...

92

Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) for Offshore Wind - Mock-Up of ERES, Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) has been created to set priorities among the environmental risks from offshore wind development. This report follows the conceptual design for ERES and shows what the system would look like, using a web interface created as part of a Knowledge Management System (KMS) for offshore wind. The KMS, called Zephyrus, and ERES for offshore wind, will be populated and made operational in a later phase of the project.

Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Modeling the risk of feline hyperthyroidism associated with diet, exercise, and environmental exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information pertaining to demographics, health history, exercise, environmental exposures, and diet of 31 incident cases and 67 controls selected from the feline population at the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital between April and December of 2001 was gathered via telephone interviews with the cats' owners. The gathered data were analyzed via logistic regression to assess whether an association between these variables and feline hyperthyroidism existed. Owners of cases were more likely to describe their cat's body condition as "normal" than as lean or overweight. Cases were more likely to be a mixed breed than a purebred, and more likely to live in a household with only one or two cats than a household with three or more cats. Cases were less likely to play with other animals than controls, but were more likely to be considered very active then controls. Administration of hairball preparation was associated with an increased risk, whereas consumption of soy in dry food was associated with a decreased risk. Amount of cooked meat consumed on a somewhat regular basis was inversely related to risk. No environmental exposures including indoor/outdoor status, cat litter, and use of pesticides and/or flea products were significant in this study.

Bernstein, Allison Sara

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Radium concentration factors and their use in health and environmental risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium is known to be taken up by aquatic animals, and tends to accumulate in bone, shell and exoskeleton. The most common approach to estimating the uptake of a radionuclide by aquatic animals for use in health and environmental risk assessments is the concentration factor method. The concentration factor method relates the concentration of a contaminant in an organism to the concentration in the surrounding water. Site specific data are not usually available, and generic, default values are often used in risk assessment studies. This paper describes the concentration factor method, summarizes some of the variables which may influence the concentration factor for radium, reviews reported concentration factors measured in marine environments and presents concentration factors derived from data collected in a study in coastal Louisiana. The use of generic default values for the concentration factor is also discussed.

Meinhold, A.F.; Hamilton, L.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Radium concentration factors and their use in health and environmental risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium is known to be taken up by aquatic animals, and tends to accumulate in bone, shell and exoskeleton. The most common approach to estimating the uptake of a radionuclide by aquatic animals for use in health and environmental risk assessments is the concentration factor method. The concentration factor method relates the concentration of a contaminant in an organism to the concentration in the surrounding water. Site specific data are not usually available, and generic, default values are often used in risk assessment studies. This paper describes the concentration factor method, summarizes some of the variables which may influence the concentration factor for radium, reviews reported concentration factors measured in marine environments and presents concentration factors derived from data collected in a study in coastal Louisiana. The use of generic default values for the concentration factor is also discussed.

Meinhold, A.F.; Hamilton, L.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hanford Site Environmental Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk management summary  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Budget-Risk Management Summary report is prepared to support the annual request to sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex by DOE, Headquarters. The request requires sites to provide supplementary crosscutting information related to ES&H activities and the ES&H resources that support these activities. The report includes the following: (1) A summary status of fiscal year (FY) 1999 ES&H performance and ES&H execution commitments; (2)Status and plans of Hanford Site Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup activities; (3) Safety and health (S&H) risk management issues and compliance vulnerabilities of FY 2001 Target Case and Below Target Case funding of EM cleanup activities; (4) S&H resource planning and crosscutting information for FY 1999 to 2001; and (5) Description of indirect-funded S&H activities.

REEP, I.E.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Using environmental risk assessment to evaluate chemical waste disposal in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Rapid industrialization of countries in the Pacific Basin has been accompanied by dramatic increases in the manufacture, formulation, use, and disposal of hazardous materials and residuals. Countries, particularly those with more developed industrial economies, have implemented waste management strategies in various ways and to varying degrees. Although existing strategies provide useful guidance for developing and newly industrialized countries, each country must consider various factors as it independently develops approaches adapted to its particular circumstances. For example, individual strategies must take into account the types and quantities of wastes being generated or those projected to be generated as a result of anticipated economic development; the ability to access trained staff and capital for effective use of available technologies; the environmental and demographic setting of the alternative sites of the associated facilities; the perceptions as to what risks are acceptable relative to other possibly more traditional health and safety risks; and the institutions available for implementing the waste management strategy. This paper discusses how the principles of risk assessment and comparison can be a constructive force in thinking through these complex decisions and describes how a risk-based analysis contributed to the development of a hazardous waste management strategy in Thailand. 6 refs.

Habegger, L.; Fingleton, D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Liengcharernsit, W.; Hastings, P. (Thailand Development Research Inst., Bangkok (Thailand))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

DUF6 Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DUF6 Guide DUF6 Guide Depleted UF6 Guide An introduction to uranium and its compounds, depleted uranium, and depleted uranium hexafluoride (depleted UF6). Uranium has unique properties that make it valuable as an energy source, yet potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. The Guide provides basic information about the properties of uranium compounds and the uranium enrichment process that produces depleted UF6. This information will help you understand the unique challenges involved in managing DOE's inventory of depleted UF6 in a safe and efficient manner. Overview Presentation DUF6 Health Risks Uranium and Its Compounds DUF6 Environmental Risks Depleted Uranium DUF6 Videos Uranium Hexafluoride Uranium Quick Facts DUF6 Production and Handling

100

Disposition of highly enriched uranium obtained from the Republic of Kazakhstan. Environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EA assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with DOE`s proposal to transport 600 kg of Kazakhstand-origin HEU from Y-12 to a blending site (B&W Lynchburg or NFS Erwin), transport low-enriched UF6 blending stock from a gaseous diffusion plant to GE Wilmington and U oxide blending stock to the blending site, blending the HEU and uranium oxide blending stock to produce LEU in the form of uranyl nitrate, and transport the uranyl nitrate from the blending site to USEC Portsmouth.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Insights on radiological risks of US Department of Energy radioactive waste management alternatives in the Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

A Facility Accident Analysis (1) was performed in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). It used an integrated risk-based approach (2) to allow risk comparisons of EM PEIS strategies for consolidating the storage and treatment of wastes at different DOE sites throughout the country. This approach was developed in accordance with the latest National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) compliance guidance from DOE (3), which calls for consideration of a spectrum of accident scenarios that could occur in implementing the various actions evaluated in the EM PEIS. This paper discusses our insights with respect to the likely importance of the relative treatment technologies, waste management facilities and operations, and waste consolidation strategies considered in the EM PEIS.

Mueller, C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Biomarkers of Exposure to Foodborne and Environmental Carcinogens: Enterosorbent Intervention in a High Risk Population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need to assess human exposures to foodborne and environmental carcinogens, particularly in populations at high risk for cancer and disease, has led to the development of chemical-specific biomarkers. Sensitive biomarkers for aflatoxin and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been useful in providing information on population exposure and reducing associated public health impacts. Aflatoxins are fungal metabolites found in a variety of foods. Among these toxins, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most predominant and hepatocarcinogenic. Acutely, AFB1 can cause disease and death, necessitating safe and effective intervention strategies. Inclusion of NovaSil (NS) clay in the diet represents a practical, sustainable approach. NS has been shown to prevent aflatoxicosis in multiple animal species by binding aflatoxins in the gastrointestinal tract, reducing toxin bioavailability. Co-exposure to PAHs, hazardous environmental contaminants, has been shown to increase the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, objectives of this research were to utilize biomarkers to assess aflatoxin and PAH exposures in susceptible populations in Ghana and the U.S. and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of NS intervention in Ghana (a population at risk for aflatoxicosis). After 3-month intervention with 3.0g NS/day, median aflatoxin M1 (an AFB1 metabolite) was significantly reduced (up to 58 percent) compared to the placebo group. Furthermore, no significant differences were found in levels of nutrient minerals between NS and placebo groups at baseline and 3-months suggesting NS can be used to effectively sorb AFB1 without affecting serum concentrations of important minerals. PAH biomarker results showed participants in Ghana were significantly exposed to high levels of PAHs based on the presence of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) in the majority of urines (98.9 percent). NS treatment had no effect on 1-OHP levels, further confirming the preferential binding of aflatoxins by NS. U.S. population data from a Hispanic community in Texas with an elevated incidence of HCC demonstrated a lower percentage and level of aflatoxin and PAH biomarkers. Aflatoxin M1 excretion, however, was associated with increased consumption of certain foods prone to aflatoxin contamination; thus, some individuals may be more vulnerable to exposure and associated interactions that increase the risk for HCC (e.g., PAHs or hepatitis infection).

Johnson, Natalie Malek

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk through Stakeholder Involvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Integration of a near real-time communications system, a public web site, training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs all help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

William T. Hartwell

2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Improved Radiation Dosimetry/Risk Estimates to Facilitate Environmental Management of Plutonium-Contaminated Sites  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes 4 years of research achievements in this Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project. The research described was conducted by scientists and supporting staff at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI)/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI). All project objectives and goals were achieved. A major focus was on obtaining improved cancer risk estimates for exposure via inhalation to plutonium (Pu) isotopes in the workplace (DOE radiation workers) and environment (public exposures to Pu-contaminated soil). A major finding was that low doses and dose rates of gamma rays can significantly suppress cancer induction by alpha radiation from inhaled Pu isotopes. The suppression relates to stimulation of the body's natural defenses, including immunity against cancer cells and selective apoptosis which removes precancerous and other aberrant cells.

Scott, Bobby R.; Tokarskaya, Zoya B.; Zhuntova, Galina V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Syrchikov, Victor A., Belyaeva, Zinaida D.

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

[Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Survey of environmental management training coordinators: Risk assessment/risk management training needs  

SciTech Connect

The Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) is conducting a survey of Risk Assessment and Risk Management. They are developing information on the existing level of risk associated with training and the perceived need for this training by both federal and private organizations. The purpose of the questionnaire is to determine the available training and the perception of the Risk Management process in the DOE. Of particular interest is the requirement for Risk Assessment/Management training in organizations that will be involved in the Decontamination and Decommissioning of DOE Facilities. The survey questions and instructions are included.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Comment to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers Comment to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers Comment by Cameco Resources On Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (July 27, 2010), Section 934 Rule Making. As discussed below, Cameco believes that producers and providers of uranium concentrates and UF6 conversion services, whether directly or as an intermediary, should be excluded from the definition of nuclear supplier. In this regard, Cameco generally agrees with the comments submitted by the Nuclear Energy Institute ("NEI") on behalf of its members; however, Cameco disagrees with the implication of NEl's comments that producers of uranium concentrates and providers of conversion services should be included in the

107

Degradation and environmental risk of surfactants after the application of compost sludge to the soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation of surfactants in soil amended with sewage sludge during 100 days. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature influences on the degradation of the studied compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overall, the LAS degradation is faster than the NP compounds degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Therefore, the LAS presented lower environmental risk than the NP compounds. - Abstract: In this work, the degradation of anionic and non-ionic surfactants in agricultural soil amended with sewage sludge is reported. The compounds analysed were: linear alkylbenzene sulphonates (LAS) with a 10-13 carbon alkylic chain, and nonylphenolic compounds (NPE), including nonylphenol (NP) and nonylphenol ethoxylates with one and two ethoxy groups (NP1EO and NP2EO). The degradation studies were carried out under winter (12.7 Degree-Sign C) and summer (22.4 Degree-Sign C) conditions in Andalusia region. The concentration of LAS was reduced to 2% of the initial concentration 100 day after sludge-application to the soil. The half-life time measured for LAS homologues were ranged between 4 and 14 days at 12.7 Degree-Sign C and between 4 and 7 days at 22.4 Degree-Sign C. With regard to NPE compounds, after 8 and 4 days from the beginning of the experiment at 12.7 and 22.4 Degree-Sign C, respectively, their concentration levels were increased to 6.5 and 13.5 mg/kg dm (dry matter) as consequence of the degradation of nonylphenol polyethoxylates. These concentration levels were reduced to 5% after 63 and 70 days for 12.7 Degree-Sign C and 22.4 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The half-life times measured for NPEs were from 8 to 16 days at 12.7 Degree-Sign C and from 8 to 18 days at 22.4 Degree-Sign C. Environmental risk assessment revealed that for LAS homologues no environment risk could be expected after 7 and 8 days of sludge application to the soil for 22.4 and 12.7 Degree-Sign C, respectively; however, potential toxic effects could be observed for the nonylphenolic compounds during the first 56 days after sludge application to the soil.

Gonzalez, M.M.; Martin, J.; Camacho-Munoz, D.; Santos, J.L.; Aparicio, I. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Escuela Politecnica Superior, University of Seville, C/Virgen de Africa 7, E-41011 Seville (Spain); Alonso, E., E-mail: ealonso@us.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Escuela Politecnica Superior, University of Seville, C/Virgen de Africa 7, E-41011 Seville (Spain)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Regulation of health, safety, and environmental risks,’ in A. Mitchell Polinsky and Steven Shavell, Handbook of law and economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides a systematic review of the economic analysis of health, safety, and environmental regulations. Although the market failures that give rise to a rationale for intervention are well known, not all market failures imply that market risk levels are too great. Hazard warnings policies often can address informational failures. Some market failures may be exacerbated by government policies, particularly those embodying conservative risk assessment practices. Labor market estimates of the value of statistical life provide a useful reference point for the efficient risk tradeoffs for government regulation. Guided by restrictive legislative mandates, regulatory policies often strike a quite different balance with an inordinately high cost per life saved. The risk-risk analysis methodology enables analysts to assess the net safety implications of policy efforts. Inadequate regulatory enforcement and behavioral responses to regulation may limit their effectiveness, while rising societal wealth will continue to generate greater levels of health and safety. 1

W. Kip Viscusi; W. Kip Viscusi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Health, safety, and environmental risks from energy production: A year-long reality check  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) offers the benefit of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions and thereby mitigating climate change risk, but it will also bring its own health, safety, and environmental risks. Curtis M. Oldenburg, Editor-in-Chief, considers these risks in the context of the broader picture of energy production. Over the last year, there have been major acute health, safety, and environmental (HSE) consequences related to accidents involving energy production from every major primary energy source. These are, in chronological order: (i) the Upper Big Branch (coal) Mine disaster, (ii) the Gulf of Mexico Macondo (oil) well blowout, (iii) the San Bruno (natural gas) pipeline leak and explosion, and (iv) the Fukushima (nuclear) reactor radioactivity releases. Briefly, the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster occurred in West Virginia on April 5, 2010, when natural methane in the mine ignited, causing the deaths of 29 miners, the worst coal mine disaster in the USA since 1970. Fifteen days later, the Macondo oil well in the Gulf of Mexico suffered a blowout, with a gas explosion and fire on the floating drilling platform that killed 11 people. The oil and gas continued to flow out of the well at the seafloor until July 15, 2010, spilling a total of approximately 5 million barrels of oil into the sea. On September 9, 2010, a 30-inch (76-cm) buried, steel, natural gas pipeline in San Bruno, California, leaked gas and exploded in a residential neighborhood, killing 8 people in their homes and burning a total of 38 homes. Flames were up to 1000 ft (300 m) high, and the initial explosion itself reportedly measured 1.1 on the Richter scale. Finally, on March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan's main island, Honshu, caused a tsunami that crippled the backup power and associated cooling systems for six reactor cores and their spent fuel storage tanks at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. At time of writing, workers trying to bring the crisis under control have been exposed to dangerous levels of radiation, and radioactive water and particulates have been released to the sea and atmosphere. These four disasters, all of which occurred within the past 12 months, were not unprecedented; similar events differing only in detail have happened around the world before, and such events will occur again. Today, developed nations primarily use fossil fuels to create affordable energy for comforts such as lighting, heating and air-conditioning, refrigeration, transportation, education, and entertainment, as well as for powering manufacturing, which creates jobs and a wealth of material goods. In addition to the risks of the existing energy infrastructure that have become obvious through these recent disasters, there is also the ongoing risk of climate change that comes from the vast emissions of greenhouse gases, primarily CO{sub 2}, from the burning of fossil fuels. The implementation of CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) will help mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel energy, but it also carries with it HSE risks. In my personal interactions with the public and with students, the main concern voiced is whether CO{sub 2} could leak out of the deep reservoirs into which it is injected and rise up out of the ground, smothering people and animals at the ground surface. Another concern expressed is that CO{sub 2} pipelines could fail and cause similar gaseous plumes of CO{sub 2}. The widespread concerns about CO{sub 2} leaking out over the ground surface may be inspired by events that have happened within natural systems in equatorial Africa, in Indonesia, and in Italy. Researchers have been investigating a wide variety of HSE risks of geologic CO{sub 2} storage for some time and have determined that wells are the main potential pathways for significant leakage from the deep subsurface. I discuss the acute HSE risks of CO{sub 2} leakage through wells and from pipelines, and compare the behavior of failures in CO{sub 2} wells and pipelines with oil and gas analogues from which most of our experien

Oldenburg, C.M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Status of Environmental Management Initiatives to Accelerate the Reduction of Environmental Risks and Challenges Posed by the Legacy of the Cold War  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fifty years of nuclear weapons production and energy research in the United States during the Cold War generated large amounts of radioactive wastes, spent nuclear fuel (SNF), excess plutonium and uranium, thousands of contaminated facilities, and contaminated soil and groundwater. During most of that half century, the Nation did not have the environmental regulatory structure or nuclear waste cleanup technologies that exist today. The result was a legacy of nuclear waste that was stored and disposed of in ways now considered unacceptable. Cleaning up and ultimately disposing of these wastes is the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In 1989, DOE established the Office of Environmental Management (EM) to solve the large scale and technically challenging risks posed by the world's largest nuclear cleanup. This required EM to build a new nuclear cleanup infrastructure, assemble and train a technically specialized workforce, and develop the technologies and tools required to safely decontaminate, disassemble, stabilize, disposition, and remediate unique radiation hazards. The sites where nuclear activities produced legacy waste and contamination include the original Manhattan Project sites--Los Alamos, New Mexico; Hanford, Washington; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee--as well as major Cold War sites, such as Savannah River Site, South Carolina; the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Rocky Flats Plant, Colorado; and Fernald, Ohio. Today EM has responsibility for nuclear cleanup activities at 21 sites covering more than two million acres in 13 states, and employs more than 30,000 Federal and contractor employees, including scientists, engineers and hazardous waste technicians. This cleanup poses unique, technically complex problems, which must be solved under the most hazardous of conditions, and which will require billions of dollars a year for several more decades. The EM program focus during its first 10 years was on managing the most urgent risks and maintaining safety at each site while negotiating state and Federal environmental compliance agreements. The program also concentrated on characterizing waste and nuclear materials and assessing the magnitude and extent of environmental contamination. By the late 1990s, EM had made significant progress in identifying and characterizing the extent of contamination and cleanup required and began transitioning from primarily a characterization and stabilization program to an active cleanup and closure program. During that time, EM formulated multi-year cleanup and closure plans, which contributed to cleanup progress; however, reducing the overall environmental risk associated with the cleanup program remained a challenge. In response, the Secretary of Energy directed a review of the EM program be undertaken. The resulting 'Top-to Bottom Review' re-directed the program focus from managing risks to accelerating the reduction of these risks.

None

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

EIS-0269: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0269: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee This impact statement will support management decisions on depleted UF6 by evaluating the environmental impacts of a range of reasonable alternative strategies as well as providing a means for the public to have a meaningful opportunity to be heard on this matter. This NOI informs the public of the proposal, explains the schedule, announces the dates, times, and places for scoping meetings, and solicits public comment. 96-1196.pdf More Documents & Publications

113

Incorporating Environmental Public HealthIncorporating Environmental Public Health Indicators into Cumulative Risk Scores toIndicators into Cumulative Risk Scores to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-vectoring mosquitoes) separate from the risks and benefits of other pesticides (such as those used on field crops. Similarly, analysis of other pesticides will focus on the impacts on other user groups and related effects to determine whether the pesticide will remain effective for at least five years. EPA also requires

114

ABSTRACT: The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk Through Stakeholder Involvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between 1951 and 1992, 928 nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), including 100 atmospheric and 828 underground tests. Initial public reaction to the tests was largely supportive, but by the late 1950s this began to change, largely as a result of fear of the potential for adverse health effects to be caused by exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from the tests. The nuclear power plant accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 served to heighten these fears, as well as foster a general distrust of the federal agencies involved and low public confidence in monitoring results. Modeled after a similar program that involved the public in monitoring activities around the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the NTS since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah, and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Since assuming administration of the program in 2000, DRI has accomplished significant enhancements to the network's data collection and transmission capabilities. A robust datalogging and communications system allows for the near real-time transmission of data to a platform maintained by DRI's Western Regional Climate Center, where the data are uploaded and displayed on a publicly accessible web site (http://cemp.dri.edu/). Additionally, the CEMP can serve as part of an emergency response network in the event of an unplanned radiological release from the NTS, and also provides an excellent platform for testing new environmental sensor technologies. Finally, the CEMP provides training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs, which help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

T. Hartwell

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels are abundant, inexpensive to produce, and are easily converted to usable energy by combustion as demonstrated by mankind's dependence on fossil fuels for over 80% of its primary energy supply (13). This reliance on fossil fuels comes with the cost of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions that exceed the rate at which CO{sub 2} can be absorbed by terrestrial and oceanic systems worldwide resulting in increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration as recorded by direct measurements over more than five decades (14). Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas linked to global warming and associated climate change, the impacts of which are currently being observed around the world, and projections of which include alarming consequences such as water and food shortages, sea level rise, and social disruptions associated with resource scarcity (15). The current situation of a world that derives the bulk of its energy from fossil fuel in a manner that directly causes climate change equates to an energy-climate crisis. Although governments around the world have only recently begun to consider policies to avoid the direst projections of climate change and its impacts, sustainable approaches to addressing the crisis are available. The common thread of feasible strategies to the energy climate crisis is the simultaneous use of multiple approaches based on available technologies (e.g., 16). Efficiency improvements (e.g., in building energy use), increased use of natural gas relative to coal, and increased development of renewables such as solar, wind, and geothermal, along with nuclear energy, are all available options that will reduce net CO{sub 2} emissions. While improvements in efficiency can be made rapidly and will pay for themselves, the slower pace of change and greater monetary costs associated with increased use of renewables and nuclear energy suggests an additional approach is needed to help bridge the time period between the present and a future when low-carbon energy is considered cheap enough to replace fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one such bridging technology (1). CCS has been the focus of an increasing amount of research over the last 15-20 years and is the subject of a comprehensive IPCC report that thoroughly covers the subject (1). CCS is currently being carried out in several countries around the world in conjunction with natural gas extraction (e.g., 2, 3) and enhanced oil recovery (17). Despite this progress, widespread deployment of CCS remains the subject of research and future plans rather than present action on the scale needed to mitigate emissions from the perspective of climate change. The reasons for delay in deploying CCS more widely are concerns about cost (18), regulatory and legal uncertainty (19), and potential environmental impacts (21). This chapter discusses the long-term (decadal) sustainability and environmental hazards associated with the geologic CO{sub 2} storage (GCS) component of large-scale CCS (e.g., 20). Discussion here barely touches on capture and transport of CO{sub 2} which will occur above ground and which are similar to existing engineering, chemical processing, and pipeline transport activities and are therefore easier to evaluate with respect to risk assessment and feasibility. The focus of this chapter is on the more uncertain part of CCS, namely geologic storage. The primary concern for sustainability of GCS is whether there is sufficient capacity in sedimentary basins worldwide to contain the large of amounts of CO{sub 2} needed to address climate change. But there is also a link between sustainability and environmental impacts. Specifically, if GCS is found to cause unacceptable impacts that are considered worse than its climate-change mitigation benefits, the approach will not be widely adopted. Hence, GCS has elements of sustainability insofar as capacity of the subsurface for CO{sub 2} is concerned, and also in terms of whether the associated environmental risks are acceptable or not to the public.

Oldenburg, C.M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Alternatives for reducing the environmental risks associated with natural disasters and their effects on pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Past pipeline failure reports have typically focused on corrosion and third party related events. However, natural disasters pose a substantial risk to pipeline integrity as well. Therefore, it was the objective of this thesis to analyze the risks and consequences of pipelines being seriously affected by natural disasters and propose potential measures to prevent leaks or spills and to mitigate the consequences of leaks and spills resulting from natural disasters. A risk assessment method has been developed for ranking the risks associated with pipelines in natural disaster areas and prevention and mitigation concepts have been recommended and discussed for reducing the risks.

Wellborn, Michael Wayne

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Depleted uranium risk assessment for Jefferson Proving Ground using data from environmental monitoring and site characterization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the third risk assessment completed for the depleted uranium (DU) munitions testing range at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG), Indiana, for the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation command. Jefferson Proving Ground was closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act and the testing mission was moved to Yuma Proving Ground. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This report integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The RACER (risk analysis, communication, evaluation, and reduction) stakeholder environmental data transparency project for Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The RACER (Risk Analysis, Communication, Evaluation, and Reduction) project was created in 2003, as an effort to enhance the Los Alamos National Laboratory's ability to effectively communicate the data and processes used to evaluate environmental risks to the public and the environment. The RACER project staff consists of members of Risk Assessment Corporation, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). RACER staff worked closely with members of the community, tribal governments, and others within NMED and LANL to create innovative tools and a process that could provide information to regulators, LANL and the community about the sources of public health risk and ecological impact from LAN L operations. The RACER Data Analysis Tool (DA T) provides the public with webbased access to environmental measurement data collected in and around the LANL site. Its purpose is to provide a 'transparent' view to the public of all data collected by LANL and NMED regarding the LANL site. The DAT is available to the public at 'www.racernm.com'.

Echohawk, John Chris [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dorries, Alison M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eberhart, Craig F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Werdel, Nancy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for underground injection control. Summary annual report, April 1992--April 1993  

SciTech Connect

ICF Resources` project, entitled {open_quotes}State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for Underground Injection Control{close_quotes} includes two primary tasks (development of state and national systems respectively) and a technology transfer element. The state system was designed to assist states with data management related to underground injection control (UIC). However, during the current period, external changes (primarily pending regulatory changes at the federal level) have made the risk assessment protocol aspect of the state system of increased importance relative to data management. This protocol would assess the relative risk of groundwater contamination due to UIC activities in various areas of the state. The risk assessment system could be used to assist states in allocating scarce resources and potentially could form the analytical basis of a state variance program to respond to pending federal regulatory changes. Consequently, a substantial portion of the effort to date has been focused on this aspect of the project, The national energy and environmental risk analysis system (EERAS) is designed to enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities. This concept will be demonstrated using UIC data. The initial system design for EERAS has been completed but may be revised based on input from DOE and on the pending UIC regulatory changes. Data have been collected and organized and can be input once the file structure is finalized. The further development options for EERAS defined as part of this project will allow for the full development of the system beyond the current prototype phase which will enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities for responding to regulatory initiatives and for evaluating the benefits of risk-based regulatory approaches.

Haas, M.R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ENVIRONMENTAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

797 797 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR THE AGUA CALIENTE SOLAR PROJECT IN YUMA COUNTY, ARIZONA U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 November 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page Executive Summary .................................................................................................................ES-1 Introduction ..........................................................................................................................ES-1 Purpose and Need ...............................................................................................................ES-1 Proposed Action and Alternatives........................................................................................ES-2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Environmental Health & Safety Risk Categories for EH&S Laboratory Inspections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and safety certification Training/ SOPs Risk Category Training and Procedure Requirements Level 1 - Requires Revised 01/11/2011 "Carcinogens" are chemicals which cause cancer. For the purpose of the CHP, chemicals

Elser, Jim

122

Addressing the Highest Risk: Environmental Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Report topics: Current status of cleanup; Shift in priorities to address highest risk; Removal of above-ground waste; and Continued focus on protecting water resources. Partnership between the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office, DOE Carlsbad Field Office, New Mexico Environment Department, and contractor staff has enabled unprecedented cleanup progress. Progress on TRU campaign is well ahead of plan. To date, have completed 130 shipments vs. 104 planned; shipped 483 cubic meters of above-ground waste (vs. 277 planned); and removed 11,249 PE Ci of material at risk (vs. 9,411 planned).

Forbes, Elaine E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

123

Report: Removal of EM Projects from the GAO High Risk List: Strategies for Improving the Effectiveness of Project and Contract Management in the Office of Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT TO THE REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Removal of EM Projects from the GAO High Risk List: Strategies for Improving the Effectiveness of Project and Contract Management in the Office of Environmental Management Submitted by the EMAB Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee December 5, 2011 Introduction: This report provides a comprehensive summary of the work performed by the Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee (APMS) of the Environmental Management Advisory Board, since tasking in March 2010. In particular, this report includes the summary observations developed and recommendations previously approved by the EMAB on the Subcommittee's work and presented to the then Assistant Secretary of Environmental Management (EM). As the

124

Compendium of selected references on air emissions; health, risk, and valuation research; and environmental externalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In preparing to develop a cost-benefit methodology that could be applied to potential projects abroad involving new coal-fired power plants that make use of US clean coal technologies, the author reviewed a wide variety of reference sources. These are listed in this publication. Before this review, the author had conducted a number of literature searches that identified source material in the newly rediscovered field of environmental externalities and related topics that might also be of value to other energy and environmental researchers. Those sources that appeared to be appropriate but that the author was unable to review are also listed in this document. Thus, this document serves as a comprehensive compendium of source material on these subjects, arranged alphabetically within categories.

Szpunar, C.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Task 2.1.1.2: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases. During FY 2011, two additional cases were added: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two FY 2011 cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted in early FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. “Risk” has two components: (1) The likelihood, or “probability”, of the occurrence of a given interaction or event, and (2) the potential “consequence” if that interaction or event were to occur. During FY 2011, the ERES screening analysis focused primarily on the second component of risk, “consequence”, with focused probability analysis for interactions where data was sufficient for probability modeling. Consequence analysis provides an assessment of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations. Probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors and requires significant data inputs to drive risk models. During FY 2011, two stressor-receptor interactions were examined for the probability of occurrence. The two interactions (spill probability due to an encounter between a surface vessel and an MHK device; and toxicity from anti-biofouling paints on MHK devices) were seen to present relatively low risks to marine and freshwater receptors of greatest concern in siting and permitting MHK devices. A third probability analysis was scoped and initial steps taken to understand the risk of encounter between marine animals and rotating turbine blades. This analysis will be completed in FY 2012.

Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.; Zdanski, Laura C.; Gill, Gary A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for underground injection control. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--July 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This task involves developing a preliminary national energy and environmental risk analysis system (EERAS). An analytical methodology for nationwise estimation of potential for USDW contamination from underground injection and the current and future resource potential associated with these areas of concern will be developed.

Not Available

1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Preliminary Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System: Task 2.1.1: Evaluating Effects of Stressors – Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Possible environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term effects. An understanding of risk associated with likely interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help reduce the level of uncertainty and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases - a tidal project in Puget Sound using Open Hydro turbines, a wave project off the coast of Oregon using Ocean Power Technologies point attenuator buoys, and a riverine current project in the Mississippi River using Free Flow turbines. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in all three cases were the effects of the dynamic physical presence of the device (e.g., strike), accidents, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the four highest tiers of risk were dominated by marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and birds (diving and non-diving); only the riverine case (Free Flow) included different receptors in the third tier (fish) and the fourth tier (benthic invertebrates). Although this screening analysis provides a preliminary analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis, especially of risk associated with chemical toxicity and accidents such as oil spills or lost gear, will be necessary to further understand high-priority risks. Subject matter expert review of this process and results is required and is planned for the first quarter of FY11. Once expert review is finalized, the screening analysis phase of ERES will be complete.

Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

MISSING WELL LOCATIONS: AN ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT AND REGULATORY PROBLEM FOR LOUISIANA  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this project is to examine 48,953 well permits and create a digital database of the locations from various public records. The Basin Research Institute (BRI), Louisiana State University, in cooperation with the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources, Office of Conservation, will obtain paper records of each well permit. Using various purchased commercial oil and gas, mapping and surveying software and data management programs, (Geographix, Arcview, AutoCad Map and ProCogo) a digital latitude and longitude for each of the missing wells is being obtained. Current status of the project is that all 48,953 permits have been examined. Of that total 48,559 have been completed and digital locations have been obtained, 270 need additional information to be completed, and no determination is possible for 124 well permits. Upon completion each permit is placed in one of the following databases determined by status-Active Producers (11,450) of which 11,444 are complete or 99.99%, Shut-in Producers (2,305) of which 2,300 are complete or 99.78%, Abandoned Previous Producer (17,513) of which 17,332 are complete or 98.96%, Abandoned Dry (9,029) of which 8,883 are complete or 98.38%, Permit Expired (7,083) of which 7,040 are complete or 99.39%, and Miscellaneous Wells (1,573) of which 1,560 are complete or 99.17%. The databases will be available in both digital and hard copy format. The completed database will help Louisiana implement risk-based regulatory policies and streamline existing policies, and provide industry and the public with access to information for all phases of the oil and gas business.

Brian Harder; Chacko John

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR RADIOECOLOGY: A NETWORK OF EXCELLENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND HUMAN RADIATION RISK REDUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Radioecology in the United States can be traced back to the early 1950s when small research programs were established to address the fate and effects of radionuclides released in the environment from activities at nuclear facilities. These programs focused primarily on local environmental effects, but global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing and the potential for larger scale local releases of radioisotopes resulted in major concerns about the threat, not only to humans, but to other species and to ecosystems that support all life. These concerns were shared by other countries and it was quickly recognized that a multi-disciplinary approach would be required to address and understand the implications of anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment. The management, clean-up and long-term monitoring of legacy wastes at Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-regulated facilities continues to be of concern as long as nuclear operations continue. Research conducted through radioecology programs provides the credible scientific data needed for decision-making purposes. The current status of radioecology programs in the United States are: fragmented with little coordination to identify national strategies and direct programs; suffering from a steadily decreasing funding base; soon to be hampered by closure of key infrastructure; hampered by aging and retiring workforce (loss of technical expertise); and in need of training of young scientists to ensure continuation of the science (no formal graduate education program in radioecology remaining in the U.S.). With these concerns in mind, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) took the lead to establish the National Center for Radioecology (NCoRE) as a network of excellence of the remaining radioecology expertise in the United States. As part of the NCoRE mission, scientists at SRNL are working with six key partner universities to re-establish a graduate education training program for radioecology. Recently, NCoRE hosted a workshop to identify the immediate needs for science-driven discoveries, tool development and the generation of scientific data to support the legislative decision-making process for remediation strategies, long-term monitoring of radiologically-contaminated sites and protection of human health and the environment. Some of the immediate strategic research needs were identified in the fields of functional genomics for determining low-dose effects, improved low-level dosimetry, and mixed (radiological and chemical) contaminant studies. Longer term strategic research and tool development areas included development of radioecology case study sites, comprehensive decision-making tools, consequence response actions, and optimized scenario based ecosystem modeling. A summary of the NCoRE workshop findings related to waste management needs and priority areas will be presented in this paper.

Jannik, T.

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

130

The development and application of a risk-based prioritization model for the Oak Ridge Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge Environmental Restoration (ER) Program developed and implemented the Environmental Restoration Benefit Assessment Matrix (ERBAM) early in 1994 to provide a simple, efficient process for prioritizing and justifying fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of activities. The decision to develop a methodology for prioritizing sites was necessitated by the large number of buildings and areas managed by the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office and the finite resources available to address these areas. The ERBAM was based on the Integrated Resource Management System prioritization methodology historically used by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., to rank compliance and operational activities. To develop the matrix, ER Program management, working with federal and state regulators, agreed on impact criteria that balance the major objectives within the ER Program: protection of public health, protection of the environment, protection of on-site workers, consideration of stakeholder/community preference, achievement of ER mission, and optimization of cost efficiency. Lessons learned from the initial application of the matrix were used to make refinements and improvements in the methodology. A standard set of assumptions (both overall and categoric) and a prioritization board, consisting of top level DOE and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., managers along with federal and state regulatory representatives, were established to facilitate consistent application. Current and future improvements include a method to incorporate existing quantitative risk data and facilitate increased efficiency in applying baseline cost data and approved funding levels to the prioritized output. Application of the prioritization methodology yields a prioritized list of all work activities within the programs` work breakdown structure.

Dail, J.L.; White, R.K.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Uncertainties in Cancer Risk Coefficients for Environmental Exposure to Radionuclides. An Uncertainty Analysis for Risk Coefficients Reported in Federal Guidance Report No. 13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Guidance Report No. 13 (FGR 13) provides risk coefficients for estimation of the risk of cancer due to low-level exposure to each of more than 800 radionuclides. Uncertainties in risk coefficients were quantified in FGR 13 for 33 cases (exposure to each of 11 radionuclides by each of three exposure pathways) on the basis of sensitivity analyses in which various combinations of plausible biokinetic, dosimetric, and radiation risk models were used to generate alternative risk coefficients. The present report updates the uncertainty analysis in FGR 13 for the cases of inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides and expands the analysis to all radionuclides addressed in that report. The analysis indicates that most risk coefficients for inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are determined within a factor of 5 or less by current information. That is, application of alternate plausible biokinetic and dosimetric models and radiation risk models (based on the linear, no-threshold hypothesis with an adjustment for the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor) is unlikely to change these coefficients by more than a factor of 5. In this analysis the assessed uncertainty in the radiation risk model was found to be the main determinant of the uncertainty category for most risk coefficients, but conclusions concerning the relative contributions of risk and dose models to the total uncertainty in a risk coefficient may depend strongly on the method of assessing uncertainties in the risk model.

Pawel, David [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Nelson, Christopher [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

FAQ 32-What are the potential health risks from conversion of depleted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to other forms? conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to other forms? What are the potential health risks from conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to other forms? Accidental release of UF6 during processing activities could result in injuries. The most immediate hazard from a release would be lung injury or death from inhalation of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a highly corrosive gas formed when UF6 reacts with moisture in air. Uranyl fluoride is also formed. Uranyl fluoride is a particulate that can be dispersed in air and inhaled. Once inhaled, uranyl fluoride is easily absorbed into the bloodstream because it is soluble. If large quantities are inhaled, kidney toxicity will result. Conversion of uranium hexafluoride to oxide or metal may involve hazardous chemicals in addition to UF6; specifically, ammonia (NH3) may be used in the process, and HF may be produced from the process. In the PEIS, the conversion accidents estimated to have the largest potential consequences were accidents involving the rupture of tanks containing either anhydrous HF or ammonia. Such an accident could be caused by a large earthquake. The probability of large earthquakes depends on the location of the facility, and the probability of damage depends on the structural characteristics of the buildings. In the PEIS, the estimated frequency of this type of accident was less than once in one million years. However, if such an extremely unlikely accident did occur, it was estimated that up to 41,000 members of the general public around the conversion facility might experience adverse effects from chemical exposures (mostly mild and temporary effects, such as respiratory irritation or temporary decrease in kidney function). Of these, up to 1,700 individuals might experience irreversible adverse effects (such as lung damage or kidney damage), with the potential for about 30 fatalities. In addition, irreversible or fatal effects among workers very near the accident scene would be possible. (Note: The actual numbers of injuries among the general public would depend on the size and proximity of the population around the conversion facility).

133

Understanding and managing health and environmental risks of CIS, CGS, and CdTe photovoltaic module production and use: A workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental, health and safety (EH&S) risks presented by CIS, CGS and CdTe photovoltaic module production, use and decommissioning have been reviewed and discussed by several authors. Several EH&S concerns exit. The estimated EH&S risks are based on extrapolations of toxicity, environmental mobility, and bioavailability data for other related inorganic compounds. Sparse data, however, are available for CIS, CGS or CdTe. In response to the increased interest in these materials, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been engaged in a cooperative research program with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the Fraunhofer Institute for Solid State Technology (IFT), the Institute of Ecotoxicity of the GSF Forschungszentrum fair Umwelt und Gesundheit, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) to develop fundamental toxicological and environmental data for these three compounds. This workshop report describes the results of these studies and describes their potential implications with respect to the EH&S risks presented by CIS, CGS, and CdTe module production, use and decommissioning.

Moskowitz, P.D.; Zweibel, K.; DePhillips, M.P. [eds.

1994-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

134

LPP Risk Management Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

History and Process History and Process Slide 2 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management History ◦ Current Baseline Process Overview ◦ Identification ◦ Simulation ◦ Management Successes & Challenges Slide 3 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks ◦ 1 Week Risk Summit held week of August 4 th , 2008 Broad representation from all levels of Isotek, DOE, PTC, and outside consultants Focused on risk and opportunity identification Included risk description, assumptions, and triggers No quantification or analysis No restrictions, constraints, or filtering HQ provided facilitator Prescribed format and capture methodology Slide 4 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks ◦ Risk Summit Results

135

ENVIRONMENTAL CANCER RISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is submitted to the President of the United States in fulfillment of the obligations of the President’s Cancer Panel to appraise the National Cancer Program as established in accordance with the National Cancer Act of 1971 (P.L. 92-218), the

Margaret L. Kripke, Ph.D.; Abby B. S, Ph.D.; Suzanne H. Reuben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Penetration of hydrogen-based energy system and its potential for causing global environmental change: Scoping risk analysis based on life cycle thinking  

SciTech Connect

A hydrogen-based economy seems superficially to be environmentally friendly, and many people have worked toward its realization. Today hydrogen is mainly produced by decarbonizing fossil fuels (e.g. natural gas), and in the future decarbonization of both fossil fuels and biomass will play a leading role in the production of hydrogen. The main purpose of this paper is to suggest the identification of potential environmental risks in terms of 'life cycle thinking' (which considers all aspects from production to utilization) with regard to the hydrogen-based economy to come. Hydrogen production by decarbonization results in CO{sub 2} emissions. The final destination of the recovered CO{sub 2} is uncertain. Furthermore, there is a possibility that hydrogen molecules will escape to the atmosphere, posing risks that could occasion global environmental changes such as depletion of stratospheric ozone, temperature change in the stratosphere and change of the hydrides cycle through global vaporization. Based on the results of simulation, requirements regarding the following items are proposed to minimize potential risks: hydrogen source, production and storage loss.

Kikuchi, Ryunosuke [Department of Basic Science and Environment (CERNAS), ESAC, Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Bencanta, 3040-316 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: kikuchi@mail.esac.pt

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

From the lab to the real world : sources of error in UF6 gas enrichment monitoring.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Safeguarding uranium enrichment facilities is a serious concern for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Safeguards methods have changed over the years, most recently switching… (more)

Lombardi, Marcie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Status Report on the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) for UF6 Cylinder Assay  

SciTech Connect

The Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) is a nondestructive assay (NDA) system being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). It was designed to determine {sup 235}U mass and enrichment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in product, feed, and tails cylinders (i.e., 30B and 48Y cylinders). These cylinders are found in the nuclear fuel cycle at uranium conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication facilities. The PNEM is a {sup 3}He-based neutron detection system that consists of two briefcase-sized detector pods. A photograph of the system during characterization at LANL is shown in Fig. 1. Several signatures are currently being studied to determine the most effective measurement and data reduction technique for unfolding {sup 235}U mass and enrichment. The system collects total neutron and coincidence data for both bare and cadmium-covered detector pods. The measurement concept grew out of the success of the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), which is an operator system at Rokkasho Enrichment Plant (REP) that uses total neutron counting to determine {sup 235}U mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The PNEM system was designed with higher efficiency than the UCAS in order to add coincidence counting functionality for the enrichment determination. A photograph of the UCAS with a 48Y cylinder at REP is shown in Fig. 2, and the calibration measurement data for 30B product and 48Y feed and tails cylinders is shown in Fig. 3. The data was collected in a low-background environment, meaning there is very little scatter in the data. The PNEM measurement concept was first presented at the 2010 Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) Annual Meeting. The physics design and uncertainty analysis were presented at the 2010 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Symposium, and the mechanical and electrical designs and characterization measurements were published in the ESARDA Bulletin in 2011.

Miller, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

139

Field Trial of LANL On-Line Advanced Enrichment Monitor for UF6 GCEP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outline of this presentation is: (1) Technology basis of on-line enrichment monitoring; (2) Timescale of trial; (3) Description of installed equipment; (4) Photographs; (5) Results; (6) Possible further development; and (7) Conclusions. Summary of the good things about the Advanced Enrichment Monitor (AEM) performance is: (1) High accuracy - normally better than 1% relative, (2) Active system as accurate as passive system, (3) Fast and accurate detection of enrichment changes, (4) Physics is well understood, (5) Elegant method for capturing pressure signal, and (6) Data capture is automatic, low cost and fast. A couple of negative things are: (1) Some jumps in measured passive enrichment - of around +2% relative (due to clock errors?); and (2) Data handling and evaluation is off-line, expensive and very slow. Conclusions are: (1) LANL AEM is being tested on E23 plant at Capenhurst; (2) The trial is going very well; (3) AEM could detect production of HEU at potentially much lower cost than existing CEMO; (4) AEM can measure {sup 235}U assay accurately; (5) Active system using X-Ray source would avoid need for pressure measurement; (6) Substantial work lies ahead to go from current prototype to a production instrument.

Ianakiev, Kiril D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lombardi, Marcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacArthur, Duncan W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Robert F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keller, Clifford [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friend, Peter [URENCO; Dunford, Andrew [URENCO

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

140

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Overview and Policy Context of UF6 Cylinder Tracking Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thousands of cylinders containing uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) move around the world from conversion plants to enrichment plants to fuel fabrication plants, and their contents could be very useful to a country intent on diverting uranium for clandestine use. Each of these large cylinders can contain close to a significant quantity of natural uranium (48Y cylinder) or low-enriched uranium (LEU) (30B cylinder) defined as 75 kg {sup 235}U which can be further clandestinely enriched to produce 1.5 to 2 significant quantities of high enriched uranium (HEU) within weeks or months depending on the scale of the clandestine facility. The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) kicked off a 5-year plan in April 2011 to investigate the concept of a unique identification system for UF{sub 6} cylinders and potentially to develop a cylinder tracking system that could be used by facility operators and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The goal is to design an integrated solution beneficial to both industry and inspectorates that would improve cylinder operations at the facilities and provide enhanced capabilities to deter and detect both diversion of low-enriched uranium and undeclared enriched uranium production. The 5-year plan consists of six separate incremental tasks: (1) define the problem and establish the requirements for a unique identification (UID) and monitoring system; (2) develop a concept of operations for the identification and monitoring system; (3) determine cylinder monitoring devices and technology; (4) develop a registry database to support proof-of-concept demonstration; (5) integrate that system for the demonstration; and (6) demonstrate proof-of-concept. Throughout NNSA's performance of the tasks outlined in this program, the multi-laboratory team emphasizes that extensive engagement with industry stakeholders, regulatory authorities and inspectorates is essential to its success.

Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, J. Michael [ORNL; White-Horton, Jessica L. [ORNL; Durbin, Karyn R. [NNSA

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ultra-low field NMR for detection and characterization of 235 UF6  

SciTech Connect

We have demonstrated the first ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), both depleted and 70% enriched, which is used in the uranium enrichment process. A sensitive non-invasive detection system would have an important role in non-proliferation surveillance. A two-frequency technique was employed to remove the transients induced by rapidly switching off the 50 mT pre-polarization field. A mean transverse relaxation time T{sub 2} of 24 ms was estimated for the un-enriched UF{sub 6} sample measured at a mean temperature of 80 C. Nuclear magnetic resonance at ULF has several advantages including the ability to measure through metal, such as pipes, and simple magnetic field generation hardware. We present here recent data and discuss the potential for non-proliferation monitoring of enrichment and flow velocity.

Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magnelind, Per E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Evaluation of UF6 to UO2 Conversion Capability at Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.2.7 Korea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

143

RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT, THE POLITICS OF RISK, AND THE MAKING OF A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS, 1954-1963 .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation examines the problem of radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing as a pioneering case of global environmental politics during the Cold War. It… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Risk assessment for the off-site transportation of high-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of high-level waste (HLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers risks to collective populations and individuals under both routine and accident transportation conditions for truck and rail shipment modes. The report discusses the scope of the HLW transportation assessment, describes the analytical methods used for the assessment, defines the alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, and details important assessment assumptions. Results are reported for five alternatives. In addition, to aid in the understanding and interpretation of the results, specific areas of uncertainty are described, with an emphasis on how the uncertainties may affect comparisons of the alternatives.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas price risk and the risk of future environmental regulations.natural gas price risk, as well as the risk of future environmental regulations,

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

About Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Us About Us Argonne National Laboratory administers this web site for The U.S. DOE Office of Environmental Management. Responsibilities The Depleted UF6 Management Program...

148

FAQ 29-What are the risks from accidents involving depleted uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The most immediate hazard after a release would be from inhalation of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a highly corrosive gas formed when UF6 reacts with moisture in air. Exposure to...

149

FAQ 31-What are the potential health risks from continued storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hazard from a release would be lung injury or death from inhalation of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a highly corrosive gas formed when UF6 reacts with moisture in air. Uranyl...

150

FAQ 12-What are the hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride? What are the hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride? The characteristics of UF6 pose potential health risks, and the material is...

151

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance for Conducting Risk Assessments and Related Risk Activities for the DOE-ORO Environmental Management Program. BJCOR-271 Guidance for Treatment of Variability and...

152

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Evaluation of Uranium Mining TENORM Wastes-Characteristics, Occurrence, and Risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is completing a multi year effort to issue technical reports and obtain stakeholder views on future programs to mitigate potential hazards associated with uranium mining Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM). The technical reports are the most comprehensive issued by the Agency on this topic, and should have utility for reclamation of abandoned uranium mines, as well as providing information for new mines proposed by the uranium mining industry. This presentation will provide principal results of the three technical reports issued, and elements of the proposed EPA program for uranium mining TENORM. (authors)

Setlow, L.W. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J), Washington, DC (United States); Peake, R.T. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J), Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Air quality analysis and related risk assessment for the Bonneville Power Administration's Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is considering 12 different alternatives for acquiring energy resources over the next 20 years. Each of the alternatives utilizes a full range of energy resources (e.g., coal, cogeneration, conservation, and nuclear); however, individual alternatives place greater emphases on different types of power-producing resources and employ different timetables for implementing these resources. The environmental impacts that would result from the implementation of each alternative and the economic valuations of these impacts, will be an important consideration in the alternative selection process. In this report we discuss the methods used to estimate environmental impacts from the resource alternatives. We focus on pollutant emissions rates, ground-level air concentrations of basic criteria pollutants, the acidity of rain, particulate deposition, ozone concentrations, visibility attenuation, global warming, human health effects, agricultural and forest impacts, and wildlife impacts. For this study, pollutant emission rates are computed by processing BPA data on power production and associated pollutant emissions. The assessment of human health effects from ozone indicated little variation between the resource alternatives. Impacts on plants, crops, and wildlife populations from power plant emissions are projected to be minimal for all resource alternatives.

Glantz, C S; Burk, K W; Driver, C J; Liljegren, J C; Neitzel, D A; Schwartz, M N; Dana, M T; Laws, G L; Mahoney, L A; Rhoads, K

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Environmental Survey preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

Not Available

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Environmental Operations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

For additional nationwide NEPA information, please visit the DOE NEPA Website. For LANL Risk Reduction Environmental Stewardship Division, please visit the LANL Environmental...

156

Who is Responsible for the DUF6 Conversion Facility EISs?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who is Responsible Who is Responsible Who Is Responsible for the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs? The U.S. DOE Office of Environmental Management is preparing the two Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs, with assistance from Argonne National Laboratory. Responsibilities The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for preparation of the Depleted UF6 Conversion EIS. Argonne National Laboratory is assisting EM in preparation of the EIS. About the Office of Environmental Management (EM) In 1989, the Department of Energy created the Office of Environmental Management (EM) to mitigate the risks and hazards posed by the legacy of nuclear weapons production and research. Although the nation continues to maintain an arsenal of nuclear weapons, as well as some production capability, the United States has embarked on new missions. The most ambitious and far ranging of these missions is dealing with the environmental legacy of the Cold War. Like most industrial and manufacturing operations, the nuclear complex has generated waste, pollution, and contamination. However, many problems posed by its operations are unique. They include unprecedented amounts of contaminated waste, water, and soil, and a vast number of contaminated structures that will remain radioactive for thousands of years.

157

Determination of white phosphorus residues in ducks: An atomic emission detection/compound-independent calibration-based method of generating residue data for risk assessment and environmental monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of phosphorus concentrations in the gizzards of ducks harvested from munitions sites is necessary to ascertain if acute phosphorus toxicity was the cause of death and to estimate potential secondary hazards to predators and scavengers, such as eagles that readily consume the dead ducks. Gas chromatography-atomic emission detection analysis permitted compound-independent quantification of white phosphorus standards following analysis of the stable phosphorus-containing compound triethyl phosphate. The white phosphorus standards were then used to quantify white phosphorus residues in duck gizzard extracts by gas chromatography-flame photometric detection analysis. For gizzards containing less than 0.01 {micro}g of phosphorus, quantification was based on a three-point calibration curve. For gizzards containing 0.01 {micro}g or more of white phosphorus, single-point calibration was used. Mean recoveries for phosphorus-fortified gizzards ranged from 73 to 91%. The method limit of detection was 0.013 {micro}g of phosphorus. This method was successfully applied to the quantification of white phosphorus in ducks collected from Eagle River Flats, AK. Potential applications to risk assessment and environmental monitoring are also discussed.

Johnston, J.J.; Goldade, D.A.; Kohler, D.J.; Cummings, J.L.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix J; Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-i APPENDIX J: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF TRANSPORTATION OF UF 6 CYLINDERS, URANIUM OXIDE, URANIUM METAL, AND ASSOCIATED MATERIALS Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-ii Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-iii CONTENTS (APPENDIX J) NOTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-vi J.1 SUMMARY OF TRANSPORTATION OPTION IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-3 J.2 TRANSPORTATION MODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-8 J.2.1 Truck Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-8 J.2.2 Rail Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-9 J.2.3 Transportation Options Considered But Not Analyzed in Detail . . . . . . . . . . J-9 J.3 IMPACTS OF OPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-10 J.3.1

159

Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level waste (LLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLW. Included are definition of the LLW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of WM LLW, an overview of the risk assessment method, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLW alternative considered.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level mixed waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report provides supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers both the radioactive and chemical hazards associated with LLMW transportation. Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment methods and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS. This report presents additional information that is not included in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLMW. Included are definitions of the LLMW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS; data related to the inventory and to the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of WM LLMW; an overview of the risk assessment methods; and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLMW case considered.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Two-Stage, Integrated, Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs: An Approach for Sustainable Energy Production, CO2-Sequestration Security, and Reduced Environmental Risk  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We introduce a hybrid two-stage energy-recovery approach to sequester CO{sub 2} and produce geothermal energy at low environmental risk and low cost by integrating geothermal production with CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) in saline, sedimentary formations. Our approach combines the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck et al. (2011b), which uses brine as the working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation CCS by Randolph and Saar (2011a). During stage one of our hybrid approach, formation brine, which is extracted to provide pressure relief for CO{sub 2} injection, is the working fluid for energy recovery. Produced brine is applied to a consumptive beneficial use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water to be injected into a neighboring reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there is often a shortage of a working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find economically feasible disposition options to reduce the volume of brine requiring reinjection in the integrated geothermal-CCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a). During stage two, which begins as CO{sub 2} reaches the production wells; coproduced brine and CO{sub 2} are the working fluids. We present preliminary reservoir engineering analyses of this approach, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable CO{sub 2} storage formation/geothermal reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess both the CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity and geothermal energy production potential as a function of well spacing between CO{sub 2} injectors and brine/CO{sub 2} producers for various well patterns and for a range of subsurface conditions.

Buscheck, T A; Chen, M; Sun, Y; Hao, Y; Elliot, T R

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. EPA, Washington, D.C. 1992. Risk Assessment Forum. Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook. Vol. I. United Staes Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and...

164

EMAB Risk Subcommittee Interim Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FIRST INTERIM REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Incorporating Risk and Sustainability into Decision Making Submitted by the EMAB Risk Subcommittee December 3, 2012 Background: In December 2011, then Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management David Huizenga, asked the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB or Board) to establish a Risk Subcommittee. In February 2012, the Subcommittee's Work Plan was approved. Under the Work Plan, the purpose of the Subcommittee is to evaluate "risk-informed decision making," specifically whether the prioritization tool developed by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) for use at the Oak Ridge Reservation (Oak Ridge) is one that

165

Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45, Protection of Children from Environmental 45, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks Each Federal agency: (a) shall make it a high priority to identify and assess environmental health risks and safety risks that may disproportionately affect children; and (b) shall ensure that its policies, programs, activities, and standards address disproportionate risks to children that result from environmental health risks or safety risks. Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks More Documents & Publications EPA -- Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act

166

Environmental Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video Community, Environment Environmental Stewardship Environmental Protection Environmental Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental...

167

EA-1791: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment EA-1791: Final Environmental Assessment University of Minnesota Wind Energy Research Consortium Project EA-1791-FEA-2011.pdf EA-1791-FEA-AvianandBatRiskAs...

168

Status of Cumulative Risk Methods in Air-Based Risk Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developments in cumulative risk assessment practices and influence on public health and environmental regulation continue to increase. Primary drivers include stakeholder-based concerns over environmental justice, as well as recent initiatives to reevaluate the current regulatory risk assessment paradigm. The United States Environmental Protection Agencyalong with other state agencies, public health advocates, and researcherscontinues to strive toward application of cumulative risk methodologies capable ...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

169

USING RISK-BASED CORRECTIVE ACTION (RBCA) TO ASSESS (THEORETICAL) CANCER DEATHS AVERTED COMPARED TO THE (REAL) COST OF ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, on the basis of existing health studies at the time, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project legislation was proposed that would authorize remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites and vicinity properties. The cost of the program to the Federal Government was expected to be $180 million. With the completion of this project, approximately 1300 theoretical cancer deaths were prevented in the next 100 years at a cost of $1.45 billion, based on the Fiscal Year 1998 Federal UMTRA budget. The individual site costs ranged from $0.2 million up to $18 billion spent per theoretical cancer death averted over the next 100 years. Resources required to sustain remediation activities such as this are subject to reduction over time, and are originally based on conservative assumptions that tend to overestimate risks to the general public. This evaluation used a process incorporating risk-based corrective action (RBCA); a three-tiered, decision-making process tailoring corrective action activities according to site-specific conditions and risks. If RBCA had been applied at the start of the UMTRA Project, and using a criterion of >1 excess cancer death prevented as justification to remediate the site, only 50% of the existing sites would have been remediated, yielding a cost savings of $303.6 million to the Federal Government and affected States, which share 10% of the cost. This cost savings equates to 21% of the overall project budget. In addition, only 22% of the vicinity properties had structural contamination contributing to elevated interior gamma exposure and radon levels. Focusing only on these particular properties could have saved an additional $269.3 million, yielding a total savings of $573 million; 40% of the overall project budget. As operational experience is acquired, including greater understanding of the radiological and nonradiological risks, decisions should be based on the RBCA process, rather than relying on conservative assumptions that tend to overestimate risks to the general public.

Miller, M. L.; Hylko, J. M.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fuel Industry Response to Power Industry Environmental Pressures: An Analysis of Risk and Investment in the Coal Supply Chain and Na tural Gas Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the question of how mounting environmental pressures on coal-fired generation will impact investment in fuel supply and transportation. If destined for demise, are coal companies cutting back investments or exiting the business? Alternatively, are natural gas companies gearing up for a financial boom? The study specifically investigates a "clean coal" case of greatly tightened NOx and SO2 limits as well as a "low coal" case of much reduced coal use to meet CO2 control objectives.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

171

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY EMPLOYEE SAFETY ORIENTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SERVICES ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Discovery 2 Building, Room 265 8888 University Drive BurnabyENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY EMPLOYEE SAFETY ORIENTATION SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY SAFETY & RISK SIGNAGE 26740 INCIDENT INVESTIGATION Supervisors, Safety Committees, EHS LABORATORY SAFETY 27265

172

Risk identification in Green IT practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of risk factors may affect Green IT's practice and eventually displease the goal of environmental sustainability. This paper adopts the value model approach to analyze potential risk effect in Green IT. The Green IT value model has been used ... Keywords: Environmental sustainability, Green IT, Risk factors, Value model

David C. Chou

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Environmental Data Science & Systems | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Change Science Institute Earth and Aquatic Sciences Ecosystem Science Environmental Data Science and Systems Energy, Water and Ecosystem Engineering Human Health Risk and...

174

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects aimed at addressing the technical challenges of producing natural gas from shales and tight sands, while simultaneously reducing environmental footprints and risks,...

175

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Program Issues associated with transport of depleted UF6 cylinders and conversion products. Conversion Plan Transportation Requirements The DOE has prepared two Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for the proposal to build and operate depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facilities at its Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plant sites, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposed action calls for transporting the cylinder at ETTP to Portsmouth for conversion. The transportation of depleted UF6 cylinders and of the depleted uranium conversion products following conversion was addressed in the EISs.

176

Geographic information system for Long Island: An epidemiologic systems approach to identify environmental breast cancer risks on Long Island. Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BNL is developing and implementing the project ``Geographic Information System (GIS) for Long Island`` to address the potential relationship of environmental and occupational exposures to breast cancer etiology on Long Island. The project is divided into two major phases: The four month-feasibility project (Phase 1), and the major development and implementation project (Phase 2). This report summarizes the work completed in the four month Phase 1 Project, ``Feasibility of a Geographic Information System for Long Island.`` It provides the baseline information needed to further define and prioritize the scope of work for subsequent tasks. Phase 2 will build upon this foundation to develop an operational GIS for the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP).

Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, H.C. Jr.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Comparison of DOE and Army Advisory Boards: Application of a Conceptual Framework for Evaluating Public Participation in Environmental Risk Decision Making  

SciTech Connect

This article is part of a growing body of literature evaluating public participation approaches and implementation efforts. It compares the characteristics and performance of citizen advisory boards established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program (DOE/EM) and by the U.S. Department of Defense's Army (DoD/Army) as a major part of the public participation programs that were undertaken to help the agencies plan and implement the cleanup of their contaminated installations. We first present the elements of the Acceptability Diamond, an evaluative framework developed by the authors through extensive fieldwork on public-federal agency interactions that identify five objectives of agency/public interactions and public participation programs, and link them to existing literature. We then use the Acceptability Diamond as a basis for comparing the performance of the DOE/EM and DoD/Army advisory boards. In the early 1990s, both DOE and DoD participated in the Federal Facilities Environmental Restoration Dialogue Committee (known as the FFER Dialogue Committee) and were influenced by the Committee's recommendations on public participation. However, the Site Specific Advisory Boards (SSABs) subsequently established by DOE/EM and the Restoration Advisory Boards (RABs) subsequently established by DoD and the Army were governed by significantly different policies and management. We describe some of these key differences and compare the performance of the SSABs and RABs. The article draws on a series of research studies conducted by the authors on the DOE/EM public participation program from its inception in the early 1990s through its transition to accelerated cleanup in 2002 and also on a recently completed study of seven Army RABs.

Branch, Kristi M.; Bradbury, Judith A.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Incorporating environmental justice into environmental decision making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Order 12898, signed on February 11, 1994, broadly states that federal activities, programs, and policies should not produce disproportionately high and adverse impacts on minority and low-income populations. Moreover, the Order indicates that these populations should not be denied the benefits of, or excluded from participation in, these activities, programs, and policies. Because a presidential memorandum accompanying the order said that National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents should begin to address environmental justice immediately, much attention has been paid to assessment-related issues. Also important, a topic that appears to have received relatively little attention, is how decision makers should be expected to use information about environmental justice in their decision making. This paper discusses issues surrounding the use of environmental justice information in the decision-making process by focusing on the following five main topics: (1) the importance, or weight, attached to environmental justice within larger decision-making contexts; (2) the potential tension between localized environmental justice issues and regional or national issues and needs; (3) the use of environmental justice information to develop (perhaps in concert with affected minority and low-income communities) appropriate mitigation strategies, or to establish conditions under which activities, programs, and policies may be accepted locally; (4) the general implications of shifting the distribution of broadly defined risks, costs, and benefits among different population groups; and (5) the implications of implementing environmental justice on an individual, ad hoc basis rather than within a larger environmental justice framework. This paper raises the issues and discusses the implications of alternative approaches to them.

Wolfe, A.K.; Vogt, D.P.; Hwang, Ho-Ling [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Environmental Biosciences Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Accidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Accidents Health Risks » Accidents DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Accidents A discussion of accidents involving depleted UF6 storage cylinders, including possible health effects, accident risk, and accident history. Potential Health Effects from Cylinder Accidents Accidents involving depleted UF6 storage cylinders are a concern because they could result in an uncontrolled release of UF6 to the environment, which could potentially affect the health of workers and members of the public living downwind of the accident site. Accidental release of UF6 from storage cylinders or during processing activities could result in injuries or fatalities. The most immediate hazard after a release would be from inhalation of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a highly corrosive gas formed when

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

182

Environmental Microbiology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Microbiology Environmental Microbiology Environmental Microbiology Los Alamos working to identify genetic regulatory systems in single microorganisms. Get Expertise Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Srinivas Iyer Bioscience Group Leader Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email Examining the soil beneath our feet Environmental microbiology Read caption + Many environmental molecular biology studies begin with purified DNA and RNA extracted from the soil. Overview of Research and Highlights Learning about microorganisms-bacteria, algae, and fungi-is essential to understanding how living things interact with their environments. Exploration of environmental microbiology at Los Alamos crosses broad scales of investigation that span from identification of genetic regulatory

183

ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assessing the Ecotoxicologic Hazards of a Pandemic Influenza MedicalENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES National Institutes of Health U75012, France 4 Computational Epidemiology Laboratory, Institute for Scientific Interchange, Turin

Cattuto, Ciro

184

Environmental Impact  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environmental Impact - a single comprehensive bibliographic information resource on climate change & other impacts of humans on the biosphere.

185

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Environmental Services Group (ESG)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Services Group Environmental Services Group Whom To Call Operating Permits For LBNL Activities Publications Advisories Internal Documents Environmental Management System Environmental Restoration Program Weather Data Image of Chicken Creek The Environmental Services Group, within the Environment, Health and Safety Division, provides a comprehensive range of cost-effective environmental management services to Berkeley Lab by working with research and support staff. Services include: Your visit may be enhanced by upgrading or installing the latest Flash Player. ESG sampling activity Air and Water Quality Management Hazardous Materials Management Environmental Monitoring Radiological Dose and Environmental Risk Assessment Environmental Management System Environmental Restoration News & Updates

186

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulation scenarios, PacifiCorp assumed higher natural gasnatural gas price risk and the risk of future environmental regulations,natural gas price risk and the financial risk of future carbon regulation –

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increasedinherent risks (e.g. , natural gas price risk, environmentalThe treatment of natural gas price risk, as well as the risk

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Risk Prioritization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Managers Quality Managers Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee Reference Document SQAS21.01.00 - 1999 Software Risk Management A Practical Guide February, 2000 Abstract This document is a practical guide for integrating software risk management into a software project. The purpose of Risk Management is to identify, assess and control project risks. Identified risks are analyzed to determine their potential impact and likelihood of occurrence. Risk Management Plans are developed to document the project's approach to risk management, risks, and decisions made about what should be done with each risk. Risks and risk actions are then tracked to closure. Software Risk Management: A Practical Guide SQAS21.01.00 Acknowledgments This document was prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) by a Working Group of the DOE

189

Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Reducing Risks and Uncertainties to Environmental Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Al Baione Engineering & Technology Waste Processing May 2009 EM Engineering & Technology Overview 2 Engineering and Technology Program Mission To Identify Vulnerabilities and to...

191

Environmental Risk Factors for Autistic Disorder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

77. Please enter the dishwasher detergent you used mostPlease enter the automatic dishwasher rinse agent you used75. Please enter the dishwasher detergent you used most

Schultz, Stephen T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Environmental Microbiology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Microbiology Environmental Microbiology Examining the soil beneath our feet Read caption + Many environmental molecular biology studies begin with purified DNA and RNA extracted from the soil. Overview of Research and Highlights Learning about microorganisms-bacteria, algae, and fungi-is essential to understanding how living things interact with their environments. Exploration of environmental microbiology at Los Alamos crosses broad scales of investigation that span from identification of genetic regulatory systems in single microorganisms to comprehensive studies of the complex microbial communities resident in soil, water and air. The long term goals of this research are to understand microbial processes and interactions, and the genomic traits underlying these activities, toward:

193

Environmental Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"The Environmental Durability of Refractory Metals and Alloys" (Conference .... " Materials Issues in Nuclear-Waste Management" (Overview), M.-S. Yim and K.L.  ...

194

Environmental Regulators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Reports Brookhaven's Environmental Regulators When it comes to the environment, Brookhaven National Laboratory must comply with the regulations of many local, state and...

195

Environmental Outreach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and public involvement program that is inclusive and responsive to communities, tribes, agencies, and federal and state governments. May 30, 2012 An example of environmental...

196

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF{sub 6} from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (United States Code, Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a Federal Register Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; from the transportation of all ETTP cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF6 [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) to Portsmouth; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). An option of shipping the ETTP cylinders to Paducah is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Portsmouth and ETTP sites. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0359) evaluates potential environmental impacts for the proposed Paducah conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

197

Risk Management RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Management Review Module Risk Management Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Risk M Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Managem view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE (SRP) ment e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, and EM's internal

198

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report summary for 1994  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a summary of the information collected for the Oak Ridge Reservation 1994 site environmental report. Topics discussed include: Oak Ridge Reservation mission; ecology; environmental laws; community participation; environmental restoration; waste management; radiation effects; chemical effects; risk to public; environmental monitoring; and radionuclide migration.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Long-Term Environmental Stewardship...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with our workforce, sponsors, and public. We reduce our environmental risk through legacy cleanup, pollution prevention, and long-term sustainability programs." View document >...

200

EA-0915: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the environmental impacts of the proposal to resolve waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington, and to reduce the risks associated...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Using Information on Uncertainty to Improve Environmental Fate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Volume 43 Issue 1 Pagination 128-134 Date Published 102008 Keywords bayesian updating, environmental chemistry, exposure & risk group, indoor environment...

202

A more accurate and penetrating method to measure the enrichment and mass of UF6 storage containers using passive neutron self-interrogation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an unattended mode neutron measurement that can provide the enrichment of the uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The new passive neutron measurement provides better penetration into the uranium mass than prior gamma-ray enrichment measurement methods. The Passive Neutron Enrichment Monitor (PNEM) provides a new measurement technique that uses passive neutron totals and coincidence counting together with neutron self-interrogation to measure the enrichment in the cylinders. The measurement uses the neutron rates from two detector pods. One of the pods has a bare polyethylene surface next to the cylinder and the other polyethylene surface is covered with Cd to prevent thermal neutrons from returning to the cylinder. The primary neutron source from the enriched UF{sub 6} is the alpha-particle decay from the {sub 234}U that interacts with the fluorine to produce random neutrons. The singles neutron counting rate is dominated by the {sub 234}U neutrons with a minor contribution from the induced fissions in the {sub 235}U. However, the doubles counting rate comes primarily from the induced fissions (i.e., multiplication) in the {sub 235}U in enriched uranium. The PNEM concept makes use of the passive neutrons that are initially produced from the {sub 234}U reactions that track the {sub 235}U enrichment during the enrichment process. The induced fission reactions from the thermal-neutron albedo are all from the {sub 235}U and provide a measurement of the {sub 235}U. The Cd ratio has the desirable feature that all of the thermal-neutron-induced fissions in {sub 235}U are independent of the original neutron source. Thus, the ratio is independent of the uranium age, purity, and prior reactor history.

Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6 Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project  

SciTech Connect

The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of -11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Results from a "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Tracking of UF6 Cylinders during a Processing Operation at a Uranium Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for processing, storing, and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants. To ensure that cylinder movements at enrichment facilities occur as declared, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) must conduct time-consuming periodic physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identity, and containment. By using a robust system design that includes the capability for real-time unattended monitoring (of cylinder movements), site-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of monitoring technologies, one can build a system that will improve overall inspector effectiveness. This type of monitoring system can provide timely detection of safeguard events that could be used to ensure more timely and appropriate responses by the IAEA. It also could reduce reliance on facility records and have the additional benefit of enhancing domestic safeguards at the installed facilities. This paper will discuss the installation and evaluation of a radio-frequency- (RF-) based cylinder tracking system that was installed at a United States Enrichment Corporation Centrifuge Facility. This system was installed primarily to evaluate the feasibility of using RF technology at a site and the operational durability of the components under harsh processing conditions. The installation included a basic system that is designed to support layering with other safeguard system technologies and that applies fundamental rules-based event processing methodologies. This paper will discuss the fundamental elements of the system design, the results from this site installation, and future efforts needed to make this technology ready for IAEA consideration.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Hines, Jairus B [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; Morgan, Jim [Innovative Solutions; Carrick, Bernie [USEC; Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Whittle, K. [USEC

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Defining the needs for non-destructive assay of UF6 feed, product, and tails at gas centrifuge enrichment plants and possible next steps  

SciTech Connect

Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to detect undeclared LEU production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of UF{sub 6} bulk material used in the process of enrichment at GCEPS. The inspectors also take destructive assay (DA) samples for analysis off-site which provide accurate, on the order of 0.1 % to 0.5% uncertainty, data on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, DA sample taking is a much more labor intensive and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of the results and contains the possibility of the loss of the continuity of knowledge of the samples during the storage and transit of the material. Use of the IAEA's inspection sampling algorithm shows that while total sample size is fixed by the total population of potential samples and its intrinsic qualities, the split of the samples into NDA or DA samples is determined by the uncertainties in the NDA measurements. Therefore, the larger the uncertainties in the NDA methods, more of the sample taken must be DA samples. Since the DA sampling is arduous and costly, improvements in NDA methods would reduce the number of DA samples needed. Furthermore, if methods of on-site analysis of the samples could be developed that have uncertainties in the 1-2% range, a lot of the problems inherent in DA sampling could be removed. The use of an unattended system that could give an overview of the entire process giving complementary data on the enrichment process as well as accurate measures of enrichment and weights of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product would be a major step in enhancing the ability of NDA beyond present attended systems. The possibility of monitoring the feed, tails, and product header pipes in such a way as to gain safeguards relevant flow and enrichment information without compromising the intellectual property of the operator including proprietary equipment and operational parameters would be a huge step forward. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including such process monitoring and possible on-site analysis of DA samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector measurements reducing the difference between the operator's and inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GeEPs safeguards.

Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moran, Bruce W [IAEA; Lebrun, Alain [IAEA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Environmental management need environmental indicators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OECD countries are collectively the biggest users of natural resources in the world and the environmental, economic and social consequences of the production and consumption of these resources and of related economic activities extend far beyond their ... Keywords: environment, environmental indicator, management, sustainable development

Davorin Kralj; Anita Trnav?evi?

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction and Operation of a Proposed Biogas Anaerobic Digestion Facility at an Ethanol Plant Western Plains Energy, LLC Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas U. S. Department of Agriculture Rural Business Cooperative Service 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-3225 August 29, 2011 Environmental Assessment Western Plains Energy, LLC Gove County, Kansas ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page I. PROPOSAL DESCRIPTION AND NEED .................................................................... 1 II. PRIMARY BENEFICIARIES AND RELATED ACTIVITIES .................................. 2 III. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSAL AREA .............................................................. 2

208

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 DOE/EA-1791 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNVIERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 U.S. Department of Energy University of Minnesota Wind Energy Research Consortium Project Golden Field Office Environmental Assessment March 2011 Page i Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1

209

Environmental Intelligence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intelligence Intelligence Answering big questions about environmental change begins with many small measurements (continued on next page) NEWSLETTER OF Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate E nvironmental intelligence is the wealth of information on the physical, biological, and chemical processes that drive Earth's ecosystems (its organisms, soil, air, and water) and the impact humans have on these ecosystems through our practices and developments. Such intelligence is often gathered though small, precise efforts to monitor complex environmental processes with sensing and measurement systems. By collecting new or more detailed observational data from a greater number of locations across the globe, researchers can improve scientific

210

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee June 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office This page intentionally left blank. DOE/EA-1779 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Date Issued-June 2011 Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC and CDM Federal Services Inc. contributed to the preparation of this document and may not be considered for review of the document U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management This page intentionally left blank. iii CONTENTS FIGURES......................................................................................................................................................

211

Risk-Related research at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk-Related Research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Risk-Related Research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Table of Contents Human Exposure Assessment Cancer Risk Assessment Extrapolation of Cancer Risks from Animals to Humans Biodosimetry to Assess Human Genotoxicity from Mutagenic or Clastogenic Agents Transgenic Mouse Models Biological Effects of Complex Chemical Mixtures Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and Cancer Models Electromagnetic Fields Risks of Ionizing Radiation in Space Risk-Based Remediation Strategy for Kesterson Reservoir Wetland Restoration and Sediment Quality Integrated, Risk-Based Environmental Clean-up SELECT: Environmental Decision-Making Software Introduction The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) conducts research to improve the scientific basis of risk assessment.

212

Environmental Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment » Environment » Environmental Stewardship » Environmental Sustainability /community-environment/_assets/images/icon_earthday.jpg Environmental Sustainability: Creating the Future Exercising our commitment to operating a sustainable site by creating a 50-year horizon of planning and preparing for effective environmental stewardship while executing national mission. Sustainability Goals» Recycling» Green Purchasing» Pollution Prevention» Reusing Water» Feature Stories» LOOK INTO LANL - highlights of our science, people, technologies close Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Improved methods for breaking down cellulose nanofibers are central to cost-effective biofuel production. READ MORE An enzyme (shown in blue) pulls out individual cellulose chains (pink) from the pretreated nanofiber surface (green) and then breaks them apart into simple sugars. Image credit, Shishir Chundawat, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center.

213

Environmental quality  

SciTech Connect

Major emphasis is placed on man environment interactions and environment management. Topics include: ecology and living resources; the global environment; water and air quality; toxic substances and environmental health; energy; natural resources; NEPA regulations; and land use.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Environmental decontamination  

SciTech Connect

The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C. (eds.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Environmental Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Systems: the Cultural Change Game What's New in DOE O 450.1A? Implementing DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B Environmentally Preferable Purchasing: What is New in DOE...

216

Climate & Environmental Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Science Institute Earth and Aquatic Sciences Ecosystem Science Environmental Data Science and Systems Energy, Water and Ecosystem Engineering Human Health Risk and Environmental Analysis Renewable Energy Systems Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Scientists Scott Brooks and Carrie Miller collect water quality data, East Fork Poplar Creek, November 15, 2012. Sampling site for mercury. Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including

217

Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Disposition Project The scope of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) needs to comprehensively address a wide range of environmental management risks at the...

218

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Bullet Baseline Risk Assessments Bullet Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Environmental Assessment Report South Campus Facility, Oak Ridge Tenn [DOE/OR/02-1274&D] Bullet Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek [DOE/OR/1119 & D2 & V2] Bullet Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study Report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit [DOE/OR/01 1282 & D1] [ORNL/ER-2] Bullet The Utility of Existing Data Conducting a CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (draft) [ORNL/ER-?] Bullet East Fork Poplar Creek Sewer Line Beltway Remedial Investigation Report [DOE/OR/02-1119&D2] Bullet Screening Risk Assessments Bullet Preliminary Assessment of Radiation Doses to the Public from Cesium

219

Mercury Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS: IMPACTS OF LOCAL DEPOSITIONS *T.M. Sullivan 1 , F.D. Lipfert 2 , S.M. Morris 2 , and S. Renninger 3 1 Building 830, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 2 Private Consultants 3 Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to regulate emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants. However, there is still debate over whether the limits should be placed on a nationwide or a plant-specific basis. Before a nationwide limit is selected, it must be demonstrated that local deposition of mercury from coal-fired power plants does not impose an excessive local health risk. The principal health

220

Health risks of energy technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume examines occupational, public health, and environmental risks of the coal fuel cycle, the nuclear fuel cycle, and unconventional energy technologies. The 6 chapters explore in detail the relationship between energy economics and risk analysis, assess the problems of applying traditional cost-benefit analysis to long-term environmental problems (such as global carbon dioxide levels), and consider questions about the public's perception and acceptance of risk. Also included is an examination of the global risks associated with current and proposed levels of energy production and comsumption from all major sources. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 6 chapters; all are included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA) and four in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

Travis, C.C.; Etnier, E.L. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management Title Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Price, Phillip N.,...

224

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Frequently asked questions (FAQs) about uranium, uranium hexafluoride (UF6), UF6 storage and depleted UF6 management. Below is a list of...

225

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increasedinherent risks (e.g. , natural gas price risk, environmentalIRPs. The treatment of natural gas price risk, as well as

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

227

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS December 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of Building Research and Standards Washington, DC 20585 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 2. PURPOSE AND NEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 3. ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.1 No Action Alternative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.2 Proposed Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.3 Alternative Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-3 3.4 Impacts of Proposed and Alternative Standards

228

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

229

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

682 682 Environmental Assessment Upgrades and Life Extension of the 242-A Evaporator, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Conducted Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington Environmental Assessment February 20 10 DOE/EA- 1682 This page intentionally left blank. 1 February 20 10 DOE/EA- 1682 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION..............................................................................1. 1.1 BACKGROUND ......................................................................... 3 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR THE PROPOSED ACTION ......................... 6 1.3 NEPA REQUIREMENTS............................................................... 6 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVE ....................... 8

230

Energy and Environmental Stewardship  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Energy and Environmental Stewardship. The Division's environmental stewardship programs in ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT www.esr.pdx.edu Undergraduate Program: Environmental Science an emphasis on natural sciences and mathematics (Environmental Science) or emphasis on policy, geography and social sciences (Environmental Studies). Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Environmental Science Bachelor

232

Environment, Safety, and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Environment, Safety and Health Risk Assessment Program (ESHRAP) models human safety and health risk resulting from waste management and environmental restoration activities. Human safety and health risks include those associated with storing, handling, processing, transporting, and disposing of radionuclides and chemicals. Exposures to these materials, resulting from both accidents and normal, incident-free operation, are modeled. In addition, standard industrial risks (falls, explosions, transportation accidents, etc.) are evaluated. Finally, human safety and health impacts from cleanup of accidental releases of radionuclides and chemicals to the environment are estimated. Unlike environmental impact statements and safety analysis reports, ESHRAP risk predictions are meant to be best estimate, rather than bounding or conservatively high. Typically, ESHRAP studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management or environmental restoration program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, processing, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal. ESHRAP can be used to support complex environmental decision-making processes and to track risk reduction as activities progress.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Thomas Wierman

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems...

234

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of performance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activities throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing programs as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science,

235

Summer Undergraduate Research Program: Environmental studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. The students are offered research topics at the Medical University in the scientific areas of pharmacology and toxicology, epidemiology and risk assessment, environmental microbiology, and marine sciences. Students are also afforded the opportunity to work with faculty at the University of Charleston, SC, on projects with an environmental theme. Ten well-qualified students from colleges and universities throughout the eastern United States were accepted into the program.

McMillan, J. [ed.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/002F 5/002F April 1998 Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment (Published on May 14, 1998, Federal Register 63(93):26846-26924) Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. NOTICE This report contains the full text of the Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment. However, the format of this version differs from the Federal Register version, as follows: text boxes that are included in this document at their point of reference were instead listed at the end of the Federal Register document as text notes, due to format limitations for Federal Register documents.

237

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Environmental Management. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE...

238

Environmental Biosciences Program Second Quarter Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report  

SciTech Connect

In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Technology and Risk Sciences Program. FY99 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

In making the transition from weapons production to environmental restoration, DOE has found that it needs to develop reliable means of defining and understanding health and environmental risks and of selecting cost-efficient environmental management technologies so that cleanup activities can be appropriately directed. Through the Technology and Risk Sciences Project, the Entergy Spatial Analysis Research Laboratory attempts to provide DOE with products that incorporate spatial analysis techniques in the risk assessment, communication, and management processes; design and evaluate methods for evaluating innovative environmental technologies; and collaborate and access technical information on risk assessment methodologies, including multimedia modeling and environmental technologies in Russia and the Ukraine, while in addition training and developing the skills of the next generation of scientists and environmental professionals.

Regens, James L.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Site environmental report for 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program, conducted in conjunction with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the general environment in the area. This monitoring effort ensures that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of the Environmental Monitoring Program, an ambient environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally-produced food stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions.

Gordon, K.W. [ed.; Brekke, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Environmental Policy and Assistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support & Corporate Safety Analysis HS-20 Home Mission & Functions » Office of Nuclear Safety, Quality Assurance & Environment » Sustainability Support » Environmental Policy & Assistance » Corporate Safety Programs » Analysis Program Contacts What's New? Sustainability Support Environment Corporate Safety Programs Analysis Environment Environmental Policy Environmental Guidance Environmental Reports Environmental Management System Radiation Protection Environmental Compliance Environmental Justice Environmental Training Environmental Tools Search Our Documents Topics & Resources Air Analytical Services Program CERCLA Cultural & Natural Resources DOE Comments on Rulemakings Federal Environmental Laws

243

Blue print for building a risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal and stet regulations require the operator of a miscellaneous waste treatment unit to demonstrate compliance with environmental performance standard. A sample risk assessment is demonstrated as a means of showing compliance for such a treatment unit. A new Open Burning and Open Detonation (OB/OD) facility for explosive wastes at LLNL experimental site is used. Simplified, the process of performing a risk assessment consists of characterization of the treatment operation and estimation of emission rates; evaluation of the emission dispersion to estimate acute exposure; and evaluation of human and environmental risks. Each step may require the environmental analysts to perform detained date gathering, modeling and calculations, and to negotiate with facility operations personnel and regulatory representatives. The Risk Assessment Protocol, which explains the assumptions, model selection and inputs, and data selection, must ultimately withstand the rigors of regulatory review and public scrutiny.s

Otsuki, H.K.; Eagan-McNeill, E.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental Sustainability Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stories community-environmentassetsimagesiconearthday.jpg Environmental Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will cleanup the past, minimize impacts for...

245

Obeying Environmental Laws  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video Community, Environment Environmental Stewardship ...

246

Environmental Management Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Management Systems Technical Assistance Tools Technical Assistance Tool: Integrating Sustainable Practices into Environmental Management Systems , November 2009...

247

Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance - Mission and Functions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Policy and Assistance (HS-22) Environmental Policy and Assistance (HS-22) Reports to the Office of Environmental Protection, Sustainability Support & Corporate Safety Analysis Mission The Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance establishes environmental protection policy, requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure that the environment is adequately protected from hazards associated with DOE environmental risks and impacts are minimized and compliant with environmental protection laws, regulations and standards are achieved. The Office works proactively with headquarters and field offices to foster continuous improvement and shape behavior in environmental protection before incidents occur. The Office serves as a corporate technical assistance, coordination, and integration resource to support line organizations in the resolution of environmental issues and management concerns. In addition, the Office provides high-quality, customer-oriented assistance that enables improved DOE program and field implementation of environmental protection.

248

National Environmental Policy Act RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Environmental Policy Act Review Module National Environmental Policy Act Review Module March 2010 CD- N -0 OFFICE O National E C CD-1 OF ENVIRO Standa Environm Rev Critical Deci CD-2 M ONMENTA ard Review mental P view Modul ision (CD) A C March 2010 AL MANAG Plan olicy Act le Applicability D-3 GEMENT t (NEPA) CD-4 ) Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

249

M E Environmental Management Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

safety  performance  cleanup  closure safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration, EM-10 Office of D&D and Facility Engineering, EM-13 Facility Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) D&D Program Map Addendum: Impact of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) on EM's D&D Program 2013 Edition U.S. Department Of Energy safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 3/13/2013 The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

250

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ecent concern about the risks to human ecent concern about the risks to human health from airborne particulates such as those in diesel exhaust has motivated a group at the Environmental Energy Technologies Division to investigate the use of scattered polar- ized light. The goals are to characterize these particles and develop an instrument to measure these characteristics in real time. Having such an instrument can help regulatory authorities devel- op standards and monitor air quality. Airborne particulates, especially those less than 2.5 micrometers (µm) in diameter, are known to be a major human health risk. Diesel exhaust particles are principally in this size range; they are also a major source of reduced visibility in populated areas. California recently declared particulates in diesel exhaust a haz-

251

Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art  

SciTech Connect

A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSMENT (EA) ASSESSMENT (EA) FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SOUTH ACCESS ROAD (CR 802) IN SUPPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT (WIPP) IN EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO NEPA #: DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE P. O. BOX 2078 CARLSBAD, NM 88221-2078 PREPARED BY: OWEN W. LOFTON SUPERVISORY MULTI RESOURCES SPECIALIST BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE 620 EAST GREENE CARLSBAD, NM 88220 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT BLM Office: Carlsbad Field Office DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA Serial #: NM-123703 Department of Energy (DOE), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) South Access Road (SAR) 1.0 Purpose and Need for Action 1.1 The DOE CBFO, is requesting a right-of-way (ROW) that consists of re-

253

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Transportation Health Risks » Transportation DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Transportation A discussion of health risks associated with transport of depleted UF6. Transport Regulations and Requirements In the future, it is likely that depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders will be transported to a conversion facility. For example, it is currently anticipated that the cylinders at the ETTP Site in Oak Ridge, TN, will be transported to the Portsmouth Site, OH, for conversion. Uranium hexafluoride has been shipped safely in the United States for over 40 years by both truck and rail. Shipments of depleted UF6 would be made in accordance with all applicable transportation regulations. Shipment of depleted UF6 is regulated by the

254

Environmental Protection Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Details Site Details EPD Home Staff List (pdf) Org Chart (pdf) Compliance / Permits Programs Other Information Land Use & Institutional Controls Mapping Site Environmental Reports Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) Spill Response BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Developing Environmental Products and Services for Brookhaven Stakeholders The Environmental Protection Division (EPD) develops and delivers environmental products and services for all Brookhaven stakeholders. We manage environmental programs such as pollution prevention, groundwater protection, and natural resource management; provide technical assistance on environmental requirements; maintain the Laboratory's IS0 14001-registered Environmental Management System; prepare environmental permit applications; conduct environmental monitoring; manage data

255

Environmental safety evaluations for nuclear installations  

SciTech Connect

Environmental safety has been an important consideration in the siting, design, and operation of nuclear installations. As a result there have been very few cases in which the releases of radioactive materials from these installations have posed a dosimetrically significant environmental risk, and almost all of these have been connected with accidents or other unintentional situations. In no situation do the intentional releases from nuclear installations appear to have posed significant environmental risks, and with adequate planning and design a high degree of environmental safety may be assured. Many disciplines are involved in the evaluation of safety for nuclear installations. These include such fundamental ones as physics, chemistry, and biology, and more specialized ones such as meteorology, engineering, ecology, medicine, and electronics. A comprehensive review of environmental surveillance data and estimates of dose commitments from nuclear installations suggests that compared to the doses from background and from fallout, those attributable to the effluents from nuclear facilities have been small and for the most part quite local. it is concluded that, the upper limit of the risk associated with exposure of up to a few millirems per year is indeed small compared to many other commonly accepted risks of living in present day society. (72 refurences) (CH)

Hull, A.P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program Requirements (DOE, 1990a), requires each DOE facility to prepare an EMP. This document is prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (DOE, 1990b); Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 834, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment (Draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1 (DOE, 1995), which is the driver for the Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP project is operated by Westinghouse Electric Company, Waste Isolation Division (WID), for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of the WIPP's effluent and environmental monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses the WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE, 1991). This document references DOE orders and other federal and state regulations affecting environmental monitoring programs at the site. WIPP procedures, which implement the requirements of this program plan, are also referenced. The DOE regulates its own activities for radiation protection of the public under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. 2011). The effluent and environmental monitoring activities prescribed by DOE Order 5400.5 and the DOE/EH-0173T guidance manual are designed to ensure that DOE facilities implement standards and regulations to protect members of the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation. Effluent and environmental monitoring also provide 1999 Environmental Monitoring Plan DOE/WIPP 99-2194 the data necessary to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental protection regulations. Other federal agencies, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), are empowered through specific legislation to regulate certain aspects of DOE activities potentially affecting public health and safety or the environment. Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards (43 FR 47707), requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all necessary actions for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. Beyond statutory requirements, the DOE has established a general environmental protection policy. The Environmental Policy Statement (issued by then Secretary Herrington on January 8, 1986, and extended on January 7, 1987) describes the DOE's commitment to national environmental protection goals in that it conducts operations ''in an environmentally safe and sound manner . . . in compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards'' (DOE, 1986). This Environmental Policy Statement also states the DOE's commitment to ''good environmental management in all of its programs and at all of its facilities in order to correct existing environmental problems, to minimize risks to the environment or public health, and to anticipate and address pote

Westinghouse Electric Company Waste Isolation Division

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

257

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), conducted December 14 through 18, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with SERI. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SERI, and interviews with site personnel. 33 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), conducted September 14 through 25, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Fermilab. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at Fermilab, and interviews with site personnel. 110 refs., 26 figs., 41 tabs.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P-03/001F P-03/001F March 2005 Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.1. PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE GUIDELINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.2. ORGANIZATION AND APPLICATION OF THE GUIDELINES . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.2.1. Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 1.2.2. Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 1.3. KEY FEATURES OF THE CANCER GUIDELINES .

260

A Bayesian Approach for the Spatiotemporal Interpolation of Environmental Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerically based models are extensively used for many environmental applications, as for example, to assist in the prediction of weather phenomena (numerical weather prediction models), in risk assessment, or in pollutant emission control (air-...

Angelo Riccio

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Environmental Management Education Program: Building Environmental Stewardship  

SciTech Connect

The BES program enhanced the capability to integrate environmental sustainability concepts and social justice into multi-dimensional curricula.

Chulock, Hilary N.

2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

262

Managing the Risks of Climate Change and Terrorism  

SciTech Connect

Society has difficult decisions to make about how best to allocate its resources to ensure future sustainability. Risk assessment can be a valuable tool: it has long been used to support decisions to address environmental problems. But in a time when the risks to sustainability range from climate change to terrorism, applying risk assessment to sustainability will require careful rethinking. For new threats, we will need a new approach to risk assessment.

Rosa, Eugene; Dietz, Tom; Moss, Richard H.; Atran, Scott; Moser, Susanne

2012-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary of Environmental Restoration Terms Glossary of Environmental Restoration Terms These definitions are from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) Environmental Restoration/Waste Management Risk Assessment Program staff and affiliates and the following sources: Click on the letter that begins the term for which you are searching. To search for another term, at the end of each definition, click on the. If a link leaves the glossary to go to an outside page you will see a. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Abatement: The reduction in degree or intensity of pollution. Absorbed Dose: The energy imparted to a unit mass of matter by ionizing radiation. The unit of absorbed dose is the rad or gray. One rad equals 100 ergs per gram. The amount of a substance absorbed into the body, usually

264

Environmental Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management System Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental Management System is a systematic method for assessing mission activities, determining the environmental impacts of those activities, prioritizing improvements, and measuring results. May 30, 2012 The continuous improvement cycle Our Environmental Management System encourages continuous improvement of our environmental performance. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Managing our effects on the environment We are committed to protecting the environment while conducting our national security and energy-related missions. Laboratory Environmental Governing Policy What is the Environmental Management System? It covers every program in the Laboratory

265

Environmental Protection Division (ENV)  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

in reducing environmental hazards, conserve environmental resources, minimize life-cycle costs and liability of DOE programs, and maximize operational capability through...

266

Environmental Management Commission (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alabama Department of Environmental Management is charged with developing the state's environmental policy, hearing administrative appeals of permits, administrative orders and variances issued...

267

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.

McLaughlin, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Environmental Biology | Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Biology BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Environmental...

269

Qualitative methods for assessing risk  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

Mahn, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hannaman, G.W. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Kryska, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Environmental Metal Releases and Autism Prevalence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identifying the underlying reasons for the rising autism rates in the United States remains a public health concern. One potential causative agent is mercury (Hg). In response, some researchers have attempted to associate local environmental Hg releases with increased autism risk in nearby schools or communities; however, results continue to be inconsistent and limited by ecologic study design.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Forward Natural Gas Prices” Energy Policy (inGas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increased6: Risk Analysis: Natural Gas Price and Environmental

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Asbestos in sludge- a significant risk  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to consider the issue of asbestos in sludge applied to land, and to provide some perspective on the health risk conclusions drawn from research on which these stories were based. While this review cannot conclude there is no health risk due to the presence of asbestos in sludge, it does suggest that such risk is not appreciably greater than from the presence of asbestos in other environmental samples. As analytical techniques continue to improve, increasing numbers of potentially toxic chemicals will be found in all types of environmental samples, including sludge. However, it is essential that the mere presence of a chemical in such samples not be equated with toxicity, or a hazard to the general public. Although some of the contaminants that will be detected in sludges or other environmental samples will be new and exotic, many have been present in the environment for years, and, in the case of the asbestos, for millenia. Scientists and engineers must work vigorously to minimize such health risks due to environmental contamination. However, scientists have the responsibility to discuss risks within a framework that is understandable by the general public. To do otherwise so as to incite fear and apprehension borders on scientific irresponsibility, and neither solves the problem, nor does justice to the scientific method.

Naylor, L.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

Current research projects have focused Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP) talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene, low-dose ionizing radiation (gamma and neutron) and alpha radiation from plutonium. Trichloroethylene research has been conducted as a joint collaborative effort with the University of Georgia. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Laboratory work has been completed on several trichloroethylene risk assessment projects, and these projects have been brought to a close. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the remaining trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A comprehensive manuscript on the scientific basis of trichloroethylene risk assessment is in preparation. Work on the low-dose radiation risk assessment projects is also progressing at a slowed rate as a result of funding uncertainties. It has been necessary to restructure the proponency and performance schedule of these projects, with the project on Low-Dose Radiation: Epidemiology Risk Models transferred to DOE Office of Science proponency under a separate funding instrument. Research on this project will continue under the provisions of the DOE Office of Science funding instrument, with progress reported in accordance with the requirements of that funding instrument. Progress on that project will no longer be reported in quarterly reports for DE-FC09-02CH11109. Following a meeting at the Savannah River Site on May 8, 2008, a plan was submitted for development of an epidemiological cohort study and prospective medical surveillance system for the assessment of disease rates among workers at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This project will be incorporated into the ongoing project on Population Health Risks in the Vicinity of the Savannah River Site. During a meeting at the SRS on October 21, 2008, a presentation was made on EBP participation in the development and operation of an Epidemiology Consortium at the SRS. A follow-up meeting with SRS officials is planned for 29 and 30 January 2009 at Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC).An epidemiology project on population health risk assessment is being conducted to assess health risks among populations in the vicinity of the SRS. This project is using the capabilities of the EBP GIS for the geographical assessment of cancer and non-cancer disease rates, as well as the potential association of population health risks with environmental exposures. Although funding uncertainties have slowed progress on some aspects of this project, it has not been necessary to restructure the performance schedule to date.

Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings: Volume 2, Environmental protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

See the abstract for Volume I for general information on the conference. Topics discussed in Volume II include data management techiques for environmental protection efforts, the use of models in environmental auditing, in emergency plans, chemical accident emergency response, risk assessment, monitoring of waste sites, air and water monitoring of waste sites, and in training programs. (TEM)

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Environmental Biosciences Program Report for Year 3  

SciTech Connect

In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Environmental Biosciences Report for Year 3  

SciTech Connect

In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Solutions for Mitigating Technology Solutions for Mitigating Environmental Impacts of Oil and Gas E&P Activity The mission of the Environmental Program is to promote a reliable, affordable, and secure supply of domestic oil and clean-burning natural gas, by providing cost-effective environmental regulatory compliance technologies, enhancing environmental protections during oil and gas E&P operations, and facilitating the development and use of scientific, risk-based environmental regulatory frameworks.

278

TOXNET and Beyond: Using the National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal  

SciTech Connect

The National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal provides access to numerous databases that can help you explore environmental chemicals and risks. TOXNET and Beyond: Using NLM's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal conveys the fundamentals of searching the NLM's TOXNET system of databases in chemistry, toxicology, environmental health, and related fields. In addition to TOXNET, the course will highlight various resources available through the Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal.

Templin-Branner, W.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan serves as an aid to management and staff to implement new environmental programs in a timely manner.

Brekke, D.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Argonne TDC: Environmental Technologies  

Emergency Response. Engineering. Environmental Research. Fuel Cells. Imaging Technology. Material Science. Nanotechnology. Physical Sciences. Sensor ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Environmental Management Science Program Workshop. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM), in partnership with the Office of Energy Research (ER), designed, developed, and implemented the Environmental Management Science Program as a basic research effort to fund the scientific and engineering understanding required to solve the most challenging technical problems facing the government's largest, most complex environmental cleanup program. The intent of the Environmental Management Science Program is to: (1) Provide scientific knowledge that will revolutionize technologies and cleanup approaches to significantly reduce future costs, schedules, and risks. (2) Bridge the gap between broad fundamental research that has wide-ranging applications such as that performed in the Department's Office of Energy Research and needs-driven applied technology development that is conducted in Environmental Management's Office of Science and Technology. (3) Focus the nation's science infrastructure on critical Department of Energy environmental problems. In an effort to share information regarding basic research efforts being funded by the Environmental Management Science Program and the Environmental Management/Energy Research Pilot Collaborative Research Program (Wolf-Broido Program), this CD includes summaries for each project. These project summaries, available in portable document format (PDF), were prepared in the spring of 1998 by the principal investigators and provide information about their most recent project activities and accomplishments.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Environmental Management Science Program Workshop. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM), in partnership with the Office of Energy Research (ER), designed, developed, and implemented the Environmental Management Science Program as a basic research effort to fund the scientific and engineering understanding required to solve the most challenging technical problems facing the government's largest, most complex environmental cleanup program. The intent of the Environmental Management Science Program is to: (1) Provide scientific knowledge that will revolutionize technologies and cleanup approaches to significantly reduce future costs, schedules, and risks. (2) Bridge the gap between broad fundamental research that has wide-ranging applications such as that performed in the Department's Office of Energy Research and needs-driven applied technology development that is conducted in Environmental Management's Office of Science and Technology. (3) Focus the nation's science infrastructure on critical Department of Energy environmental problems. In an effort to share information regarding basic research efforts being funded by the Environmental Management Science Program and the Environmental Management/Energy Research Pilot Collaborative Research Program (Wolf-Broido Program), this CD includes summaries for each project. These project summaries, available in portable document format (PDF), were prepared in the spring of 1998 by the principal investigators and provide information about their most recent project activities and accomplishments.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Risk Management Tool Attributes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Tools & SMEs - Tools & SMEs Outline for Breakout Session TOOLS 1. Types of Tools a. Risk Management - Database & Reports, risk register, risk forms, risk tracking & monitoring, basis of estimate, action item tracking, historical record of risks & changes, configuration control, enterprise-wide, metrics, risk performance index, risk checklist, graphical display, management reporting (various levels), risk communications b. Risk Analysis i. Cost, ii. budgets, funding, cash-flow analysis, iii. Schedule iv. tailoring categories v. Integrated Cost & Schedule vi. Project phase analysis; organization ownership & joint planning c. Risk Knowledge and Lessons Learned Database i. Enterprise-wide ii. Job/owner-specific iii. Workshops - project specific, risk management,

284

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. This report focuses on the following: notification of environmental occurrences; general planning and reporting; special programs and plans; environmental monitoring program; and quality assurance and data verification.

Brekke, D.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Managing Electricity Reliability Risk Through the Futures Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-47645 Managing Electricity Reliability Risk Through the Futures Markets Afzal S. Siddiqui Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley for Operations Research and the Management Sciences INFORMS Annual Meeting in San Antonio, TX, November 2000

286

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF EM Recovery NEWS FLASH RECOVERY.GOV March 10, 2011 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Payments Surge Past $4 Billion U.S. Depar tment of Energy | Office of Environmental Management For More Information on EM Recovery Act Work, Visit Us on the Web: http://www.em.doe.gov/emrecovery/ FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS * More than $4 BILLION in Recovery Act payments are accelerating environmental cleanup * 67% of EM Recovery Act funds have been paid Financial data are based on reporting as of March 9, 2011, and are subject to change. EM has made more than $4 billion in Recovery Act payments, or 32 percent of the DOE's $12.4 billion in Recovery Act payments. DOE received $35.2 billion

287

Environmental protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California's commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities.

R. C. Holland

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks Print E-mail New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks Print E-mail Climate Change and Chemical Risks Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program Pesticides, air pollutants, and other contaminants could become increasingly harmful to human health due to climate change, according to a new series of papers published in Environmental Toxicology Chemistry (ET&C). The seven publications, which appeared in ET&C's January 2013 issue, present evidence that climate change could affect how chemicals are transported and cause toxicity in both ecosystems and people. These impacts could mean that chemical risk assessment practices will demand swift modification and adaptation. "Risk assessors and public health practitioners need to understand how climate change may alter chemical risks to people in the future," said one of the papers' lead authors John Balbus, M.D., who is leading the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences's (NIEHS) Global Environmental Health and Sustainable Development projects. "Existing data sources and assumptions used in exposure and risk assessment may not apply. Environmental health researchers and risk assessors will need to consider interactions between climate-related stressors and chemical stressors and other ways that future risks may be changing," he added.

289

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Project, Ector, Texas August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern Counties, California...

290

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Environmental Impact Statement and to Conduct Scoping Meetings Hualapai Valley Solar Interconnection Project in Mohave County, Arizona July 30, 2009 EIS-0425: Notice of...

291

INEL Geothermal Environmental Program. Final environmental report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of environmental monitoring programs and research during development of a moderate temperature geothermal resource in the Raft River Valley is presented. One of the major objectives was to develop programs for environmental assessment and protection that could serve as an example for similar types of development. The monitoring studies were designed to establish baseline conditions (predevelopment) of the physical, biological, and human environment. Potential changes were assessed and adverse environmental impacts minimized. No major environmental impacts resulted from development of the Raft River Geothermal Research Facility. The results of the physical, biological, and human environment monitoring programs are summarized.

Thurow, T.L.; Cahn, L.S.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17, 2010 EIS-0455: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA December 17, 2010 EIS-0403: EPA Notice of...

293

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico...

294

EA-1290: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90: Finding of No Significant Impact 90: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1290: Finding of No Significant Impact Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium The Proposed Action to submit an export license to the NRC and then ship up to 9,000 metric tons per year of natural uranium as UF6 (Russian Federation-titled) by truck from the Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plants to either Hampton Roads, VA or the port of Batlitnmore, MD and thence by ocean-going freighter to St. Petersburg, Russia, and to continue these shipments for up to 15 years, entails insignificant impacts and low risks. The action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Therefore, based upon

295

Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Quarterly report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the EHAP program stated in the proposal to DOE are to: (1) develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication which recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all, (2) develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects, and (3) identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Transportation Technical Environmental Information Center index  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to determine the environmental intensities to which energy materials in transit may be exposed, a Data Center of technical environmental information has been established by Sandia National Laboratories, Division 5523, for the DOE Office of Transportation Fuel Storage. This document is an index which can be used to request data of interest. Access to the information held is not limited to Sandia personnel. The purpose of the Transportation Technical Environmental Information Center is to collect, analyze, store, and make available descriptions of the environment of transportation expressed in engineering terms. The data stored in the Center are expected to be useful in a variety of transportation related analyses. Formulations of environmental criteria for shipment of cargo, risk assessments, and detailed structural analyses of shipping containers are examples where these data have been applied. For purposes of indexing and data retrieval, the data are catalogued under two major headings: Normal and Abnormal Environments.

Davidson, C. A.; Foley, J. T.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL ENTERPRISE  

SciTech Connect

THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL ENTERPRISE (CEE) is a joint partnership of: the DOE Laboratories LLNL, LBL, and Sandia; the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA); and the Institute of Environmental Solutions (IES). CEE is an independent, non-profit regional function organized and operated in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) ``Enterprise`` model developed by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Strategic Task Force and the Strategic Laboratory Council. The vision of THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL ENTERPRISE is to create new economic opportunities through the advancement of rehabilitative reuse of environmentally impaired property, and through research, development and commercialization of alternative environmental technologies. The mission of THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL ENTERPRISE is to maximize the DOE investment by acting as the catalyst for the rapid development and acceptance of environmental technologies needed for redevelopment of contaminated sites, economic revitalization, and the dissipation of adversarial relationships between the public, regulators, problem-holders, and Federal agencies.

Ragaini, R.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Buckles, R.J. [Institute of Environmental Solutions, Sacarameto, CA (United States); Goldstein, N.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bramlette, T.T. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Environmental boundaries to energy development  

SciTech Connect

Public concern about the environment, health and safety consequences of energy technology has been growing steadily for more than two decades in the United States. This concern forms an important boundary condition as the United States seeks to develop a new National Energy Strategy. Furthermore, the international aspects of the energy/environment interface such as acid rain global climate change and stratospheric ozone depletion are very prominent in US thinking. In fact, the energy systems of the world are becoming more closely coupled environmentally and otherwise. Now where is this coupling more important than that between the industrialized and developing world; the choices made by each will have profound effects on the other. The development of energy technologies compatible with both economic growth and improving and sustaining environmental quality represents a major R D challenge to the US and USSR. Decision about adoption of new technology and R D priorities can be improved by better measurements of how energy sources and uses are changing throughout the world and better methods to project the potential consequences of these decisions. Such projection require understanding relative risks of alternating existing and evolving technologies. All of these R D areas, technology improvement energy system monitoring and projection and comparative risk assessment are the topics of this seminar. Progress in each may be enhanced by collaboration and cooperation between our two countries. 7 refs., 27 figs., 5 tabs.

Trivelpiece, A.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita: Climate Change Risk Assessment Elevensectors(forinitial analysis) Health Energy Transport Built-24000 deaths avoided in winter) by 2050s Increases in drought and some pest and diseases could reduce timber

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

300

EA-1290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium 290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium EA-1290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to transport up to an average of 9,000 metric tons per year of natural uranium as uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from the United States to the Russian Federation. This amount of uranium is equivalent to 13,3000 metric tons of UF6. The EA also examines the impacts of this action on the global commons. Transfer of natural UF6 to the Russian Federation is part of a joint U.S./Russian program to dispose of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Environmental Records.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TERMS TERMS ALARA as low as reasonably achievable CAA Clean Air Act CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act CFR Code of Federal Regulations CX categorical exclusion DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA environmental assessment ECL environmental checklist EIS environmental impact statement EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPCRA Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 FFA&CO Federal Facility Agreement & Consent Order FRC Federal Records Center HEPA high-efficiency particulate air IB information bulletin MSDS material safety data sheet NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards Program NARA National Archives and Records Administration

302

Environmental protection implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. SNL is committed to operating in full compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental laws, regulations, and standards. Furthermore, SNL/California strives to go beyond compliance with legal requirements by making every effort practical to reduce impacts to the environment to levels as low as reasonably achievable.

Holland, R.C.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Statement from DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management James  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement from DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Statement from DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management James Rispoli on the National Academy of Public Administration's Management Review of DOE's Office of Environmental Management Statement from DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management James Rispoli on the National Academy of Public Administration's Management Review of DOE's Office of Environmental Management December 18, 2007 - 4:58pm Addthis "Today the National Academy of Public Administration released their comprehensive management review of the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). EM is a $5.6 billion per year program responsible for the risk reduction and cleanup of the environmental legacy of the Nation's nuclear weapons program, one of the largest, most diverse,

304

Statement from DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management James  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management James Rispoli on the National Academy of Public Administration's Management Review of DOE's Office of Environmental Management Statement from DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management James Rispoli on the National Academy of Public Administration's Management Review of DOE's Office of Environmental Management December 18, 2007 - 4:58pm Addthis "Today the National Academy of Public Administration released their comprehensive management review of the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). EM is a $5.6 billion per year program responsible for the risk reduction and cleanup of the environmental legacy of the Nation's nuclear weapons program, one of the largest, most diverse,

305

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is a dynamic long-range environmental-protection plan for SRS. The EIP communicates the current and future (five year) environmental plans from individual organizations and divisions as well as site environmental initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed compliance with changing environmental/ regulatory requirements. Communication with all site organizations is essential for making the site environmental planning process work. Demonstrating environmental excellence is a high priority embodied in DOE and WSRC policy. Because of your support and participation in the three EIP initiatives; Reflections, Sectional Revision, and Integrated Planning, improvements are being made to the EIP and SRS environmental protection programs. I appreciate the ``Partnership in Environmental Excellence`` formed by the environmental coordinators and professionals who work daily toward our goal of compliance and environmental excellence. I look forward to seeing continued success and improvement in our environmental protection programs through combined efforts of all site organizations to protect our employees, the public health, and the environment. Together, we will achieve our site vision for SRS to be the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Environmental Management Report update, Region 10, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1985 update to the Region 10 Environmental Management Report of 1983 describes work planned during Fiscal 86 in high priority efforts by the States of the Pacific Northwest and Region 10 to address current and emerging environmental problems. Because those problems the authors now feel merit priority status are not the same problems the authors discussed in 1983 and 1984, the organization of this 1985 update differs. Where possible, environmental problems were discussed collectively by media. For example, the general topic of Pesticides and Toxic Substances, identified as a separate priority problem in 1983, is addressed this year in media-related sections on Groundwater and Air Contamination. Similarly, Fishery Damage is discussed this year as part of the placer mining and nonpoint source problem discussions. The authors also took a different approach to ranking the significance of each problem this year. The Management Team assessed each environmental problem independently according to four criteria: (1) number of persons exposed, (2) human health risk, (3) ecological risk, and (4) the level of public concern. They were also asked to weigh each of the four criteria. The attached environmental priority list presents the results of this exercise. The top priority - hazardous waste contamination of groundwater.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Defense Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(EM) Defense Environmental Cleanup The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Defense Environmental Cleanup Microsoft Word - 271C2C7B.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft...

308

Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is to show the current and future (five years) environmental plans from individual site organizations and divisions, as well as site environmental programs and initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed changing environmental/regulatory requirements. Communicating with site organizations, departments, and committees is essential in making the site's environmental-planning process work. The EIP gives the site the what, when, how, and why for environmental requirements. Through teamwork and proactive planning, a partnership for environmental excellence is formed to achieve the site vision for SRS to become the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex.

Not Available

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is to show the current and future (five years) environmental plans from individual site organizations and divisions, as well as site environmental programs and initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed changing environmental/regulatory requirements. Communicating with site organizations, departments, and committees is essential in making the site`s environmental-planning process work. The EIP gives the site the what, when, how, and why for environmental requirements. Through teamwork and proactive planning, a partnership for environmental excellence is formed to achieve the site vision for SRS to become the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the Department of Energy`s Nuclear Weapons Complex.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Environmental Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP) is to show the current and future (five years) environmental plans from individual site organizations and divisions, as well as site environmental programs and initiatives which are designed to protect the environment and meet or exceed changing environmental/regulatory requirements. Communicating with site organizations, departments, and committees is essential in making the site's environmental-planning process work. The EIP gives the site the what, when, how, and why for environmental requirements. Through teamwork and proactive planning, a partnership for environmental excellence is formed to achieve the site vision for SRS to become the recognized model for Environmental Excellence in the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Environmental Impacts of Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

~~"'"""""""""'l.. _ _ 4 Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operation and Monitoring, and Closure 4-iii Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 4. Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure ..............4-1 4.1 Preclosure Environmental Impacts of Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure of a Repository ...............................................................................................................................4-3 4.1.1 Impacts to Land Use and Ownership .......................................................................................4-4

313

Marine Environmental Specimen Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... National Status and Trends Program, the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Mussel Watch Program, and the EXXON VALDEZ Damage ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

314

Environmental Policy Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Environmental Policy Statement. ... Ensuring that energy and water are used responsibly and conserved through innovative practices and procedures ...

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Nuclear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2014. Symposium, Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Nuclear. Sponsorship. Organizer(s) ...

316

Because Environmental Stewardship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exceptional environmental per- formance and management. Minimize consumption (energy, water, non- renewable resources). Minimize the production of waste...

317

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health, and Safety Division Environmental Services Group March 2009 Revision 4 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory, conducted April 18 through 22, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are being supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Ames Laboratory. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Ames Laboratory, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A plan is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When S A is completed, the results will be incorporated into the Ames Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 60 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

Not Available

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), conducted June 15 through 26, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 75 refs., 24 figs., 60 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Environmental Public Health at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requiring special laboratory expertise · The Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services, which, environmental sanitation, and laboratory sciences----to protect public health · Responding and sharing solutions to environmental public health problems worldwide "We" are---- · The Division of Laboratory Sciences, which

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

offices, the EMS Program Program Elements Environmental ManagementOffice of Institutional Assurance as stated in the OQMP. 3-7 • Environmental ManagementEnvironmental Management System Fiscal Year Improve (EMP classification) Integrated Safety Management System International Organization for Standardization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Office

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Program on Technology Innovation: Managing the Risks of Climate Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate policy creates substantial risks and opportunities for companies in the electric sector and the broader energy sector. Understanding these risks and making investment choices that explicitly recognize future policy uncertainty are critical to effective risk management. Today, many electric companies are actively considering substantial investments in new capacity. The technology choices these companies make and the financial return on these investments are integrally tied to future environmental ...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

323

Energy Crossroads: Global Climate Change | Environmental Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Global Climate Change Suggest a Listing Best Global Warming Articles Global Warming Articles provides facts about the causes, effects and answers to global warming; the environment; energy conservation, climate change and more. Ecolytics As emissions requirements, climate change, financial markets, and risk management become increasingly interconnected, organizations are left with critical choices regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions management. Ecolytics(tm), a comprehensive web-based software tool, can help organizations in the navigation of this complex area by providing an effective cataloging, strategic planning, economic analysis, and risk management solution. Enviro$en$e Funded by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Strategic

324

Environmental Management FY 2006 Budget Request DRAFT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation - Key to Transportation - Key to EM Success Presented to the Transportation External Coordination Working Group July 24, 2007 James Rispoli, Assistant Secretary Office of Environmental Management Solving Cleanup Challenges Through Risk Reduction 2 Solving Cleanup Challenges Through Risk Reduction ● EM's mission is the safe and successful cleanup of the Cold War legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research and includes:  Over 80 million gallons of radioactive liquid waste - the volume equivalent of 121 Olympic-size swimming pools  More than two thousand tons of spent nuclear fuel - roughly equal to the weight of 1,175 Toyota Camrys

325

Risk Management RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tool is the process of continuous and iterative identification and control of project risks and opportunities. Risks can be technical, financial, or programmatic. The goal for the risk...

326

Risk and robust optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops and explores the connections between risk theory and robust optimization. Specifically, we show that there is a one-to-one correspondence between a class of risk measures known as coherent risk measures ...

Brown, David Benjamin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 1996 EIS-0240: Final Environmental Impact Statement Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 next Energy.gov Careers & Internships...

328

1994 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I-Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C, Risk C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/004 Publication 9285.7-01 C December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper NOTICE The policies set out in [his document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

331

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) conducted December 7--11, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with PETC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at PETC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site Survey activities at PETC. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the Plan's results will be incorporated into the PETC Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 64 refs., 23 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE), Y-12 Plant, conducted November 10 through 21 and December 9 through 11, 1986. This Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Y-12 Plant. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at Y-12, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Y-12 Plant Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Y-12 Plant Survey. 80 refs., 76 figs., 61 tabs.

Not Available

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), conducted August 11 through 22, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the RFP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations carried on at RFP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activates. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the RFP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the RFP Survey. 75 refs., 24 figs., 33 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, conducted August 18 through September 5, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Hanford Site. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Hanford Site, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the Hanford Site. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Hanford Site Survey. 44 refs., 88 figs., 74 tabs.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, conducted August 18 through September 5, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Hanford Site. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Hanford Site, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the Hanford Site. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Hanford Site Survey. 44 refs., 88 figs., 74 tabs.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pantex Facility, Amarillo, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Pantex Facility, conducted November 3 through 14, 1986.The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialist, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Pantex Facility. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Pantex Facility, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Pantex Facility Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey for the Pantex Facility. 65 refs., 44 figs., 27 tabs.

Not Available

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the environmental survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), conducted June 16 through 27, 1986. The survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the FMPC. The survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at FMPC, and interviews with site personnel. The survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its onsite activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE national laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the FMPC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the FMPC survey. 41 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), conducted December 1 through 19, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with LLNL. The Survey covers all environmental media all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at LLNL, and interviews with site personnel. A Sampling and Analysis Plan was developed to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during performance of on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LLNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LLNL Survey. 70 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.,

Not Available

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) conducted April 6 through 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with BNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at BNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the BNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the BNL Survey. 80 refs., 24 figs., 48 tabs.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Environmental Report 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2008 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites - the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.lln.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2008: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status wildlife and plants (Chapter 6). Complete monitoring data, which are summarized in the body of the report, are provided in Appendix A. The remaining three chapters discuss the radiological impact on the public from LLNL operations (Chapter 7), LLNL's groundwater remediation program (Chapter 8), and quality assurance for the environmental monitoring programs (Chapter 9). The report uses Systeme International units, consistent with the federal Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and Executive Order 12770, Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs (1991). For ease of comparison to environmental reports issued prior to 1991, dose values and many radiological measurements are given in both metric and U.S. customary units. A conversion table is provided in the glossary. The report is the responsibility of LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Monitoring data were obtained through the combined efforts of the Environmental Protection Department; Environmental Restoration Department; Physical and Life Sciences Environmental Monitoring Radiation Laboratory; and the Hazards Control Department.

Gallegos, G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S; Dibley, V; Doman, J L; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Kumamoto, G; MacQueen, D H; Nelson, J C; Paterson, L; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, A M; Wilson, K; Woollett, J

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Environmental Compliance Management System  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy.

Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Environmental Compliance Management System  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing the Environmental Compliance Management System (ECMS) as a comprehensive, cost-effective tool to ensure (1) that the Laboratory complies with all applicable federal and state environmental laws and regulations, (2) that environmental issues and concerns are recognized and considered in the early phases of projects; and (3) that Laboratory personnel conduct Laboratory operations in the most environmentally acceptable manner. The ECMS is an expert computer system which is designed to allow project engineers to perform an environmental evaluation of their projects. The system includes a Master Program which collects basic project information, provide utility functions, and access the environmental expert modules, environmental expert system modules for each federal and state environmental law which allows the user to obtain specific information on how an individual law may affect his project; and site-specific databases which contain information necessary for effective management of the site under environmental regulations. The ECMS will have the capability to complete and print many of the necessary environmental forms required by federal and state agencies, including the Department of Energy.

Brownson, L.W.; Krsul, T.; Peralta, R.A. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Knudson, D.A.; Rosignolo, C.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

ScienceDirect JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ontine at wtYw.sciencedlrect.com ontine at wtYw.sciencedlrect.com ^-- 9 e* + - . , * * ScienceDirect JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY Journal o f Environmental Radioactivity 91 (2006) 27-40 www.elsevier.co~nAocate/jenvrad Radionuclides in marine macroalgae from Amchitka and Kiska Islands in the Aleutians: establishing a baseline for future biomonitoring Joanna Burger Michael Gochfeld C-d, David S . Kosson b7e, Charles W. Powers b-d*e7 Stephen Jewett b*f, Barry Friedlander b7d, Heloise Chenelot b=f7 Conrad D. Volz b-8, Christian Jeitner a-b Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 6 0 4 Allison R o a d . Piscataway, N.I 0 8 8 5 4 - 8 0 8 2 , USA Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Piscataway. N.I 0 8 8 5 4 . USA Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSZ), Piscataway, NJ 0

344

NREL: Wind Research - Environmental Impacts Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Impacts Research Environmental Impacts Research Photo of a Greater Prairie-Chicken. Credit: James Shroyer. NREL is a partner in the Grassland Shrub Steppe Species Collaborative, a multi-year effort to study wind turbines in prairie chicken habitat. The Wind Program at NREL works to resolve environmental issues that may hinder acceptance of wind energy technologies. The program accomplishes this through activities that address the potential effects of wind development on wildlife and identifies corresponding mitigation strategies. As part of this effort, the program supports the work of the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative (NWCC) Wildlife Workgroup, which is focused on collaborative approaches for understanding and evaluating species- and habitat-specific impacts, mitigation tools, risk assessment, and nocturnal

345

Novel Threat-risk Index Using Probabilistic Risk Assessment and Human Reliability Analysis - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

In support of a national need to improve the current state-of-the-art in alerting decision makers to the risk of terrorist attack, a quantitative approach employing scientific and engineering concepts to develop a threat-risk index was undertaken at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result of this effort, a set of models has been successfully integrated into a single comprehensive model known as Quantitative Threat-Risk Index Model (QTRIM), with the capability of computing a quantitative threat-risk index on a system level, as well as for the major components of the system. Such a threat-risk index could provide a quantitative variant or basis for either prioritizing security upgrades or updating the current qualitative national color-coded terrorist threat alert.

George A. Beitel

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Environmental risk analysis of crops for biofuels in the UK.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The past two decades have witnessed significant growth in attention and investment in renewable energy technologies. Replacement of fossil fuels that have long dominated our… (more)

Shepherd, Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1999: 1999: Vol. 1, No. 1 Characterizing Diesel Particle Exhaust Miscellaneous Electricity Use COMIS: An Interzonal Air-Flow Model GenOpt: A Generic Optimization Program News from the D.C. Office Around the Division The A-Team Report Sources and Credits PDF of EETD News Characterizing Diesel Particle Exhaust Recent concern about the risks to human health from airborne particulates such as those in diesel exhaust has motivated a group at the Environmental Energy Technologies Division to investigate the use of scattered polarized light. The goals are to characterize these particles and develop an instrument to measure these characteristics in real time. Having such an instrument can help regulatory authorities develop standards and monitor air quality. Airborne particulates, especially those less than 2.5

348

RM Environmental Review (NEPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Review-NEPA Environmental Review-NEPA Categorical exclusions are posted here to promote transparency and openness. Some actions may have environmental impacts that require an environmental assessment and a detailed analysis to determine the extent and severity of the impacts. For actions that have significant impacts or consequences to the environment or human health, RM prepares environmental impact statements. Environmental Impact Statements-EIS Estes-Flatiron Transmission Line Rebuild Project Granby Pumping Plant-Windy Gap Transmission Line Rebuild Project Hermosa West Wind Energy Project Maintenance and Vegetation Management along Existing Western TransmissionLine Rights of Way on National Forest System Lands in Colorado, Utah, Nebraska Platte River Cooperative Agreement PEIS, NE, CO and WY, DOE/EIS-0295 (Cooperating Agency)

349

UGP Environmental Review (NEPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Review-NEPA Environmental Review-NEPA Categorical exclusions are posted here to promote transparency and openness. Some actions may have environmental impacts that require an environmental assessment and a detailed analysis to determine the extent and severity of the impacts. For actions that have significant impacts or consequences to the environment or human health, UGP prepares environmental impact statements. Environmental Impact Statement-EIS Groton Generation Projects Draft EIS, Deer Creek Station Energy Facility Project, Brookings County, South Dakota (12.7mb pdf) Deer Creek Station Energy Facility Project Record of Decision (900kb pdf) Grande Praire Wind Farm, O'Neill, NE Wilton IV Wind Energy Center EIS (DOE/EIS-0469) Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS (DOE/EIS-0408)

350

Earth & Environmental Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth & Environmental Science Earth & Environmental Science Earth & Environmental Science1354608000000Earth & Environmental ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Earth & Environmental Science Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Reference Data Sources Organizations Journals Key Resources AGRICOLA The catalog and index to the collections of the National Agricultural Library, as well as a primary public source for world-wide access to agricultural information. BioOne A global, not-for-profit collaboration bringing together scientific societies, publishers, and libraries to provide access to critical, peer-reviewed research in the biological, ecological, and environmental

351

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' to present summary environmental data for the purpose of: (a) characterizing site's environmental management performance; (b) summarizing environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) describing compliance status with respect to environmental standards and requirements; and (d) highlighting significant site programs and efforts. This report is the principal document that demonstrates compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment,' and is a key component of DOE's effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at Savannah River Site (SRS). SRS has four primary missions: (1) Environmental Management - Cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War efforts and preparing decommissioned facilities and areas for long-term stewardship; (2) Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Support - Meeting the needs of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile through the tritium programs of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); (3) Nuclear Nonproliferation Support - Meeting the needs of the NNSA's nuclear nonproliferation programs by safely storing and dispositioning excess special nuclear materials; and (4) Research and Development - Supporting the application of science by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to meet the needs of SRS, the DOE complex, and other federal agencies During 2010, SRS worked to fulfill these missions and position the site for future operations. SRS continued to work with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to find and implement solutions and schedules for waste management and disposition. As part of its mission to clean up the Cold War legacy, SRS will continue to address the highest-risk waste management issues by safely storing and preparing liquid waste and nuclear materials for disposition, and by safely stabilizing any tank waste residues that remain on site.

Mamatey, A.; Dunaway-Ackerman, J.

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

Site environmental report summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Environmental renaissance in Pennsylvania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During centuries of rapid growth of the coal mining industry and expanded development in Pennsylvania, trees were felled, streams were diverted and strip mining caused much environmental damage. All that has now changed. The article gives examples of land and water restoration carried out by organizations such as the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, the West Branch Susquehanna Restoration Coalition and the Anthracite Region Independent Power Producers Association. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection directs and coordinates environmental projects. 5 photos.

Stevens, J.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

PIEDMONT ENVIRONMENTAL COUNCIL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIEDMONT ENVIRONMENTAL COUNCIL PIEDMONT ENVIRONMENTAL COUNCIL October 30, 2013 Julie A. Smith and Christopher Lawrence Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code: OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 VIA electronic mail: juliea.smith@hq.doe.gov christopher.lawrence@hq.doe.gov Dear Ms. Smith and Mr. Lawrence: The Piedmont Environmental Council (PEC) was founded in 1972 to promote and protect the Virginia

355

2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Environmental Responsibility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Environmental 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Environmental Responsibility 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Environmental Responsibility The scope of the Department's environmental cleanup includes stabilization and disposition of some of the earth's most hazardous materials generated from spent nuclear fuel and nuclear radioactive waste material. The cleanup program resulting from over five decades of nuclear weapons production and energy research is the largest active cleanup program in the world. In addition, after active cleanup, residual risks will remain for significant periods of time at most DOE cleanup sites. The Department will take appropriate action to protect human health and the environment from these residual risks. The Department continues its effort

356

Office of Environmental Management FY 2011 Budget Request  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on 20 Years of Cleanup Progress: on 20 Years of Cleanup Progress: Investments to sustain risk reduction and strengthen technology Office of Environmental Management Office of Environmental Management FY 2011 Budget Request FY 2011 Budget Request Dr. Inés Triay Dr. Inés Triay Assistant Secretary Assistant Secretary Office of Environmental Management Office of Environmental Management February 2010 Building on 20 Years of Cleanup Progress: Investments to sustain risk reduction and strengthen technology Chief Business Chief Technical Assistant Secretary Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary EM has embarked on a Journey to Excellence 2 Our Vision: "EM completes quality work safely, on schedule and within cost and delivers demonstrated value to the American taxpayer." Chief Business Officer

357

Site Environmental Report, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Environmental information management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Information Management Plan provides an overview of the management of environmental information generation by Hanford Site programs. The long-term nature of environmental programs requires that electronic data, documents, and other materials be kept for extended periods in a secure, controlled, and retrievable manner. An important part of the program is the maintenance of administrative records under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989). The Environmental Information Management Plan introduces Westinghouse Hanford records management and engineering document control systems and their relationship to environmental programs. Specific information is provided about the operation of the Environmental Data Management Center, a central facility that receives, processes, and maintains information related to environmental program activities. The Environmental Data Management Center maintains a reference file, coordinates administrative record activities, and distributes administrative record indexes and administrative record documents to the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and four information repositories. 43 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

Michael, L.E.; Main, G.C.; See, E.J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

1987 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental monitoring program is to determine whether: facility operations, waste treatment, and control systems functioned as designed to contain environmental pollutants; and the applicable environmental standards and effluents control requirements were met. This annual report for calendar year 1987 follows the recommendations given by the Department of Energy (DOE) but has been broadened to meet site-specific environmental monitoring needs. This program includes the sampling and analysis for radioactivity, water quality indices, metals, and organic compounds. 32 refs., 17 figs., 70 tabs.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Environmental Compliance Guide  

SciTech Connect

Volume II supplements Vol. I in providing procedures, relative timing, and details to assist in achieving compliance with Federal environmental requirements. (PSB)

None

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Center for Environmental Biotechnology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Program, the Energy Resources Program, and the Climate Change and Carbon Management Program. The Center for Environmental Biotechnology, houses all of the Ecology...

362

Environmental Quality: Air (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Quality regulates air quality in Louisiana. The Department has an established a fee system for funding the monitoring, investigation and other activities required...

363

Environmental Degradation Meeting 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmentally induced materials problems cause a significant portion of nuclear power plant outage time and are of great economic and safety concern both ...

364

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MO, June 4-7, 1979 INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTALContract W-7405-ENG-48 INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL0.003 mrem C^ Figure 5 INSTRUMENTATION: Too often analytical

McLaughlin, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

1999 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report for Brookhaven National Laboratory for the calendar year 1999, as required by DOE Order 231.1.

NONE

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

SRS Environmental Report 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

free Adobe Acrobat Reader. To download this software from Adobe, please CLICK HERE. DOE Logo DOE-EM logo Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2001 (PDFs) Savannah...

367

Special Environmental Analysis  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

April 14, 2003 iv ACRONYMS BMPs best management practices BRMP Biological Resources Management Plan DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA environmental assessment SEA Mitigation...

368

EML: Environmental Measurements Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security and Privacy Notices History of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory The Manhattan ProjectAtomic Energy Commission (1942 1975) Our Laboratory traces its roots...

369

E M Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E M Environmental Management safety performance cleanup closure EM RECOVERY ACT TOP LINE MESSAGES * The Department estimates the 6 billion Recovery Act investment has allowed us...

370

Environmental report 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility operated by the University of California, serves as a national resource of scientific, technical, and engineering capability with a special focus on national security. Over the years, the Laboratory`s mission has been broadened to encompass such areas as strategic defense, energy, the environment, biomedicine, the economy, and education. The Laboratory carries out this mission in compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulatory requirements and takes measures to ensure that its operations do not adversely affect the environment or public health. It does so with the support of the Environmental Protection Department, which is responsible for environmental monitoring, environmental restoration, hazardous waste management, and ensuring environmental compliance. During 1993, the Environmental Protection Department conducted sampling of air, sewage effluent, ground water, surface water, soil, vegetation and foodstuffs, and took measurements of environmental radiation. It performed more than 190,000 analyses of environmental samples. The analytical results are summarized along with evaluations of the impact of radioactive and nonradioactive materials, a discussion of the effects of LLNL operations on the environment, and a summary of the activities undertaken to comply with local, state, and federal environmental laws.

Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Gallegos, G.M.; Tate, P.J.; Balke, B.K. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Environmental Programs Long-Term Environmental Stewardship Baseline Handbook  

SciTech Connect

As environmental restoration (ER) projects move toward completion, the planning, integration, and documentation of long-term environmental stewardship (LTES) activities is increasingly important for ensuring smooth transition to LTES. The Long-Term Environmental Stewardship Baseline Handbook (Handbook) prepared by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Service Center Environmental Programs Department (EPD) outlines approaches for integrating site-specific LTES planning and implementation into site ER baseline documentation. Since LTES will vary greatly from site to site, the Handbook also provides for flexibility in addressing LTES in ER Project life-cycle baselines, while clearly identifying Environmental Management (EM) requirements. It provides suggestions for enacting LTES principles and objectives through operational activities described in site-specific LTES plans and life cycle ER Project baseline scope, cost, and schedule documentation and tools for more thorough planning, better quantification, broader understanding of risk and risk management factors, and more comprehensive documentation. LTES planning applied to baselines in a phased approach will facilitate seamlessly integrating LTES into site operational activities, thereby minimizing the use of resources.

Griswold, D. D.; Rohde, K.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

373

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). This EMP does not address the technical requirements for such monitoring.

Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Nevada Test Site, Mercury, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS), conducted June 22 through July 10, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the NTS. The Survey covers all environment media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations and activities performed at the NTS, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by the Battelle Columbus Division under contract with DOE. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the NTS Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the NTS Survey. 165 refs., 42 figs., 52 tabs.

Not Available

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents ORNL RA Graphic Results ORNL Baseline Risk Assessment Results ORNL Screening Risk Assessment Results ORNL Other Risk Assessment Results ORNL RA Graphic Results WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse (No Fish) Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Industrial Landuse

377

PNNL: About - Environmental Commitment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

public and future generations from unacceptable risks resulting from its operations. PNNL fulfills these commitments through active identification, evaluation, prevention, and...

378

Comprehensive Environmental Management Process  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information about Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Environmental Management Plan. The topics covered include: waste minimization, waste generation, environmental concerns, public relations of the laboratory, and how this plan will help to answer to the demands of the laboratory as their mission changes.

Hjeresen, D.L.; Roybal, S.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Environmental geographic information system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

Peek, Dennis; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Supplemental Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2007, the U.S. Department of the Navy (Navy) prepared the Environmental Assessment for the Disposal of Naval Activity Puerto Rico (2007 EA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with the disposal of Naval Activity Puerto Rico (NAPR) in accordance with the

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Environmental Report 2007  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of the 'Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2007' are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites--the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.lln.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2007: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status wildlife and plants (Chapter 6). Complete monitoring data, which are summarized in the body of the report, are provided in Appendix A. The remaining three chapters discuss the radiological impact on the public from LLNL operations (Chapter 7), LLNL's groundwater remediation program (Chapter 8), and quality assurance for the environmental monitoring programs (Chapter 9). The report uses Systeme International units, consistent with the federal Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and Executive Order 12770, Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs (1991). For ease of comparison to environmental reports issued prior to 1991, dose values and many radiological measurements are given in both metric and U.S. customary units. A conversion table is provided in the glossary.

Mathews, S; Gallegos, G; Berg, L L; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S; Doman, J L; Ferry, L S; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Kumamoto, G; Larson, J; MacQueen, D H; Paterson, L; Revelli, M A; Ridley, M; Rueppel, D; Wegrecki, A M; Wilson, K; Woollett, J

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

382

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE TO RECORD HILL WIND LLC FOR CONSTRUCTION OF A WIND ENERGY PROJECT IN ROXBURY, MAINE U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 July 2011 DOE/EA-1824 i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to issue a loan guarantee to Record Hill Wind LLC (Record Hill) for the construction of a 50.6 megawatt (MW) wind energy project located in Roxbury, Maine. 1 DOE has prepared this Final Environmental Assessment (EA) in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [USC] 4321, et. seq.) Council on Environmental Quality regulations for implementing NEPA (40 Code of Federal Regulations

383

Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

94 Federal Register 94 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 209 / Friday, October 30, 2009 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-8798-8] Environmental Impact Statements and Regulations; Availability of EPA Comments Availability of EPA comments prepared pursuant to the Environmental Review Process (ERP), under section 309 of the Clean Air Act and Section 102(2)(c) of the National Environmental Policy Act as amended. Requests for copies of EPA comments can be directed to the Office of Federal Activities at 202-564-7146 or http://www.epa.gov/ compliance/nepa/. An explanation of the ratings assigned to draft environmental impact statements (EISs) was published in FR dated July 17, 2009 (74 FR 34754). Draft EISs EIS No. 20090290, ERP No. D-FTA- F54014-WI, Kenosha-Racine-Milwaukee

384

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

2009 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

387

2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Environmental Science and Research Foundation annual technical report to DOE-ID, January , 1995--December 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The foundation conducts an environmental monitoring and surveillance program over an area covering much of the upper Snake River Plain and provide environmental education and support services related to INEL natural resource issues. Also, the foundation, with its university affiliates, conducts ecological and radioecological research on the Idaho National Environmental Research Park. This research benefits major DOE-ID programs including waste management, environmental restoration, spent nuclear fuels, and land management issues. Major accomplishments during CY1995 can be divided into five categories: environmental surveillance program, environmental education, environmental services and support, ecological risk assessment, and research benefitting the DOE-ID mission.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Environmental Survey preliminary report, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Team members are being provided by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NIPER. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NIPER and interviews with site personnel. 35 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Environmental Justice | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Justice Environmental Justice Environmental Justice Selected documents on the topic of Environmental Justice under NEPA. May 1, 2008 Environmental Justice Strategy In response to Executive Order 12898, DOE prepared and issued its Environmental Justice Strategy in 1995. Since then, the agency has conducted a series of activities to implement the Strategy. Both the Executive Order and the Strategy require that DOE establish and maintain an integrated approach for identifying, tracking, and monitoring environmental justice across the Department. July 1, 1999 Final Guidance for Consideration of Environmental Justice in Clean Air Act 309 Reviews This Environmental Protection Agency document provides guidance on reviewing and commenting on other federal agencies NEPA documents to help

391

EIS-0396: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement 6: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0396: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Global Nuclear Energy Partnership The proposed Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Program, which is part of the President's Advanced Energy Initiative, is intended to support a safe, secure, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy, both domestically and internationally. Domestically, the GNEP Program would promote technologies that support economic, sustained production of nuclear-generated electricity, while reducing the impacts associated with spent nuclear fuel disposal and reducing proliferation risks. The Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action envisions changing the United States nuclear energy fuel cycle from an open (or once-through) fuel

392

Environmental monitoring via compressive sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring aims to describe the state of the environment. It identifies environmental issues to show us how well our environmental objectives are being met. Traditional large-scale sensor networks for environmental monitoring suffers from ... Keywords: compressive sensing, environmental monitoring, information management, sensor networks

Shulin Yan; Chao Wu; Wei Dai; Moustafa Ghanem; Yike Guo

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Office of Environmental Management Non-Defense Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates 6-25-10v2 The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Defense Environmental Cleanup The Office of Environmental Management Uranium Enrichment D&D...

394

Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) Structure and Application  

SciTech Connect

The Simplified Risk Model Version II (SRM-II) is a quantitative tool for efficiently evaluating the risk from Department of Energy waste management activities. Risks evaluated include human safety and health and environmental impact. Both accidents and normal, incident-free operation are considered. The risk models are simplifications of more detailed risk analyses, such as those found in environmental impact statements, safety analysis reports, and performance assessments. However, wherever possible, conservatisms in such models have been removed to obtain best estimate results. The SRM-II is used to support DOE complex-wide environmental management integration studies. Typically such studies involve risk predictions covering the entire waste management program, including such activities as initial storage, handling, treatment, interim storage, transportation, and final disposal.

S. A. Eide; T. E. Wierman

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Guidance for Data Useability in Risk Assessment (Part A)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superfund Superfund Guidance for Data Useability in Risk Assessment (Part A) Final April 1992 Guidance for Data Useability in Risk Assessment (Part A) Final Notice: Guidance for Radioanalytical Data Usability in Risk Assessment is Given in Part B Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 NOTICE The policies and procedures set forth here are intended as guidance to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other government employees. They do not constitute rulemaking by the Agency, and may not be relied on to create a substantive or procedural right enforceable by any other person. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency may take action that is at variance with the policies and procedures in this guidance and may change them at any time without

396

NETL: Global Environmental Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gasification Systems Global Environmental Benefits Environmental performance for future energy production systems is a much greater factor as emission standards tighten in the United States and worldwide. The outstanding environmental performance of gasification systems makes it an excellent technology for the clean production of electricity and other products. In addition, the reduction of CO2 emissions is one of the major challenges facing industry in response to global climate change. Other countries with coal reserves might potentially import technologies developed in the United States to enable low-cost gasification with carbon capture and EOR or sequestration. Not only will this benefit the U.S. gasification technology industry, but it will also result in a global environmental benefit through more affordable control of greenhouse gases (GHGs). See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) link below for a summary of the impact of fossil fuels without carbon capture on CO2 emissions, on the GHG contributions of different countries, and of the projected impact of developing countries to 2030:

397

1985 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program is designed to determine that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. The data were evaluated using the appropriate environmental regulatory criteria. The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1985 are summarized in this report. Detailed data are not included in the main body of the report, but are tabulated and presented in Appendix D. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratoy; concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory; and the 1984 strontium-90 data which was not available for inclusion in the 1984 Environmental Monitoring Report. In 1985, the results of the surveillance program demonstraed that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a multi-program national laboratory, prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform outside regulators, the public, and Laboratory employees of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review, and to summarize BNL's on-site environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state, and local regulations; and environmental, restoration, and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. This report is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.ser.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview, and is distributed with a CD version of the full-length SER. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

ENVIRONMENT AND WASTE MANAGMENT SERVICES DIVISION; ET AL.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Environmental readiness document magnetohydrodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major areas of environmental concern with regard to the commercialization of coal-fired MHD generators are discussed. MHD technology and expectations about its future utilization are described. Information pertinent to the technology was drawn from the DOE technology program office and from an Environmental Development Plan developed for the technology by EV and the program office through an Environmental Coordination Committee. The environmental concerns associated with the technology are examined, and the current status of knowledge about each concern and its potential seriousness and manageability through regulation and control technology, is discussed. Present and projected societal capabilities to reduce and control undesirable environmental, health, safety, and related social impacts to a level of public acceptability -- as reflected in current and proposed environmental standards -- which will allow the technology to be commercialized and utilized in a timely manner are summarized. The ERD as a whole thus provides an assessment, within the limits of available knowledge and remaining uncertainties, of the future environmental readiness of the technology to contribute to the meeting of the Nation's energy needs. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Risk Assess - updated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Software Development Risk Assessment Software Development Risk Assessment Note: The purpose of this prompt list is to provide project managers with a tool for identifying and planning for potential project risks. It is process-based and supports the framework established by the DOE Software Engineering Methodology. It will be used within the stage exit process as an additional tool to ensure that the project manager has identified and is managing known risk factors. Additional detailed information describes the various risk factors and how to score them. Performing a risk assessment is an important step in being prepared for potential problems that can occur within any software project. During the risk assessment, if a potential risk is identified, a solution or plan of action should be developed. (A problem analyzed and planned

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uf6 environmental risks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- - FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ANALYTICAL LABORATORY PROJECT NO. 94-AA-01 PANTEX PLANT AMAFsLLo, TEXAS June 1995 U.S. Department of E n e r g y Albuquerque Operations office Amarillo Area Office Pantex Plant P.O. Box 30030 Amarillo, Texas 79120 DISTRl6UTlON OF THIS DOCUMENT IS CMLtMmD FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR June 1995 1 I U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Amarillo Area m i c e Pantex Plant P.O. Box 30030 Amarillo, Texas 79120 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. . --.-- - . . _ . I . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . - I I I TABLE OF CONTENTS m EXECUTIVESUMMARY .............................................. 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION

402

National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31-10 31-10 u.s. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Checklist Project/Activity: Restoration of drill pads, infiltration basins, sumps, and other surface areas at the Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada A. Brief Project/Activity Description The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) proposes to restore two drill pads with infiltration basins, two lined sumps, and miscellaneous surface areas associated with groundwater monitoring wells. A small crew of four people would take 2 weeks to complete this work in early September 2010. Disturbed areas would be hand-seeded with native plant species in November 2010. An attached figure shows all affected areas. Drill pads associated with groundwater monitoring wells MV-4 and MV-5 are each approximately 250 feet (ft)

403

EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing three ground water compliance strategies for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. These proposed strategies were derived through consultation with representatives of the Navajo UMTRA Program, the Navajo Environmental Protection Agency, and other agencies. The strategies are designed to minimize risk to human health and the environment that result from mill-related constituents in ground water and surface water. Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site DOE/EA-1388 (September 2001)

404

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Environmental settings for selected US Department of Energy installations - support information for the programmatic environmental impact statement and the baseline environmental management report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the environmental setting information developed for 25 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) installations in support of the DOE`s Programmatic Environmental Impact Study (PEIS) and the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). The common objective of the PEIS and the BEMR is to provide the public with information about the environmental contamination problems associated with major DOE facilities across the country, and to assess the relative risks that radiological and hazardous contaminants pose to the public, onsite workers, and the environment. Environmental setting information consists of the site-specific data required to model (using the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System) the atmospheric, groundwater, and surface water transport of contaminants within and near the boundaries of the installations. The environmental settings data describes the climate, atmospheric dispersion, hydrogeology, and surface water characteristics of the installations. The number of discrete environmental settings established for each installation was governed by two competing requirements: (1) the risks posed by contaminants released from numerous waste sites were to be modeled as accurately as possible, and (2) the modeling required for numerous release sites and a large number of contaminants had to be completed within the limits imposed by the PEIS and BEMR schedule. The final product is the result of attempts to balance these competing concerns in a way that minimizes the number of settings per installation in order to meet the project schedule while at the same, time providing adequate, if sometimes highly simplified, representations of the different areas within an installation. Environmental settings were developed in conjunction with installation experts in the fields of meteorology, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry.

Holdren, G.R.; Glantz, C.S.; Berg, L.K.; Delinger, K.; Fosmire, C.J.; Goodwin, S.M.; Rustad, J.R.; Schalla, R.; Schramke, J.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

1986 environmental monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1986 are summarized in this report. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates and halogens; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the organics, radioactivity, and water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; and the concentrations of organics, radioactivity, and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory. In 1986, the results of the surveillance program demonstrated that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Environmental management system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System (EMS) is identification of environmental consequences from SNL/NM activities, products, and/or services to develop objectives and measurable targets for mitigation of any potential impacts to the environment. This Source Document discusses the annual EMS process for analysis of environmental aspects and impacts and also provides the fiscal year (FY) 2010 analysis. Further information on the EMS structure, processes, and procedures are described within the programmatic EMS Manual (PG470222).

Salinas, Stephanie A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

PPPL Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

Contained in the following report are data for radioactivity in the environment collected and analyzed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s Princeton Environmental, Analytical, and Radiological Laboratory (PEARL). The PEARL is located on?site and is certified for analyzing radiological and non?radiological parameters through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection’s Laboratory Certification Program, Certification Number 12471. Non?radiological surface and ground water samples are analyzed by NJDEP certified subcontractor laboratories – QC, Inc. and Accutest Laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, these data, as contained in the “Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011,” are documented and certified to be correct.

Virginia Finley, Robeert Sheneman and Jerry Levine

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

409

Environmental Review Branch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment (GLE) submitted its Environmental Report on January 31, 2009 to construct and operate a laser enrichment facility. Since the original ER was finalized, the location of the entrance and roadway into the Wilmington Site has been revise. GLE hereby submits the GLE Environmental Report Supplement 2- Revised Entrance and Roadway to describe the environmental impacts of the change. If you have any questions, or require additional information, please contact Julie Olivier of my staff at 910-819-4799, or at Julie.Olivier@qe.com; or myself at 910-819-1925 or at Alberte.Kennedy @ pe.com.

Albert Kennedy; Andrea Kock Chief

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

CEQ Environmental Justice Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JUSTICE JUSTICE Guidance Under the National Environmental Policy Act Council on Environmental Quality Executive Office of the President Old Executive Office Building, Room 360 Washington, D.C. 20502 (202)395-5750 http://www.whitehouse.gov/CEQ/ December 10, 1997 ii Table of Contents I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. Executive Order 12898 and the Presidential Memorandum . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 III. Executive Order 12898 and NEPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 A. NEPA Generally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 B. Principles for Considering Environmental Justice under NEPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1. General Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2. Additional Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

411

1998 Environmental Management Science Program Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) is a collaborative partnership between the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Science (DOE-SC), and the Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to sponsor basic environmental and waste management related research. Results are expected to lead to reduction of the costs, schedule, and risks associated with cleaning up the nation's nuclear complex. The EMSP research portfolio addresses the most challenging technical problems of the EM program related to high level waste, spent nuclear fuel, mixed waste, nuclear materials, remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and health, ecology, or risk. The EMSP was established in response to a mandate from Congress in the fiscal year 1996 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. Congress directed the Department to ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs, develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective''. This mandate followed similar recommendations from the Galvin Commission to the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board. The EMSP also responds to needs identified by National Academy of Sciences experts, regulators, citizen advisory groups, and other stakeholders.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund, Vol.II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States United States Office of Emergency and EPA/540/1-89/001 Environmental Protection Remedial Responce March 1989 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Superfund Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume II Environmental Evaluation Manual Interim Final EPA EPA/540/1-89/001 March 1989 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume II Environmental Evaluation Manual Interim Final Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Disclaimer The policies and procedures set forth here are intended as guidance to Agency and other government employees. They do not constitute rulemaking by the Agency, and may not be relied on to create a substantive or procedural right enforceable by any other person. The Government may take action

413

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Memorandum , Part II. Screening Level Risk Assessment 92-225-161-49 K-33 Cooling Towers screening risk assessments (2) K-770 sites screening risk assessment (9...

414

2012 Annual Planning Summary for Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Environmental Management.

415

Business Opportunities Session Office of Environmental Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Opportunities Session Office of Environmental Management Business Opportunities Session Office of Environmental Management Environmental Clean up Business Opportunities...

416

Preliminary Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project Revision Sheet for the Environmental Assessment Finding of No Significant Impact Mitigation Action Plan DOE/EA-1731 Bonneville Power Administration May 2011 Walla Walla-Tucannon Transmission Line Rebuild Project 1 Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment Revision Sheet for the Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1731 Summary This revision sheet documents the changes to be incorporated into the Walla Walla-Tucannon River Transmission Line Rebuild Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment (EA). With the addition of these changes, the Preliminary EA will not be reprinted and will serve as the Final

417

Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Al Al b any, OR * Mo rg antow n , WV * Pitt, bu rg h , PA August 12, 20 II Dear Reader: The enclosed document, Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment for General Motors LLC Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative (supplemental EA; DOElEA- I 723S), was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500 to 1508) and DOE NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). DOE prepared this supplemental EA to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of providing financial assistance under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act; Public Law 111-5, 123 Stat. liS) to General Motors Limited Liability Company (GM) for its proposed project

418

Environmental report for 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents summary information about environmental compliance efforts for 1989. To enable evaluation of the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements were made at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300 of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, and foodstuff. Evaluations were made of LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment. The monitoring data demonstrate that LLNL was in compliance with environmental laws and regulations concerning emission and discharge of materials to the environment. In addition, the monitoring data demonstrate that the environmental impacts of LLNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public or the environment. 98 refs., 40 figs., 77 tabs.

Sims, J.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Brown, M.G.; Gallegos, G.M. (eds.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Environmentally safe fluid extractor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

Sungaila, Zenon F. (Orland Park, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2013 January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office JANUARY 2013 DOE/EA-1923 iv January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office January 2013 DOE/EA-1923 v January 2013 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Final Environmental Assessment for the Green Energy School Wind Project (DOE/EA-1923) CONTACT: For additional copies or more information on this final Environmental Assessment (EA),

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421

Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

076 Federal Register 076 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 250 / Monday, December 31, 2012 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-9006-8] Notice of Intent: Designation of an Expanded Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) off Charleston, South Carolina AGENCY: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4. ACTION: Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the designation of an expanded ODMDS off Charleston, South Carolina. Purpose: EPA has the authority to designate ODMDSs under Section 102 of the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (33 U.S.C. 1401 et seq.). It is EPA's policy to prepare a National Environmental Policy Document for all ODMDS designations (63 FR 58045, October 1998). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, TO

422

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE (EC)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE (EC) OBJECTIVE EC.1: LANL has established and implemented an Environmental Compliance program to ensure safe accomplishment of work and operations within the requirements of the BIO, TSRs, SER, and regulatory permits for WCRR Facility activities. Sufficient numbers of qualified personnel, as well as adequate facilities and equipment, are available to support WCRRF operations. (CRs 1, 4, 6, 7, 9) CRITERIA 1. WCRRF has implemented the requirements for hazardous materials and waste management programs, as described in the WCRRF BIO and TSRs (WCRRF TSRs 5.6.9 and 5.10.2). 2. Environmental permits required for WCRR operations have been met. Processes are in place to ensure that these requirements are maintained. Environmental regulations include Resource

423

RMOTC - Testing - Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Environmental Deer at RMOTC Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC offers industrial infrastructure and has dedicated sites for long- and short-term environmental testing projects. It also maintains a close working relationship with the Wyoming Oil & Gas Conservation Commission and the Wyoming Department of Environmental

424

Environmental Management System Plan  

SciTech Connect

Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

425

Environmental Approvals (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Environmental Approvals Branch ensures that developments are regulated in a manner that protects the environment and public health, and sustains a high quality of life for present and future...

426

External > Programs > Environmental Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Haul Road Environmental Management The Oak Ridge Reservation is one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) most unique and complex sites, encompassing three major campuses and...

427

Environmental report 1992  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a US Department of Energy facility operated by the University of California, serves as a national resource of scientific, technical, and engineering capability with a special focus on national security. During 1992, the Environmental Protection Department conducted sampling of air, sewage effluent, ground water, surface water, soil, vegetation and foodstuffs, and took measurements of environmental radiation. It performed more than 150,000 analyses of environmental samples. The analytical results are summarized in the chapters that follow, along with evaluations of the impact of radioactive and nonradioactive materials, a discussion of the effects of LLNL operations on the environment, and a summary of the activities undertaken to comply with local, state, and federal environmental laws.

Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Gallegos, G.M.; Wander, S.M. [and others

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and summarizes the status of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental programs and performance and restoration efforts, as well as any impacts, both past and present, that Laboratory operations have had on the environment. The document is intended to be technical in nature. A summary of the report is also prepared as a separate document to provide a general overview and includes a CD version of the full report. Operated by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) for the Department of Energy (DOE), BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future'', reflects BNL's management philosophy to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its missions, with a health balance between science and the environment.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Exploring Civil and Environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,000 Drinking water supply system 1.6 million km Waste water treatment facilities (publicly owned) 16,000 TRB is a profession that applies technology to meet society's needs. · Civil and environmental engineers are essential

430

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3) environmental management programs, (4) training, (5)Management Programs3-5 Structure and Responsibility.3-6 Training,Management System Plan Program Elements Additional information regarding EMS training

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Environmental Data Bank  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to determine the environment to which the equipment designed by Sandia Corporation will be exposed, a "Data Bank" of environmental information was compiled. Measured quantities resulting from actual uses were continually being summarized.

,

1962-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Screening Risk Evaluation methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) Guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on D&D facilities. These guidelines are designed specifically for the completion of the