Sample records for uf6 cylinder storage

  1. NGSI: IAEA Verification of UF6 Cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is often ignorant of the location of declared, uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders following verification, because cylinders are not typically tracked onsite or off. This paper will assess various methods the IAEA uses to verify cylinder gross defects, and how the task could be ameliorated through the use of improved identification and monitoring. The assessment will be restricted to current verification methods together with one that has been applied on a trial basis—short-notice random inspections coupled with mailbox declarations. This paper is part of the NNSA Office of Nonproliferation and International Security’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) program to investigate the concept of a global monitoring scheme that uniquely identifies and tracks UF6 cylinders.

  2. Enrichment Assay Methods for a UF6 Cylinder Verification Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Jordan, David V.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.; Orton, Christopher R.

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These enrichment assay methods interrogate only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume, and are time-consuming and expensive to execute for inspectors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an unattended measurement system capable of automated enrichment measurements over the full volume of Type 30B and Type 48 cylinders. This Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) could be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. The focus of this paper is the development of nondestructive assay (NDA) methods that combine “traditional” enrichment signatures (e.g. 185-keV emission from U-235) and more-penetrating “non-traditional” signatures (e.g. high-energy neutron-induced gamma rays spawned primarily from U-234 alpha emission) collected by medium-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers (i.e. sodium iodide or lanthanum bromide). The potential of these NDA methods for the automated assay of feed, tail and product cylinders is explored through MCNP modeling and with field measurements on a cylinder population ranging from 0.2% to 5% in U-235 enrichment.

  3. Onsite Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plant UF6 Cylinder Destructive Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Carter, Jennifer C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Phillips, Jon R.; Curtis, Michael M.

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The IAEA safeguards approach for gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) includes measurements of gross, partial, and bias defects in a statistical sampling plan. These safeguard methods consist principally of mass and enrichment nondestructive assay (NDA) verification. Destructive assay (DA) samples are collected from a limited number of cylinders for high precision offsite mass spectrometer analysis. DA is typically used to quantify bias defects in the GCEP material balance. Under current safeguards measures, the operator collects a DA sample from a sample tap following homogenization. The sample is collected in a small UF6 sample bottle, then sealed and shipped under IAEA chain of custody to an offsite analytical laboratory. Current practice is expensive and resource intensive. We propose a new and novel approach for performing onsite gaseous UF6 DA analysis that provides rapid and accurate assessment of enrichment bias defects. DA samples are collected using a custom sampling device attached to a conventional sample tap. A few micrograms of gaseous UF6 is chemically adsorbed onto a sampling coupon in a matter of minutes. The collected DA sample is then analyzed onsite using Laser Ablation Absorption Ratio Spectrometry-Destructive Assay (LAARS-DA). DA results are determined in a matter of minutes at sufficient accuracy to support reliable bias defect conclusions, while greatly reducing DA sample volume, analysis time, and cost.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A PORTAL MONITOR FOR UF6 CYLINDER VERIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Curtis, Michael M.; Shaver, Mark W.; Benz, Jacob M.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.; Jordan, David V.; Noss, Daniel; Ford, Herbert

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s operations. As additional enrichment plans come online to support the expansion of nuclear power, reducing person-days of inspection will take on greater importance. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a concept to automate the verification of enrichment plant cylinders to enable 100% product-cylinder verification and potentially, mass-balance calculations on the facility as a whole (by also measuring feed and tails cylinders). The Automated Cylinder Enrichment Verification System (ACEVS) would be located at key measurement points and will positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the data along with operator inputs in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. Given the potential for reduced inspector presence, the operational and manpower-reduction benefits of the portal concept are clear. However, it is necessary to assess whether the cylinder portal concept can meet, or potentially improve upon, today’s U-235 enrichment assay performance. PNNL’s ACEVS concept utilizes sensors that could be operated in an unattended mode: moderated He-3 neutron detectors and large NaI(Tl) scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy. The medium-resolution NaI(Tl) scintillators are a sacrifice in energy resolution but do provide high collection efficiency for signatures above 1 MeV. The He-3/NaI sensor combination allows the exploitation of additional, more-penetrating signatures than those currently utilized: Neutrons produced from F-19(?,n) reactions (spawned primarily from U-234 alpha emission) and high-energy gamma rays (extending up to 10 MeV) induced by neutrons interacting in the steel cylinder. These signatures are indirect measures of U-235 that require a relatively stable U-234/U-235 ratio in the product material in order to be useful. The hypothesis of this work is that the U-234/U-235 ratio is sufficiently constant, for the specific facility where the automated system is installed, to rely on neutron and high-energy gamma-ray signatures for indirect measurement of U-235. Further, these highly penetrating signatures can be combined with a modified form of NaI-based 185-keV enrichment measurements to meet target uncertainties for the verification of product cylinders, with the additional benefits of full-volume assay of the cylinder and 100% product-cylinder verification (as opposed to today’s sampling-based approach). This paper focuses on the enrichment measurement aspects of the ACEVS concept: neutron and high-energy gamma-ray signatures, the radiation sensors designed to collect those signatures, and proof-of-principle cylinder measurements and analysis. Preliminary analysis indicates that an automated cylinder verification approach has the potential to meet target uncertainty values for 30B products cylinders (5%), assuming ore-based enrichment feed and a facility-specific calibration. Also described is the additional work needed to more definitively assess the concept’s viability, particularly through a better understanding of the U-234/U-235 ratio variability in modern enrichment plants.

  5. Integrating UF6 Cylinder RF Tracking With Continuous Load Cell Monitoring for Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations Verifying Declared UF6 Feed and Withdrawal Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Miller, Paul [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is demonstrating the integration of UF6 cylinder tracking, using RF technology, with continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) at mock UF6 feed and withdrawal (F&W) stations. CLCM and cylinder tracking are two of several continuous-monitoring technologies that show promise in providing integrated safeguards of F&W operations at enrichment plants. Integrating different monitoring technologies allows advanced, automated event processing to screen innocuous events thereby minimizing false alerts to independent inspectors. Traditionally, international inspectors rely on batch verification of material inputs and outputs derived from operator declarations and periodic on-site inspections at uranium enrichment plants or other nuclear processing facilities. Continuously monitoring F&W activities between inspections while providing filtered alerts of significant operational events will substantially increase the amount of valuable information available to inspectors thereby promising to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards and to improve efficiency in conducting on-site inspections especially at large plants for ensuring that all operations are declared.

  6. Conceptual Ideas for New Nondestructive UF6 Cylinder Assay Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of uranium cylinders play an important role in helping the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguard uranium enrichment plants. Traditionally, these measurements have consisted of a scale or load cell to determine the mass of UF{sub 6} in the cylinder combined with a gamma-ray measurement of the 186 keV peak from {sup 235}U to determine enrichment. More recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed systems that exploit the passive neutron signal from UF{sub 6} to determine uranium mass and/or enrichment. These include the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM), and the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The purpose of this report is to provide the IAEA with new ideas on technologies that may or may not be under active development but could be useful for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay. To begin, we have included two feasibility studies of active interrogation techniques. There is a long history of active interrogation in the field of nuclear safeguards, especially for uranium assay. Both of the active techniques provide a direct measure of {sup 235}U content. The first is an active neutron method based on the existing PNEM design that uses a correlated {sup 252}Cf interrogation source. This technique shows great promise for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay and is based on advanced technology that could be implemented in the field in the near term. The second active technique is nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF). In the NRF technique, a bremsstrahlung photon beam could be used to illuminate the cylinder, and high-resolution gamma-ray detectors would detect the characteristic de-excitation photons. The results of the feasibility study show that under certain measurement geometries, NRF is impractical for UF6 cylinder assay, but the 'grazing transmission' and 'secant transmission' geometries have more potential for this application and should be assessed quantitatively. The next set of techniques leverage scintillator detectors that are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. The first is the BC-523A capture-gated organic liquid scintillator. The detector response from several different neutron energies has been characterized and is included in the study. The BC-523A has not yet been tested with UF{sub 6} cylinders, but the application appears to be well suited for this technology. The second detector type is a relatively new inorganic scintillator called CLYC. CLYC provides a complementary detection approach to the HEVA and PNEM systems that could be used to determine uranium enrichment in UF{sub 6} cylinders. In this section, the conceptual idea for an integrated CLYC-HEVA/PNEM system is explored that could yield more precision and robustness against systemic uncertainties than any one of the systems by itself. This is followed by a feasibility study on using alpha-particle-induced reaction gamma-rays as a way to estimate {sup 234}U abundance in UF{sub 6}. Until now, there has been no readily available estimate of the strength of these reaction gamma-rays. Thick target yields of the chief reaction gammas are computed and show that they are too weak for practical safeguards applications. In special circumstances where long count times are permissible, the 1,275 keV F({alpha},x{gamma}) is observable. Its strength could help verify an operator declaration provided other knowledge is available (especially the age). The other F({alpha},x{gamma}) lines are concealed by the dominant uranium line spectrum and associated continuum. Finally, the last section provides several ideas for electromagnetic and acoustic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. These can be used to measure cylinder wall thickness, which is a source of systematic uncertainty for gamma-ray-based NDA techniques; characterize the UF{sub 6} filling profile inside the cylinder, which is a source of systematic uncertainty for neutron-based NDA techniques; locate hidden objects inside the cylinder; a

  7. Supplemental Systems for Unattended UF6 Cylinder Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylinder assay and mass measurements, the mainstay of enrichment plant verification efforts have historically been performed by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors using portable equipment. For the sake of efficiency, accuracy, and timeliness, such equipment is being supplanted by unattended measurement stations. Ancillary systems must be employed with such stations to ensure that measured parameters are properly recorded, cylinders are positively identified, operations occur according to procedure, and no tampering takes place in the inspectors’ absence. Depending on the facility, it may prove feasible to track cylinders from the measurement vicinity to their storage locations using surveillance. This paper will provide a cursory description of the various subsystems associated with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Integrated Cylinder Verification Station and how inattention to the requirements of such systems could seriously diminish the capability of the integrated whole.

  8. Benefits of an International Database for UF6 Cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babcock, R A; Whitaker, J M; Murphy, J; Oakberg, J

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A reasonable expectation regarding the nuclear energy renaissance is that the location of fuel cycle nuclear materials throughout the world will be known. We ask--would an international system for uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders provide the effective assurances expected for international fuel supply and of the international fuel centers? This paper introduces the question and discusses the potential benefits of tracking UF{sub 6} cylinders through the development of an international database. The nonproliferation benefits of an international database for UF{sub 6} cylinders being used in the fuel cycle include an enhanced capability to reconcile nuclear material imports and exports. Currently, import and export declarations only require the reporting of total 'rolled up' quantities of nuclear materials contained in all items--not the quantities of materials in individual items like individual UF{sub 6} cylinders. The database could provide supplier countries with more assurance on the location of the UF{sub 6} cylinders they export. Additionally, a comprehensive database on all declared cylinders would be a valuable resource in detecting and recognizing undeclared cylinders. The database could potentially be administered by the IAEA and be accessible to authorized countries around the world. During the nuclear renaissance, the general public, as well as the participants will expect transparency and quality information about movement of nuclear fuel cycle nuclear materials. We will discuss the potential benefits of such a database for the suppliers, inspectorates, and general public.

  9. activities uf6 cylinder: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. An Operator Perspective from a Facility Evaluation of an RFID-Based UF6 Cylinder Accounting and Tracking System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martyn, Rose [Global Nuclear Fuels; Fitzgerald, Peter [Global Nuclear Fuels; Stehle, Nicholas D [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational field test of a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) system for tracking and accounting UF6 cylinders was conducted at the Global Nuclear Fuel Americas (GNF) fuel fabrication plant in 2009. The Cylinder Accountability and Tracking System (CATS) was designed and deployed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and evaluated in cooperation with GNF. The system required that passive RFID be attached to several UF6 30B cylinders as they were received at the site; then the cylinders were tracked as they proceeded to interim storage, to processing in an autoclave, and eventually to disposition from the site. This CATS deployment also provided a direct integration of scale data from the site accountability scales. The integration of this information into the tracking data provided an attribute for additional safeguards for evaluation. The field test provided insight into the advantages and challenges of using RFID at an operating nuclear facility. The RFID system allowed operators to interact with the technology and demonstrated the survivability of the tags and reader equipment in the process environment. This paper will provide the operator perspective on utilizing RFID technology for locating cylinders within the facility, thereby tracking the cylinders for process and for Material Control & Accounting functions. The paper also will present the operator viewpoint on RFID implemented as an independent safeguards system.

  11. Prototype Radiation Detector Positioning System For The Automated Nondestructive Assay Of Uf6 Cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.

    2011-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming, expensive, and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of efficiency and assay accuracy. This paper describes an approach denoted the Integrated Cylinder Verification Station (ICVS) that supports 100% cylinder verification, provides volume-averaged cylinder enrichment assay, and reduces inspector manpower needs. To allow field measurements to be collected to validate data collection algorithms, a prototype radiation detector positioning system was constructed. The system was designed to accurately position an array of radiation detectors along the length of a cylinder to measure UF6 enrichment. A number of alternative radiation shields for the detectors were included with the system. A collimated gamma-ray spectrometer module that allows translation of the detectors in the surrounding shielding to adjust the field of view, and a collimating plug in the end to further reduce the low-energy field of view, were also developed. Proof-of-principle measurements of neutron and high-energy gamma-ray signatures, using moderated neutron detectors and large-volume spectrometers in a fixed-geometry, portal-like configuration, supported an early assessment of the viability of the concept. The system has been used successfully on two testing campaigns at an AREVA fuel fabrication plant to scan over 30 product cylinders. This paper will describe the overall design of the detector positioning system and provide an overview of the Integrated Cylinder Verification Station (ICVS) approach.

  12. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  13. Determination of the 235U Mass and Enrichment within Small UF6 Cylinders via a Neutron Coincidence Well Counting System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, Robert Dennis [ORNL; Croft, Dr. Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Young, Brian M [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT; Venkataraman, Ram [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of three new uranium enrichment facilities in the United States has sparked renewed interest in the development and enhancement of methods to determine the enrichment and fissile mass content of UF6 cylinders. We describe the design and examine the expected performance of a UF6 bottle counter developed for the assay of Type 5A cylinders. The counter, as designed and subsequently constructed, is a tall passive neutron well counter with a clam-shell configuration and graphite end plugs operated in fast neutron mode. Factory performance against expectation is described. The relatively high detection efficiency and effectively 4 detection geometry provide a near-ideal measurement configuration, making the UF6 bottle counter a valuable tool for the evaluation of the neutron coincidence approach to UF6 cylinder assay. The impacts of non-uniform filling, voids, enrichment, and mixed enrichments are examined

  14. Automated Nondestructive Assay of UF6 Cylinders: Detector Characterization and Initial Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, Emily K.; Smith, Leon E.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders assumed to be representative of the facility's entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of manpower and assay accuracy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) intended for this purpose and has developed a field prototype of the nondestructive assay (NDA) components of an ICVS. The nondestructive assay methods would combine the 'traditional' enrichment-meter signature (i.e. 186-keV emission from 235U) as well as 'non-traditional' high-energy photon signatures derived from neutrons produced primarily by 19F({alpha},n) reactions. This paper describes the design, calibration and characterization of the NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) spectrometers utilized in the field prototype. An overview of a recent field measurement campaign is then provided, supported by example gamma-ray pulse-height spectra collected on cylinders of known enrichment.

  15. A "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Technologies for UF6 Cylinder Tracking at Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL] [ORNL; Dixon, E. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Martinez, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This effort describes how radio-frequency (RF) technology can be integrated into a uranium enrichment facility's nuclear materials accounting and control program to enhance uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinder tracking and thus provide benefits to both domestic and international safeguards. Approved industry-standard cylinders are used to handle and store UF6 feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. In the international arena, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming manual cylinder inventory and tracking techniques to verify operator declarations and to detect potential diversion of UF6. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant process for tracking and monitoring UF6 cylinders would greatly reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a "proof-of concept" system that was designed show the feasibility of using RF based technologies to track individual UF6 cylinders throughout their entire life cycle, and thus ensure both increased domestic accountability of materials and a more effective and efficient method for application of IAEA international safeguards at the site level. The proposed system incorporates RF-based identification devices, which provide a mechanism for a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant tracking network. We explore how securely attached RF tags can be integrated with other safeguards technologies to better detect diversion of cylinders. The tracking system could also provide a foundation for integration of other types of safeguards that would further enhance detection of undeclared activities.

  16. Signatures and Methods for the Automated Nondestructive Assay of UF6 Cylinders at Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Mace, Emily K.; Misner, Alex C.; Shaver, Mark W.

    2010-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming, expensive, and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of manpower and assay accuracy. Such a station would use sensors that can be operated in an unattended mode at an industrial facility: medium-resolution scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy (e.g., NaI(Tl)) and moderated He-3 neutron detectors. This sensor combination allows the exploitation of additional, more-penetrating signatures beyond the traditional 185-keV emission from U-235: neutrons produced from F-19(?,n) reactions (spawned primarily from U 234 alpha emission) and high-energy gamma rays (extending up to 8 MeV) induced by neutrons interacting in the steel cylinder. This paper describes a study of these non-traditional signatures for the purposes of cylinder enrichment verification. The signatures and the radiation sensors designed to collect them are described, as are proof-of-principle cylinder measurements and analyses. Key sources of systematic uncertainty in the non-traditional signatures are discussed, and the potential benefits of utilizing these non-traditional signatures, in concert with an automated form of the traditional 185-keV-based assay, are discussed.

  17. Hybrid Enrichment Assay Methods for a UF6 Cylinder Verification Station: FY10 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing the concept of an automated UF6 cylinder verification station that would be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until the arrival of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. At the center of this unattended system is a hybrid enrichment assay technique that combines the traditional enrichment-meter method (based on the 186 keV peak from 235U) with non-traditional neutron-induced high-energy gamma-ray signatures (spawned primarily by 234U alpha emissions and 19F(alpha, neutron) reactions). Previous work by PNNL provided proof-of-principle for the non-traditional signatures to support accurate, full-volume interrogation of the cylinder enrichment, thereby reducing the systematic uncertainties in enrichment assay due to UF6 heterogeneity and providing greater sensitivity to material substitution scenarios. The work described here builds on that preliminary evaluation of the non-traditional signatures, but focuses on a prototype field system utilizing NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) spectrometers, and enrichment analysis algorithms that integrate the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Results for the assay of Type-30B cylinders ranging from 0.2 to 4.95 wt% 235U, at an AREVA fuel fabrication plant in Richland, WA, are described for the following enrichment analysis methods: 1) traditional enrichment meter signature (186 keV peak) as calculated using a square-wave convolute (SWC) algorithm; 2) non-traditional high-energy gamma-ray signature that provides neutron detection without neutron detectors and 3) hybrid algorithm that merges the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Uncertainties for each method, relative to the declared enrichment for each cylinder, are calculated and compared to the uncertainties from an attended HPGe verification station at AREVA, and the IAEA’s uncertainty target values for feed, tail and product cylinders. A summary of the major findings from the field measurements and subsequent analysis follows: • Traditional enrichment-meter assay using specially collimated NaI spectrometers and a Square-Wave-Convolute algorithm can achieve uncertainties comparable to HPGe and LaBr for product, natural and depleted cylinders. • Non-traditional signatures measured using NaI spectrometers enable interrogation of the entire cylinder volume and accurate measurement of absolute 235U mass in product, natural and depleted cylinders. • A hybrid enrichment assay method can achieve lower uncertainties than either the traditional or non-traditional methods acting independently because there is a low degree of correlation in the systematic errors of the two individual methods (wall thickness variation and 234U/235U variation, respectively). This work has indicated that the hybrid NDA method has the potential to serve as the foundation for an unattended cylinder verification station. When compared to today’s handheld cylinder-verification approach, such a station would have the following advantages: 1) improved enrichment assay accuracy for product, tail and feed cylinders; 2) full-volume assay of absolute 235U mass; 3) assay of minor isotopes (234U and 232U) important to verification of feedstock origin; single instrumentation design for both Type 30B and Type 48 cylinders; and 4) substantial reduction in the inspector manpower associated with cylinder verification.

  18. Technology Assessment for Proof-of-Concept UF6 Cylinder Unique Identification Task 3.1.2 Report – Survey and Assessment of Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wylie, Joann; Hockert, John

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security’s (NA-24) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the nuclear industry have begun to develop approaches to identify and monitor uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders. The NA-24 interest in a global monitoring system for UF6 cylinders relates to its interest in supporting the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in deterring and detecting diversion of UF6 (e.g., loss of cylinder in transit) and undeclared excess production at conversion and enrichment facilities. The industry interest in a global monitoring system for UF6 cylinders relates to the improvements in operational efficiencies that such a system would provide. This task is part of an effort to survey and assess technologies for a UF6 cylinder to identify candidate technologies for a proof-of-concept demonstration and evaluation for the Cylinder Identification System (CIS).

  19. Remote Monitoring and Tracking of UF6 Cylinders Using Long-Range Passive Ultra-wideband (UWB) RFID Tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F

    2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An IAEA Technical Meeting on Techniques for IAEA Verification of Enrichment Activities identified 'smart tags' as a technology that should be assessed for tracking and locating UF6 cylinders. Although there is vast commercial industry working on RFID systems, the vulnerabilities of commercial products are only beginning to emerge. Most of the commercially off-the-shelf (COTS) RFID systems operate in very narrow frequency bands, making them vulnerable to detection, jamming and tampering and also presenting difficulties when used around metals (i.e. UF6 cylinders). Commercial passive RFID tags have short range, while active RFID tags that provide long ranges have limited lifetimes. There are also some concerns with the introduction of strong (narrowband) radio frequency signals around radioactive and nuclear materials. Considering the shortcomings of commercial RFID systems, in their current form, they do not offer a promising solution for continuous monitoring and tracking of UF6 cylinders. In this paper, we identify the key challenges faced by commercial RFID systems for monitoring UF6 cylinders, and introduce an ultra-wideband approach for tag/reader communications that addresses most of the identified challenges for IAEA safeguards applications.

  20. Summary of Field Measurement on UF6 Cylinders Using Electro-Mechanically Cooled Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, Brent R [ORNL; Smith, Steven E [ORNL; Solodov, Alexander A [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Morgan, James B [ORNL; MayerII, Richard L. [USEC, Inc.; Montgomery, J. Brent [U.S. Enrichment Corporation Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of the enrichment of solid state UF6 stored within large metal cylinders is a task commonly performed by plant operators and inspectors. The measurement technologies typically used range from low-resolution, high-efficiency sodium iodide detectors to high-resolution, moderate-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. The technology used and methods deployed are dependent upon the material being measured, environmental conditions, time constraints, and measurement-precision requirements. Operators and inspectors typically use specially designed, HPGe detectors that are cooled with liquid nitrogen in situations where high-resolution measurements are required. However, the requirement for periodically refilling the system with liquid nitrogen makes remote usage cumbersome and slow. The task of cooling the detector reduces the available time for the inspector to perform other safeguards activities while on site. If the inspector has to reduce the count time for each selected cylinder to ensure that all preselected cylinders are measured during the inspection, the resulting measurement uncertainties may be increased, making it more difficult to detect and verify potential discrepancies in the operator's declarations. However, recent advances in electromechanically cooled HPGe detectors may provide the inspector with an improved verification tool by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen. This report provides a summary of test results for field measurements performed using electromechanically cooled HPGe detectors on depleted, natural, and low-enriched uranium cylinders. The results of the study provide valuable information to inspectors and operators regarding the capabilities and limitations of electromechanically cooled systems based on true field-measurement conditions.

  1. Automated UF6 Cylinder Enrichment Assay: Status of the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA) Project: POTAS Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Smith, Leon E.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) intends to automate the UF6 cylinder nondestructive assay (NDA) verification currently performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at enrichment plants. PNNL is proposing the installation of a portal monitor at a key measurement point to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the data along with operator inputs in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until inspector arrival. This report summarizes the status of the research and development of an enrichment assay methodology supporting the cylinder verification concept. The enrichment assay approach exploits a hybrid of two passively-detected ionizing-radiation signatures: the traditional enrichment meter signature (186-keV photon peak area) and a non-traditional signature, manifested in the high-energy (3 to 8 MeV) gamma-ray continuum, generated by neutron emission from UF6. PNNL has designed, fabricated, and field-tested several prototype assay sensor packages in an effort to demonstrate proof-of-principle for the hybrid assay approach, quantify the expected assay precision for various categories of cylinder contents, and assess the potential for unsupervised deployment of the technology in a portal-monitor form factor. We refer to recent sensor-package prototypes as the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The report provides an overview of the assay signatures and summarizes the results of several HEVA field measurement campaigns on populations of Type 30B UF6 cylinders containing low-enriched uranium (LEU), natural uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). Approaches to performance optimization of the assay technique via radiation transport modeling are briefly described, as are spectroscopic and data-analysis algorithms.

  2. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Overview and Policy Context of UF6 Cylinder Tracking Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, J. Michael [ORNL; White-Horton, Jessica L. [ORNL; Durbin, Karyn R. [NNSA

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Thousands of cylinders containing uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) move around the world from conversion plants to enrichment plants to fuel fabrication plants, and their contents could be very useful to a country intent on diverting uranium for clandestine use. Each of these large cylinders can contain close to a significant quantity of natural uranium (48Y cylinder) or low-enriched uranium (LEU) (30B cylinder) defined as 75 kg {sup 235}U which can be further clandestinely enriched to produce 1.5 to 2 significant quantities of high enriched uranium (HEU) within weeks or months depending on the scale of the clandestine facility. The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) kicked off a 5-year plan in April 2011 to investigate the concept of a unique identification system for UF{sub 6} cylinders and potentially to develop a cylinder tracking system that could be used by facility operators and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The goal is to design an integrated solution beneficial to both industry and inspectorates that would improve cylinder operations at the facilities and provide enhanced capabilities to deter and detect both diversion of low-enriched uranium and undeclared enriched uranium production. The 5-year plan consists of six separate incremental tasks: (1) define the problem and establish the requirements for a unique identification (UID) and monitoring system; (2) develop a concept of operations for the identification and monitoring system; (3) determine cylinder monitoring devices and technology; (4) develop a registry database to support proof-of-concept demonstration; (5) integrate that system for the demonstration; and (6) demonstrate proof-of-concept. Throughout NNSA's performance of the tasks outlined in this program, the multi-laboratory team emphasizes that extensive engagement with industry stakeholders, regulatory authorities and inspectorates is essential to its success.

  3. Status Report on the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) for UF6 Cylinder Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) is a nondestructive assay (NDA) system being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). It was designed to determine {sup 235}U mass and enrichment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in product, feed, and tails cylinders (i.e., 30B and 48Y cylinders). These cylinders are found in the nuclear fuel cycle at uranium conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication facilities. The PNEM is a {sup 3}He-based neutron detection system that consists of two briefcase-sized detector pods. A photograph of the system during characterization at LANL is shown in Fig. 1. Several signatures are currently being studied to determine the most effective measurement and data reduction technique for unfolding {sup 235}U mass and enrichment. The system collects total neutron and coincidence data for both bare and cadmium-covered detector pods. The measurement concept grew out of the success of the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), which is an operator system at Rokkasho Enrichment Plant (REP) that uses total neutron counting to determine {sup 235}U mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The PNEM system was designed with higher efficiency than the UCAS in order to add coincidence counting functionality for the enrichment determination. A photograph of the UCAS with a 48Y cylinder at REP is shown in Fig. 2, and the calibration measurement data for 30B product and 48Y feed and tails cylinders is shown in Fig. 3. The data was collected in a low-background environment, meaning there is very little scatter in the data. The PNEM measurement concept was first presented at the 2010 Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) Annual Meeting. The physics design and uncertainty analysis were presented at the 2010 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Symposium, and the mechanical and electrical designs and characterization measurements were published in the ESARDA Bulletin in 2011.

  4. Evaluation of a RF-Based Approach for Tracking UF6 Cylinders at a Uranium Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL] [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hines, Jairus B [ORNL] [ORNL; Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Martinez, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally to handle and store uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming physical inspections to verify operator declarations and detect possible diversion of UF{sub 6}. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant system for near real-time tracking and monitoring UF{sub 6} cylinders (as they move within an enrichment facility) would greatly improve the inspector function. This type of system can reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a proof-of-concept approach that was designed to evaluate the feasibility of using radio frequency (RF)-based technologies to track individual UF{sub 6} cylinders throughout a portion of their life cycle, and thus demonstrate the potential for improved domestic accountability of materials, and a more effective and efficient method for application of site-level IAEA safeguards. The evaluation system incorporates RF-based identification devices (RFID) which provide a foundation for establishing a reliable, automated, and near real-time tracking system that can be set up to utilize site-specific, rules-based detection algorithms. This paper will report results from a proof-of-concept demonstration at a real enrichment facility that is specifically designed to evaluate both the feasibility of using RF to track cylinders and the durability of the RF equipment to survive the rigors of operational processing and handling. The paper also discusses methods for securely attaching RF devices and describes how the technology can effectively be layered with other safeguard systems and approaches to build a robust system for detecting cylinder diversion. Additionally, concepts for off-site tracking of cylinders are described.

  5. Refurbishment of uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yards C-745-K, L, M, N, and P and construction of a new uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yard (C-745-T) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is a uranium enrichment facility owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). A residual of the uranium enrichment process is depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Depleted UF6, a solid at ambient temperature, is stored in 32,200 steel cylinders that hold a maximum of 14 tons each. Storage conditions are suboptimal and have resulted in accelerated corrosion of cylinders, increasing the potential for a release of hazardous substances. Consequently, the DOE is proposing refurbishment of certain existing yards and construction of a new storage yard. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of the proposed action and no action and considers alternate sites for the proposed new storage yard. The proposed action includes (1) renovating five existing cylinder yards; (2) constructing a new UF6 storage yard; handling and onsite transport of cylinders among existing yards to accommodate construction; and (4) after refurbishment and construction, restacking of cylinders to meet spacing and inspection requirements. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, DOE is issuing a Finding of No Significant Impact. Additionally, it is reported in this EA that the loss of less than one acre of wetlands at the proposed project site would not be a significant adverse impact.

  6. gas cylinder storage guidelines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    used to support small cylinders must not allow water to accumulate and possible cause corrosion. Avoid corrosive chemicals including salt and fumes - keep away from direct sunlight...

  7. Results from a "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Tracking of UF6 Cylinders during a Processing Operation at a Uranium Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL] [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Hines, Jairus B [ORNL] [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Morgan, Jim [Innovative Solutions] [Innovative Solutions; Carrick, Bernie [USEC] [USEC; Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Whittle, K. [USEC] [USEC

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for processing, storing, and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants. To ensure that cylinder movements at enrichment facilities occur as declared, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) must conduct time-consuming periodic physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identity, and containment. By using a robust system design that includes the capability for real-time unattended monitoring (of cylinder movements), site-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of monitoring technologies, one can build a system that will improve overall inspector effectiveness. This type of monitoring system can provide timely detection of safeguard events that could be used to ensure more timely and appropriate responses by the IAEA. It also could reduce reliance on facility records and have the additional benefit of enhancing domestic safeguards at the installed facilities. This paper will discuss the installation and evaluation of a radio-frequency- (RF-) based cylinder tracking system that was installed at a United States Enrichment Corporation Centrifuge Facility. This system was installed primarily to evaluate the feasibility of using RF technology at a site and the operational durability of the components under harsh processing conditions. The installation included a basic system that is designed to support layering with other safeguard system technologies and that applies fundamental rules-based event processing methodologies. This paper will discuss the fundamental elements of the system design, the results from this site installation, and future efforts needed to make this technology ready for IAEA consideration.

  8. Advancements of the Hybrid Method UF6 Container Inspection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, Emily K.; Orton, Christopher R.; Jordan, David V.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Smith, Leon E.

    2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Safeguards inspectors currently visit uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are performed with handheld high-resolution detectors on a limited number of cylinders taken to be representative of the plant’s cylinder inventory. These enrichment assay methods interrogate only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume, and are time-consuming and expensive to execute. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an automated UF6 cylinder verification station concept based on the combined collection of traditional enrichment-meter data (186 keV photons from 235U) and non-traditional, neutron-induced, high-energy gamma-ray signatures (3-8 MeV) with an array of collimated, medium-resolution scintillators. Previous work at PNNL (2010) demonstrated proof-of-principle that this hybrid method yields accurate, full-volume assay of the cylinder enrichment, reduces systematic errors when compared to several other enrichment assay methods, and provides simplified instrumentation and algorithms suitable for long-term, unattended operations. This system aims to increase the number of inspected cylinders at higher accuracy and with lower cost than when compared to inspectors with hand-held instruments. Several measurement campaigns of 30B cylinder populations and a refined MCNP model will be reported. The MCNP model consists of per-gram basis vectors for the different uranium isotopes and several fill geometries, enabling fast generation of any UF6 enrichment level and multiple configurations. The refined model was used to optimize collimator design and detector configuration for the hybrid method. In addition, a new field prototype based on model results was utilized in a set of field measurements.

  9. A more accurate and penetrating method to measure the enrichment and mass of UF6 storage containers using passive neutron self-interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an unattended mode neutron measurement that can provide the enrichment of the uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The new passive neutron measurement provides better penetration into the uranium mass than prior gamma-ray enrichment measurement methods. The Passive Neutron Enrichment Monitor (PNEM) provides a new measurement technique that uses passive neutron totals and coincidence counting together with neutron self-interrogation to measure the enrichment in the cylinders. The measurement uses the neutron rates from two detector pods. One of the pods has a bare polyethylene surface next to the cylinder and the other polyethylene surface is covered with Cd to prevent thermal neutrons from returning to the cylinder. The primary neutron source from the enriched UF{sub 6} is the alpha-particle decay from the {sub 234}U that interacts with the fluorine to produce random neutrons. The singles neutron counting rate is dominated by the {sub 234}U neutrons with a minor contribution from the induced fissions in the {sub 235}U. However, the doubles counting rate comes primarily from the induced fissions (i.e., multiplication) in the {sub 235}U in enriched uranium. The PNEM concept makes use of the passive neutrons that are initially produced from the {sub 234}U reactions that track the {sub 235}U enrichment during the enrichment process. The induced fission reactions from the thermal-neutron albedo are all from the {sub 235}U and provide a measurement of the {sub 235}U. The Cd ratio has the desirable feature that all of the thermal-neutron-induced fissions in {sub 235}U are independent of the original neutron source. Thus, the ratio is independent of the uranium age, purity, and prior reactor history.

  10. Thermo-mechanical study of bare 48Y UF6 containers exposed to the regulatory fire environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Douglas James; Lopez, Carlos; Morrow, Charles; Korbmacher, Tim (Urenco Enrichment Co. Ltd., Gronau, Germany); Charette, Marc-Andre (Cameco Corporation, Port Hope, ON, Canada)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the regulatory agencies world-wide require that containers used for the transportation of natural UF6 and depleted UF6 must survive a fully-engulfing fire environment for 30 minutes as described in 10CFR71 and in TS-R-1. The primary objective of this project is to examine the thermo-mechanical performance of 48Y transportation cylinders when exposed to the regulatory hypothetical fire environment without the thermal protection that is currently used for shipments in those countries where required. Several studies have been performed in which UF6 cylinders have been analyzed to determine if the thermal protection currently used on UF6 cylinders of type 48Y is necessary for transport. However, none of them could clearly confirm neither the survival nor the failure of the 48Y cylinder when exposed to the regulatory fire environment without the additional thermal protection. A consortium of five companies that move UF6 is interested in determining if 48Y cylinders can be shipped without the thermal protection that is currently used. Sandia National Laboratories has outlined a comprehensive testing and analysis project to determine if these shipping cylinders are capable of withstanding the regulatory thermal environment without additional thermal protection. Sandia-developed coupled physics codes will be used for the analyses that are planned. A series of destructive and non-destructive tests will be performed to acquire the necessary material and behavior information to benchmark the models and to answer the question about the ability of these containers to survive the fire environment. Both the testing and the analysis phases of this project will consider the state of UF6 under thermal and pressure loads as well as the weakening of the steel container due to the thermal load. Experiments with UF6 are also planned to collect temperature- and pressure-dependent thermophysical properties of this material.

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring enrichment of UF6

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Thomas Roy (Santa Fe, NM); Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are disclosed for determining the enrichment of .sup.235U in Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) utilizing synthesized X-rays which are directed at a container test zone containing a sample of UF6. A detector placed behind the container test zone then detects and counts the X-rays which pass through the container and the UF6. In order to determine the portion of the attenuation due to the UF6 gas alone, this count rate may then be compared to a calibration count rate of X-rays passing through a calibration test zone which contains a vacuum, the test zone having experienced substantially similar environmental conditions as the actual test zone. Alternatively, X-rays of two differing energy levels may be alternately directed at the container, where either the container or the UF6 has a high sensitivity to the difference in the energy levels, and the other having a low sensitivity.

  12. An update on corrosion monitoring in cylinder storage yards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, H.M.; Newman, V.S.; Frazier, J.L. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Depleted uranium, from US uranium isotope enrichment activities, is stored in the form of solid uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in A285 and A516 steel cylinders designed and manufactured to ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code criteria. In general, storage facilities are open areas adjacent to the enrichment plants where the cylinders are exposed to weather. This paper describes the Oak Ridge program to determine the general corrosion behavior of UF{sub 6} cylinders, to determine cylinder yard conditions which are likely to affect long term storage of this material, and to assess cylinder storage yards against these criteria. This program is targeted at conditions specific to the Oak Ridge cylinder yards. Based on (a) determination of the current cylinder yard conditions, (b) determination of rusting behavior in regions of the cylinders showing accelerated attack, (c) monitoring of corrosion rates through periodic measurement of test coupons placed within the cylinder yards, and (d) establishment of a computer base to incorporate and retain these data, the technical division is working with the enrichment sites to implement an upgraded system for storage of this material until such time as it is used or converted.

  13. Corrosion of breached UF{sub 6} storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, E.J.; Taylor, M.S.; DeVan, J.H.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the corrosion processes that occurred following the mechanical failure of two steel 14-ton storage cylinders containing depleted UF{sub 6}. The failures both were traced to small mechanical tears that occurred during stacking of the cylinders. Although subsequent corrosion processes greatly extended the openings in the wall. the reaction products formed were quite protective and prevented any significant environmental insult or loss of uranium. The relative sizes of the two holes correlated with the relative exposure times that had elapsed from the time of stacking. From the sizes and geometries of the two holes, together with analyses of the reaction products, it was possible to determine the chemical reactions that controlled the corrosion process and to develop a scenario for predicting the rate of hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}, the loss rate of HF, and chemical attack of a breached UF{sub 6} storage cylinder.

  14. Corrosion of breached UF[sub 6] storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, E.J.; Taylor, M.S.; DeVan, J.H.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the corrosion processes that occurred following the mechanical failure of two steel 14-ton storage cylinders containing depleted UF[sub 6]. The failures both were traced to small mechanical tears that occurred during stacking of the cylinders. Although subsequent corrosion processes greatly extended the openings in the wall. the reaction products formed were quite protective and prevented any significant environmental insult or loss of uranium. The relative sizes of the two holes correlated with the relative exposure times that had elapsed from the time of stacking. From the sizes and geometries of the two holes, together with analyses of the reaction products, it was possible to determine the chemical reactions that controlled the corrosion process and to develop a scenario for predicting the rate of hydrolysis of UF[sub 6], the loss rate of HF, and chemical attack of a breached UF[sub 6] storage cylinder.

  15. Preliminary Concept of Operations for a Global Cylinder Identification and Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, J. M. [ORNL; White-Horton, J. L. [ORNL; Morgan, J. B. [InSolves Associates

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a preliminary concept of operations for a Global Cylinder Identification and Monitoring System that could improve the efficiency of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in conducting its current inspection activities and could provide a capability to substantially increase its ability to detect credible diversion scenarios and undeclared production pathways involving UF6 cylinders. There exist concerns that a proliferant State with access to enrichment technology could obtain a cylinder containing natural or low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and produce a significant quantity (SQ)1 of highly enriched uranium in as little as 30 days. The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative sponsored a multi-laboratory team to develop an integrated system that provides for detecting scenarios involving 1) diverting an entire declared cylinder for enrichment at a clandestine facility, 2) misusing a declared cylinder at a safeguarded facility, and 3) using an undeclared cylinder at a safeguarded facility. An important objective in developing this integrated system was to improve the timeliness for detecting the cylinder diversion and undeclared production scenarios. Developing this preliminary concept required in-depth analyses of current operational and safeguards practices at conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication facilities. The analyses evaluated the processing, movement, and storage of cylinders at the facilities; the movement of cylinders between facilities (including cylinder fabrication); and the misuse of safeguarded facilities.

  16. Next Generations Safeguards Initiative: The Life of a Cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, James B [ORNL; White-Horton, Jessica L [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation and International Security's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has begun a program based on a five-year plan to investigate the concept of a global monitoring scheme that uniquely identifies uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders and their locations throughout the life cycle. A key initial activity in the NGSI program is to understand and document the 'life of a UF6 cylinder' from cradle to grave. This document describes the life of a UF6 cylinder and includes cylinder manufacture and procurement processes as well as cylinder-handling and operational practices at conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, and depleted UF6 conversion facilities. The NGSI multiple-laboratory team is using this document as a building block for subsequent tasks in the five-year plan, including development of the functional requirements for cylinder-tagging and tracking devices.

  17. HGSYSTEMUF6. Model for Simulating Dispersion due to Atmospheric Release of UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, G [George Mason University, (United States); Chang, J.C. [Earthtech, Inc., (United States); Zhang, J.X. [BlazeTech Corporation, (United States); Bloom, S.G. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Goode, W.D. Jr [Bechtel Jacobs Company, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lombardi, D.A. [JBF Associates, (United States); Yambert, M.W. [LMERC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HGSYSTEMUF6 is a suite of models designed for use in estimating consequences associated with accidental, atmospheric release of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) and its reaction products, namely Hydrogen Fluoride (HF), and other non-reactive contaminants which are either negatively, neutrally, or positively buoyant. It is based on HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 of Shell Research LTD., and contains specific algorithms for the treatment of UF6 chemistry and thermodynamics. HGSYSTEMUF6 contains algorithms for the treatment of dense gases, dry and wet deposition, effects due to the presence of buildings (canyon and wake), plume lift-off, and the effects of complex terrain. The models components of the suite include (1) AEROPLUME/RK, used to model near-field dispersion from pressurized two-phase jet releases of UF6 and its reaction products, (2) HEGADAS/UF6 for simulating dense, ground based release of UF6, (3) PGPLUME for simulation of passive, neutrally buoyant plumes (4) UF6Mixer for modeling warm, potentially reactive, ground-level releases of UF6 from buildings, and (5) WAKE, used to model elevated and ground-level releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant.

  18. Natural phenomena evaluations of the K-25 site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, K.E.

    1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards are used for the temporary storage of UF{sub 6} normal assay cylinders and long-term storage of other UF{sub 6} cylinders. The K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards consist of six on-site areas: K-1066-B, K-1066-E, K-1066-F, K-1066-J, K-1066-K and K-1066-L. There are no permanent structures erected on the cylinder yards, except for five portable buildings. The operating contractor for the K-25 Site is preparing a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) to examine the safety related aspects of the K-25 Site UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards. The SAR preparation encompasses many tasks terminating in consequence analysis for the release of gaseous and liquid UF{sub 6}, one of which is the evaluation of natural phenomena threats, such as earthquakes, floods, and winds. In support of the SAR, the six active cylinder storage yards were evaluated for vulnerabilities to natural phenomena, earthquakes, high winds and tornados, tornado-generated missiles, floods (local and regional), and lightning. This report summarizes those studies. 30 refs.

  19. High Pressure Fuel Storage Cylinders Periodic Inspection and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous Fuels Natural Gas Vehicle Cylinder Safety, Training and Inspection Project The Compelling Case for Natural Gas Vehicles...

  20. MODEL AND ALGORITHM EVALUATION FOR THE HYBRID UF6 CONTAINER INSPECTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Benjamin S.; Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.; Smith, Leon E.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an automated UF6 cylinder verification station concept based on the combined collection of traditional enrichment-meter (186 keV photons from U-235) data and non-traditional, neutron-induced, high-energy gamma-signatures (3-8.5 MeV) with an array of collimated, medium-resolution scintillators. Previous (2010) work at PNNL demonstrated proof-of-principle that this hybrid method yields accurate, full-volume assay of the cylinder enrichment, reduces systematic errors when compared to several other enrichment assay methods, and provides simplified instrumentation and algorithms suitable for long-term unattended operations. We used Monte Carlo modeling with MCNP5 to support system design (e.g., number and configuration of detector arrays, and design of iron/poly collimators for enhanced (n,?) conversion) and enrichment algorithm development. We developed a first-generation modeling framework in 2010. These tools have since been expanded, refined and benchmarked against field measurements with a prototype system of a 30B cylinder population (0.2 to 4.95 weight % U-235). The MCNP5 model decomposes the radiation transport problem into a linear superposition of “basis spectra” representing contributions from the different uranium isotopes and gamma-ray generation mechanisms (e.g. neutron capture). This scheme accommodates fast generation of “virtual assay signatures” for arbitrary enrichment, material age, and fill variations. Ongoing (FY-2011) refinements to the physics model include accounting for generation of bremsstrahlung photons, arising primarily from the beta decay of Pa-234m, a U-238 daughter. We are using the refined model to optimize collimator design for the hybrid method. The traditional assay method benefits from a high degree of collimation (to isolate each detector’s field-of-view) and relatively small detector area, while the non-traditional method benefits from a wide field-of-view, i.e. less collimation and larger detectors. We implement the enrichment-meter method by applying a square-wave digital filter to a raw spectrum and extracting the 186-keV peak area directly from the convolute spectrum. Ongoing enhancements to this approach include mitigating a systematic peak-area measurement deficit arising from curvature in the spectrum continuum shape. An optimized system prototype based on model results is utilized in a new set of 2011 field measurements, and model and measurement enrichment assay uncertainties are compared.

  1. UF6 overfilling prevention at Eurodif production Georges Besse plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reneaud, J.M. [Eurodif Production, Pierrelatte (France)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk of overfilling exists on different equipments of Georges BESSE Plant: cylinders, desublimers and intermediate tanks. The preventive measures are composed of technical devices: desublimers weighing, load monitoring alarms, automatic controls ... and procedures, training, safety organization. In thirteen years of operation, some incidents have occurred but none of them has caused any personal injuries. They are related and discussed. The main factors involved in the Sequoyah fuel facility accident on 1/4/1986 have been analyzed and taken into account.

  2. Results of the remote sensing feasibility study for the uranium hexafluoride storage cylinder yard program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balick, L.K.; Bowman, D.R. [Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Remote Sensing Lab.; Bounds, J.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE manages the safe storage of approximately 650,000 tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride remaining from the Cold War. This slightly radioactive, but chemically active, material is contained in more than 46,000 steel storage cylinders that are located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Some of the cylinders are more than 40 years old, and approximately 17,500 are considered problem cylinders because their physical integrity is questionable. These cylinders require an annual visual inspection. The remainder of the 46,000-plus cylinders must be visually inspected every four years. Currently, the cylinder inspection program is extremely labor intensive. Because these inspections are accomplished visually, they may not be effective in the early detection of leaking cylinders. The inspection program requires approximately 12--14 full-time-equivalent (FTE) employees. At the cost of approximately $125K per FTE, this translates to $1,500K per annum just for cylinder inspection. As part of the technology-development portion of the DOE Cylinder Management Program, the DOE Office of Facility Management requested the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) to evaluate remote sensing techniques that have potential to increase the effectiveness of the inspection program and, at the same time, reduce inspection costs and personnel radiation exposure. During two site visits (March and May 1996) to the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN, RSL personnel tested and characterized seven different operating systems believed to detect leakage, surface contamination, thickness and corrosion of cylinder walls, and general area contamination resulting from breached cylinders. The following techniques were used and their performances are discussed: Laser-induced fluorescent imaging; Long-range alpha detection; Neutron activation analysis; Differential gamma-ray attenuation; Compton scatterometry; Active infrared inspection; and Passive thermal infrared imaging.

  3. Prediction of external corrosion for steel storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, B.F.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently manages the UF{sub 6} Cylinder Program (the program). The program was formed to address the depleted-uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) stored in approximately 50,000 carbon steel cylinders. The cylinders are located at three DOE sites: the K-25 site (K-25) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. The System Requirements Document (SRD) (LMES 1996a) delineates the requirements of the program. The appropriate actions needed to fulfill these requirements are then specified within the System Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) (LMES 1996b). The report presented herein documents activities that in whole or in part satisfy specific requirements and actions stated in the UF{sub 6} Cylinder Program SRD and SEMP with respect to forecasting cylinder conditions. The wall thickness projections made in this report are based on the assumption that the corrosion trends noted will continue. Some activities planned may substantially reduce the rate of corrosion, in which case the results presented here are conservative. The results presented here are intended to supersede those presented previously, as the quality of several of the datasets has improved.

  4. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies of UF5 ? and UF6 ?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dau, Phuong D.; Su, Jing; Liu, Hong-Tao; Huang, Dao-Ling; Wei, Fan; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai S.

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The UF5 ? and UF6 ? anions are produced using electrospray ionization and investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry. An extensive vibrational progression is observed in the spectra of UF5 ?, indicating significant geometry changes between the anion and neutral ground state. Franck-Condon factor simulations of the observed vibrational progression yield an adiabatic electron detachment energy of 3.82 ± 0.05 eV for UF5 ?. Relativistic quantum calculations using density functional and ab initio theories are performed on UF5 ? and UF6 ? and their neutrals. The ground states of UF5 ? and UF5 are found to have C4v symmetry, but with a large U?F bond length change. The ground state of UF5 ? is a triplet state (3B2) with the two 5f electrons occupying a 5fz3-based 8a1 highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the 5fxyz-based 2b2 HOMO-1 orbital. The detachment cross section from the 5fxyz orbital is observed to be extremely small and the detachment transition from the 2b2 orbital is more than ten times weaker than that from the 8a1 orbital at the photon energies available. The UF6 ? anion is found to be octahedral, similar to neutral UF6 with the extra electron occupying the 5fxyz-based a2u orbital. Surprisingly, no photoelectron spectrum could be observed for UF6 ? due to the extremely low detachment cross section from the 5fxyz-based HOMO of UF6 ?.

  5. Results of Continuous Load Cell Monitoring Field Trial for UF6 Withdrawals at an Operating Industrial Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL] [ORNL; Bell, Lisa S [ORNL] [ORNL; Conchewski, Curtis A [ORNL] [ORNL; Peters, Benjamin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL] [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL] [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) has been implemented and tested for use as a safeguards tool during a 2009 field trial in an operating UF6 transfer facility. The transfer facility is part of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio, operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. During the field trial, two process scales for UF{sub 6} cylinders were continuously monitored for a 6-month period as cylinders were being filled. The collected CLCM data were used in testing an event processor serving as a filter for highlighting measurements representing significant operational activities that are important in verifying declared operations. The collection of CLCM data, coupled with rules-based event processing, can provide inspectors with knowledge of a facility's feed and withdrawal activities occurring between site visits. Such process knowledge promises to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards by enabling inspectors to quantitatively compare declared activities directly with process measurements. Selected results of the field trial and event processing will be presented in the context of their value to an independent inspector and a facility operator.

  6. Gas Cylinder Storage and Handling Serious accidents can result from the misuse, abuse, or mishandling of compressed gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Gas Cylinder Storage and Handling Serious accidents can result from the misuse, abuse, or mishandling of compressed gas cylinders. Safe procedures for their use are as follows: · All compressed gas combustible material. · Keep cylinders out of the direct sun and do not allow them to be overheated. · Gas

  7. Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykins, M.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

  8. A concept of a nonfissile uranium hexafluoride overpack for storage, transport, and processing of corroded cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, R.B.; Cash, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Singletary, B.H. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a need to develop a means of safely transporting breached 48-in. cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) from current storage locations to locations where the contents can be safely removed. There is also a need to provide a method of safely and easily transporting degraded cylinders that no longer meet the US Department of Transportation (DOT) and American National Standards Institute, Inc., (ANSI) requirements for shipments of depleted UF{sub 6}. A study has shown that an overpack can be designed and fabricated to satisfy these needs. The envisioned overpack will handle cylinder models 48G, 48X, and 48Y and will also comply with the ANSI N14.1 and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Sect. 8 requirements.

  9. Standard practice for dissolution of UF6 from P-10 tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice covers the dissolution of UF6 from a P-10 tube to provide solutions for analysis. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific safeguard and safety precaution statements, see Section 8.

  10. Modified biokinetic model for uranium from analysis of acute exposure to UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, D.R.; Kathren, R.L.; Swint, M.J. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (USA))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urinalysis measurements from 31 workers acutely exposed to uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and its hydrolysis product UO2F2 (during the 1986 Gore, Oklahoma UF6-release accident) were used to develop a modified recycling biokinetic model for soluble U compounds. The model is expressed as a five-compartment exponential equation: yu(t) = 0.086e-2.77t + 0.0048e-0.116t + 0.00069e-0.0267t + 0.00017 e-0.00231t + 2.5 x 10(-6) e-0.000187t, where yu(t) is the fractional daily urinary excretion and t is the time after intake, in days. The excretion constants of the five exponential compartments correspond to residence half-times of 0.25, 6, 26, 300, and 3,700 d in the lungs, kidneys, other soft tissues, and in two bone volume compartments, respectively. The modified recycling model was used to estimate intake amounts, the resulting committed effective dose equivalent, maximum kidney concentrations, and dose equivalent to bone surfaces, kidneys, and lungs.

  11. Releases of UF{sub 6} to the atmosphere after a potential fire in a cylinder storage yard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Williams, W.R.; Anderson, J.C. [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), a toxic material, is stored in just over 6200 cylinders at the K-25 site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The safety analysis report (SAR) for cylinder yard storage operations at the plant required the development of accident scenarios for the potential release of UF{sub 6} to the atmosphere. In accordance with DOE standards and guidance, the general approach taken in this SAR was to examine the functions and contents of the cylinder storage yards to determine whether safety-significant hazards were present for workers in the immediate vicinity, workers on-site, the general public off-site, or the environment. and to evaluate the significance of any hazards that were found. A detailed accident analysis was performed to determine a set of limiting accidents that have potential for off-site consequences. One of the limiting accidents identified in the SAR was the rupture of a cylinder engulfed in a fire.

  12. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  13. A Mock UF6 Feed and Withdrawal System for Testing Safeguards Monitoring Systems and Strategies Intended for Nuclear Fuel Enrichment and Processing Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Bates, Bruce E [ORNL; Chesser, Joel B [ORNL; Koo, Sinsze [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an engineering-scale, mock UF6 feed and withdrawal (F&W) system, its operation, and its intended uses. This system has been assembled to provide a test bed for evaluating and demonstrating new methodologies that can be used in remote, unattended, continuous monitoring of nuclear material process operations. These measures are being investigated to provide independent inspectors improved assurance that operations are being conducted within declared parameters, and to increase the overall effectiveness of safeguarding nuclear material. Testing applicable technologies on a mock F&W system, which uses water as a surrogate for UF6, enables thorough and cost-effective investigation of hardware, software, and operational strategies before their direct installation in an industrial nuclear material processing environment. Electronic scales used for continuous load-cell monitoring also are described as part of the basic mock F&W system description. Continuous monitoring components on the mock F&W system are linked to a data aggregation computer by a local network, which also is depicted. Data collection and storage systems are described only briefly in this report. The mock UF{sub 6} F&W system is economical to operate. It uses a simple process involving only a surge tank between feed tanks and product and withdrawal (or waste) tanks. The system uses water as the transfer fluid, thereby avoiding the use of hazardous UF{sub 6}. The system is not tethered to an operating industrial process involving nuclear materials, thereby allowing scenarios (e.g., material diversion) that cannot be conducted otherwise. These features facilitate conducting experiments that yield meaningful results with a minimum of expenditure and quick turnaround time. Technologies demonstrated on the engineering-scale system lead to field trials (described briefly in this report) for determining implementation issues and performance of the monitoring technologies under plant operating conditions. The ultimate use of technologies tested on the engineering-scale test bed is to work with safeguards agencies to install them in operating plants (e.g., enrichment and fuel processing plants), thereby promoting new safeguards measures with minimal impact to operating plants. In addition, this system is useful in identifying features for new plants that can be incorporated as part of 'safeguards by design,' in which load cells and other monitoring technologies are specified to provide outputs for automated monitoring and inspector evaluation.

  14. Cylinder monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alderson, J.H. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in storage at the Department of Energy (DOE) gaseous diffusion plants, managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are being evaluated to determine their expected storage life. Cylinders evaluated recently have been in storage service for 30 to 40 years. In the present environment, the remaining life for these storage cylinders is estimated to be 30 years or greater. The group of cylinders involved in recent tests will continue to be monitored on a periodic basis, and other storage cylinders will be observed as on a statistical sample population. The program has been extended to all types of large capacity UF{sub 6} cylinders.

  15. Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  16. 10/6/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 1 High Pressure Fuel Storage Cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Type 4 gaseous fuel tanks are now designed under standards that specify finite lifetimes of 15, 20 notification of owners 10/6/2010 4www.cleanvehicle.org #12;Cylinder and fuel system inspections are critical to safe operations Visual inspection of CNG fuel systems is, at this time, the best method of monitoring

  17. Hydrogen Cylinder Storage Array Explosion Evaluations at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, David Howard [ORNL] [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL] [ORNL; Hyman III, Clifton R [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety analysis for a recently-installed cold neutron source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) involved evaluation of potential explosion consequences from accidental hydrogen jet releases that could occur from an array of hydrogen cylinders. The scope of the safety analysis involved determination of the release rate of hydrogen, the total quantity of hydrogen assumed to be involved in the explosion, the location of an ignition point or center of the explosion from receptors of interest, and the peak overpressure at the receptors. To evaluate the total quantity of hydrogen involved in the explosion, a 2D model was constructed of the jet concentration and a radial-axial integral over the jet cloud from the centerline to the flammability limit of 4% was used to determine the hydrogen mass to be used as a source term. The location of the point source was chosen as the peak of the jet centerline concentration profile. Consequences were assessed using a combination of three methods for estimating local overpressure as a function of explosion source strength and distance: the Baker-Strehlow method, the TNT-equivalence method, and the TNO method. Results from the explosions were assessed using damage estimates in screening tables for buildings and industrial equipment.

  18. Enrichment Assay Methods Development for the Integrated Cylinder Verification System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Misner, Alex C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Curtis, Michael M.

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility's entire product-cylinder inventory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a concept to automate the verification of enrichment plant cylinders to enable 100 percent product-cylinder verification and potentially, mass-balance calculations on the facility as a whole (by also measuring feed and tails cylinders). The Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) could be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. The three main objectives of this FY09 project are summarized here and described in more detail in the report: (1) Develop a preliminary design for a prototype NDA system, (2) Refine PNNL's MCNP models of the NDA system, and (3) Procure and test key pulse-processing components. Progress against these tasks to date, and next steps, are discussed.

  19. Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety I. Background. Due to the nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Compressed Gas Cylinder Safety I. Background. Due to the nature of gas cylinders hazards of a ruptured cylinder. There are almost 200 different types of materials in gas cylinders, there are several general procedures to follow for safe storage and handling of a compressed gas cylinder: II

  20. Thermal Reactions of Uranium Metal, UO2, U3O8, UF4, and UO2F2 with NF3 to Produce UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Edwards, Matthew K.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    he objective of this paper is to demonstrate that NF3 fluorinates uranium metal, UO2, UF4, UO3, U3O8, and UO2F2•2H2O to produce the volatile UF6 at temperatures between 100 and 500?C. Thermogravimetric reaction profiles are described that reflect changes in the uranium oxidation state and discrete chemical speciation. Differences in the onset temperatures for each system indicate that NF3-substrate interactions are important for the temperature at which NF3 reacts: U metal > UO3 > UO2 > UO2F2 > UF4 and in fact may indicate different fluorination mechanisms for these various substrates. These studies demonstrate that NF3 is a potential replacement fluorinating agent in the existing nuclear fuel cycle and in oft-proposed actinide volatility reprocessing.

  1. Breached cylinder incident at the Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boelens, R.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On June 16, 1990, during an inspection of valves on partially depleted product storage cylinders, a 14-ton partially depleted product cylinder was discovered breached. The cylinder had been placed in long-term storage in 1977 on the top row of Portsmouth`s (two rows high) storage area. The breach was observed when an inspector noticed a pile of green material along side of the cylinder. The breach was estimated to be approximately 8- inches wide and 16-inches long, and ran under the first stiffening ring of the cylinder. During the continuing inspection of the storage area, a second 14-ton product cylinder was discovered breached. This cylinder was stacked on the bottom row in the storage area in 1986. This breach was also located adjacent to a stiffening ring. This paper will discuss the contributing factors of the breaching of the cylinders, the immediate response, subsequent actions in support of the investigation, and corrective actions.

  2. Fire exposure of empty 30B cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziehlke, K.T. [MJB Technical Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylinders for UF{sub 6} handling, transport, and storage are designed and built as unfired pressure vessels under ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code criteria and standards. They are normally filled and emptied while UF{sub 6} is in its liquid phase. Transport cylinders such as the Model 30B are designed for service at 200 psi and 250{degrees}F, to sustain the process conditions which prevail during filling or emptying operations. While in transport, however, at ambient temperature the UF{sub 6} is solid, and the cylinder interior is well below atmospheric pressure. When the cylinders contain isotopically enriched product (above 1.0 percent U-235), they are transported in protective overpacks which function to guard the cylinders and their contents against thermal or mechanical damage in the event of possible transport accidents. Two bare Model 30B cylinders were accidentally exposed to a storage warehouse fire in which a considerable amount of damage was sustained by stored materials and the building structure, as well as by the cylinder valves and valve protectors. The cylinders were about six years old, and had been cleaned, inspected, hydrotested, and re-certified for service, but were still empty at the time of the fire. The privately-owned cylinders were transferred to DOE for testing and evaluation of the fire damage.

  3. Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVan, J.H. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. An investigation team was immediately formed to determine the cause of the failures and their impact on future storage procedures and to recommend corrective actions. Subsequent investigation showed that the failures most probably resulted from mechanical damage that occurred at the time that the cylinders had been placed in the storage yard. In both cylinders evidence pointed to the impact of a lifting lug of an adjacent cylinder near the front stiffening ring, where deflection of the cylinder could occur only by tearing the cylinder. The impacts appear to have punctured the cylinders and thereby set up corrosion processes that greatly extended the openings in the wall and obliterated the original crack. Fortunately, the reaction products formed by this process were relatively protective and prevented any large-scale loss of uranium. The main factors that precipitated the failures were inadequate spacing between cylinders and deviations in the orientations of lifting lugs from their intended horizontal position. After reviewing the causes and effects of the failures, the team`s principal recommendation for remedial action concerned improved cylinder handling and inspection procedures. Design modifications and supplementary mechanical tests were also recommended to improve the cylinder containment integrity during the stacking operation.

  4. Investigation of breached depleted UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVan, J.H.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. An investigation team was immediately formed to determine the cause of the failures and their impact on future storage procedures and to recommend corrective actions. Subsequent investigation showed that the failures most probably resulted from mechanical damage that occurred at the time that the cylinders had been placed in the storage yard. In both cylinders evidence pointed to the impact of a lifting lug of an adjacent cylinder near the front stiffening ring, where deflection of cylinder could occur only by tearing the cylinder. The impacts appear to have punctured the cylinders and thereby set up corrosion processes that greatly extended the openings in the wall and obliterated the original crack. Fortunately, the reaction products formed by this process were relatively protective and prevented any large-scale loss of uranium. The main factors that precipitated the failures were inadequate spacing between cylinders and deviations in the orientations of lifting lugs from their intended horizontal position. After reviewing the causes and effects of the failures, the team's principal recommendation for remedial action concerned improved cylinder handling and inspection procedures. Design modifications and supplementary mechanical tests were also recommended to improve the cylinder containment integrity during the stacking operation. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contained in cylinders display chemical hazards that include toxic, flammable, corrosive, pyrophoric on their side but stored in a way to prevent damage to the product label. In a free standing gas cylinder the height of the cylinder. So that the cylinder label is easily viewed. On a dry surface allowing no contact

  6. Valve studies: Hydrogen fluoride monitoring of UF{sub 6} cylinder valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leedy, R.R.; Ellis, A.R.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Marsh, G.C. [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinder valves have, like the cylinders, been in use and/or storage for periods ranging from 15 to 44 years. Visual inspection of the cylinders has shown that the extent of corrosion and the overall cylinder condition varies widely throughout the storage yards. One area of concern is the integrity of the cylinder valves. Visual inspection has found deposits which have been identified as radioactive material on or near the valves. These deposits suggest leakage of UF{sub 6} and may indicate valve degradation; however, these deposits may simply be residual material from cylinder filling operations.

  7. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6 Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of -11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  8. Cylinder Test Specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Catanach; Larry Hill; Herbert Harry; Ernest Aragon; Don Murk

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the cylinder testis two-fold: (1) to characterize the metal-pushing ability of an explosive relative to that of other explosives as evaluated by the E{sub 19} cylinder energy and the G{sub 19} Gurney energy and (2) to help establish the explosive product equation-of-state (historically, the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation). This specification details the material requirements and procedures necessary to assemble and fire a typical Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) cylinder test. Strict adherence to the cylinder. material properties, machining tolerances, material heat-treatment and etching processes, and high explosive machining tolerances is essential for test-to-test consistency and to maximize radial wall expansions. Assembly and setup of the cylinder test require precise attention to detail, especially when placing intricate pin wires on the cylinder wall. The cylinder test is typically fired outdoors and at ambient temperature.

  9. Defining the needs for non-destructive assay of UF6 feed, product, and tails at gas centrifuge enrichment plants and possible next steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moran, Bruce W [IAEA; Lebrun, Alain [IAEA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to detect undeclared LEU production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of UF{sub 6} bulk material used in the process of enrichment at GCEPS. The inspectors also take destructive assay (DA) samples for analysis off-site which provide accurate, on the order of 0.1 % to 0.5% uncertainty, data on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, DA sample taking is a much more labor intensive and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of the results and contains the possibility of the loss of the continuity of knowledge of the samples during the storage and transit of the material. Use of the IAEA's inspection sampling algorithm shows that while total sample size is fixed by the total population of potential samples and its intrinsic qualities, the split of the samples into NDA or DA samples is determined by the uncertainties in the NDA measurements. Therefore, the larger the uncertainties in the NDA methods, more of the sample taken must be DA samples. Since the DA sampling is arduous and costly, improvements in NDA methods would reduce the number of DA samples needed. Furthermore, if methods of on-site analysis of the samples could be developed that have uncertainties in the 1-2% range, a lot of the problems inherent in DA sampling could be removed. The use of an unattended system that could give an overview of the entire process giving complementary data on the enrichment process as well as accurate measures of enrichment and weights of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product would be a major step in enhancing the ability of NDA beyond present attended systems. The possibility of monitoring the feed, tails, and product header pipes in such a way as to gain safeguards relevant flow and enrichment information without compromising the intellectual property of the operator including proprietary equipment and operational parameters would be a huge step forward. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including such process monitoring and possible on-site analysis of DA samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector measurements reducing the difference between the operator's and inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GeEPs safeguards.

  10. Engine Cylinder Temperature Control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kilkenny, Jonathan Patrick (Peoria, IL); Duffy, Kevin Patrick (Metamora, IL)

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for controlling a temperature in a combustion cylinder in an internal combustion engine. The cylinder is fluidly connected to an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold. The method and apparatus includes increasing a back pressure associated with the exhaust manifold to a level sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of residual exhaust gas in the cylinder, and varying operation of an intake valve located between the intake manifold and the cylinder to an open duration sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of fresh air from the intake manifold to the cylinder, wherein controlling the quantities of residual exhaust gas and fresh air are performed to maintain the temperature in the cylinder at a desired level.

  11. CNG Cylinder Safety - Education, Outreach, and Next Steps (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.; Schroeder, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mr. Schroeder discussed the work that NREL is performing for the U.S. Department of Transportation on compressed natural gas cylinder end-of-life requirements. CNG vehicles are different from most other vehicles in that the CNG fuel storage cylinders have a pre-determined lifetime that may be shorter than the expected life of the vehicle. The end-of-life date for a cylinder is based on construction and test protocols, and is specific to the construction and material of each cylinder. The end-of-life date is important because it provides a safe margin of error against catastrophic cylinder failure or rupture. The end-of-life dates range from 15 to 25 years from the date of manufacture. NREL worked to develop outreach materials to increase awareness of cylinder end-of-life dates, has provided technical support for individual efforts related to cylinder safety and removal, and also worked with CVEF to document best practices for cylinder removal or inspection after an accident. Mr. Smith discussed the engagement of the DOE Clean Fleets Partners, which were surveyed to identify best practices on managing cylinder inventories and approached to provide initial data on cylinder age in a fleet environment. Both DOE and NREL will continue to engage these fleets and other stakeholders to determine how to best address this issue moving forward.

  12. Gas Cylinders: Proper Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

  13. Assessment of UF6 Equation of State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, P; Chand, K; Warren, D; Vandersall, J

    2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A common assumption in the mathematical analysis of flows of compressible fluids is to treat the fluid as a perfect gas. This is an approximation, as no real fluid obeys the perfect gas relationships over all temperature and pressure conditions. An assessment of the validity of treating the UF{sub 6} gas flow field within a gas centrifuge with perfect gas relationships has been conducted. The definition of a perfect gas is commonly stated in two parts: (1) the gas obeys the thermal equation of state, p = {rho}RT (thermally perfect), and, (2) the gas specific heats are constant (calorically perfect). Analysis indicates the thermally perfect assumption is valid for all flow conditions within the gas centrifuge, including shock fields. The low operating gas pressure is the primary factor in the suitability of the thermally perfect equation of state for gas centrifuge computations. UF{sub 6} is not calorically perfect, as the specific heats vary as a function of temperature. This effect is insignificant within the bulk of the centrifuge gas field, as gas temperatures vary over a narrow range. The exception is in the vicinity of shock fields, where temperature, pressure, and density gradients are large, and the variation of specific heats with temperature should be included in the technically detailed analyses. Results from a normal shock analysis incorporating variable specific heats is included herein, presented in the conventional form of shock parameters as a function of inlet Mach Number. The error introduced by assuming constant specific heats is small for a nominal UF{sub 6} shock field, such that calorically perfect shock relationships can be used for scaling and initial analyses. The more rigorous imperfect gas analysis should be used for detailed analyses.

  14. Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

  15. Investigation of breached depleted UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

  16. Prediction of External Corrosion for Steel Cylinders--2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) is stored in over 62,000 containment cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, and at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. Over 4,800 of the cylinders at Portsmouth were recently moved there from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The cylinders range in age up to 56 years and come in various models, but most are 48-inch diameter 'thin-wall'(312.5 mil) and 'thick-wall' (625 mil) cylinders and 30-inch diameter '30A' (including '30B') cylinders with 1/2-inch (500 mil) walls. Most of the cylinders are carbon steel, and they are subject to corrosion. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) manages the cylinders to maintain them and the DUF{sub 6} they contain. Cylinder management requirements are specified in the System Requirements Document (LMES 1997a), and the activities to fulfill them are specified in the System Engineering Management Plan (LMES 1997b). This report documents activities that address DUF{sub 6} cylinder management requirements involving measuring and forecasting cylinder wall thicknesses. As part of these activities, ultrasonic thickness (UT) measurements are made on samples of cylinders. For each sampled cylinder, multiple measurements are made in an attempt to find, approximately, the minimum wall thickness. Some cylinders have a skirt, which is an extension of the cylinder wall to protect the head (end) and valve. The head/skirt interface crevice is thought to be particularly vulnerable to corrosion, and for some skirted cylinders, in addition to the main body UT measurements, a separate suite of measurements is also made at the head/skirt interface. The main-body and head/skirt minimum thickness data are used to fit models relating minimum thickness to cylinder age, nominal thicknesses, and cylinder functional groups defined in terms of plant site, storage yard, top or bottom row storage positions, etc. These models are then used to compute projections of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various minimum wall thickness criteria. The minimum wall thickness criteria are as follows. For thin-wall cylinders: 0 (breach), 62.5, and 250 mils. For thick-wall cylinders: 0, 62.5, and 500 mils. For 30A cylinders: 0, 62.5, and 100 mils. Each of these criteria triplets are based respectively on (1) loss of DUF{sub 6} (breaching), (2) safe handling and stacking operations, and (3) ANSI N14.1 standards for off-site transport and contents transfer. This report complements and extends previous editions of the cylinder corrosion report by Lyon (1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000), by Schmoyer and Lyon (2001, 2002, 2003), and by Schmoyer (2004). These reports are based on UT data collected in FY03 and before. In this report UT data collected after FY03 but before FY07 is combined with the earlier data, and all of the UT data is inventoried chronologically and by the various functional groups. The UT data is then used to fit models of maximum pit depth and minimum wall thickness, statistical outliers are investigated, and the fitted models are used to extrapolate minimum thickness estimates into the future and in turn to compute projections of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various thickness criteria. A model evaluation is performed comparing UT measurements made after FY05 with model-fitted projections based only on data collected in FY05 and before. As in previous reports, the projections depend on the treatment of outliers.

  17. Relativistic Bessel Cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Krisch; E. N. Glass

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of cylindrical solutions to Einstein's field equations for power law densities is described. The solutions have a Bessel function contribution to the metric. For matter cylinders regular on axis, the first two solutions are the constant density Gott-Hiscock string and a cylinder with a metric Airy function. All members of this family have the Vilenkin limit to their mass per length. Some examples of Bessel shells and Bessel motion are given.

  18. Prediction of External Corrosion for Steel Cylinders--2004 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoyer, RLS

    2004-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) is stored in over 60,000 steel cylinders at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, and at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. The cylinders range in age from 4 to 53 years. Although when new the cylinders had wall thicknesses specified to within manufacturing tolerances, over the years corrosion has reduced their actual wall thicknesses. The UF{sub 6} Cylinder Project is managed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to safely maintain the UF{sub 6} and the cylinders containing it. This report documents activities that address UF{sub 6} Cylinder Project requirements and actions involving forecasting cylinder wall thicknesses. These requirements are delineated in the System Requirements Document (LMES 1997a), and the actions needed to fulfill them are specified in the System Engineering Management Plan (LMES 1997b). The report documents cylinder wall thickness projections based on models fit to ultrasonic thickness (UT) measurement data. UT data is collected at various locations on randomly sampled cylinders. For each cylinder sampled, the minimum UT measurement approximates the actual minimum thickness of the cylinder. Projections of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various thickness criteria are computed from corrosion models relating minimum wall thickness to cylinder age, initial thickness estimates, and cylinder subpopulations defined in terms of plant site, yard, top or bottom storage positions, nominal thickness, etc. In this report, UT data collected during FY03 is combined with UT data collected in earlier years (FY94-FY02), and all of the data is inventoried chronologically and by various subpopulations. The UT data is used to fit models of maximum pit depth and minimum thickness, and the fitted models are used to extrapolate minimum thickness estimates into the future and in turn to compute estimates of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various thickness criteria. A model evaluation is performed comparing UT measurements made in FY03 with model-fitted projections based only on data collected before FY03.

  19. Cylinder inspection logs and analytical data LCRU-066 through LCRU-131. Volume 4, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ERC sampled, analyzed, and recontainerized when necessary gas cylinders of various chemicals in storage at LANL TA-54 Area L. This report summarizes the operation. This is Volume 4 of five volumes.

  20. Prediction of External Corrosion for Steel Cylinders--2002 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoyer, RLS

    2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) manages the UF{sub 6} Cylinder Project. The project was formed to maintain and safely manage the depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) stored in approximately 50,000 carbon steel cylinders. The cylinders are located at three DOE sites: the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. The System Requirements Document (SRD) (LMES 1997a) delineates the requirements of the project, and the actions needed to fulfill these requirements are specified in the System Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) (LMES 1997b). This report documents activities that in whole or part satisfy specific requirements and actions stated in the UF{sub 6} Cylinder Project SRD and SEMP with respect to forecasting cylinder conditions. The results presented here supercede those presented by Lyon (1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000), and Schmoyer and Lyon (2001). Many of the wall thickness projections made in this report are conservative, because they are based on the assumption that corrosion trends will continue, despite activities such as improved monitoring, relocations to better storage, painting, and other improvements in storage conditions relative to the conditions at the times most of the wall thickness measurements were made. For thin-wall cylinders (design nominal wall thickness 312.5 mils), the critical minimum wall thicknesses criteria used in this report are 0 (breach), 62.5 mils, and 250 mils (1 mil = 0.001 in.). For thick-wall cylinders (design nominal wall thickness 625 mils), the thickness criteria used in this report are 0, 62.5 mils, and 500 mils. The criteria triples are preliminary boundaries identified within the project that indicate (1) loss of material (UF{sub 6}), (2) safe handling and stacking operations, and (3) standards for off-site transport and contents transfer criteria, respectively. In general, these criteria are based on an area of wall thinning. However, the minimum thickness predicted in this report is essentially for a point--an area of about 0.01 square inches--because the thickness measurements on which the predictions are based are essentially for points. For thicknesses criteria greater than zero, conclusions based on minimum point thicknesses are conservative. Because of the interaction of UF{sub 6}, with atmospheric moisture and steel, a point breach would deteriorate in a year to one-inch diameter hole (DNFSB 1995), however, and so small area approximations should be close for the breach criteria. The most recently collected data, entered into the corrosion model database and not available for the previous report (Schmoyer and Lyon 2001), consists of evaluations of wall loss of 48 inch thin-wall cylinders: 301 cylinders at Paducah, 101 at ETTP, and 139 at Portsmouth; 14 thick-wall cylinders at Portsmouth; and 99 model 30A cylinders at Paducah. However, because of missing values, repeated measures on the same cylinders, outliers, and other data problems, however, not all of these measurements are necessarily used in the corrosion analysis. In several cases, difficulty with the data is also due to a mathematical approach to cylinder corrosion modeling that is used in this report, in Schmoyer and Lyon (2001), and in earlier reports by Lyon. Therefore, an alternative approach is also considered in this report. In previous reports, minimum wall thicknesses have been modeled indirectly through separate models of initial thickness and maximum pit depth. In order to estimate minimum wall thicknesses, the initial thickness and maximum pit depth models are combined using mathematics that assumes independence of the statistical distributions of the initial thicknesses and maximum pit depths. Initial thicknesses are modeled from wall thickness maxima measured at relatively uncorroded wall areas of each cylinder. Maximum pit depths for each cylinder are estimated as differences between the initial thickness estimates and me

  1. Method for charging and discharging a latent-heat storage medium and heat storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreikenbohm, R.; Reusch, H.

    1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat storage unit is disclosed having a vertically cylindrical container accommodating a latent-heat storage medium and a conduit introducing a heat carrier liquid not miscible with the medium at the bottom of the container. The conduit has an exit nozzle which is located outside the axial center of the cylinder and nearly perpendicular to the radius of the cylinder so that the heat carrier liquid enters the cylinder at the bottom in a direction to cause the heat storage melt to be set into a rotary motion.

  2. Method for charging and discharging a latent-heat storage medium and heat storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreikenbohm, R.; Reusch, H.

    1981-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat storage unit is disclosed having a vertically cylindrical container accommodating a latent-heat storage medium and a conduit introducing a heat carrier liquid not miscible with the medium at the bottom of the container. The conduit has an exit nozzle which is located outside the axial center of the cylinder and nearly perpendicular to the radius of the cylinder so that the heat carrier liquid enters the cylinder at the bottom in a direction to cause the heat storage melt to be set into a rotary motion.

  3. Prediction of External Corrosion for Steel Cylinders 2001 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoyer, RLS

    2001-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently manages the UF{sub 6} Cylinder Project. The project was formed to maintain and safely manage the depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) stored in approximately 50,000 carbon steel cylinders. The cylinders are located at three DOE sites: the ETTP site (K-25) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. The System Requirements Document (SRD) (LMES 1997a) delineates the requirements of the project. The appropriate actions needed to fulfill these requirements are then specified within the System Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) (LMES 1997b). This report documents activities that in whole or in part satisfy specific requirements and actions stated in the UF{sub 6} Cylinder Project SRD and SEMP with respect to forecasting cylinder conditions. The results presented here supercede those presented previously (Lyon 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000). Many of the wall thickness projections made in this report are conservative, because they are based on the assumption that corrosion trends will continue, despite activities such as improved monitoring, relocations to better storage, and painting.

  4. GLOBAL MONITORING OF URANIUM HEXIFLORIDE CYLINDERS NEXT STEPS IN DEVELOPMENT OF AN ACTION PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanks, D.

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 40 industrial facilities world-wide use standardized uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders for transport, storage and in-process receiving in support of uranium conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication processes. UF{sub 6} is processed and stored in the cylinders, with over 50,000 tU of UF{sub 6} transported each year in these International Organization for Standardization (ISO) qualified containers. Although each cylinder is manufactured to an ISO standard that calls for a nameplate with the manufacturer's identification number (ID) and the owner's serial number engraved on it, these can be quite small and difficult to read. Recognizing that each facility seems to use a different ID, a cylinder can have several different numbers recorded on it by means of metal plates, sticky labels, paint or even marker pen as it travels among facilities around the world. The idea of monitoring movements of UF{sub 6} cylinders throughout the global uranium fuel cycle has become a significant issue among industrial and safeguarding stakeholders. Global monitoring would provide the locations, movements, and uses of cylinders in commercial nuclear transport around the world, improving the efficiency of industrial operations while increasing the assurance that growing nuclear commerce does not result in the loss or misuse of cylinders. It should be noted that a unique ID (UID) attached to a cylinder in a verifiable manner is necessary for safeguarding needs and ensuring positive ID, but not sufficient for an effective global monitoring system. Modern technologies for tracking and inventory control can pair the UID with sensors and secure data storage for content information and complete continuity of knowledge over the cylinder. This paper will describe how the next steps in development of an action plan for employing a global UF{sub 6} cylinder monitoring network could be cultivated using four primary UID functions - identification, tracking, controlling, and accounting.

  5. Ultra High Precision Muon Storage Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, B. Lee

    .06 UF5 White 348 Disp. 6.45 UF6 Colorless 64.05 56.54 5.06 UCl3 Olive green 837 1657 5.51 UCl4 Dark

  6. Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

  7. Enhanced Algorithm for Traceability Measurements in UF6 Flow Pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copinger, Thomas E [ORNL; March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL; Upadhyaya, Belle R [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) is used to continually assess the mixing and downblending of highly enriched uranium (HEU) with low-enriched uranium (LEU). This is accomplished by measuring the enrichment and the fissile mass flow rate of the UF{sub 6} gas located in each process pipe of the system by inducing the fission of the {sup 235}U contained in the gas. Measurements are taken along this process route to trace the HEU content all the way to the product stream, ensuring that HEU was down blended. A problem associated with the current traceability measuring algorithm is that it does not account for the time-varying background that is introduced to the system by the movement of the shutter located at the HEU leg of the process. The current way of dealing with that problem is to discard the data for periods when the HEU shutter is open (50% of overall data) because it correlates with the same timeframe in which the direct contribution to background from the HEU shutter was seen. The advanced algorithm presented in this paper allows for continuous measurement of traceability (100%) by accurately accounting for the varying background during the shutter-movement cycle. This algorithm utilizes advanced processing techniques that identify and discriminate the different sources of background radiation, instead of grouping them into one background group for the whole measurement cycle. By using this additional information, the traceability measurement statistics can achieve a greater number of values, thus improving the overall usefulness of these measurements in the BDMS. The effectiveness of the new algorithm was determined by modeling it in a simulation and ensuring that it retained its integrity through a large number of runs, including various shutter-failure conditions. Each run was performed with varying amounts of background radiation from each individual source and with varying traceability counts. The simulations documented in this paper prove that the algorithm can stand up to various transients introduced into the system, such as failure of shutter movement.

  8. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Rige, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  9. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} x 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover, the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining 6 cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  10. Overseas shipments of 48Y cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, R.T.; Furlan, A.S. [Cameco Corp., Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes experiences with two incidents of overseas shipments of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The first incident involved nine empty UF{sub 6} cylinders in enclosed sea containers. Three UF{sub 6} cylinders broke free from their tie-downs and damaged and contaminated several sea containers. This paper describes briefly how decontamination was carried out. The second incident involved a shipment of 14 full UF{sub 6} cylinders. Although the incident did not cause an accident, the potential hazard was significant. The investigation of the cause of the near accident is recounted. Recommendations to alleviate future similar incidents for both cases are presented.

  11. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blue, S.C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  12. Internal combustion engine cylinder-to-cylinder balancing with balanced air-fuel ratios

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D.; Smalley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of balancing combustion among cylinders of an internal combustion engine. For each cylinder, a normalized peak firing pressure is calculated as the ratio of its peak firing pressure to its combustion pressure. Each cylinder's normalized peak firing pressure is compared to a target value for normalized peak firing pressure. The fuel flow is adjusted to any cylinder whose normalized peak firing pressure is not substantially equal to the target value.

  13. Compressed Gas Safety The purpose of this section is to assist the laboratory worker with identification, storage, maintenance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    with identification, storage, maintenance, and handling of compressed gases. Compressed gases can be hazardous because on the tank to remind users to leak test before each use. Storage and Handling · All cylinders should, greases, and gasoline. · DO NOT subject any part of a cylinder to a temperature higher than 125o F

  14. Chemical aspects of cylinder corrosion and a scenario for hole development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, E.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1990, two cylinders in the depleted UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards at Portsmouth were discovered to have holes in their walls at the valve-end stiffening ring at a point below the level of the gas-solid interface of the UF{sub 6}. The cylinder with the larger hole, which extended under the stiffening ring, was stacked in a top row 13 years ago. The cylinder with the smaller hole had been stacked in a bottom row 4 years ago. The lifting lugs of the adjacent cylinders pointed directly at the holes. A Cylinder Investigating Committee was appointed to determine the cause or causes of the holes and to assess the implications of these findings. This report contains a listing of the chemically related facts established by the Investigating Committee with the cooperation of the Operations and Technical Support Divisions at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, the scenario developed to explain these findings and some implications of this scenario. In summary, the interrelated reactions of water, solid UF{sub 6} and iron presented by R. L. Ritter are used to develop a scenario which explains the observations and deductions made during the investigation. The chemical processes are intimately related to the course of the last three of the four stages of hole development. A simple model is proposed which permits semiquantitative prediction of such information as the HF loss rates as a function of time, the rate of hole enlargement, the time to hydrolyze a cylinder of UF{sub 6} and the approximate size of the hole. The scenario suggests that the environmental consequences associated with a developing hole in a depleted UF{sub 6} cylinder are minimal for the first several years but will become significant if too many years pass before detection. The overall environmental picture is presented in more detail elsewhere.

  15. ORNL 99-04743/arb 1. K-1435 TSCA Incinerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    KAFaD Laundry 14. K-1066-E UF6 Cylinder Venting 15. K-1065-D Waste Downblending 15 1 2 5 7 12 13 14 10

  16. Microsoft Word - SWMU 99newformat1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    function of the buildings. The buildings have been demolished, but the remaining concrete pads are used to store UF 6 cylinders and classified waste. There is also a...

  17. STREAMWISE AND CROSSFLOW INSTABILITIES ON INCLINED CIRCULAR CYLINDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STREAMWISE AND CROSSFLOW INSTABILITIES ON INCLINED CIRCULAR CYLINDERS S. J. Garrett , J. P: Turbine blades, swept cylinder, streamwise & crossflow instabilities Abstract Observations of streamwise and crossflow insta- bilities on swept circular cylinders over a range of inclinations are presented

  18. Aspects of uranium chemistry pertaining to UF{sub 6} cylinder handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, R.L.; Barber, E.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under normal conditions, the bulk of UF{sub 6} in storage cylinders will be in the solid state with an overpressure of gaseous UF{sub 6} well below one atmosphere. Corrosion of the interior of the cylinder will be very slow, with formation of a small amount of reduced fluoride, probably U{sub 2}F{sub 9}. The UO{sub 3}-HF-H{sub 2}O phase diagram indicates that reaction of any inleaking water vapor with the solid UF{sub 6} will generate the solid material [H{sub 3}O]{sub 2}(U(OH){sub 4}F{sub 4}) in equilibrium with an aqueous HF solution containing only small amounts of uranium. The corrosion of the steel cylinder by these materials may be enhanced over that observed with gaseous anhydrous UF{sub 6}.

  19. Prediction of external corrosion for UF{sub 6} cylinders: Results of an empirical method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, B.F.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wall thickness data for depleted LTF, (DU) cylinders in above-ground storage at three Department of Energy (DOE) sites (Oak Ridge, TN; Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH) were analyzed in order to address the following questions: How many cylinders may have breaches now? and, What will the conditions be like in 2020? This report summarizes preliminary results of the analyses conducted. These results are to be used as input into models for estimating risks and hazards associated with the cylinders in the various conditions. These models will then be used as a basis for implementing engineering fixes where possible and for management decisions on corrective actions. This is part of the overall assessment of the risks and hazards within the DU management program.

  20. Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors Cylinder Head Gasket with Integrated Combustion Pressure Sensors Poster presented at the 16th Directions in...

  1. 3-Cylinder Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection: A High Value...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cylinder Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection: A High Value Solution for Euro VI Emissions 3-Cylinder Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection: A High Value Solution for Euro VI...

  2. Quantitative in-cylinder NO-LIF imaging in a realistic gasoline engine with spray-guided direct injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    of engines with gasoline direct injection. Exhaust gas aftertreatment requires storage catalystsQuantitative in-cylinder NO-LIF imaging in a realistic gasoline engine with spray-guided direct fractions in a gasoline engine with spray-guided direct injection using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF

  3. The Cylinder: Kinematics of the Nineteenth Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller-Sievers, Helmut

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yale University Press. Kempe, Alfred. 1877. How to Draw a50. Becker (1875, 45). 51. Kempe (1877). 4. The Cylinder asinfinite circumference; see Kempe (1877, 12–17). 30. Ball (

  4. Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, A.B.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

  5. UF{sub 6} cylinder fire test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, S.H. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing number of nuclear reactors for power generation, there is a comparable increase in the amount of UF{sub 6} being transported. Likewise, the probability of having an accident involving UF{sub 6}-filled cylinders also increases. Accident scenarios which have been difficult to assess are those involving a filled UF{sub 6} cylinder subjected to fire. A study is underway at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, as part of the US DOE Enrichment Program, to provide empirical data and a computer model that can be used to evaluate various cylinder-in-fire scenarios. It is expected that the results will provide information leading to better handling of possible fire accidents as well as show whether changes should be made to provide different physical protection during shipment. The computer model being developed will be capable of predicting the rupture of various cylinder sizes and designs as well as the amount of UF{sub 6}, its distribution in the cylinder, and the conditions of the fire.

  6. UF{sub 6} cylinder inspections at PGDP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, G.W.; Whinnery, W.N. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Routine inspections of all UF{sub 6} cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant have been mandated by the Department of Energy. A specific UF{sub 6} cylinder inspection procedure for what items to inspect and training for the operators prior to inspection duty are described. The layout of the cylinder yards and the forms used in the inspections are shown. The large number of cylinders (>30,000) to inspect and the schedule for completion on the mandated time table are discussed. Results of the inspections and the actions to correct the deficiencies are explained. Future inspections and movement of cylinders for relocation of certain cylinder yards are defined.

  7. Natural convection heat transfer from two horizontal cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reymond, Olivier; Murray, Darina B. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); O'Donovan, Tadhg S. [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Nasmyth Building, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection heat transfer from a single horizontal cylinder and a pair of vertically aligned horizontal cylinders is investigated. Surface heat transfer distributions around the circumference of the cylinders are presented for Rayleigh numbers of 2 x 10{sup 6}, 4 x 10{sup 6} and 6 x 10{sup 6} and a range of cylinder spacings of 1.5, 2 and 3 diameters. With a cylinder pairing the lower cylinder is unaffected by the presence of the second cylinder; the same is true of the upper cylinder if the lower one is not heated. However, when both cylinders are heated it has been found that a plume rising from the heated lower cylinder interacts with the upper cylinder and significantly affects the surface heat transfer distribution. Spectral analysis of surface heat transfer signals has established the influence of the plume oscillations on the heat transfer. Thus, when the plume from the lower cylinder oscillates out of phase with the flow around the upper cylinder it increases the mixing and results in enhanced heat transfer. (author)

  8. Fact #725: April 30, 2012 Cylinder Deactivation is More Prevalent...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5: April 30, 2012 Cylinder Deactivation is More Prevalent in Light Trucks than Cars Fact 725: April 30, 2012 Cylinder Deactivation is More Prevalent in Light Trucks than Cars...

  9. Silo Storage Preconceptual Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanie L. Austad; Patrick W. Bragassa; Kevin M Croft; David S Ferguson; Scott C Gladson; Annette L Shafer; John H Weathersby

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a need to develop and field a low-cost option for the long-term storage of a variety of radiological material. The storage option’s primary requirement is to provide both environmental and physical protection of the materials. Design criteria for this effort require a low initial cost and minimum maintenance over a 50-year design life. In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-West was tasked with developing a dry silo storage option for the BN-350 Spent Fuel in Aktau Kazakhstan. Argon’s design consisted of a carbon steel cylinder approximately 16 ft long, 18 in. outside diameter and 0.375 in. wall thickness. The carbon steel silo was protected from corrosion by a duplex coating system consisting of zinc and epoxy. Although the study indicated that the duplex coating design would provide a design life well in excess of the required 50 years, the review board was concerned because of the novelty of the design and the lack of historical use. In 2012, NNSA tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with reinvestigating the silo storage concept and development of alternative corrosion protection strategies. The 2012 study, “Silo Storage Concepts, Cathodic Protection Options Study” (INL/EST-12-26627), concludes that the option which best fits the design criterion is a passive cathotic protection scheme, consisting of a carbon steel tube coated with zinc or a zinc-aluminum alloy encapsulated in either concrete or a cement grout. The hot dipped zinc coating option was considered most efficient, but the flame-sprayed option could be used if a thicker zinc coating was determined to be necessary.

  10. On rigidly rotating perfect fluid cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    2002-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational field of a rigidly rotating perfect fluid cylinder with gamma- law equation of state is found analytically. The solution has two parameters and is physically realistic for gamma in the interval (1.41,2]. Closed timelike curves always appear at large distances.

  11. Rigidly rotating cylinders of charged dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational field of a rigidly rotating cylinder of charged dust is found analytically. The general and all regular solutions are divided into three classes. The acceleration and the vorticity of the dust are given, as well as the conditions for the appearance of closed timelike curves.

  12. Paducah and Portsmouth Off-Specification Enriched and Normal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enriched and Normal UF 6 Inventory 1 3B refers to a 30B cylinder size and 4A refers to a 48A size cylinder. Table 1 PORTS Enriched Inventory Container ID Sample Transfer Gross lbs...

  13. Portsmouth and Paducah DUF6 Inventory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Paducah DUF6 Inventory The following tables display the DUF6 inventories at Portsmouth and Paducah by assay range and cylinder sizes. Portsmouth Depleted UF6 Cylinders As of...

  14. An evaluation of an optically-based, cylinder pressure sensor in a single-cylinder, research, diesel engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Timothy Troy

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers have long searched for a viable method to reliably measure cylinder pressure in real-world, internal combustion engines during normal operation. Although many devices to measure cylinder pressure in a laboratory situation exist, none exist...

  15. Containment and storage of uranium hexafluoride at US Department of Energy uranium enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, C.R.; Alderson, J.H.; Blue, S.C.; Boelens, R.A.; Conkel, M.E.; Dorning, R.E.; Ecklund, C.D.; Halicks, W.G.; Henson, H.M.; Newman, V.S.; Philpot, H.E.; Taylor, M.S.; Vournazos, J.P. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States). UEO Enrichment Technical Operations Div.; Russell, J.R. [USDOE Oak Ridge Field Office, TN (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ziehlke, K.T. [MJB Technical Associates (United States)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopically depleted UF{sub 6} (uranium hexafluoride) accumulates at a rate five to ten times greater than the enriched product and is stored in steel vessels at the enrichment plant sites. There are approximately 55,000 large cylinders now in storage at Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Most of them contain a nominal 14 tons of depleted UF{sub 6}. Some of these cylinders have been in the unprotected outdoor storage environment for periods approaching 40 years. Storage experience, supplemented by limited corrosion data, suggests a service life of about 70 years under optimum conditions for the 48-in. diameter, 5/16-in.-wall pressure vessels (100 psi working pressure), using a conservative industry-established 1/4-in.-wall thickness as the service limit. In the past few years, however, factors other than atmospheric corrosion have become apparent that adversely affect the serviceability of small numbers of the storage containers and that indicate the need for a managed program to ensure maintenance ofcontainment integrity for all the cylinders in storage. The program includes periodic visual inspections of cylinders and storage yards with documentation for comparison with other inspections, a group of corrosion test programs to permit cylinder life forecasts, and identification of (and scheduling for remedial action) situations in which defects, due to handling damage or accelerated corrosion, can seriously shorten the storage life or compromise the containment integrity of individual cylinders. The program also includes rupture testing to assess the effects of certain classes of damage on overall cylinder strength, aswell as ongoing reviews of specifications, procedures, practices, and inspection results to effect improvements in handling safety, containment integrity, and storage life.

  16. Assessment of Reusing 14-ton, Thin-Wall, Depleted UF{sub 6} Cylinders as LLW Disposal Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, D.G.

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 700,000 MT of DUF{sub 6} is stored, or will be produced under a current agreement with the USEC, at the Paducah site in Kentucky, Portsmouth site in Ohio, and ETTP site in Tennessee. On July 21, 1998, the 105th Congress approved Public Law 105-204 (Ref; 1), which directed that facilities be built at the Kentucky and Ohio sites to convert DUF{sub 6} to a stable form for disposition. On July 6, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued the ''Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride as Required by Public Law 105-204 (Ref. 2), in which DOE committed to develop a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap''. On September 1, 2000, DOE issued the Draft Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap (Ref. 3) (Roadmap), which provides alternate paths for the long-term storage, beneficial use, and eventual disposition of each product form and material that will result from the DUF{sub 6} conversion activity. One of the paths being considered for DUF{sub 6} cylinders is to reuse the empty cylinders as containers to transport and dispose of LLW, including the converted DU. The Roadmap provides results of the many alternate uses and disposal paths for conversion products and the empty DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders. As a part of the Roadmap, evaluations were conducted of cost savings, technical maturity, barriers to implementation, and other impacts. Results of these evaluations indicate that using the DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders as LLW disposal containers could provide moderate cost savings due to the avoided cost of purchasing LLW packages and the avoided cost of disposing of the cylinders. No significant technical or institutional issues were identified that would make using cylinders as LLW packages less effective than other disposition paths. Over 58,000 cylinders have been used, or will be used, to store DUF{sub 6}. Over 51,000 of those cylinders are 14TTW cylinders with a nominal wall thickness of 5/16-m (0.79 cm). These- 14TTW cylinders, which have a nominal diameter of 48 inches and nominally contain 14 tons (12.7 MT) of DUF{sub 6}, were originally designed and fabricated for temporary storage of DUF{sub 6}. They were fabricated from pressure-vessel-grade steels according to the provisions of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Ref. 4). Cylinders are stored in open yards at the three sites and, due to historical storage techniques, were subject to corrosion. Roughly 10,000 of the 14TTW cylinders are considered substandard (Ref. 5) due to corrosion and other structural anomalies caused by mishandling. This means that approximately 40,000 14TTW cylinders could be made available as containers for LLW disposal In order to demonstrate the use of 14TTW cylinders as LLW disposal containers, several qualifying tasks need to be performed. Two demonstrations are being considered using 14TTW cylinders--one demonstration using contaminated soil and one demonstration using U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The objective of this report are to determine how much information is known that could be used to support the demonstrations, and how much additional work will need to be done in order to conduct the demonstrations. Information associated with the following four qualifying tasks are evaluated in this report. (1) Perform a review of structural assessments that have been conducted for 14TTW. (2) Develop a procedure for filling 14TTW cylinders with LLW that have been previously washed. (3) Evaluate the transportation requirements for shipping 14TTW cylinders containing LLW. (4) Evaluate the WAC that will be imposed by the NTS. Two assumptions are made to facilitate this evaluation of using DUF{sub 6} cylinders as LLW disposal containers. (1) Only 14TTW cylinders will be considered for use as LLW containers, and (2) The NTS will be the LLW disposal site.

  17. Radiation levels on empty cylinders containing heel material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shockley, C.W. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Empty UF{sub 6} cylinders containing heel material were found to emit radiation levels in excess of 200 mr/hr, the maximum amount stated in ORO-651. The radiation levels were as high as 335 mr/hr for thick wall (48X and 48Y) cylinders and 1050 mr/hr for thin wall (48G and 48H) cylinders. The high readings were found only on the bottom of the cylinders. These radiation levels exceeded the maximum levels established in DOT 49 CFR, Part 173.441 for shipment of cylinders. Holding periods of four weeks for thick-wall cylinders and ten weeks for thin-wall cylinders were established to allow the radiation levels to decay prior to shipment.

  18. DDES and IDDES of tandem cylinders.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakrishnan, R.; Garbaruk, A.; Shur, M.; Strelets, M.; Spalart, P.; New Technologies and Services - Russia; St.-Peterburg State Polytechnic Univ.; Boeing Commercial Airplanes

    2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents an overview of the authors contribution to the BANC-I Workshop on the flow past tandem cylinders (Category 2). It includes an outline of the simulation approaches, numerics, and grid used, the major results of the simulations, their comparison with available experimental data, and some preliminary conclusions. The effect of varying the spanwise period in the simulations is strong for some quantities, and not others.

  19. Safety analysis of in-use vehicle wrapping cylinder

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The focus of this presentation is on the security analysis for wrapped cylinders used in vehicles and analyzing safety conditions and environmental effects through testing.

  20. Tunable capillary-induced attraction between vertical cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennifer M. Rieser; P. E. Arratia; A. G. Yodh; J. P. Gollub; D. J. Durian

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Deformation of a fluid interface caused by the presence of objects at the interface can lead to large lateral forces between the objects. We explore these fluid-mediated attractive force between partially submerged vertical cylinders. Forces are experimentally measured by slowly separating cylinder pairs and cylinder triplets after capillary rise is initially established for cylinders in contact. For cylinder pairs, numerical computations and a theoretical model are found to be in good agreement with measurements. The model provides insight into the relative importance of the contributions to the total force. For small separations, the pressure term dominates, while at large separations, surface tension becomes more important. A cross-over between the two regimes occurs at a separation of around half of a capillary length. The experimentally measured forces between cylinder triplets are also in good agreement with numerical computations, and we show that pair-wise contributions account for nearly all of the attractive force between triplets. For cylinders with equilibrium capillary rise height greater than the height of the cylinder, we find that the attractive force depends on the height of the cylinders above the submersion level, which provides a means to create precisely-controlled tunable cohesive forces between objects deforming a fluid interface.

  1. Coated Conductors Cylinder Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCityCoated Conductors Cylinder Ltd Jump to: navigation,

  2. Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

  3. Energy Storage

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

  4. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.storage ..2013: Global ocean storage of anthropogenic carbon.

  5. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .example system based on log-structured storage 10.1 SystemA storage bottleneck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  6. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  7. EC Driver - 41" Stroke Hydraulic Cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaques, A.; /Fermilab

    1990-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    It was decided to use a hydraulic cylinder resting on the floor of the argon spill trough in the EC carriage to drive the EC's motion on the center beam. Space was limited due to the spill bellows and their required support and containment system. The 0.0. of the cylinder had to be limited to 3 to 3-1/2 inches, maximum. The weight of a wet EC and carriage is estimated to be 320 tons. The rolling coefficient of friction of the Tychoway rollers chosen to guide the EC and carriage along the hardened centerbeam ways is claimed to be less than 0.0025. The driver will also need to overcome the forces produced by moving (rotating) the numerous bayonets located at the top of the cryostats in the many piping systems. These forces were conservatively estimated at 1000 lbs. The drive force required to overcome these forces was then calculated to be: 320(2,000) x 0.0025 + 1,000 = 2.600 lbs. (min. required). Due to the uncertainty in the actual roller coefficient of friction and the various unknowns in estimating the resistive forces contained in the piping and cabling systems attached to the cryostat, a conservative design factor of 5 was chosen. This should account for any uncertainty in our estimation of the minimum required drive force and also leaves us with a reserve to fall back on in case any unforeseen problems might arise. Thus the desired capacity of the driver was set at: (2,600) x 5 = 13,000 lbs. (design capacity). Assuming a 3 inch O.D. cylinder with a 1/2 inch wall (2 inch bore), we first analyzed a 1-3/8 inch diameter piston rod. Using Shigley & Mischke's 'Mechanical Engineering Design' (5th Ed.) and it's formulas for long columns with central loading, it was determined that a 1-3/8 inch diameter rod would not suffice, given our safety factor of 2. Increasing the piston rod diameter to 1-1/2 inches proved to be sufficient. The maximum allowable load came out to be approximately 17,000 lbs., which is greater than the 13,000 lbs. design capacity. With a 1-1/2 inch rod, a 2 inch bore and 10,000 psi capacity, the maximum return (retraction) force is: ({pi}/4)(2{sup 2}-1.52) x (10,000) = 13,744 lbs. (return force). This meets the desired design capacity of the cylinder. On the extension of the cylinder, the pressure will be limited such to produce only the 13,000 lb. design capacity. Through the use of a regulator on the cylinder extension inlet, the pressure will be limited to: 13,000/[({pi}/4)(2){sup 2}] {approx_equal} 4,200 psi. (regulator setting) and 4,200 x ({pi}/4)(2){sup 2} = 13,195 lbs. (thrust force). Another reference used by some Fermi engineers in designing hydraulic cylinders is the 'Design Engineers Handbook', Bulletin 0224-B1 published by the Parker-Hannifin Corporation. The piston rod-stroke selection table on page b-5 is used to determine the stroke factor. Our setup most approximates Case II of the table which gives a stroke factor of 0.70. Multiplying this by the actual stroke (41-inch) gives us a basic length of 28.7-inch. Using the piston rodstroke selection graph on page b-6, the 1-1/2 inch rod and 28.7-inch basic length indicate an allowable thrust of approximately 13,000 lbs. According to the Chief Application Engineer at the Parker-Hannifin regional sales office in Des Plaines, IL, a min imum safety factor of 4 can be assumed in the piston rod-stroke selection graph, possibly even higher. This would be at least twice as high as our initial safety factor of 2. Thus we feel our cylinder design falls well within the acceptable region of this reference.

  8. UF{sub 6} pressure excursions during cylinder heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, P.G. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As liquid UF{sub 6} inside a cylinder changes from a liquid to a solid, it forms a porous solid which occupies approximately the same volume as that of the liquid before cooling. Simultaneously as the liquid cools, UF{sub 6} vapor in the cylinder ullage above the liquid desublimes on the upper region of the inner cylinder wall. This solid is a dense, glass-like material which can accumulate to a significant thickness. The thickness of the solid coating on the upper cylinder wall and directly behind the cylinder valve area will vary depending on the conditions during the cooling stage. The amount of time lapsed between UF{sub 6} solidification and UF{sub 6} liquefaction can also affect the UF{sub 6} coating. This is due to the daily ambient heat cycle causing the coating to sublime from the cylinder wall to cooler areas, thus decreasing the thickness. Structural weakening of the dense UF{sub 6} layer also occurs due to cylinder transport vibration and thermal expansion. During cylinder heating, the UF{sub 6} nearest the cylinder wall will liquefy first. As the solid coating behind the cylinder valve begins to liquefy, it results in increased pressure depending upon the available volume for expansion. At the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) during the liquefaction of the UF{sub 6} in cylinders in the UF{sub 6} feed and sampling autoclaves, this pressure increase has resulted in the activation of the systems rupture discs which are rated at 100 pounds per square inch differential.

  9. Flow Separation Control with Rotating Cylinders James Schulmeister

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (February 2001): 291-326. Goal: Control flow separation to reduce hydrodynamic drag and oscillating lift layer flow of the main cylinder. This delays flow separation and reduces drag. The control effortFlow Separation Control with Rotating Cylinders James Schulmeister Dr. Jason Dahl Prof. Michael

  10. Artificial Neural Nets and Cylinder Pressures in Diesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkey, Amanda

    Artificial Neural Nets and Cylinder Pressures in Diesel Engine Fault Diagnosis * Gopi O diagnosis system for a diesel engine, which uses artificial neural nets to identify faults on the basis cylinder Ruston AP 230, medium speed Diesel engine was simulated. When tested on new data previously unseen

  11. NGSI: FUNCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR A CYLINDER TRACKING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branney, S.

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    While nuclear suppliers currently track uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders in various ways, for their own purposes, industry practices vary significantly. The NNSA Office of Nonproliferation and International Security's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has begun a 5-year program to investigate the concept of a global monitoring scheme that uniquely identifies and tracks UF{sub 6} cylinders. As part of this effort, NGSI's multi-laboratory team has documented the 'life of a UF{sub 6} cylinder' and reviewed IAEA practices related to UF{sub 6} cylinders. Based on this foundation, this paper examines the functional requirements of a system that would uniquely identify and track UF{sub 6} cylinders. There are many considerations for establishing a potential tracking system. Some of these factors include the environmental conditions a cylinder may be expected to be exposed to, where cylinders may be particularly vulnerable to diversion, how such a system may be integrated into the existing flow of commerce, how proprietary data generated in the process may be protected, what a system may require in terms of the existing standard for UF{sub 6} cylinder manufacture or modifications to it and what the limiting technology factors may be. It is desirable that a tracking system should provide benefit to industry while imposing as few additional constraints as possible and still meeting IAEA safeguards objectives. This paper includes recommendations for this system and the analysis that generated them.

  12. Fluid forces on two circular cylinders in crossflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Chen, S.S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid excitation forces are measured in a water loop for two circular cylinders arranged in tandem and normal to flow. The Strouhal number and fluctuating drag and lift coefficients for both cylinders are presented for various spacings and incoming flow conditions. The results show the effects of Reynolds number, pitch ratio, and upstream turbulence on the fluid excitation forces.

  13. Prediction of External Corrosion for Steel Cylinders - 1998 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, B.F.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently manages the UF, Cylinder Project. The project was formed to maintain and safely manage depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) stored in approximately 50,000 carbon steel cylinders. The cylinders located at three DOE sites: the K-25 site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee (K-25); the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky (PGDP), and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. The System Requirements Document (SRD) (LMES 1997a) delineates the requirements of the project. The appropriate actions needed to fulfill these requirements are then specified within the System Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) (LMES 1997b). The report presented herein documents activities that in whole or in part satisfy specific requirements and actions stated in the UF{sub 6} Cylinder Project SRD and SEMP with respect to forecasting cylinder conditions. The wall thickness projections made in this report are based on the assumption that the corrosion trends noted will continue. Some activities planned may substantially reduce the rate of corrosion, in which case the results presented here are conservative. The results presented here are intended to supercede and enlarge the scope of those presented previously (Lyon 1995,1996, 1997). In particular, projections are made for thin-walled cylinders (nominal initial thickness 312.5 mils) and thick-walled cylinders (nominal initial thickness 625 mils). In addition, a preliminary analysis is conducted for the minimum thickness at the head/skirt interface for skirted cylinders.

  14. Technical basis for flawed cylinder test specification to assure adequate fracture resistance of ISO high-strength steel cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Smith, J.H. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Metallurgy Div.; Tribolet, R.O. [Tribolet (R.O.), Van Wert, OH (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-pressure industrial gases (such as oxygen, nitrogen, argon, hydrogen, etc.) are stored and transported in portable cylinders. ISO TC58 SC3 has developed a draft specification 9809 for design and fabrication of high-pressure cylinders with maximum tensile strength limitation of 1,100 N/mm{sup 2}. In order to extend the ISO 9809 rules for higher than 1,100 N/mm{sup 2} strength level cylinders, a working group WG14 was formed in 1989 to develop new rules to assure adequate fracture resistance. In 1994, WG14 recommended a simple, but unique flawed cylinder test method for design qualification of the cylinder and acceptance criteria to assure adequate fracture resistance. WG14 also recommended Charpy-V-notch impact tests to control the required fracture resistance on production cylinders. This paper presents the technical basis that was employed in developing the flawed cylinder test method and acceptance criteria. The specification was developed for seamless steel cylinders having actual strength in the range of 1,100 to 1,400 N/mm{sup 2} and cylindrical section wall thickness in the range of 3 to 10 mm. Flawed cylinder tests were conducted on several hundred cylinders of varying sizes and strength levels. The specification requires to demonstrate LEAK-BEFORE-BREAK performance of the cylinder having flaw length equal to 1.6 (o.d. {times} t{sub design}){sup 0.5} at failure pressure = (t{sub design}/t{sub actual}) x Design Pressure.

  15. Technical basis for flawed cylinder test specification to assure adequate fracture resistance of ISO high strength steel cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Process and Systems R and D; Smith, J.H. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Metallurgy Div.; Tribolet, R.O.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure industrial gases (such as oxygen, nitrogen, argon, hydrogen, etc.) are stored and transported in portable cylinders. ISO TC58 SC3 has developed a draft specification 9809 for design and fabrication of high pressure cylinders with maximum tensile strength limitation of 1,100 N/mm{sup 2}. In order to extend the ISO 9809 rules for higher than 1,100 N/mm{sup 2} strength level cylinders, a working group WG14 was formed in 1989 to develop new rules to assure adequate fracture resistance. In 1994, WG14 recommended a simple, but unique flawed cylinder test method for design qualification of the cylinder and acceptance criteria to assure adequate fracture resistance. WG14 also recommended Charpy-V-Notch impact tests to control the required fracture resistance on production cylinders. This paper presents the technical basis that was employed in developing the flawed cylinder test method and acceptance criteria. The specification was developed for seamless steel cylinders having actual strength in the range of 1,100 to 1,400 N/mm{sup 2} and cylindrical section wall thickness in the range of 3mm to 10mm. Flawed cylinder tests were conducted on several hundred cylinders of varying sizes and strength levels. The specification requires to demonstrate LEAK-BEFORE-BREAK performance of the cylinder having flaw length equal to 1.6(O.D. {times} t{sub design}){sup 0.5} at failure pressure = (t{sub design}/t{sub actual}) {times} Design Pressure.

  16. Control-Oriented Modeling for HCCI Combustion and Multi-Cylinder...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control-Oriented Modeling for HCCI Combustion and Multi-Cylinder HCCI Experimental Activities Control-Oriented Modeling for HCCI Combustion and Multi-Cylinder HCCI Experimental...

  17. High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    issues related to cylinder-to-cylinder balancing, dilution, heat rejection, turbo-machinery, ... * Analysis Thermodynamic analysis to understand fuel usage...

  18. Short piston-cylinder pressure cells based on Ni-Cr-Al cylinders and their application to fragile materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taniguchi, Hiromi; Takeda, Sunao; Satoh, Ryosuke; Taniguchi, Arisa; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Satoh, Kazuhiko [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Ohkubo, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this decade, the performance of piston-cylinder pressure cells has been drastically improved by using robust materials such as nickel-chromium-aluminum and cobalt-nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys to construct the inner cylinders. In this article, we present several experimental techniques for carrying out resistivity measurements under high pressure by applying the piston-cylinder devices based on the nickel-chromium-aluminum cylinders to fragile materials such as organics. These techniques are, in principle, applicable to measurements on any solid-state conductor. First, we introduce the construction of our piston-cylinder cells including two kinds of wired platforms for transport measurements. Second, we describe the construction of the platforms and the method of introducing the samples. After reporting test results for conventional materials such as ammonium fluoride, bismuth, and tellurium, lastly, we present examples of the successful application of our method to organic materials.

  19. Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

  20. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues · Chemical Storage ·Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues · Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage · Provide

  1. An experimental study of jet impingement on a circular cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potts, Dennis Wayne

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The range of movement for the nozzle ~ was f rom seven nozzle diameters to 40 nozzle diameters from the surface of the cylinder (see Pig. 3) . The working medium was air which was supplied from a I very large tank. Using a compressor, the tank could... L. F. Porteiro A round turbulent jet was impinged normally upon a circular cylinder and the resulting flow field was studied. The investigation was conducted using a jet which issued from a nozzle with an 'I1/16 inch diameter. The cylinder had a...

  2. Coupled heat conduction and deformation in a viscoelastic composite cylinder 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Sneha

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes the thermo-mechanical response of a composite cylinder made up of two layers of linear isotropic viscoelastic materials that belong to the class of non-Thermorheologically Simple Material. The effect of time-varying temperature...

  3. The uranium cylinder assay system for enrichment plant safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rael, Carlos D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Iwamoto, Tomonori [JNFL; Tamura, Takayuki [JNFL; Aiuchi, Syun [JNFL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safeguarding sensitive fuel cycle technology such as uranium enrichment is a critical component in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. A useful tool for the nuclear materials accountancy of such a plant would be an instrument that measured the uranium content of UF{sub 6} cylinders. The Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS) was designed for Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) for use in the Rokkasho Enrichment Plant in Japan for this purpose. It uses total neutron counting to determine uranium mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders given a known enrichment. This paper describes the design of UCAS, which includes features to allow for unattended operation. It can be used on 30B and 48Y cylinders to measure depleted, natural, and enriched uranium. It can also be used to assess the amount of uranium in decommissioned equipment and waste containers. Experimental measurements have been carried out in the laboratory and these are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo modeling results.

  4. Prediction of External Corrosion for Steel Cylinders 2003 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoyer, RLS

    2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) is stored in over 60,000 steel cylinders at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, and at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. The cylinders range in age from six to 52 years. Although when new the cylinders had wall thicknesses specified to within manufacturing tolerances, over the years corrosion has reduced their actual wall thicknesses. The UF{sub 6} Cylinder Project is managed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to safely maintain the UF{sub 6} and the cylinders containing it. The requirements of the Project are delineated in the System Requirements Document (LMES 1997a), and the actions needed to fulfill those requirements are specified in the System Engineering Management Plan (LMES 1997b). This report documents activities that address requirements and actions involving forecasting cylinder wall thicknesses. Wall thickness forecasts are based on models fit to ultrasonic thickness (UT) measurement data. First, UT data collected during FY02 is combined with UT data collected in earlier years (FY92-FY01), and all of the data is inventoried chronologically and by various subpopulations. Next, the data is used to model either maximum pit depth or minimum thickness as a function of cylinder age, subpopulation (e.g., PGDP G-yard, bottom-row cylinders), and initial thickness estimates. The fitted models are then used to extrapolate minimum thickness estimates into the future and to compute estimates of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various thickness criteria. A model evaluation is performed comparing UT measurements made in FY02 with model-fitted projections based only on data collected before FY02. The FY02 UT data, entered into the corrosion model database and not available for the previous edition of this report (Schmoyer and Lyon 2002), consists of thickness measurements of 48'' thin-wall cylinders: 102 cylinders at Paducah, 104 at ETTP, and 117 at Portsmouth; and 72 thick-wall cylinders at Portsmouth. However, because of missing values, repeated measures on the same cylinders, outliers, and other data problems, not all of these measurements are necessarily used in the corrosion analysis, and some previous measurements may simply be replaced with the new ones. In this edition of the report, cylinder subpopulation definitions and counts are updated using the latest (as of June 2003) information from the Cylinder Inventory Database (CID). Cylinders identified in the CID as painted during the last ten years are excluded from subpopulations considered at-risk of failing minimum thickness criteria, because it is assumed that painting fully arrests corrosion for ten years. As in the previous edition of the report, two different approaches to corrosion modeling are pursued: (1) a direct approach in which minimum thickness is modeled directly as a function of age, subpopulation, and initial thickness estimates; and (2) an indirect approach, in which maximum pit depth is modeled, and the pit-depth model is then combined with a model of initial thickness to compute estimates of minimum thickness.

  5. adiabatic circular cylinder: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (D), exposed height oi the cylinder (E. ), wave height (H), water depth (d), and the wave length (L). The kinematic ard dynamic qua ntvties are the wave per od (T),...

  6. EGR Spatial Uniformity & Cylinder-Resolved Transients-Measurements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an EGR probe for assessing steady-state spatial uniformity and cylinder-resolved EGR dynamics. p-27yoo.pdf More Documents & Publications CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control &...

  7. Coupled heat conduction and deformation in a viscoelastic composite cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Sneha

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes the thermo-mechanical response of a composite cylinder made up of two layers of linear isotropic viscoelastic materials that belong to the class of non-Thermorheologically Simple Material. The effect of time-varying temperature...

  8. Cylinder supplied ammonia scrubber testing in IDMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.P.

    1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the off-line testing the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) ammonia scrubbers using ammonia supplied from cylinders. Three additional tests with ammonia are planned to verify the data collected during off-line testing. Operation of the ammonia scrubber during IDMS SRAT and SME processing will be completed during the next IDMS run. The Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) scrubbers were successful in removing ammonia from the vapor stream to achieve ammonia vapor concentrations far below the 10 ppM vapor exit design basis. In most of the tests, the ammonia concentration in the vapor exit was lower than the detection limit of the analyzers so results are generally reported as <0.05 parts per million (ppM). During SRAT scrubber testing, the ammonia concentration was no higher than 2 ppM and during SME testing the ammonia concentration was no higher than 0.05 m.

  9. Criticality concerns in cleaning large uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.; Lutz, H.F.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleaning large cylinders used to transport low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) presents several challenges to nuclear criticality safety. This paper presents a brief overview of the cleaning process, the criticality controls typically employed and their bases. Potential shortfalls in implementing these controls are highlighted, and a simple example to illustrate the difficulties in complying with the Double Contingency Principle is discussed. Finally, a summary of recommended criticality controls for large cylinder cleaning operations is presented.

  10. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  11. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  12. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

  13. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  14. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  15. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

  16. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage by Russell C. Sears AR. Larson Fall 2009 Stasis: Flexible Transactional StorageC. Sears Abstract Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage by

  17. An evaluation of an optically-based, cylinder pressure sensor in a single-cylinder, research, diesel engine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Timothy Troy

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in head bolts were tested under a variety of operating conditions on a single cylinder, research, diesel engine. The sensors' pressure vs. crank angle output was compared with the output of a piezoelectric pressure transducer mounted, in the engine head...

  18. Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10{sup -6} eV to 3.5 x 10{sup 12} eV (LHC, 7 x 10{sup 12} eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or positron beams. Storage rings have instrumentation to monitor the electrical and mechanical systems, and the beam quality. Computers are used to control the operation. Large storage rings have millions of control points from all systems. The time dependent beam intensity I(t) can often be approximated by an exponential function I(t) = I(0) exp(-t/{tau}) (1) where the decay time {tau} and, correspondingly, the store time ranges from a few turns to 10 days (ISR). {tau} can be dominated by a variety of effects including lattice nonlinearities, beam-beam, space charge, intrabeam and Touschek scattering, interaction with the residual gas or target, or the lifetime of the stored particle. In this case, the beam lifetime measurement itself can be the purpose of a storage ring experiment. The main consideration in the design of a storage ring is the preservation of the beam quality over the store length. The beam size and momentum spread can be reduced through cooling, often leading to an increase in the store time. For long store times vacuum considerations are important since the interaction rate of the stored particles with the residual gas molecules is proportional to the pressure, and an ultra-high vacuum system may be needed. Distributed pumping with warm activated NEG surfaces or cold surfaces in machines with superconducting magnets are ways to provide large pumping speeds and achieve low pressures even under conditions with dynamic gas loads. The largest application of storage rings today are synchrotron light sources, of which about 50 exist world wide. In experiments where the beam collides with an internal target or another beam, a storage ring allows to re-use the accelerated beam many times if the interaction with the target is sufficiently small. In hadron collider and ion storage rings store times of many hours or even days are realized, corresponding to up to 1011 turns and thereby target passages. Ref. [3] is the first proposal for a collider storage ring. A number of storage rings exist where the beam itself or its decay products are the object of s

  19. In-Cylinder Fuel Blending of Gasoline/Diesel for Improved Efficiency and Lowest Possible Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL] [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Kokjohn, Sage [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline/diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a potential strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances, heat rejection, and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system. Parameter sweeps included gasoline-to-diesel fuel ratio, intake air mixture temperature, in-cylinder swirl number, and diesel start-of-injection phasing. In addition, engine parameters were trimmed for each cylinder to balance the combustion process for maximum efficiency and lowest emissions. An important observation was the strong influence of intake charge temperature on cylinder pressure rise rate. Experiments were able to show increased thermal efficiency along with dramatic decreases in oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). However, indicated thermal efficiency for the multi-cylinder experiments were less than expected based on modeling and single-cylinder results. The lower indicated thermal efficiency is believed to be due increased heat transfer as compared to the model predictions and suggest a need for improved cylinder-to-cylinder control and increased heat transfer control.

  20. Cool Storage Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This article covers three thermal storage topics. The first section catalogs various thermal storage systems and applications. Included are: load shifting and load leveling, chilled water storage systems, and ice storage systems using Refrigerant 22 or ethylene...

  1. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Transactions1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravel Ground,"

  2. Accident Conditions versus Regulatory Test for NRC-Approved UF6 Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLS, G. SCOTT; AMMERMAN, DOUGLAS J.; LOPEZ, CARLOS

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approves new package designs for shipping fissile quantities of UF{sub 6}. Currently there are three packages approved by the NRC for domestic shipments of fissile quantities of UF{sub 6}: NCI-21PF-1; UX-30; and ESP30X. For approval by the NRC, packages must be subjected to a sequence of physical tests to simulate transportation accident conditions as described in 10 CFR Part 71. The primary objective of this project was to relate the conditions experienced by these packages in the tests described in 10 CFR Part 71 to conditions potentially encountered in actual accidents and to estimate the probabilities of such accidents. Comparison of the effects of actual accident conditions to 10 CFR Part 71 tests was achieved by means of computer modeling of structural effects on the packages due to impacts with actual surfaces, and thermal effects resulting from test and other fire scenarios. In addition, the likelihood of encountering bodies of water or sufficient rainfall to cause complete or partial immersion during transport over representative truck routes was assessed. Modeled effects, and their associated probabilities, were combined with existing event-tree data, plus accident rates and other characteristics gathered from representative routes, to derive generalized probabilities of encountering accident conditions comparable to the 10 CFR Part 71 conditions. This analysis suggests that the regulatory conditions are unlikely to be exceeded in real accidents, i.e. the likelihood of UF{sub 6} being dispersed as a result of accident impact or fire is small. Moreover, given that an accident has occurred, exposure to water by fire-fighting, heavy rain or submersion in a body of water is even less probable by factors ranging from 0.5 to 8E-6.

  3. Ultra-low field NMR for detection and characterization of 235 UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magnelind, Per E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated the first ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), both depleted and 70% enriched, which is used in the uranium enrichment process. A sensitive non-invasive detection system would have an important role in non-proliferation surveillance. A two-frequency technique was employed to remove the transients induced by rapidly switching off the 50 mT pre-polarization field. A mean transverse relaxation time T{sub 2} of 24 ms was estimated for the un-enriched UF{sub 6} sample measured at a mean temperature of 80 C. Nuclear magnetic resonance at ULF has several advantages including the ability to measure through metal, such as pipes, and simple magnetic field generation hardware. We present here recent data and discuss the potential for non-proliferation monitoring of enrichment and flow velocity.

  4. Field Trial of LANL On-Line Advanced Enrichment Monitor for UF6 GCEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lombardi, Marcie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacArthur, Duncan W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Robert F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keller, Clifford [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friend, Peter [URENCO; Dunford, Andrew [URENCO

    2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The outline of this presentation is: (1) Technology basis of on-line enrichment monitoring; (2) Timescale of trial; (3) Description of installed equipment; (4) Photographs; (5) Results; (6) Possible further development; and (7) Conclusions. Summary of the good things about the Advanced Enrichment Monitor (AEM) performance is: (1) High accuracy - normally better than 1% relative, (2) Active system as accurate as passive system, (3) Fast and accurate detection of enrichment changes, (4) Physics is well understood, (5) Elegant method for capturing pressure signal, and (6) Data capture is automatic, low cost and fast. A couple of negative things are: (1) Some jumps in measured passive enrichment - of around +2% relative (due to clock errors?); and (2) Data handling and evaluation is off-line, expensive and very slow. Conclusions are: (1) LANL AEM is being tested on E23 plant at Capenhurst; (2) The trial is going very well; (3) AEM could detect production of HEU at potentially much lower cost than existing CEMO; (4) AEM can measure {sup 235}U assay accurately; (5) Active system using X-Ray source would avoid need for pressure measurement; (6) Substantial work lies ahead to go from current prototype to a production instrument.

  5. Storage System and IBM System Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM® XIV® Storage System and IBM System Storage® SAN Volume Controller deliver high performance and smart management for SAP® landscapes IBM SAP International Competence Center #12;"The combination of the XIV Storage System and SAN Volume Controller gives us a smarter way to manage our storage. If we need

  6. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  7. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  8. Assembly for electrical conductivity measurements in the piston cylinder device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watson, Heather Christine (Dublin, CA); Roberts, Jeffrey James (Livermore, CA)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An assembly apparatus for measurement of electrical conductivity or other properties of a sample in a piston cylinder device wherein pressure and heat are applied to the sample by the piston cylinder device. The assembly apparatus includes a body, a first electrode in the body, the first electrode operatively connected to the sample, a first electrical conductor connected to the first electrode, a washer constructed of a hard conducting material, the washer surrounding the first electrical conductor in the body, a second electrode in the body, the second electrode operatively connected to the sample, and a second electrical conductor connected to the second electrode.

  9. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Abstract: Solid-state reversible...

  10. An In-Cylinder Imaging Survey of Low-Temperature, High-Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An In-Cylinder Imaging Survey of Low-Temperature, High-Efficiency Combustion Strategies An In-Cylinder Imaging Survey of Low-Temperature, High-Efficiency Combustion Strategies High...

  11. High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines 2010 DOE Vehicle...

  12. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Measurement and...

  13. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

  14. Detailed Modeling of HCCI and PCCI combustion and Multi-cylinder...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling of HCCI and PCCI combustion and Multi-cylinder HCCI Engine Control Detailed Modeling of HCCI and PCCI combustion and Multi-cylinder HCCI Engine Control 2003 DEER...

  15. Vortex Shedding from Superhydrophobic Cylinders Nangelie Ferrer, Robert Daniello and Jonathan Rothstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Vortex Shedding from Superhydrophobic Cylinders Nangelie Ferrer, Robert Daniello and Jonathan Rothstein University of Massachusetts Amherst Abstract Superhydrophobic surfaces are ideal for applications to characterize the vortex shedding phenomenon observed within the wake region of the superhydrophobic cylinder

  16. Vortex-induced vibration of flexible cylinders in time-varying flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resvanis, Themistocles L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates two aspects of Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV) on long flexible cylinders. The work is split into a minor and major part. The minor part addresses the effect of Reynolds number on flexible cylinder ...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News,...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: hydrogen storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    storage Energy Department Awards 7M to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems On June 12, 2014, in CRF, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Infrastructure...

  19. Operation of a Four-Cylinder 1.9L Propane Fueled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine: Basic Operating Characteristics and Cylinder-to-Cylinder Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Smith, J R; Au, M; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A four-cylinder 1.9 Volkswagen TDI Engine has been converted to run in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mode. The stock configuration is a turbocharged direct injection Diesel engine. The combustion chamber has been modified by discarding the in-cylinder Diesel fuel injectors and replacing them with blank inserts (which contain pressure transducers). The stock pistons contain a reentrant bowl and have been retained for the tests reported here. The intake and exhaust manifolds have also been retained, but the turbocharger has been removed. A heater has been installed upstream of the intake manifold and fuel is added just downstream of this heater. The performance of this engine in naturally aspirated HCCI operation, subject to variable intake temperature and fuel flow rate, has been studied. The engine has been run with propane fuel at a constant speed of 1800 rpm. This work is intended to characterize the HCCI operation of the engine in this configuration that has been minimally modified from the base Diesel engine. The performance (BMEP, IMEP, efficiency, etc) and emissions (THC, CO, NOx) of the engine are presented, as are combustion process results based on heat release analysis of the pressure traces from each cylinder.

  20. High Pressure Fuel Storage Cylinders Periodic Inspection and End of Life

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TOTechnologyHighLouisianaDepartment of

  1. Absolute measurement of the viscosity of classical and quantum fluids by rotating-cylinder viscometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, R.J.; LaMar, M.M.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the use of rotating-cylinder viscometers to determine absolute shear viscosities of classical fluids and of helium II in the context of past and current knowledge of the stability and flow of these fluids between concentric cylinders. We identify a problem in measuring the absolute viscosity when the inner cylinder is rotating and the outer cylinder is at rest. We conclude by discussing the design of viscometers for absolute viscosity measurements in helium I and helium II.

  2. OBSERVATION OF FLOW CHARACTERISTICS IN A MODEL I.C. ENGINE CYLINDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishikawa, N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics in an Internal Combustion Engine Cylinder,lIWalls of an Internal Combustion Engine," Sixth Symposium (

  3. UF{sub 6} cylinder lifting equipment enhancements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hortel, J.M. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents numerous enhancements that have been made to the Portsmouth lifting equipment to ensure the safe handling of cylinders containing liquid uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). The basic approach has been to provide redundancy to all components of the lift path so that any one component failure would not cause the load to drop or cause any undesirable movement.

  4. Alternative method of retesting UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christ, R. [Nuclear Crago + Service GmbH, Hanau (Germany)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes an alternative method to perform the periodic inspection of UF{sub 6} cylinders. The hydraulic test is replaced by ultrasonic checking of wall thickness and by magnetic particle testing of all the weld seams. Information about the legal background, the air leak test and the qualification of inspectors is also given.

  5. Temporary patching of damaged UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardenas, A.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Patching techniques based on application of epoxy resins have been developed for temporarily repairing UF{sub 6} cylinders which have sustained relatively minor damage and must be safely emptied. The method is considerably faster and simpler than metallurgical weld repairs. Laboratory tests, detailed operational procedures, and case histories of experience at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are described.

  6. Photon Storage Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sessler, "Analysis of Photon Storage Cavities for a Free-configuration of coupled storage cavity and PEL cavity. TheFig. 2. A ring resonator storage cavity coupled through a

  7. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  8. Gas-lubricated seal for sealing between a piston and a cylinder wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoult, D.P.

    1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A piston-cylinder seal uses gas for a lubricant and has a runner supported on a gapless structure and placed in the space between the piston and the cylinder wall. The runner is deformed elastically under the influence of the operating pressures to follow and compensate for variations in the piston-cylinder fit and maintain a seal. 4 figs.

  9. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Wake of a cylinder performing rotary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godoy-Diana, Ramiro

    on the mean flow and the global drag applied on the cylinder. We then discuss the mechanism responsible cylinder, the effect of "in-line" oscillations on wake structure and hydrodynamic forces have been that the rotary oscillation of the cylinder could, for optimal parameters, achieve a significant drag reduction

  10. Oscillations and translation of a free cylinder in a confined flow Maria Veronica D'Angeloa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ). In the studies of the hydrodynamical transport of confined cylinders3­6 , it has usually been assumed that strongly influenced by the viscosity. Early studies of the torque and drag forces on a cylinder facingOscillations and translation of a free cylinder in a confined flow Maria Veronica D'Angeloa) Grupo

  11. FINITE ENERGY CYLINDERS OF SMALL AREA H. HOFER 1, K. WYSOCKI 2, AND E. ZEHNDER 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofer, Helmut

    FINITE ENERGY CYLINDERS OF SMALL AREA H. HOFER 1, K. WYSOCKI 2, AND E. ZEHNDER 3 Abstract = R/Z. The energy of u satisfies E(u) = T #12;FINITE ENERGY CYLINDERS OF SMALL AREA 3 while the d-energy that a sufficiently long cylinder having small area is close to a constant map, if its center action vanishes. If its

  12. Storage and IO Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Burst Buffer User Defined Images Archive Home R & D Storage and IO Technologies Storage and IO Technologies Burst Buffer NVRAM and Burst Buffer Use Cases In collaboration...

  13. NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Trends and Summaries Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting IO Resources for Scientific Applications at NERSC Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file...

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to MW/40 MWI-IR Battery Energy Storage Facility", proc. 23rdcompressed air, and battery energy storage are all only 65

  15. Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorning, R.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

  16. ISO test method to determine sustained-load-cracking resistance of aluminium cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhuyan, G.S. [Powertech Labs. Inc., Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leak as well as rupture types of failures related to sustained-load-cracking (SLC) have been observed in high-pressure gas cylinders fabricated from certain aluminium alloy. The stable crack growth mechanism observed primarily in the cylinder neck and shoulder area have been identified as the SLC mechanism occurring at room temperature without any environmental effect. The International Organization for standardization (ISO) Sub-Committee 3, Working Group 16 has developed a test method to measure the SLC resistance using fracture mechanics specimens along with an acceptance criterion for aluminium cylinders. The technical rationale for the proposed test method and the physical significance of the acceptance criterion to the cylinder performance in terms of critical stress-crack size relationship is presented. Application of the developed test method for characterizing new aluminium alloy for manufacturing cylinders is demonstrated. SLC characteristics of several aluminium cylinders as well as on-board cylinders for natural gas vehicles assessed by the authors are discussed.

  17. Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF{sub 6} spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing {sup 238}U from those containing the lighter {sup 235}U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF{sub 6} gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

  18. Spatio-temporal spectral analysis of a forced cylinder wake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Adamo, Juan; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wake of a circular cylinder performing rotary oscillations is studied using hydrodynamic tunnel experiments at $Re=100$. Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry on the mid-plane perpendicular to the axis of cylinder is used to characterize the spatial development of the flow and its stability properties. The lock-in phenomenon that determines the boundaries between regions of the forcing parameter space were the wake is globally unstable or convectively unstable is scrutinized using the experimental data. A novel method based on the analysis of power density spectra of the flow allows us to give a detailed description of the forced wake, shedding light on the energy distribution in the different frequency components and in particular on a cascade-like mechanism evidenced for a high amplitude of the forcing oscillation. In addition, a calculation of the drag from the velocity field is performed, allowing us to relate the resulting force on the body to the wake properties.

  19. Loading on a vertical cylinder in multidirectional waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaplin, J.R.; Subbiah, K. [City Univ., London (United Kingdom). Ocean Engineering Research Center; Irani, M. [National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Institute for Marine Dynamics

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents laboratory measurements of local and total loading on an isolated vertical cylinder in irregular unidirectional and multidirectional waves. Maximum Keulegan-Carpenter numbers in individual waves were about 16, and maximum reynolds numbers about 3 {times} 10{sup 4}. It is shown that in these conditions, existing theoretical and numerical models underestimate the reduction in loading on a cylinder due to wave spreading. Besides the changes that are predicted when Morison`s equation is used with constant coefficients, there are hydrodynamic influences that contribute further force reductions. Comparisons with Dena`s (1977) hybrid approach suggest that in the present conditions these reductions are in the region of 3 and 6 percent for a spreading function cos{sup 2s} {theta}, with s = 8 and s = 2, respectively. Larger reductions can be expected at higher Keulegan-Carpenter numbers, though scale effects are likely to become more important in the drag-dominated regime.

  20. Rolling friction for hard cylinder and sphere on viscoelastic solid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. N. J. Persson

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the friction force acting on a hard cylinder or spherical ball rolling on a flat surface of a viscoelastic solid. The rolling friction coefficient depends non-linearly on the normal load and the rolling velocity. For a cylinder rolling on a viscoelastic solid characterized by a single relaxation time Hunter has obtained an exact result for the rolling friction, and our result is in very good agreement with his result for this limiting case. The theoretical results are also in good agreement with experiments of Greenwood and Tabor. We suggest that measurements of rolling friction over a wide range of rolling velocities and temperatures may constitute an useful way to determine the viscoelastic modulus of rubber-like materials.

  1. Means and method of balancing multi-cylinder reciprocating machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John A. (North Troy, NY); Walsh, Michael M. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A virtual balancing axis arrangement is described for multi-cylinder reciprocating piston machines for effectively balancing out imbalanced forces and minimizing residual imbalance moments acting on the crankshaft of such machines without requiring the use of additional parallel-arrayed balancing shafts or complex and expensive gear arrangements. The novel virtual balancing axis arrangement is capable of being designed into multi-cylinder reciprocating piston and crankshaft machines for substantially reducing vibrations induced during operation of such machines with only minimal number of additional component parts. Some of the required component parts may be available from parts already required for operation of auxiliary equipment, such as oil and water pumps used in certain types of reciprocating piston and crankshaft machine so that by appropriate location and dimensioning in accordance with the teachings of the invention, the virtual balancing axis arrangement can be built into the machine at little or no additional cost.

  2. Integrated hydraulic cooler and return rail in camless cylinder head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marriott, Craig D. (Clawson, MI); Neal, Timothy L. (Ortonville, MI); Swain, Jeff L. (Flushing, MI); Raimao, Miguel A. (Colorado Springs, CO)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An engine assembly may include a cylinder head defining an engine coolant reservoir, a pressurized fluid supply, a valve actuation assembly, and a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The valve actuation assembly may be in fluid communication with the pressurized fluid supply and may include a valve member displaceable by a force applied by the pressurized fluid supply. The hydraulic fluid reservoir may be in fluid communication with the valve actuation assembly and in a heat exchange relation to the engine coolant reservoir.

  3. Natural Gas Vehicle Cylinder Safety, Training and Inspection Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hank Seiff

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the auspices of the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the US Department of Energy, the Clean Vehicle Education Foundation conducted a three-year program to increase the understanding of the safe and proper use and maintenance of vehicular compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel systems. High-pressure fuel systems require periodic inspection and maintenance to insure safe and proper operation. The project addressed the needs of CNG fuel containers (cylinders) and associated high-pressure fuel system components related to existing law, codes and standards (C&S), available training and inspection programs, and assured coordination among vehicle users, public safety officials, fueling station operators and training providers. The program included a public and industry awareness campaign, establishment and administration of a cylinder inspector certification training scholarship program, evaluation of current safety training and testing practices, monitoring and investigation of CNG vehicle incidents, evaluation of a cylinder recertification program and the migration of CNG vehicle safety knowledge to the nascent hydrogen vehicle community.

  4. Centrifugal force induced by relativistically rotating spheroids and cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Katz; Donald Lynden-Bell; Jiri Bicak

    2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from the gravitational potential of a Newtonian spheroidal shell we discuss electrically charged rotating prolate spheroidal shells in the Maxwell theory. In particular we consider two confocal charged shells which rotate oppositely in such a way that there is no magnetic field outside the outer shell. In the Einstein theory we solve the Ernst equations in the region where the long prolate spheroids are almost cylindrical; in equatorial regions the exact Lewis "rotating cylindrical" solution is so derived by a limiting procedure from a spatially bound system. In the second part we analyze two cylindrical shells rotating in opposite directions in such a way that the static Levi-Civita metric is produced outside and no angular momentum flux escapes to infinity. The rotation of the local inertial frames in flat space inside the inner cylinder is thus exhibited without any approximation or interpretational difficulties within this model. A test particle within the inner cylinder kept at rest with respect to axes that do not rotate as seen from infinity experiences a centrifugal force. Although the spacetime there is Minkowskian out to the inner cylinder nevertheless that space has been induced to rotate, so relative to the local inertial frame the particle is traversing a circular orbit.

  5. Distributed storage with communication costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Craig Kenneth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5 Introduction to Coding for Distributed Storage The Repairflow graph for 1 repair with varying storage capac- itythe Capacity of Storage Nodes . . . 4.1 Characterizing

  6. Storage Space Request Aurora Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Storage Space Request Aurora Facility (1855 Marika) Department and Division: _______________________________________________________ Storage Contact: ____________________________________________________________ Name Phone and fax Fiscal Footage required: ______________ Brief Description of storage items

  7. Energy Storage | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Energy Storage The challenge of creating new advanced batteries and energy storage technologies is one of Argonne's key initiatives. By creating a multidisciplinary...

  8. System and method of cylinder deactivation for optimal engine torque-speed map operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sujan, Vivek A; Frazier, Timothy R; Follen, Kenneth; Moon, Suk-Min

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure provides a system and method for determining cylinder deactivation in a vehicle engine to optimize fuel consumption while providing the desired or demanded power. In one aspect, data indicative of terrain variation is utilized in determining a vehicle target operating state. An optimal active cylinder distribution and corresponding fueling is determined from a recommendation from a supervisory agent monitoring the operating state of the vehicle of a subset of the total number of cylinders, and a determination as to which number of cylinders provides the optimal fuel consumption. Once the optimal cylinder number is determined, a transmission gear shift recommendation is provided in view of the determined active cylinder distribution and target operating state.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Multimedia Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StorageEnergy Storage Multimedia Gallery Energy Storage Multimedia Gallery Images Videos Energy Storage Image Gallery Energy Storage B-Roll Videos Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory...

  10. Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3NiAl(100). Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3...

  11. The legal status of UF{sub 6}-cylinder testing and licensing in Germany (and Europe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wieser, K.E. [Federal Institute for Material Research and Testing (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Tietze, A. [Bergische Universitaet - Gesamthochschule Wuppertal (Germany)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    New German and European transport regulations for road and rail transport of UF{sub 6}-cylinders are presented, in particular those provisions which have direct impact on the majority of cylinders used in shipments touching ADR and RID member states. First experiences and difficulties in it`s application are highlighted taking into account experiences of a for running German regulation. A summary of research efforts on the behaviour of cylinders in fire environments concludes the paper.

  12. Storage Ring Operation Modes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Source Parameter Table Storage Ring Operation Modes Standard Operating Mode, top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in...

  13. Underground Storage Tank Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Underground Storage Tank Regulations is relevant to all energy projects that will require the use and building of pipelines, underground storage of any sorts, and/or electrical equipment. The...

  14. Cool Storage Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities have promoted the use of electric heat and thermal storage to increase off peak usage of power. High daytime demand charges and enticing discounts for off peak power have been used as economic incentives to promote thermal storage systems...

  15. Safe Home Food Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Laanen, Peggy

    2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper food storage can preserve food quality and prevent spoilage and food/borne illness. The specifics of pantry, refrigerator and freezer storage are given, along with helpful information on new packaging, label dates, etc. A comprehensive table...

  16. Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Storage Systems – An Old Idea Doing New Things with New Technology article for the International Assoication of ELectrical Inspectors

  17. Hydrodynamic forces on smooth inclined cylinder in oscillatory flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, H.G. [Dalian Univ. of Technology (China)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrodynamic forces on a smooth inclined circular cylinder exposed to oscillating flow were experimentally investigated at Reynolds number (Re) in the range 40,000--200,000 and Keulegan-Capenter number (Kc) in the interval from 5--40. In the test, Re number and Kc number were varied systematically. The inertia force coefficient (C{sub M}) and the drag force coefficient (C{sub D}) in Morison equation were determined form the measured loads and the water particle kinematics. This analysis uses a modified form of Morison equation since it uses the normal velocity and acceleration. Thus, the applicability of the Cross Flow Principle was assumed. This principle, simply stated, is as follows: the force acting in the direction normal to the axis of a cylinder placed at some oblique angle to the direction of flow is expressed in terms of the normal component of flow only, and the axial component is disregarded. Both total in-line force coefficient (C{sub F}) and transverse force (lift) coefficient (C{sub L}) were analyzed in terms of their maximum and root mean square values. All the in-line and lift force coefficient were given as a functions of Re and Kc number. From this research, it can be seen that the Cross-Flow Principle does not always work well. It seems valid for the total in-line force at high Re and large Kc number; the C{sub M} for {alpha} = 45{degree} is larger and the C{sub D} for {alpha} = 45{degree} is smaller than that for {alpha} = 90{degree} and Re {ge} 80,000. The hydrodynamic force coefficients C{sub D} and C{sub M} for the inclined cylinder are only the functions of oblique angle ({alpha}) and Kc number, but not of the Re number.

  18. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine Gasoline-Like Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Regimes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Efficiency Clean...

  19. In-Cylinder Processes of EGR-Diluted Low-Load, Low-Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model for Partially PremixedLow-Temperature Diesel Combustion Based onIn-Cylinder Laser Diagnostics and Chemical Kinetics Modeling Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel...

  20. In-Cylinder Imaging of Conventional and Advanced, Low-Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cylinder Imaging of Conventional and Advanced, Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion Sponsor: USDOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Managers: Gurpreet Singh,...

  1. FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI PURPOSE COURT STUDENT RESIDENCES GREEN HOUSE STUDENT RESIDENCES STUDENT RESIDENCES RECPLEX STORAGE BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Infrastructure Security, Materials...

  3. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.Estimating ground water storage changes in the Mississippistorage..

  4. Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS Dploiement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collette. Sébastien

    CH8 Divers Agenda · Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS · Déploiement · VLAN ­ 802.1Q · Gestion d · Sécurisation de Windows · Sécurisation de UNIX · Qu'est-ce que... ­ Firewall, VPN, IDS/IPS, PKI Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN #12;Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN · Direct Attached Storage · Network Attached Storage · Storage

  5. Storage Ring Revised March 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    Chapter 8. Storage Ring Revised March 1994 8.1. Introduction -- 107 -- #12; 108 Storage Ring 8.2. Magnetic Design and Field Calculations 8.2.1. Conceptual Approach #12; Storage Ring 109 #12; 110 Storage Ring 8.2.2. Computer Aided Refined Pole Designs #12; Storage Ring 111 #12; 112 Storage Ring #12

  6. Electrorefining cell with parallel electrode/concentric cylinder cathode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, Eddie C. (Park Forest, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Laidler, James J. (Burr Ridge, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cathode-anode arrangement for use in an electrolytic cell is adapted for electrochemically refining spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear reactor and recovering purified uranium for further treatment and possible recycling as a fresh blanket or core fuel in a nuclear reactor. The arrangement includes a plurality of inner anodic dissolution baskets that are each attached to a respective support rod, are submerged in a molten lithium halide salt, and are rotationally displaced. An inner hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is concentrically disposed about the inner anodic dissolution baskets. Concentrically disposed about the inner cathode in a spaced manner are a plurality of outer anodic dissolution baskets, while an outer hollow cylindrical-shaped is disposed about the outer anodic dissolution baskets. Uranium is transported from the anode baskets and deposited in a uniform cylindrical shape on the inner and outer cathode cylinders by rotating the anode baskets within the molten lithium halide salt. Scrapers located on each anode basket abrade and remove the spent fuel deposits on the surfaces of the inner and outer cathode cylinders, with the spent fuel falling to the bottom of the cell for removal. Cell resistance is reduced and uranium deposition rate enhanced by increasing the electrode area and reducing the anode-cathode spacing. Collection efficiency is enhanced by trapping and recovery of uranium dendrites scrapped off of the cylindrical cathodes which may be greater in number than two.

  7. Electrorefining cell with parallel electrode/concentric cylinder cathode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A cathode-anode arrangement for use in an electrolytic cell is adapted for electrochemically refining spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear reactor and recovering purified uranium for further treatment and possible recycling as a fresh blanket or core fuel in a nuclear reactor. The arrangement includes a plurality of inner anodic dissolution baskets that are each attached to a respective support rod, are submerged in a molten lithium halide salt, and are rotationally displaced. An inner hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is concentrically disposed about the inner anodic dissolution baskets. Concentrically disposed about the inner cathode in a spaced manner are a plurality of outer anodic dissolution baskets, while an outer hollow cylindrical-shaped is disposed about the outer anodic dissolution baskets. Uranium is transported from the anode baskets and deposited in a uniform cylindrical shape on the inner and outer cathode cylinders by rotating the anode baskets within the molten lithium halide salt. Scrapers located on each anode basket abrade and remove the spent fuel deposits on the surfaces of the inner and outer cathode cylinders, with the spent fuel falling to the bottom of the cell for removal. Cell resistance is reduced and uranium deposition rate enhanced by increasing the electrode area and reducing the anode-cathode spacing. Collection efficiency is enhanced by trapping and recovery of uranium dendrites scrapped off of the cylindrical cathodes which may be greater in number than two. 12 figs.

  8. Application of advanced composites for efficient on-board storage of fuel in natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirosh, S.N. [EDO Canada Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following outlines the performance requirements for high pressure containers for on-board storage of fuel in Natural Gas Vehicles. The construction of state-of-the-art carbon-fiber reinforced all-composite cylinders is described and the validation testing and key advantages are discussed. Carbon-fiber reinforced advanced composite technology offers a number of key advantages to the NGV industry, by providing: improved range, including up to 30% more fuel storage for a given storage envelope and up to 300% more fuel storage for a given weight allowance; life-cycle cost advantages, including savings in non-recurring costs (installation), savings in recurring costs (fuel and maintenance), and increased revenues from more passengers/payload; and uncompromising safety, namely, superior resistance to degradation from fatigue or stress rupture and inherent resistance to corrosion; proven toughness/impact resistance.

  9. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Designing an educational dissection activity for a four cylinder engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    activity for a four cylinder engine Overview General Motors had donated several four cylinder Chevy CruzePENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Designing an educational dissection engines to the university. The team was challenged with creating an activity that uses these engines

  10. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model for Prediction of Falling Cylinder Through Water Column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    1 1 Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model for Prediction of Falling Cylinder Through Water Column-coordinate), cylinder's main-axis following coordinate (M-coordinate), and hydrodynamic force following coordinate (F-coordinate system. The hydrodynamic forces (such as the drag and lift forces) and their moments are easily computed

  11. On the power required to control the circular cylinder wake by rotary oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On the power required to control the circular cylinder wake by rotary oscillations Michel Bergmann Communication, we determine an approximate relation which gives the mean time power required to control the wake on whole or part of the cylinder surface. The mean control power thus depends on four parameters

  12. Symmetry reduction and control of the dynamics of a 2-D rigid circular cylinder and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    Symmetry reduction and control of the dynamics of a 2-D rigid circular cylinder and a point vortex. This dynamic model is an idealized example in an inviscid framework of fully- coupled solid-fluid systems vortex, cylinder, optimal control, reduction, scat- tering #12;Contents 1 INTRODUCTION 4 2 The SMBK model

  13. Instability inside a rotating gas cylinder subject to axial periodic strain Y. Duguet,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of viscous flow inside a closed circular cylinder rotating about its axis, periodically compressed by meansInstability inside a rotating gas cylinder subject to axial periodic strain Y. Duguet,a J. F. Scott are known to support inertial oscillations whose frequencies are less than twice the basic rotation rate.1

  14. Extending the Reach of a Rod Injected into a Cylinder Through Distributed Vibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, Pedro Miguel

    of rods fo- cused on the case of compression of a fixed length of rod inside of a frictionless cylinder [7Extending the Reach of a Rod Injected into a Cylinder Through Distributed Vibration Jay T. MIller. The injection speed (be- low a critical value that we uncover), as well as the ampli- tude and frequency

  15. Assigning mass values to in-house standard UF/sub 6/ cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, A.; McGuire, D.; Croarkin, C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistical experimental design called the Fast 4-1 Series is used to assign mass values to in-house standard UF/sub 6/ cylinders. This design is intended to minimize the number of weighings of large cylinders yet provide acceptable estimates of mass values and their precision. 5 refs.

  16. Biaxial testing of high strength carbon fiber composite cylinders for pulsed magnet reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    envelope) of composite materials. This methodology was applied to two different carbon/epoxy basedBiaxial testing of high strength carbon fiber composite cylinders for pulsed magnet reinforcement N A methodology is introduced to test carbon-fiber-reinforced, hoop-wound composite cylinders for their biaxial

  17. An experimental investigation of the mean flow field of a wavy cylinder at critical Reynolds numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damiana, Thomas Anthony

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid flow around a wavy cylinder geometry was investigated in the Texas A&M University 2'x3' wind tunnel. Tests consisted of mean surface static pressure and mean wake dynamic pressure measurements around two wavy cylinders of differing wavelength...

  18. Influence of slip on vortex-induced motion of a superhydrophobic cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    Influence of slip on vortex-induced motion of a superhydrophobic cylinder Robert Daniello, Pranesh: Superhydrophobic Ultrahydrophobic Superhydrophobicity Slip Partial slip Drag reduction Vortex Cylinder a b s t r a c t The partial slip boundary condition produced by a superhydrophobic surface in the Cassie state

  19. Inertial Particle Dispersion in the Lagrangian Wake of a Square Cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Gustaaf "Guus"

    in Fluent at a Reynolds number of 150 ensuring a periodic Karman street in the cylinder's wake. The traces, inertial particle transport and entrainment in the vortex-dominated wake of a square cylinder placed between large coherent vortex structures. With increased blockage, transport barriers form of the walls

  20. Abstract--Linear electrical loading system (LELS) driven by electrical cylinder with permanent magnet synchronous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) offers several advantages of high transmission efficiency and high cylinder driven by permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM). Though direct-drive linear motors has some to direct-drive linear motor, the solution of electrical cylinder with PMSM has larger output force

  1. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by many thin cylinders: theory and computational modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramm, A G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetic (EM) wave scattering by many parallel infinite cylinders is studied asymptotically as a tends to 0, where a is the radius of the cylinders. It is assumed that the centres of the cylinders are distributed so that their numbers is determined by some positive function N(x). The function N(x) >= 0 is a given continuous function. An equation for the self-consistent (limiting) field is derived as a tends to 0. The cylinders are assumed perfectly conducting. Formula for the effective refraction coefficient of the new medium, obtained by embedding many thin cylinders into a given region, is derived. The numerical results presented demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach and its efficiency for solving the many-body scattering problems, as well as the possibility to create media with negative refraction coefficients.

  2. Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder in a slit channel: Lubrication theory versus molecular dynamics analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmani, Amir M; Jupiterwala, Mehlam; Colosqui, Carlos E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plane Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder that is arbitrarily confined (i.e., symmetrically or asymmetrically confined) in a slit channel is studied via hydrodynamic lubrication theory and molecular dynamics simulations, considering cases where the cylinder remains static or undergoes thermal motion. Lubrication theory predictions for the drag force and volumetric flow rate are in close agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of flows having molecularly thin lubrication gaps, despite the presence of significant structural forces induced by the crystalline structure of the modeled solid. While the maximum drag force is observed in symmetric confinement, i.e., when the cylinder is equidistant from both channel walls, the drag decays significantly as the cylinder moves away from the channel centerline and approaches a wall. Hence, significant reductions in the mean drag force on the cylinder and hydraulic resistance of the channel can be observed when thermal motion induces random off-center displace...

  3. Advanced engine management of individual cylinders for control of exhaust species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graves, Ronald L [Knoxville, TN; West, Brian H [Knoxville, TN; Huff, Shean P [Knoxville, TN; Parks, II, James E

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system controls engine-out exhaust species of a combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders. The method typically includes various combinations of steps such as controlling combustion parameters in individual cylinders, grouping the individual cylinders into a lean set and a rich set of one or more cylinders, combusting the lean set in a lean combustion parameter condition having a lean air:fuel equivalence ratio, combusting the rich set in a rich combustion parameter condition having a rich air:fuel equivalence ratio, and adjusting the lean set and the rich set of one or more cylinders to generate net-lean combustion. The exhaust species may have elevated concentrations of hydrogen and oxygen.

  4. Energy Loss Distribution in the Taylor-Couette Flow between Concentric Rotating Cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dou, H S; Phan-Thien, N; Yeo, K S; Dou, Hua-Shu; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Yeo, Khoon Seng

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of energy loss due to viscosity friction in plane Couette flow and Taylor-Couette Flow between concentric rotating cylinders are studied in detail for various flow conditions. The energy loss is related to the industrial processes in some fluid delivery devices and has significant influence on the flow efficiency, flow stability, turbulent transition, mixing, and heat transfer behaviours, etc. Therefore, it is very helpful to know about the energy loss distribution in the flow domain and to know its influence on the flow for understanding the flow physics. The calculation method of the energy loss distribution in the Taylor-Couette Flow between concentric rotating cylinders has not been found in open literature. In this note, the principle and the calculation are given for single cylinder rotating of inner or outer cylinder, and counter and same direction rotating of two cylinders. For comparison, the distribution of energy loss in a plane Couette flow is also derived for various flow conditi...

  5. Heat storage duration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

  6. Torsional waves propagation in an initially stressed dissipative cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Selim

    2009-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper has been framed to show the effect of damping on the propagation of torsional waves in an initially stressed, dissipative, incompressible cylinder of infinite length. A governing equation has been formulated on Biot's incremental deformation theory. The velocities of torsional waves are obtained as complex ones, in which real part gives the phase velocity of propagation and corresponding imaginary part gives the damping. The study reveals that the damping of the medium has strong effect in the propagation of torsional wave. Since every medium has damping so it is more realistic to use the damped wave equation instead of the undamped wave equation. The study also shows that the velocity of propagation of such waves depend on the presence of initial stress. The influences of damping and initial stresses are shown separately.

  7. Process for manufacturing hollow fused-silica insulator cylinder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA); Krogh, Michael L. (Lee's Summit, MO); Davis, Steven C. (Lee's Summit, MO); Decker, Derek E. (Discovery Bay, CA); Rosenblum, Ben Z. (Overland Park, KS); Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for building hollow insulator cylinders that can have each end closed off with a high voltage electrode to contain a vacuum. A series of fused-silica round flat plates are fabricated with a large central hole and equal inside and outside diameters. The thickness of each is related to the electron orbit diameter of electrons that escape the material surface, loop, and return back. Electrons in such electron orbits can support avalanche mechanisms that result in surface flashover. For example, the thickness of each of the fused-silica round flat plates is about 0.5 millimeter. In general, the thinner the better. Metal, such as gold, is deposited onto each top and bottom surface of the fused-silica round flat plates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Eutectic metals can also be used with one alloy constituent on the top and the other on the bottom. The CVD, or a separate diffusion step, can be used to defuse the deposited metal deep into each fused-silica round flat plate. The conductive layer may also be applied by ion implantation or gas diffusion into the surface. The resulting structure may then be fused together into an insulator stack. The coated plates are aligned and then stacked, head-to-toe. Such stack is heated and pressed together enough to cause the metal interfaces to fuse, e.g., by welding, brazing or eutectic bonding. Such fusing is preferably complete enough to maintain a vacuum within the inner core of the assembled structure. A hollow cylinder structure results that can be used as a core liner in a dielectric wall accelerator and as a vacuum envelope for a vacuum tube device where the voltage gradients exceed 150 kV/cm.

  8. Energy Storage Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers HEV & PHEV Technology Roadmaps R&D Timeline Overview 3 Develop electrochemical energy storage technologies which support the commercialization of hybrid and electric...

  9. Hydrogen Storage Related Links

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following resources provide details about DOE-funded hydrogen storage activities, research plans and roadmaps, models and tools, and additional related links.

  10. Culex quinquefasciatus Storage Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and hemolymph proteins of Cx. quinquefasciatus . A and B:of typical storage proteins in Cx. quinquefasciatus.Fourth-instar Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae and early pupae

  11. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  12. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. W . BOOIll, "Superconductive Energy Storage Inducand H. A. Peterson, "Superconductive E nergy S torage forMeeting, Janua ry N. Mohan, "Superconductive Energy S torage

  13. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design of the BPA Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storagefor a Utility Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storagefor a Lnrge Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage

  14. Secondary Storage Management Himanshu Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Himanshu

    Secondary Storage Management Himanshu Gupta Storage­1 #12;Outline · Memory Hierarchy · Disk Records/Fields · Deletions and Insertions of Records Himanshu Gupta Storage­2 #12;Himanshu Gupta Storage­3 Memory Hierarchy Cache (1 MB; 1-5 nsec) Main Memory (GBs; 10-100 nsec) Secondary Storage

  15. Optimal Storage Allocation for Serial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yechiali, Uri

    Optimal Storage Allocation for Serial Haim Mendelson, Joseph S. Pliskin, and Uri Yechiali Tel Aviv reside on a direct-access storage device in which storage space is limited. Records are added allocating storage space to the files. Key Words and Phrases: serial files, storage allocation

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: implement energy storage projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    implement energy storage projects Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration,...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Stationary Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StorageStationary Energy Storage Stationary Energy Storage The 1 MW Energy Storage Test Pad integrated with renewable energy generation at Sandia's Distributed Energy Technology...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Batteries & Energy Storage Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StorageBatteries & Energy Storage Publications Batteries & Energy Storage Publications Batteries & Energy Storage Fact Sheets Achieving Higher Energy Density in Flow Batteries at...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: evaluate energy storage opportunity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage opportunity Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration,...

  20. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legalization of Ground Water Storage," Water Resourcesprocedure to above ground storage of heat in huge insulatedthis project is heat storage in ground-water regions storage

  1. Sandia Energy - Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Test Pad (ESTP) Home Energy Permalink Gallery Evaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy...

  2. LABORATORY DEMONSTRATION OF A MULTISENSOR UNATTENDED CYLINDER VERIFICATION STATION FOR URANIUM ENRICHMENT PLANT SAFEGUARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, David I [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rowland, Kelly L [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sheriden [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Miller, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Flynn, Eric B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of the diversion of a significant quantity of nuclear materials, and safeguarding uranium enrichment plants is especially important in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. The IAEA’s proposed Unattended Cylinder Verification Station (UCVS) for UF6 cylinder verification would combine the operator’s accountancy scale with a nondestructive assay system such as the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) and cylinder identification and surveillance systems. In this project, we built a laboratory-scale UCVS and demonstrated its capabilities using mock UF6 cylinders. We developed a signal processing algorithm to automate the data collection and processing from four continuous, unattended sensors. The laboratory demonstration of the system showed that the software could successfully identify cylinders, snip sensor data at the appropriate points in time, determine the relevant characteristics of the cylinder contents, check for consistency among sensors, and output the cylinder data to a file. This paper describes the equipment, algorithm and software development, laboratory demonstration, and recommendations for a full-scale UCVS.

  3. Energy storage capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjeant, W.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of capacitors are reviewed in general, including dielectrics, induced polarization, and permanent polarization. Then capacitance characteristics are discussed and modelled. These include temperature range, voltage, equivalent series resistance, capacitive reactance, impedance, dissipation factor, humidity and frequency effects, storage temperature and time, and lifetime. Applications of energy storage capacitors are then discussed. (LEW)

  4. Random wave forces on a free-to-surge vertical cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sajonia, Charles Blake

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' the fluid, and D is the diameter of thc pile or cylinder. The total wave induced force acting on the cylinder is considered as the sum of a viscous drag force component and an inertia component. VVhen the structure moves in response to hydrodynamic loads... Morison Equation The principle objective of this research is to gain insight into the applications and limitations ol the relative motion form of the Morison equation for the prediction of hydrodynamic forces on a free-to-surge vertical cylinder...

  5. Experimental studies of unrestrained cylinders on an impermeable bottom under currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenical, Scott William

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a cylinder is below 70/o of the current velocity. This region is defined as the transition region. 27 10 c 0 'o o Ave. Angular Velocity (rad/scc) ? Ave. Angular Acceleration (rad/seoc2) 0 0. 2 0. 4 0. 6 0. 8 1 1. 2 Time (scc) Figure 4. 3... Typical angular motion of cylinder started from rest (0. 115 m steel) 10 C 0 o 6 - Ave Angular Velocity (rad/sec) ? Ave. Angular Aoceleration (rad/secc2) 0 0. 2 0. 4 0 6 0. 8 1 1. 2 Time (sec) Figure 4. 4 Typical angular motion of cylinder started...

  6. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Electric Car Challenge Sparks Students' STEM Interest On January 9, 2015, in Energy, Energy Storage, News, News & Events, Partnership, Transportation Energy Aspiring...

  8. Improving energy storage devices | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage devices Improving energy storage devices Released: April 15, 2014 Lithium-sulfur batteries last longer with nanomaterial-packed cathode A new PNNL-developed...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture & Storage, Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC), Materials Science, News,...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaboration On May 28, 2014, in Biofuels, CRF, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid Integration,...

  11. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

    2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  12. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  13. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  14. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  15. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  16. Zeeman splitting of photonic angular momentum states in a gyromagnetic cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Hui Yuan

    We show that, under the presence of a static magnetic field, the photon eigenfrequencies of a circular gyromagnetic cylinder experience a splitting that is proportional to the angular momentum density of light at the ...

  17. Rocking and rolling down an incline : the dynamics of nested cylinders on a ramp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vener, David Paul

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I report the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of a journal bearing, specifically, a cylinder suspended in a viscous fluid housed within a cylindrical shell, rolling down an ...

  18. Wave Energy Extraction from an Oscillating Water Column in a Truncated Circular Cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hao

    2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Oscillating Water Column (OWC) device is a relatively practical and convenient way that converts wave energy to a utilizable form, which is usually electricity. The OWC is kept inside a fixed truncated vertical cylinder, which is a hollow structure...

  19. Chimera RANS simulations of nonlinear waves induced by a heaving cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nurtjahyo, Prahoro Yulijanto

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surface boundary conditions are satisfied on the exact free surface to ensure accurate resolution of the fully nonlinear waves. In the present induced by vertical motion of a floating circular cylinder. research, the Chimera RANS method has been...

  20. Wave Interactions with Arrays of Bottom-Mounted Circular Cylinders: Investigation of Optical and Acoustical Analogies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquet, Aldric

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave scattering by arrays of cylinders has received special attention by many authors and analytical solutions have been derived. The investigation of optical and acoustical analogies to the problem of interaction of water waves with rigid...

  1. Spark-plug-mounted fiber optic sensor for measuring in-cylinder pressure in engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Taehan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new design for an in-cylinder fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) pressure sensor suitable for automotive engines has been investigated experimentally. The FFPI sensor consists of a single mode fiber containing two internal mirrors which form...

  2. REAL-TIME NONLINEAR INDIVIDUAL CYLINDER AIR FUEL RATIO OBSERVER ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    commercial products lines. For forthcoming HCCI engines (see (Kahrstedt et al., 2003; Hultqvist et al., 2001 cylinder AFR estimation can give crucial information to get the HCCI running better. The contribution

  3. Fresnel zone effects in the scattering of sound by cylinders of various lengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanton, Tim

    Fresnel zone effects in the scattering of sound by cylinders of various lengths DanielT. Di-source/point-receivercombination.Numerically evaluatingthisexpressionshowedthescatteringcharacteristicstobedominatedbyFresnel zoneeffects·scillationsin thebackscatterversuslengthcurvecausedbyconstructiveand

  4. In situ control of lubricant properties for reduction of power cylinder friction through thermal barrier coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molewyk, Mark Allen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lowering lubricant viscosity to reduce friction generally carries a side effect of increased metal-metal contact in mixed or boundary lubrication, for example near top ring reversal along the engine cylinder liner. A ...

  5. Strategies for In-Cylinder Reductions to Reach Bin 2 and LEV...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Strategies for In-Cylinder Reductions to Reach Bin 2 and LEVIII Air System Management to Reduce NOx and PM and Improve Fuel Economy Poster Location P-03 Robert Czarnowski, John...

  6. Fiber optic sensing technology for measuring in-cylinder pressure in automotive engines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Taehan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Field tests were carried out in a 3-cylinder automotive engine with a piezoelectric pressure sensor as a reference transducer up to about 3500 rpm. The fiber optic sensor data generally matched those measured by the piezoelectric reference sensor...

  7. Testing of one-inch UF{sub 6} cylinder valves under simulated fire conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, P.G. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate computational models which predict the behavior of UF{sub 6} cylinders exposed to fires are required to validate existing firefighting and emergency response procedures. Since the cylinder valve is a factor in the containment provided by the UF{sub 6} cylinder, its behavior under fire conditions has been a necessary assumption in the development of such models. Consequently, test data is needed to substantiate these assumptions. Several studies cited in this document provide data related to the behavior of a 1-inch UF{sub 6} cylinder valve in fire situations. To acquire additional data, a series of tests were conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) under a unique set of test conditions. This document describes this testing and the resulting data.

  8. DNS of flow past a stationary and oscillating cylinder at Re ¼ 10 000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords: Flow structure interaction; Vortex induced vibration; Cylinder flow; High ... methods, and low-order upwind schemes are observed to fail to predict several .... overhead and enables the applications to scale to a large number of ...

  9. Coal slurry combustion optimization on single cylinder engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, GE Transportation System has been conducting a proof of concept program to use coal water slurry (CWS) fuel to power a diesel engine locomotive since 1988. As reported earlier [1], a high pressure electronically controlled accumulator injector using a diamond compact insert nozzle was developed for this project. The improved reliability and durability of this new FIE allowed for an improved and more thorough study of combustion of CWS fuel in a diesel engine. It was decided to include a diesel pilot fuel injector in the combustion system mainly due to engine start and low load operation needs. BKM, Inc. of San Diego, CA was contracted to develop the electronic diesel fuel pilot/starting FIE for the research engine. As a result, the experimental combustion study was very much facilitated due to the ability of changing pilot/CWS injection timings and quantities without having to stop the engine. Other parameters studied included combustion chamber configuration (by changing CWS fuel injector nozzle hole number/shape/angle), as well as injection pressure. The initial phase of this combustion study is now complete. The results have been adopted into the design of a 12 cylinder engine FIE, to be tested in 1992. This paper summarizes the main findings of this study.

  10. The control of air flow separation on a cylinder by rearward mass ejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Leopoldo Fernando

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CONTROL OF AIR FLOW SEPARATION ON A CYLINDER BY REARWARD MASS EJECTION A Thesis By LEOPOLDO FERNANDO PEREZ Submitted to the Graduate College oi the Texas A 4 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1965 Major Subject; Aerospace Engineering THE CONTROL OF AIR FLOW SEPARATION ON A CYLINDER BY REARWARD MASS EJECTION A Thesis By LEOPOLDO FERNANDO PEREZ Approved as to style and content by: (C airman of Committee) (Head...

  11. Extending operating range of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine via cylinder deactivation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL); Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL)

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An HCCI engine has the ability to operate over a large load range by utilizing a lower cetane distillate diesel fuel to increase ignition delay. This permits more stable operation at high loads by avoidance of premature combustion before top dead center. During low load conditions, a portion of the engines cylinders are deactivated so that the remaining cylinders can operate at a pseudo higher load while the overall engine exhibits behavior typical of a relatively low load.

  12. Criticality safety review of 2 1/2 -, 10-, and 14-ton UF sub 6 cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, UF{sub 6} cylinders designed to contain 2{1/2} tons of UF{sub 6} are classified as Fissile Class 2 packages with a transport index (TI) of 5 for the purpose of transportation. The 10-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders are classified as Fissile Class 1 with no TI assigned for transportation. The 14-ton cylinders, although not certified for transport with enrichments greater than 1 wt % because they have no approved overpack, can be used in on-site operations for enrichments greater than 1 wt %. The maximum {sup 235}U enrichments for these cylinders are 5.0 wt % for the 2{1/2}-ton cylinder and 4.5 wt % for the 10- and 14-ton cylinders. This work reviews the suitability for reclassification of the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} packages as Fissile Class 1 with a maximum {sup 235}U enrichment of 5 wt %. Additionally, the 10- and 14-ton cylinders are reviewed to address a change in maximum {sup 235}U enrichment from 4.5 to 5 wt %. Based on this evaluation, the 2{1/2}-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders meet the 10 CFR.71 criteria for Fissile Class 1 packages, and no TI is needed for criticality safety purposes; however, a TI may be required based on radiation from the packages. Similarly, the 10- and 14-ton UF{sub 6} packages appear acceptable for a maximum enrichment rating change to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. 11 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Storage Exchange: A Global Trading Platform for Storage Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    Storage Exchange: A Global Trading Platform for Storage Services Martin Placek and Rajkumar Buyya,raj}@csse.unimelb.edu.au Abstract. The Storage Exchange (SX) is a new platform allowing stor- age to be treated as a tradeable resource. Organisations with varying storage requirements can use the SX platform to trade and exchange

  14. Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher Yongdae Kim are witnessing a revival of Storage Service Providers (SSP) in the form of new vendors as well as traditional players. While storage outsourcing is cost-effective, many companies are hesitating to outsource

  15. Measured voltages and currents internal to closed metal cylinders due to diffusion of simulated lightning currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnetzer, G.H.; Fisher, R.J.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One mechanism for the penetration of lightning energy into the interior of a weapon is by current diffusion through the exterior metal case. Tests were conducted in which simulated lightning currents were driven over the exteriors of similar aluminum and ferrous steel cylinders of 0.125-in wall thickness. Under conditions in which the test currents were driven asymmetrically over the exteriors of the cylinders, voltages were measured between various test points in the interior as functions of the amplitude and duration of the applied current. The maximum recorded open-circuit voltage, which occurred in the steel cylinder, was 1.7 V. On separate shots, currents flowing on a low impedance shorting conductor between the same set of test points were also measured, yielding a maximum current of 630 A, again occurring across the interior of the steel cylinder. Under symmetrical exterior drive current conditions, a maximum end-to-end internal voltage of 4.1 V was obtained, also in the steel cylinder, with a corresponding current of 480 A measured on a coaxial conductor connected between the two end plates of the cylinder. Data were acquired over a range of input current amplitudes between about 40 and 100 kA. These data provide the experimental basis for validating models that can subsequently be applied to real weapons and other objects of interest.

  16. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Encrgy Storage Plant" , EPRI Report EM-3457, April 1984. [4521st century. REFERENCES The EPRI Regional Systems preparedby J. J. Mulvaney, EPRI Report EPRI P-19S0SR, (1981). [2J O.

  17. Marketing Cool Storage Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCannon, L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the field. The International Thermal Storage Advisory Council was formed to help meet this perceived need. This paper will review activities of EPRI and ITSAC to achieve widespread acceptance of the technology....

  18. Hydrogen storage compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH4- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH4- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  19. Hydrogen storage compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  20. APS Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Main Parameters APS Storage Ring Parameters M. Borland, G. Decker, L. Emery, W. Guo, K. Harkay, V. Sajaev, C.-Y. Yao Advanced Photon Source September 8, 2010 This document list the...

  1. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He and Bowei Du implemented Oasys, and helped with my firstwas built on top of a C++ object persistence library, Oasys.Oasys uses plug-in storage modules that implement persistent

  2. Gas Storage Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate...

  3. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World's First 290 MW Gas Turbine Air Storage Peaking Plant",hydro e lectric plants and gas turbines, are less effectedelectricity. For a gas turbine the conversion efficiency may

  4. Storage Tanks (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Storage Tanks regulations is a set of rules and permit requirements mandated by the Arkansas Pollution and Ecology Commission in order to protect the public health and the lands and the waters...

  5. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  6. Energy Storage 101

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the storage of heat or cold between opposing seasons in deep aquifers or bedrock. A wind-up clock stores potential energy, in this case mechanical, in the spring tension. ...

  7. Storage management solutions Buyer's guide: purchasing criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage management solutions Buyer's guide: purchasing criteria Manage your storage to meet service storage environment cohesively As new guidelines or regulations surface, storage administrators receive increasing numbers of requests for change (RFCs) in storage provisioning. Simultaneously, routine changes

  8. Storage In C Matt Bishop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storage In C Matt Bishop Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science NASA Ames Research Center. Intimately bound with the idea of scope is that of storage. When a program defines a variable, the compiler storage (such as on a stack) or as more permanent storage (in data space.) Recall that the format of a C

  9. Storage In C Matt Bishop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storage In C Matt Bishop Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science NASA Ames Research Center. Intimately bound with the idea of scope is that of storage. When a program deÞnes a variable, the compiler storage (such as on a stack) or as more permanent storage (in data space.) Recall that the format of a C

  10. DOE Global Energy Storage Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

  11. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  12. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

  13. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

  14. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

  15. Energy storage connection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benedict, Eric L.; Borland, Nicholas P.; Dale, Magdelena; Freeman, Belvin; Kite, Kim A.; Petter, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brendan F.

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system for connecting a variable voltage power source, such as a power controller, with a plurality of energy storage devices, at least two of which have a different initial voltage than the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. The power system includes a controller that increases the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. When such output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a first one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the first one of the energy storage devices. The controller then causes the output voltage of the variable voltage power source to continue increasing. When the output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a second one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the second one of the energy storage devices.

  16. Interacting delayed critical 38.1-cm-diam uranium (93.2) metal cylinders at large distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihalczo, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A delayed critical experiment was performed with two 38.10-cm-diam, {approximately}7.62-cm-thick unmoderated and unreflected uranium metal cylinders to study the interaction of two loosely coupled large flat cylinders. Previously tightly coupled, two component uranium metal assemblies of 27.93-cm-diam cylinders had been assembled to delayed criticality and the results reported. For this experiment, the uranium metal density was 18.75 g U/cm{sup 3}, and the enrichment was 93.15 wt% {sup 235}U. The two right circular cylinders were coaxial and separated 1.3 m; thus the fractional solid angle subtended by one cylinder as seen from the other is {approximately}5 X 10{sup -3}. This delayed critical configuration is a useful experiment for assessing the convergence of Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron multiplication factor because it is a very loosely coupled system, a problem that has been designated as {open_quotes}k{sub eff} of the world{close_quotes}. The neutron multiplication factor of one of the interacting cylinders is 0.994, and the solid angle seen by the other cylinder is such that very few neutrons starting in one cylinder reach the other cylinder. This assembly was configured on a vertical assembly machine in the east cell of the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in 1965 and was unreported until this paper. The east cell of this facility is a 10.6- x 10.6- x 9.1-m room with thick concrete walls. The lower cylinder of this assembly was located 3.5 m from the 1.5-m-thick west wall, 3.9 m from the 0.61-m-thick north wall, and 2.8 m above the concrete floor. The calculation of two such loosely coupled cylinders by Monte Carlo methods can be a problem because the interaction between cylinders is so small.

  17. CHEMICAL STORAGE: MYTHS VERSUS REALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, F

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of resources explaining proper chemical storage are available. These resources include books, databases/tables, and articles that explain various aspects of chemical storage including compatible chemical storage, signage, and regulatory requirements. Another source is the chemical manufacturer or distributor who provides storage information in the form of icons or color coding schemes on container labels. Despite the availability of these resources, chemical accidents stemming from improper storage, according to recent reports (1) (2), make up almost 25% of all chemical accidents. This relatively high percentage of chemical storage accidents suggests that these publications and color coding schemes although helpful, still provide incomplete information that may not completely mitigate storage risks. This manuscript will explore some ways published storage information may be incomplete, examine the associated risks, and suggest methods to help further eliminate chemical storage risks.

  18. Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder in a slit channel: Lubrication theory versus molecular dynamics analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir M. Rahmani; Yang Shao; Mehlam Jupiterwala; Carlos E. Colosqui

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Plane Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder that is arbitrarily confined (i.e., symmetrically or asymmetrically confined) in a slit channel is studied via hydrodynamic lubrication theory and molecular dynamics simulations, considering cases where the cylinder remains static or undergoes thermal motion. Lubrication theory predictions for the drag force and volumetric flow rate are in close agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of flows having molecularly thin lubrication gaps, despite the presence of significant structural forces induced by the crystalline structure of the modeled solid. While the maximum drag force is observed in symmetric confinement, i.e., when the cylinder is equidistant from both channel walls, the drag decays significantly as the cylinder moves away from the channel centerline and approaches a wall. Hence, significant reductions in the mean drag force on the cylinder and hydraulic resistance of the channel can be observed when thermal motion induces random off-center displacements. Analytical expressions and numerical results in this work provide useful insights into the hydrodynamics of colloidal solids and macromolecules in confinement.

  19. Characterizing dilute combustion instabilities in a multi-cylinder spark-ignited engine using symbolic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Kaul, Brian C [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spark-ignited internal combustion engines have evolved considerably in recent years in response to increasingly stringent regulations for emissions and fuel-economy. One new advanced engine strategy utilizes high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to reduce combustion temperatures, thereby increasing thermodynamic efficiency and reducing nitrogen oxide emissions. While this strategy can be highly effective, it also poses major control and design challenges due to the large combustion oscillations that develop at sufficiently high EGR levels. Previous research has documented that combustion instabilities can propagate between successive engine cycles in individual cylinders via self-generated feedback of reactive species and thermal energy in the retained residual exhaust gases. In this work, we use symbolic analysis to characterize multi-cylinder combustion oscillations in an experimental engine operating with external EGR. At low levels of EGR, intra-cylinder oscillations are clearly visible and appear to be associated with brief, intermittent coupling among cylinders. As EGR is increased further, a point is reached where all four cylinders lock almost completely in phase and alternate simultaneously between two distinct bi-stable combustion states. From a practical perspective, it is important to understand the causes of this phenomenon and develop diagnostics that might be applied to ameliorate its effects. We demonstrate here that two approaches for symbolizing the engine combustion measurements can provide useful probes for characterizing these instabilities.

  20. Conductive and convective heat transfer in fluid flows between differentially heated and rotating cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Jose M; Avila, Marc

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow of fluid confined between a heated rotating cylinder and a cooled stationary cylinder is a canonical experiment for the study of heat transfer in engineering. The theoretical treatment of this system is greatly simplified if the cylinders are assumed to be of infinite length or periodic in the axial direction, in which cases heat transfer occurs only through conduction as in a solid. We here investigate numerically heat transfer and the onset of turbulence in such flows by using both periodic and no-slip boundary conditions in the axial direction. We obtain a simple linear criterion that determines whether the infinite-cylinder assumption can be employed. The curvature of the cylinders enters this linear relationship through the slope and additive constant. For a given length-to-gap aspect ratio there is a critical Rayleigh number beyond which the laminar flow in the finite system is convective and so the behaviour is entirely different from the periodic case. The criterion does not depend on the Pra...

  1. Vortex and structural dynamics of a flexible cylinder in cross-flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Jessica K., E-mail: jshang@princeton.edu; Stone, Howard A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Smits, Alexander J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-density, flexible cantilevered cylinder was permitted to vibrate freely under the influence of vortex shedding in the laminar flow regime. We find that the vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a flexible cantilever depart from those of a flexible cylinder that is fixed at both ends. In particular, we find discontinuous regions of VIV behavior – here called states – as a function of the reduced velocity U{sup *}. These states are demarcated by discrete changes in the dominant eigenmodes of the structural response as the cylinder vibrates in progressively higher structural modes with increasing U{sup *}. The contribution of structural modes can be identified readily by a modal projection of the cylinder oscillation onto known cantilever beam modes. Oscillation frequencies do not monotonically increase with U{sup *}. The wake response between different states is also found to have distinct characteristics; of particular note is the occurrence of a P+S wake over one of these regions, which is associated with a high-amplitude vibration of the cylinder that is due to the constructive interference of contributing eigenmodes.

  2. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354 217,814 218,494StorageStorage

  3. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News, News &...

  5. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

  6. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridge

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE International Energy Storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Energy Storage Database Has Logged 420 Energy Storage Projects Worldwide with 123 GW of Installed Capacity DOE International Energy Storage Database Has Logged 420...

  8. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper, Colorado1991). Wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solarR. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling, Pacific

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Electricity Storage Handbook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  10. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Electrochemical Energy Storage Nanostructured ElectrodesCells for Energy Storage and Generation . . . . . . . . . .batteries and their energy storage efficiency. vii Contents

  11. NERSC Frontiers in Advanced Storage Technology Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage R&D Frontiers in Advanced Storage Technologies (FAST) project Working with vendors to develop new functionality in storage technologies generally not yet available to...

  12. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withAnnual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors' InformationLarge-Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and

  13. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of new energy generation and storage technologies arenew energy generation and storage technologies is importantBased Energy Storage and Generation Technologies The world

  14. Water Heaters (Storage Oil) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oil) Water Heaters (Storage Oil) Water Heater, Storage Oil - v1.0.xlsx More Documents & Publications Water Heaters (Tankless Electric) Water Heaters (Storage Electric)...

  15. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

  16. NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

  17. NGLW RCRA Storage Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

  18. Underground pumped hydroelectric storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

  19. Hydrogen Storage CODES & STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    automotive start-up. · Air/Thermal/Water Management ­ improved air systems, high temperature membranes, heat to pump Hydrogen Fuel/ Storage/ Infrastructure $45/kW (2010) $30kW (2015) 325 W/kg 220 W/L 60% (hydrogen system Component Air management, sensors, MEA's, membranes, Bipolar Plates, fuel processor reactor zones

  20. Method and apparatus for reconstructing in-cylinder pressure and correcting for signal decay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Jian

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method comprises steps for reconstructing in-cylinder pressure data from a vibration signal collected from a vibration sensor mounted on an engine component where it can generate a signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio, and correcting the vibration signal for errors introduced by vibration signal charge decay and sensor sensitivity. The correction factors are determined as a function of estimated motoring pressure and the measured vibration signal itself with each of these being associated with the same engine cycle. Accordingly, the method corrects for charge decay and changes in sensor sensitivity responsive to different engine conditions to allow greater accuracy in the reconstructed in-cylinder pressure data. An apparatus is also disclosed for practicing the disclosed method, comprising a vibration sensor, a data acquisition unit for receiving the vibration signal, a computer processing unit for processing the acquired signal and a controller for controlling the engine operation based on the reconstructed in-cylinder pressure.

  1. Externally pressurized porous cylinder for multiple surface aerosol generation and method of generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apel, C.T.; Layman, L.R.; Gallimore, D.L.

    1988-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A nebulizer is described for generating aerosol having small droplet sizes and high efficiency at low sample introduction rates. The nebulizer has a cylindrical gas permeable active surface. A sleeve is disposed around the cylinder and gas is provided from the sleeve to the interior of the cylinder formed by the active surface. In operation, a liquid is provided to the inside of the gas permeable surface. The gas contacts the wetted surface and forms small bubbles which burst to form an aerosol. Those bubbles which are large are carried by momentum to another part of the cylinder where they are renebulized. This process continues until the entire sample is nebulized into aerosol sized droplets. 2 figs.

  2. Centrifugal instability of Stokes layers in crossflow: the case of a forced cylinder wake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Adamo, Juan; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wake flow around a circular cylinder at $Re\\approx100$ performing rotatory oscillations has been thoroughly discussed in the literature, mostly focusing on the modifications to the natural B\\'enard-von K\\'arm\\'an vortex street that result from the forced shedding modes locked to the rotatory oscillation frequency. The usual experimental and theoretical frameworks at these Reynolds numbers are quasi-two-dimensional, since the secondary instabilities bringing a three-dimensional structure to the cylinder wake flow occur only at higher Reynolds numbers. In the present paper we show that a three-dimensional structure can appear below the usual three-dimensionalization threshold, when forcing with frequencies lower than the natural vortex shedding frequency, at high amplitudes, as a result of a previously unreported mechanism: a pulsed centrifugal instability of the oscillating Stokes layer at the wall of the cylinder. The present numerical investigation lets us in this way propose a physical explanation for t...

  3. Storage Ring | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electron Storage Ring The 7-GeV electrons are injected into the 1104-m-circumference storage ring, a circle of more than 1,000 electromagnets and associated equipment, located...

  4. Chit-based Remote Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paluska, Justin Mazzola

    We propose a model for reliable remote storage founded on contract law. Consumers submit their bits to storage providers in exchange for a chit. A chit is a cryptographically secure, verifiable contract between a consumer ...

  5. Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today's state of the art for hydrogen storage includes 5,000- and 10,000-psi compressed gas tanks and cryogenic liquid hydrogen tanks for on-board hydrogen storage.

  6. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  7. Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avedisian, C. T. (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY); Presser, Cary (National Institute of Standard & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD); DesJardin, Paul Edward (University at Buffalo, New York, NY); Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

  8. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, D.L.; Baraszu, D.J.; Foulkes, D.M.; Gomes, E.G.

    1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine`s crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages. 4 figs.

  9. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

  10. Deformation of a thin, elastic plate to a deep parabolic cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, R.C. Jr.; Wilson, R.K.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equations governing the elastic deformation of thin plates through large displacements to deep parabolic cylinders are presented and solved. The solution consists of expressions for a spatially distributed surface pressure and uniform rim loads which, when applied to the plate, produce the specified, deep parabolic cylindrical shape. These forming loads are written in dimensionless form for parabolic cylinders of arbitrary focal length and arbitrary rim to rim aperture. Numerical results are presented and limiting values are discussed. The solution and results find immediate application to mechanical forming and adhesive retention of parabolic solar collector components.

  11. A study of gravity wave induced pressure variations in the presence of a submerged cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Roy

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that a portion of the fluid (that immediately below the cylinder) must transmit the energy entirely in the kinetic form* Due to the nature of wave motion in water, this problem does not seem to be related to any behavior of sound or light waves* Dean... form,with the top end attached to an adjustable frame near the end of the tank and the lower end weighted to prevent its vibrating with the waves. Circular cylinders of three sizes, rigidly mounted in a horizontal position across the tank, were used...

  12. The Power of Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    The Power of Energy Storage How to Increase Deployment in California to Reduce Greenhouse Gas;1Berkeley Law \\ UCLA Law The Power of Energy Storage: How to Increase Deployment in California to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Executive Summary: Expanding Energy Storage in California Sunshine and wind, even

  13. HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobagi, Fouad

    HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE VIDEO­ON­DEMAND Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A; Hierarchical Storage Systems for Interactive Video­On­Demand Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A. Tobagi Technical­9040 pubs@shasta.stanford.edu Abstract On­demand video servers based on hierarchical storage systems

  14. GETTING CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    GETTING CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES TO MARKET BREAKING THE DEADLOCK Report of a Science: Carbon Capture and Storage © OECD/IEA 2009, fig. 1, p. 6 Figures 2 and 3 reprinted with permission from `UK Carbon storage and capture, where is it?' by Stuart Haszeldine, Professor of Carbon Capture

  15. Normal matter storage of antiprotons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, L.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

  16. Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form Petroleum Bulk Storage Form Facility Name.ehs.cornell.edu/env/bulk-material-storage/petroleum-bulk-storage/Documents/AST_Inspection_Form.pdf #12;

  17. Panel 4, Hydrogen Energy Storage Policy Considerations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Storage Policy Considerations Hydrogen Storage Workshop Jeffrey Reed Southern California Gas Company May 15, 2014 0 Methane is a Great Storage Medium 1 SoCalGas' storage...

  18. Central Storage for Unsealed Radioactive Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Central Storage for Unsealed Radioactive Materials Radiation Safety Form PERMIT HOLDER NAME:______________________________ PHONE #: ____________________________ ADDRESS/DEPT.: _______________________________ Storage Location: Refrigerator Freezer Dry Storage List each item being transferred to storage separately: EH&S LAB WIPE SURVEY

  19. Kalman Filtering for Real-Time Individual Cylinder Air Fuel Ratio Observer on a Diesel Engine Test Bench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalman Filtering for Real-Time Individual Cylinder Air Fuel Ratio Observer on a Diesel Engine Test of a time-varying Kalman Filter based on a physics-based model for the engine dynamics. We prove Kalman filter. Performance is evaluated through test bench experiments on a 4 cylinder Diesel engine

  20. Modeling the Effect of Fuel Ethanol Concentration on Cylinder Pressure Evolution in Direct-Injection Flex-Fuel Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Modeling the Effect of Fuel Ethanol Concentration on Cylinder Pressure Evolution in Direct the fuel vaporization pro- cess for ethanol-gasoline fuel blends and the associated charge cooling effect from both measured and modeled cylinder pressure exhibit a monotonic correlation with the fuel ethanol

  1. Cylinder Pressures and Vibration in Internal Combustion Engine Condition G O Chandroth, A J C Sharkey and N E Sharkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkey, Amanda

    Cylinder Pressures and Vibration in Internal Combustion Engine Condition Monitoring G O Chandroth focus on the detection of incipient faults in an internal combustion engine using a minimum number. The cylinder pressure (P) developed within an internal combustion engine can be considered to be the pulse

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reserve University On January 28, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security, Materials Science,...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Infrastructure Security, Materials...

  4. Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous...

  5. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1975. Underground Storage of Treated Water: A Field Test.1975. "Underground Storage of Treated Water: A Field Test,"

  6. Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Document states additional...

  7. Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presentation on NIST Combinatorial Methods at the...

  8. Nanoscale data storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Li

    2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of this article is to review the development of ultrahigh-density, nanoscale data storage, i.e., nanostorage. As a fundamentally new type of storage system, the recording mechanisms of nanostorage may be completely different to those of the traditional devices. Currently, two types of molecules are being studied for potential application in nanostorage. One is molecular electronic elements including molecular wires, rectifiers, switches, and transistors. The other approach employs nanostructured materials such as nanotubes, nanowires, and nanoparticles. The challenges for nanostorage are not only the materials, ultrahigh data-densities, fabrication-costs, device operating temperatures and large-scale integration, but also the development of the physical principles and models. There are already some breakthroughs obtained, but it is still unclear what kind of nanostorage systems can ultimately replace the current silicon based transistors. A promising candidate may be a molecular-nanostructure hybrid device with sub-5 nm dimensions.

  9. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. HYDROGEN USAGE AND STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    It is thought that it will be useful to inform society and people who are interested in hydrogen energy. The study below has been prepared due to this aim can be accepted as an article to exchange of information between people working on this subject. This study has been presented to reader to be utilized as a “technical note”. Main Energy sources coal, petroleum and natural gas are the fossil fuels we use today. They are going to be exhausted since careless usage in last decades through out the world, and human being is going to face the lack of energy sources in the near future. On the other hand as the fossil fuels pollute the environment makes the hydrogen important for an alternative energy source against to the fossil fuels. Due to the slow progress in hydrogen’s production, storage and converting into electrical energy experience, extensive usage of Hydrogen can not find chance for applications in wide technological practices. Hydrogen storage stands on an important point in the development of Hydrogen energy Technologies. Hydrogen is volumetrically low energy concentration fuel. Hydrogen energy, to meet the energy quantity necessary for the nowadays technologies and to be accepted economically and physically against fossil fuels, Hydrogen storage technologies have to be developed in this manner. Today the most common method in hydrogen storage may be accepted as the high pressurized composite tanks. Hydrogen is stored as liquid or gaseous phases. Liquid hydrogen phase can be stored by using composite tanks under very high pressure conditions. High technology composite material products which are durable to high pressures, which should not be affected by hydrogen embrittlement and chemical conditions.[1

  11. Maui energy storage study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Karlson, Benjamin

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigates strategies to mitigate anticipated wind energy curtailment on Maui, with a focus on grid-level energy storage technology. The study team developed an hourly production cost model of the Maui Electric Company (MECO) system, with an expected 72 MW of wind generation and 15 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation in 2015, and used this model to investigate strategies that mitigate wind energy curtailment. It was found that storage projects can reduce both wind curtailment and the annual cost of producing power, and can do so in a cost-effective manner. Most of the savings achieved in these scenarios are not from replacing constant-cost diesel-fired generation with wind generation. Instead, the savings are achieved by the more efficient operation of the conventional units of the system. Using additional storage for spinning reserve enables the system to decrease the amount of spinning reserve provided by single-cycle units. This decreases the amount of generation from these units, which are often operated at their least efficient point (at minimum load). At the same time, the amount of spinning reserve from the efficient combined-cycle units also decreases, allowing these units to operate at higher, more efficient levels.

  12. Surface plasmon polaritons on metal cylinders with dielectric core Ursula Schroter and Alain Dereux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Surface plasmon polaritons on metal cylinders with dielectric core Ursula Schr¨oter and Alain is attributed to cylindrical surface plasmons. We present here fully retarded calculations of the dispersion and field patterns of the non-radiative plasmon modes in cylindrical geometry. We study the effect

  13. Dynamics and control of the system of a 2-D rigid circular cylinder and point vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    Dynamics and control of the system of a 2-D rigid circular cylinder and point vortices Zhanhua Ma dynamically interacting with N point vortices in its vicinity [16] is an idealized example of coupled solid from a fluid mechanics viewpoint as well as a dynamics and control viewpoint. The problem has many

  14. On the inverse transform of Laplace transforms that contain (products of) the parabolic cylinder function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirk Veestraeten

    2015-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laplace transforms of the transition probability density and distribution functions for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process contain the product of two parabolic cylinder functions, namely D_{v}(x)D_{v}(y) and D_{v}(x)D_{v-1}(y), respectively. The inverse transforms of these products have as yet not been documented. However, the transition density and distribution functions can be obtained by alternatively applying Doob's transform to the Kolmogorov equation and casting the problem in terms of Brownian motion. Linking the resulting transition density and distribution functions to their Laplace transforms then specifies the inverse transforms to the aforementioned products of parabolic cylinder functions. These two results, the recurrence relation of the parabolic cylinder function and the properties of the Laplace transform then enable the calculation of inverse transforms also for countless other combinations in the orders of the parabolic cylinder functions such as D_{v}(x)D_{v-2}(y), D_{v+1}(x)D_{v-1}(y) and D_{v}(x)D_{v-3}(y).

  15. VIBRATION REDUCTION OF A SINGLE CYLINDER RECIPROCATING COMPRESSOR BASED ON MULTI-STAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 VIBRATION REDUCTION OF A SINGLE CYLINDER RECIPROCATING COMPRESSOR BASED ON MULTI-STAGE BALANCING, INSA-Lyon, LaMCoS UMR5259, F69621, Villeurbanne, France ** Danfoss Commercial Compressors, F01600, a reciprocating compressor consists of three main mechanical subsets: the hermetic housing, the crankcase

  16. AIAA 2002-3297 INTERFERENCE BETWEEN TWO SIDE-BY-SIDE CYLINDERS IN HYPERSONIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    AIAA 2002-3297 INTERFERENCE BETWEEN TWO SIDE-BY-SIDE CYLINDERS IN HYPERSONIC RAREFIED-GAS FLOWS Vladimir V. Riabov* Rivier College, Nashua, New Hampshire 03060 Abstract Hypersonic rarefied-gas flows near-Carlo technique under transitional rarefied-gas-flow conditions (Knudsen numbers from 0.0167 to 10). Strong

  17. Fiber optic sensing technology for measuring in-cylinder pressure in automotive engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Taehan

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fiber optic sensing technology for measuring in-cylinder pressure in automotive engines was investigated. The optic sensing element consists of two mirrors in an in-line single mode fiber that are separated by some distance. To withstand...

  18. Characteristics of a Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna (LTSA) Conformed Longitudinally Around a Cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Characteristics of a Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna (LTSA) Conformed Longitudinally Around a Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna (LTSA) conformed longitudinally around a cylinder. Measured and simulated are presented. Fig. 1: Schematic of LTSA with dimensions in cm. Fig. 2: LTSA wrapped around 90º curve. LTSA

  19. Thin Film Motion of an Ideal Fluid on the Rotating Cylinder Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Yu. Zhukov; A. M. Morad

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The shallow water equations describing the motion of thin liquid film on the rotating cylinder surface are obtained. These equations are the analog of the modified Boussinesq equations for shallow water and the Korteweg-de Vries equation. It is clear that for rotating cylinder the centrifugal force plays the role of the gravity. For construction the shallow water equations (amplitude equations) usual depth-averaged and multi-scale asymptotic expansion methods are used. Preliminary analysis shows that a thin film of an ideal incompressible fluid precesses around the axis of the cylinder with velocity which differs from the angular velocity of rotating cylinder. For the mathematical model of the liquid film motion the analytical solutions are obtained by the Tanh-Function method. To illustrate the integrability of the equations the Painleve analysis is used. The truncated expansion method and symbolic computation allows to present an auto-Backlund transformation. The results of analysis show that the exact solutions of the model correspond to the solitary waves of different types.

  20. Uniform boundedness and longtime asymptotics for the twodimensional NavierStokes equations in an infinite cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallay, Thierry

    in an infinite cylinder Thierry Gallay Institut Fourier Universitâ??e de Grenoble 1 BP 74 38402 Saint­Martin­d'Hâ??eres, France Thierry.Gallay@ujf­grenoble.fr SiniŸsa SlijepŸceviâ??c Department of Mathematics University

  1. Perturbative zero-point energy for a cylinder of elliptical section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian R. Kitson; August Romeo

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the Casimir effect for a perfectly conducting cylinder of elliptical section, taking as reference the known case of circular section. The zero-point energy of this system is evaluated by the mode summation method, using the ellipticity as a perturbation parameter. Mathieu function techniques are applied.

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory/National Synchrotron Light Source Subject: Devalving of compressed gas cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    gas cylinders Number: LS-ESH-0052 Revision: 2 Effective: 08/05/2008 Page 1 of 1 Prepared By: Keith, retighten the valve, immediately stop the process, and contact NSLS ESH staff to investigate. The only official copy of this file is the one on-line in the NSLS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify

  3. Flow past a rectangular cylinder in a stratified fluid Harish Dixit, A Sameen 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixit, Harish

    ); Zdravkovich (1996); Matsumoto (1999). When the Reynolds number, Re exceeds a critical value, a Karman vortex street associated with a periodic shedding appears. Traditionally, studies on bluff body wakes have been the Strouhal numbers for vortex shedding behind rectangular cylinders. Davis et al. (1984) carried out

  4. Near wake of a circular cylinder submitted to blowing II Impact on the dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathelin, Lionel

    and recirculating ¯ows. Von Karman [2] focused on the vortex street that forms downstream of the cylinder. He found review of these recently discovered three-dimen- sional phenomena. In addition to the von Karman vortex. The blowing impact on the Strouhal number exhibits a linear decrease of the vortex shedding frequency

  5. Near wake models for the hydrodynamics forces on a cylinder in periodic flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sibetheros, I.A.; Medeiros, E.F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Miksad, R.W. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between hydrodynamic forces and the reversing near wake flow field around a cylinder in oscillatory farfield flow was experimentally investigated. A computer controlled pressurized water tunnel was employed to generate a planar harmonic flow past a stationary cylinder of Keulegan-Carpenter numbers (KC) in the inertia-drag flow regime and at subcritical Reynolds numbers (Re). Streamwise (u-) and cross-stream (v-) velocities near the cylinder and u-velocities at the far flow field were measured using a three-component LDV system. Inline and lift forces on the cylinder were measured using a very sensitive six-component load cell. A modal phase averaging technique was applied to the velocity data to estimate averaged velocity cycles that distinguish between positive and negative flow modes. A positive (negative) flow mode signifies dominant vortex shedding and motion occurring from the top (bottom) of the cylinder, respectively. The force measurements were likewise phase averaged into positive and negative mode force cycles. u- and v-velocity profiles for KC = 10, 15, and 20, based on modal phase averages of velocity measurements, were used to estimate averaged wake u- and v-velocities. These wake velocities were used in the place of the undisturbed farfield u-velocity as inputs to Morison`s equation for the inline force, and to the quasi-steady model for the lift force. It was found that, for KC = 15 a significant improvement in the prediction of lift force was achieved using the wake-based lift force model, whereas a smaller improvement in the inline force prediction was obtained from the wake-based Morison`s equation.

  6. Counts-in-Cylinders in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with Comparisons to N-Body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrier, Heather D.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; /UC, Irvine; Berrier, Joel C.; /Arkansas U.; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /Pittsburgh U.; Wechsler, Risa H. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental statistics provide a necessary means of comparing the properties of galaxies in different environments and a vital test of models of galaxy formation within the prevailing, hierarchical cosmological model. We explore counts-in-cylinders, a common statistic defined as the number of companions of a particular galaxy found within a given projected radius and redshift interval. Galaxy distributions with the same two-point correlation functions do not necessarily have the same companion count distributions. We use this statistic to examine the environments of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 4. We also make preliminary comparisons to four models for the spatial distributions of galaxies, based on N-body simulations, and data from SDSS DR4 to study the utility of the counts-in-cylinders statistic. There is a very large scatter between the number of companions a galaxy has and the mass of its parent dark matter halo and the halo occupation, limiting the utility of this statistic for certain kinds of environmental studies. We also show that prevalent, empirical models of galaxy clustering that match observed two- and three-point clustering statistics well fail to reproduce some aspects of the observed distribution of counts-in-cylinders on 1, 3 and 6-h{sup -1}Mpc scales. All models that we explore underpredict the fraction of galaxies with few or no companions in 3 and 6-h{sup -1} Mpc cylinders. Roughly 7% of galaxies in the real universe are significantly more isolated within a 6 h{sup -1} Mpc cylinder than the galaxies in any of the models we use. Simple, phenomenological models that map galaxies to dark matter halos fail to reproduce high-order clustering statistics in low-density environments.

  7. Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham Gal

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments at GSI are reconsidered, with special emphasis placed on the quasi-circular motion of the daughter ions in two-body decays. Whereas parent-ion decay rates cannot exhibit modulation with the several-second period reported in these experiments, the time evolution of the detected daughter ions is shown to produce oscillations that under certain conditions may provide resolution of the `GSI Oscillations' puzzle. New dedicated storage-ring or trap experiments could look up for these oscillations.

  8. Prediction of external corrosion for steel cylinders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: Application of an empirical method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, B.F.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1995, ultrasonic wall thickness data were collected for 100 steel cylinders containing depleted uranium (DU) hexafluoride located at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The cylinders were selected for measurement to assess the condition of the more vulnerable portion of the cylinder inventory at PGDP. The purpose of this report is to apply the method used in Lyon to estimate the effects of corrosion for larger unsampled populations as a function of time. The scope of this report is limited and is not intended to represent the final analyses of available data. Future efforts will include continuing analyses of available data to investigate defensible deviations from the conservative assumptions made to date. For each cylinder population considered, two basic types of analyses were conducted: (1) estimates were made of the number of cylinders as a function of time that will have a minimum wall thickness of either 0 mils (1 mil = 0.00 1 in.) or 250 mils and (2) the current minimum wall thickness distributions across cylinders were estimated for each cylinder population considered. Additional analyses were also performed investigating comparisons of the results for F and G yards with the results presented in Lyon (1995).

  9. Corrosion monitoring in the UF{sub 6} cylinder yards at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site: FY 1994 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, M. [Midwest Technical Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Adamski, R.; Broders, J.; Ellis, A.; Freels, D.; Kelley, D.; Phillips, B. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at the U.S. Department of Energy`s K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been stored in large steel cylinders that have undergone significant atmospheric corrosion damage over the last 35 years. A detailed experimental program to characterize the corrosion damage was initiated in 1992. Large amounts of corrosion scale and deep pits are found to cover UF{sub 6} cylinder surfaces. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurements have shown uniform corrosion losses up to 20 mils (0.5 mm) and pits up to 100 mils (2.5 mm) deep. Electrical resistance corrosion probes, TOW sensors, and thermocouples have been attached to cylinder bodies. Atmospheric conditions are monitored using rain gauges, relative humidity sensors, and thermocouples. Long-term (16-year) data are being obtained from mild steel corrosion coupons on test racks as well as attached directly to cylinder surfaces. Corrosion rates have been found to be intimately related to the times-of-wetness, both tending to be higher on cylinder tops due to apparent sheltering effects. Data from the various tests are compared, discrepancies are discussed, and a pattern of cylinder corrosion as a function of cylinder position and location is described.

  10. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 1981, analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include estimates of both the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, an in-depth study evaluated thermal storage concepts for water/steam, organic fluid, and gas/Brayton solar thermal receivers. Promising and nonpromising concepts were identified. A study to evaluate thermal storage concepts for a liquid metal receiver was initiated. The value of thermal storage in a solar thermal industrial process heat application was analyzed. Several advanced concepts are being studied, including ground-mounted thermal storage for parabolic dishes with Stirling engines.

  11. Entanglement Storage Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Caneva; T. Calarco; S. Montangero

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a protocol based on optimal control to drive many body quantum systems into long-lived entangled states, protected from decoherence by big energy gaps, without requiring any apriori knowledge of the system. With this approach it is possible to implement scalable entanglement-storage units. We test the protocol in the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model, a prototype many-body quantum system that describes different experimental setups, and in the ordered Ising chain, a model representing a possible implementation of a quantum bus.

  12. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  13. Interim storage study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlins, J.K.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

  14. Multiported storage devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grande, Marcus Bryan

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of niultiported storage device 3 Linux file I/O subsystem 4 Windows NT layered I/O driver model 10 15 5 Location of multiported module in I/O stack 17 6 The bulfer cache . . . 20 7 Queuing of I/O requests 8 Processing of I/O requests by smart blkfiltcr 9... Registering of filter applet via Linux stacked module mechanism . 21 22 . . 26 10 Table of registered filter applets (functions) . . 27 11 Overhead due to presence of smart blkfilter alone . 12 Overhead of smart blkfilter using rot13 filter port 31 33...

  15. Storage | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPower 2010 1 TNews & Solar Solar How much doStorage

  16. Warehouse and Storage Buildings

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0 0349,980Warehouse and Storage

  17. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Weekly DownloadRegionalStorage Ring

  18. Sandia Energy - Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergy Council ExecutivegeochemStorage

  19. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354 217,814 218,494Storage Ring

  20. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354 217,814 218,494Storage

  1. NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1AllocationsNOVA Portal: Submit2014ftp ftp Storage Trends

  2. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  3. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  4. Underground caverns for hydrocarbon storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barron, T.F. [Exeter Energy Services, Houston, TX (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Large, international gas processing projects and growing LPG imports in developing countries are driving the need to store large quantities of hydrocarbon liquids. Even though underground storage is common in the US, many people outside the domestic industry are not familiar with the technology and the benefits underground storage can offer. The latter include lower construction and operating costs than surface storage, added safety, security and greater environmental acceptance.

  5. Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations Reveal Ion Dynamics in Polymer Electrolyte On November 13, 2012, in Energy Storage, News, News & Events Improving battery electrolytes is highly desirable, particularly...

  7. Holographic Storage of Biphoton Entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han-Ning Dai; Han Zhang; Sheng-Jun Yang; Tian-Ming Zhao; Jun Rui; You-Jin Deng; Li Li; Nai-Le Liu; Shuai Chen; Xiao-Hui Bao; Xian-Min Jin; Bo Zhao; Jian-Wei Pan

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent and reversible storage of multi-photon entanglement with a multimode quantum memory is essential for scalable all-optical quantum information processing. Although single photon has been successfully stored in different quantum systems, storage of multi-photon entanglement remains challenging because of the critical requirement for coherent control of photonic entanglement source, multimode quantum memory, and quantum interface between them. Here we demonstrate a coherent and reversible storage of biphoton Bell-type entanglement with a holographic multimode atomic-ensemble-based quantum memory. The retrieved biphoton entanglement violates Bell's inequality for 1 microsecond storage time and a memory-process fidelity of 98% is demonstrated by quantum state tomography.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Carbon Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from improved climate models to performance models for underground waste storage to 3D printing and digital rock physics. Marianne Walck (Director ... Joint SandiaUniversity of...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from improved climate models to performance models for underground waste storage to 3D printing and digital rock physics. Marianne Walck (Director ... Recent Sandia Secure,...

  10. Underground Storage Tanks (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule governs the construction, installation, upgrading, use, maintenance, testing, and closure of underground storage tanks, including certification requirements for individuals who install,...

  11. The Petascale Data Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, Garth [Carnegie Mellon University; Long, Darrell [The Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz; Honeyman, Peter [University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; Grider, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kramer, William [National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center; Shalf, John [National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center; Roth, Philip [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Felix, Evan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Ward, Lee [Sandia National Laboratory

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petascale computing infrastructures for scientific discovery make petascale demands on information storage capacity, performance, concurrency, reliability, availability, and manageability. The Petascale Data Storage Institute focuses on the data storage problems found in petascale scientific computing environments, with special attention to community issues such as interoperability, community buy-in, and shared tools. The Petascale Data Storage Institute is a collaboration between researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Michigan, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.

  12. CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon...

  13. Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter constitutes rules for all underground storage tank facilities- including registration, reporting, permitting, certification, financial responsibility and to protect human health and...

  14. Underground Storage Tank Program (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules are intended to protect public health and the environment by establishing standards for the design, installation, operation, maintenance, monitoring, and closure of underground storage...

  15. (front end fuel cycle) 2.1 (CANDU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    , , Phosphorus . 2.2. (U3O8) . U235 . UO2 ( ) UF6 ( ) . 2235 U235 UF6 . 2.2.2. UF6 UO2 UF6 UO2 UF4 UF4 UF6 . (1) : (4) : UF4 UF6 . UF4 1600 500 . UF4 UF4 UO2 . UF6 , , 150

  16. Flywheel energy storage workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J. [comps.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

  17. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to th

  18. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage William Tumas proprietary or confidential information #12;2 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Overview Project Start Date: FY Barriers Addressed #12;3 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center National

  19. Bike Storage on McMaster University BIKE STORAGE ON CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Bike Storage on Campus McMaster University BIKE STORAGE ON CAMPUS Secure Bike Storage on Campus Located on the west side of Chester New Hall, the Secure Bike Storage facility features video surveillance

  20. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy produced by the solar collectors A. t::.T/2. )- (lAwith heat pumps and solar collectors Vertical cylinderA trickle type of solar collector heats the water in the

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) Evaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems,...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE Energy Storage Systems program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Energy Storage Systems program 2013 Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety,...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: NM Renewable Energy Storage Task...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Storage Task Force New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security,...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: incentivize renewable-energy storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incentivize renewable-energy storage infrastructure development New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage...

  5. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trates a design load profile for a partial storage system.load management / full storage / ice storage / partialfor partial storage) because part of the cooling load is

  6. Spin 1/2 Particle on a Cylinder with Radial Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Chryssomalakos; A. Franco; A. Reyes-Coronado

    2003-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the motion of a charged quantum particle, constrained on the surface of a cylinder, in the presence of a radial magnetic field. When the spin of the particle is neglected, the system essentially reduces to an infinite family of simple harmonic oscillators, equally spaced along the axis of the cylinder. Interestingly enough, it can be used as a quantum Fourier transformer, with convenient visual output. When the spin 1/2 of the particle is taken into account, a non-conventional perturbative analysis results in a recursive closed form for the corrections to the energy and the wavefunction, for all eigenstates, to all orders in the magnetic moment of the particle. A simple two-state system is also presented, the time evolution of which involves an approximate precession of the spin perpendicularly to the magnetic field. A number of plots highlight the findings while several three-dimensional animations have been made available on the web.

  7. Second-order diffraction forces on an array of vertical cylinders in bichromatic bidirectional waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez, J.H. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Williams, A.N. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete second-order solution is presented for the hydrodynamic forces due to the action of bichromatic, bidirectional waves on an array of bottom-mounted, surface-piercing cylinders of arbitrary cross section in water of uniform finite depth. Based on the constant structural cross section, the first-order problem is solved utilizing a two-dimensional Green function approach, while an assisting radiation potential approach is used to obtain the hydrodynamic loads due to the second-order potential. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of wave directionality on the second-order sum and difference frequency hydrodynamic forces on a two-cylinder array. It is found that wave directionality may have a significant influence on the second-order hydrodynamic forces on these arrays and that the assumption of unidirectional waves does not always lead to conservative estimates of the second-order loading.

  8. Homogenous charge compression ignition engine having a cylinder including a high compression space

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agama, Jorge R.; Fiveland, Scott B.; Maloney, Ronald P.; Faletti, James J.; Clarke, John M.

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to the field of homogeneous charge compression engines. In these engines, fuel is injected upstream or directly into the cylinder when the power piston is relatively close to its bottom dead center position. The fuel mixes with air in the cylinder as the power piston advances to create a relatively lean homogeneous mixture that preferably ignites when the power piston is relatively close to the top dead center position. However, if the ignition event occurs either earlier or later than desired, lowered performance, engine misfire, or even engine damage, can result. Thus, the present invention divides the homogeneous charge between a controlled volume higher compression space and a lower compression space to better control the start of ignition.

  9. Portable load-cell based system for weighing UF/sub 6/ cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fainberg, A.; Gordon, D.; Dermendjiev, E.; Terrey, D.; Mitchell, R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A load-cell-based portable weighing system which is capable of verifying the weights of 2.2 tonne 30-inch UF/sub 6/ cylinders has been developed by the US National Bureau of Standards (NBS). This system weighs about 13 kg and has an attainable accuracy of about 1 kg. After an initial calibration at NBS, the system is ready for use in the field. Approximately 5 to 10 minutes are needed for assembly, and, if an overhead crane has access to all cylinders to be weighed, from 10 to 15 weighings may be performed in one hour. During the past year the system has been tested at several facilities around the world with satisfactory results and with favorable comments from the facility operators. Results of several tests are presented in this paper.

  10. Spontaneous helicity of a polymer with side-loops confined to a cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Debasish

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by recent experiments on the spatial organization of bacterial chromosomes, we consider a type of "bottle brush" polymer consisting of a flexible backbone chain, to which flexible side loops are connected. We show that such a model with an open linear backbone spontaneously adopts a helical structure with a well-defined pitch when confined to small cylindrical volume. This helicity persists over a range of sizes and aspect-ratios of the cylinder, provided the packing fraction of the chain is suitably large. We analyze this results in terms of the interplay between the effective stiffness and actual intra-chain packing effects caused by the side-loops in response to the confinement. For the case of a circular backbone, mimicking e.g. the E. coli chromosome, the polymer adopts a linearized configuration of two parallel helices connected at the cylinder poles.

  11. Dynamics of a horizontal cylinder oscillating as a wave energy converter about an off-centred axis. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Jorge

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrodynamic properties of a horizontal cylinder which is free to pitch about an off-centred axis are studied and used to derive the equations of motion of a wave energy converter which extracts energy from incoming ...

  12. Compressive Sensing Based Machine Learning Strategy For Characterizing The Flow Around A Cylinder With Limited Pressure Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bright, Ido; Lin, Guang; Kutz, Nathan

    2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Compressive sensing is used to determine the flow characteristics around a cylinder (Reynolds number and pressure/flow field) from a sparse number of pressure measurements on the cylinder. Using a supervised machine learning strategy, library elements encoding the dimensionally reduced dynamics are computed for various Reynolds numbers. Convex L1 optimization is then used with a limited number of pressure measurements on the cylinder to reconstruct, or decode, the full pressure field and the resulting flow field around the cylinder. Aside from the highly turbulent regime (large Reynolds number) where only the Reynolds number can be identified, accurate reconstruction of the pressure field and Reynolds number is achieved. The proposed data-driven strategy thus achieves encoding of the fluid dynamics using the L2 norm, and robust decoding (flow field reconstruction) using the sparsity promoting L1 norm.

  13. Emission Reduction and Assisted Combustion Strategies for Compression Ignition Engines with Subsequent Testing on a Single-Cylinder Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragone, Colter

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    temperatures, while decreasing brake specific PM due to increased turbulence. Resulting performance calculations displayed a slight increase in fuel consumption. Chapter three analyzes the effects of ozone-assisted combustion on a single cylinder diesel engine...

  14. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  15. COLD STORAGE DESIGN REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 1 \\ "..\\- ,,, T I Fishery Leaflet 427 Washington 25, D. C. June 1956 REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART em; COlD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT By Charles Butler (Section 1), Joseph W. Slavin (Sections 1, 2, and 3), Max Patashnik

  16. Catalytically Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the Freedom CAR hydrogen storage system targets (Key parameters: cost, specific energy, and energy density). #12;Objectives I. Determination of the chemical nature of the titanium species responsible that are compatible with the Freedom CAR hydrogen storage system targets. Key parameters: cost, specific energy

  17. MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Materials shall be stored in a manner that allows easy identification and access to labels, identification entering storage areas. All persons shall be in a safe position while materials are being loadedEM 385-1-1 XX Jun 13 14-1 SECTION 14 MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL 14.A MATERIAL

  18. PBX 9404 detonation copper cylinder tests: a comparison of new and aged material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mier, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Briggs, Matthew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present detonation copper cylinder test results on aged PBX 9404 (94 wt% HMX, 3 wt% CEF, 2.9 wt% NC, 0.1 wt% DPA) explosive. The charges were newly pressed from 37.5 year-old molding powder. We compare these results to equivalent data performed on the same lot when it was 3.5 years old. Comparison of the detonation energy inferred from detonation speed to that inferred from wall motion suggests that the HMX energy is unchanged but the NC energy has decreased to {approx}25% of its original value. The degradation of explosives and their binders is a subject of continual interest. Secondary explosives such as HMX are sufficiently stable near room temperature that they do not measurably degrade over a period of at least several decades. For formulated systems the bigger concern is binder degradation, for which the three main issues are strength, initiation safety, and (if the binder is energetic) energy content. In this paper we examine the detonation energy of new and aged PBX 9404 (94 wt% HMX, 3 wt% tris-{beta} chloroethylphosphate (CEF), 2.9 wt% nitrocellulose (NC), 0.1 wt% diphenylamine (DPA) [1, 2]), measured via the detonation copper cylinder test. In 1959, two independent PBX 9404 accidents [3] raised serious concerns about the safety of the formulation. Over about a decade's time, Los Alamos pursued a safer, energetically equivalent replacement, which ultimately became PBX 9501. In order to accurately compare the performance of the PBX 9404 and PBX 9501 formulations, W. Campbell and R. Engelke (C & E) developed a stringent cylinder test protocol that they called the Los Alamos Precision Cylinder Test [4]. The present aging study is possible because excellent PBX 9404 data from those qualification tests endures.

  19. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  20. Superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  1. March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure Chapter 12 #12;March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 2 Objectives Describe the physical structure of secondary and tertiary storage of mass-storage devices Discuss operating-system services provided for mass storage, including RAID

  2. Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage Jun Li, Baochun--Distributed storage systems store redundant data to tolerate failures of storage nodes and lost data should be repaired when storage nodes fail. A class of MDS codes, called minimum- storage regenerating (MSR) codes

  3. March 24, 2008 ADBS: Storage 1 Disk Storage, Basic File Structures, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 24, 2008 ADBS: Storage 1 Disk Storage, Basic File Structures, and Hashing. #12;March 24, 2008 ADBS: Storage 2 Chapter Outline The Storage Hierarchy How Far is Your Data Disk Storage Devices Records Blocking Files of Records Unordered Files Ordered Files Hashed Files RAID Technology Storage Area Network

  4. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R. J.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY80 analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include both estimates of the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, promising thermal storage concepts are being identified. A preliminary screening was completed in FY80 and a more in-depth study was initiated. Value studies are being conducted to establish cost goals. A ranking of storage concepts based on value in solar thermal electric plants was conducted for both diurnal and long duration applications. Ground mounted thermal storage concepts for a parabolic dish/Stirling systtem are also being evaluated.

  5. Operation of a Four-Cylinder 1.9L Propane Fueled HCCI Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Smith, J R; Au, M; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A four-cylinder 1.9 Volkswagen TDI Engine has been converted to run in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mode. The stock configuration is a turbocharged direct injection Diesel engine. The combustion chamber has been modified by discarding the in-cylinder Diesel fuel injectors and replacing them with blank inserts (which contain pressure transducers). The stock pistons contain a reentrant bowl and have been retained for the tests reported here. The intake and exhaust manifolds have also been retained, but the turbocharger has been removed. A heater has been installed upstream of the intake manifold and fuel is added just downstream of this heater. The performance of this engine in naturally aspirated HCCI operation, subject to variable intake temperature and fuel flow rate, has been studied. The engine has been run with propane fuel at a constant speed of 1800 rpm. This work is intended to characterize the HCCI operation of the engine in this configuration that has been minimally modified from the base Diesel engine. The performance (BMEP, IMEP, efficiency, etc) and emissions (THC, CO, NOx) of the engine are presented, as are combustion process results based on heat release analysis of the pressure traces from each cylinder.

  6. Centrifugal instability of Stokes layers in crossflow: the case of a forced cylinder wake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan D'Adamo; Ramiro Godoy-Diana; José Eduardo Wesfreid

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The wake flow around a circular cylinder at $Re\\approx100$ performing rotatory oscillations has been thoroughly discussed in the literature, mostly focusing on the modifications to the natural B\\'enard-von K\\'arm\\'an vortex street that result from the forced shedding modes locked to the rotatory oscillation frequency. The usual experimental and theoretical frameworks at these Reynolds numbers are quasi-two-dimensional, since the secondary instabilities bringing a three-dimensional structure to the cylinder wake flow occur only at higher Reynolds numbers. In the present paper we show that a three-dimensional structure can appear below the usual three-dimensionalization threshold, when forcing with frequencies lower than the natural vortex shedding frequency, at high amplitudes, as a result of a previously unreported mechanism: a pulsed centrifugal instability of the oscillating Stokes layer at the wall of the cylinder. The present numerical investigation lets us in this way propose a physical explanation for the turbulence-like features reported in the recent experimental study of D'Adamo et al. (2011).

  7. Determination of the theoretical feasibility for the transmutation of europium isotopes from high flux isotope reactor control cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, K.R.; Reich, W.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a 100 MWth light-water research reactor designed and built in the 1960s primarily for the production of transuranic isotopes. The HFIR is equipped with two concentric cylindrical blade assemblies, known as control cylinders, that are used to control reactor power. These control cylinders, which become highly radioactive from neutron exposure, are periodically replaced as part of the normal operation of the reactor. The highly radioactive region of the control cylinders is composed of europium oxide in an aluminum matrix. The spent HFIR control cylinders have historically been emplaced in the ORNL Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The control cylinders pose a potential radiological hazard due to the long lived radiotoxic europium isotopes {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 155}Eu. In a 1991 health evaluation of WAG 6 (ERD 1991) it was shown that these cylinders were a major component of the total radioactivity in WAG 6 and posed a potential exposure hazard to the public in some of the postulated assessment scenarios. These health evaluations, though preliminary and conservative in nature, illustrate the incentive to investigate methods for permanent destruction of the europium radionuclides. When the cost of removing the control cylinders from WAG 6, performing chemical separations and irradiating the material in HFIR are factored in, the option of leaving the control cylinders in place for decay must be considered. Other options, such as construction of an engineered barrier around the disposal silos to reduce the chance of migration, should also be analyzed.

  8. Determination of performance characteristics of a one-cylinder diesel engine modified to burn low-Btu (lignite) gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blacksmith, James Richard

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF A ONE-CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE MODIFIED TO BURN LOW-BTU (LIGNITE) GAS A Thesis JAMES RICHARD BLACKSMITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A86YI University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DETERMINATION OF PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF A ONE-CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE MODIFIED TO BURN LOW-BTU (LIGNITE) GAS A Thesis by JAMES RICHARD BLACKSMITH...

  9. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid-fluid heat storage systems in the ground; extractions0 Thermal storage of cold water in ground water aquifers forA. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-gravel ground:

  10. On Storage Rings for Short Wavelength FELs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a hypothetical 144 m long storage ring optimized for FELin the Proceedings On Storage Rings for Short WavelengthLBL-28483 ESG Note-92 ON STORAGE RINGS FOR SHORT WAVELENGTH

  11. Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on MicrogridEPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage for Transmission andLong- vs. Short-Term Energy Storage Technologies Analysis, A

  12. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak RidgeAquifers for Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of

  13. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in floor tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper,D. R. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling,A simple model of thermal energy storage is developed as a

  14. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy generation and battery storage via the use ofenergy generation and battery storage via the use of nanos-and storage (e.g lithium-ion rechargeable battery)

  15. NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Shahab D. Mohaghegh Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Keywords: Gas Storage, Natural Gas, Storage, Deliverability, Inventory

  16. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    must be if mal energy storage technologies as means for con-Robert Thorne. Energy Storage is more technology-orientedEnergy with Heat Storage Wells," Environmental Science and Technology,

  17. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersB. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

  18. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into gaseous uranium fluoride (UF6); enrichment; fuel rodU-235 Concentration in UF6 Losses (conversion, fuelgaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF6) can be liquefied at lower

  19. Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), power electronics, and control systems, visit the Energy Storage page. Fact Sheet: Energy...

  20. DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report: Revision 2 DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee Report: Revision 2 Energy storage plays a vital role in all forms of business and affects the...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: energy storage resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Outages With New 'Smart Grid' System On June 20, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: energy storage requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accomplishments On March 3, 2015, in Capabilities, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  3. JCESR | Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    want. More Sandia: High Density Storage JCESR Partner Sandia discusses high density energy storage for electric vehicles and the grid More JCESR and NASA team up JCESR and...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal energy storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Address Flooding, Water, and Power Systems On June 11, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Infrastructure Security, Microgrid,...

  6. Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) On November 7, 2012, Clean...

  7. Carbon Storage Atlas, Employee Newsletter Earn International...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV and FE's internal employee newsletter, inTouch, earned 2013 National Association of Government Communicators awards. NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV...

  8. Panel 3, Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage DOE-Industry Canada Workshop May 15, 2014 INTRODUCTION HYDROGEN ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR ENERGY STORAGE AND CLEAN FUEL PRODUCTION ITM POWER INC. ITM...

  9. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

  10. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Poster Session Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3: Poster Session The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking...

  11. Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 A workshop on compressed and liquefied hydrogen storage was a...

  12. Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and Pre-Cooling Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and Pre-Cooling This presentation by Aaron...

  13. Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center of Excellence Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of...

  14. BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials EA-1321: Final Environmental Assessment...

  15. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Requirements (Text Version) Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements,"...

  16. Underground Storage Tank Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New underground storage tank construction standards must include at least the following requirements: (1) That an underground storage tank will prevent releases of regulated substances stored...

  17. Georgia Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Underground Storage Act (GUST) provides a comprehensive program to prevent, detect, and correct releases from underground storage tanks (“USTs”) of “regulated substances” other than...

  18. Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution A Public Meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review, Hosted by the...

  19. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

  20. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

  1. Storage containers for radioactive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

    1980-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

  2. Drying Rough Rice in Storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. Jr.; Crane, L. E.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drying. Rough Rice in Storage Ih AGRf""' TURP YPERIMENT STAT10 I. TEXAS SUMMARY Research was conducted at the Rice-Pasture Experiment Station near Beaumont during 7 crop years (1952-53 through 1958-59) to determine the engineering problems... and the practicability of dry- ing rough rice in storage in Texas. Drying rice in storage means drying rice in the same bin in which it is to be stored. Rough rice, with initial moisture contents of 15.0 to 23.0 percent, was dried at depths of 4 to 10 feet...

  3. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Bloking, Jason T; Andersson, Anna M

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries.

  4. Recombinant electric storage battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flicker, R.P.; Fenstermacher, S.

    1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a recombinant storage battery. It comprises: a plurality of positive plates containing about 2 to 4 percent of antimony based upon the total weight of the alloy and positive active material, and essentially antimony free negative plates in a closed case; a fibrous sheet plate separator between adjacent ones of the plates, and a body of an electrolyte to which the sheet separators are inert absorbed by each of the separators and maintained in contact with each of the adjacent ones of the plates. Each of the separator sheets comprising first fibers which impart to the sheet a given absorbency greater than 90 percent relative to the electrolyte and second fibers which impart to the sheet a different absorbency less than 80 percent relative to the electrolyte. The first and second fibers being present in such proportions that each of the sheet separators has an absorbency with respect to the electrolyte of from 75 to 95 percent and the second fibers being present in such proportions that the battery has a recombination rate adequate to compensate for gassing.

  5. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric storage, energy efficiency, heat storage, micro-generation systems, photovoltaic, software, solar thermal

  6. Production, Storage, and FC Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Production, Storage, and FC Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  7. A Successful Cool Storage Rate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's ...

  8. Forecourt Storage and Compression Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pressure, capacity ­ Compressor output, power, electric demand ­ Station and dispenser load profiles Pro > Station demand profiles > Operational analysis results ­ Compressor-storage relationships ­ Vehicle fueling times ­ Temperature effects > Cost profiles > Considerations for 70 MPa > Next steps #12

  9. CFES RESEARCH THRUSTS: Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lü, James Jian-Qiang

    CFES RESEARCH THRUSTS: Energy Storage Wind Energy Solar Energy Smart Grids Smart Buildings For our with the student to finalize the project plan. To sponsor an Energy Scholar, a company agrees to: · Assign

  10. A Successful Cool Storage Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air...

  11. Device-transparent personal storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Jacob A. (Jacob Alo), 1979-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Users increasingly store data collections such as digital photographs on multiple personal devices, each of which typically presents the user with a storage management interface isolated from the contents of all other ...

  12. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  13. The Storage of Shelled Pecans.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brison, Fred R. (Fred Robert)

    1945-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AGRIC - KPERIA .. -. STATIC t,4L EI rlENT ! C. H. MCUOSELL, Act~ng mrector Collegz Station. Texas 'LLETIN NO. 667 MARCH, THE STORAGE OF SHELLED PEC-4NS FRED R. BRISON Division of Horticulture . AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TE... Gibb Gilchrist, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Shelled pecans may change in flavor, texture, and color, while in storage. They may also change as a result of insect or disease damage. Kernels change in flavor by becoming progressively...

  14. Lih thermal energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

  15. FAFCO Ice Storage test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. FAFCO provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The FAFCO ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank fully, storing from 150 to 200 ton-h. However, the charging rate showed significant variations during the latter portion of the charge cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate and tank state of charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend on both charge and discharge conditions. This report describes FAFCO system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. While the test results reported here are accurate for the prototype 1990 FAFCO Model 200, currently available FAFCO models incorporate significant design enhancements beyond the Model 200. At least one major modification was instituted as a direct result of the ISTF tests. Such design improvements were one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

  16. The High Performance Storage System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyne, R.A.; Hulen, H. [IBM Federal Systems Co., Houston, TX (United States); Watson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Storage Laboratory (NSL) was organized to develop, demonstrate and commercialize technology for the storage system that will be the future repositories for our national information assets. Within the NSL four Department of Energy laboratories and IBM Federal System Company have pooled their resources to develop an entirely new High Performance Storage System (HPSS). The HPSS project concentrates on scalable parallel storage system for highly parallel computers as well as traditional supercomputers and workstation clusters. Concentrating on meeting the high end of storage system and data management requirements, HPSS is designed using network-connected storage devices to transfer data at rates of 100 million bytes per second and beyond. The resulting products will be portable to many vendor`s platforms. The three year project is targeted to be complete in 1995. This paper provides an overview of the requirements, design issues, and architecture of HPSS, as well as a description of the distributed, multi-organization industry and national laboratory HPSS project.

  17. Prompt neutron decay for very loosely coupled delayed critical 38.1-cm-diam uranium (93.2) metal cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihalczo, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A delayed critical very loosely coupled configuration of coaxial right circular 38.1-cm-diam, {approximately}7.62-cm-thick uranium (93.15 wt% {sup 235}U) metal cylinders was assembled in 1965 at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility to study interaction effects for unmoderated and unreflected uranium metal and described in 1996. Each of the two interacting cylinders was carefully adjusted by inverse kinetics rod drop (IKRD) measurements to have the same subcritical reactivity ({approximately} 85{cents}). For these reactivity determinations, each cylinder was alternately and separately assembled to delayed criticality with a small piece of polyethylene reflector present on the top surface. The system was raised to the appropriate power level by the use of a small additional reflector worth {approximately}10{cents} until delayed neutron precursors reached equilibrium. All reflectors were rapidly removed, and the subcriticality was obtained by IKRD interpretational algorithms. Several adjustments of the mass and configuration of each cylinder were required until the configuration of each cylinder had a subcritical reactivity of 85 {cents}. These adjustments were made by small variations in the mass of each of the cylinders so that the mass of the upper cylinder was 163.1 kg and that of the lower cylinder was 162.8 kg. Once each individual cylinder reactivity was adjusted to 85 {cents} subcritical, the distance between the flat surfaces of each of the two cylinders was adjusted to achieve delayed criticality. The delayed critical spacing between cylinders was 1.3 m. At this spacing for delayed criticality, the coupling reactivity exactly compensates for the subcriticality of the individual cylinders. Thus, the coupling reactivity is 85 {cents}, and using a delayed neutron fraction of 0.0066, the coupling reactivity in k units is 0.0056. This paper describes the prompt neutron decay constant measurements for this assembly.

  18. Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

  19. Presented by Robust Storage Management in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan

    , intermediate checkpoint storage or a staging ground ­ Job's own allocated nodes can contribute storage spacePresented by Robust Storage Management in the Machine Room and Beyond Sudharshan Vazhkudai Computer Problem space: HPC storage crisis · Data checkpointing, staging, and offloading are all affected by data

  20. Bulk Storage Program Compliance Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Bulk Storage Program Compliance Written Program Cornell University 5/8/2013 #12;Bulk Storage.......................................................... 5 4.2.2 Aboveground Petroleum Storage Tanks­ University activities/operations designed to prevent releases of oil from Aboveground Petroleum Storage Tanks (ASTs) required to comply with following