National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ue cips cilco

  1. UES (Electric)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    UniSource Energy Services (UES) offers rebates to its residential customers who have certain energy efficient equipment installed by participating contractors. The rebate is provided directly to...

  2. CIPS Validation Data Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam Dinh

    2012-03-01

    This report documents analysis, findings and recommendations resulted from a task 'CIPS Validation Data Plan (VDP)' formulated as an POR4 activity in the CASL VUQ Focus Area (FA), to develop a Validation Data Plan (VDP) for Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) challenge problem, and provide guidance for the CIPS VDP implementation. The main reason and motivation for this task to be carried at this time in the VUQ FA is to bring together (i) knowledge of modern view and capability in VUQ, (ii) knowledge of physical processes that govern the CIPS, and (iii) knowledge of codes, models, and data available, used, potentially accessible, and/or being developed in CASL for CIPS prediction, to devise a practical VDP that effectively supports the CASL's mission in CIPS applications.

  3. UES (Gas)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    UniSource Energy Services (UES) offers the Commercial Energy Solutions Program for non-residential gas customers to install energy efficient equipment. Incentives are provided for qualified...

  4. UES (Electric)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    UniSource Energy Services (UES) offers the Commercial Energy Solutions Program for non-residential electric customers to upgrade existing equipment with more energy efficient measures. Rebates are...

  5. CIP1 polypeptides and their uses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foreman, Pamela; Van Solingen, Pieter; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael

    2011-04-12

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  6. Recompletion Report for Well UE-10j

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Townsend

    2000-05-01

    Existing Well UE-10j was deepened and recompleted for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was originally drilled to a total depth of 725.4 meters in 1965 for use as a hydrologic test hole in the northern portion of Yucca Flat in Area 8 of the Nevada Test Site. The well is located up-gradient of the Yucca Flat underground test area and penetrates deep into the Paleozoic rocks that form the lower carbonate aquifer of the NTS and surrounding areas. The original 24.4-centimeter-diameter borehole was drilled to a depth of 725.4 meters and left uncompleted. Water-level measurements were made periodically by the U.S. Geological Survey, but access to the water table was lost between 1979 and 1981 due to hole sloughing. In 1993, the hole was opened to 44.5 centimeters and cased off to a depth of 670.0 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 796.4 meters. The depth to water in the open borehole was measured at 658.7 meters on March 18, 1993.

  7. The CIP Report, Vol.11, No. 2 (August 2012): Smart Grid Security |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The CIP Report, Vol.11, No. 2 (August 2012): Smart Grid Security The CIP Report, Vol.11, No. 2 (August 2012): Smart Grid Security The August 2012 issue of The CIP Report highlights the significance of and the challenges to securing the smart grid, with contributions from DOE's Hank Kenchington, Progress Energy, Schweitzer Engineering Laboratory, the Director of Global Supply Chain Security with the National Security Staff, and more. The CIP Report: Smart Grid Security

  8. August 2012 CIP Report Focuses on Smart Grid Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The August 2012 issue of The CIP Report from George Mason University's Center for Infrastructure Protection and Homeland Security highlights the significance and challenges to securing the smart grid. The report includes an overview of smart grid security by Deputy Assistant Secretary Hank Kenchington and the findings for reducing cyber risks from the Workshop on Securing the Smart Grid: Best Practices in Supply Chain Security, Integrity, and Resilience.

  9. Microsoft Word - CIP_CyberAssessmentGuide.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guide to CIP Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Executive Summary The North American Electric Reliability Corporation adopted Critical Infrastructure Protection standards in 2006. The standards establish the minimum requirements needed to ensure the security of electronic exchange of information needed to support the reliability and the bulk power system. Industry feedback at conferences and meetings indicate uncertainty about implementation of the standards. Sandia National Labs Center for Control

  10. "Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems." The CIP Report.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vol 7 No 8 | Department of Energy "Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems." The CIP Report. Vol 7 No 8 "Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems." The CIP Report. Vol 7 No 8 Featured in this month's issue of The CIP Report are Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. SCADA systems monitor and control the processes of many of our Nation's infrastructures. The security and safety of transportation, water, communications,

  11. Compensation of Beam Line Polarizing Effects at UE112 of BESSY II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahrdt, J.; Follath, R.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Scheer, M.

    2010-06-23

    Reflections in synchrotron radiation beam lines tend to change the state of polarization of the radiation. This effect is more pronounced for steep angle of incidence, i.e. at low photon energy (say below 100 eV) beam lines. The APPLE II undulator UE112 at BESSY has all four magnetic rows shiftable and thus generates any state of polarization. To provide any intended polarization state at the sample we perform polarization measurements based on simple and fast linear polarization analysis that together with calculations of the undulator radiation predicts undulator settings that cancel beam line polarization effects.

  12. Functional Heterologous Expression of an Engineered Full Length CipA from Clostridium thermocellum in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, Devin; Herring, Christopher; Guss, Adam M; Olson, Daniel G.; Hogsett, David; Lynd, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cellulose is highly recalcitrant and thus requires a specialized suite of enzymes to solubilize it into fermentable sugars. In C. thermocellum, these extracellular enzymes are present as a highly active multi-component system known as the cellulosome. This study explores the expression of a critical C. thermocellum cellulosomal component in T. saccharolyticum as a step toward creating a thermophilic bacterium capable of consolidated bioprocessing by employing heterologously expressed cellulosomes. RESULTS: We developed an inducible promoter system based on the native T. saccharolyticum xynA promoter, which was shown to be induced by xylan and xylose. The promoter was used to express the cellulosomal component cipA*, an engineered form of the wild-type cipA from C. thermocellum. Expression and localization to the supernatant were both verified for CipA*. When a cipA mutant C. thermocellum strain was cultured with a CipA*-expressing T. saccharolyticum strain, hydrolysis and fermentation of 10 grams per liter SigmaCell 101, a highly crystalline cellulose, were observed. This trans-species complementation of a cipA deletion demonstrated the ability for CipA* to assemble a functional cellulosome. CONCLUSION: This study is the first example of an engineered thermophile heterologously expressing a structural component of a cellulosome. To achieve this goal we developed and tested an inducible promoter for controlled expression in T. saccharolyticum as well as a synthetic cipA. In addition, we demonstrate a high degree of hydrolysis (up to 93%) on microcrystalline cellulose.

  13. A COUPLED TH/NEUTRONICS/CRUD FRAMEWORK IN PREDICTION OF CIPS PHENOMENON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Jess Gehin; Brendan Kochunas

    2012-04-01

    A coupled TH/Neutronics/CRUD framework, which is able to simulate the CRUD deposits impact on CIPS phenomenon, was described in this paper. This framework includes the coupling among three essential physics, thermal-hydraulics, CRUD and neutronics. The overall framework was implemented by using the CFD software STAR-CCM+, developing CRUD codes, and using the neutronics code DeCART. The coupling was implemented by exchanging data between softwares using intermediate exchange files. A typical 3 by 3 PWR fuel pin problem was solved under this framework. The problem was solved in a 12 months length period of time. Time-dependent solutions were provided, including CRUD deposits inventory and their distributions on fuels, boron hideout amount inside CRUD deposits, as well as power shape changing over time. The results clearly showed the power shape suppression in regions where CRUD deposits exist, which is a strong indication of CIPS phenomenon.

  14. A coupled TH/Neutronics/CRUD framework in prediction of CIPS phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, L.; Zhang, H.; Gehin, J.; Kochunas, B.

    2012-07-01

    A coupled TH/Neutronics/CRUD framework, which is able to simulate the CRUD deposits impact on CIPS phenomenon, was described in this paper. The coupling among three essential physics, thermal-hydraulics, CRUD and neutronics described in the framework was implemented by using CFD software STAR-CCM+, developing CRUD module, and using the neutronics code DeCART. The coupling among these codes was implemented by exchanging data between them using intermediate exchange files. A typical 3 by 3 PWR fuel pin problem was solved under this framework and the results were presented. Time-dependent solutions were provided for a 12-month simulation, including CRUD deposits inventory and their distributions on fuel rods, boron hideout amount inside CRUD deposits, as well as power shape changing over time. The results clearly showed the power shape suppression in regions where CRUD deposits exist, which is a clear indication of CIPS phenomenon. (authors)

  15. Assessing your competitors' application of CIM/CIP. [Computer Integrated Manufacturing/Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, M.J. ); Evans, H.N. )

    1993-07-01

    As part of the authors consulting assignments, they are frequently asked to describe what is best industry practice in the area of computer integrated manufacturing/processing (CIM/CIP). This might be specific to a particular piece, such as advanced controls or a laboratory system. Often it is in response to the enormous publicity given to CIM/CIP--begging the question, Who in the hydrocarbon industry is actually doing it '' Although much of this information is available to consultants, client confidentiality precludes its release. Instead, included is a questionnaire intended to be completed by representatives of manufacturing sites. The data gathered will be analyzed and reported in a future issue. The intent is to give anyone who has completed the questionnaire the opportunity to assess the position of his or her site with respect to the competition. To show how this might work a prototype study was completed. This included an estimate of the advanced control benefits achieved in 68 refineries in Western Europe. So that sites could be compared, these were expressed as a percentage of the maximum economically achievable.

  16. CIP Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Outside the United States, cyber attacks into utilities followed by extortion demands have been used to disrupt power, in at least one case causing a power outage that affected ...

  17. Bulk and mechanical properties of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-4 and -5: Data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.J.; Noel, J.S.; Martin, R.J. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Experimental results are presented for bulk and mechanical properties measurements on specimens of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-4 and -5, at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Measurements have been performed on three thermal/mechanical units, PTn, TSwl, and TSw2. On each specimen the following bulk properties have been reported: dry bulk density, saturated bulk density, average grain density, and porosity. Unconfined compression to failure, confined compression to failure, and indirect tensile strength tests were performed on selected specimens recovered from the boreholes. In addition, compressional and shear wave velocities were measured on specimens designated for unconfined compression and confined compression experiments. Measurements were conducted at room temperature on nominally water-saturated specimens. The nominal rate for the fracture experiments was 10{sup -5}s{sup -1}.

  18. The anchorage function of CipA (CelL), a scaffolding protein of the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruus, K.; Wu, J.H.D.; Lua, A.C.

    1995-09-26

    Enzymatic cellulose degradation is a heterogeneous reaction requiring binding of soluble cellulase molecules to the solid substrate. Based on our studies of the cellulase complex of Clostridium thermocellum (the cellulosome), we have previously proposed that such binding can be brought about by a special {open_quotes}anchorage subunit.{close_quotes} In this {open_quotes}anchor-enzyme{close_quotes} model, CipA (a major subunit of the cellulosome) enhances the activity of CelS (the most abundant catalytic subunit of the cellulosome) by anchoring it to the cellulose surface. We have subsequently reported that CelS contains a conserved duplicated sequence at its C terminus and the CipA contains nine repeated sequences with a cellulose binding domain (CBD) in between the second and third repeats. In this work, we reexamined the anchor-enzyme mechanism by using recombinant CelS (rCelS) and various CipA domains, CBD, R3 (the repeat next to CBD), and CBD/R3, expressed in Escherichia coli. As analyzed by non-denaturing gel electrophoresis, rCelS, through its conserved duplicated sequence, formed a stable complex with R3 or CBD/R3 but not with CBD. Although R3 or CBD alone did not affect the binding of rCelS to cellulose, such binding was dependent on CBD/R3, indicating the anchorage role of CBD/R3. Such anchorage apparently increased the rCelS activity toward crystalline cellulose. These results substantiate the proposed anchor-enzyme model and the expected roles of individual CipA domains and the conserved duplicated sequence of CelS.

  19. A Neutronic Analysis of TRU Recycling in PWRs Loaded with MOX-UE Fuel (MOX with U-235 Enriched U Support)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Youinou; S. Bays

    2009-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study dealing with the homogeneous recycling of either Pu or Pu+Np or Pu+Np+Am or Pu+Np+Am+Cm in PWRs using MOX-UE fuel, i.e. standard MOX fuel with a U235 enriched uranium support instead of the standard tail uranium (0.25%) for standard MOX fuel. This approach allows to multirecycle Pu or TRU (Pu+MA) as long as U235 is available, by keeping the Pu or TRU content in the fuel constant and at a value ensuring a negative moderator void coefficient (i.e. the loss of the coolant brings imperatively the reactor to a subcritical state). Once this value is determined, the U235 enrichment of the MOX-UE fuel is adjusted in order to reach the target burnup (51 GWd/t in this study).

  20. Mineralogy of drill holes J-13, UE-25A No. 1, and USW G-1 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bish, D.L.; Chipera, S.J.

    1986-09-01

    The mineralogy of drill holes J-13, UE-25A No. 1, and USW G-1 was previously determined using qualitative and semiquantitative techniques, and most of the available data were neither complete nor accurate. New quantitative x-ray diffraction data were obtained for rocks from all three of these drill holes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These quantitative analyses employed both external and internal standard x-ray powder diffraction methods and permitted the precise determination of all phases commonly found in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain, including glass and opal-CT. These new data supplant previous analyses and include numerous additional phases. New findings of particular importance include better constraints on the distribution of the more soluble silica polymorphs, cristobalite and opal-CT. Opal-CT was associated solely with clinoptilolite-bearing horizons, and cristobalite disappearance coincided with the appearance of analcime in USW G-1. Unlike previous analyses, we identified significant amounts of smectite in drill hole J-13. We found no evidence to support previous reports of the occurrence of erionite or phillipsite in these drill holes.

  1. CASL L1 Milestone report : CASL.P4.01, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for CIPS with VIPRE-W and BOA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, Yixing; Adams, Brian M.; Secker, Jeffrey R.

    2011-12-01

    The CASL Level 1 Milestone CASL.P4.01, successfully completed in December 2011, aimed to 'conduct, using methodologies integrated into VERA, a detailed sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification of a crud-relevant problem with baseline VERA capabilities (ANC/VIPRE-W/BOA).' The VUQ focus area led this effort, in partnership with AMA, and with support from VRI. DAKOTA was coupled to existing VIPRE-W thermal-hydraulics and BOA crud/boron deposit simulations representing a pressurized water reactor (PWR) that previously experienced crud-induced power shift (CIPS). This work supports understanding of CIPS by exploring the sensitivity and uncertainty in BOA outputs with respect to uncertain operating and model parameters. This report summarizes work coupling the software tools, characterizing uncertainties, and analyzing the results of iterative sensitivity and uncertainty studies. These studies focused on sensitivity and uncertainty of CIPS indicators calculated by the current version of the BOA code used in the industry. Challenges with this kind of analysis are identified to inform follow-on research goals and VERA development targeting crud-related challenge problems.

  2. Bulk and mechanical properties of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-2, 2A, 2B, and 3: Data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.J.; Martin, R.J.; Noel, J.S. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    An integral part of the licensing procedure for the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, involves characterization of the in situ rheology for the design and construction of the facility and the emplacement of canisters containing radioactive waste. The data used to model the thermal and mechanical behavior of the repository and surrounding lithologies include dry and saturated bulk densities, average grain density, porosity, compressional and shear wave velocities, elastic moduli, and compressional and tensional fracture strengths. In this study, a suite of experiments was performed on cores recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-2, 2A, 2B, and 3 drilled in support of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The holes penetrated the Timber Mountain tuff and two thermal/mechanical units of the Paintbrush tuff. The thermal/mechanical stratigraphy was defined by Ortiz to group rock horizons of similar properties for the purpose of simplifying modeling efforts. The relationship between the geologic stratigraphy and the thermal/mechanical stratigraphy for each borehole is presented. The tuff samples in this study have a wide range of welding characteristics (usually reflected in sample porosity), and a smaller range of mineralogy and petrology characteristics. Generally, the samples are silicic, ash-fall tuffs that exhibit large variability in their elastic and strength properties.

  3. Upgrading the UES Measure List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Present Value of Region Act's 10% Conservation Credit (kWh)" * Sequence of columns (reading left to right) does not follow logical thinking What We Propose * Improve...

  4. Low Temperature Material Bonding Techniq Ue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2002-08-06

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  5. CIP cover 1 and 4.qxd

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Current State of Industry Response and Recovery Planning . . ... water systems and emergency services, both gov- ... - Transportation problems. * Foreign ...

  6. CIP cover 1 and 4.qxd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY NATIONAL PETROLEUM COUNCIL JUNE 2001 SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY NATIONAL PETROLEUM COUNCIL JUNE 2001 SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY SECURING OIL AND NATURAL GAS INFRASTRUCTURES IN THE NEW ECONOMY A report by the National Petroleum Council Committee on Critical Infrastructure Protection David J. Lesar, Chair June 2001 NATIONAL PETROLEUM COUNCIL Archie W. Dunham,

  7. Hydrogeologic characterization of wells HTH-1, UE18r, UE6e, and HTH-3, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, B.F.; McKay, W.A.; Chapman, J.B.; Tyler, S.W.

    1991-06-01

    Monitoring for the migration of contaminants in groundwater or for the proper design of nuclear test emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) requires proper placement and completion of monitoring wells. This is only possible if the hydrogeologic system is understood in a regional and local context, necessitating data from existing wells and boreholes. Though the NTS Groundwater Characterization Project will be drilling wells, their great expense limits the number of new wells. However, there are many existing boreholes and wells on the NTS which have not been completely evaluated hydrologically. Some of these are incorporated in the Long Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), others are related to the testing programs. In all cases, additional site investigation in necessary to properly interpret the hydrogeologic data from these wells. Monitoring wells on the NTS are poorly characterized with regard to aquifers penetrated, vertical hydraulic gradients, and vertical variations in water quality. One of the goals of the well validation program was to gain a thorough understanding of the parameters needed to interpret the source and fate potential hazardous and radioactive substances that may be detected in these wells in the future. One of the most critical parameters for monitoring is the knowledge of what aquifer or geologic unit is being sampled when a water sample is collected. Pumped water samples are weighted most heavily to the water quality of the most productive (highest transmissivity) aquifer penetrated by the well.

  8. The CIP Report: Smart Grid Security (August 2012)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Legal Insights ......19 Conference ... can use smart grid technology to more quickly recognize ... For example, new sensing and control systems are able to ...

  9. City of Las Vegas 5yr CIP 2010-2014

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Changes to regulations and encroachment by the community have caused many modifications to the process at the Water Pollution Control Facility. Examples are: Odor control, air ...

  10. Portsmouth TSCA UE FFCA 02-20-1992 Compliance Agreement Modification 07-17-97_1.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  11. Microsoft Word - Cyber-Wireless-CIP_Draft_ 5 1_2-25-09_clean...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... as a reminder to a forgetful employee or by averting discovery by a malicious adversary. ... P, S W, B, Z, C, S, O M, C A, I Physical search P, S W, B, Z, C, S M, C A, I, C ...

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Pete H's 2007 SWPA Conf Pres(NWK Proj...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AmerenUE, Bagnell Dam FERC Re-licensing Impacts at Harry S. Truman AmerenUE, Bagnell Dam FERC Re-licensing Impacts at Harry S. Truman * FERC recommended AmerenUE initiate ...

  13. Safety & Training | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety & Training The UES Group provides facility ESH oversight for all user experiment safety and day-to-day beamline activities. The UES Floor Coordinators are deployed around...

  14. DOE Announces Competitive Improvement Project Awards | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Competitiveness Improvement Project (CIP), which was announced in January 2013. Bergey Windpower Company of Oklahoma, an initial CIP recipient, used this funding to identify ...

  15. Microsoft Word - Top_10_vuln_2006_16mar2006_ss.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Ensure vendors and contractors have implemented similar procedures. (CIP-004 R3) - Establish a policy for system access including password authentication. (CIP-005 R5) - Change all ...

  16. "Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems." The...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems." The CIP Report. Vol 7 No 8 "Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems." The CIP Report. Vol 7 No 8 ...

  17. Uranium, thorium isotopic analyses and uranium-series ages of calcite and opal, and stable isotopic compositions of calcite from drill cores UE25a No. 1, USW G-2 and USW G-3/GU-3, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szabo, B.J.; Kyser, T.K.

    1985-12-31

    Fracture and cavity filling calcite and opal in the unsaturated zone of three drill cores at Yucca Mountain were analyzed for uranium and stable isotope contents, and were dated by the uranium-series method. Stable isotope data indicate that the water from which the calcite precipitated was meteoric in origin. The decrease in {sup 18}O and increase in {sup 13}C with depth are interpreted as being due to the increase in temperature in drill holes corresponding to an estimated maximum geothermal gradient of 43{sup 0} per km. Of the eighteen calcite and opal deposits dated, four of the calcite and all four of the opal deposits yield dates older than 400,000 years and ten of the remaining calcite deposits yield dates between 26,000 and 310,000 years. The stable isotope and uranium data together with the finite uranium-series dates of precipitation suggest a complex history of fluid movements, rock and water interactions, and episodes of fracture filling during the last 310,000 years. 10 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Protection Standards | Department of Energy Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Energy asset owners are facing a monumental challenge as they address compliance with the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Standards (CIP-002 through CIP-009). The increased

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policies Plans In Progress Recent Results * QSSI Policies approved by Sponsors * 2016 Strategy finalizing - UES evaluation focus * "Why Evaluation" brownbag * Simple Steps *...

  20. The Environmental Building Partnership Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Partnership Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Environmental Building Partnership Ltd Place: Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: AB24 3UE Product: The Environmental...

  1. Financing future power generation in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, P.

    1998-07-01

    Under Italian law, independent power generation fueled by renewable and so-called ``assimilated'' sources must be given incentives. To implement this provision, a resolution known as ``CIP 6'' and a decree setting forth the procedure to sell such electricity to ENEL were issued. CIP 6 has recently been revoked and new incentives have been announced. In the meantime, CIP 6 continues to apply to various projects which have been approved but not yet constructed.

  2. Intermediate SCADA Security Training Course Slides (September 2006) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Intermediate SCADA Security Training Course Slides (September 2006) Intermediate SCADA Security Training Course Slides (September 2006) Presentation for Intermediate SCADA Security, SS-2 SANS SCADA Summit, September 28-29, 2006. The class enabled attendees to develop an understanding of tools and methods that can be used to discover and identify system vulnerabilities (CIP-005 R3.2, CIP-005 R4, & CIP-007 R8); develop mitigation strategies for resolving these issues

  3. Microsoft Word - DOE_PPPL_M220_Sect_H.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... from the standpoint of national significance, it is ... the operators of DOE's laboratories continually advised of ... the CIP, DOE will approve salaries upon the initial contract ...

  4. Articles about Testing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... in January 2013. Bergey Windpower Company of Oklahoma, an initial CIP recipient, used this funding to identify the component improvements to optimize its Excel 10 turbine for ...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Minnesota customers are eligible for the 1.9% Energy Efficiency plan to help pay for Conservation Improvement Program (CIP) qua... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial,...

  6. Distributed Wind Competitiveness Improvement Project Fact Sheet...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    perform turbine testing. The goals of the CIP are to make wind energy cost competitive with other distributed generation technology and increase the number of wind turbine designs ...

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-000 CIPS Simulation Progress and Path Forward CASL Industry Council Meeting April 12-13, 2016 Greenville, SC Brian Kendrick Los Alamos National Laboratory 2 CASL-U-2016-1084-000 Crud Risk Analysis * Since the occurrences of severe CIPS in the 1980's/1990's the industry has developed tools to predict the risk of CIPS occurring for a given reload design and core loading pattern (Westinghouse BOB code which became the EPRI BOA code) * If CIPS risk appears excessive, then steps can be taken to

  8. DeCART/STAR-CCM+/MAMBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 3302012 Introduction Optimal PWR performance relies on ... is for CIPS (Crud Induced Power Shift) also known as AOA ... The swirlingturbulent flow through the mixing vanes leads ...

  9. MueLu User's Guid for Trilinos Version 11.12.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jonathan J.; Prokopenko, Andrey; Wiesner, Tobias A.; Siefert, Christopher; Tuminaro, Raymond S.

    2014-10-01

    This is the official user guide for the M UE L U multigrid library in Trilinos version 11.12. This guide provides an overview of M UE L U , its capabilities, and instructions for new users who want to start using M UE L U with a minimum of effort. Detailed information is given on how to drive M UE L U through its XML interface. Links to more advanced use cases are given. This guide gives information on how to achieve good parallel performance, as well as how to introduce new algorithms. Finally, readers will find a comprehensive listing of available M UE L U options. Any options not documented in this manual should be considered strictly experimental.

  10. Trichoderma genes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foreman, Pamela; Goedegebuur, Frits; Van Solingen, Pieter; Ward, Michael

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1998 AMERICAN SOLAR ENERGY SOCIETY ANNUAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 14 - 17, 1998 Editors: R. Campbell-Howe T. Cortez B. Wilkins-Crowder American Solar Energy Society 2400 Central Aven ue, Suite G-l Boulder, Colorado 80301 Printed on recycled ...

  12. EEVRC Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EEVRC Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: EEVRC Ltd Place: london, England, United Kingdom Zip: WC1X 8UE Product: London-based company set up to introduce and run the new...

  13. BPA-2012-01173-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SERVICES I otal va,ue ** NOT TO EXCEED Pricing Method: FIRM FIXED PRICE Payment Terms: Days Net 30 ...w p,..-;,I. flQ1flIfl - flQFflUllA * . ...-.. * . iii - Coattactor...

  14. Midwest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Illustrative R esilience S olutions Thermoelectric Power Generation; Electric G rid ... Increased d emand f or e lectricity f or cooling i n t he s ummer d ue t o h igher ...

  15. NREL Announces Two New Competitiveness Improvement Project Awards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In July, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) announced two new Competitiveness Improvement Project (CIP) awards. Northern Power Systems of Barre,...

  16. Otter Tail Power Company- DollarSmart Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of Minnesota's Conservation Improvement Program, qualifying Minnesota customers are eligible for the 1.9% Energy Efficiency plan to help pay for Conservation Improvement Program (CIP) qua...

  17. CX-014377: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Olympia Substation NERC-CIP Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 11/12/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-014182: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NERC-CIP Security Upgrades 2015 CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 09/03/2015 Location(s): Multiple LocationsOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - McFarquhar_2007.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , is a good test of whether shattering amplified CAS concentrations * During Costa-Rica Aura Validation Experiment (CR-AVE), coincident data with CAS, CIP and CDP also obtained in...

  20. CNS 2008 Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SYSTEM BASED ON ANC9, VIPRE-W and BOA FOR CIPS EVALUATION B. Zhang, Y. Sung, J. Secker, C. Beard, P. Hilton, G. Wang, R. Oelrich, Z. Karoutas, and Y. Sung Westinghouse Electric...

  1. Distributed Wind Competitiveness Improvement Project Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Competitiveness Improvement Project (CIP) is a periodic solicitation through the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Manufacturers of small and medium wind turbines are awarded cost-shared grants via a competitive process to optimize their designs, develop advanced manufacturing processes, and perform turbine testing. The goals of the CIP are to make wind energy cost competitive with other distributed generation technology and increase the number of wind turbine designs certified to national testing standards.

  2. Distributed Wind Competitiveness Improvement Project (Fact Sheet), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Increased Energy Production CIP system optimization awardee North- ern Power Systems of Barre, Vermont, achieved a 15% energy production increase for the NPS-100 100-kilowatt turbine by increasing blade length and improving blade aerodynamics. Reduced Hardware Costs CIP advanced manufacturing awardee Pika Energy of Westbrook, Maine, reduced blade costs by approximately 90% by developing an innovative tooling and cooling strategy to produce blades using injection-molded plastic. Certified Turbine

  3. DOE Seeking Proposals to Advance Distributed Wind Turbine Technology and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing | Department of Energy Seeking Proposals to Advance Distributed Wind Turbine Technology and Manufacturing DOE Seeking Proposals to Advance Distributed Wind Turbine Technology and Manufacturing December 30, 2014 - 11:04am Addthis On December 29, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) released a third round of Requests for Proposals (RFPs) under DOE's Distributed Wind Competitiveness Improvement Project (CIP). The CIP aims to help U.S.

  4. DOE Announces Nearly $170 Million in Available Funding to Advance Solar

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Competitive Improvement Project Awards DOE Announces Competitive Improvement Project Awards March 31, 2014 - 10:22am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is building on the success of the initial Distributed Wind Turbine Competitiveness Improvement Project (CIP), which was announced in January 2013. Bergey Windpower Company of Oklahoma, an initial CIP recipient, used this funding to identify the component improvements to optimize its Excel 10

  5. Evaluation of existing wells at the Nevada Test Site for plugging and abandonment or for recompletion as monitoring wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, D.; Donithan, D.; Seaber, P.

    1996-09-01

    In this investigation, various information sources from the Nevada Test Site (NTS), national laboratories and the Desert Research Institute were utilized to verify the existence of approximately 250 existing wells or boreholes at the NTS. Of these wells, 40 were determined to be located within one kilometer of underground nuclear tests conducted near (within 25 m) or below the water table. These 40 existing wells were then investigated in detail to determine their drilling and construction history, lithology and hydrologic units penetrated, and current conditions. These findings are presented for each well, as well as recommendations as to whether individual wells should be plugged and abandoned or could possibly be recompleted as groundwater quality monitoring locations. Two of the 40 wells, UE-20e and UE-2a, contain lost drilling strings and do not penetrate aquifers. These two wells should be plugged and abandoned and removed from the NTS well inventory. Three other wells, TestWell No. 1, TestWell No. 5, and TestWell No. 6, are reported stemmed with sand to the surface. These three wells did not penetrate the water table and would require substantial deepening to be recompleted as groundwater monitoring locations. If not recompleted, these wells should also be plugged and abandoned and removed from the NTS well inventory. Eleven of the 34 wells, Test Well No. 7, RNM No. 1, RNM No. 2, RNM No. 2S, U-3cn No. 5, UE-20n No. 1, UE-7ns, UE-5n, UE-4t, UE-3e No. 3 and U-15k Test Hole, penetrate aquifers and do not require recompletion to produce groundwater monitoring locations. These wells are either constructed such that recompletion is not needed or not possible. Several of the 11 wells may require the removal of tubing and the placement or replacement of pump equipment. All five of the wells require wellhead rehabilitation to ensure they are not contaminated by surface water or other materials.

  6. Agent-based Large-Scale Emergency Evacuation Using Real-Time Open Government Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Wei; Liu, Cheng; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2014-01-01

    The open government initiatives have provided tremendous data resources for the transportation system and emergency services in urban areas. This paper proposes a traffic simulation framework using high temporal resolution demographic data and real time open government data for evacuation planning and operation. A comparison study using real-world data in Seattle, Washington is conducted to evaluate the framework accuracy and evacuation efficiency. The successful simulations of selected area prove the concept to take advantage open government data, open source data, and high resolution demographic data in emergency management domain. There are two aspects of parameters considered in this study: user equilibrium (UE) conditions of traffic assignment model (simple Non-UE vs. iterative UE) and data temporal resolution (Daytime vs. Nighttime). Evacuation arrival rate, average travel time, and computation time are adopted as Measure of Effectiveness (MOE) for evacuation performance analysis. The temporal resolution of demographic data has significant impacts on urban transportation dynamics during evacuation scenarios. Better evacuation performance estimation can be approached by integrating both Non-UE and UE scenarios. The new framework shows flexibility in implementing different evacuation strategies and accuracy in evacuation performance. The use of this framework can be explored to day-to-day traffic assignment to support daily traffic operations.

  7. Exchange of Type II Dockerin-Containing Subunits of the C. thermocellum Cellulosome as Revealed by SNAP-tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waller, Benjamin; Olson, Daniel G.; Currie, Devin; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium which efficiently hydrolyzes and metabolizes cellulose to ethanol through the action of its cellulosome, a multiprotein enzymatic complex. A fluorescent protein probe, consisting of a type II dockerin module fused to a SNAP-tag, was developed in order to gain insight into the quaternary configuration of the cellulosome and to investigate the effect of deleting cipA, the protein scaffold on which the cellulosome is built. Fluorescence microscopy suggested that the probe had localized to polycellulosomal protuberances on the cell surface. Surprisingly, fluorescence intensity did not substantially change in the cipA deletion mutants. Sequential labeling experiments suggested that this was a result of bound type II dockerins from CipA being replaced by unbound type II dockerins from the fluorophore-SNAP-XDocII probe. This mechanism of dockerin exchange could represent an efficient means for modifying cellulosome composition.

  8. Topical Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INL/EXT-12-25347 March 2012 CIPS Validation Data Plan Nam Dinh CASL-U-2012-0044-000 CASL-U-2012-0044-000 INL/EXT-12-25347 CIPS Validation Data Plan Nam Dinh Published March 2012 Idaho National Laboratory Nuclear Science & Engineering Division Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Under U.S. Department of Energy-Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-99ID13727 CASL-U-2012-0044-000 CASL-U-2012-0044-000 ABSTRACT The Consortium for

  9. UNITED STATE% ENGINEER OFFICE I" RaCLI MANHATTAN D' ISTRICT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    w-1 - ,.. P..*e ,e.arzUE.m -JuTm-&a- . . . UNITED STATE% ENGINEER OFFICE I" RaCLI MANHATTAN D' ISTRICT RLFSR TO ; I. 0. eox a ,. STATJON J N E W YORK, N. Y. tr.et h % ...

  10. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 2.76 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-09-21

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|η jet| < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 ≤ pT jet < 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of pT jet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal regionmore » transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics« less

  11. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-09-21

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|η jet| < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 ≤ pT jet < 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of pT jet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal region transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics

  12. Alliance Project: Cyber-Physical Security Unified Access Solution

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alliance Project: Cyber-Physical Security Unified Access Solution Unified cyber-physical security to protect energy sector control systems and facilities Background The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) standards require utility operators to control, monitor, and record physical access to cybersecurity assets and establish physical security perimeters (PSPs). Many operators engage security contractors to provide access controls,

  13. Microsoft Word - Wireless Automation World for OE FINAL.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Automation World Features New White Paper on Wireless Security, Interviews Authors April 16, 2009 The April 2009 issue of Automation World magazine features the white paper Wireless Systems Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards. The paper addresses wireless protection issues arising from requirements of the Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Standards for the electricity sector, developed by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation

  14. Applying Nonlinear Signal Analysis Technologies to Flame Scanner Signals to Improve Staging of Cyclone Boilers for NOx control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T. J.; Bailey, R. T.; Fuller, T. A.; FINNEY, Charles E A; Daw, C Stuart; Stallings, J.; Himes, R.; Bermke, R.

    2006-08-01

    Cyclone{trademark} boiler owners continue to drive down NO{sub x} emissions by increasingly sophisticated staging and air distribution schemes. For example, Alliant Energy has employed RMT's SmartBurn{reg_sign} technology, and Ameren UE has pioneered neural nets to reduce emissions. Over the last 11 years under sponsorship of EPRI, the team of ORNL and B&W has developed pulverized coal burner diagnostic technology by applying nonlinear signal analysis techniques to flame scanner signals. The team has extended the technology to cyclones to facilitate deeper staging of the cyclones to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Development projects were conducted at the Alliant Energy Edgewater Units 3 and 4, and Ameren UE Sioux Unit 1. Nonlinear analysis statistics were correlated to upsets in cyclone operation resulting from poor air distribution in the burner and barrel. The team demonstrated that the lighter and main flame scanners can be used to independently guide adjustments to the burner and barrel.

  15. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    'Xxy";^ ...... ' '. .- -- Metals, Ceramics, and Materials. : . - ,.. ; - . _ : , , ' z . , -, .- . >. ; . .. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A .-... r .. .. i ' LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER 4 r . _.i'- ' ...... ' -'".. :-'' ,' :... : , '.- ' ;BY R.' J. ' ANSEN .AEC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT PERSONAL PROPERTY OF J. F. Schlltz .:- DECLASSIFIED - PER AUTHORITY OF (DAlE) (NhTI L (DATE)UE) FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER NATIONAL LFE A COMPANY OF OHIO 26 1 3967 3035406 NLCO -

  16. Method development and strategy for the characterization of complexly faulted and fractured rhyolitic tuffs, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, K.; Galloway, D.

    1991-06-01

    The planned high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, would exist in unsaturated, fractured welded tuff. One possible contaminant pathway to the accessible environment is transport by groundwater infiltrating to the water table and flowing through the saturated zone. Therefore, an effort to characterize the hydrology of the saturated zone is being undertaken in parallel with that of the unsaturated zone. As a part of the saturated zone investigation, there wells-UE-25c{number_sign}1, UE-25c{number_sign}2, and UE-25c{number_sign}3 (hereafter called the c-holes)-were drilled to study hydraulic and transport properties of rock formations underlying the planned waste repository. The location of the c-holes is such that the formations penetrated in the unsaturated zone occur at similar depths and with similar thicknesses as at the planned repository site. In characterizing a highly heterogeneous flow system, several issues emerge. (1) The characterization strategy should allow for the virtual impossibility to enumerate and characterize all heterogeneities. (2) The methodology to characterize the heterogeneous flow system at the scale of the well tests needs to be established. (3) Tools need to be developed for scaling up the information obtained at the well-test scale to the larger scale of the site. In the present paper, the characterization strategy and the methods under development are discussed with the focus on the design and analysis of the field experiments at the c-holes.

  17. Nevada National Security Site 2012 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-02-11

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2012 results. During 2012, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Groundwater samples were collected at UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 on March 21, August 7, August 21, and September 11, 2012, and static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 19, June 6, August 2, and October 15, 2012. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Final results from samples collected in 2012 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

  18. Nevada National Security Site 2010 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2010 results. During 2010, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 10 and August 10, 2010; at UE5PW-2 on March 10, August 10, and August 25, 2010; and at UE5PW-3 on March 31, August 10, and August 25, 2010. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, April 26, August 9, and November 9, 2010. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Results from all samples collected in 2010 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

  19. Pairing preferences of the model mono-valence mono-atomic ions investigated by molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China) [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China); Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Zhang, Ruiting; Zhao, Ying; Li, HuanHuan; Zhuang, Wei, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China); Gao, Yi Qin, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-05-14

    We carried out a series of potential of mean force calculations to study the pairing preferences of a series of model mono-atomic 1:1 ions with evenly varied sizes. The probabilities of forming the contact ion pair (CIP) and the single water separate ion pair (SIP) were presented in the two-dimensional plots with respect to the ion sizes. The pairing preferences reflected in these plots largely agree with the empirical rule of matching ion sizes in the small and big size regions. In the region that the ion sizes are close to the size of the water molecule; however, a significant deviation from this conventional rule is observed. Our further analysis indicated that this deviation originates from the competition between CIP and the water bridging SIP state. The competition is mainly an enthalpy modulated phenomenon in which the existing of the water bridging plays a significant role.

  20. United States Supports Distributed Wind Technology Improvements; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, Karin

    2015-06-15

    This presentation provides information on the activities conducted through the Competitiveness Improvement Project (CIP), initiated in 2012 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and executed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support the distributed wind industry. The CIP provides research and development funding and technical support to improve distributed wind turbine technology and increase the competitiveness of U.S. small and midsize wind turbine manufacturers. Through this project, DOE/NREL assists U.S. manufacturers to lower the levelized cost of energy of wind turbines through component improvements, manufacturing process upgrades, and turbine testing. Ultimately, this support is expected to lead to turbine certification through testing to industry-recognized wind turbine performance and safety standards.

  1. Audit Report: IG-0448 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Audit Report: IG-0448 July 13, 1999 Review of the Status of the U.S. Department of Energy's Counterintelligence Implementation Plan In February 1998 the President issued Presidential Decision Directive 61 (PDD-61) designed to reorganize and improve the counterintelligence program of the U.S. Department of Energy (Department). Subsequent to the release of PDD-61, the Department developed a Counterintelligence Implementation Plan (CIP), which included 46 actions to achieve this goal. On May 26,

  2. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CIP Cyber Assessment Package admin 2016-04-18T20:58:24+00:00 Popular Downloads Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems: Final Report of the Florida Solar Energy Center Team (11369 downloads) Modeling System Losses in PVsyst (9347 downloads) Numerical Manufacturing And Design Tool (NuMAD v2.0) for Wind Turbine Blades: User's Guide (7615 downloads) Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS) Proactive Intelligent Advances for Photovoltaic Systems (6676 downloads) Improved Test Method to Verify the

  3. EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guide to CIP Cyber Vulnerability Assessment admin 2016-04-18T20:58:24+00:00 Popular Downloads Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems: Final Report of the Florida Solar Energy Center Team (11369 downloads) Modeling System Losses in PVsyst (9347 downloads) Numerical Manufacturing And Design Tool (NuMAD v2.0) for Wind Turbine Blades: User's Guide (7615 downloads) Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS) Proactive Intelligent Advances for Photovoltaic Systems (6677 downloads) Improved Test

  4. L2:VUQ.P2.03 Brian Adams SNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -a 1 VUQ: Achieving Credible, Science-Based Predictions Milestone VUQ.Y1.03 (Enable SA/UQ Demonstrations in VERA) * Strategy: Integrate SNL's DAKOTA UQ Toolkit with Westinghouse's VIPRE-W subchannel T/H simulator * Demonstration for CRUD/CIPS problem (quarter-core geometry): Assess influence of core operating parameters on mass evaporation rate * Results: Affirmed well-known sensitivity to temperature and exposed sensitivity to pressure. Boiling model parameters may dominate UQ if not

  5. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CASL's Latest Research CIPS Simulation Capability Implemented in VERA Posted on October 28, 2015 Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) Multi-Physics Approach & Applications using VERA Posted on October 28, 2015 Illustration of VERA Capability to Model a Typical SMR Posted on October 28, 2015 ITM/DNS for High Volume Fraction Bubbly Flow Regimes: Simulations for Closure Development Posted on October 28, 2015 Verification and Validation Supporting VERA Neutronics Code Posted on October 28, 2015

  6. During FY15, CASL significantly advanced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    During FY15, CASL significantly advanced VERA's capability to mod- el the CRUD Challenge Problem to predict the occurrence of CRUD Induced Power Shift (CIPS). VERA has been modified to include the space and time dependent deposition of CRUD onto the fuel, along with boron capture and its effects on local rod power and thermal hydraulic conditions. Early in CASL's program, coolant chemistry subcompo- nents (MAMBA and MAMBA-BDM) were developed to describe local CRUD deposition. Since then the

  7. Multifunctional cellulase and hemicellulase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Brian G.; Takasuka, Taichi; Bianchetti, Christopher M.

    2015-09-29

    A multifunctional polypeptide capable of hydrolyzing cellulosic materials, xylan, and mannan is disclosed. The polypeptide includes the catalytic core (cc) of Clostridium thermocellum Cthe_0797 (CelE), the cellulose-specific carbohydrate-binding module CBM3 of the cellulosome anchoring protein cohesion region (CipA) of Clostridium thermocellum (CBM3a), and a linker region interposed between the catalytic core and the cellulose-specific carbohydrate binding module. Methods of using the multifunctional polypeptide are also disclosed.

  8. Smart Grid Educational Series | Energy Systems Integration | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smart Grid Educational Series NREL hosts an ongoing series of educational webinars on smart grid-related topics, featuring speakers from the lab and the energy industry. Stay informed about upcoming webinars in the series by subscribing to our monthly newsletter. Video Surveillance System Security & NERC CIP Compliance August 19, 2016 This webinar featured a presentation on cybersecurity and video surveillance from Joe Coe of Hikvision, and a second presentation by John Chowdhury of NKSoft

  9. Isolated polypeptide having arabinofuranosidase activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foreman, Pamela; Van Solingen, Pieter; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael

    2010-02-23

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry. TABLE-US-00001 cip1 cDNA sequence (SEQ ID NO: 1) GACTAGTTCA TAATACAGTA GTTGAGTTCA TAGCAACTTC 50 ACTCTCTAGC TGAACAAATT ATCTGCGCAA ACATGGTTCG CCGGACTGCT 100 CTGCTGGCCC TTGGGGCTCT CTCAACGCTC TCTATGGCCC AAATCTCAGA 150 CGACTTCGAG TCGGGCTGGG ATCAGACTAA ATGGCCCATT TCGGCACCAG 200 ACTGTAACCA GGGCGGCACC GTCAGCCTCG ACACCACAGT AGCCCACAGC 250 GGCAGCAACT CCATGAAGGT CGTTGGTGGC CCCAATGGCT ACTGTGGACA 300 CATCTTCTTC GGCACTACCC AGGTGCCAAC TGGGGATGTA TATGTCAGAG 350 CTTGGATTCG GCTTCAGACT GCTCTCGGCA GCAACCACGT CACATTCATC 400 ATCATGCCAG ACACCGCTCA GGGAGGGAAG CACCTCCGAA TTGGTGGCCA 450 AAGCCAAGTT CTCGACTACA ACCGCGAGTC CGACGATGCC ACTCTTCCGG 500 ACCTGTCTCC CAACGGCATT GCCTCCACCG TCACTCTGCC TACCGGCGCG 550 TTCCAGTGCT TCGAGTACCA CCTGGGCACT GACGGAACCA TCGAGACGTG 600 GCTCAACGGC AGCCTCATCC CGGGCATGAC CGTGGGCCCT GGCGTCGACA 650 ATCCAAACGA CGCTGGCTGG ACGAGGGCCA GCTATATTCC GGAGATCACC 700 GGTGTCAACT TTGGCTGGGA GGCCTACAGC GGAGACGTCA ACACCGTCTG 750 GTTCGACGAC ATCTCGATTG CGTCGACCCG CGTGGGATGC GGCCCCGGCA 800 GCCCCGGCGG TCCTGGAAGC TCGACGACTG GGCGTAGCAG CACCTCGGGC 850 CCGACGAGCA CTTCGAGGCC AAGCACCACC ATTCCGCCAC CGACTTCCAG 900 GACAACGACC GCCACGGGTC CGACTCAGAC ACACTATGGC CAGTGCGGAG 1000 GGATTGGTTA CAGCGGGCCT ACGGTCTGCG CGAGCGGCAC GACCTGCCAG 1050 GTCCTGAACC CATACTACTC CCAGTGCTTA TAAGGGGATG AGCATGGAGT 1100 GAAGTGAAGT GAAGTGGAGA GAGTTGAAGT GGCATTGCGC TCGGCTGGGT 1150 AGATAAAAGT CAGCAGCTAT GAATACTCTA TGTGATGCTC ATTGGCGTGT 1200 ACGTTTTAAA AAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAA 1250 AAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAG GGGGCGGCCG C 1271

  10. Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

  11. Nevada National Security Site 2011 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-02-27

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2011 results. During 2011, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 8, August 2, August 24, and October 19, 2011; at UE5PW-2 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011; and at UE5PW-3 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, June 7, August 1, and October 17, 2011. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Initial total organic carbon and total organic halides results for samples collected in August 2011 were above previous measurements and, in some cases, above the established investigation limits. However, after field sample pumps and tubing were disinfected with Clorox solution, the results returned to normal levels. Final results from samples collected in 2011 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

  12. Office of Information Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    20c81-2a97-4e60-80e5-4177d22c7916 202-234-4433 Neal R. Gross and Co., Inc. Page 1 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY + + + + + TRANSCRIPT OF THE NATIONAL COAL COUNCIL MEETING + + + + + Thursday, May 1, 2008 + + + + + Hilton St. Louis 1 South Broadway St. Louis, Missouri + + + + + ATTENDEES ROBERT A. BECK National Coal Council FREDRICK D. PALMER Senior VP Government Relations Peabody Energy MIKE MILLER AmerenUE HOLLY KRUTKA, PhD Research Scientist ADA-ES JANET GELLICI, CAE CEO, American Coal

  13. Concept selection for advanced low-emission coal fired boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorrell, R.L.; Rodgers, L.W.; Farthing, G.A.

    1993-12-31

    The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE) with subcontract to Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSIT), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and United Engineers and Constructors (UE&C) has begun development of an advanced low-emission boiler system (LEBS). The initial phase of this multi-phase program required a thorough review and assessment of potential advanced technologies and techniques for control of combustion and flue gas emissions. Results of this assessment are presented in this paper.

  14. MACHINE AND FOUNDRY COMPANY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MACHINE AND FOUNDRY COMPANY kt '- : :'~ ENGINEERING DIVISIOJ ---. Cl FIELD iRIP ,REP@?T ,' ~ i;~:z;~zy~ MEETING REPORT : .I.-.-' ~Y ::,:I :. &, .I7 ENGINEERING REPORT- : $T, ~ suBJ:m~i-c n-..*~~.~n~ 9r.1 _ P,Y.~.I~ ADDRESS: :'~.'"I .- .._ c. Plans for - ,:, ..-; .:.j s ,PERSON CONTACTED . . .' ., I : /LV cliq 22: PLPCZS w: - American Machine & Fouudq Co., i3ue Termlual. Office ;s& $' PRI?sI?,NT: S. P~:Chartland - DuPont D. B. Craxford - AW ..x.i "7.7, J. J* Crata - LHF 1, .

  15. Fuel Cell Bus Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ue Ce ec o o es o a Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Overview and Purp pose Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Fuel Cell Technolog gies Prog gram DOE and DOT Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop, Washington DC DOE and DOT Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop, Washington DC June 7, 2010 June 7, 2010 Fuel Cells - Addressing Energy Challenges Energy Efficiency and Resource Diversity * Fuel cells offer a highly efficient way to use diverse fuels and energy sources Fuel cells offer a highly

  16. Preparing the BESSY APPLE Undulators for Top-Up Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahrdt, J.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Scheer, M.

    2007-01-19

    BESSY plans to go to topping up operation in the near future. A high injection efficiency is essential to avoid particle losses inside the undulator magnets and to ensure a low radiation background in the beamlines. Dynamic and static multipoles of the insertion devices have to be minimized to accomplish this requirement. APPLE II devices show strong dynamic multipoles in the elliptical and vertical polarization mode. Measurements before and after shimming of these multipoles are presented. The static multipoles of the BESSY UE56-2 which are due to systematic block inhomgeneities have successfully been shimmed recovering the full dynamic aperture.

  17. Underground Energy Storage Program. 1984 annual summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1985-06-01

    Underground Energy Storage (UES) Program activities during the period from April 1984 through March 1985 are briefly described. Primary activities in seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involved field testing of high-temperature (>100/sup 0/C (212/sup 0/F)) aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) at St. Paul, laboratory studies of geochemical issues associated with high-temperatures ATES, monitoring of chill ATES facilities in Tuscaloosa, and STES linked with solar energy collection. The scope of international activities in STES is briefly discussed.

  18. Identification of ion-pair structures in solution by vibrational stark effects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hack, John; Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2016-01-25

    Here, ion pairing is a fundamental consideration in many areas of chemistry and has implications in a wide range of sciences and technologies that include batteries and organic photovoltaics. Ions in solution are known to inhabit multiple possible states, including free ions (FI), contact ion pairs (CIP), and solvent-separated ion pairs (SSIP). However, in solutions of organic radicals and nonmetal electrolytes, it is often difficult to distinguish between these states. In the first part of this work, we report evidence for the formation of SSIPs in low-polarity solvents and distinct measurements of CIP, SSIP, and FI, by using the ν(C≡N)more » infrared (IR) band of a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion. Use of time-resolved IR detection following pulse radiolysis allowed us to unambiguously assign the peak of the FI. In the presence of nonmetal electrolytes, two distinct red-shifted peaks were observed and assigned to the CIP and SSIP. The assignments are interpreted in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect (VSE) and are supported by (1) the solvent dependence of ion-pair populations, (2) the observation of a cryptand-separated sodium ion pair that mimics the formation of SSIPs, and (3) electronic structure calculations. In the second part of this work, we show that a blue-shift of the ν(C≡N) IR band due to the VSE can be induced in a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion by covalently tethering it to a metal-chelating ligand that forms an intramolecular ion pair upon reduction and complexation with sodium ion. This adds support to the conclusion that the shift in IR absorptions by ion pairing originates from the VSE. These results combined show that we can identify ion-pair structures by using the VSE, including the existence of SSIPs in a low-polarity solvent.« less

  19. Insights into Higher-Order Organization of the Cellulosome Revealed by a Dissect-and build Approach: Crystal Structure of Interacting Clostridium thermocellum Multimodular components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Adams; M Currie; S Ali; E Bayer; Z Jia; S Smith

    2011-12-31

    Cellulosomes are large, multienzyme, plant cell wall-degrading protein complexes found affixed to the surface of a variety of anaerobic microbes. The core of the cellulosome is a noncatalytic scaffoldin protein, which contains several type-I cohesin modules that bind type-I dockerin-containing enzymatic subunits, a cellulose-binding module, an X module, and a type-II dockerin that interacts with type-II cohesin-containing cell surface proteins. The unique arrangement of the enzymatic subunits in the cellulosome complex, made possible by the scaffoldin subunit, promotes enhanced substrate degradation relative to the enzymes free in solution. Despite representative high-resolution structures of all of the individual modules of the cellulosome, this mechanism of enzymatic synergy remains poorly understood. Consequently, a model of the entire cellulosome and a detailed picture of intermodular contacts will provide more detailed insight into cellulosome activity. Toward this goal, we have solved the structure of a multimodular heterodimeric complex from Clostridium thermocellum composed of the type-II cohesin module of the cell surface protein SdbA bound to a trimodular C-terminal fragment of the scaffoldin subunit CipA to a resolution of 1.95 {angstrom}. The linker that connects the ninth type-I cohesin module and the X module has elevated temperature factors, reflecting an inherent flexibility within this region. Interestingly, a novel dimer interface was observed between CipA and a second, symmetry-related CipA molecule within the crystal structure, mediated by contacts between a type-I cohesin and an X module of a symmetry mate, resulting in two intertwined scaffoldins. Sedimentation velocity experiments confirmed that dimerization also occurs in solution. These observations support the intriguing possibility that individual cellulosomes can associate with one another via inter-scaffoldin interactions, which may play a role in the mechanism of action of the complex.

  20. Structural role of calcium for the organization of the cellulosome of clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Sang Ki; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1996-04-16

    The cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum is a multipolypeptide complex of structural and catalytic subunits. Several of the catalytic subunits have at the carboxyl end a conserved duplicated region (CDR) which interacts with internally repeated elements (IREs) of scaffolding subunits such as CipA. This interaction requires calcium. The two parts of the CDR region here designated CDR1 and CDR2 (closest to the carboxyl end) each consist of about 20 amino acid residues. As shown in our previous paper, treatment of the cellulosome with ethylenediamineteraacetic acid (EDTA) under aerobic conditions disintegrates the cellulosome with formation of truncated catalytic subunits. The cleavage is at a specific asparagine residue located within CDR1 and occurs with complete loss of CDR2. Two branched peptides containing the amino acid sequences of CDR1 and CDR2 (designated bCDR1 and bCDR2) were synthesized, and specific antibodies were raised against them. These antibodies did not cross react with bCDR1 or bCDR2, respectively. After sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western bloting, it was observed that about 15 subunits of the cellulosome reacted with anti-bCDR1 and antibCDR2. In a similar experiment with EDTA-treated cellulosomes, these subunits reacted with antibCDR1 but not with anti-bCDR2, showing that they lost the bCDR2 epitope and were truncated. The peptide bCDR1 binds calcium, where as bCDR2 does not. Furthermore, bCDR1 but not bCDR2 binds to CipA, presumably at IRE regions. This binding requires calcium. A model is proposed for the binding of the catalytic subunits to CipA which involves CDR1, and IRE, and calcium. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Environmental assessment for the granting of US Navy easements near Pearl Harbor and Waikele Gulch Oahu, Hawaii to Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luersen, P.; Wiley, M.; Hart, J.; Kanehiro, C.; Soloway, M.

    1994-09-23

    This document was prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA: and Navy regulations (OPNAVINST 5090.1B)). The document addresses environmental impacts from the proposed granting of three easements to the Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc. (HECO) for the use of Navy property near Waikele Gulch, Pearl City and the Waiau Power Plant. HECO`s proposed Waiau-CIP, Part 2, Project requires installation, operation, and maintenance of steel transmission line poles and associated equipment on three Navy parcels crossed by the 7.8 mile project. Health risks from exposure to the electric and magnetic fields of 138-kV transmission lines are discussed.

  2. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    evidence of ice particle shattering by OAP-2DC Environment Canada Alexei Korolev, Walter Strapp Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Ed Emery NASA, Cleveland, OH, USA Objective: To estimate the effect of airborne probe inlets on the accuracy of ice particle measurements FSSP, CPI, CAPS, SID Sample volume OAP-2DC, OAP-2DP, HVPS, CIP Sample volume Cox Wind Tunnel OAP-2DC arm D ~ 2.5cm TAS ~ 70m/s How can shattering events be identified from measurements? OAP-2DP (200µm pixel resolution)

  3. Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2009-03-15

    The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles include the following: Application of modeling and simulation to nuclear power plants, by Berry Gibson, IBM, and Rolf Gibbels, Dassault Systems; Steam generators with tight manufacturing procedures, by Ei Kadokami, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries; SG design based on operational experience and R and D, by Jun Tang, Babcock and Wilcox Canada; Confident to deliver reliable performance, by Bruce Bevilacqua, Westinghouse Nuclear; An evolutionary plant design, by Martin Parece, AREVA NP, Inc.; and, Designed for optimum production, by Danny Roderick, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy. Industry Innovation articles include: Controlling alloy 600 degradation, by John Wilson, Exelon Nuclear Corporation; Condensate polishing innovation, by Lewis Crone, Dominion Millstone Power Station; Reducing deposits in steam generators, by the Electric Power Research Institute; and, Minimizing Radiological effluent releases, by the Electric Power Research Institute. The plant profile article is titled 2008 - a year of 'firsts' for AmerenUE's Callaway plant, by Rick Eastman, AmerenUE.

  4. Multiphase Nano-Composite Coatings for Achieving Energy Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Jose Nainaparampil

    2012-03-26

    UES Inc. and ANL teamed in this work to develop novel coating systems for the protection of surfaces from thermal degradation mainly in two applications; Machining and Die casting. These coatings were specifically designed for the purpose by incorporating required material phases and the overall architecture, which led to reduce the energy usage and increase efficiency of the operations. Following the UES/ANL'?s feasibility work, the coatings were developed utilizing High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPMS) and Large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) techniques. Toughness, hardness and oxidation resistance: contrasting qualities have been mixed in the right proportion to attain the suitable material characteristic for the cause. Hafnium diboride (HfB2) based materials provided such a system and its properties were tamed to attain the right combination of toughness and hardness by working on the microstructure and architecture of coatings. An effective interfacing material (graded concentrations of topcoat) was also achieved in this work to provide the required adhesion between the substrate and the coating. Combination of an appropriate bond coat and a functional top coat provided the present thermal degradation resistant coating for cutting tools and die-casting applications. Laboratory level performance tests and industrial level application tests by partner companies (Beta Site Testing) were used for the development of these coatings.

  5. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING DATA FROM THE AREA 5 PILOT WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-09-01

    Three exploratory boreholes were drilled and completed to the uppermost alluvial aquifer in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in 1992. The boreholes and associated investigations were part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level, mixed, and high-specific-activity waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize the hydrogeology of the thick vadose zone and to help define the water quality and hydraulic properties of the uppermost aquifer. Wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are located in a triangular array near the southeast, northeast, and northwest corners, respectively, of the approximately 2.6-square-kilometer Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to give reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization, and to help define the nearly horizontal water table. Two of the wells, UE5PW-1 and UE5PW-2, penetrated only unconsolidated alluvial materials. The third well, located closer to the margin of the basin, penetrated both alluvium and underlying ash-flow and bedded tuff units. The watertable was encountered at the elevation of approximately 734 meters. The results of laboratory testing of core and drill cuttings samples indicate that the mineralogical, material, and hydrologic properties of the alluvium are very similar within and between boreholes. Additional tests on the same core and drill cuttings samples indicate that hydrologic conditions within the alluvium are also similar between pilot wells. Both core and drill cuttings samples are dry (less than 10 percent water content by weight) throughout the entire unsaturated section of alluvium, and water content increases slightly with depth in each borehole. Water potential measurements on core samples show a large positive potential gradient (water tends to move upward, rather than downward) to a depth of approximately 30

  6. Proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowers gastric adenocarcinoma TMK1 cell proliferation via bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Yu Le; Cho, C.H.

    2008-06-27

    Proteasome inhibitor is a novel class of cancer therapeutics, of which the mechanism of action is not fully understood. It is reported that proteasome inhibitor enhances bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in osteoblasts to stimulate bone formation. BMP signaling is also an important tumor-suppressing pathway in gastric carcinogenesis. We therefore sought to determine the anti-mitogenic effect of proteasome inhibition in relation to BMP signaling in gastric cancer cells. Results showed that proteasome inhibitor MG-132 significantly suppressed the proliferation and the colony-forming ability of gastric cancer TMK1 cells. In this connection, MG-132 activated BMP signaling, manifested as an increase in Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and up-regulation of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of BMP receptor II by RNA interference abolished Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} induction, and the inhibition of cell proliferation induced by MG-132. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 up-regulated the expression of BMP1 and BMP4 and suppressed the expression of Smad6. Knockdown of Smad6 also mimicked the effect of MG-132 on BMP signaling. Collectively, these findings suggest that inhibition of proteasome suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation via activation of BMP signaling. This discovery may open up a novel therapeutic avenue to proteasome inhibitors for the management of gastric cancer.

  7. Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at INL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy G. Garn; David H. Meikrantz; Nick R. Mann; Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-09-01

    Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5 cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at the INL Troy G. Garn, Dave H. Meikrantz, Nick R. Mann, Jack D. Law, Terry A. Todd Idaho National Laboratory Commercially available, Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACC) are currently being evaluated for processing dissolved nuclear fuel solutions to selectively partition integrated elements using solvent extraction technologies. These evaluations include hydraulic and clean-in-place (CIP) testing of a commercially available 12.5 cm unit. Data from these evaluations is used to support design of future nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Hydraulic testing provides contactor throughput performance data on two-phase systems for a wide range of operating conditions. Hydraulic testing results on a simple two-phase oil and water system followed by a 30 % Tributyl phosphate in N-dodecane / nitric acid pair are reported. Maximum total throughputs for this size contactor ranged from 20 to 32 liters per minute without significant other phase carryover. A relatively new contactor design enhancement providing Clean-in-Place capability for ACCs was also investigated. Spray nozzles installed into the central rotor shaft allow the rotor internals to be cleaned, offline. Testing of the solids capture of a diatomaceous earth/water slurry feed followed by CIP testing was performed. Solids capture efficiencies of >95% were observed for all tests and short cold water cleaning pulses proved successful at removing solids from the rotor.

  8. Purification and Crystallization of a Multimodular Heterotrimeric Complex Containing Both Type I and Type II Cohesin-dockerin Interactions from the Cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Currie; J Adams; S Ali; S Smith; Z Jia

    2011-12-31

    The multimodular scaffoldin subunit CipA is the central component of the cellulosome, a multienzyme plant cell-wall-degrading complex, from Clostridium thermocellum. It captures secreted cellulases and hemicellulases and anchors the entire complex to the cell surface via high-affinity calcium-dependent interactions between cohesin and dockerin modules termed type I and type II interactions. The crystallization of a heterotrimeric complex comprising the type II cohesin module from the cell-surface protein SdbA, a trimodular C-terminal fragment of the scaffoldin CipA and the type I dockerin module from the CelD cellulase is reported. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 119.37, b = 186.31, c = 191.17 {angstrom}. The crystals diffracted to 2.7 {angstrom} resolution with four or eight molecules of the ternary protein complex in the asymmetric unit.

  9. Nevada National Security Site 2014 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, David

    2015-02-19

    This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada. Groundwater samples from the aquifer immediately below the Area 5 RWMS have been collected and analyzed and static water levels have been measured in this aquifer since 1993. This report updates these data to include the 2014 results. Analysis results for leachate contaminants collected from the mixed-waste cell at the Area 5 RWMS (Cell 18) are also included. During 2014, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at three wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Groundwater samples were collected at wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 on March 11 and August 12, 2014, and static water levels were measured at each of these wells on March 10, June 2, August 11, and October 14, 2014. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. General water chemistry (cations and anions) was also measured. Results from samples collected in 2014 are within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. The data from the shallow aquifer indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS, and there were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. Leachate from above the primary liner of Cell 18 drains into a sump and is collected in a tank at the ground surface. Cell 18 began receiving waste in January 2011. Samples were collected from the tank when the leachate volume approached the 3,000-gallon tank capacity. Leachate samples have been collected 16 times since January 2011. During 2014, samples were collected on February 25, March 5, May 20, August 12, September 16, November 11, and December 16. Each leachate sample was

  10. Site Characterization Data from the U3ax/bl Exploratory Boreholes at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-08-01

    This report provides qualitative analyses and preliminary interpretations of hydrogeologic data obtained from two 45-degree, slanted exploratory boreholes drilled within the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site. Borehole UE-3bl-D1 was drilled beneath the U3ax/bl mixed waste disposal unit, and Borehole UE-3bl-U1 was drilled in undisturbed alluvium adjacent to the disposal unit. The U3ax/bl disposal unit is located within two conjoined subsidence craters, U3ax and U3bl, which were created by underground nuclear testing. Data from these boreholes were collected to support site characterization activities for the U3ax/bl disposal unit and the entire Area 3 RWMS. Site characterization at disposal units within the Area 3 RWMS must address the possibility that subsidence craters and associated disturbed alluvium of the chimneys beneath the craters might serve as pathways for contaminant migration. The two boreholes were drilled and sampled to compare hydrogeologic properties of alluvium below the waste disposal unit with those of adjacent undisturbed alluvium. Whether Borehole UE-3bl-D1 actually penetrated the chimney of the U3bl crater is uncertain. Analyses of core samples showed little difference in hydrogeologic properties between the two boreholes. Important findings of this study include the following: No hazardous or radioactive constituents of waste disposal concern were found in the samples obtained from either borehole. No significant differences in physical and hydrogeologic properties between boreholes is evident, and no evidence of significant trends with depth for any of these properties was observed. The values observed are typical of sandy materials. The alluvium is dry, with volumetric water content ranging from 5.6 to 16.2 percent. Both boreholes exhibit a slight increase in water content with depth, the only such trend observed. Water potential measurements on core samples from both boreholes show a large positive

  11. Research News TEMPLATE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revealing Secrets Locked in the Ice page 3 the ENERGY lab NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY From NETL's Office of Research & Development - October 2014, Issue 1 Researchnews Science & Engineering To Power Our Future 2 FE AT U RE ST O RY : R e v e a li n g S e c re ts L o c k e d in th e Ic e pa ge 3 Fr om NE TL 's O ffi ce of Re se ar ch & De ve lo pm en t - O ct ob er 20 14 , Iss ue 1 R e s e a r c h n e w s Sc ien ce & En gi ne er in g To Po we r Ou r Fu tu re Contents

  12. STREET CENTR AL AVENU E C E N T R A L A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 6 15 18 19 17 20 21 23 24 25 20TH STREET CENTR AL AVENU E C E N T R A L A V E N U E CENT RAL AVEN UE CAN YO N RO AD IRIS STREET N E C T A R S T R E E T M YR TL E ST RE ET 15TH STREET 4TH STREET 6TH STREET TRINITY DRIVE DP ROAD T R I N I T Y D R I V E TRINITY DRIVE T R I N I T Y D R I V E O P P E N H E I M E R D R I V E POST OFFICE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BRADBURY SCIENCE MUSEUM BUS PARKING FULLER LODGE ASHLEY POND HISTORICAL MUSEUM MESA PUBLIC LIBRARY SENIOR CENTER KNECHT STREET 9TH STREET 16 14

  13. Outage management and health physics issue, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2009-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles include the following: Planning and scheduling to minimize refueling outage, by Pat McKenna, AmerenUE; Prioritizing safety, quality and schedule, by Tom Sharkey, Dominion; Benchmarking to high standards, by Margie Jepson, Energy Nuclear; Benchmarking against U.S. standards, by Magnox North, United Kingdom; Enabling suppliers for new build activity, by Marcus Harrington, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Identifying, cultivating and qualifying suppliers, by Thomas E. Silva, AREVA NP; Creating new U.S. jobs, by Francois Martineau, Areva NP. Industry innovation articles include: MSL Acoustic source load reduction, by Amir Shahkarami, Exelon Nuclear; Dual Methodology NDE of CRDM nozzles, by Michael Stark, Dominion Nuclear; and Electronic circuit board testing, by James Amundsen, FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company. The plant profile article is titled The future is now, by Julia Milstead, Progress Energy Service Company, LLC.

  14. WIPP Update 4_01_14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , 2 014 Delay i n D elivery o f P rotective E quipment P ostpones P ersonnel R e---Entry Today's s cheduled p ersonnel r e---entry t o t he W IPP u nderground was p ostponed d ue t o a delivery d elay of the lapel m onitors w orkers w ould w ear o n t heir o uter c lothing t o d etect r adiation. Safety requirements for r e---entry w ork r equire t his t ype o f p ersonal p rotective e quipment a nd e ntry w ill b e postponed u ntil t hey a rrive. Community M eetings S cheduled April 3 --- C

  15. PDSF User Meeting 06-10-14.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 1 0, 2 014 Lisa Gerhardt Utilization --- 2 --- Past Outages * 5/13/14 ( all d ay): Q uarterly m aintenance * 6/02/14 - 6 /16/14 ( ish): G lobal s cratch a t 6 0% o f peak d ue t o r olling u pgrade Planned Outages * None Other Topics from PDSF Staff * NERSC i s m oving * Four s tory, 1 40,000 G SF - 300 o ffices o n t wo fl oors - 20K --- > 2 9Ksf H PC fl oor - 12.5MW --- > 4 2 M W t o b uilding * Located for collaboraOon - CRD a nd E Snet - UC B erkeley * ExcepOonal energy efficiency

  16. A=12C (1980AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12C) GENERAL: See also (1975AJ02) and Table 12.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1974BO1P, 1975BI05, 1975BO27, 1975FR06, 1975GI1C, 1975MU13, 1975WA30, 1976BA24, 1977CA02, 1977CA08, 1977GR02, 1977JA14, 1978FU13, 1978MU04, 1978SV01, 1979LO1F). Collective and deformed models: (1974BO1P, 1975BO27, 1975KI21, 1975LE14, 1975MC15, 1975SO07, 1976GL1C, 1976PA25, 1977CA08, 1977TH03, 1977UE01, 1977VI03, 1979MA1J). Cluster and alpha particle

  17. A=12C (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12C) GENERAL: See also (1980AJ01) and Table 12.6 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977ME05, 1978RA1B, 1979HA59, 1979IN05, 1980CA12, 1980GI05, 1980HA35, 1980OH07, 1981AM08, 1981BO1Y, 1981DE2G, 1981LU1B, 1981RA06, 1982AR03, 1982BA52, 1982BR08, 1983VA31, 1984DE04, 1984VA06). Deformed models: (1979UE03, 1980BA1T, 1980BA44, 1980CA12, 1980FU1H, 1981DE2G, 1981RA06, 1981SE03, 1982AS03, 1982BR08, 1982KU1K, 1982SA1U, 1983LO04, 1983SA12,

  18. Steam turbine upgrading: low-hanging fruit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R.

    2006-04-15

    The thermodynamic performance of the steam turbine, more than any other plant component, determines overall plant efficiency. Upgrading steam path components and using computerized design tools and manufacturing techniques to minimise internal leaks are two ways to give tired steam turbines a new lease on life. The article presents three case studies that illustrate how to do that. These are at Unit 1 of Dairyland's J.P. Madgett Station in Alma, WI, a coal-fired subcritical steam plant; the four units at AmerenUE's 600 MW coal-fired Labadie plant west of St. Louis; and Unit 3 of KeyPlan Corp's Northport Power Station on Long Island. 8 figs.

  19. Development of high temperature solid lubricant coatings. Final report, 15 August 1997--14 August 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, R.S.; Keller, S.

    1999-01-29

    The primary research objective of this work was to develop a solid lubricant coating that can function over a broad temperature range. The approach investigated consisted of developing adaptive lubricant coating from materials that undergo chemical change with increasing temperature by reacting together and with the environment. To test this approach, UES and Cleveland State University have conducted experiments to form cesium oxythiotungstate, a high temperature lubricant, on Inconel 718 surface from composite coatings of cesium tungstate and tungsten sulfide. The coatings were deposited by RF sputtering and characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that sulfur escapes from the composite coating upon exposure to temperature above 5000C in air. Thus, the desired adaptive lubricant phase, cesium oxythiotungstate could not be formed. However, cesium oxythiotungstate phase has been found to form upon annealing at high temperature in vacuum. The friction coefficients of sputtered cesium oxythiotungstate and cesium tungstate coatings have been measured.

  20. 14B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1974AL11: 14B; measured βγ-coin, T1/2, Eγ; deduced log ft, J, π. 14C deduced levels. 1986CU01, 1986HAYX: 14B(β-); measured β-decay T1/2. 1992AS01, 1992OKZT, 1992OKZV: 14B(β-); measured g-factor. 1993ASZZ, 1994ASZZ: 14B(β-); measured NMR. 14B deduced μ. 1993REZX: 14B(β-n); measured β-delayed neutron average energies. 1994RE1R: 14B(β-n); measured delayed n intensity, T1/2. 1994UE04, 1995OK04, 1996IZ01, 1996IZ02, 1996IZZY, 1996OKZZ: 14B(β-);

  1. Synergy between Membranes and Microbial Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    S Sy yn ne er rg gy y b be et tw we ee en n M Me em mb br ra an ne es s a an nd d M Mi ic cr ro ob bi ia al l F Fu ue el l C Ce el ll ls s Zhen (Jason) He, Ph.D. Associate Professor � Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering � Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University � DOE Workshop on Hydrogen, Hydrocarbons, and Bioproduct Precursors from Wastewaters March 18-19, Washington DC * Hi h- lit effluent for direct dischar e or W Wh hy y l li in nk ki in ng g " "f fi

  2. Cyclone Boiler Field Testing of Advanced Layered NOx Control Technology in Sioux Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc A. Cremer; Bradley R. Adams

    2006-06-30

    A four week testing program was completed during this project to assess the ability of the combination of deep staging, Rich Reagent Injection (RRI), and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) to reduce NOx emissions below 0.15 lb/MBtu in a cyclone fired boiler. The host site for the tests was AmerenUE's Sioux Unit 1, a 500 MW cyclone fired boiler located near St. Louis, MO. Reaction Engineering International (REI) led the project team including AmerenUE, FuelTech Inc., and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This layered approach to NOx reduction is termed the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA). Installed RRI and SNCR port locations were guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based modeling conducted by REI. During the parametric testing, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were achieved consistently from overfire air (OFA)-only baseline NOx emissions of 0.25 lb/MBtu or less, when firing the typical 80/20 fuel blend of Powder River Basin (PRB) and Illinois No.6 coals. From OFA-only baseline levels of 0.20 lb/MBtu, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were also achieved, but at significantly reduced urea flow rates. Under the deeply staged conditions that were tested, RRI performance was observed to degrade as higher blends of Illinois No.6 were used. NOx emissions achieved with ALTA while firing a 60/40 blend were approximately 0.15 lb/MBtu. NOx emissions while firing 100% Illinois No.6 were approximately 0.165 lb/MBtu. Based on the performance results of these tests, economics analyses of the application of ALTA to a nominal 500 MW cyclone unit show that the levelized cost to achieve 0.15 lb/MBtu is well below 75% of the cost of a state of the art SCR.

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - ACTIVE_NYC_2006_1.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particle Imager data from the Egret P. Connolly♣, K. Bower♣, M. Gallagher♣, G. Vaughan♣, T. Choularton♣, G. Allen♣, A. Heymsfield ♥ ♣School of Earth,Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester. ♥NCAR, USA 16.5 17 17.5 18 18.5 19 0 0.2 0.4 AE04, 16-Nov-2005 N 100-1800 µm (cm -3 ) CIP sph col plt sir bir 16.5 17 17.5 18 18.5 19 0 0.5 1 IWC (gm -3 ) 16.5 17 17.5 18 18.5 19 -60 -50 -40 -30 TIME (hrs) T ( ° C) 10 0 10 1 10 2 10 3 10 4 10 -8 10 -7 10 -6 10

  4. Utility of reactively sputtered CuN{sub x} films in spintronics devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang Yeyu; Persson, J.; Zha, C.; Willman, J.; Miller, Casey W.; Aakerman, Johan

    2012-04-01

    We have studied nitrified copper (CuN{sub x}) thin films grown by reactive sputtering in the context of spintronic devices. The Ar-to-N{sub 2} flow ratio enables tunability of the electrical resistivity and surface roughness of the CuN{sub x} films, with the former increasing to nearly 20 times that of Cu, and the latter reduced to the atomic scale. Incorporating this into a Ta/CuN{sub x}/Ta seed stack for spin valves improves the current-in-plane (CIP) magnetoresistance; maximum magnetoresistance results with CuN{sub x} seed layer and Cu interlayer. Finally, finite element modeling results are presented that suggest the use of CuN{sub x} in nanocontact spin torque oscillators can enhance current densities by limiting the current spread through the device. This may positively impact threshold currents, power requirements, and device reliability.

  5. SISGR: Linking Ion Solvation and Lithium Battery Electrolyte Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trulove, Paul C; Foley, Matthew P

    2013-03-14

    The solvation and phase behavior of the model battery electrolyte salt lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiCF3SO3) in commonly used organic solvents; ethylene carbonate (EC), gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), and propylene carbonate (PC) was explored. Data from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were correlated to provide insight into the solvation states present within a sample mixture. Data from DSC analyses allowed the construction of phase diagrams for each solvent system. Raman spectroscopy enabled the determination of specific solvation states present within a solvent-????salt mixture, and X-ray diffraction data provided exact information concerning the structure of a solvates that could be isolated Thermal analysis of the various solvent-salt mixtures revealed the phase behavior of the model electrolytes was strongly dependent on solvent symmetry. The point groups of the solvents were (in order from high to low symmetry): C2V for EC, CS for GBL, and C1 for PC(R). The low symmetry solvents exhibited a crystallinity gap that increased as solvent symmetry decreased; no gap was observed for EC-LiTf, while a crystallinity gap was observed spanning 0.15 to 0.3 mole fraction for GBL-LiTf, and 0.1 to 0.33 mole fraction for PC(R)-LiTf mixtures. Raman analysis demonstrated the dominance of aggregated species in almost all solvent compositions. The AGG and CIP solvates represent the majority of the species in solutions for the more concentrated mixtures, and only in very dilute compositions does the SSIP solvate exist in significant amounts. Thus, the poor charge transport characteristics of CIP and AGG account for the low conductivity and transport properties of LiTf and explain why is a poor choice as a source of Li+ ions in a Li-ion battery.

  6. The development of a high-throughput gradient array apparatus for the study of porous polymer networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Partha; Lee, Elizabeth; Chisholm, Bret J.; Dirk, Shawn M.; Weisz, Michael; Bahr, James; Schiele, Kris

    2010-01-01

    A gradient array apparatus was constructed for the study of porous polymers produced using the process of chemically-induced phase separation (CIPS). The apparatus consisted of a 60 element, two-dimensional array in which a temperature gradient was placed in the y-direction and composition was varied in the x-direction. The apparatus allowed for changes in opacity of blends to be monitored as a function of temperature and cure time by taking images of the array with time. The apparatus was validated by dispense a single blend composition into all 60 wells of the array and curing them for 24 hours and doing the experiment in triplicate. Variations in micron scale phase separation were readily observed as a function of both curing time and temperature and there was very good well-to-well consistency as well as trial-to-trial consistency. Poragen of samples varying with respect to cure temperature was removed and SEM images were obtained. The results obtained showed that cure temperature had a dramatic affect on sample morphology, and combining data obtained from visual observations made during the curing process with SEM data can enable a much better understanding of the CIPS process and provide predictive capability through the relatively facile generation of composition-process-morphology relationships. Data quality could be greatly enhanced by making further improvements in the apparatus. The primary improvements contemplated include the use of a more uniform light source, an optical table, and a CCD camera with data analysis software. These improvements would enable quantification of the amount of scattered light generated from individual elements as a function of cure time. In addition to the gradient array development, porous composites were produced by incorporating metal particles into a blend of poragen, epoxy resin, and crosslinker. The variables involved in the experiment were metal particle composition, primary metal particle size, metal concentration

  7. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this works calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the CIPS Validation Data Plan at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable

  8. “Thought experiments” as dry-runs for “tough experiments”: novel approaches to the hydration behavior of oxyanions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Vlcek, Lukas

    2016-01-21

    We explore the deconvolution of correlations for the interpretation of the microstructural behavior of aqueous electrolytes according to the neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS) approach toward the experimental determination of ion coordination numbers of systems involving oxyanions, in particular, sulfate anions. We discuss the alluded interplay in the title of this presentation, emphasized the expectations, and highlight the significance of tackling the challenging NDIS experiments. Specifically, we focus on the potential occurrence of Nmore » $$2+\\atop{i}$$ ...SO$$2-\\atop{4}$$ pair formation, identify its signature, suggest novel ways either for the direct probe of the contact ion pair (CIP) strength and the subsequent correction of its effects on the measured coordination numbers, or for the determination of anion coordination numbers free of CIP contributions through the implementation of null-cation environments. For that purpose we perform simulations of NiSO4 aqueous solutions at ambient conditions to generate the distribution functions required in the analysis (a) to identify the individual partial contributions to the total neutron-weighted distribution function, (b) to isolate and assess the contribution of N$$2+\\atop{i}$$ ...SO$$2-\\atop{4}$$ pair formation, (c) to test the accuracy of the neutron diffraction with isotope substitution based coordination calculations and X-ray diffraction based assumptions, and (d) to describe the water coordination around both the sulfur and oxygen sites of the sulfate anion. In conclusion, we finally discuss the strength of this interplay on the basis of the inherent molecular simulation ability to provide all pair correlation functions that fully characterize the system microstructure and allows us to “reconstruct” the eventual NDIS output, i.e., to take an atomistic “peek” (e.g., see Figure 1) at the local environment around the isotopically-labeled species before any experiment is ever

  9. Evaluation of a New Remote Handling Design for High Throughput Annular Centrifugal Contactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David H. Meikrantz; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law; Lawrence L. Macaluso

    2009-09-01

    Advanced designs of nuclear fuel recycling plants are expected to include more ambitious goals for aqueous based separations including; higher separations efficiency, high-level waste minimization, and a greater focus on continuous processes to minimize cost and footprint. Therefore, Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACCs) are destined to play a more important role for such future processing schemes. Previous efforts defined and characterized the performance of commercial 5 cm and 12.5 cm single-stage ACCs in a cold environment. The next logical step, the design and evaluation of remote capable pilot scale ACCs in a hot or radioactive environment was reported earlier. This report includes the development of remote designs for ACCs that can process the large throughput rates needed in future nuclear fuel recycling plants. Novel designs were developed for the remote interconnection of contactor units, clean-in-place and drain connections, and a new solids removal collection chamber. A three stage, 12.5 cm diameter rotor module has been constructed and evaluated for operational function and remote handling in highly radioactive environments. This design is scalable to commercial CINC ACC models from V-05 to V-20 with total throughput rates ranging from 20 to 650 liters per minute. The V-05R three stage prototype was manufactured by the commercial vendor for ACCs in the U.S., CINC mfg. It employs three standard V-05 clean-in-place (CIP) units modified for remote service and replacement via new methods of connection for solution inlets, outlets, drain and CIP. Hydraulic testing and functional checks were successfully conducted and then the prototype was evaluated for remote handling and maintenance suitability. Removal and replacement of the center position V-05R ACC unit in the three stage prototype was demonstrated using an overhead rail mounted PaR manipulator. This evaluation confirmed the efficacy of this innovative design for interconnecting and cleaning

  10. Anarchy and hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2000-09-14

    We advocate a new approach to study models of fermion massesand mixings, namely anarchy proposed in hep-ph/9911341. In this approach,we scan the O(1) coefficients randomly. We argue that this is the correctapproach when the fundamental theory is sufficiently complicated.Assuming there is no physical distinction among three generations ofneutrinos, the probability distributions in MNS mixing angles can bepredicted independent of the choice of the measure. This is because themixing angles are distributed according to the Haar measure of the Liegroups whose elements diagonalize the mass matrices. The near-maximalmixings, as observed in the atmospheric neutrino data and as required inthe LMA solution to the solar neutrino problem, are highly probable. Asmall hierarchy between the Delta m2 for the atmospheric and the solarneutrinos is obtained very easily; the complex seesaw case gives ahierarchy of a factor of 20 as the most probable one, even though thisconclusion is more measure-dependent. U_e3 has to be just below thecurrent limit from the CHOOZ experiment. The CP-violating parameter sindelta is preferred to be maximal. We present a simple SU(5)-likeextension of anarchy to the charged-lepton and quark sectors which workswell phenomenologically.

  11. Criticism of generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2015-03-10

    It is explained why the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown (a transition from free flow to congested traffic) should be the empirical basis for any traffic and transportation theory that can be reliable used for control and optimization in traffic networks. It is shown that generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory are not consistent with the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown at a highway bottleneck. To these fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory belong (i) Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) theory, (ii) the General Motors (GM) model class (for example, Herman, Gazis et al. GM model, Gipps’s model, Payne’s model, Newell’s optimal velocity (OV) model, Wiedemann’s model, Bando et al. OV model, Treiber’s IDM, Krauß’s model), (iii) the understanding of highway capacity as a particular stochastic value, and (iv) principles for traffic and transportation network optimization and control (for example, Wardrop’s user equilibrium (UE) and system optimum (SO) principles). Alternatively to these generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory, we discuss three-phase traffic theory as the basis for traffic flow modeling as well as briefly consider the network breakdown minimization (BM) principle for the optimization of traffic and transportation networks with road bottlenecks.

  12. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AMCHITKA BIOLOGICAL IWODlATION S J M U I i Y Prspard for tho U. S. Atoric En~rny C d a a i o n undmr Contract No. A T (26-11-171 MTTkUE Colrubua LaboratoriRa 505 Kirq A V ~ R Collubua. Ohio 43201 Printed i n t h e U n i t d S t a t ~ of A l r r i w . A v a i h b l e f t o l - Nrtio-1 Technical I n f o r m t i o n Servic* U. S. D e p a r t u n t o f C o W t E P Sprinlf i a l d , v i + # i n b 22151 Thim r e p o r t naa p r e m r d a m an account of w x k mpon~ored by t h e United S t r t a a

  13. Model Evaluation Report for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruskauff, Greg; Marutzky, Sam

    2014-09-01

    Model evaluation focused solely on the PIN STRIPE and MILK SHAKE underground nuclear tests’ contaminant boundaries (CBs) because they had the largest extent, uncertainty, and potential consequences. The CAMBRIC radionuclide migration experiment also had a relatively large CB, but because it was constrained by transport data (notably Well UE-5n), there was little uncertainty, and radioactive decay reduced concentrations before much migration could occur. Each evaluation target and the associated data-collection activity were assessed in turn to determine whether the new data support, or demonstrate conservatism of, the CB forecasts. The modeling team—in this case, the same team that developed the Frenchman Flat geologic, source term, and groundwater flow and transport models—analyzed the new data and presented the results to a PER committee. Existing site understanding and its representation in numerical groundwater flow and transport models was evaluated in light of the new data and the ability to proceed to the CR stage of long-term monitoring and institutional control.

  14. Uranium (VI)Bis(imido) chalcogenate complexes:synthesis and density functional theory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Liam P; Batista, Enrique R; Boncella, James M; Yang, Ping; Scott, Brian L

    2009-01-01

    Bis(imido) uranium(VI) trans- and cis-dichalcogenate complexes with the general formula U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 (EAr = O-2-tBuC6H4, SPh, SePh, TePh) and U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(R2bpy) (EAr = SPh, SePh, TePh) (R2bpy = 4,4'-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridyl, R = Me, tBu) have been prepared. This family of complexes includes the first reported monodentate selenolate and tellurolate complexes of uranium(VI). Density functional theory calculations show that covalent interactions in the U-E bond increase in the trans-dichalcogenate series U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 as the size of the chalcogenate donor increases and that both 5f and 6d orbital participation is important in the M-E bonds of U-S, U-Se, and U-Te complexes.

  15. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sytnikov, V. E. Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A.; Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  16. Effects of rolling temperature and subsequent annealing on mechanical properties of ultrafine-grained Cu–Zn–Si alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Yang, Xuyue; Chen, Wei; Qin, Jia; Fouse, Jiaping

    2015-08-15

    The effects of rolling temperature and subsequent annealing on mechanical properties of Cu–Zn–Si alloy were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, electron back scattered diffraction and tensile tests. The Cu–Zn–Si alloy has been processed at cryogenic temperature (approximately 77 K) and room temperature up to different rolling strains. It has been identified that the cryorolled Cu–Zn–Si alloy samples show a higher strength compared with those room temperature rolled samples. The improved strength of cryorolled samples is resulted from grain size effect and higher densities of dislocations and deformation twins. And subsequent annealing, as a post-heat treatment, enhanced the ductility. An obvious increase in uniform elongation appears when the volume fraction of static recrystallization grains exceeds 25%. The strength–ductility combination of the annealed cryorolled samples is superior to that of annealed room temperature rolled samples, owing to the finer grains, high fractions of high angle grain boundaries and twins. - Highlights: • An increase in hardness of Cu–Zn–Si alloy is noticed during annealing process. • Thermal stability is reduced in Cu–Zn–Si alloy by cryorolling. • An obvious enhancement in UE is noticed when fraction of SRX grains exceeds 25%. • A superior strength–ductility combination is achieved in the cryorolling samples.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL TURBINE BLADES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amarendra K. Rai

    2006-12-04

    Turbine blades in coal derived syngas systems are subject to oxidation and corrosion due to high steam temperature and pressure. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are developed to address these problems. The emphasis is on prime-reliant design and a better coating architecture, having high temperature and corrosion resistance properties for turbine blades. In Phase I, UES Inc. proposed to develop, characterize and optimize a prime reliant TBC system, having smooth and defect-free NiCoCrAlY bond layer and a defect free oxide sublayer, using a filtered arc technology. Phase I work demonstrated the deposition of highly dense, smooth and defect free NiCoCrAlY bond coat on a single crystal CMSX-4 substrate and the deposition of alpha-alumina and yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) sublayer on top of the bond coat. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation test and pre- and post-characterization of these layers, in Phase I work, (with and without top TBC layer of commercial EB PVD YSZ) revealed significant performance enhancement.

  18. Repository site data report for unsaturated tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tien, P.L.; Updegraff, C.D.; Siegel, M.D.; Wahi, K.K.; Guzowski, R.V.

    1985-11-01

    The US Department of Energy is currently considering the thick sequences of unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, on the southwestern boundary of the Nevada Test Site, as a possible candidate host rock for a nuclear-waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in one of the most arid areas in the United States. The site is within the south-central part of the Great Basin section of the Basin and Range physiographic province and is located near a number of silicic calderas of Tertiary age. Although localized zones of seismic activity are common throughout the province, and faults are present at Yucca Mountain, the site itself is basically aseismic. No data are available on the composition of ground water in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. It has been suggested that the composition is bounded by the compositions of water from wells USW-H3, UE25p-1, J-13, and snow or rain. There are relatively few data available from Yucca Mountain on the moisture content and saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and characteristic curves of the unsaturated zone. The available literature on thermomechanical properties of tuff does not always distinguish between data from the saturated zone and data from the unsaturated zone. Geochemical, hydrologic, and thermomechanical data available on the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain are tabulated in this report. Where the data are very sparse, they have been supplemented by data from the saturated zone or from areas other than Yucca Mountain. 316 refs., 58 figs., 37 tabs.

  19. Modeling a ponded infiltration experiment at Yucca Mountain, NV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, D.B.; Guertal, W.R. [Foothill Engineering, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States); Flint, A.L. [Geological Survey, Mercury, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository for high level radioactive waste. As part of the site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, a field-scale ponded infiltration experiment was done to help characterize the hydraulic and infiltration properties of a layered dessert alluvium deposit. Calcium carbonate accumulation and cementation, heterogeneous layered profiles, high evapotranspiration, low precipitation, and rocky soil make the surface difficult to characterize.The effects of the strong morphological horizonation on the infiltration processes, the suitability of measured hydraulic properties, and the usefulness of ponded infiltration experiments in site characterization work were of interest. One-dimensional and two-dimensional radial flow numerical models were used to help interpret the results of the ponding experiment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of a ponded infiltration experiment done around borehole UE25 UZN {number_sign}85 (N85) at Yucca Mountain, NV. The effects of morphological horizons on the infiltration processes, lateral flow, and measured soil hydaulic properties were studied. The evaluation was done by numerically modeling the results of a field ponded infiltration experiment. A comparison the experimental results and the modeled results was used to qualitatively indicate the degree to which infiltration processes and the hydaulic properties are understood. Results of the field characterization, soil characterization, borehole geophysics, and the ponding experiment are presented in a companion paper.

  20. Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Sjostrom

    2008-06-30

    ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and industry partners, studied mercury control options at six coal-fired power plants. The overall objective of the this test program was to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at six plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, American Electric Power's Conesville Station Unit 6, and Labadie Power Plant Unit 2. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The financial goals for the program established by DOE/NETL were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the target established by DOE of $60,000 per pound of mercury removed. Results from testing at Holcomb, Laramie, Meramec, Labadie, and Monroe indicate the DOE goal was successfully achieved. However, further improvements for plants with conditions similar to Conesville are recommended that would improve both mercury removal performance and economics.

  1. Core characterization of the new CABRI Water Loop Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, G.; Rodiac, F.; Beretz, D.; Girard, J.M.; Gueton, O.

    2011-07-01

    The CABRI experimental reactor is located at the Cadarache nuclear research center, southern France. It is operated by the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and devoted to IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire) safety programmes. It has been successfully operated during the last 30 years, enlightening the knowledge of FBR and LWR fuel behaviour during Reactivity Insertion Accident (RIA) and Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) transients in the frame of IPSN (Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire) and now IRSN programmes devoted to reactor safety. This operation was interrupted in 2003 to allow for a whole facility renewal programme for the need of the CABRI International Programme (CIP) carried out by IRSN under the OECD umbrella. The principle of operation of the facility is based on the control of {sup 3}He, a major gaseous neutron absorber, in the core geometry. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how several dosimetric devices have been set up to better characterize the core during the upcoming commissioning campaign. It presents the schemes and tools dedicated to core characterization. (authors)

  2. Up-regulation of E-cadherin by small activating RNA inhibits cell invasion and migration in 5637 human bladder cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao Qiqi; Li Yubing; Zheng Xiangyi; Yang Kai; Shen Huafeng; Qin Jie; Bai Yu; Kong Debo; Jia Xiaolong [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Qingchun Road 79, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang Province (China); Xie Liping [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Qingchun Road 79, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang Province (China)], E-mail: xielp@zjuem.zju.edu.cn

    2008-10-31

    Recent studies have reported that chemically synthesized small duplex RNAs complementary to promoters of target genes can specifically induce gene expression in several cancer cell lines. Such dsRNA, referred to as small activating RNA (saRNA), are involved in the recently described phenomenon called RNA activation (RNAa). Recent findings show that saRNA can inhibit cell proliferation and viability via up-regulation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} (p21) in human bladder cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that induction of E-cadherin expression by saRNA leads to suppression of migration and invasion of 5637 human bladder cancer cells in vitro. The elevated E-cadherin expression was confirmed at transcriptional and protein levels after transfection of a 21-nucleotide dsRNA targeting the E-cadherin promoter (dsEcad). Furthermore, this inhibitory effect was associated with relocalization of {beta}-catenin from the nucleus to the plasma membrane and decreased {beta}-catenin-mediated transactivation. These data suggest that activation of E-cadherin by saRNA may have a therapeutic benefit for bladder and other types of cancer.

  3. The potassium ion channel opener NS1619 inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in A2780 ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han Xiaobing; Xi Ling; Wang Hui; Huang Xiaoyuan; Ma Xiangyi; Han Zhiqiang; Wu Peng; Ma Xiaoli; Lu Yunping; Wang, Gang Zhou Jianfeng; Ma Ding

    2008-10-17

    Diverse types of voltage-gated potassium (K{sup +}) channels have been shown to be involved in regulation of cell proliferation. The maxi-conductance Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channels (BK channels) may play an important role in the progression of human cancer. To explore the role of BK channels in regulation of apoptosis in human ovarian cancer cells, the effects of the specific BK channel activator NS1619 on induction of apoptosis in A2780 cells were observed. Following treatment with NS1619, cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis of A2780 cells pretreated with NS1619 was detected by agarose gel electrophoresis of cellular DNA and flow cytometry. Our data demonstrate that NS1619 inhibits the proliferation of A2780 cells in a dosage and time dependent manner IC{sub 50} = 31.1 {mu}M, for 48 h pretreatment and induces apoptosis. Western blot analyses showed that the anti-proliferation effect of NS1619 was associated with increased expression of p53, p21, and Bax. These results indicate that BK channels play an important role in regulating proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells and may induce apoptosis through induction of p21{sup Cip1} expression in a p53-dependent manner.

  4. Impact of Pretreated Switchgrass and Biomass Carbohydrates on Clostridium thermocellum 27405 Cellulosome Composition- a Quantitative Proteomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, Babu; Pan, Chongle; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; McKeown, Catherine K; Lankford, Patricia K; Samatova, Nagiza F; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    The anaerobic thermophilic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulolytic organism capable of hydrolyzing cellulose and fermenting the hydrolysis products to ethanol and other metabolic products. C. thermocellum achieves efficient cellulose hydrolysis using multiprotein extracellular enzymatic complexes, termed the cellulosomes. In this study, we used quantitative proteomics (multidimensional LC-MS/MS and 15N-metabolic labeling) to measure relative changes in levels of cellulosomal subunit proteins (per CipA scaffoldin basis) when C. thermocellum was grown on a variety of carbon sources [dilute-acid pretreated switchgrass, cellobiose, amorphous cellulose, crystalline cellulose (Avicel) and combinations of crystalline cellulose with pectin or xylan or both]. Cellulosome samples isolated from cultures grown on these carbon sources were compared to 15N labeled cellulosome samples isolated from crystalline cellulose grown cultures. In total from all samples, proteomic analysis identified 59 dockerin- and 8 cohesin-module containing components, including 15 previously undetected cellulosomal subunits. Many cellulosomal components showed differential protein abundance in the presence of non-cellulose substrates in the growth medium. Cellulosome samples from amorphous cellulose, cellobiose and pretreated switchgrass grown cultures displayed the most distinct differences in composition as compared to cellulosome samples from crystalline cellulose grown cultures. While Glycoside Hydrolase Family 9 enzymes showed increased levels in the presence of crystalline cellulose, and pretreated switchgrass in particular, GH5 enzymes showed increased levels in response to the presence of cellulose in general, amorphous or crystalline. Overall, the results suggest a coordinated substrate-specific regulation of cellulosomal composition in C. thermocellum.

  5. Purification and crystallization of a trimodular complex comprising the type II cohesin–dockerin interaction from the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Jarrett J.; Pal, Gour; Yam, Katherine; Spencer, Holly L.; Jia, Zongchao; Smith, Steven P.

    2005-01-01

    A trimodular complex comprising the type II cohesin–dockerin interaction from the cellulosome of C. thermocellum has been purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A native crystal and a selenomethionine derivative have been analyzed using X-ray diffraction. The high-affinity calcium-mediated type II cohesin–dockerin interaction is responsible for the attachment of the multi-enzyme cellulose-degrading complex, termed the cellulosome, to the cell surface of the thermophilic anaerobe Clostridium thermocellum. A trimodular 40 kDa complex comprising the SdbA type II cohesin and the the CipA type II dockerin–X module modular pair from the cellulosome of C. thermocellum has been crystallized. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 45.21, b = 52.34, c = 154.69 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of the protein complex and native and selenomethionine-derivative crystals diffracted to 2.1 and 2.0 Å, respectively.

  6. Power from bio-sources in Italy incentives and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerardi, V.; Ricci, A.; Scoditti, E.

    1996-12-31

    In Italy most of the technologies for producing power from bio-sources, as well as from other non-conventional renewable Energy Sources (RES), are rather mature, but their exploitation is still not completely convenient from the economic point of view. It depends on many factors, such as designing of plants, selection of energy conversion system and components, selection of installation site, size of market still too limited, high production costs of the technologies and lack of adequate financial supports. In the early nineties, in the attempt to overcome this situation, the Italian Government issued a series of measures addressed mainly to the power production from RES. This gives a short description of the regulations in force and some details about an important incentive tool (CIP 6/92 and relative decrees) for RES power plants installation. In particular, it indicates the possible power plant typologies, the criteria to assimilate the fossil fuel plants to RES ones, the present prices of electricity transferred into the grid and the methodology for updating the prices. Furthermore, the paper gives some data concerning submitted proposals, plant operation planning and their geographic distribution according to different bio-sources typologies.

  7. Ground motion analysis of OSSY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, R.P.; Snell, C.M.

    1993-11-01

    The On Site Seismic Yield experiment, OSSY, was performed to investigate the viability of a high-explosive technique to help estimate the yield of nuclear explosions. We have analyzed recorded data and conducted numerical simulations of the 100-pound OSSY experiments performed in hole UE-10 ITS No. 3 at the Nevada Test Site. Particle velocity wave forms from these experiments show a distinct dual-pulse structure in the close-in and far-field regions, with the amplitude of the second pulse being as large as or larger than the first pulse. To gain some insight into the cause of the dual-pulse feature, we examine how the explosion-induced close-in response is affected by (1) certain features of inelastic rock/soil constitutive models applied in the near-field region, (2) the large length-to-diameter charge ratio of 8, (3) the charge and gauge package emplacement, and (4) geology (e.g., layering) in the vicinity of the explosion. Our results from 1-D and 2-D simulations show the following: (a) the response, measured by accelerometers located above the charges, is significantly influenced by the charge length-to-diameter ratio out to a distance of 8 m. (b) the grout emplacement of the charge has very little effect on the response. (c) the geologic layering serves mainly to phase the arrival of the pulses. (d) the second pulse can be best accounted for by applying a dilatant feature that allows for pore recovery during unloading. Other material property variations do not provide any contribution to the formation of a second pulse.

  8. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Septic Systems and Discharge Area. CAU 151 consists of the following eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 12, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada: (1) CAS 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) CAS 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) CAS 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) CAS 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) CAS 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) CAS 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) CAS 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; and (8) CAS 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed). CAU 151 closure activities were conducted according to the FFACO (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008) and the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 151 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2007) from October 2007 to January 2008. The corrective action alternatives included no further action, clean closure, and closure in place with administrative controls. CAU 151 closure activities are summarized in Table 1. Closure activities generated liquid remediation waste, sanitary waste, hydrocarbon waste, and mixed waste. Waste generated was appropriately managed and disposed. Waste that is currently staged onsite is being appropriately managed and will be disposed under approved waste profiles in permitted landfills. Waste minimization activities included waste characterization sampling and segregation of waste streams. Some waste exceeded land disposal restriction limits and required offsite treatment prior to disposal. Other waste meeting land disposal restrictions was disposed of in appropriate onsite or offsite landfills. Waste disposition documentation is included as Appendix C.

  9. Entry/Exit Port testing, test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkelman, R.H.

    1993-05-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module I (WRAP-1) facility must have the ability to allow 55-gallon drums to enter and exit glovebox enclosures. An Entry/Exit Port (Appendix 1, Figure 1), designed by United Engineers and Constructors (UE&C), is one method chosen for drum transfer. The Entry/Exit Port is to be used for entry of 55-gallon drums into both process entry gloveboxes, exit of 55-gallon drum waste pucks from the low-level waste (LLW) glovebox, and loadout of waste from the restricted waste management glovebox. The Entry/Exit Port relies on capture velocity air flow and a neoprene seal to provide alpha confinement when the Port is in the open and closed positions, respectively. Since the glovebox is in a slight vacuum, air flow is directed into the glovebox through the space between the overpack drum and glovebox floor. The air flow is to direct any airborne contamination into the glovebox. A neoprene seal is used to seal the Port door to the glovebox floor, thus maintaining confinement in the closed position. Entry/Exit Port testing took place February 17, 1993, through April 14, 1993, in the 305 building of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Testing was performed in accordance with the Entry/Exit Port Testing Test Plan, document number WHC-SD-WO26-TP-005. A prototype Entry/Exit Port built at the Hanford Site was tested using fluorescent paint pigment and smoke candles as simulant contaminants. This test report is an interim test report. Further developmental testing is required to test modifications made to the Port as the original design of the Port did not provide complete confinement during all stages of operation.

  10. Air-injection testing in vertical boreholes in welded and nonwelded Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCain, G.D.

    1997-12-31

    Air-injection tests, by use of straddle packers, were done in four vertical boreholes (UE-25 UZ-No.16, USW SD-12, USW NRG-6, and USW NRG-7a) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The geologic units tested were the Tiva Canyon Tuff, nonwelded tuffs of the Paintbrush Group, Topopah Spring Tuff, and Calico Hills Formation. Air-injection permeability values of the Tiva Canyon Tuff ranged from 0.3 x 10{sup -12} to 54.0 x 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}(square meter). Air-injection permeability values of the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff ranged from 0.12 x 10{sup -12} to 3.0 x 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}. Air-injection permeability values of the Topopah Spring Tuff ranged from 0.02 x 10{sup -12} to 33.0 x 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}. The air-injection permeability value of the only Calico Hills Formation interval tested was 0.025 x 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}. The shallow test intervals of the Tiva Canyon Tuff had the highest air-injection permeability values. Variograms of the air-injection permeability values of the Topopah Spring Tuff show a hole effect; an initial increase in the variogram values is followed by a decrease. The hole effect is due to the decrease in permeability with depth identified in several geologic zones. The hole effect indicates some structural control of the permeability distribution, possibly associated with the deposition and cooling of the tuff. Analysis of variance indicates that the air-injection permeability values of borehole NRG-7a of the Topopah Spring Tuff are different from the other boreholes; this indicates areal variation in permeability.

  11. Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Sjostrom

    2005-12-30

    The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. This is the final site report for tests conducted at Laramie River Station Unit 3, one of five sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The overall objective of the test program is to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at five plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, and AEP's Conesville Station Unit 6. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The goals for the program established by DOE/NETL are to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the benchmark established by DOE of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The goals of the program were exceeded at Laramie River Station by achieving over 90% mercury removal at a sorbent cost of $3,980/lb ($660/oz) mercury removed for a coal mercury content of 7.9 lb/TBtu.

  12. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2001-2002 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, T P; Kersting, A B; Harris, L J; Hudson, G B; Smith, D K; Williams, R W; Loewen, D R; Nelson, E J; Allen, P G; Ryerson, F J; Pawloski, G A; Laue, C A; Moran, J E

    2003-08-15

    This report contains highlights of FY 2001 and 2002 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work emphasizes the Defense Programs goal of responsible management of natural resources at the NTS, while UGTA-funded work focuses on defining the extent of radionuclide contamination in NTS groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing. The report is organized on a topical basis, and contains eight chapters that reflect the range of technical work performed by LLNL-ANCD in support of HRMP and UGTA. Chapter 1 describes recent hot well sampling efforts at the NTS, and presents the results of chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples from six near-field wells. These include the Cambric (UE-5n), Bilby (U-3cn PS No.2), Bourbon (UE-7nS), Nash (UE-2ce), Tybo/Benham (ER-20-5 No.3), and Almendro (U-19v PS No.1ds) sites. The data generated by the hot well program is vital to the development and validation of contaminant transport models at the NTS. Chapter 2 discusses the results of xenon isotope measurements of groundwater samples from the six near-field wells described in Chapter 1. This work demonstrates that fission xenon is present in the water at levels that are readily measurable and highlights the significant differences in xenon concentrations and isotopic abundances at different sites. These differences provide insight into the early cooling history of nuclear test cavities, and may assist in predicting the distribution of the source term in the near-field environment. Chapter 3 is an investigation of the distribution

  13. Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification and Insurance Process for the Electric Utility Industry (initial award through Award Modification 2); Energy & Risk Transfer Assessment (Award Modifications 3 - 6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Ebert

    2008-02-28

    This is the final report for the DOE-NETL grant entitled 'Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification & Insurance Processes for the Electric Utility Industry' and later, 'Energy & Risk Transfer Assessment'. It reflects work done on projects from 15 August 2004 to 29 February 2008. Projects were on a variety of topics, including commercial insurance for electrical utilities, the Electrical Reliability Organization, cost recovery by Gulf State electrical utilities after major hurricanes, and review of state energy emergency plans. This Final Technical Report documents and summarizes all work performed during the award period, which in this case is from 15 August 2004 (date of notification of original award) through 29 February 2008. This report presents this information in a comprehensive, integrated fashion that clearly shows a logical and synergistic research trajectory, and is augmented with findings and conclusions drawn from the research as a whole. Four major research projects were undertaken and completed during the 42 month period of activities conducted and funded by the award; these are: (1) Creating New Incentives for Risk Identification and Insurance Process for the Electric Utility Industry (also referred to as the 'commercial insurance' research). Three major deliverables were produced: a pre-conference white paper, a two-day facilitated stakeholders workshop conducted at George Mason University, and a post-workshop report with findings and recommendations. All deliverables from this work are published on the CIP website at http://cipp.gmu.edu/projects/DoE-NETL-2005.php. (2) The New Electric Reliability Organization (ERO): an examination of critical issues associated with governance, standards development and implementation, and jurisdiction (also referred to as the 'ERO study'). Four major deliverables were produced: a series of preliminary memoranda for the staff of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability ('OE'), an ERO interview

  14. Investigation of advanced UQ for CRUD prediction with VIPRE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldred, Michael Scott

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes the results from a level 3 milestone study within the CASL VUQ effort. It demonstrates the application of 'advanced UQ,' in particular dimension-adaptive p-refinement for polynomial chaos and stochastic collocation. The study calculates statistics for several quantities of interest that are indicators for the formation of CRUD (Chalk River unidentified deposit), which can lead to CIPS (CRUD induced power shift). Stochastic expansion methods are attractive methods for uncertainty quantification due to their fast convergence properties. For smooth functions (i.e., analytic, infinitely-differentiable) in L{sup 2} (i.e., possessing finite variance), exponential convergence rates can be obtained under order refinement for integrated statistical quantities of interest such as mean, variance, and probability. Two stochastic expansion methods are of interest: nonintrusive polynomial chaos expansion (PCE), which computes coefficients for a known basis of multivariate orthogonal polynomials, and stochastic collocation (SC), which forms multivariate interpolation polynomials for known coefficients. Within the DAKOTA project, recent research in stochastic expansion methods has focused on automated polynomial order refinement ('p-refinement') of expansions to support scalability to higher dimensional random input spaces [4, 3]. By preferentially refining only in the most important dimensions of the input space, the applicability of these methods can be extended from O(10{sup 0})-O(10{sup 1}) random variables to O(10{sup 2}) and beyond, depending on the degree of anisotropy (i.e., the extent to which randominput variables have differing degrees of influence on the statistical quantities of interest (QOIs)). Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate the application of these adaptive stochastic expansion methods to the analysis of CRUD using the VIPRE simulation tools for two different plant models of differing random dimension, anisotropy, and

  15. Heating 7.2 user`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1993-02-01

    HEATING is a general-purpose conduction heat transfer program written in Fortran 77. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat-generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray-body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a runtime memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution, and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method. The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

  16. HEATING 7. 1 user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1991-07-01

    HEATING is a FORTRAN program designed to solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three- dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heating generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-boundary or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General graybody radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING is variably dimensioned and utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution (for one-dimensional or two-dimensional problems), and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method (which for some circumstances allows a time step greater than the CEP stability criterion). The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

  17. Heating 7. 2 user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1993-02-01

    HEATING is a general-purpose conduction heat transfer program written in Fortran 77. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat-generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray-body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a runtime memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution, and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method. The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-06-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental corrective action alternatives. Corrective Action Unit 151 is located in Areas 2, 12, 18, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 151 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CAS) listed below: (1) 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; (8) 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed); and (9) 20-19-02, Photochemical Drain. The CASs within CAU 151 are discharge and collection systems. Corrective Action Site 02-05-01 is located in Area 2 and is a well-water collection pond used as a part of the Nash test. Corrective Action Sites 12-03-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, and 12-47-01 are located in Area 12 and are comprised of sewage lagoons, septic tanks, associated piping, and two sumps. The features are a part of the Area 12 Camp housing and administrative septic systems. Corrective Action Sites 18-03-01 and 18-99-09 are located in the Area 17 Camp in Area 18. These sites are sewage lagoons and associated piping. The origin and terminus of CAS 18-99-09 are unknown; however, the type and configuration of the pipe indicates that it may be a part of the septic systems in Area 18. Corrective Action Site 20-19-02 is located in the Area 20 Camp. This site is comprised of a surface discharge of photoprocessing chemicals.

  19. Neptunium Transport Behavior in the Vicinity of Underground Nuclear Tests at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, P; Tinnacher, R M; Zavarin, M; Williams, R W; Kersting, A B

    2010-12-03

    We used short lived {sup 239}Np as a yield tracer and state of the art magnetic sector ICP-MS to measure ultra low levels of {sup 237}Np in a number of 'hot wells' at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The results indicate that {sup 237}Np concentrations at the Almendro, Cambric, Dalhart, Cheshire and Chancellor sites, are in the range of 3 x 10{sup -5} to 7 x 10{sup -2} pCi/L and well below the MCL for alpha emitting radionuclides (15 pCi/L) (EPA, 2009). Thus, while Np transport is believed to occur at the NNSS, activities are expected to be well below the regulatory limits for alpha-emitting radionuclides. We also compared {sup 237}Np concentration data to other radionuclides, including tritium, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and plutonium, to evaluate the relative {sup 237}Np transport behavior. Based on isotope ratios relative to published unclassified Radiologic Source Terms (Bowen et al., 1999) and taking into consideration radionuclide distribution between melt glass, rubble and groundwater (IAEA, 1998), {sup 237}Np appears to be substantially less mobile than tritium and other non-sorbing radionuclides, as expected. However, this analysis also suggests that {sup 237}Np mobility is surprisingly similar to that of plutonium. The similar transport behavior of Np and Pu can be explained by one of two possibilities: (1) Np(IV) and Pu(IV) oxidation states dominate under mildly reducing NNSS groundwater conditions resulting in similar transport behavior or (2) apparent Np transport is the result of transport of its parent {sup 241}Pu and {sup 241}Am isotopes and subsequent decay to {sup 237}Np. Finally, measured {sup 237}Np concentrations were compared to recent Hydrologic Source Term (HST) models. The 237Np data collected from three wells in Frenchman Flat (RNM-1, RNM-2S, and UE-5n) are in good agreement with recent HST transport model predictions (Carle et al., 2005). The agreement provides

  20. Exe-Guard Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Rhett; Marshall, Tim; Chavez, Adrian; Bratus, Sergey

    2015-12-26

    compromised. This project provided non-destructive intrusion, isolation and automated response solution, achieving a goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Roadmap to Secure Control Systems. It also addressed CIP-007-R4 which requires asset owners to employ malicious software prevention tools on assets within the electronic security perimeter. In addition, the CIP-007-R3 requirement for security patch management is minimized because white listing narrows the impact of vulnerabilities and patch releases. The exe-Guard Project completed all tasks identified in the statement of project objective and identified additional tasks within scope that were performed and completed within the original budget. The cost share was met and all deliverables were successfully completed and submitted on time. Most importantly the technology developed and commercialized under this project has been adopted by the Energy sector and thousands of devices with exe-Guard technology integrated in them have now been deployed and are protecting our power systems today

  1. Carbon Dioxide Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesch, David A

    2010-06-30

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, in collaboration with Professor Douglas LeVan at Vanderbilt University (VU), Professor Adam Matzger at the University of Michigan (UM), Professor Randall Snurr at Northwestern University (NU), and Professor Stefano Brandani at the University of Edinburgh (UE), supported by Honeywell's Specialty Materials business unit and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have completed a three-year project to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated vacuum-pressure swing adsorption (vPSA) process for the removal of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas. The project leveraged the team's complementary capabilities: UOP's experience in materials development and manufacturing, adsorption process design and process commercialization; LeVan and Brandani's expertise in high-quality adsorption measurements; Matzger's experience in syntheis of MOFs and the organic components associated with MOFs; Snurr's expertise in molecular and other modeling; Honeywell's expertise in the manufacture of organic chemicals; and, EPRI's knowledge of power-generation technology and markets. The project was successful in that a selective CO{sub 2} adsorbent with good thermal stability and reasonable contaminant tolerance was discovered, and a low cost process for flue gas CO{sub 2} capture process ready to be evaluated further at the pilot scale was proposed. The team made significant progress toward the current DOE post-combustion research targets, as defined in a recent FOA issued by NETL: 90% CO{sub 2} removal with no more than a 35% increase in COE. The team discovered that favorable CO{sub 2} adsorption at more realistic flue gas conditions is dominated by one particular MOF structure type, M/DOBDC, where M designates Zn, Co, Ni, or Mg and DOBDC refers to the form of the organic linker in the resultant MOF structure, dioxybenzenedicarboxylate. The structure of the M/DOBDC MOFs consists of infinite-rod secondary

  2. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30

    remain open until the casting is solidified and pressure is maintained on the solidifying casting. Fanned gates, particularly on the smaller section castings avoid jetting effects at the ingate end. The fan type ingate helps accomplish a rapid fill without high velocities. The molten metal has to fill the cavity before localized solidification occurs. This is best accomplished with a larger ingate to attain rapid filling without excessive velocity or jetting that occurs at high metal velocities. Straight gates are prone to case jetting of the metal stream even a low velocities. Fanned gates allow use of higher fill velocity without excessive jetting. A higher metal pressure provides a more complete fill of the die including improved compensation for solidification shrinkage. With the proper filling pattern, ingates, overflows and die temperature for a given die, very good tensile properties can be attained in squeeze casting. In general, the smaller squeeze castings require higher die temperatures. Computer models using the UES Procast and MagmaSoft finite element software can, after suitable adjustments, predict the flow pattern in the die cavity.

  3. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-04-08

    This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and

  4. Transuranic Waste Processing Center (TWPC) Legacy Tank RH-TRU Sludge Processing and Compliance Strategy - 13255

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Ben C.; Heacker, Fred K.; Shannon, Christopher; and others

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to safely and efficiently treat its 'legacy' transuranic (TRU) waste and mixed low-level waste (LLW) from past research and defense activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) so that the waste is prepared for safe and secure disposal. The TWPC operates an Environmental Management (EM) waste processing facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The TWPC is classified as a Hazard Category 2, non-reactor nuclear facility. This facility receives, treats, and packages low-level waste and TRU waste stored at various facilities on the ORR for eventual off-site disposal at various DOE sites and commercial facilities. The Remote Handled TRU Waste Sludge held in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) was produced as a result of the collection, treatment, and storage of liquid radioactive waste originating from the ORNL radiochemical processing and radioisotope production programs. The MVSTs contain most of the associated waste from the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the ORNL's Tank Farms in Bethel Valley and the sludge (SL) and associated waste from the Old Hydro-fracture Facility tanks and other Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) tanks. The SL Processing Facility Build-outs (SL-PFB) Project is integral to the EM cleanup mission at ORNL and is being accelerated by DOE to meet updated regulatory commitments in the Site Treatment Plan. To meet these commitments a Baseline (BL) Change Proposal (BCP) is being submitted to provide continued spending authority as the project re-initiation extends across fiscal year 2012 (FY2012) into fiscal year 2013. Future waste from the ORNL Building 3019 U-233 Disposition project, in the form of U-233 dissolved in nitric acid and water, down-blended with depleted uranyl nitrate solution is also expected to be transferred to the 7856 MVST Annex Facility (formally the Capacity Increase Project (CIP) Tanks) for co-processing with the SL. The SL-PFB project will construct and install

  5. Handbook: Collecting Groundwater Samples from Monitoring Wells in Frenchman Flat, CAU 98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Jenny; Lyles, Brad; Cooper, Clay; Hershey, Ron; Healey, John

    2015-06-01

    Available Data” section to an “MP diagram” with a photo annotated with the datum information. On the UGTA Field Operations well page, the same information is in the “Wellhead Diagram” link. Well RNM-2s does not have an annotated photo at this time. All of the CAU 98 monitoring wells are located within Area 5 of Frenchman Flat, with the exception of ER-11-2 in Area 11 (Figure 1). The wells are clustered in two areas: the northern area (Figure 2) and the central area (Figure 3). Each well is discussed below in geographic order from north to south as follows: ER-11-2, ER-5-3 shallow piezometer, ER-5-3-2, ER-5-5, RNM-1, RNM-2s, and UE-5n.

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2006-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151, Septic Systems and Discharge Area, at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, according to the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 151 is comprised of eight corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) CAS 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) CAS 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) CAS 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) CAS 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) CAS 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) CAS 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; and (8) CAS 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed). The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for each of the eight CASs within CAU 151. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from September 12 through November 18, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 151 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. Additional confirmation sampling was performed on December 9, 2005; January 10, 2006; and February 13, 2006. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the contaminants of concern for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified contaminants of concern at two of the eight CASs in CAU 151 and required the evaluation of CAAs. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 151 revealed the following: (1) Soils at CASs 02-05-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, 12-47-01, 18-03-01, 18-99-09, and Lagoons B through G of CAS 12-03-01 do not contain contamination at concentrations exceeding the FALs. (2) Lagoon A of CAS 12-03-01 has arsenic above FALs in shallow subsurface soils. (3) One of the two tanks of CAS 12-04-01, System No.1, has polychlorinated biphenyls (aroclor-1254), trichloroethane, and cesium-137 above FALs in the sludge. Both CAS 12-04-01, System No.1 tanks contain