Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

IP Networking Lab http://inl.info.ucl.ac.be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eduroam - Abuse scenario 12 Stockholms universitet UCL Internet user: Beck@SU.se Swedish Authority Belgian Belgium, Jan 2009 Eduroam - Abuse scenario 13 Stockholms universitet UCL Internet Swedish Authority Context : Open WiFi Roaming 3 H F Internet #12;ALAWN - Technical aspects D. Leroy, M. Manulis, F. Koeune

Bonaventure, Olivier

2

Louvain-la-Neuve, jeudi 8 septembre 2011 Recherche UCL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communauté française ont obtenu une bourse ERC : 8 UCL, 7 ULB, 2 ULg, 1 FUNDP et 1 UMons. En 2011, la CfB décroche 10 bourses, dont 5 pour l'UCL. De leur côté, les chercheurs confirmés de la CfB ont décroché

Nesterov, Yurii

3

UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" miniaturised sensors, · low cost - high return due to development derived from Solar Orbiter EAS and Tech Outline · What is L-DEPP? · How are we involved? · Low-energy Electron and Ion Analyser (LEIA) · Why is LEIA necessary? · Potential UK benefits · Summary #12;UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE

Anand, Mahesh

4

Mons, le 27 fvrier 2012 Collaboration UCL Mons -HELHa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, à la clé, la mise sur pied d'une campagne pour un produit de type non marchand. Cette année, le. Celle-ci aura pour thème « La communication du non-marchand à l'heure du numérique. Quelles tactiques), Jean-Marie Pierlot (maitre de conférence et expert en communication du non-marchand, UCL), Philippe

Nesterov, Yurii

5

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

6

LinShim6 -Implementation of the Shim6 protocol http://inl.info.ucl.ac.be/LinShim6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LinShim6 - Implementation of the Shim6 protocol http://inl.info.ucl.ac.be/LinShim6 Documentation at http://inl.info.ucl. ac.be/publications/shim6-masterthesis. Like the whole project, this documentation

Bonaventure, Olivier

7

Investor Confidence Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projects (under $1MM), Lighter engineering requirements V1 Released September 2013 Targeted Commercial Single Measure or Non-Interactive Retrofits Release Date Dec 2013 Multifamily Release Q1 2014 Quality Assurance Protocol Currently in BETA...Environmental Defense Funds Investor Confidence Project Delivering Investment Quality Energy Efficiency to Market ESL-KT-13-12-38 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Investor Confidence Project...

Golden, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The UCL Centre for International Health and Development (CIHD) at the Institute of Child Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Education Centre, the Centre for International Child Health and the International Perinatal Care Unit in changing patterns of health care provision. TheThe UCL Centre for International Health and Development (CIHD) at the Institute of Child Health

Saunders, Mark

9

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

10

Curvewise DET confidence regions and pointwise EER confidence intervals using radial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Curvewise DET confidence regions and pointwise EER confidence intervals using radial sweep methodology to create pointwise confidence intervals for the equal error rate (EER). The EER is the rate methods to to estimate the variability in both the DET and the EER. Our radial sweep is based

Adler, Andy

11

Curvewise DET confidence regions and pointwise EER confidence intervals using radial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Curvewise DET confidence regions and pointwise EER confidence intervals using radial sweep methodology to create pointwise confidence intervals for the equal error rate (EER). The EER is the rate or bootstrap methods to estimate the variability in both the DET and the EER. Our radial sweep is based

Schuckers, Michael E.

12

Status Update: Extended Storage and Transportation Waste Confidence...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Status Update: Extended Storage and Transportation Waste Confidence Status Update: Extended Storage and Transportation Waste Confidence Presentation made by David W. Pstrak for the...

13

upper (hydroelectric) development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

upper (hydroelectric) development, upper (hydroelectric) station, upstream (hydroelectric) development, upstream (hydroelectric) station ? Oberstufe f, oberes Wasserkraftwerk n, Oberliegerkraftwerk

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES  

SciTech Connect

A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper limits that applies to all detection algorithms.

Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Connors, Alanna [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Freeman, Peter E. [Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Zezas, Andreas, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dvd@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: jinx@ics.uci.ed, E-mail: aconnors@eurekabayes.co, E-mail: pfreeman@cmu.ed, E-mail: azezas@cfa.harvard.ed [Physics Department, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.  

SciTech Connect

We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

Darby, John L.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Germany and America: Crisis of confidence  

SciTech Connect

The paper examines the deterioration in German-American relations. The reasons for this downturn in German-American relations are quite simple. Washington views the Persian Gulf crisis as a defining moment in European-American relations and in the creation of a new world order. It is also the first diplomatic test of a unified Germany and a new German-American relationship. It is a test that Germany is thus far seen as having failed for three reasons. First, from the outset many Americans sensed that Germans did not comprehend what this crisis meant for the United States. A second and, in many ways, more worrying factor was the growing sense that the Germans were not being good Europeans. The third and most serious American concern, however, was the unsettling appearance of a very selective German definition of collective defense and common security. The result has been a crisis of confidence in the performance of the German political elite that goes beyond the problems in German-American relations during the early 1980s and the INF debate.

Asmus, R.D.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident Identifications of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Abstract:...

18

Exploiting Sensing Diversity for Confident Sensing in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unneeded nodes. Using real vehicle detection trace data, we demonstrate that Wolfpack provides confident, and disaster warning all have stringent accuracy requirements for detecting or classifying events while maximizing system lifetime. We define meeting such user accuracy requirements as confident sensing

Zhou, Gang

19

INCREMENTAL LEARNING OF NDE SIGNALS WITH CONFIDENCE ESTIMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INCREMENTAL LEARNING OF NDE SIGNALS WITH CONFIDENCE ESTIMATION Robi Polikar Department evaluation (NDE) applications resort to pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms for automated classification and characterization of NDE signals. Applications of such systems include defect identification

Polikar, Robi

20

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with *the plasma frethe progress...explorcreated an even larger number of...the upper atmosphere and ionosphere...the upper atmosphere. For this...ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...field is large, the horizontal...resolved. The atmospheric gravity waves...simul-taneously at a large number of...two regions plasma drifts separated...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS Rick Katz Institute of the validity of this analysis." -- Emil Gumbel #12;3 Outline (1) Introduction (2) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Classical Approach (3) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Modern Approach (4) Extreme

Katz, Richard

22

Trust, control and confidence in logistics outsourcing decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of theoretical constructs and models exist for framing logistics outsourcing decisions. In transaction cost economics, it is argued that the dimensions of transactions, notably asset specificity, are the main criteria to consider in outsourcing situations. Resource-based approaches focus on the company's assets and capabilities that should be protected and developed while non-core activities should be outsourced. Behaviourally oriented theories explore the human and social factors facilitating outsourcing decisions. In this paper, the model of Das and Teng (1998) is used to examine the role of trust and control as facilitators creating confidence in outsourcing when relationship specific investments are present in the outsourcing relationship. A conceptual model is developed and tested with structural equation modelling using survey data from Finnish industrial companies. The results show that confidence is positively associated with the propensity to outsource logistics when the outsourcing relationship is disposed to specific investments.

Jari Juga; Jouni Juntunen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DATA, JOURNAL OF ATMOSPHERIC AND TERRESTRIAL...IN NEAR-EARTH PLASMA, SPACE SCIENCE...INVESTIGATION OF WHISTLING ATMOSPHERICS, PHILOSOPHICAL...TRANSPOLAR EXOSPHERIC PLASMA .1. PLASMASPHERE...dynamics of the upper atmosphere. For this purpose...the ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

24

Upper East Fork Poplar Creek  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document explains the cleanup activities and any use limitations for the land surrounding the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek.

25

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Located along Los Alamos Canyon from 7th Street to the Pajarito Ski Hill, the Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves examining sites in present and former Laboratory technical areas to see if any further environmental cleanup actions are needed. If not, the Laboratory can apply to have these sites removed permanently from LANL's Hazardous Waste Permit, meaning that no further actions are needed at those sites. Among the 115 sites included in the Upper LA Canyon Project, 54 have been

26

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

septic tanks, sanitary and industrial waste lines, storm drains, incinerators, transformer sites, and areas in which soil has been contaminated. The Upper Los Alamos Canyon...

27

Analysis of sampling plan options for tank 16H from the perspective of statistical uncertainty  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a concentration variability model for Tank 16H in order to compare candidate sampling plans for assessing the concentrations of analytes in the residual material in the annulus and on the floor of the primary vessel. A concentration variability model is used to compare candidate sampling plans based on the expected upper 95% confidence limit (UCL95) for the mean. The result is expressed as a rank order of candidate sampling plans from lowest to highest expected UCL95, with the lowest being the most desirable from an uncertainty perspective.

Shine, E. P.

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Multiplicative scale uncertainties in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated how uncertainties in the estimation of the detection efficiency affect the 90% confidence intervals in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals. The study has been conducted for experiments where the number of detected events is large and can be described by a Gaussian probability density function. We also assume the detection efficiency has a Gaussian probability density and study the range of the relative uncertainties $\\sigma_\\epsilon$ between 0 and 30%. We find that the confidence intervals provide proper coverage over a wide signal range and increase smoothly and continuously from the intervals that ignore scale uncertainties with a quadratic dependence on $\\sigma_\\epsilon$.

E. S. Smith

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

UNC EM Boot Camp Boosts Confidence Levels of Graduating Medical Students Entering EM Residency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

favorably viewed their EM Boot Camp experience and felt that57 UNC EM Boot Camp Boosts Confidence Levels of Graduatinghave used some type of Boot Camp, modeled after military

Watson, L F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An analysis of confidence limit calculations used in AAPM Task Group No. 119  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The report issued by AAPM Task Group No. 119 outlined a procedure for evaluating the effectiveness of IMRT commissioning. The procedure involves measuring gamma pass-rate indices for IMRT plans of standard phantoms and determining if the results fall within a confidence limit set by assuming normally distributed data. As stated in the TG report, the assumption of normally distributed gamma pass rates is a convenient approximation for commissioning purposes, but may not accurately describe the data. Here the authors attempt to better describe gamma pass-rate data by fitting it to different distributions. The authors then calculate updated confidence limits using those distributions and compare them to those derived using TG No. 119 method. Methods: Gamma pass-rate data from 111 head and neck patients are fitted using the TG No. 119 normal distribution, a truncated normal distribution, and a Weibull distribution. Confidence limits to 95% are calculated for each and compared. A more general analysis of the expected differences between the TG No. 119 method of determining confidence limits and a more time-consuming curve fitting method is performed. Results: The TG No. 119 standard normal distribution does not fit the measured data. However, due to the small range of measured data points, the inaccuracy of the fit has only a small effect on the final value of the confidence limits. The confidence limits for the 111 patient plans are within 0.1% of each other for all distributions. The maximum expected difference in confidence limits, calculated using TG No. 119's approximation and a truncated distribution, is 1.2%. Conclusions: A three-parameter Weibull probability distribution more accurately fits the clinical gamma index pass-rate data than the normal distribution adopted by TG No. 119. However, the sensitivity of the confidence limit on distribution fit is low outside of exceptional circumstances.

Knill, Cory; Snyder, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan 48201 and Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Confidence intervals for state probabilities of system capacity outages and for LOLP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONFID"NC. , INTERVALS FO- S'TATE PROBABILITIES OF SYSTEM CAPACITY OUTAGES AND FOR LOLP A Thcsi. , bv ATHANASIOS STASINOS Submi. tted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR STA1'E PROBABILITIES OF STSTEM CAPACITY OVTAGES AND FOR LOLP A Thesis by ATHANASIOS STASINOS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Stasinos, Athanasios

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/18: Maritime Cooperation Between India and Pakistan: Building Confidence at Sea  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses ways in which the navies of both India and Pakistan can cooperate on issues of maritime and naval significance. Although the militaries and navies of the two countries have traditionally seen each other as rivals, international economic developments make cooperation imperative. South Asia requires an approach that can alter the existing hostile images and perceptions. This can be achieved through developing an incremental approach towards confidence building that would allow consistency and help build confidence gradually. The aim is to make confidence building a sustainable activity that would help transform hostile images and build cooperative and nonhostile relationships. This paper proposes a five-step model to suggest what the two navies can do jointly to build confidence, with the ultimate goal of naval arms control. The steps include (1) the Signaling Stage to initiate communication between the two navies, (2) the Warming-Up Stage to build confidence through nonmilitary joint ventures, (3) the Handshake Stage to build confidence between the two navies through military joint ventures, (4) the Problem-Solving Stage to resolve outstanding disputes, and (5) the Final Nod Stage to initiate naval arms control. This model would employ communication, navigation, and remote sensing technologies to achieve success.

SIDDIQA-AGHA,AYESHA

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Method and system for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location that includes analyzing a retinal image and determining at least two sets of coordinates locating an optic disc in the retinal image. The sets of coordinates can be determined using first and second image analysis techniques that are different from one another. An accuracy parameter can be calculated and compared to a primary risk cut-off value. A high confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is less than the primary risk cut-off value and a low confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is greater than the primary risk cut-off value. The primary risk cut-off value being selected to represent an acceptable risk of misdiagnosis of a disease having retinal manifestations by the automated technique.

Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN); Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya (Knoxville, TN); Chaum, Edward (Memphis, TN)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

34

Approach and development strategy for an agent-based model of economic confidence.  

SciTech Connect

We are extending the existing features of Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool, and introducing new features to simulate the role of confidence in economic activity. The new model is built from a collection of autonomous agents that represent households, firms, and other relevant entities like financial exchanges and governmental authorities. We simultaneously model several interrelated markets, including those for labor, products, stocks, and bonds. We also model economic tradeoffs, such as decisions of households and firms regarding spending, savings, and investment. In this paper, we review some of the basic principles and model components and describe our approach and development strategy for emulating consumer, investor, and business confidence. The model of confidence is explored within the context of economic disruptions, such as those resulting from disasters or terrorist events.

Sprigg, James A.; Pryor, Richard J.; Jorgensen, Craig Reed

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Tables for Trials and Failures with PD for Designated Confidence Level  

SciTech Connect

Two attachments are provided for performance testing of sensors and other Physical Protection System (PPS) components.#2; The first attachment is a table of Trials and Failures, giving Probability of Detection (PD) for a designated confidence level and sorted by trials.#2; The second attachment contains the same data, sorted by failures.

Leach, Janice

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Rapid Deployment with Confidence: Calibration and Fault Detection in Environmental Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

working hypothesis is that the influx of dissolved arsenic into the ground water is greatly enhanced where and a system for online fault remediation. Care in the calibration process for ion selective electrodes used for water quality assists interpretation of the data. Scientists will have more confidence in the data

Nowak, Robert

37

CONFIDENCE-BASED DENOISING RELYING ON A TRANSFORMATION-INVARIANT, ROBUST PATCH SIMILARITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONFIDENCE-BASED DENOISING RELYING ON A TRANSFORMATION-INVARIANT, ROBUST PATCH SIMILARITY Exploring ways to improve patch synchronous summation Cesario V. Angelino, Eric Debreuve, Michel Barlaud, France {angelino,debreuve,barlaud}@i3s.unice.fr Keywords: Denoising, image patch, patch denoising

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

38

PATCH CONFIDENCE K-NEAREST NEIGHBORS DENOISING Cesario V. Angelino, Eric Debreuve, Michel Barlaud, Fellow IEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PATCH CONFIDENCE K-NEAREST NEIGHBORS DENOISING Cesario V. Angelino, Eric Debreuve, Michel Barlaud, barlaud}@i3s.unice.fr ABSTRACT Recently, patch-based denoising techniques have proved to be very effective. Indeed, they account for the correlations that exist among patches of natural images. Taking

Boyer, Edmond

39

Confidence Interval Estimation for Inequality Indices of the GiniFamily  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present some nonparametric bootstrap methods to construct distribution-free confidence intervals for inequality indices belonging to the Gini family. These methods have a coverage accuracy better than that obtained with the asymptotic ... Keywords: Gini index family, Monte Carlo experiment, income distribution, nonparametric bootstrap

Paola Palmitesta; Corrado Provasi; Cosimo Spera

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon ranksum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ? P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ? P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic curricula for the radiation oncology clerkship.

Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

An upper limit on the decay D/sup 0/. -->. mu. e  

SciTech Connect

A search for the lepton family number violating decay D/sup 0/ ..-->.. ..mu..e is reported. No signal is observed in a data sample of 9.3 pb/sup -1/ collected at the psi(3770) resonance with the Mark III detector, where 0.18 +- 0.06 +- 0.05 background events are expected. A 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction B(D/sup 0/ ..-->.. ..mu..e) of 1.5 x 10/sup -4/ is obtained.

Stockhausen, W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect

Scenario development is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence in this aspect of the PA will be through the use of the systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A.; Swift, P.N.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Radar Measurement of the Upper Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the Upper Atmosphere James C. G...two decades large radars have...of the upper atmosphere. These radars...ionospheric plasma, all as functions...ionospheric plasma by detection...is wasted. Atmospheric radar scientists...305 m and an area of 73,000...frequency of 430 MHz. The radar...

James C. G. Walker

1979-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper White River Watershed Alliance Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA) P.O. Box 2065 integrity of the White River ecosystem. To successfully accomplish the vision of UWRWA, a 16-county was formed. It exists to improve and protect water quality on a watershed basis in the larger Upper White

45

Constraining Red-shift Parametrization Parameters in Brans-Dicke Theory: Evolution of Open Confidence Contours  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Brans Dicke theory of gravity, from the nature of the scalar field-potential considered, the dark energy, dark matter, radiation densities predicted by different observations and the closedness of the universe considered, we can fix our $\\omega_{BD}$, the Brans Dicke parameter, keeping only the thing in mind that from different solar system constrains it must be greater than $5\\times 10^{5}$. Once we have a value, satisfying the required lower boundary, in our hand we proceed for setting unknown parameters of the different dark energy models' EoS parameter. In this paper we work with three well known red shift parametrizations of dark energy EoS. To constrain their free parameters for Brans Dicke theory of gravity we take twelve point red shift vs Hubble's parameter data and perform $\\chi^{2}$ test. We present the observational data analysis mechanism for Stern, Stern+BAO and Stern+BAO+CMB observations. Minimising $\\chi^2$, we obtain the best fit values and draw different confidence contours. We analyze the contours physically. Also we examine the best fit of distance modulus for our theoretical models and the Supernovae Type Ia Union2 sample. For Brans Dicke theory of gravity the difference from the mainstream confidence contouring method of data analysis id that the confidence contours evolved are not at all closed contours like a circle or a ellipse. Rather they are found to be open contours allowing the free parameters to float inside a infinite region of parameter space. However, negative EoSs are likely to evolve from the best fit values.

Ritabrata Biswas; Ujjal Debnath

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

46

Upper Scioto Valley School | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley School Valley School Jump to: navigation, search Name Upper Scioto Valley School Facility Upper Scioto Valley School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Upper Scioto Valley Schools Energy Purchaser Upper Scioto Valley Schools Location McGuffey OH Coordinates 40.691542°, -83.786353° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.691542,"lon":-83.786353,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

Tensor rank : some lower and upper bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of Strassen [25] and Raz [19] show that good enough tensor rank lower bounds have implications for algebraic circuit/formula lower bounds. We explore tensor rank lower and upper bounds, focusing on explicit ...

Forbes, Michael Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Military confidence building on the Korean Peninsula: possible first steps toward cooperation  

SciTech Connect

The Korean Peninsula is one of the world`s most tense military confrontational sites. Nearly 2 million North Korean, South Korean, and U.S. troops face each other along the 255-km long military demarcation line. Confidence building measures (CBMs), particularly military ones, that address the security needs of both countries could decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment where a peace regime might be negotiated. In spite of the present high level of mutual distrust, steps can still be taken to prepare for future development and implementation of CBMs. This paper defines some simple and specific first steps toward CBMs that might be useful on the Korean Peninsula.

Vannoni, M.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Confidence building measures at sea:opportunities for India and Pakistan.  

SciTech Connect

The sea presents unique possibilities for implementing confidence building measures (CBMs) between India and Pakistan that are currently not available along the contentious land borders surrounding Jammu and Kashmir. This is due to the nature of maritime issues, the common military culture of naval forces, and a less contentious history of maritime interaction between the two nations. Maritime issues of mutual concern provide a strong foundation for more far-reaching future CBMs on land, while addressing pressing security, economic, and humanitarian needs at sea in the near-term. Although Indian and Pakistani maritime forces currently have stronger opportunities to cooperate with one another than their counterparts on land, reliable mechanisms to alleviate tension or promote operational coordination remain non-existent. Therefore, possible maritime CBMs, as well as pragmatic mechanisms to initiate and sustain cooperation, require serious examination. This report reflects the unique joint research undertaking of two retired Senior Naval Officers from both India and Pakistan, sponsored by the Cooperative Monitoring Center of the International Security Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Research focuses on technology as a valuable tool to facilitate confidence building between states having a low level of initial trust. Technical CBMs not only increase transparency, but also provide standardized, scientific means of interacting on politically difficult problems. Admirals Vohra and Ansari introduce technology as a mechanism to facilitate consistent forms of cooperation and initiate discussion in the maritime realm. They present technical CBMs capable of being acted upon as well as high-level political recommendations regarding the following issues: (1) Delimitation of the maritime boundary between India and Pakistan and its relationship to the Sir Creek dispute; (2) Restoration of full shipping links and the security of ports and cargos; (3) Fishing within disputed areas and resolution of issues relating to arrest and repatriation of fishermen from both sides; and (4) Naval and maritime agency interaction and possibilities for cooperation.

Vohra, Ravi Bhushan Rear Admiral (; ); Ansari, Hasan Masood Rear Admiral (; )

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Upper San Juan Basin Biological Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the biological assessment. The Colorado Natural Heritage Program began its research by updating its BiologicalUpper San Juan Basin Biological Assessment Colorado State University 8002 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523-8002 June 2003 Colorado Natural Heritage Program #12;Southwest Land Alliance Pagosa

51

VERITAS Upper Limit on the VHE Emission from the Radio Galaxy NGC 1275  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent detection by the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope of high-energy gamma-rays from the radio galaxy NGC 1275 makes the observation of the very high energy (VHE: E > 100 GeV) part of its broadband spectrum particularly interesting, especially for the understanding of active galactic nuclei (AGN) with misaligned multi-structured jets. The radio galaxy NGC 1275 was recently observed by VERITAS at energies above 100 GeV for about 8 hours. No VHE gamma-ray emission was detected by VERITAS from NGC 1275. A 99% confidence level upper limit of 2.1% of the Crab Nebula flux level is obtained at the decorrelation energy of approximately 340 GeV, corresponding to 19% of the power-law extrapolation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) result.

Acciari, V A; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Bautista, M; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Boltuch, D; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Celik, O; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, Philip; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Toner, J A; Varlotta, A; Vasilev, V V; Vincent, S; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Wood, M; Zitzer, B; Kataoka, J; Cavazzuti, E; Cheung, C C; Lott, B; Thompson, D J; Tosti, G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Methods for Predicting More Confident Lifetimes of Seals in Air Environments  

SciTech Connect

We have been working for many years to develop improved methods for predicting the lifetimes of polymers exposed to air environments and have recently turned our attention to seal materials. This paper describes an extensive study on a butyl material using elevated temperature compression stress-relaxation (CSR) techniques in combination with conventional oven aging exposures. The results initially indicated important synergistic effects when mechanical strain is combined with oven aging, as well as complex, non-Arrhenius behavior of the CSR results. By combining modeling and experiments, we show that diffusion-limited oxidation (DLO) anomalies dominate traditional CSR experiments. A new CSR approach allows us to eliminate DLO effects and recover Arrhenius behavior. Furthermore, the resulting CSR activation energy (E{sub a}) from 125 C to 70 C is identical to the activation energies for the tensile elongation and for the oxygen consumption rate of unstrained material over similar temperature ranges. This strongly suggests that the same underlying oxidation reactions determine both the unstrained and strained degradation rates. We therefore utilize our ultrasensitive oxygen consumption rate approach down to 23 C to show that the CSR E{sub a} likely remains unchanged when extrapolated below 70 C, allowing very confident room temperature lifetime predictions for the butyl seal.

Celina, M.; Gillen, K.T.; Keenan, M.R.

1999-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

53

On the need and use of models to explore the role of economic confidence:a survey.  

SciTech Connect

Empirical studies suggest that consumption is more sensitive to current income than suggested under the permanent income hypothesis, which raises questions regarding expectations for future income, risk aversion, and the role of economic confidence measures. This report surveys a body of fundamental economic literature as well as burgeoning computational modeling methods to support efforts to better anticipate cascading economic responses to terrorist threats and attacks. This is a three part survey to support the incorporation of models of economic confidence into agent-based microeconomic simulations. We first review broad underlying economic principles related to this topic. We then review the economic principle of confidence and related empirical studies. Finally, we provide a brief survey of efforts and publications related to agent-based economic simulation.

Sprigg, James A.; Paez, Paul J. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Hand, Michael S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sedimentary parameters of upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upon oonditions of sedimentation is exerted by currents set in motion 'by oceanic tides. Tidal activity causes sediment to be introduced into the upper bay and controls its distribution. A modifying influence i. s exerted by the influx of fresh... Classification and Distribution of Sediment Types Anomalous Areas CONDITIONS OF SEDIMENTATION Bathymetry Signifioance of Parameter Distribution Patterns Marginal areas Central bay Marginal embayments . ~ Environments of Deposition . CONCLUSIONS...

Siegert, Rudolf B

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Dispersion relation for magnetosonic waves within the upper atmospheric plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dispersion relation for magnetosonic waves within the upper atmospheric plasma has been derived. The result can be...

S. S. De; Bithika Ghosh; Manasi Mal; B. Ghosh

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

An upper limit to [C II] emission in a z ~= 5 galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-ionization-state far-infrared (FIR) emission lines may be useful diagnostics of star-formation activity in young galaxies, and at high redshift may be detectable from the ground. In practice, however, very little is known concerning how strong such line emission might be in the early Universe. We attempted to detect the 158 micron [C II] line from a lensed galaxy at z = 4.926 using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. This source is an ordinary galaxy, in the sense that it shows high but not extreme star formation, but lensing makes it visible. Our analysis includes a careful consideration of the calibrations and weighting of the individual scans. We find only modest improvement over the simpler reduction methods, however, and the final spectrum remains dominated by systematic baseline ripple effects. We obtain a 95 per cent confidence upper limit of 33 mJy for a 200 km/s full width at half maximum line, corresponding to an unlensed luminosity of 1x10^9 L_sun for a standard cosmology. Combining this with a marginal detection of the continuum emission using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, we derive an upper limit of 0.4 per cent for the ratio of L_CII/L_FIR in this object.

Gaelen Marsden; Colin Borys; Scott C. Chapman; Mark Halpern; Douglas Scott

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

57

Upper bounds on the photon mass  

SciTech Connect

The effects of a nonzero photon rest mass can be incorporated into electromagnetism in a simple way using the Proca equations. In this vein, two interesting implications regarding the possible existence of a massive photon in nature, i.e., tiny alterations in the known values of both the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and the gravitational deflection of electromagnetic radiation, are utilized to set upper limits on its mass. The bounds obtained are not as stringent as those recently found; nonetheless, they are comparable to other existing bounds and bring new elements to the issue of restricting the photon mass.

Accioly, Antonio [Laboratorio de Fisica Experimental (LAFEX), Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Group of Field Theory from First Principles, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl. II-Barra Funda, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl. II-Barra Funda, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Helayeel-Neto, Jose [Laboratorio de Fisica Experimental (LAFEX), Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Group of Field Theory from First Principles, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl. II-Barra Funda, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Scatena, Eslley [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl. II-Barra Funda, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Group of Field Theory from First Principles, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl. II-Barra Funda, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Heat Pump: $150 per unit Commercial Heat Pump: $150 per three tons Water Heater: $100 Provider Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (UCEMC), in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers incentives for its customers to purchase and install energy efficient equipment through the Energy Right

59

Upper Peninsula Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peninsula Power Co Peninsula Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Upper Peninsula Power Co Place Michigan Utility Id 19578 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A-1 - Residential Seasonal Service Power Supply Service Residential A-1 - Residential Service Seasonal Residential A-2 - Residential Service Seasonal Residential Capacity Buyback Rider CP-IB

60

Characterization of a geothermal system in the Upper Arkansas...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Paper: Characterization of a geothermal system in the Upper Arkansas Valley Authors T. Blum, K. van Wijk, L. Liberty, M. Batzle, R. Krahenbuhl, A. Revil and R. Reynolds...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eastern California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

62

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Abstract In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity...

63

Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) mission trades  

SciTech Connect

Solar thermal propulsion and propulsion/power systems were recently identified as key technologies in the Operational Effectiveness and Cost Comparison Study (OECS) sponsored by Phillips Laboratory (PL). These technologies were found to be pervasively cost effective with short transfer times and very good performance across a wide range of missions. The on-going Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) Program sponsored by PL represents development of a solar thermal propulsion/power (bimodal) system. As part of this effort, mission trades are being conducted to further define the ISUS system for geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), high Earth orbit (HEO-Molniya class), and mid Earth orbit (MEO-GPS class) missions. These trades will consider launch vehicles ranging in size from a LLV3 to an Atlas IIAS that insert the ISUS into low Earth orbit (LEO). These trades will be used to define the ISUS system for the planned Engine Ground Demonstration, a space demonstration mission, and as a future operational system.

Frye, P. [Rockwell Aerospace, Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

A new upper limit on the total neutrino mass from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We constrain f_nu = Omega_nu / Omega_m, the fractional contribution of neutrinos to the total mass density in the Universe, by comparing the power spectrum of fluctuations derived from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with power spectra for models with four components: baryons, cold dark matter, massive neutrinos and a cosmological constant. Adding constraints from independent cosmological probes we find f_nu < 0.13 (at 95% confidence) for a prior of 0.1< Omega_m <0.5, and assuming the scalar spectral index n=1. This translates to an upper limit on the total neutrino mass and m_nu,tot < 1.8 eV for "concordance" values of Omega_m and the Hubble constant. Very similar results are obtained with a prior on Omega_m from Type Ia supernovae surveys, and with marginalization over n.

O. Elgaroy; O. Lahav; W. J. Percival; J. A. Peacock; D. S. Madgwick; S. L. Bridle; C. M. Baugh; I. K. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. P. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; P. Norberg; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

Diversity in the upper management of leading Texas contractors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the overall sample, Gender, Position, or Ethnicity categories. It was found that the Ethnic make up of upper management is not representative of the Ethnic make up of the Texas or national construction workforces, while the Gender make up of upper management...

Lawrence, Anne Nicole

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Managing Upper extremity Fx's Sweden 10-Managing Pediatric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing Upper extremity Fx's Sweden 10- 05 1 Managing Pediatric Fractures Andrew Pennock, M extremity Fx's Sweden 10- 05 2 Children Are Not Miniature Adults! · Open Growth Plates · Remodeling is Changing "Citius, Altius, Fortius" - Faster, Higher, Stronger #12;Managing Upper extremity Fx's Sweden 10

Squire, Larry R.

67

volumes. Innovation frequencies also correlated with laboratory measures of learning, increasing our confidence in the innovation measure, and with social learning frequencies,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

our confidence in the innovation measure, and with social learning frequencies, suggesting that innovation and social learning propensities have evolved together. Species range size did not correlatevolumes. Innovation frequencies also correlated with laboratory measures of learning, increasing

Reader, Simon

68

Paleotectonic controls on deposition of upper Upper Jurassic La Casita Formation, east-central Chihuahua, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Surface mapping of the basal Mesozoic La Casita Formation (upper Upper Jurassic) in east-central Chihuahua, Mexico, indicates initial Mesozoic sedimentation occurred in a segmented, interconnected subbasin of the Chihuahua trough. La Casite Formation (1200 m thick) is a tectonostratigraphic unit resting with angular unconformity on the Lower Permian Plomosas Formation. It consists primarily of siliciclastic material with sporadic interbedded limestones. The dominant lithofacies, approximately 1000 m thick, consists of turbiditic sandstone units (10-20 m) alternating with thicker, monotonous shale sequences. In the mapped area (approximately 30 km/sup 2/), flute cast measurements indicate flows from both the northeast (N20/degree/E) and southwest (S58/degree/W). Turbiditic sandstone units appear to pinch out and/or interfinger as they extend from the north and south into the central portion of the area. The initial opening of the Chihuahua trough is often associated with Late Jurassic block faulting, related to development of the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Synrift depositional sequences of a similar age have been described in southern Coahuila, northern Zacatecas, and western Chiapas, Mexico. The subbasin (graben ) examined here may be ascribed a paleoposition near the western edge of the early Chihuahua trough. The western boundary of the early trough may have comprised a series of these subbasins, forming a cuspate or serrated coastline. Late Jurassic ammonites recovered from this and other localities along the length of the Chihuahua trough suggest that the subbasins were interconnected by means of an eastern continuous seaway.

Roberts, D.C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Detecting discontinuities in time series of upper air data: Demonstration of an adaptive filter technique  

SciTech Connect

The issue of global climate change due to increased anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has gained considerable attention and importance. Climate change studies require the interpretation of weather data collected in numerous locations and/or over the span of several decades. Unfortunately, these data contain biases caused by changes in instruments and data acquisition procedures. It is essential that biases are identified and/or removed before these data can be used confidently in the context of climate change research. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the use of an adaptive moving average filter and compare it with traditional parametric methods. The advantage of the adaptive filter over traditional parametric methods is that it is less effected by seasonal patterns and trends. The filter has been applied to upper air relative humidity and temperature data. Applied to generated data, the filter has a root mean squared error accuracy of about 600 days when locating changes of 0.1 standard deviations and about 20 days for changes of 0.5 standard deviations. In some circumstances, the accuracy of location estimation can be improved through parametric techniques used in conjunction with the adaptive filter.

Zurbenko, I.; Chen, J.; Rao, S.T. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area (Redirected from Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

71

Upper bound analysis for drag anchors in soft clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents an upper bound plastic limit analysis for predicting drag anchor trajectory and load capacity. The shank and fluke of the anchor are idealized as simple plates. The failure mechanism involves the motion of the anchor about a...

Kim, Byoung Min

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

Wave-forced resuspension of upper Chesapeake Bay muds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Moored instruments were used to make observations of near bottom currents, waves, temperature, salinity, and turbidity at shallow (3.5 m and 5.5 m depth) dredged sediment disposal sites in upper Chesapeake Bay du...

Lawrence P. Sanford

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Buoyancy of the continental upper mantle Robyn K. Kelly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buoyancy of the continental upper mantle Robyn K. Kelly Department of Geology and Geophysics, MIT). Received 21 June 2002; Revised 11 October 2002; Accepted 15 October 2002; Published 18 February 2003. Kelly

74

Upper-tropospheric moistening in response to anthropogenic warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Upper-tropospheric moistening in response to anthropogenic warming 10.1073/pnas.1409659111 Eui-Seok Chung Brian Soden B. J. Sohn Lei Shi aRosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami...

Eui-Seok Chung; Brian Soden; B. J. Sohn; Lei Shi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Improvable upper bounds to the piezoelectric polaron ground state energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It was shown that an infinite sequence of improving non-increasing upper bounds to the ground state energy (GSE) of a slow-moving piezoeletric polaron can be devised.

A. V. Soldatov

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Infiltration in the Upper Ro Chagres Basin, Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Annual runoff hydrographs recorded by the Panama Canal Authority in the upper Ro Chagres...Curve Number (CN) methodology. Specifically, variation curve of the CN was analyzed using rainfall and runoff observati...

Lucas E. Calvo; Fred L. Ogden; Jan M.H. Hendrickx

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Characterization of Sea Turtle Nesting on the Upper Texas Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearly annual record Kemps ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii) nesting activity on the upper Texas coast (UTC; defined as beaches from Sabine Pass to Matagorda Peninsula), where scientifically verifiable nesting commenced in 2002, has occurred...

Hughes, Christi Lynn

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

78

An upper bound for the proton temperature anisotrophy  

SciTech Connect

This tutorial describes recent research concerning the upper bound on the hot proton temperature anisotropy imposed by wave-particle scattering due to enhanced fluctuations from the electromagnetic proton cyclotron anisotropy instability. This upper bound, which has been observed in both the magnetosheath and the outer magnetosphere, represents a limited closure relation for the equations of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics. Such a closure relation has the potential to improve the predictive capability of large-scale anisotropic models of the magnetosphere.

Gary, S.P.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Beyond Density: Measuring Neighborhood Form in New England's Upper Connecticut River Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in New Englands Upper Connecticut River Valley by Peterin New Englands Upper Connecticut River Valley by Peterof New Englands Upper Connecticut River Valley encompassing

Owens, Peter Marshall

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Benthic Assemblage Variability in the Upper San Francisco Estuary: A 27-Year Retrospective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sediments along a salinity gradient in the upper Forthalong estuarine salinity gradients. Journal of Marinestations located along a salinity gradient in the upper San

Peterson, Heather A; Vayssieres, Marc

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

PRA In Design: Increasing Confidence in Pre-operational Assessments of Risks (Results of a Joint NASA/ NRC Workshop)  

SciTech Connect

In late 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly organized a workshop to discuss technical issues associated with application of risk assessments to early phases of system design. The workshop, which was coordinated by the Idaho National Laboratory, involved invited presentations from a number of PRA experts in the aerospace and nuclear fields and subsequent discussion to address the following questions: (a) What technical issues limit decision-makers confidence in PRA results, especially at a preoperational phase of the system life cycle? (b) What is being done to address these issues? (c) What more can be done? The workshop resulted in participant observations and suggestions on several technical issues, including the pursuit of non-traditional approaches to risk assessment and the verification and validation of risk models. The workshop participants also identified several important non-technical issues, including risk communication with decision makers, and the integration of PRA into the overall design process.

Robert Youngblood

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

83

MODELING THE FATE AND TRANSPORT OF ATRAZINE IN THE UPPER CHESAPEAKE BAY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for agrochemicals in the Upper Chesapeake Bay. Keywords: Chesapeake Bay, hydrodynamic model, atrazine, photolysis

Frei, Allan

84

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Upper Ohio River Valley Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Ohio River Valley Project Upper Ohio River Valley Project In cooperation with key stakeholders including EPA, local and state environmental agencies, industry, and academia, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), a network for monitoring and characterizing PM2.5 in the Upper Ohio River Valley. This region was chosen because it has a high density of coal-fired electric utilities, heavy industries (e.g. coke and steel making), light industry, and transportation emission sources. It is also ideally situated to serve as a platform for the study of interstate pollution transport issues. This region, with its unique topography (hills and river valleys) as well as a good mix of urban and rural areas, has a high population of elderly who are susceptible to health impacts of fine particulate as well as other related environmental issues (e.g., acid rain, Hg deposition, ozone). A world-class medical research/university system is also located in the region, which will facilitate the subsequent use of the air quality data in studies of PM2.5 health effects.

85

LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Dinelli, B. M. [ISAC-CNR, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E. [IAPS-INAF, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Moriconi, M. L. [ISAC-CNR, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J., E-mail: puertas@iaa.es [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2nd Annual Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour Aug. 31 ­ Sept. 2, 2010 #12;Tuesday, fuel, and fiber research. 8:15 p.m. Adjourn to University Plaza Hotel www.uphwl.com #12;Wednesday.m. Controlled Sub-Surface Drainage Dr. Eileen Kladivko, Department of Agronomy 2:00 p.m. Algae Wheel (Sewage

87

Scales and Effects of Fluid Flow in the Upper Crust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subsurface reservoirs. The tapping of these reservoirs is the basis...drives the rock cycle and...and a soil porosity of 25...variations in permeability focus or...fracture porosity ofigneous rocks. Fluids...oil reservoirs. ModifiedUpper...can modify permeability and topography...

Lawrence M. Cathles III

1990-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

Remark on the coherent information saturating its upper bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coherent information is a useful concept in quantum information theory. It connects with other notions in data processing. In this short remark, we discuss the coherent information saturating its upper bound. A necessary and sufficient condition for this saturation is derived.

Lin Zhang

2012-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

89

An unexpected cooling effect in Saturn's upper atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The upper atmospheres of the four Solar System giant planets exhibit high temperatures that cannot be explained by the absorption of sunlight ... the absorption of sunlight. In the case of Saturn the temperatures predicted by models of solar heating are ?200?K, compared to temperatures of ?400?K observed independently in ...

C. G. A. Smith; A. D. Aylward; G. H. Millward; S. Miller; L. E. Moore

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

90

Scales and Effects of Fluid Flow in the Upper Crust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of these reservoirs is the basis...drives the rock cycle and...and a soil porosity of 25...variations in permeability focus or...Mesozoic sandstones, siltstones...fracture porosity ofigneous rocks. Fluids...oil reservoirs. ModifiedUpper...can modify permeability and topography...and water quality), and at...fracture porosity and permeability...

Lawrence M. Cathles III

1990-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

Scales and Effects of Fluid Flow in the Upper Crust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of these reservoirs is the basis...drives the rock cycle and...and a soil porosity of 25...variations in permeability focus or...fracture porosity ofigneous rocks. Fluids...oil reservoirs. ModifiedUpper...can modify permeability and topography...and water quality), and at...fracture porosity and permeability...

Lawrence M. Cathles III

1990-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions  

SciTech Connect

There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; (CIW); (RITS)

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

93

Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River Water Issue: Introduction and Context This research project addresses a chronic water management issue in Arizona: management and allocation of water supplies in areas undergoing rapid growth and land use changes

Fay, Noah

94

Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009-2010 LIGO and Virgo Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the universe that is unavailable through standard electromagnetic observations, making its study of fundamental importance to understanding the evolution of the universe. We carry out a search for the stochastic background with the latest data from LIGO and Virgo. Consistent with predictions from most stochastic gravitational-wave background models, the data display no evidence of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal. Assuming a gravitational-wave spectrum of Omega_GW(f)=Omega_alpha*(f/f_ref)^alpha, we place 95% confidence level upper limits on the energy density of the background in each of four frequency bands spanning 41.5-1726 Hz. In the frequency band of 41.5-169.25 Hz for a spectral index of alpha=0, we constrain the energy density of the stochastic background to be Omega_GW(f)<5.6x10^-6. For the 600-1000 Hz band, Omega_GW(f)<0.14*(f/900 Hz)^3, a factor of 2.5 lower than the best previously reported upper limits. We find Omega_GW(f)<1.8x10^-4 using a spectral index of zero for 170-600 Hz and Omega_GW(f)<1.0*(f/1300 Hz)^3 for 1000-1726 Hz, bands in which no previous direct limits have been placed. The limits in these four bands are the lowest direct measurements to date on the stochastic background. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the recent claim by the BICEP2 experiment of the possible evidence for inflationary gravitational waves.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brckner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Caldern Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Delglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Daz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. Gonzlez; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Grf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jimnez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kflian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley; W. Kells; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

95

Longing for service: Bringing the UCL Conception towards services research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Territoriality, Temporality Benefit Reduce travel and shopping time...is represented as a 10 by 10 grid (category plus the adjective...functional, social and relational benefits coupled with monetary and non-monetary...diffusion of the innovative smart phone use: A case study of......

Peter J. Wild

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

GamificationGamificationGamificationGamification in Citizenin Citizenin Citizenin Citizen CyberscienceCyberscienceCyberscienceCyberscience CharleneCharleneCharleneCharlene JennettJennettJennettJennett (UCL),(UCL),(UCL),(UCL), IoannaIoannaIoannaIoanna Iaco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GamificationGamificationGamificationGamification in Citizenin Citizenin Citizenin Citizen gamification to increase the appeal of their projects and to make them more engaging for volunteers

Subramanian, Sriram

97

Longing for service: Bringing the UCL Conception towards services research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......quality and resource cost measures (e.g. social...carbon offsetting, using renewable fuel and lift/car share...physical environmental costs that cannot be sustained...e.g., material or energy) and information or...and conative resources costs were covered in the first......

Peter J. Wild

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Mons, le 31 janvier 2012 Docteurs honoris causa -UCL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

�mocratique du Congo Conf�rence avec Solange Lusiku et Bob Kabamba, le 3 f�vrier � Mons Solange Lusiku, �ditrice�mocratique du Congo �. Cette conf�rence-d�bat sera l'occasion de faire connaissance avec la femme de conviction Lusiku et Bob Kabamba sur le th�me � Journalisme et d�mocratie : la R�publique d�mocratique du Congo

Nesterov, Yurii

99

Upper Cumberland E M C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Cumberland E M C Upper Cumberland E M C Place Tennessee Utility Id 19574 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial GSA 1 Commercial Commercial GSA 2 Commercial Commercial GSA 3 Commercial Industrial GSA 1 Industrial Industrial GSA 2 Industrial Industrial GSA 3 Industrial Residential Residential outdoor light(Mercury 175 Watt) Lighting outdoor light(Mercury 400 Watt) Lighting outdoor light(Metal Halide 1000 watt FL) Lighting outdoor light(Metal Halide 250 watt FL) Lighting

100

EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interiors Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota Westerns Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - amputated upper limb Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

daily tasks 7-9. Currently, rotation of upper-limb prostheses... of a small permanent magnet into the distal residual bone of an upper-limb amputee 9. The magnet...

102

Response of upper ocean currents to typhoons at two ADCP moorings west of the Luzon Strait  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We deployed two ADCP mooring systems west of the Luzon Strait in August 2008, and measured the upper ocean currents at high frequency. Two typhoons passed over ... , we studied the response of the upper ocean to ...

Fei Chen ??; Yan Du ??; Li Yan ??

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Note on Amphibians and Reptiles in the Upper Ro Chagres Basin, Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Twenty-nine amphibians and six reptiles were recorded at a site in the upper Ro Chagres basin at the confluence of the Ro Chagrecito with the upper Ro Chagres. Most of them are assumed to be the common spec...

Roberta Ibez D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts  

SciTech Connect

We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h{sub rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h{sub rss} {approx} 10{sup -19} - 10{sup -17} strain/{radical}Hz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

B. Abbott et al.

2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

105

Geology of the Upper Schep Creek area, Mason County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Llano uplift in Central Texas. The location and shape of tbe area are shown in Figure l. As the nano inplies, the upper part of Schep creek, as well as ths west branch of Panther Creek, &re within the area, ACCESSIBILITY Accessibility by road... is oausod by two internittont streans that aro deeply inoised into this plateau. The west branob of Panther Creek, which is the eastern nest stress, has developed a network of very short steep lateral oanyons in the areas of resistant Iinestone outorops...

Marshall, Hollis Dale

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Upper limits on charm-changing neutral-current interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parallel decays can be computed with NII =Ne(l+l )8(c l X), where N is the number of cc events, e(1+I ) is the detection efficiency for parallel decays, and 8(c l X) is the average semileptonic branching ratio of the charmed hadrons in the continuum...VOLUME 60, NUMBER 16 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 18 APRIL 1988 Upper Limits on Charm-Changing Neutral-Current Interactions P. Haas, ' M. Hempstead, ' T. Jensen, ' D. R. Johnson, ' H. Kagan, ' R. Kass, ' P. Baringer, R. L. McIlwain, D. H. Miller, C. R...

Baringer, Philip S.

1988-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

Combined upper limit for SM Higgs at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

We combine results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Compared to the previous Higgs Tevatron combination, more data and new channels (WH {yields} {tau}{nu}b{bar b}, VH {yields} {tau}{tau}b{bar b}/jj{tau}{tau}, VH {yields} jjb{bar b}, t{bar t}H {yields} t{bar t}b{bar b}) have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. We use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when comparing our limits to the SM predictions. With 2.0-3.6 fb{sup -1} of data analyzed at CDF, and 0.9-4.2 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95%C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production are a factor of 2.5 (0.86) times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of m{sub H} = 115 (165) GeV/c{sup 2}. Based on simulation, the corresponding median expected upper limits are 2.4 (1.1). The mass range excluded at 95% C.L. for a SM Higgs has been extended to 160 < m{sub H} < 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Penning, Bjorn; /Fermilab

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Monthly Performance Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

schedule variance SWOB Small Woman-Owned Business TPA Tri-Party Agreement UBS Usage Based Services UCL Upper Control Limit VECP Value Engineering Change Proposal VOSB Veteran-Owned...

109

Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso Range, eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso Range, eastern California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Range is an extensional domain in a releasing stepover between major dextral strike-slip faults along the southeastern margin of the Sierra Nevada Microplate. New multifold seismic reflection data from the Coso geothermal field in the central Coso Range image reflectors that resemble suites of structural and magmatic features exposed in many exhumed metamorphic core complexes (MCC). The Coso Wash Fault, a Holocene-active normal fault that is a locus of surface geothermal activity, is imaged as a

110

Upper Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources (Redirected from Upper Marlboro, MD) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.8159473°, -76.7496909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8159473,"lon":-76.7496909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

111

Upper crustal faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control on permeability and production in the Coso Geothermal Field, eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control on permeability and production in the Coso Geothermal Field, eastern California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New multifold seismic reflection data from the Coso geothermal field in the central Coso Range, eastern California, image brittle faults and other structures in a zone of localized crustal extension between two major strike-slip faults. The Coso Wash fault, a Quaternary-active normal fault that is a locus of surface geothermal activity, is well-imaged as a

112

Integrated solar upper stage (ISUS) space demonstration design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High temperature solar thermal propulsion/power systems will enable the placement of higher power satellite systems launched from smaller less expensive launch vehicles. The on-going Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) Program sponsored by Phillips Laboratory is one such solar thermal system. A system test of an engine ground test configuration of ISUS is planned for Spring 1997. The next step in the development of the ISUS system will be a flight demonstration mission. This paper details the conceptual designs for two potential ISUS space demonstration configurations. These designs were developed with a design-to-cost philosophy for a LEO (low Earth orbit) to GEO (geosynchronous equatorial orbit) and LEO to HEEO (highly elliptical Earth orbit) flight demonstration missions. Design considerations included packaging within the selected launch vehicle fairings (Pegasus XL and SSLV Taurus) system performance propellant selection ( H 2 CH 4 or NH 3 ) and 100150 watts of power production using thermionic diodes.

Patrick Frye

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Coalbed gases and hydrocarbon source rock potential of upper Carboniferous coal-bearing strata in upper Silesian Coal Basin, Poland  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB) is one of the major Upper Carboniferous coal basins in the world. Its coalbed gas reserves to the depths of 1,000 m are estimated to be about 350 billion cubic meters (about 12.4 TCF). Coalbed gases in the USCB are variable in both molecular and stable isotope composition [{delta}{sup 13}C(CH{sub 4}), {delta}D(CH{sub 4}), {delta}{sup 13}C(C{sub 2}H{sub 6}), {delta}{sup 13}C(C{sub 3}H{sub 8}), {delta}{sup 13}C(CO{sub 2})]. Such variability suggests the effects of both primary reactions operating during the generation of gases and secondary processes such as mixing and migration. Coalbed gases are mostly thermogenic methane in which depth-related isotopic fractionation has resulted from migration but not from mixing with the microbial one. The stable carbon isotope composition indicates that the carbon dioxide, ethane and higher gaseous hydrocarbons were generated during the bituminous coal stage of the coalification process. The main stage of coalbed gas generation occurred during the Variscan orogeny, and generation was completed after the Leonian and Asturian phases of this orogeny. The coals and carbonaceous shales have high gas generation potential but low potential for generation and expulsion of oil compared to the known Type III source rocks elsewhere. In general, the carbonaceous shales have slightly higher potential for oil generation, but probably would not be able to exceed expulsion thresholds necessary to expel economic quantities of oil.

Kotarba, M.J.J. [Univ. of Mining and metallurgy, Cracow (Poland); Clayton, J.L.; Rice, D.D. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

SALINITY MANAGEMENT IN THE UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN: MODELING, MONITORING, AND COST-EQUITY CHALLENGES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Salinity issues in the Upper Colorado River Basin have been a serious concern to the western United States and northern Mexico. The Colorado River (more)

Keum, Jongho

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Analytic model of upper tropospheric clouds in the tropical Hadley cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a two-dimensional analytic model that describes the behavior of upper tropospheric clouds in the tropical Hadley cell. The behavior of the model is...

Kyoko K. Tanaka; Tetsuo Yamamoto; Sei-ichiro Watanabe

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic upper critical Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30 A two-dimensional hybrid method for modeling seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media Summary: upper mantle. We calculated the synthetics for a series of laterally...

117

Molecular Fluorescence accompanying the Twilight Injection of Triethylborane into the Upper Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... fluorescence spectrum, and at the same time to obtain data on the upper atmospheric \\vind from the motion of the released material.

J. M. HOFFMAN; M. A. PALMER; L. B. SMITH

1967-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

118

Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.35744679,"lon":-156.7663995,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

119

Thermionic converters for an Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS)  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) is a solar bimodal system which combines thermal propulsion and electric power generation in a single integrated system. A thermionic converter was designed and fabricated for the ISUS system. The ISUS thermionic energy converters differ from previous designs, due to the significant changes in operating temperature prior to and during an eclipse, with the emitter temperature increasing from 1,900 K to 2,200 K, and then back again. A complete thermal and electrical model was developed for a planar diode to determine optimum operating dimensions and parameters. The model includes an overall energy balance for the diode, and changes the interelectrode gap spacing due to thermal expansion of the parts as the emitter and/or collector temperatures change. Cesium pressure can be chosen from an external liquid reservoir, an integral reservoir using cesium intercalated into graphite attached to the collector heat pipe, or optimum cesium pressure. With optimum cesium pressure, the maximum efficiency increases from 14% to 16% as the emitter temperature increases from 1,900 K to 2,200 K. The improvement in efficiency is only 2% as the emitter temperature is increased. Optimum efficiency requires an external, actively controlled liquid reservoir.

Anderson, W.G.; Horner-Richardson, K. [Thermacore, Inc., Lancaster, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Solar wind energy dissipation in the upper atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dissipation of solar wind energy makes an important contribution to the energy budget of the earth's upper atmosphere. Heating and momentum transfer by this energy source generate a permanent disturbance zone in the polar region which is characterized by an increase in the temperature and pressure, strong vertical and horizontal winds, and significant changes in the density structure. Heavier gases like Ar, O2 and N2 are enhanced, He depleted, and O moderately enhanced or depleted depending on the altitude. The extension and latitudinal structure of this disturbance zone sensitively depend on a number of parameters including the level of magnetic activity, the season, local, universal and storm time, and solar activity. The same parameters also determine the magnitude of the perturbation. Changes outside the disturbance zone are relatively small and are characterized by an increase of all gas constituents. Whereas present models do provide a first order description, more sophisticated algorithms are needed for a satisfactory representation of the disturbance effects.

G.W. Prlss

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

What can the Upper Colorado basin expect this winter? Klaus Wolter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Upper Colorado basin appears marginal at best! #12;What are typical impacts in Western U.S.? FebWhat can the Upper Colorado basin expect this winter? Klaus Wolter NOAA-Earth System Research Lab & University of Colorado at Boulder-CIRES · ENSO: current situation, typical impacts, and outlook · What about

122

Cognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interventions ­at the upper division. Keywords: physics education research, course reform, electricityCognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock and Stephanie V. Chasteen* * Science Education Initiative, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA Department

Colorado at Boulder, University of

123

Observations on student difficulties with mathematics in upper-division electricity and magnetism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations on student difficulties with mathematics in upper-division electricity and magnetism Rachel E. Pepper, Stephanie V. Chasteen, Steven J. Pollock, and Katherine K. Perkins Science Education 2011; published 27 March 2012) We discuss common difficulties in upper-division electricity

Colorado at Boulder, University of

124

Crustal and upper mantle structure of southernmost South America inferred from regional waveform inversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crustal and upper mantle structure of southernmost South America inferred from regional waveform; published 24 January 2003. [1] We determine the crustal and upper mantle structure of southern South America Information Related to Geographic Region: South America; KEYWORDS: niching genetic algorithm, regional

125

Upper Permian vertebrates and their sedimentological context in the South Urals, Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper Permian vertebrates and their sedimentological context in the South Urals, Russia Valentin P,* a Geological Institute of Saratov University, Ulitsa Moskovskaya, 161, Saratov 410075, Russia b Department in the Upper Permian of the Southern Urals area of European Russia. The first sites were found in the 1940s

Benton, Michael

126

Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind Y. I. An updated empirical climatic zonally aver- aged prevailing wind model for the upper mesosphere/ lower of monthly mean winds from meteor radar and MF radar measurements at more than 40 stations, well distributed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

127

A modified algorithm for computing the upper-bound reliabilty of computer networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a modified algorithm to node elimination process for computing the upper-bound reliability of two-terminal networks. The algorithm has two technique; nodes removal and decomposition technique. The first technique is a modified algorithm ... Keywords: Computer networks, Network reliability, Networks decomposition, Nodes removal, The upper bound reliability

Y. B. Mahdy, A. Younes, M. A. Soliman, M. H. Abdellha

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Long-Term Sediment Generation Rates for the Upper Rio Chagres Basin: Implications for Panama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 19 Long-Term Sediment Generation Rates for the Upper Rio Chagres Basin: Implications: We measured in situ-produced cosmogenic 10 Be in 17 sand-sized sediment samples (0.25 to 0.85 mm) to estimate the rate and distribution of sediment generation in the upper Chagres watershed over the last 10

Nichols, Kyle K.

129

HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON-DIOXIDE DISCHARGE AT SHRUB AND UPPER KLAWASI MUD VOLCANOES,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON-DIOXIDE DISCHARGE AT SHRUB AND UPPER KLAWASI MUD VOLCANOES and July 1973 at Shrub and Upper Klawasi mud volcanoes 8 ii #12;HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON. Map of diffuse carbon dioxide flow from soils near the summit of Shrub mud volcano 9 TABLES 1

130

Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean;Abstract Processes which control the upper ocean thermohaline structure in the western equa- torial Pacific forcing data have indicated that the thick isothermal layer in the western equatorial Pacific is found

Luther, Douglas S.

131

Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal of a large-scale upper ocean circulation in the tropic Pacific domain. We construct different POD models-scale seasonal variability of the tropic Pacific obtained by the original model is well captured by a low

Aluffi, Paolo

132

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. References Dick Benoit, David Blackwell (2006) Exploration Of The Upper Hot

133

EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS 8: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS Summary This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota - Western's Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 22, 2013 EIS-0408: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS

134

GAISUS-1 thermionic converter for the integrated solar upper stage  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) system is a compact orbital transfer vehicle which generates thrust to boost payloads from LEO to higher orbits. It does this by collecting and concentrating solar flux into a sensible thermal storage, graphite receiver which is used to heat hydrogen propellant to temperatures of up to 2500 K. The ISUS receiver also radiates heat into an array of thermionic converters which produce electrical power. The GAISUS-1 thermionic converter is a first generation planar converter designed to produce electrical power when coupled with the ISUS receiver. GAISUS-1 will deliver over 31 W{sub e} at 1900 K. A wrought Re hotshoe accepts radiant heat from the receiver. The back side of the hotshoe forms the emitting surface of the converter. Special attention was paid to optimize the electrical and thermal losses experienced through the sleeve. Triple and single sleeve geometries were thermally modeled and evaluated, resulting in the selection of a single sleeve design. A high temperature metal/ceramic seal isolates the emitter sleeve from the collector. A Nb collector is used and is an integral part of a Nb/Na heat pipe. The heat pipe transports reject heat from the collector surface to a thermal radiator (condenser) portion of the heat pipe. The converter utilizes an integral graphite Cs reservoir. This type of reservoir automatically produces a rise in Cs pressure in response to a rise in emitter/collector temperatures. This Cs pressure feedback mechanism insures adequate Cs coverage of the emitter over a broad range of operating conditions (temperatures).

Begg, L.L.; Heffernan, T.F.; Horner, M.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evaluating Radiative Closure in the Middle-to-Upper Troposhere  

SciTech Connect

This project had two general objectives. The first is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer parameterization in strongly absorbing water vapor bands, as these strongly absorbing bands dictate the clear sky radiative heating rate. The second is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer in cirrus clouds, with emphasis on ensuring that the parameterization of the radiative transfer is consistent and accurate across the spectrum. Both of these objectives are important for understanding the radiative processes in the mid-to-upper troposphere. The research on this project primarily involved analysis of data from the First and Second Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns, RHUBC-I and II. This included a climate model sensitivity study using results from RHUBC-I. The RHUBC experiments are ARM-funded activities that directly address the objectives of this research project. A secondary effort was also conducted that investigated the trends in the long-term (~14 year) dataset collected by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) at the ARM Southern Great Plains site. This work, which was primarily done by a post-doc at the University of Wisconsin ???????¢???????????????? Madison under Dr. Turner???????¢????????????????s direction, uses the only NIST-traceable instrument at the ARM site that has a well-documented calibration and uncertainty performance to investigate long-term trends in the downwelling longwave radiance above this site.

Tobin, David C; Turner, David D; Knuteson, Robert O

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

136

Diagenesis of upper Cretaceous Teapot sandstones, Powder River basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Cretaceous Teapot sandstones of Well Draw field, Converse County, Wyoming, are turbidite fan deposits bounded stratigraphically by marine shales. They presently occur from 6360 to 7200 ft (1920 to 2195 m), dipping to the northwest. Cored samples selected from nonbioturbated A bedsets show that the sandstones are fine to very fine-grained feldspathic litharenites. Major authigenic minerals include carbonate cement, quartz overgrowths, and clay minerals. The clay minerals originated either as alteration rims on detrital silicates or as precipitated from pore fluids. Alteration rims typically consist of illite, smectite, mixed layer illite/smectite, and lesser chlorite. Feldspars are altered to kaolinite. Precipitated clays occur as thin, unoriented, grain coating chlorite and kaolinite; pore lining mixed layer illite/smectite and lesser chlorite oriented with (001) normal to the pore wall; and unoriented, poorly crystalline, pore filling chlorite. The diagenetic sequence is: compaction and limited quartz overgrowth development; complete calcite cementation and precipitation of grain-coating clays; dissolution of carbonate cement; precipitation of pore lining and later pore filling clays; and development of second stage quartz overgrowths. Development of silicate alteration rims occurred throughout the diagenetic history. Dissolution of carbonate cement produced the majority of present-day porosity; however, this secondary porosity was reduced by precipitation of clays minerals. In the downdip sandstones, hydrodynamic flow and an increase in the abundance of detrital labile grains have caused an increased abundance of clay mineral precipitates, reducing the reservoir potential. The pore fluids which controlled sandstones diagenesis were likely provided by dewatering and diagenesis of enclosing shales.

Conner, S.P.; Tieh, T.T.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Upper limit on the cross section for elastic neutralino-nucleon scattering in a neutrino experiment at the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope  

SciTech Connect

The results of a neutrino experiment that involved 24.12 yr of live time of observation of muons from the lower Earth's hemisphere with the aid of the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope are presented. In the problem of searches for a signal from the annihilation of dark matter in the Sun, an upper limit on the cross section for the elastic scattering of a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) on a nucleon was obtained at a 90% confidence level from an analysis of data accumulated within 21.15 yr of live time of observation. A neutralino in a nonminimal supersymmetric theory was considered for a WIMP. The best limit at the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope on the cross section for spin-dependent neutralino interactionwith a proton corresponds to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} pb for the neutralino mass of 210 GeV/c{sup 2}. This limit is three orders of magnitude more stringent than similar limits obtained in experiments that detected directly WIMP scattering on target nuclei.

Suvorova, O. V., E-mail: suvorova@cpc.inr.ac.ru; Boliev, M. M., E-mail: boliev2005@yandex.ru; Demidov, S. V., E-mail: demidov@inr.ac.ru; Mikheyev, S. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

The edited version has been published in 2004 in N. Hopkins & R. Saad (eds), Upper Egypt, Identity and Change, Cairo,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The edited version has been published in 2004 in N. Hopkins & R. Saad (eds), Upper Egypt, Identity tendency, at least since the early 20th c., to describe Upper Egypt (hereafter as-Sa'îd) as a specific these questions and were always stressing "How unknown and unfamiliar and neglected Upper Egypt was for the State

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

139

Influence Of Upper Air Conditions On The Patagonia Icefields L. A. Rasmussen, H. Conway, C. F. Raymond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence Of Upper Air Conditions On The Patagonia Icefields L. A. Rasmussen, H. Conway, C. F, Second Fig ABSTRACT. Upper-air conditions archived in the NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis have been used cannot be determined, so the investigation is limited to examining relative changes in those upper air

Rasmussen, L.A.

140

Upper mantle structure of South America from joint inversion of waveforms and fundamental mode group velocities of Rayleigh waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper mantle structure of South America from joint inversion of waveforms and fundamental mode tomographic S wave velocity model for the upper mantle beneath South America is presented. We developed three-dimensional (3-D) upper mantle S velocity model and a Moho depth model for South America, which

van der Lee, Suzan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some

142

Microsoft Word - Upper Jocko River Final Draft CX 7-15-2013.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Upper Jocko River Property funding Upper Jocko River Property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-007168 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real property transfers for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, and wildlife management Location: Township 16 North, Range 19 West, Section 10, Lake County, MT Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the Salish and Kootenai Tribes for the purchase of 5 acres of property, referred to as the Upper Jocko River Land Acqusition in Lake County, MT. The Salish and Kootenai Tribes will own and manage the Upper Jocko River property for fish and wildlife conservation purposes and BPA will receive a conservation

143

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity soundings in the Upper Raft River Valley and in parts of the Raft River Valley. These soundings complement the seventy-nine soundings made previously in the Raft River Valley (Zohdy and others, 1975) and bring the total number of soundings to 149. This work was done as part of a hydrogeologic study of the area. The location, number, and azimuth of all 149 Schlumberger sounding stations are presented. The location of the new

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - ares-i upper stage Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 Summary: stage engine would be added to Ares I-Y. For the Upper Stage (US), the production line at MSFC would... engines), eliminating Ares I-Y flight test, accelerating...

145

Upper Missouri G&T El Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

El Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Upper Missouri G&T El Coop Inc Place: Montana References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data...

146

A palaeomagnetic study of the Upper Mesozoic succession in Northern Tunisia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Carolina 29208, USA Geologisches Institut, Karlsruhe, FRG Marathon Oil Company, Casper, Wyoming, USA The Upper Mesozoic section...GeologischesInstitut, Karlsruhe, FRG M. E. Smithwick Marathon ail Conzpany, Casper, Wyoming, USA Received 1980April......

A. E. M. Nairn; T. J. Schmitt; M. E. Smithwick

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Upper bounds of the rates of decay for solutions of the Boussinesq equations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, upper bounds of the L 2-decay rate for the Boussinesq equations are considered. Using the L 2...decay rate of solutions for the heat equation, and assuming that the ...

Ying Liu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Sedimentology of Upper Cretaceous Cody-Parkman Delta, Southwestern Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1959). Some pillows moved downslope to pile up like box cars behind a stalled locomotive so that an occasional pillow slid...south-central New York (Sorauf, 1965), Upper Cretaceous Panther Sandstone of central Utah (Howard and Lohrengel, 1969...

149

Geochemical and rheological constraints on the dynamics of the oceanic upper mantle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I provide constraints on mantle convection through observations of the rheology and composition of the oceanic upper mantle. Convection cannot be directly observed, yet is a fundamental part of the plate tectonic cycle. ...

Warren, Jessica Mendelsohn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Attribution and Characteristics of Wet and Dry Seasons in the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous research has shown that the temperature and precipitation variability in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is correlated with large-scale climate variability (i.e., El Nio - Southern Oscillation [ENSO] and Pacific Decadal Oscillation ...

Rebecca A. Bolinger; Christian D. Kummerow; Nolan J. Doesken

151

Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is a well known source rock and fractured reservoir. Production is mainly from fractures, and the mechanism by which oil migrates from the matrix into the fractures is not well understood. Microfracturing due...

Chanchani, Jitesh

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

152

Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata in the Piceance basin, western Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas samples were collected for geochemical analyses from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata of the Piceance basin in western Colorado to: 1) determine the origin of gases (i.e., microbial versus thermogenic), 2) determine the thermogenic...

Katz, David Jonathan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

Development of North Atlantic Tropical Disturbances Near Upper-Level Potential Vorticity Streamers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropical cyclone (TC) development near upper-level potential vorticity (PV) streamers in the North Atlantic is studied from synoptic climatology, composite, and case study perspectives. Midlatitude anticyclonic wave breaking is instrumental in ...

Thomas J. Galarneau; Jr.; Ron McTaggart-Cowan; Lance F. Bosart; Christopher A. Davis

154

Sr isotope chemostratigraphy of Upper Jurassic carbonate rocks in the Demerdzhi Plateau (Crimean Mountains)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first Sr chemostratigraphic data are obtained for the Upper Jurassic carbonate sections in the Demerdzhi Plateau of the Crimean Mountains. The oncoid, microbial, and organogenic-detrital limestone varietie...

S. V. Rudko; A. B. Kuznetsov; V. K. Piskunov

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts Graduate-pronged approach has required a combination of expertise from R. Watts, G. Sutyrin, and I. Ginis (who have

Rhode Island, University of

156

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts Graduate of expertise from R. Watts, G. Sutyrin, and I. Ginis (who have a coordinated ONR-supported study at URI

Rhode Island, University of

157

The skull of Postosuchus kirkpatricki (Archosauria: Paracrocodyliformes) from the Upper Triassic of the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9000) were obscured by plaster, wire mesh, and paint duringskull were covered by the plaster and paint used in theHoltz 1994). When plaster was removed from the upper

Weinbaum, Jonathan C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

159

Surface currents and equatorial thermocline in a coupled upper ocean-atmosphere GCM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Oregon State University coupled upper ocean-atmosphere GCM is evaluated in terms of the simulated winds, ocean currents and thermocline depth variations. Although the zonal ... a factor of about three and the...

Kenneth R Sperber; Sultan Hameed; W Gates Lawrence

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Tree Species Composition and Beta Diversity in the Upper Ro Chagres Basin, Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tree species composition at two sites in the upper Ro Chagres basin of central Panama was evaluated using rapid inventory methods. At ... inventories were compared to 81 others within the Panama Canal Watershed,...

Rolando Prez; Salomn Aguilar; Agustn Somoza; Richard Condit

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Development of an upper extremity motor function rehabilitation system and an assessment system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel upper extremity motor function rehabilitation system and an assessment system. The rehabilitation system is an active rehabilitation that can be manipulated by patients through a haptic device and an inertia sensor to perform a tracking task in virtual environment with coordination training of bilateral upper extremity. The design of system aims to augment patients' force exerted by their upper extremity and the ability of force control, namely, dexterity. The structure of rehabilitation system is compact and the inertia of the haptic device's stylus is very small (only 45 g), which makes the system suitable for home-rehabilitation. Simultaneously, in order to assess the effect of rehabilitation, an assessment system has been developed using a 6-axis force sensor. The proposed rehabilitation system is testified experimentally for the upper limbs' rehabilitation training.

Zhibin Song; Shuxiang Guo; Yili Fu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

An Approach to the Detection of Long-Term Trends in Upper Stratospheric Ozone from Space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A central problem in the detection of long-term trends in upper stratospheric ozone from orbiting remote sensors involves the separation of instrument drifts from true geophysical changes. Periodic flights of a Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet ...

John E. Frederick; Xufeng Niu; Ernest Hilsenrath

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Upper-Ocean Processes under the Stratus Cloud Deck in the Southeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual mean heat budget of the upper ocean beneath the stratocumulus/stratus cloud deck in the southeast Pacific is estimated using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) and an eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Both are ...

Yangxing Zheng; George N. Kiladis; Toshiaki Shinoda; E. Joseph Metzger; Harley E. Hurlburt; Jialin Lin; Benjamin S. Giese

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Effects of horizontal mixing on the upper ocean temperature in the equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of horizontal mixing on the thermal structure of the equatorial Pacific Ocean is examined based on a sigma coordinate ... on the upper thermal structure in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, while their ...

Chuanjiang Huang; Fangli Qiao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Evolution of upper mantle beneath East Asia and the Tibetan Plateau from P-wave tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of the research presented in this thesis is to improve our understanding for the evolution of the upper mantle beneath East Asia and the Tibetan Plateau through high resolution P-wave tomography. The ...

Li, Chang, Ph.D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Local foehn effects in the upper Isar Valley, part 1: Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An unusually strong nocturnal downvalley wind can be regularly observed in the upper ... located over Central Europe or when ambient southerly winds are present. Due to the structure of the local topography, this...

Matthias Hornsteiner

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Local foehn effects in the upper Isar Valley, Part 2: numerical simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The local wind system in the upper Isar Valley (Bavarian ... near Mittenwald has the peculiarity that regularly strong foehn-like nocturnal flows occur, mainly during clear ... its properties are similar to the c...

M. Hornsteiner; G. Zngl

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from interfluvial wetlands in the upper Negro River basin, Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extensive interfluvial wetlands occur in the upper Negro River basin (Brazil) and contain a mosaic of vegetation dominated by emergent grasses and sedges with patches of shrubs and palms. To characterize the rele...

Lauren Belger; Bruce R. Forsberg; John M. Melack

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin Report Prepared by using tools such as tracers to determine groundwater travel times and this dynamic simulation modeling

Fay, Noah

170

Density Perturbations in the Upper Atmosphere Caused by the Dissipation of Solar Wind Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The upper atmosphere constitutes the outer region of the terrestrial gas envelope above about 100km altitude. The energy budget of this outer gas layer is partly controlled by the dissipation of solar wind energy

Gerd W. Prlss

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Upper Wilcox sandstones, Katy gas field, Waller County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" Wilcox oil and gas fields Page Structure map on the top of the Wilcox Group, Katy gas field, Wailer County, Texas. Contour interval is 100 feet. Nap shows location of wells in the field which penetrate the'IJpper Wilcox" section. Cores are from... Sedimentary structures of the Upper Wilcox sandstones in Humble W-35, Katy gas field, Mailer County, Texas 18 Shale character, deformational features, and sedimentary structures of the Upper Wilcox sand- stones in Humble W-35, Katy gas field, Mailer...

DePaul, Gilbert John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Clinical Reality of Measuring Upper-Limb Ability in Neurologic Conditions: A Systematic Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Connell LA, Tyson SF. Clinical reality of measuring upper-limb ability in neurologic conditions: a systematic review. Objective To review the psychometric properties and clinical utility of upper-limb measurement tools in people with neurologic conditions to provide recommendations for practice. Data Sources MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PEDro, and AMED. Study Selection Independent reviewers searched, selected, and extracted data from articles that assessed reliability, validity, ability to detect change, and clinical utility of measures of the upper limb in adult neurologic conditions. Data Extraction Measures with good psychometrics and 8 or higher (out of 10) clinical utility scores were recommended. Data Synthesis The searches identified 31 measures of the upper limb. However, only 2 measures fulfilled all of the psychometric and clinical utility criteria; the Box and Block Test and the Action Research Arm Test. Conclusions The Box and Block and the Action Research Arm Tests produce robust data and are feasible for use in clinical practice. Future development of new or existing measures should ensure the construct and content validity of the measure is clearly identified, standardized guidelines are easily available, and ensure that it is individualized and contemporary. Attention to measures of upper-limb activity for people who are unable to grip objects is also needed.

Louise A. Connell; Sarah F. Tyson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Depositional facies of hydrocarbon reservoirs of upper Cherokee Group, Anadarko basin  

SciTech Connect

The Desmoinesian upper Cherokee Group sequence in the Anadarko basin is the subsurface equivalent of the Cabaniss Group of eastern Oklahoma. This sequence includes the Pink limestone, Skinner sandstone, Verdigris limestone, and Prue sandstone intervals. The upper Skinner sandstone, which has not been well documented, is an important hydrocarbon-producing reservoir in the Anadarko basin. The Skinner sandstone is represented by channel, delta-front-prodelta, and shallow marine facies. Channel facies consist of a primary elongate trend extending 40 mi southeast-northwest across Custer and Roger Mills Counties, Oklahoma. Several small secondary channels trending northeast-southwest were also observed. Active channel-fill sequences in the primary trend exceed 100 ft in thickness and represent the major producing reservoir of the upper Skinner sandstone. Delta-front-prodelta sequences are dominated by shale and interbedded sandstone-shale units. Shallow marine facies consist of massive coarsening-upward units that reach 300 ft in thickness. This facies belt is broad and slightly elongated, approximately 12 mi wide by 20 mi long, and trends northeast-southwest somewhat normal to channel facies orientation. Lithologically, the upper Skinner channel sandstone is feldspathic litharenite with abundant feldspar and quartz overgrowth. Both primary and secondary porosity were observed in the upper Skinner sandstone. Secondary porosity evolved mainly from dissolution of feldspar and lithic fragments. However, extensive cementation in the shallow marine facies has reduced porosity to negligible amounts and consequently reduced reservoir quality.

Puckette, J.O.; Al-Shaieb, Z. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Shut-down dose rate analyses for the ITER electron cyclotron-heating upper launcher  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The electron cyclotron resonance heating upper launcher (ECHUL) is going to be installed in the upper port of the ITER tokamak thermonuclear fusion reactor for plasma mode stabilization (neoclassical tearing modes and the sawtooth instability). The paper reports the latest neutronic modeling and analyses which have been performed for the ITER reference front steering launcher design. It focuses on the port accessibility after reactor shut-down for which dose rate (SDDR) distributions on a fine regular mesh grid were calculated. The results are compared to those obtained for the ITER Dummy Upper Port. The calculations showed that the heterogeneous ECHUL design gives rise to enhanced radiation streaming as compared to the homogenous dummy upper port. Therefore the used launcher geometry was upgraded to a more recent development stage. The inter-comparison shows a significant improvement of the launchers shielding properties but also the necessity to further upgrade the shielding performance. Furthermore, the analysis for the homogenous dummy upper port, which represents optimal shielding inside the launcher, demonstrates that the shielding upgrade also needs to include the launcher's environment.

Bastian Weinhorst; Arkady Serikov; Ulrich Fischer; Lei Lu; Peter Spaeh; Dirk Strauss

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Although commonly obscured by simple shear, pure shear fabrics occur locally within many metamorphic core complexes. The cover rocks to the Raft River metamorphic core complex exposed within the Black Pine Mountains display an early coaxial strain history which developed prior to the formation of low-angle fault-bounded allochthons. At higher structural levels this is documented by pressure shadows with straight sutures, and

176

An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Previous interpretations of seismic data collected by the Kenya Rift International Seismic Project (KRISP) experiments indicate the presence of crustal thickening within the rift valley area beneath the Kenya dome, an uplift centred on the southern part of the Kenya rift. North of the dome, these interpretations show thinning of the crust and an increase in crustal extension. To the south near the Kenya/Tanzania border, crustal thinning associated with the rift is modest. Our study was aimed at further investigating crustal structure from this dome southwards via a

177

A Case Study Of The Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Case Study Of The Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geochemical and geophysical investigations in the Bohai Gulf and adjacent areas, China, indicate that uplift of the high-conductivity layer in the lithosphere coincides with the area of high heat flow. In this area are distributed abundant oil and gas fields in a Tertiary fault basin and also large quantities of basaltic rocks. Gas fields, mostly CO2 bearing, occur at the basin margins, where a widespread alkaline olivine basalt has high contents of gold. Geochemical prospecting of the surface (soil and soil gas) in the area indicates that there is an anomaly zone of

178

Understanding the importance of natural neuromotor strategy in upper extremity neuroprosthetic control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A key challenge in upper extremity neuroprosthetics is variable levels of skill and inconsistent functional recovery. We examine the feasibility and benefits of using natural neuromotor strategies through the design and development of a proof-of-concept model for a feed-forward upper extremity neuroprosthetic controller. Developed using Artificial Neural Networks, the model is able to extract and classify neural correlates of movement intention from multiple brain regions that correspond to functional movements. This is unique compared to contemporary controllers that record from limited physiological sources or require learning of new strategies. Functional MRI (fMRI) data from healthy subjects (N = 13) were used to develop the model, and a separate group (N = 4) of subjects were used for validation. Results indicate that the model is able to accurately (81%) predict hand movement strictly from the neural correlates of movement intention. Information from this study is applicable to the development of upper extremity technology aided interventions.

Dominic E. Nathan; Robert W. Prost; Stephen J. Guastello; Dean C. Jeutter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

An Upper Limit to the Mass of rho1 Cnc's Radial Velocity Companion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Doppler spectroscopy of rho1 Cnc has detected evidence of a companion with an orbital period of 14.65 days and a minimum mass of 0.88 Jupiter masses. Astrometric observations performed with the Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor 1r using a novel new observing technique have placed an upper limit on the astrometric reflex motion of rho1 Cnc in a time period of only one month. These observations detected no reflex motion induced by the 14.65 day period radial velocity companion, allowing us to place a 3-sigma upper limit of \\~0.3 milliarcseconds on the semi-major axis of this motion, ruling out the preliminary Hipparcos value of 1.15 milliarcseconds. The corresponding upper limit on the true mass of the companion is ~30 Mj, confirming that it is a sub-stellar object.

Melissa A. McGrath; Edmund Nelan; David C. Black; George Gatewood; Keith Noll; Al Schultz; Stephen Lubow; Inwoo Han; Tomasz F. Stepinski; Thomas Targett

2001-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hydrochemistry and hydrogeologic conditions within the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, Flow System Characterization Task. Pacific Northwest Laboratory examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system for the US Department of Energy (DOE). As part of this activity, groundwater samples were collected over the past 2 years from selected wells completed in the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt. The hydrochemical and isotopic information obtained from these groundwater samples provides hydrologic information concerning the aquifer-flow system. Ideally, when combined with other hydrologic property information, hydrochemical and isotopic data can be used to evaluate the origin and source of groundwater, areal groundwater-flow patterns, residence and groundwater travel time, rock/groundwater reactions, and aquifer intercommunication for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydrochemical properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report provides the hydrogeologic characteristics (Section 2.0) and hydrochemical properties (Section 3.0) for groundwater within this system. A detailed description of the range of the identified hydrochemical parameter subgroups for groundwater in the upper basalt confined aquifer system is also presented in Section 3.0. Evidence that is indicative of aquifer contamination/aquifer intercommunication and an assessment of the potential for offsite migration of contaminants in groundwater within the upper basalt aquifer is provided in Section 4.0. The references cited throughout the report are given in Section 5.0. Tables that summarize groundwater sample analysis results for individual test interval/well sites are included in the Appendix.

Spane, F.A. Jr.; Webber, W.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Estimated Costs and Returns for Catfish Farms with Recirculating Ponds Along the Upper Texas Coast.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_TDOC ' Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1704 - . , ., TEXAS A&M UNIVERSHY LIBRARY for Catfish Farms ' with Recirculating Ponds Along ? . . the Upper Texas Coast ~7'!K~fi~~~ation ? J. Charles Lee: Interim Director? The Texas A&M University System ? C...~J1ege Station, Texas :,. .,: (Blank Page in OrigiBal BuBetiol ' 1iJ. ~ ; :; . : . . / I Estimated Costs and Returns for Catfish Farms with Recirculating Ponds Along the Upper Texas Coast J.A.D. Lambregts, Marketing Manager for Niaid...

Lambregts, J.A.D.; Griffin, W.L.; Lacewell R.D.; Davis, J.T.; Clary, G.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Robot-Assisted Therapy for Long-Term Upper-Limb Impairment after Stroke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Robot-Assisted Therapy for Long-Term Upper-Limb Impairment after Stroke Original Article, N Engl J Med 2010;362:1772-1783. In the Cost Analysis subsection of Results (page 1779), the dollar values given in the first two sentences were incorrect. The sentences should have read, "The average per-patient... Robot-Assisted Therapy for Long-Term Upper-Limb Impairment after Stroke Original Article, N Engl J Med 2010;362:1772-1783. In the Cost Analysis subsection of Results (page 1779), the dollar values given in the first two sentences were incorrect. The ...

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

183

Shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SHALLOW GEOLCGIC FEATURES OF THE UPPER CONTI~wAL SLOPE, NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by TOK~ EDWIN TATUM, JR. Submitted to the Graduate ColleSe of Texas A&N University in partial fulfill . ent of the requirement fo= the deenee cf i...%STER F SCIENCE December. 1977 Najoz Subject: 3c ano~phy SHALLOW GEOLOGIC FEATURES OF THE UPPER CONTINENTAL SLOPE, NORTHWESTERN GUIZ OF ?EXICO A Thesis by TOMMY EDWIN TATUM, JR. Approved as to sty'e and content by: (Chairman of Committee Head...

Tatum, Tommy Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Essays on the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois Waterway and U.S. grain market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

navigation efficiency was initiated by the U.S. Army of Corps Engineers in 1993 (USACE, 1997). The Corps proposed to expand five 600- foot long locks (locks 20, 21, 22, 24, 25) on the Upper Mississippi River and locks Peoria and LaGrange on the Illinois... 1). Among the eight locks on the Illinois River, lock LaGrange had the highest average delay of 3.96 hours during the 1980 to 1999 period. Further, although the average delay time of delayed vessels at each lock on the lower portion of the Upper...

Yu, Tun-Hsiang

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

Decay instability of an upper hybrid wave in a magnetized dusty plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The decay instability of an upper hybrid wave into an upper hybrid sideband wave and low frequency ion-cyclotron wave are studied in a magnetized dusty plasma cylinder. The growth rate and ion-cyclotron mode frequencies were evaluated based on existing dusty plasma parameters. It is found that the unstable mode frequency increases linearly with {delta} (ion-to-electron density ratio). In addition, the growth rate of the unstable ion-cyclotron mode decreases sharply for lower values of {delta} in the presence of dust charge fluctuations, i.e., the dust grains increases the damping effect in three wave interaction process.

Gahlot, Ajay [Maharaja Surajmal Institute of Technology, C-4, Janakpuri, New Delhi (India); Walia, Ritu [Department of Physics, Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology, PSP Area Plot No.-1, Sector-22, Rohini, Delhi 110 086 (India); Sharma, Jyotsna [Department of Physics, KIIT College of Engineering, Gurgaon 122102 (India); Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Rinku [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi 110 042 (India)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Currents and waters of the upper 1200 meters of the southwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CURRENTS AND WATERS OF THE UPPER 1200 METERS OF THE SOUTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by ALBERTO MARIANO VAZQUEZ DE LA CERDA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1975 Major Subject: Oceanography CURRENTS AND WATERS OF THE UPPER 1200 METERS OF THE SOUTHWESTERN GULF OP MEXICO A Thesis by ALBERTO MARIANO VAZ0UEZ DE LA CERDA Approved as to style and content by: , , l (Chairman...

Vasquez de la Cerda, Alberto Mariano

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Knowledge and Misconceptions Regarding Upper Respiratory Infections and Influenza Among Urban Hispanic Households: Need for Targeted Messaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background To characterize knowledge and misconceptions regarding viral upper respiratory infections (URI) among urban Hispanics and identify correlates of greater knowledge. Methods...In-home in...

Elaine Larson; Yu-Hui Ferng; Jennifer Wong

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Bio-Climatic Analysis and Thermal Performance of Upper Egypt A Case Study Kharga Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Upper Egypt. In the recent century the most attentions of the government is the creation of new wadi parallel to Nile wadi in the west desert. Kharga Oasis is 25 degrees 26'56?North latitude and 30 degrees 32'24?East longitude. This oasis, is the largest...

Khalil, M. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on simulated mixed layer depth and upper ocean temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on simulated mixed layer depth and upper ocean temperature. Citation: Lee, T., and W. T. Liu (2005), Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on simulated mixed layer 2005. [1] Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on a near-global ocean model are studied by forcing

Talley, Lynne D.

190

Aerial Survey of the Upper McKenzie River Thermal Infrared and Color Videography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research has shown that forward-looking infrared (FLIR) is a reliable, cost-effective, and accessible in selected streams in the upper McKenzie River basin using FLIR. Traditional methods for monitoring stream been able to quickly map stream temperatures across entire stream networks. FLIR technology has proven

Torgersen, Christian

191

CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009 The CDF of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH bV/c2 in steps of 5 GeV/c2 , assuming Standard Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson

Fermilab

192

CATOSTOMID FISH LARVAE AND EARLY JUVENILES OF THE UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN --  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CATOSTOMID FISH LARVAE AND EARLY JUVENILES OF THE UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN -- MORPHOLOGICAL fertilization. Reared at 18-19 C in March and April 1990 by the Larval Fish Laboratory from artificially fertilized eggs provided by Dexter National Fish Hatchery (New Mexico). Xyrauchen texanus O #12

193

Receiver functions in the western United States, with implications for upper mantle structure and dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Receiver functions in the western United States, with implications for upper mantle structure for Research in Environmental Sciences and Department of Geological Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA Received 12 September 2001; revised 13 September 2002; accepted 18 December 2002; published 2

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

194

NIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary Upper Colorado River Basin Pilot Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the past week which should decrease irrigation water demand from the Western Slope. Areas of SW Colorado of moisture moving over western Colorado on Tuesday will spark off widely scattered showers in the highNIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary Upper Colorado River Basin Pilot Project

195

But Does It Last? Sustaining a Research-Based Curriculum in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

But Does It Last? Sustaining a Research-Based Curriculum in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Stephanie V. Chasteen, Rachel E. Pepper, Steven J. Pollock, Katherine K. Perkins Science Education course approach in junior-level electricity and magnetism (E&M). Almost all developed materials (i

Colorado at Boulder, University of

196

Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 3 Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological 1:'_i 'I I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green email: mgani@uno.edu t",. The Green River Formation comprises the world's largest deposit of oil-shale characterization of these lacustrine oil-shale deposits in the subsurface is lacking. This study analyzed ~300 m

Gani, M. Royhan

197

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processes Coupling the Upper and Deep Ocean on the Continental Slope D. Randolph Watts Graduate / modeling) approach requires a combination of expertise from R. Watts, G. Sutyrin, and I. Ginis (who have in a published journal article (Logoutov, Sutyrin and Watts, 2001). These results are being used by Ginis

Rhode Island, University of

198

Evidence for kill-butchery events of early Upper Paleolithic age at Kostenki, Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence for kill-butchery events of early Upper Paleolithic age at Kostenki, Russia John F, Universitetskaya nab., 1, 199034 St. Petersburg, Russia c Institute of the History of Material Culture, Russian Academy of Sciences, Dvortsovaya nab., 18, 191186 St. Petersburg, Russia d Kostenki Museum-Preserve, ul

Holliday, Vance T.

199

Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and garben-filling Eagle Mills red beds. Because basin-wide evaporative drawdowns overprint even higher order eustatic sea level changes, transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) are indistinguishable. Anhydrite and shale caps accumulated via interstratal halite dissolution. Oxfordian Norphlet siliciclastics form a continental lowstand systems tract as illustrated by abrupt contact with underlying marine evaporites without intervening progradational marginal marine facies. Marine-reworked uppermost Norphlet sandstone marks the base of a subsequent TST, which includes overstepping lower Smackover lithofacies (laminated mudstone, algal-laminated mudstone, and pellet wackestone). The upper Smackover HST is characterized by formation of rimmed shelves upon which algal mounds and aggrading ooid grainstone parasequences accumulated. Shallow lagoonal carbonate and evaporite saltern deposition occurred behind ooid shoals; fine-grained siliciclastics accumulated in updip areas. Equivalents of Smackover A, Smackover B, Bossier, and Gilmer sequences are largely masked by influx of Haynesville and Cotton Valley continental clastics. Lack of biostratigraphic data, a consequence of restricted fauna, precludes useful age assignments for these sequences in Alabama. Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama are regionally atypical and cannot serve as a model for Gulf-wide sequences.

Wade, W.J.; Moore, C.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Upper bounds and asymptotics in a quantitative version of the Oppenheim conjecture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper bounds and asymptotics in a quantitative version of the Oppenheim conjecture. Alex Eskin. The Oppenheim conjecture, proved by G.A. Margulis (cf. [Mar2, Mar3, Mar4]) states that if n ?? 3, and Q, the Oppenheim conjecture enjoyed attention and many studies, mostly using analytic number theory methods. See

Eskin, Alex

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Upper bounds and asymptotics in a quantitative version of the Oppenheim conjecture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper bounds and asymptotics in a quantitative version of the Oppenheim variables. Let LQ = Q(* *Zn) denote the set of values of Q at integral points. The Oppenheim conjecture, the Oppenheim conjecture enjoyed attention and many studies, mostly using analy* *tic number theory methods

Eskin, Alex

202

Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain and continuing with the still- ongoing volcanism in the High Lava Plains (HLP) and eastern Snake River Plain (SRP waves; shear wave splitting; high lava plains; Snake River Plain; Yellowstone. Index Terms: 8137

203

Upper bound of polymeric membranes for mixed-gas CO2/CH4 separations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Membrane polymers with high permeability and high selectivity are preferred for gas separations. However, there exists a trade-off or upper bound, i.e., polymers with higher permeability often exhibit lower selectivity, and vice versa. The upper bound for separation of various gas pairs has been empirically drawn and theoretically rationalized using pure-gas data. However, for CO2/CH4 separation, the high pressure CO2 and non-methane hydrocarbons can plasticize polymers, increasing mixed-gas CO2 permeability and decreasing mixed-gas CO2/CH4 selectivity. This study aims to apply a modified free volume theory to interpret CO2/CH4 separation performance in polymeric membranes. The model satisfactorily describes the pure-gas upper bounds for various gas pairs including CO2/CH4, the effect of high pressure CO2 on mixed-gas CO2/CH4 separation properties, and the practical mixed-gas upper bound for CO2/CH4 separations. The CO2 is found to have an estimated glass transition temperature of 108K. The assumptions of this model are discussed, and future work to improve this model is proposed.

Haiqing Lin; Milad Yavari

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Upper Basalt-Confined Aquifer System in the Southern Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The 1990 DOE Tiger Team Finding GW/CF-202 found that the hydrogeologic regime at the Hanford Site was inadequately characterized. This finding also identified the need for completing a study of the confined aquifer in the central and southern portions of the Hanford Site. The southern portion of the site is of particular interest because hydraulic-head patterns in the upper basalt-confined aquifer system indicate that groundwater from the Hanford central plateau area, where contaminants have been found in the aquifer, flows southeast toward the southern site boundary. This results in a potential for offsite migration of contaminants through the upper basalt-confined aquifer system. Based on the review presented in this report, available hydrogeologic characterization information for the upper basalt-confined aquifer system in this area is considered adequate to close the action item. Recently drilled offsite wells have provided additional information on the structure of the aquifer system in and near the southern part of the Hanford Site. Information on hydraulic properties, hydrochemistry, hydraulic heads and flow directions for the upper basalt-confined aquifer system has been re-examined and compiled in recent reports including Spane and Raymond (1993), Spane and Vermeul ( 1994), and Spane and Webber (1995).

Thorne, P.

1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

205

FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in water levels and mean water temperature in Pool 8 of the Mississippi River during summer of I9U8 ih 6 and Wildlife Service, meeting in December, I9I1.3, formed the Upper Mississippi River Conservation Committee of Conservation St. Paul, Minn. Special Scientific Reports Fisheries No. 101 #12;#12;CONTENTS Page Area fished 1

206

Seasonal variation of upper-level mobile trough development upstream of the Pacific storm track  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of upper-level mobile troughs as they enter and exit the DZ as well as over the western Pacific, using Lefevre and Nielsen-Gammon's trough tracking data (1995). The relationship between deformation and trough intensification upstream of the Pacific storm...

Myoung, Boksoon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

207

Slowdown of the meridional overturning circulation in the upper Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... climate variability assumes that the meridional overturning circulation in the upper ocean acts as a conveyor belt for transporting water mass anomalies from the subtropics to the tropics. In this ... on this density surface are about 510 years, depending on details of a water parcel's pathway and where it is subducted. Comparable transit times and circulation pathways have ...

Michael J. McPhaden; Dongxiao Zhang

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

MARKETING MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2008/09 CATALOG YEAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MARKETING MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2008/09 CATALOG YEAR Course Grade Prerequisites to Operations Management MGT 350: Management & Organizational Behavior MKT 370: Marketing Minimum grade of C required for Marketing majors MGT 405: International Business Strategy & Integration or BA 404: Small

Ponce, V. Miguel

209

MARKETING MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 & 2011 CATALOG YEARS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MARKETING MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 & 2011 CATALOG YEARS MKTG 370: Marketing Minimum grade of C required for Marketing majors MGT 405: International Business 370 MIS 301: Statistical Analysis Minimum grade of C required for Marketing majors MKTG 371: Consumer

Ponce, V. Miguel

210

MARKETING MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MARKETING MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS Course: Marketing Minimum grade of C required for Marketing majors MGT 405: International Business Strategy: Statistical Analysis Minimum grade of C required for Marketing majors MKT 371: Consumer & Buyer Behavior MKT

Ponce, V. Miguel

211

Facies architecture of the Upper Sego member of the Mancos Shale Formation, Book Cliffs, Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Late Cretaceous upper Sego Member of the Mancos Shale exposed in the Book Cliffs of east-central Utah is a 30 m thick sandstone wedge that overlies the Anchor Mine Tongue of the Mancos Shale and underlies coastal plain deposits of the Neslen...

Robinson, Eric D.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

212

A SURVEY OF THE STREAMFISHES OF THE UPPER REACHES OF THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A SURVEY OF THE STREAMFISHES OF THE UPPER REACHES OF THE NGERMESKANG RIVER, PALAU of the Ngermeskang River, Palau, with Recommendations for Conservation and Monitoring, by Stephen G. Nelson, Barry D Station, Mangilao, Guam 96923 Introduction This work was carried out in response to a request of the Palau

Mcilwain, Jenny

213

The Upper Santa Cruz River: A Case Study for Shifting Riparian Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Upper Santa Cruz River: A Case Study for Shifting Riparian Conditions Amy McCoy Ph.D. Candidate initially proposed to conduct water quality and tree pathology tests directly on the riparian floodplain. As a result, I was unable to take water quality and tree pathology samples from the affected areas and I

Fay, Noah

214

FY 2007 Progress Report for Upper Columbia United Tribes' Regional Coordination.  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of activities conducted over the fiscal year 2007 contract period to fulfill requirements to coordinate Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) interests within the Columbia River Basin. This coordination was specific to the implementation of portions of the Integrated Fish and Wildlife Program within the purview of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and Bonneville Power Administration.

Michel, D.R.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board c/o Okanogan County Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board c/o Okanogan County Natural Resources 123 5th Ave N, Suite 110 Salmon Recovery Board (Board) appreciates the opportunity to comment on the Northwest Power, the Yakama Nation, and the Colville Confederated Tribes. The agencies reviewed the proposed projects using

216

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature13698 Placing an upper limit on cryptic marine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature13698 Placing an upper limit on cryptic marine sulphur cycling D. T biogeochemical problem of closing marine fixed-nitrogen budgets inintenselyoxygen-deficientregions4 .Thedegree suppliedfromtheremineralizationoforganic matter by denitrification is in areas insufficient to fuel anammox2 . The role of the sulphur

Cai, Long

217

Bubble entrainment by breaking waves and their influence on optical scattering in the upper ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bubble entrainment by breaking waves and their influence on optical scattering in the upper ocean's surface inject bubbles and turbulence into the water column. During periods of rough weather the scales and the turbulent transport of bubbles to depth. Depending on their concentrations and size distribution

Stramski, Dariusz

218

Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation, and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......where E* is the activation energy, R is the gas constant, tau...This is achieved by use of a cost function based on the norm...Petrologic and non-steady-state geothermal constraints available for these...1965. Attenuation of seismic energy in upper mantle, J. geophys......

Irina M. Artemieva; Magali Billien; Jean-Jacques Lvque; Walter D. Mooney

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Evaluation of Polar WRF forecasts on the Arctic System Reanalysis domain: Surface and upper air analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analyses of regional mod- eling with Polar WRF have been performed with results compared to selected localEvaluation of Polar WRF forecasts on the Arctic System Reanalysis domain: Surface and upper air.1.1 of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), a highresolution regional scale model, is used to simulate

Howat, Ian M.

220

UPPER DES PLAINES RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES, IL & WI FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT AND ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

risk to residential and commercial structures and restore impaired aquatic ecosystems in the watershedUPPER DES PLAINES RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES, IL & WI FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT AND ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION / National Ecosystem Restoration (NED/NER) Plan. The Recommended Plan includes five structural flood risk

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Stream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that dollars are well spent and restoration effective- ness is maximized. Key words: ecosystem management, monitoring, restora- tion, stream improvement, watershed. Introduction Aquatic ecosystems are being impairedStream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1 and J. David Allan1

Allan, David

222

A New Approach to Proving Upper Bounds for MAX-2-SAT Arist Kojevnikov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Approach to Proving Upper Bounds for MAX-2-SAT Arist Kojevnikov Alexander S. Kulikov problem (MAX-2-SAT). We present a new 2K/5.5 -time algorithm for MAX-2-SAT, where K is the number formula, for a particular case of MAX-2-SAT, where each variable appears in at most three 2-clauses

223

Integrated Sr isotope variations and sea-level history of Middle to Upper Cambrian platform carbonates: Implications for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Sr isotope variations and sea-level history of Middle to Upper Cambrian platform to Upper Cam- brian platform carbonates of the southern Great Basin significantly refines the structure-African orogenesis and attendant enhanced chemical weathering. High-resolution changes in seawa- ter 87 Sr/86 Sr

Banner, Jay L.

224

Journal of Biomechanics 40 (2007) 24422449 Moment-generating capacity of upper limb muscles in healthy adults  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA c Bone and Joint Center, VA Palo Alto HCS, Palo Alto, CA 94304 populations (Amis et al., 1980; Engin and Kaleps, 1980; Otis et al., 1990; Winters and Kleweno, 1993; Delp et strength of upper limb muscles in this population. Upper limb muscle size has typically been characterized

Murray, Wendy

225

Distillation protocols that involve local distinguishing: Composing upper and lower bounds on locally accessible information  

SciTech Connect

We find a universal lower bound on locally accessible information for arbitrary bipartite quantum ensembles, when one of the parties is two dimensional. In higher dimensions and in a higher number of parties, the bound is on accessible information by separable operations. We show that for any given density matrix (of an arbitrary number of parties and dimensions), there exists an ensemble, which averages to the given density matrix and whose locally accessible information saturates the lower bound. Moreover, we give a general method to obtain bounds on the yield of singlets in distillation protocols that involves local distinguishing, by using lower and upper bounds on locally accessible information. We then illustrate it by using our lower bound, along with a previously obtained upper bound, on locally accessible information.

Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Lewenstein, Maciej [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); ICREA and ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Assessing student reasoning in upper-division electricity and magnetism at Oregon State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized assessment tests that allow researchers to compare the performance of students under various curricula are highly desirable. There are several research-based conceptual tests that serve as instruments to assess and identify students' difficulties in lower-division courses. At the upper-division level, however, assessing students' difficulties is a more challenging task. Although several research groups are currently working on such tests, their reliability and validity are still under investigation. We analyze the results of the Colorado Upper-Division Electrostatics diagnostic from Oregon State University and compare it with data from University of Colorado. In particular, we show potential shortcomings in the Oregon State University curriculum regarding separation of variables and boundary conditions, as well as uncover weaknesses of the rubric to the free response version of the diagnostic. We also demonstrate that the diagnostic can be used to obtain information about student learning during ...

Zwolak, Justyna P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

Specht, W.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Upper Mission Canyon coated-grain producing facies in Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

The upper Mission Canyon formation, along the northeastern flank of the Williston basin, is a regressive carbonate and evaporite sequence, which has been informally divided into log-defined intervals. Oil production locally occurs at the transition from anhydrite to carbonate for each of the regressive intervals. These carbonate shoreline reservoirs are limestones dominated by coated grains. Porosity is intergranular and vuggy, and production from these reservoirs locally exceeds 400,000 bbl of oil/well. Upper Mission Canyon beds are also productive in island-shoal reservoirs, which developed basinward of of shorelines. These limestone reservoirs are also dominated by coated grains and porosity is intergranular and vuggy. Oil production from these reservoirs is variable, but wells within the Sherwood field along the US-Canadian border have produced over 2.0 MMbbl of oil/well.

Hendricks, M.L. (Hendricks and Associates, Inc., Denver, CO (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500' deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400' encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The

230

The Impact of Tenure Arrangements and Crop Rotations on Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I ____J - TDOC Z TA245 .7 8873 N0.1530 The Impact Of Tenure Arrangements And Crop Rotations On Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station/ Neville P. Clarke, Director/ The Texas A&M University System/ College... influence on the farm's viability. - Examination of the effects of widespread adoption of Lemont (a new rice variety) throughout the southern rice producing region indi cated an estimated nominal rough rice cash price decline of $0.35/cwt (because...

Perry, Gregory M.; Rister, M. Edward; Richardson, James W.; Grant, Warren R.; Sij, John W. Jr

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

SciTech Connect

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

232

The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System. Navigation. Seismic Data Interpretation. Bathymetry. Identification of Geological Features. . Drilling and Coring Surveys. Isopach Maps anci Sedil. lent Velociiy OBSERVATIONS. Hath metrv 10 13 13 13 15 20 20 Physiograohic...). The geologic structures seen in the upper 300 m (1000 ft) of sediment are mainly a result of the large influx of terrigenous sediments and deep seated salt tectonism. Drilling and seismic stratigraphy have confirmed that numerous topographic highs...

Buck, Arvo Viktor

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian conodont zones in Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shale of the Sappington Member of the Three Forks Formation at another locality in the Bridger Range. The taxonomic section includes a discussion of 34 species, which are referred to 11 genera. Two new species of Dinodus and Siphonodella are described. 2...," Hannibal, and Chouteau Formations). Related to the problem of the Kinderhookian is that of the Chattanooga Shale of Tennessee and adjacent states. HASS (51, 52) by comparison with the New York Upper Devonian conodont se- quence, firmly dated the Chattanooga...

Klapper, G.

1966-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

234

Investigation of techniques for improvement of seasonal streamflow forecasts in the Upper Rio Grande  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 2-1. Maps of the Upper Rio Grande basin showing the gauging sites used in this study: (a) NWS temperature and precipitation stations and snowcourse sites (left); (b) USGS streamflow gauging stations and their drainage...-7. Map of composite average monthly temperature residuals at each station from October through September for El Ni?o (solid), neutral (dotted), La Ni?a (dashed) years??????????... 29 Figure 2-8. Map of composite average monthly total precipitation...

Lee, Song-Weon

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Morphological variations in the ammonite Scaphites of the Blue Hill Member, Carlile Shale, Upper Cretaceous, Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characters of ornamentation ap- pear in macroconchs and microconchs of a genus more or less simultaneously (Callomon, 1963; Cobban, 1969; Leh- mann, 1971). All of these criteria should be considered in the description and definition of ammonite taxa... (1952, 1962), Morrow Fort Hays L 7:.,Codell Ss CrickUpper Cretaceous Scaphites from Kansas 5 immediately above the basal level of large cal- careous septarian concretions and terminates ap- proximately half the distance between concretion levels 2...

Crick, R. E.

1978-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

236

Solubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determined the total equilibrium metal solubility ([Fe2+ ]T and [Mg2+ ]T) in 20­90 wt % sulfuric acidSolubility and freezing effects of Fe2+ and Mg2+ in H2SO4 solutions representative of upper solutions over the temperature range 200­300 K. We have measured solubilities using samples of MgSO4, FeSO4Á

237

Upper Cretaceous Foraminifera from southern California and northwestern Baja California, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California, Berkeley, for information on ostracodes of southern California. Special gratitude is expressed to Dr. HELEN TAPPAN LOEBLICH for her continued help and guidance and to Dr. ROBERT G. DOUGLAS, Western Reserve University, Ohio, for field assistance... laminations, current-ripple lamina- tions, and an upper, thin, dark, lignitic layer. These in turn are overlain by another sandstone and the sequence is repeated. Numer- ous burrows in this member penetrate both the silty and sandy beds. Such sedimentary...

Sliter, W. V.

1968-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

238

Geochronology of upper Paleocene and lower Eocene strata, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain  

SciTech Connect

Four samples of glauconitic sand from upper Paleocene and lower Eocene strata of the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain were analyzed for conventional potassium-argon (K-Ar) age determination. Results from these analyses are as follows: Coal Bluff Marl Member of the Naheola Formation of the Midway Group (58.2 [+-] 1.5 MA), Ostrea thirsae beds of the Nanafalia Formation of the Wilcox Group (56.3 [+-] 1.5 MA), upper Tuscahoma Sand of the Wilcox Group (54.5 [+-] 1.4 MA), and Bashi Marl Member of the Hatchetigbee Formation of the Wilcox Group (53.4 [+-] 1.4 MA). The Nanafalia Formation (Wilcox Group) disconformably overlies the Naheola Formation (Midway Group), and based on the data presented here, the age of this unconformity is bracketed between 59.7 and 54.8 MA. The Paleocene-Eocene Epoch boundary occurs in the Wilcox Group and coincides with the lithostratigraphic contact of the upper Paleocene Tuscahoma Sand with the lower eocene Hatchetigbee Formation. The age of this boundary, which is also an unconformity, can be placed between 55.9 and 52.0 MA. The K-Ar age dates for this boundary in the Gulf Coastal Plain compare favorably with the numerical limits placed on the Paleocene-Eocene boundary in the published literature. Generally, the Paleocene-Eocene Epoch boundary is reported as approximately 54 to 55 MA.

Mancini, E.A.; Tew, B.H. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States) Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

SAGE II long-term measurements of stratospheric and upper tropospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II solar occultation instrument has been making measurements on stratospheric aerosols and gases continually since October 1984. Observations from the SAGE II instrument provide a valuable long-term data set for study of the aerosol in the stratosphere and aerosol and cloud in the upper troposphere. The period of observation covers the decay phase of material injected by the El Chichon volcanic eruption in 1982, the years 1988--1990 when stratospheric aerosol levels approached background levels, and the period after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991. The Mount Pinatubo eruption caused the largest perturbation in stratospheric aerosol loading in this century, with effects on stratospheric dynamics and chemistry. The SAGE II data sequence shows the global dispersion of aerosols following the Mount Pinatubo eruption, as well as the changes occurring in stratospheric aerosol mass and surface area. The downward transfer of stratospheric aerosols into the upper troposphere following the earlier eruption of El Chichon is clearly visible. Estimates have been made of the amount of volcanic material lying in the upper troposphere and the way in which this varies with latitude and season.

Wang, P.H.; Kent, G.S. [Science and Technology Corp., Hampton, VA (United States); McCormick, M.P.; Thomason, L.W. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Matroidal structure of covering-based rough sets through the upper approximation number  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Covering-based rough set theory is a generalisation of rough set theory. Matroids are based on linear algebra and graph theory, and have a variety of applications in many fields. In this paper, we introduce matroid theory to covering-based rough sets, and explore the matroidal structure and properties of covering-based rough sets. Specifically, we define the upper approximation number to establish the matroidal structure of covering-based rough sets. So many important concepts and methods in matroid theory can be employed to investigate covering-based rough sets. The rank plays a very important role in a matrix, so we use the rank function of the matroid induced by a covering to measure the covering. With the rank function, a pair of approximation operators, namely, matroid approximation operators, are constructed. This type of approximation operators not only inherits the properties of those traditional ones which are defined from the perspective of set theory, but also presents some new properties. Finally, the matroid upper approximations are compared with the second upper approximations in covering-based rough sets.

Shiping Wang; William Zhu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Experimental study on the spatial distribution of particle rotation in the upper dilute zone of a cold CFB riser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle rotation plays an important role in gas-solid flows. This paper presents an experimental investigation on the spatial distribution of average rotation speed for glass beads in the upper dilute zone of a ...

Xue-cheng Wu; Qin-hui Wang; Chen Tian

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fine Mapping and in silico Isolation of the EUI1 Gene Controlling Upper Internode Elongation in Rice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Upper internode elongation in rice is an important agronomic trait. Well-known mutants with an elongated uppermost internode (eui) are important germplasms for developing unsheathed-panicle male-sterile lines in ...

Hongli Ma; Shubiao Zhang; Lan Ji; Hongbo Zhu; Shulan Yang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Cold Water Flow and Upper-Ocean Currents in the Bismarck Sea from December 2001 to January 2002  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors investigated the upper-ocean currents in the Bismarck Sea and related oceanic thermal changes in the western equatorial South Pacific for December 2001January 2002; during this period, coastal upwelling occurred along the Papua New ...

Takuya Hasegawa; Kentaro Ando; Hideharu Sasaki

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Dental maturational sequence and dental tissue proportions in the early Upper Paleolithic child from Abrigo do Lagar Velho, Portugal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dental maturational sequence and dental tissue proportions in the early Upper...completion, and delayed relative dental calcification rates has been hypothesized...structural evidence from traditional radiology (1, 30, 42 45) and microtomography...

Priscilla Bayle; Roberto Macchiarelli; Erik Trinkaus; Cidlia Duarte; Arnaud Mazurier; Joo Zilho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Upper bounds on sparticle masses from muon g-2 and the Higgs mass and the complementarity of future colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supersymmetric (SUSY) explanation of the discrepancy between the measurement of $(g-2)_\\mu$ and its SM prediction puts strong upper bounds on the chargino and smuon masses. At the same time, lower experimental limits on the chargino and smuon masses, combined with the Higgs mass measurement, lead to an upper bound on the stop masses. The current LHC limits on the chargino and smuon masses (for not too compressed spectrum) set the upper bound on the stop masses of about 10 TeV. The discovery potential of the future lepton and hadron colliders should lead to the discovery of SUSY if it is responsible for the explanation of the $(g-2)_\\mu$ anomaly. This conclusion follows from the fact that the upper bound on the stop masses decreases with the increase of the lower experimental limit on the chargino and smuon masses.

Badziak, Marcin; Lewicki, Marek; Olechowski, Marek; Pokorski, Stefan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

MIMOC: A Global Monthly Isopycnal Upper-Ocean Climatology with Mixed Layers* Sunke Schmidtko1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 MIMOC: A Global Monthly Isopycnal Upper-Ocean Climatology with Mixed Layers* 1 2 Sunke Schmidtko1 Marine Environmental Laboratory Contribution Number 380520 21 Corresponding Author: Sunke Schmidtko

Johnson, Gregory C.

247

Patterns of fish and macro-invertebrate distribution in the upper Laguna Madre: bag seines 1985-2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laguna Madre is a hypersaline lagoon. Despite harsh conditions, the upper Laguna Madre (ULM) is a highly productive ecosystem and a popular sportfishing area, especially for spotted seatrout and red drum. It is also the most important Texas bay...

Larimer, Amy Beth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

The depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the Upper Morrow "A" sandstone, Postle field, Texas County, Oklahoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE, POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN SUZANNE TRAVIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major subject: Geology THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN...

Travis, Lynn Suzanne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

249

Salt tectonism and seismic stratigraphy of the Upper Jurassic in the Destin Dome Region, northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SALT TECI'ONISM AND SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY OF THE UPPER JURASSIC IN THE DESTIN DOME REGION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by GRANT MACRAE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Oceanography SALT TECI'ONISM AND SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY OF THE UPPER JURASSIC IN THE DESTIN DOME REGION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by GRANT MACRAE Approved...

MacRae, Grant

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

A crust and upper mantle model of Eurasia and North Africa for Pn travel time calculation  

SciTech Connect

We develop a Regional Seismic Travel Time (RSTT) model and methods to account for the first-order effect of the three-dimensional crust and upper mantle on travel times. The model parameterization is a global tessellation of nodes with a velocity profile at each node. Interpolation of the velocity profiles generates a 3-dimensional crust and laterally variable upper mantle velocity. The upper mantle velocity profile at each node is represented as a linear velocity gradient, which enables travel time computation in approximately 1 millisecond. This computational speed allows the model to be used in routine analyses in operational monitoring systems. We refine the model using a tomographic formulation that adjusts the average crustal velocity, mantle velocity at the Moho, and the mantle velocity gradient at each node. While the RSTT model is inherently global and our ultimate goal is to produce a model that provides accurate travel time predictions over the globe, our first RSTT tomography effort covers Eurasia and North Africa, where we have compiled a data set of approximately 600,000 Pn arrivals that provide path coverage over this vast area. Ten percent of the tomography data are randomly selected and set aside for testing purposes. Travel time residual variance for the validation data is reduced by 32%. Based on a geographically distributed set of validation events with epicenter accuracy of 5 km or better, epicenter error using 16 Pn arrivals is reduced by 46% from 17.3 km (ak135 model) to 9.3 km after tomography. Relative to the ak135 model, the median uncertainty ellipse area is reduced by 68% from 3070 km{sup 2} to 994 km{sup 2}, and the number of ellipses with area less than 1000 km{sup 2}, which is the area allowed for onsite inspection under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, is increased from 0% to 51%.

Myers, S; Begnaud, M; Ballard, S; Pasyanos, M; Phillips, W S; Ramirez, A; Antolik, M; Hutchenson, K; Dwyer, J; Rowe, C; Wagner, G

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[2]. The distance which the wind has to act on the surface of a pond is commonly called fetch, or fetch length. The purpose of the nets or other devices used in wind suppression is to reduce the fetch and transmit some of the energy in the waves... to the sides of the pond. Wind mixing of the upper convective zone can be thought of as converting some of the kinetic energy in the wind to potential energy in the fluid by a process called entrainment. Entrainment is defined in detail in Chapter V...

McMinn, Steven Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

252

Robot-Assisted Therapy for Long-Term Upper-Limb Impairment after Stroke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...patients with deficits more than 6 months after a stroke has not been definitively shown. Robotic rehabilitation devices have the potential to deliver high-intensity, reproducible therapy. Advances in robotics and an increased understanding of the latent neurologic potential for stroke recovery led to... In this randomized study evaluating rehabilitative therapies in patients with long-term upper-limb impairment after stroke, outcomes at 12 weeks were similar with robot-assisted therapy, intensive comparison therapy, and usual care. In secondary analyses, modest improvements were observed over 36 weeks in both intensive-therapy groups, as compared with the usual-care group.

Lo A.C.; Guarino P.D.; Richards L.G.

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

253

Microstructures and Rheology of the Earth Upper Mantle Inferred from a Multiscale Approach  

SciTech Connect

The strongly anisotropic rheology of olivine polycrystals, associated to their microstructure, constitutes a key feature affecting the dynamics of the Earth's upper mantle. High pressure deformation experiments carried out on olivine single crystals under synchrotron radiation, together with estimations of lattice friction based on first-principle calculations, show a transition from easy [100] to easy [001] slips as pressure and temperature (thus depth) increases. We input these data at the slip system level into the second-order extension of the self-consistent scheme to assess microstructure evolution along a typical flow pattern beneath an oceanic spreading center.

O Castelnau; P Cordier; R Lebensohn; S Merkel; P Raterron

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Movements and habitat use of lesser snow geese wintering on the upper Texas Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences MOVEMENTS AND HABITAT USE OF LESSER SNOW GEESE WINTERING ON THE UPPER TEXAS COAST A Thesis by DONNA GAIL ROBERTSON Approved as to style and content by: R. Douglas Slack.... The most dramatic influx into the prairies occurred during the 1940's in response to the extensive agricultural and industrial development boom of World war II. Snow geese neckbanded and radio-tagged on the coast in 1988-89 and 1989-90 moved up to 190...

Robertson, Donna Gail

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed, and the results of this analysis are reported. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogeneous across composite samples.

Shine, E.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

UCL INSTITUTE FOR RISK AND DISASTER REDUCTION WHY CANCUN MARKS A KEY TURNING POINT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was underlined most recently by an International Energy Agency (IEA) report last month on the trend of increasing, as extreme weather becomes more frequent, countries will need to develop integrated practical policies at the end of November), emissions would rise 21% above 2008 levels by 2035 alone. The IEA indicates

Guillas, Serge

259

UCL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE RESEARCH CENTRE Land-Use Experiments in the Loch Laidon Catchment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, D. T. Monteith3 , K. Roe1 , N. L. Rose1 & H. Yang1 2011 1. Environmental Change Research Centre.............................................................................................................................. 15 4.1.1 COMPARISON OF THE CONTROL AND EXPERIMENTAL BURN ..........................................................................16 4.1.2 COMPARISON OF THE ALLT RIABHACH NA BIORAICH WITH THE CONTROL AND LOWER EXPERIMENTAL BURN

Jones, Peter JS

260

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest As part of a Cooperative Agreement with DOE-NETL, the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing advanced sampling and analysis methodologies for particulate matter that can be used for source apportionment and to assist in health studies. These techniques will be used to determine sources of fine particulate matter in rural states such as North Dakota. Ambient particulate matter (PM) sampling and automated scanning electron microscopy, (ASEM) are being used to characterize and evaluate the sources of PM2.5 at three rural sites. Land use in the sampling site locations is dominated by ranching and small grain farming. Potential sources of PM in these areas include diesel- and gasoline-fueled motor vehicles, fugitive dust from gravel roads and agriculture, vegetation and fires, an oil refinery, and coal-fired power plants. PM2.5 samples were collected using an automatic cartridge collection unit for ASEM analysis. An ASEM method has been developed to size and chemically classify individual particles composing PM2.5.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The spectral-timing properties of upper and lower kHz QPOs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft lags from the emission of the lower kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) of neutron star low mass X-ray binaries have been reported from 4U1608-522 and 4U1636-536. Those lags hold prospects for constraining the origin of the QPO emission, including the location at which the oscillation takes place, a stepping stone before we can use the kHz QPOs to probe strong field General Relativity. In this paper, we investigate the spectral-timing properties of both the lower and upper kHz QPOs from the neutron star binary 4U1728-34, in which the duty cycles of both QPOs are comparable, using the entire Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer archive on this source. We show that the lag-energy spectra of the two QPOs are systematically different: while the lower kHz QPO shows soft lags, the upper kHz QPO shows either a flat lag-energy spectrum or hard variations lagging softer variations. This suggests two different QPO-generation mechanisms. We also computed the first covariance spectra for both kHz QPOs and perfor...

Peille, Philippe; Uttley, Phil

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Quality-Controlled Upper-Air Sounding Dataset for DYNAMO/CINDY/AMIE: Development and Corrections  

SciTech Connect

The upper-air sounding network for DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation or MJO) has provided an unprecedented set of observations for studying the MJO over the Indian Ocean (IO) where coupling of this oscillation with deep convection first occurs. With 72 sounding sites and dropsonde data from 13 aircraft mission, the sonde network covers the tropics from Eastern African to the West Pacific. In total nearly 26,000 sondes were collected from this network during the experiments 6-month extended observing period (from October 2011 to March 2012). Slightly more than half of the sondes, collected from 33 sites, are at high vertical resolution. Rigorous post-field phase processing of the sonde data included several levels of quality checks and a variety of corrections which address a number of issues (e.g., daytime dry bias, baseline surface data errors, ship deck-heating effects, artificial dry spikes in slow ascent sondes). Because of the importance of an accurate description of the moisture field in meeting the scientific goals of the experiments, particular attention is given to humidity correction and its validation. The humidity corrections, though small relative to some previous field campaigns, produced high fidelity moisture analyses in which sonde precipitable water compared well with independent estimates. An assessment of model operational analyses moisture using corrected sonde data shows an overall good agreement with the exception at upper-levels where model moisture and clouds are more abundant than the sounding data would indicate.

Ciesielski, Paul; Yu, Hungjui; Johnson, Richard; Yoneyama, Kunio; Katsumata, Masaki; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Junhong; Loehrer, Scot; Young, Kate; Williams, S.; Brown, William; Braun, John; Van Hove, Terese

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Reclamation of abandoned mined lands along th Upper Illinois Waterway using dredged material  

SciTech Connect

Sediments were sampled and characterized from 28 actual or proposed maintenance-dredging locations in the Upper Illinois Waterway, that is, the Calumet-Sag Channel, the Des Plaines River downstream of its confluence with the Calumet-Sag Channel, and the Illinois River from the confluence of the Kankakee and Des Plaines rivers to Havana, Illinois. Sufficient data on chemical constituents and physical sediments were obtained to allow the classification of these sediments by currently applicable criteria of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency for the identification of hazardous, persistent, and potentially hazardous wastes. By these criteria, the potential dredged materials studied were not hazardous, persistent, or potentially hazardous; they are a suitable topsoil/ reclamation medium. A study of problem abandoned surface-mined land sites (problem lands are defined as being acidic and/or sparsely vegetated) along the Illinois River showed that three sites were particularly well suited to the needs of the Corps of Engineers (COE) for a dredged material disposal/reclamation site. Thes sites were a pair of municipally owned sites in Morris, Illinois, and a small corporately owned site east of Ottawa, Illinois, and adjacent to the Illinois River. Other sites were also ranked as to suitability for COE involvement in their reclamation. Reclamation disposal was found to be an economically competitive alternative to near-source confined disposal for Upper Illinois Waterway dredged material.

Van Luik, A; Harrison, W

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Math and science partnership program in the Upper Cumberland districts of Tennessee  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mathematics and Science Partnership (MSP) program by the US Department of Education "is intended to increase the academic achievement of students in mathematics and science by enhancing the content knowledge and teaching skills of classroom teachers. Partnerships between high?need school districts and the science technology engineering and mathematics (STEM) faculty in institutions of higher education are at the core of these improvement efforts." This paper will present efforts in the Upper Cumberland districts of Tennessee to introduce engineering applications to Math and Science teachers in grades 8?12. The science teachers recruited represented the disciplines of Chemistry Physics and Physical Science. The 3?year program consisted of summer institutes as well as bi?monthly Saturday workshops. An overview of the program will be discussed. It will include background information about the Upper Cumberland region Tennessee content standards related to acoustics working with teachers some of the hands?on activities that were used during summer workshops and the equipment that was provided to the teachers.

Corinne Darvennes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Depositional environment and diagenesis of Teapot Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous), Converse and Natrona counties, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Teapot Sandstone forms the upper member of the Upper Cretaceous Mesa Verde Formation in the Powder River basin. Previous interpretations of the Teapot based on outcrop or subsurface data range from nearshore marine to fluvial. Marine lithofacies coarsen upward from bioturbated offshore siltstone to nearshore sandstone with large, pellet-lined ophiomorpha and overlying well-sorted, horizontally laminated foreshore sandstone exhibiting ridge and runnel topography. Marine foreshore sandstone is overlain by complexly interbedded sandstone and carbonaceous shale in stacked fining-upward sequences of the delta plain. Fining-upward units are interpreted as abandoned channels, whereas coarsening-upward sequences are interpreted as interdistributary bay or lagoonal deposits. Capping the sequence is a thick, cross-bedded fluvial section consisting of levee, point bar, and channel sand deposits. The Teapot Sandstone has a complex diagenetic history. Siderite and framboidal pyrite formed early in the diagenetic sequence at shallow depths of burial under anaerobic conditions. Pore-filling kaolinite, chlorite, and quartz overgrowths formed coevally following dissolution of relatively unstable framework grains. Poikilotopic calcite cement is locally abundant and extensively replaces framework grains. Nearshore marine and fluvial sandstone are potentially hydrocarbon reservoirs, although authigenic clays have significantly reduced permeability. Reservoir potential of well-sorted foreshore marine sandstone was destroyed by pore-filling calcite cement. However, tightly cemented sandstone forms a potential diagenetic trapping mechanism.

Coughlan, P.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sandia National Laboratories: increase investor confidence in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, SunShot, Systems Analysis The solar industry is now more than 60% of the way toward achieving...

267

NIFES Consulting Group COMMERCIAL IN CONFIDENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: UKE1520 MMU Hollings Energy Audit/SE/Rel 1 Date: December 2008 NIFES Consulting Group, NIFES House.3 Brief Description of the Site 6 1.4 Acknowledgement 7 2.0 ENERGY AUDIT 8 2.1 Site Configuration 8 2 ANALYSIS APPENDIX 5 ENERGY MANAGEMENT MATRIX #12;UKE1520 MMU Hollings Audit Rel 1 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

268

Election Auditing and Nonparametric Confidence Bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ballot measure in Marin County, CA, a November 2008 bond measure in Yolo County California, with audits · Random selection · Hypothesis testing framework: the math · The realities · Examples: 2008 Yolo Measure W

Stark, Philip B.

269

Upper Albian OAE 1d event in the Chihuahua Trough, New Mexico, U.S.A.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Oceanic anoxic events are clues to ocean processes and are correlation datums. In North America only OAE 1a and 2 are well documented. Based on a low-resolution sampling program, a multi-proxy geochemical approach constrained by a biostratigraphic framework was utilized to identify OAE 1d in the upper part of the upper Albian Mesilla Valley Formation near El Paso, Texas. Chronostratigraphic and biostratigraphic evidence indicate that the OAE 1d event in the Mesilla Valley section is located in the lower part of the upper AlbianCenomanian Ovoidinium verrucosum zone, which correlates with the uppermost Albian Parathalmanninella appenninica and Stoliczkaia dispar zones. The chronostratigraphic age of the geochemical event in the Mesilla Valley Formation is uppermost Albian (97.3997.30Ma). The classic geochemical signatures for \\{OAEs\\} are enriched total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations and coupled positive ?13C excursions. OAE 1d at this location records TOC values ranging from 0.25 to 0.69wt.% throughout the Mesilla Valley Formation, where TOC increases during the OAE (21.040.0m) to more than 0.40wt.%. Interestingly, the organic matter in the Mesilla Valley is dominantly type III, which indicates a pervasive terrigenous source. Although marine organic matter is abundant from the base into the middle of the proposed OAE interval, it is progressively replaced by terrestrial material above the OAE section during progradation. The ?13Corganic values record a positive ?13C shift of+1.6 from?26.41 to?24.80 across the stratigraphic interval from 21.0 to 40.0m, which correlates with OAE1d. Mn and Fe geochemistry suggest the depositional conditions of the Mesilla Valley Formation were dominated by anoxic and possibly Fe-rich bottom waters, specifically during the time period associated with the OAE 1d event. This interpretation is supported by the presence of Fe enrichment recorded by FeTotal/Al and FeHighly Reactive/FeT with the lack of Fepyrite/FeHighly Reactive associated with Mn depletion.

R.W. Scott; Michael Formolo; Natalie Rush; Jeremy D. Owens; Francisca Oboh-Ikuenobe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Using SCUBA to place upper limits on arcsecond scale CMB anisotropies at 850 microns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The SCUBA instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope has already had an impact on cosmology by detecting relatively large numbers of dusty galaxies at high redshift. Apart from identifying well-detected sources, such data can also be mined for information about fainter sources and their correlations, as revealed through low level fluctuations in SCUBA maps. As a first step in this direction we analyse a small SCUBA data-set as if it were obtained from a Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) differencing experiment. This enables us to place limits on CMB anisotropy at 850 microns. Expressed as Q_{flat}, the quadrupole expectation value for a flat power spectrum, the limit is 152 microKelvin at 95 per cent confidence, corresponding to C_0^{1/2} < 355 microKelvin for a Gaussian autocorrelation function, with a coherence angle of about 20--25 arcsec; These results could easily be reinterpretted in terms of any other fluctuating sky signal. This is currently the best limit for these scales at high frequency, and comparable to limits at similar angular scales in the radio. Even with such a modest data-set, it is possible to put a constraint on the slope of the SCUBA counts at the faint end, since even randomly distributed sources would lead to fluctuations. Future analysis of sky correlations in more extensive data-sets ought to yield detections, and hence additional information on source counts and clustering.

Colin Borys; Scott C. Chapman; Douglas Scott

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

271

Solar thermal upper stage technology demonstrator liquid hydrogen storage and feed system test program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar Thermal Upper Stage Technology Demonstrator (STUSTD) Liquid Hydrogen Storage and Feed System (LHSFS) Test Program is described. The test program consists of two principal phases. First an engineering characterization phase includes tests performed to demonstrate and understand the expected tank performance. This includes fill and drain; baseline heat leak; active Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS); and flow tests. After the LHSFS performance is understood and performance characteristics are determined a 30 day mission simulation test will be conducted. This test will simulate a 30 day transfer mission from low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO). Mission performance predictions based on the results of the engineering characterization tests will be used to correlate the results of the 30 day mission simulation.

E. C. Cady

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Upper Bound on the Hadronic Light-By-Light Contribution to the Muon g-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are indications that hadronic loops in some electroweak observables are almost saturated by parton level effects. Taking this as the hypothesis for this work, we propose a genuine parton level estimate of the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a?LBL(had). Our quark mass definitions and values are motivated in detail, and the simplicity of our approach allows for a transparent error estimate. For infinitely heavy quarks our treatment is exact, while for asymptotically small quark masses a?LBL(had) is overestimated. Interpolating, this suggests quoting an upper bound. We obtain a?LBL(had)<1.5910-9 (95% C.L.).

Jens Erler and Genaro Toledo Snchez

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

273

Upper bounds on parity-violating ?-ray asymmetries in compound nuclei from polarized cold neutron capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Parity-odd asymmetries in the electromagnetic decays of compound nuclei can sometimes be amplified above values expected from simple dimensional estimates by the complexity of compound nuclear states. Using a statistical approach, we estimate the root-mean-square of the distribution of expected parity-odd correlations s?nk??, where s?n is the neutron spin and k?? is the momentum of the ?, in the integrated ? spectrum from the capture of cold polarized neutrons on Al, Cu, and In. We present measurements of the asymmetries in these and other nuclei. Based on our calculations, large enhancements of asymmetries were not predicted for the studied nuclei and the statistical estimates are consistent with our measured upper bounds on the asymmetries.

M. T. Gericke et al. (NPDGamma Collaboration)

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Satellite Measurement of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor: Development and Applications and Applications for the ARM Program  

SciTech Connect

Upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) measurements from the 6.7 micron channel on GOES (8, 9, 12) and GMS-5 satellites were employed to develop a near real-time UTH product that is now available from the ARM External Data Center (XDC). The UTH product is available in either gridded format (2.0 x 2.0 lat-lon resolution), full-disk pixel resolution, or individual pixel resolution for both the SGP and TWP sites. This product provides the basis for the instrument intercomparison and validation activities (Section 0.2), diurnal analysis and model evaluation (0.3), and cloud lifecycle studies (0.5); and is also an important component of the research proposed here. Full details regarding the retrieval algorithm for the ARM sites can be found in Soden et al. (2004a) and references therein.

Brian J. Soden

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

275

Upper Cretaceous sequence stratigraphy of the Galala Plateaux, western side of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Based on the study of lithology, biostratigraphy and analysis of facies, this study deduces the occurrence of nine third-order Upper Cretaceous (CenomanianMaastrichtian) depositional sequences, which are bounded by eleven sequence boundaries of geographic extent in the Galala Plateaux, situated along the western side of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. Some of the recorded sequence boundaries (e.g., Cenomanian/Turonian, Turonian/Coniacian, intra Santonian, and Campanian/Maastrichtian sequence boundaries) are not yet confirmed to eustatic sea-level changes. Fourteen main mixed carbonate/siliciclastic facies associations were recognized on a lateral transition between inner to outer ramp settings, with apparent subsidence towards the south. The tectonic position of the Galala Plateaux played an important role in the profound complexity of facies changes and the configuration of depositional sequences representing variable time gaps.

Sherif Farouk

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Late-Quaternary Stratigraphy and Geoarchaeology of the Upper Neosho River Basin, East-Central Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C o. L yo n C o. C of fe y C o. 15 0 22 5 30 0 km 75 0 20 30 40 k m 10 0 N K an sa s U pp er N eo sh o R iv er B as in Cr F ig ur e 1. 1. U pp er N eo sh o R iv er b as in in K an sa s, U SA 2 3 settlement patterns (Mandel, 2006a: 28... Arkansas River Basin Upper Neosho River Basin (Study Area) Gulf of Mexico M ississippi R i ver 6 S m ok y H il ls B lu e H il ls C ha lk B ut te s H ig h P la in s A rk an sa s R iv er L ow la nd s F li nt H il ls O sa ge...

Gottsfield, Andrew Stefan

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

277

Net thickness of the radioactive shale facies in the upper Olentangy Shale  

SciTech Connect

This map represents the net thickness of the radioactive shale facies included in that part of the Olentangy Shale of Ohio which correlates to the West Falls, Sonyea, and Genesee Formations of New York State. Specifically excluded from consideration is the uppermost part of the upper Olentangy Shale which correlates to the Java Formation of New York. The net thickness of radioactive shale is determined by first establishing a normal base line for each well based upon the gamma ray log response of shale units, such as the Bedford, Chagrin, and certain units within the Olentangy, observed to be fairly consistently radioactive. Radioactive shales are then defined as those shales having a gamma ray response 20 API units or more to the right of the shale base line. The combined thickness of beds reaching the radioactive shale threshold value is reported as the net thickness of radioactive shale facies within the mapping unit.

Honeycutt, M.; Majchszak, F.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The structural alignment of coal and the analogous case of Argonne Upper Freeport coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has long been recognized that coal is somewhat aligned. Multiple techniques imply a structural alignment but its quantification has been challenging. Moreover, discrepancies exist among techniques as to whether low-rank coals are aligned. The extent of structural alignment for the rank range was quantified directly via image analysis of high-resolution transmission electron micrograph lattice fringes. Alignment was quantified, for each coal, by the contribution to the total fringe length within the prominent 45 of orientation over random orientation (1/4 of the possible orientations). It was evident that there is structural alignment across the rank range. Thus it is time for the community to desist from making the erroneous statement that: low-rank coals are randomly oriented. The slight orientation was similar for low-rank Beulah-Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous coals (24% and 22%) with Pocahontas (lvb) coal showing slightly greater (39%) alignment with extensive alignment (65%) in the case of an anthracite coal. The degree of ordering is illustrated with the aid of false-color lattice fringe images and Rose diagrams. The fringe contribution 90 opposed to the maximum length contribution had the minimum or near minimum percentage length contribution for all coals except Upper Freeport and to a lesser degree Illinois No. 6. For the Upper Freeport coal the alignment is lower than expected given its mvb rank (14% over random) and is attributed to a variant of T-stacking for the small aromatic moieties sited perpendicular and between horizontal displaced fringes.

Jonathan P. Mathews; Atul Sharma

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Seasonal variation of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric equatorial waves over the tropical Pacific  

SciTech Connect

Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric wind data spanning 31 years from 1964 to 1994 were analyzed at rawinsonde stations in the central/western Pacific. Traditional spectral and cross-spectral analysis led to the conclusion that there is a significant signal with periods between 3 and 4.5 days, which the authors link with the dominant antisymmetric waves predicted by theory to have these periods, mixed Rossby-gravity waves, and equatorial Rossby waves. Then the authors applied the seasonally varying spectral analysis method developed by Madden to study the average seasonal variation of these waves. The seasonally varying analysis suggested that there are significant twice-yearly maxima in equatorial wave activity throughout the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, with peaks occurring in late winter-spring and in late summer-fall. The twice-yearly signal was most prominent at the 70-hPa and 100-hPa levels. Similar and consistent results were also shown by an autoregressive cyclic spectral analysis. The cyclic spectral analysis suggested that the frequency characteristics of the v-wind wave power are different during the two maxima at some stations. In addition, the seasonally varying squared coherence between the u and v winds and the associated phase implied that there is horizontal momentum flux associated with these waves and that the sign of the flux is different during the two maxima. The differences in wave characteristics during the maxima periods may be related to different wave modes, seasonal variation of the basic zonal state, or possibly to different equatorial wave forcing mechanisms (i.e., convective versus lateral excitations). 52 refs., 12 figs.

Wikle, C.K.; Tsing-Chang Chen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)] [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Madden, R.A. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Ochoan (upper Permian) stratigraphy and age determinations, southeastern New Mexico and west Texas  

SciTech Connect

Upper Permian strata, which are the stratotype of the Ochoan State (Series), have an extensive subsurface distribution and limited outcrop area in southeastern New Mexico and west Texas. The oldest strata are alternating laminae of anhydrite and calcite of the Castile Formation and are as much as 700 m thick. The closely related and overlying Salado Formation is a much as 600 m thick and is mostly halite and argillaceous halite with minor anhydrite. The overlying Rustler Formation is as much as 150 m thick and consists of anhydrite, red silty shale and magnesian limestone. Overlying red beds are the Quartermaster Formation (Dewey Lake Formation is a synonym, as is the term Pierce Canyon red beds), which is as much as 106 m thick and consist of fine sandstones, siltstones, and minor gypsum. The Castile rests disconformably on the Capitanian (middle Permian) Lamar Limestone Member of the Bell Canyon Formation and its equivalent, the Tansill Formation of the Artesia Group. Counting of Castile-Salado laminae and their posited relationship to astronomical cycles suggests that Castile-Salado deposition took only 200,000-300,000 yr. Limited assemblages of brachiopods and conodonts from the Rustler Formation indicate a Late Permian age, but are no more precise age indicators. A small assemblage of bivalves, K-Ar ages and magnetostratigraphy indicate a late Permian age for the Quartermaster Formation. There is no evidence to support a Triassic age assignment for the Quarter-master; it is disconformably overlain by the Upper Triassic (Carnian) Chinle group. Most workers us the Ochoan as a Late Permian Stage-Age, although its typical strata generally lack good age indicators and may represent relatively short and sporadic intervals of the Late Permian. We prefer recognition of the Ochoan as a lithostratigraphic unit (group) without regional or global geochronologial significance.

Lucas, S.G. (New Mexico Museum of Natural History, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Anderson, O.R. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Vegetation of Upper Coastal Plain depression wetlands: Environmental templates and wetland dynamics within a landscape framework.  

SciTech Connect

Reference wetlands play an important role in efforts to protect wetlands and assess wetland condition. Because wetland vegetation integrates the influence of many ecological factors, a useful reference system would identify natural vegetation types and include models relating vegetation to important regional geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical properties. Across the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain, depression wetlands are a major hydrogeomorphic class with diverse characteristics. For 57 functional depression wetlands in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, we characterized the principal vegetation types and used a landscape framework to assess how local (wetland-level) factors and regional landscape settings potentially influence vegetation composition and dynamics. Wetland sites were stratified across three Upper Coastal Plain landscape settings that differ in soils, surface geology, topography, and land use. We sampled plant composition, measured relevant local variables, and analyzed historical transitions in vegetative cover types. Cluster analysis identified six vegetation types, ranging from open-water ponds and emergent marshes to closed forests. Significant vegetation-environment relationships suggested environmental ''templates'' for plant community development. Of all local factors examined, wetland hydrologic regime was most strongly correlated with vegetation type, but depression size, soil textural type, and disturbance history were also significant. Because hydrogeologic settings influence wetland features, local factors important to vegetation were partly predictable from landscape setting, and thus wetland types were distributed non-randomly across landscape settings. Analysis of long-term vegetation change indicated relative stability in some wetlands and succession in others. We developed a landscape-contingent model for vegetation dynamics, with hydroperiod and fire as major driving variables. The wetland classification, environmental templates, and dynamics model provide a reference framework to guide conservation priorities and suggest possible outcomes of restoration or management.

De Steven, Diane; Toner, Maureen, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Phase mixing of upper hybrid oscillations in a cold inhomogeneous plasma placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

We study phase mixing/wave breaking phenomena of upper hybrid modes in a cold inhomogeneous plasma placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Inhomogeneities both in the background ion density and magnetic field profile are treated as periodic in space but independent in time. The Lagrangian fluid description is employed to obtain an exact solution of this fully nonlinear problem. It is demonstrated that the upper hybrid modes, excited by an initial local charge imbalance, break via phase mixing, induced by the inhomogeneities. It is also shown that it is possible to avoid phase mixing in excited upper hybrid oscillations in an inhomogeneous plasma containing a finite amplitude ion density fluctuation. The choice of external magnetic field is shown to have a key role in avoiding phase mixing in such oscillations. The relevance of our investigation regarding the particle acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma has also been discussed.

Sarkar, Anwesa; Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)] [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Depositional environments and reservoir properties of the upper Queen Formation, Concho Bluff and Concho Bluff North fields, Midland basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The upper Queen Formation (Upper Permian) in Concho Bluff and Concho Bluff North fields (Crane, Upton, and Ector counties, Texas) consists of four thick (6-11 m) clastic members separated by evaporite members, and contains several major sandstone reservoirs. A study of cores and logs from the upper Queen was done to determine its depositional environments and the properties of its sandstone reservoirs. Four facies are present in the upper Queen. Facies 1 consists of planar- and wavy-laminated fine and very fine sandstones and silty sandstones deposited in fluvial sandflats and delta-plains. Facies 2 consists of wavy-laminated siltstones and haloturbated mudstones with anhydrite nodules deposited in subaqueous prodelta environments and subaerial saline mudflats. Facies 3 consists of well-sorted fine to very fine sandstones with horizontal and inclined planar laminae deposited in eolian sand sheets. Facies 4 consists of massive to laminated halite and anhydrite deposited in hypersaline playas. The vertical sequence of these facies indicates that the upper Queen was deposited during four cycles of fan-delta progradation into and retreat from coastal-plain playas during a sea level lowstand in the Midland basin. The sandstones of the fluvial sandflat and eolian sand-sheet facies constitute the reservoirs of the upper Queen in the fields. The average cumulative thickness of these facies is 8 m, and the fields average 16% porosity and 40-50 md of permeability. The remaining facies are all nonproductive with averagge porosities of less than 10% and average permeabilities of less than 1 md.

Mazzullo, J.; Newsom, D.; Harper, J.; McKone, C.; Price, B. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Summary and evaluation of hydraulic property data available for the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system. For the past 40 years, hydrologic testing of the upper basalt confined aquifer has been conducted by a number of Hanford Site programs. Hydraulic property estimates are important for evaluating aquifer flow characteristics (i.e., ground-water flow patterns, flow velocity, transport travel time). Presented are the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydraulic properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). Available hydrologic test data were reevaluated using recently developed diagnostic test analysis methods. A comparison of calculated transmissivity estimates indicates that, for most test results, a general correspondence within a factor of two between reanalysis and previously reported test values was obtained. For a majority of the tests, previously reported values are greater than reanalysis estimates. This overestimation is attributed to a number of factors, including, in many cases, a misapplication of nonleaky confined aquifer analysis methods in previous analysis reports to tests that exhibit leaky confined aquifer response behavior. Results of the test analyses indicate a similar range for transmissivity values for the various hydro-geologic units making up the upper basalt confined aquifer. Approximately 90% of the calculated transmissivity values for upper basalt confined aquifer hydrogeologic units occur within the range of 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 2} m{sup 2}/d, with 65% of the calculated estimate values occurring between 10{sup 1} to 10{sup 2} m{sup 2}d. These summary findings are consistent with the general range of values previously reported for basalt interflow contact zones and sedimentary interbeds within the Saddle Mountains Basalt.

Spane, F.A. Jr.; Vermeul, V.R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant fish kill for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the monitoring of fish kills in upper East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) from July 1990 to June 1993. Since the opening of Lake Reality (LR) in 1988, total numbers of fish inhabiting upper EFPC have increased. However, species diversity has remained poor. Water quality data have been collected in upper EFPC during the time period covered in this report. Total residual chlorine (TRC) levels have exceeded federal and state water quality criteria over the years. However, with the installation of two dechlorination systems in late 1992, TRC levels have been substantially lowered in most portions of upper EFPC. By June 1993, concentrations of TRC were 0.04 to 0.06 mg/L at the north-south pipes (NSP) and below detection limits at sampling station AS-8 and were 0 to 0.01 mg/L at the inlet and outlet of LR. The daily chronic fish mortality in upper EFPC has been attributed to background stress resulting from the continuous discharge of chlorine into upper EFPC. Mean daily mortality rates for 22 acute fish kills were three fold or more above background and usually exceeded ten fish per day. Total number of dead fish collected per acute kill event ranged from 30 to over 1,000 fish; predominant species killed were central stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) and striped shiners (Luxilus chrysocephalus). Spills or elevated releases of toxic chemicals, such as acids, organophosphates, aluminum nitrate, ammonia, or chlorine, were identified as possible causative agents; however, a definitive cause-effect relationship was rarely established for any acute kills. Ambient toxicity testing, in situ chemical monitoring, and streamside experiments were used to examine TRC dynamics and ambient toxicity in EFPC.

Etnier, E.L.; Opresko, D.M.; Talmage, S.S. [eds.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

An upper bound on the second order asymptotic expansion for the quantum communication cost of state redistribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State redistribution is the protocol in which, given an arbitrary tripartite quantum state, with two of the subsystems initially being with Alice and one being with Bob, the goal is for Alice to send one of her subsystems to Bob, possibly with the help of prior shared entanglement. We derive an upper bound on the second order asymptotic expansion for the quantum communication cost of achieving state redistribution with a given finite accuracy. In proving our result, we also obtain an upper bound on the quantum communication cost of this protocol in the one-shot setting, by using the protocol of coherent state merging as a primitive.

Nilanjana Datta; Min-Hsiu Hsieh; Jonathan Oppenheim

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

A new expected upper limit on the rare decay B(s) ---> mu+ mu- with the D0 experiment  

SciTech Connect

We present a new expected upper limit of the rare decay branching ratio B{sub s} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} using about 5 fb{sup -1} of Run II data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron. When setting limits on the branching ratio, selected events are normalized to reconstructed B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{Psi}K{sup {+-}} events in order to decrease the systematic uncertainty. The resulting expected upper limit is {Beta}(B{sub s} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = 4.3(5.3) x 10{sup -8} at the 90% (95%) C.L.

Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; /Strasbourg, IPHC

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation  

SciTech Connect

Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Upper bounds on the relative energy difference of pure and mixed Gaussian states with a fixed fidelity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exact and approximate formulas for the upper bound of the relative energy difference of two Gaussian states with the fixed fidelity between them are derived. The reciprocal formulas for the upper bound of the fidelity for the fixed value of the relative energy difference are obtained as well. The bounds appear higher for pure states than for mixed ones, and their maximal values correspond to squeezed vacuum states. In particular, to guarantee the relative energy difference less than 10%, for quite arbitrary Gaussian states, the fidelity between them must exceed the level 0.998866.

V. V. Dodonov

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

290

Three-column osteotomies of the lower cervical and upper thoracic spine: comparison of early outcomes, radiographic parameters, and peri-operative complications in 48 patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To evaluate and compare early radiographic and clinical outcomes of lower cervical and upper thoracic three-column osteotomies (3CO) for cervicothoracic kyphosis correction.

Alexander A. Theologis; Ehsan Tabaraee; Haruki Funao

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Depositional and diagenetic controls on reservoir quality and their petrophysical predictors within the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Doe Creek Member of the Kaskapau Formation at Valhalla Field, Northwest Alberta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Valhalla Field, discovered in 1979 and located in northwest Alberta, produces from the Upper Cretaceous Doe Creek Member of the Kaskapau Formation. Original reserves in (more)

Ball, Nathaniel H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Upper-ocean variability in Drake Passage and the Weddell Sea : Measuring the oceanic response to air-sea and ice-ocean interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remote-sensing observations of SST to an upper-ocean heatremote-sensing and reanalysis products provide estimates of the net heat

Stephenson, Gordon Ronald

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

ARCHAEOLOGY, LATE-QUATERNARY LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE IN THE UPPER DRIFTWOOD CREEK BASIN, BARBER COUNTY, KANSAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D) . 26 Donovan Ranch Fan. 33 Blunk Ranch Location.. 37 Sterling Ranch Section.. 48 VI. CONCLUSIONS 53 Paleo... of the study area within the upper Driftwood Creek basin 2 3. Location of archaeological sites discussed in the text.. 12 4. Location of the Vincent-Donovan site and the Donovan Ranch Fan ... 29 5. Terrace remnant and soil...

Kessler, Nicholas Victor

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

Area Study prior to Companion Modelling to Integrate Multiple Interests in Upper Watershed Management of Northern Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management of Northern Thailand C. Barnaud*, G. Trébuil**, P. Dumrongrojwatthana***, J. Marie**** * CU of northern Thailand have long been accused of degrading the upper watersheds of the country's major basins communities and state agencies, calling for the need for adapted participatory methodologies to facilitate

Boyer, Edmond

295

Allelic Loss in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients with and without Family History of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...patients in group 2 had no family history of upper gastrointestinal or...cancers were combined for family history because historically both were...daily), and a detailed family history of cancer (including all cancers...microdissection (Pixcell 100; Arcturus Engineering, Mountain View, CA). Procured...

Nan Hu; Mark J. Roth; Michael R. Emmert-Buck; Ze-Zhong Tang; Mihael Polymeropolous; Quan-Hong Wang; Alisa M. Goldstein; Xiao-You Han; Sanford M. Dawsey; Ti Ding; Carol Giffen; and Philip R. Taylor

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Radiative heating of the ISCCP upper level cloud regimes and its impact on the large-scale tropical circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiative heating of the ISCCP upper level cloud regimes and its impact on the large-scale tropical 2012; accepted 14 December 2012; published 31 January 2013. [1] Radiative heating profiles. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating

297

The Effect of Practice on Learning and Transferring Goal Directed Isometric Contractions across Ipsilateral Upper and Lower Limbs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 8 women; 22.1 or - 2.1 years) performed 80 trials of goal directed isometric contractions that involved accurately matching a target force of 25% MVC in 200 ms, either with the upper limb or the lower limb followed by the other limb. After...

Kaur, Navneet

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Shear viscosity measurements in the binary mixture butyl cellosolve-water near its upper and lower critical consolute points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has been measured for a two-component critical liquid system, butyl cellosolve-water, in the region to report measurements of the shear viscosity of critical binary mixture butyl cello- solve (2-n353 Shear viscosity measurements in the binary mixture butyl cellosolve-water near its upper

Boyer, Edmond

299

Upper-mantle anisotropy beneath the Cameroon Volcanic Line and Congo Craton from shear wave splitting measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......material from a large rising thermal anomaly beneath southern Ethiopia...Central Africa from Angola to Sudan. In the Archaean, the Gabon-Cameroon...attributed to convection driven by thermal gradients between the asthenosphere...upper-mantle LPO due to the thermal gradient at the edge of the......

Franklin W. Koch; Douglas A. Wiens; Andrew A. Nyblade; Patrick J. Shore; Rigobert Tibi; B. Ateba; C.T. Tabod; J. M. Nnange

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

HOME RANGE SIZE, MOVEMENT AND HABITAT USE FOR A POPULATION OF BLANDING'S TURTLES (EMYS BLANDINGII) IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOME RANGE SIZE, MOVEMENT AND HABITAT USE FOR A POPULATION OF BLANDING'S TURTLES (EMYS BLANDINGII TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES iii LIST OF TABLES iv HOME RANGE SIZE, MOVEMENT AND HABITAT USE. HOME RANGE AND HABITAT COMPOSITION MAPS FOR ALL 17 RADIO-TRACKED TURTLES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER

Janzen, Fredric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

263ESTUARINE MICROFOSSILS AND CRETACEOUS COAL-BEARING STRATA RECOGNITION OF RELATIVE SEA-LEVEL CHANGE IN UPPER CRETACEOUS COAL-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

263ESTUARINE MICROFOSSILS AND CRETACEOUS COAL-BEARING STRATA RECOGNITION OF RELATIVE SEA-LEVEL CHANGE IN UPPER CRETACEOUS COAL- BEARING STRATA: A PALEOECOLOGICAL APPROACH USING AGGLUTINATED, Holyoke, Massachusetts 01040, U.S.A. ABSTRACT: Microfossils from Cretaceous coal-bearing strata can

Leckie, Mark

302

Direct measurements of the mean flow and eddy kinetic energy structure of the upper ocean circulation in the NE Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct measurements of the mean flow and eddy kinetic energy structure of the upper ocean, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway Tom Rossby Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island and variable wind-forcing, and strong and variable deep currents that lead to large uncertainties in the use

303

Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Petroleum potential of the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Illinois: A coordinated geological and geochemical study  

SciTech Connect

The Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Illinois, predominantly composed of shale, calcareous shale, and carbonates, has long been considered a potential source for Illinois basin hydrocarbons. Methods used to better define the petroleum potential of the Maquoketa in the Illinois basin were lithostratigraphic study, Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) analyses, comparison of molecular markers from whole-rock extracts and produced oil, and construction of burial history models. Organic-rich submature Maquoketa potential source rocks are present in western Illinois at shallow depths on the basin flank. Deeper in the basin in southern Illinois, Rock-Eval analyses indicate that the Maquoketa shale is within the oil window. Solvent extracts of the Maquoketa from western Illinois closely resemble the Devonian New Albany Shale, suggesting that past studies may have erroneously attributed Maquoketa-generated petroleum to a New Albany source or failed to identify mixed source oils. Subtle differences between Maquoketa and New Albany solvent extracts include differences in pristane/phytane ratios, proportions of steroids, and distribution of dimethyldibenzothiophene isomers. Maquoketa solvent extracts show little resemblance to Middle Ordovician oils from the Illinois or Michigan basins. Lithostratigraphic studies identified localized thick carbonate facies in the Maquoketa, suggesting depositional response to upper Ordovician paleostructures. Sandstone facies in the Maquoketa in southwestern Illinois offer a potential source/trap play, as well as serving as potential carrier beds for hydrocarbon migration. Maquoketa source and carrier beds may feed older Ordovician rocks in faulted areas along and south of the Cottage Grove fault system in southern Illinois.

Crockett, J.E.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Kruge, M.A. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sedimentary regimes of upper Midway and lower Wilcox lignite in Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Paleoenvironments favorable for lignite deposition existed in sedimentary regimes of the Naheola Formation (upper Midway Group) and in Midway-Wilcox transition sediments apparently assignable to the Nanafalia Formation (Wilcox Group). In addition, lignite horizons are recognized in the Tuscahoma Sand (Wilcox Group). Lignite of potential economic significance occurs within the Naheola Formation west of Butler County and within the Nanafalia Formation east of Butler County. Lignite horizons in the Naheola Formation west of Butler County probably are not stratigraphically or time equivalent to lignite horizons east of Butler County. Depositional environments of the Naheola west of Butler County were favorable for development of lignite deposits with extensive lateral continuity, whereas lignite depositional environments east of Butler County apparently favored variability in thickness and lateral continuity. Estuarine and back-barrier coastal marsh environments are suggested for the lignite. Carbonaceous silt and clay in varying proportions are commonly associated with lignite in the Naheola Formation. Lithologic associations of lignite related to the Nanafalia Formation include quartzarenite, carbonaceous silt and clay, oyster beds, and limestone of the Clayton Formation (Midway Group).

Smith, W.E.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Geothermal exploration assessment and interpretation, Upper Klamah Lake Area, Klamath Basin, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Data from public and private sources on the Klamath Basin geothermal resource are reviewed, synthesized, and reinterpreted. In this, the second and final phase of the work, geological, remote sensing, geochemical, temperature gradient, gravity, aeromagnetic, and electrical resistivity data sets are examined. These data were derived from surveys concentrated on the east and west shores of Upper Klamath Lake. The geological, remote sensing, and potential field data suggest a few northeast-trending discontinuities, which cross the regional north-westerly strike. The near-surface distribution of warm water appears to be related to the intersections of these lineaments and northwest-trending faults. The groundwater geochemical data are reviewed and the various reservoir temperature estimates compared. Particular attention is given to specific electrical conductivities of waters as an interpretational aid to the subsurface resistivity results. A clear trend emerges in the Klamath Falls/Olene Gap area; hotter waters are associated with higher specific conductivities. In the Nuss Lake/Stukel Mountain area the opposite trend prevails, although the relationship is somewhat equivocal.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Upper limits on the probability of an interstellar civilization arising in the local Solar neighborhood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At this point in time, there is very little empirical evidence on the likelihood of a space-faring species originating in the biosphere of a habitable world. However, there is a tension between the expectation that such a probability is relatively high (given our own origins on Earth), and the lack of any basis for believing the Solar System has ever been visited by an extraterrestrial colonization effort. This paper seeks to place upper limits on the probability of an interstellar civilization arising on a habitable planet in its stellar system, using a percolation model to simulate the progress of such a hypothetical civilization's colonization efforts in the local Solar neighborhood. To be as realistic as possible, the actual physical positions and characteristics of all stars within 40 parsecs of the Solar System are used as possible colony sites in the percolation process. If an interstellar civilization is very likely to have such colonization programs, and they can travel over large distances, then the...

Cartin, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to test global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in litre-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results provide proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume at high altitude over Germany occurred several days before the ground level plume.

Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

309

Protect and Restore the Upper Lochsa : Annual Progress Report, May 2008 April 2009.  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Lochsa watersheds included in the project contain critical spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish (Clearwater National Forest 1999). Species that depend on the tributary habitat include spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Snake River summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentes), and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Steelhead and bull trout populations are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing. Both out-of-basin and in-basin factors threaten fish populations in the Lochsa Drainage (Clearwater Subbasin Plan 2003). Out-of-basin factors include the hydroelectric system and ocean conditions, while in-basin factors include a variety of management activities leading to habitat degradation. This project is implemented under Bonneville Power Administration's Fish and Wildlife program in order to meet National Marine Fisheries Service requirements to offset losses caused by the operation of the hydrosystem by improving tributary habitats to promote increased productivity of salmon and steelhead. The Clearwater Subbasin Plan (2003) defines limiting factors to fisheries in the area as watershed disturbances, habitat degradation, sediment, temperature, and connectivity.

Lloyd, Rebecca; Forestieri, David [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

High temperature energy conversion for the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS)  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary studies were conducted to assess the benefits of the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) concept and key components including high temperature thermionic converters, have been tested and evaluated. Advanced radiatively coupled heat pipe cooled thermionic converters with rhenium and tungsten emitters were characterized individually for integration in a modular power unit. The converter with the tungsten emitter was performance mapped in the temperature range of 1,750 K to 2,400 K in order to conform to the ISUS requirements. Higher off-design temperatures yielded power densities as high as 12 watts/sq. cm. in the cesium pressure range of 4 to 9 torr. The converter with the rhenium emitter was tested in the temperature range of 1,575 K to 1,950 K and produced 10.5 watts/sq. cm. at the highest temperature. Dynamic switching characteristics were also measured to evaluate the possibility of interfacing a pulse width modulated (PWM) power regulator directly to a thermionic source.

Ramalingam, M.L. [UES, Inc., Dayton, OH (United States); Lamp, T.R. [Wright Lab., Wright Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Jacox, M.; Kennedy, F. [Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Upper limit on the cross section for reactor antineutrinos changing 22Na decay rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present results of a long-term observation of the decay of 22Na in the presence of a nuclear fission reactor. The measurements were made outside the containment wall of and underneath the Koeberg nuclear power plant near Cape Town, South Africa. Antineutrino fluxes ranged from ~5*10^11 to 1.6*10^13 cm^-2 s^-1 during this period. We show that the coincidence summing technique provides a sensitive tool to measure a change in the total decay constant as well as the branching ratio between EC and beta+ decay of 22Na to the first excited state in 22Ne. We observe a relative change in count rate between reactor-ON and reactor-OFF equal to (-0.51+/-0.11)*10^-4. After evaluating possible systematic uncertainties we conclude that the effect is either due to a hidden instrumental cause or due to an interaction between antineutrinos and the 22Na nucleus. An upper limit of ~0.03 barn has been deduced for observing any change in the decay rate of 22Na due to antineutrino interactions.

de Meijer, R J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Upper limit on the cross section for reactor antineutrinos changing 22Na decay rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present results of a long-term observation of the decay of 22Na in the presence of a nuclear fission reactor. The measurements were made outside the containment wall of and underneath the Koeberg nuclear power plant near Cape Town, South Africa. Antineutrino fluxes ranged from ~5*10^11 to 1.6*10^13 cm^-2 s^-1 during this period. We show that the coincidence summing technique provides a sensitive tool to measure a change in the total decay constant as well as the branching ratio between EC and beta+ decay of 22Na to the first excited state in 22Ne. We observe a relative change in count rate between reactor-ON and reactor-OFF equal to (-0.51+/-0.11)*10^-4. After evaluating possible systematic uncertainties we conclude that the effect is either due to a hidden instrumental cause or due to an interaction between antineutrinos and the 22Na nucleus. An upper limit of ~0.03 barn has been deduced for observing any change in the decay rate of 22Na due to antineutrino interactions.

R. J. de Meijer; S. W. Steyn

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

313

Presence and absence of bats across habitat scales in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract During 2001, we used active acoustical sampling (Anabat II) to survey foraging habitat relationships of bats on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Using an a priori information-theoretic approach, we conducted logistic regression analysis to examine presence of individual bat species relative to a suite of microhabitat, stand, and landscape-level features such as forest structural metrics, forest type, proximity to riparian zones and Carolina bay wetlands, insect abundance, and weather. There was considerable empirical support to suggest that the majority of the activity of bats across most of the 6 species occurred at smaller, stand-level habitat scales that combine measures of habitat clutter (e.g., declining forest canopy cover and basal area), proximity to riparian zones, and insect abundance. Accordingly, we hypothesized that most foraging habitat relationships were more local than landscape across this relatively large area for generalist species of bats. The southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparius) was the partial exception, as its presence was linked to proximity of Carolina bays (best approximating model) and bottomland hardwood communities (other models with empirical support). Efforts at SRS to promote open longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) and loblolly pine (P. taeda) savanna conditions and to actively restore degraded Carolina bay wetlands will be beneficial to bats. Accordingly, our results should provide managers better insight for crafting guidelines for bat habitat conservation that could be linked to widely accepted land management and environmental restoration practices for the region.

Ford, W.Mark; Menzel, Jennifer M.; Menzel, Michael A.: Edwards, John W.; Kilgo, John C.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

GeV Gamma-ray Flux Upper Limits from Clusters of Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of diffuse radio emission associated with clusters of galaxies indicates populations of relativistic leptons infusing the intracluster medium. Those electrons and positrons are either injected into and accelerated directly in the intracluster medium, or produced as secondary pairs by cosmic-ray ions scattering on ambient protons. Radiation mechanisms involving the energetic leptons together with decay of neutral pions produced by hadronic interactions have the potential to produce abundant GeV photons. Here, we report on the search for GeV emission from clusters of galaxies using data collected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) from August 2008 to February 2010. Thirty-three galaxy clusters have been selected according to their proximity and high mass, X-ray flux and temperature, and indications of non-thermal activity for this study. We report upper limits on the photon flux in the range 0.2-100 GeV towards a sample of observed clusters (typical va...

al., M Ackermann et

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

TWO WIDE PLANETARY-MASS COMPANIONS TO SOLAR-TYPE STARS IN UPPER SCORPIUS  

SciTech Connect

At wide separations, planetary-mass and brown dwarf companions to solar-type stars occupy a curious region of parameter space not obviously linked to binary star formation or solar system scale planet formation. These companions provide insight into the extreme case of companion formation (either binary or planetary), and due to their relative ease of observation when compared to close companions, they offer a useful template for our expectations of more typical planets. We present the results from an adaptive optics imaging survey for wide ({approx}50-500 AU) companions to solar-type stars in Upper Scorpius. We report one new discovery of a {approx}14 M{sub J} companion around GSC 06214-00210and confirm that the candidate planetary-mass companion 1RXS J160929.1-210524 detected by Lafreniere et al. is in fact comoving with its primary star. In our survey, these two detections correspond to {approx}4% of solar-type stars having companions in the 6-20 M{sub J} mass and {approx}200-500 AU separation range. This figure is higher than would be expected if brown dwarfs and planetary-mass companions were drawn from an extrapolation of the binary mass function. Finally, we discuss implications for the formation of these objects.

Ireland, M. J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kraus, A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Martinache, F. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Subaru Telescope, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Law, N. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto M5S 3H4, Ontario (Canada); Hillenbrand, L. A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 105-24, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

316

Self-organization of local magnetoplasma structures in the upper layers of the solar convection zone  

SciTech Connect

Self-organization and evolution of magnetoplasma structures in the upper layers of the solar convection zone are discussed as a process of diffuse aggregation of magnetic flux tubes. Equations describing the tube motion under the action of magnetic interaction forces, hydrodynamic forces, and random forces are written explicitly. The process of aggregation of magnetic flux tubes into magnetic flux clusters of different shapes and dimensions is simulated numerically. The obtained structures are compared with the observed morphological types of sunspot groups. The quantitative comparison with the observational data was performed by comparing the fractal dimensions of the photospheric magnetic structures observed in solar active regions with those of structures obtained in the numerical experiment. The model has the following free parameters: the numbers of magnetic flux tubes with opposite polarities on the considered area element (Nn and Ns), the average radius of the cross section of the magnetic flux tube (a), its effective length (l), the twist factor of the tube field (k), and the absolute value of the average velocity of chaotic tube displacements (d). Variations in these parameters in physically reasonable limits leads to the formation of structures (tube clusters of different morphological types) having different fractal dimensions. Using the NOAA 10488 active region, which appeared and developed into a complicated configuration near the central meridian, as an example, it is shown that good quantitative agreement between the fractal dimensions is achieved at the following parameters of the model: Nn = Ns = 250 50; a = 150 50 km; l ? 5000 km, and d = 80 10 m/s. These results do not contradict the observational data and theoretical estimates obtained in the framework of the Parker spaghetti model and provide new information on the physical processes resulting in the origin and evolution of local magnetic plasma structures in the near-photospheric layers of the solar convection zone.

Chumak, O. V., E-mail: chuo@yandex.ru [Moscow State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Slump dominated upper slope reservoir facies, Intra Qua Iboe (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria  

SciTech Connect

An integration of sedimentologic and 3D seismic data provides a basis for unraveling complex depositional processes and sand distribution of the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Nearly 3,000 feet of conventional core was examined in interpreting slump/slide/debris flow, bottom current, turbidity current, pelagic/hemipelagic, wave and tide dominated facies. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated seaward, deposition began with a turbidite channel dominated slope system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated slope system (IQI 3, the principal reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated, collapsed shelf-edge deltaic system (IQI 4). Using seismic time slices and corresponding depositional facies in the core, a sandy {open_quotes}fairway{open_quotes} has been delineated in the IQI 3. Because of differences in stacking patterns of sandy and muddy slump intervals, seismic facies show: (1) both sheet-like and mounded external forms (geometries), and (2) parallel/continuous as well as chaotic/hummocky internal reflections. In wireline logs, slump facies exhibits blocky, coarsening-up, fining-up, and serrated motifs. In the absence of conventional core, slump facies may be misinterpreted and even miscorrelated because seismic facies and log motifs of slumps and debris flows tend to mimic properties of turbidite fan deposits. The slump dominated reservoir facies is composed of unconsolidated fine-grained sand. Thickness of individual units varies from 1 to 34 feet, but amalgamated intervals reach a thickness of up to 70 feet and apparently form connected sand bodies. Porosity commonly ranges from 20 to 35%. Horizontal permeability commonly ranges from 1,000 to 3,000 md.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Diagenetic history of Missourian (Upper Pennsylvanian) Chanute Shale, Cherokee Shelf, midcontinent U. S. A  

SciTech Connect

The Chanute (Ch) Shale consists of two sandstone bodies deposited in fluvial deltaic complexes separated by a shale unit and a coal. The lower Ch is characterized by very fine-to-medium-grained sandstone that fill channels at its base, while the upper Ch includes silt-to-fine-grained sandstone bodies. Petrographic analyses of both units show that they consist of quartz arenites, subarkose, sublitharenite, feldspathic litharenites, litharenites and wackes of the same compositions. Silica-supersaturated waters in the meteoric regime cemented the Ch sands creating thin and discontinuous overgrowths on detrital quartz grains. Early calcite cement precipitated afterwards, inhibiting further silica cementation and shielding feldspars and other liable grains from extensive dissolution. A change in the composition of the meteoric waters caused calcite dissolution leaving patches of cement. As Ch sands entered the compactional regime, saline and alkaline waters dissolved quartz grains and overgrowths as well as other liable grains no longer shielded by the early carbonate cement. The absence of cements and continued compaction resulted in concave-convex and sutured contacts. Dissolution and alteration of feldspars, alteration of micas to clays, and chloritization of biotite and clays continued in the compactional regime. Acidified waters released from organic matter and coal altered micas and feldspars to kaolinite and other clays, releasing Fe, Mg, and Ca necessary for late precipitation of ankerite, dolomite, and calcite cements. Extensive clay and Fe oxide coatings formed, filling embayments on the etched grains. During subsequent Pennsylvanian low sea level stands, ground water dissolved most carbonate cements, creating secondary porosity. Porosity was further enhanced on the outcrop belt during weathering, leaving higher total Fe oxide content on surface samples compared to core samples.

Fernandez, S.; Brenner, R.L. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Stratigraphy of Upper Miocene Potter sands, Midway-Sunset field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Upper Miocene Potter sands in the northern part of the Midway-Sunset field were analyzed extensively using detailed electric-log correlations. Structural and stratigraphic cross sections and subsurface mapping demonstrate variations across four general areas in T31S, R22E, referred to as west (parts of Secs. 16, 17, 21), north (parts of Secs. 15, 16), east (part of sec. 14), and south (within Sec. 27). Potter sands deposited in the west area represent the oldest strata of the Potter sequence because they unconformably overlie older silts, diatomaceous shales, and isolated sand channels believed to be part of the Antelope Shale Member. These sands are interpreted to represent massive debris flow/grain flows deposited in a proximal channel-trough system that carried sediments from west to east, toward the low point of the Midway syncline. In the north area, Potter sands change abruptly from massive sands in the eastern part of Sec. 16 to thinner sand channels with more correlative and continuous silt interbeds in Sec. 15. The massive sands are stratigraphically equivalent, if not slightly younger than, sands in the west. However, at the base, these sands depositionally onlap onto the southwest flank of the globe anticline. The Potter sand channel packages thin in Sec. 15, which represents lateral facies changes within the system as the sand to silt ratios become lower and the silts become more continuous. Potter sands in the east area are the uppermost and youngest strata encountered in the study area. Although massive sand channel packages are common, they show better lateral continuity and exhibit lower sand to silt ratios than the north sequences. In the south area, Potter sands are interbedded with continuous silt units that can be mapped over much of the section.

Balch, D.C.; Martin, T.K.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Testing of a Receiver-Absorber-Converter (RAC) for the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) is a solar bi-modal system based on a concept developed by Babcock & Wilcox in 1992. ISUS will provide advanced power and propulsion capabilities that will enable spacecraft designers to either increase the mass to orbit or decrease the cost to orbit for their satellites. In contrast to the current practice of using chemical propulsion for orbit transfer and photovoltaic conversion/battery storage for electrical power ISUS uses a single collection storage and conversion system for both the power and propulsion functions. The ISUS system is currently being developed by the Air Forces Phillips Laboratory. The ISUS program consists of a systems analysis design and integration (SADI) effort and three major sub-system development efforts: the Concentrator Array and Tracking (CATS) sub-system which tracks the sun and collects/focuses the energy; the Receiver-Absorber-Converter (RAC) sub-system which receives and stores the solar energy transfers the stored energy to the propellant during propulsion operations and converts the stored energy to electricity during power operations; and the Cryogenic Storage and Propellant Feed Sub-system (CSPFS) which stores the liquid hydrogen propellant and provides it to the RAC during propulsion operations. This paper discuses the evolution of the RAC sub-system as a result of the component level testing and provides the initial results of systems level ground testing. A total of 5 RACs were manufactured as part of the Phillips Laboratory ISUS Technology Development program. The first series of component tests were carried out at the Solar Rocket Propulsion Laboratory at Edwards AFB California. These tests provided key information on the propulsion mode of operations. The second series of RAC tests were performed at the Thermionic Evaluation Facility (TEF) in Albuquerque New Mexico and provided information on the electrical performance of the RAC. The systems level testing was performed at the NASA Lewis Research Center Solar Simulator Facility (Tank 6) in Cleveland OH.

Kurt O. Westerman; Barry J. Miles

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Porosity and cementation in upper Cretaceous Mooreville and Demopolis Chalks, central Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Cyclically arranged chalky marl, marl, limestone, and sand facies comprise the Upper Cretaceous Mooreville and Demopolis Chalks, the lower two formation in the Selma Group, inner Coastal Plain of Alabama. In the central Alabama study area (Dallas, Lowndes, and Montgomery Counties), the Mooreville-Demopolis section is 305 m thick and the two main facies are chalky marl and marl. Chalky marl consists of 50-70% carbonate (nannofossil component plus isopachous cement) and is relatively impermeable (average permeability is 0.9 md). The marl has 30-50% carbonate (mainly nannofossil component) and has an average permeability of 0.13 md. Helium-calibrated porosity values range from 31 to 35% in chalky marl and 36 to 41% in the marl. Scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) of chalky marl and marl shows a relatively poor alignment of phyllosilicate grains in both facies. Under SEM, the calcareous nannofossil component, mainly coccoliths and rhabdoliths, shows pristine to cement-coated exterior surfaces. The cement coating is most common in the chalky marl. Sampling throughout the Mooreville-Demopolis section shows no apparent vertical (stratigraphic) trends in facies-specific petrologic characteristics such as permeability, helium-calibrated porosity, phyllosilicate grain alignment, nannofossil content, and extent of cementation. The most parsimonious explanation of the development and evolution of porosity and cementation in the study area is as follows. First, simple mechanical compaction from burial under a few hundred meters of sediment can readily explain the reduction in porosity to less than 40% in most samples from the Mooreville-Demopolis section. Secondary (facies-selective) cementation is a further cause for porosity reduction in chalky marl. Cementation is likely the result of calcareous nannofossil dissolution during compaction and carbonate solution-transfer via groundwater movement.

Holston, I.; King, D.T. Jr.; Bittner, E. (Auburn Univ., AL (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Neurogenic period of ascending tract neurons in the upper lumbar spinal cord of the rat  

SciTech Connect

Although the neurogenic period for neurons in the lumbar spinal cord has been clearly established (Days 12 through 16 of gestation), it is not known when the neurogenesis of ascending tract neurons is completed within this period. The purpose of the present study was to determine the duration of the neurogenic period for projection neurons of the ascending tracts. To label neurons undergoing mitosis during this period, tritiated thymidine was administered to fetal rats on Embryonic (E) Days E13 through E16 of gestation. Ascending tract neurons of the lumbar cord were later (Postnatal Days 40-50) labeled in each animal with a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold, applied at the site of a hemisection at spinal cord segment C3. Ascending tract neurons which were undergoing mitosis in the upper lumbar cord were double labeled, i.e., labeled with both tritiated thymidine and Fluoro-Gold. On Day E13, 89-92% of the ascending tract neurons were double labeled; on Day E14, 35-37%; and on Day E15, 1-4%. Results showed, then, that some ascending tract neurons were double labeled through Day E15 and were, therefore, proliferating in the final one-third of the neurogenic period. Ascending tract neurons proliferating on Day E15 were confined to laminae III, IV, V, and X and the nucleus dorsalis. Long tract neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (laminae I and II), on the other hand, were found to have completed neurogenesis on Day E14 of gestation. Results of the present study show that spinal neurogenesis of ascending projection neurons continues throughout most of the neurogenic period and does not completely follow the well-established ventral to dorsal gradient.

Nandi, K.N.; Beal, J.A.; Knight, D.S. (Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Shreveport (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Evaluate the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds on Satellite Retrievals of Low-Level Cloud Droplet Effective Radius  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds on Satellite Retrievals of Low-Level Cloud Droplet Effective Radius F.-L. Chang and Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction The earth's radiation budget is sensitive to changes in the microphysical properties of low-level stratiform clouds. Their extensive coverage can significantly reduce the solar energy absorbed by the earth system. An estimate of reducing the global-mean droplet effective radius (r e ) of these low-level clouds by ~2 µm, while keeping the column liquid water constant would balance the warming due to CO 2 doubling in the atmosphere (Slingo 1990). Accurate determination of the droplet r

324

Rheology of the Deep Upper Mantle and its Implications for the Preservation of the Continental Roots: A Review  

SciTech Connect

The longevity of deep continental roots depends critically on the rheological properties of upper mantle minerals under deep upper mantle conditions. Geodynamic studies suggest that the rheological contrast between the deep continental and oceanic upper mantle is a key factor that controls the longevity of the continental roots. Current understanding of rheological properties of deep upper mantle is reviewed to examine how a large enough rheological contrast between the continental and oceanic upper mantle develops that leads to the longevity of the deep continental roots. Based on the microstructures of naturally deformed deep continental rocks as well as on the observations of seismic anisotropy, it is concluded that power-law dislocation creep dominates in most of the deep upper mantle. Deformation by power-law creep is sensitive to water content and therefore the removal of water by partial melting to form depleted continental roots is a likely mechanism to establish a large rheological contrast. The results of experimental studies on the influence of temperature, pressure and water content on plastic flow by power-law dislocation creep are reviewed. The degree of rheological contrast depends critically on the dependence of effective viscosity on water content under 'wet' (water-rich) conditions but it is also sensitive to the effective viscosity under 'dry' (water-free) conditions that depends critically on the influence of pressure on deformation. Based on the analysis of thermodynamics of defects and high-temperature creep, it is shown that a robust estimate of the influence of water and pressure can be made only by the combination of low-pressure (< 0.5 GPa) and high-pressure (> 5 GPa) studies. A wide range of flow laws has been reported, leading to nearly 10 orders of magnitude differences in estimated viscosities under the deep upper mantle conditions. However, based on the examination of several criteria, it is concluded that relatively robust experimental data are now available for power-law dislocation creep in olivine both under 'dry' (water-free) and 'wet' (water-saturated) conditions. These data show that the influence of water is large (a change in viscosity up to {approx} 4 orders of magnitude for a constant stress) at the depth of {approx} 200-400 km. I conclude that the conditions for survival of a deep root for a few billions of years can be satisfied when 'dry' olivine rheology with a relatively large activation volume (> (10-15) x 10{sup -6} m{sup 3}/mol) is used and the substantial water removal occurs to these depths. High degree of water removal requires a large degree of melting in the deep upper mantle that could have occurred in the Archean where geotherm was likely hotter than the current one by 200 K presumably with the help of water.

Karato, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The depositional environments, diagenetic history, and porosity development of the Upper Smackover Member at Eustace Field, Henderson County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Steve Stems, Stan "T. A. God" Franklin, Leah Flanagan, Greg Bond, Nary Helen Neiman, and Laura Bagwell (from next door). Thank you all. TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION METHODS. REGIONAL GEOLOGY East Texas Basin - Jurassic Stratigraphy. East Texas... as the Gulf of Mexico opened. One of the basins which formed was the East Texas Basin . 8 Jurassic stratigraphy in east Texas. Adapted from McGillis ( 1984). . . 10 Upper Smackover facies patterns in the Gulf Coast. The ramp in east Texas is steeper...

Sequeira, Jose J.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Tectostratigraphic evidence for Late Paleozoic Pacific plate collision and post-Upper Jurassic transpression in northeastern Chihuahua, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The rocks of Mina Plomosas, Chihuahua include a structurally complex association of Ordovician to Permian and Upper Jurassic strata. The structural deformation has historically been considered as two-fold including late Paleozoic compression associated with the collision of North and Afro-South America followed by loosely defined Laramide influences. These interpretations, however, are inconsistent with respect to timing, direction and style of deformation and the tectostratigraphic development of northeastern Mexico. Paleozoic strata which are folded, overturned and thrusted to the southwest are in opposition to the predicted, and elsewhere observed, northwestward compression. More likely, deformation is the result of late Paleozoic, northeastward directed Pacific plate collision causing underthrusting of the Paleozoic strata. Typical Laramide deformations are also in question. Upper Jurassic La Casita-equivalent rocks are twisted into distally thrusted, arcuate, en echelon, omega-folded anticlines which rotate into the trend of the suspected continuation of the oblique strike-slip San Marcos Fault. Such structures are diagnostic of transpressive mobile belts. The implications of late Paleozoic Pacific plate interactions and post-middle Paleozoic transpressive tectonics are that northern Mexico was located to the northwest during the Paleozoic and was repositioned following deposition of Upper Jurassic strata.

Montgomery, H.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina, March 1990--July 1991  

SciTech Connect

In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Runs Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F/H area effluent on the creek, the study included qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites (see map), chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. In a March 1990 study of the potential impact of F/H Area effluent on the macroinvertebrate communities of Upper Three Runs Creek was extended, with reductions in the number of sites to be sampled and in the frequency of water chemistry sampling. This report presents the results of macroinvertebrate stream surveys at three sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent and water chemistry analysis of the three stream sites and the effluent from March 1990 to July 1991.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Tempestites in a teapot? Condensation-generated shell beds in the Upper Ordovician, Cincinnati Arch, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Skeletal concentrations in mudstones may represent local facies produced by storm winnowing in shallow water, or time-specific deposits related to intervals of diminished sediment supply. Upper Ordovician (Katian) of the Cincinnati region is a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate succession including meter-scale cycles containing a shelly limestone-dominated phase and a mudstone-dominated phase. The tempestite proximality model asserts that shell-rich intervals originated by winnowing of mud from undifferentiated fair-weather deposits. Thus shell beds are construed as tempestites, while interbedded mudstones represent either fair-weather or bypassed mud. Meter-scale cycles are attributed to sea-level fluctuation or varying storm intensity. Alternatively, the episodic starvation model argues, on the basis of petrographic, taphonomic, and stratigraphic evidence, that, despite widespread evidence for storms or other turbulence events (e.g. tsunamis), winnowing alone could not generate shell beds where none had previously existed. Instead, variations in sediment supply are construed as the principal cause of shelly-mudstone cycles. Shell-rich deposits accrue during periods of siliciclastic sediment starvation and relatively shell-free mud accumulates during periods of sediment influx. Tempestite proximality and episodic starvation models lead to contrasting predictions about proximal-to-distal facies patterns. These are: (i) large versus small volumes of distally-deposited, bypassed mud; (ii) proximal grainstones and distal packstones versus distal grainstones and proximal packstones; and (iii) proximal versus distal amalgamation and condensation of shell beds. In this paper, these predictions are tested by (i) comparing meter-scale cycles from different horizons and depositional environments through the lower Cincinnatian succession (Kope through McMillan Formations representing deep subtidal through intertidal environments), and (ii) correlating intervals and individual meter-scale cycles from the Fairview Formation of the Cincinnati Arch (shallow subtidal) north and west into the Maquoketa Shale (deep subtidal) in subsurface of Ohio and Indiana. Both approaches show patterns consistent with episodic starvation, not winnowing, including: (i) small differences in stratigraphic thickness indicate small volumes of bypassed mud; (ii) discrete distal deep-water grainstones that splay proximally into bundles of thinner shallow-water packstones alternating with shelly muds show that grainstones formed from a lack of, rather than removal of mud; and (iii) distal shell?bed amalgamation and condensation (and corresponding proximal splaying) of shell beds shows a proximal source of mud. Thus, winnowing by storms or other turbulence events did not generate shell beds or cycles from undifferentiated sediments despite abundant evidence for storm deposition. High-resolution correlations imply that the shell-bed and mud-bed hemicycles reflect simultaneous basin-wide changes in sedimentary style rather than contemporaneous facies belts that track sea level. In this sense, shell-rich and mud-rich hemicycles are non-Waltherian facies.

Benjamin F. Dattilo; Carlton E. Brett; Thomas J. Schramm

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Simulation of barotropic wind-driven circulation in the upper layers of Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea during the southwest and northeast monsoon seasons using observed winds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, nonlinear, vertically integrated model was used to simulate depth-mean wind-driven circulation in the upper Ekman layers of the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea. The model resolution was one th...

N. Bahulayan; A. S. Unnikrishnan

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Thermodynamics of SiO2H2O uid near the upper critical end point from quartz solubility measurements at 10 kbar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fundamental implications for uid-rock interaction in the lower crust and upper mantle (Manning, 2004; Hack et systems may exhibit critical end points on their hydrous melting curves (e.g., Hack et al., 2007a

Manning, Craig

331

Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A Comparative Analysis of Speed Profile Models for Ankle Pointing Movements: Evidence that Lower and Upper Extremity Discrete Movements are Controlled by a Single Invariant Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Little is known about whether our knowledge of how the central nervous system controls the upper extremities (UE), can generalize, and to what extent to the lower limbs. Our continuous efforts to design the ideal adaptive ...

Vaisman, Lev

333

Observations of Upper Ocean Currents at DOMES Sites A,B, and C in the Tropical Central North Pacific Ocean During 1975 and 1976  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The time and space (vertical) scales of the upper ocean current field are described from moored current measurements made at 20 m, 50 m ... C was within the westward-flowing North Equatorial Current. At Sites A a...

David Halpern

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Geotechnical investigation of sewage wastewater disposal sites and use of GIS land use maps to assess environmental hazards: Sohag, upper Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land application is the only currently available technique for sewage wastewater disposal along the Nile Valley in Upper Egypt. Wastewater disposal projects have been established in the lowland desert zone ext...

Ahmed M. Youssef; Adly A. Omer; Mohamed S. Ibrahim

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Sensitivity of Hadley Circulation to Physical Parameters and Resolution through Changing Upper-Tropospheric Ice Clouds Using a Global Cloud-System Resolving Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between upper-tropospheric ice cloud properties and the Hadley circulation intensity is examined through parameter sensitivity studies of global cloud-system-resolving simulations with explicit cloud convection. Experiments under ...

Shin-ichi Iga; Hirofumi Tomita; Yoko Tsushima; Masaki Satoh

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Depositional environment of the Monserrate Formation: Palogrande, Cebu, and Dina-K fields, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia, South America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shales supply a ready source rock for oil generation (Macellari, 1985). The Upper Magdalena Valley Cretaceous marine strata was deposited from the Aptian to the Maastrichtian. These deposits are overlain by paralic sediments of Maastrichtian... was developed through the 1970s and 1980s. A typical well, DK-24, was completed at a depth of 6918 ft (2108. 6 m) in September 1985, and put on pump for 419 BOPD, with a gas/oil ratio of 261 cubic ft per barrel. The well produced 23. 6' API oil (relative...

Goddard, Curtis Fred

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Water quality improvements in the Upper North Bosque River watershed due to phosphorous export through turfgrass sod  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clyde L. Munster The Upper North Bosque River (UNBR) watershed is under a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) mandate to reduce Phosphorus (P) due to excess nutrients in the watershed. To address... of the manure applied P. Plot and field scale research has demonstrated the effectiveness of turfgrass to remove manure phosphorus (P). In order to assess the impact of the turfgrass BMP on a watershed scale, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used...

Stewart, George Russell

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

338

Robust upper limit on the neutron single-particle energy of the $i_{13/2}$ orbit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The boundary of the neutron $i_{13/2}$ single-particle energy is investigated with exact shell-model calculations, where random two-body interactions are adopted to overcome the bias from effective interactions. Excitation energies of $3^-_1$ state in $^{134}$Te and $^{136}$Xe, as well as those of $13/2^+_1$ states in $^{135}$Te and $^{137}$Xe, are taken as touchstones of our samplings. A robust upper limit of $\\varepsilon_{i13/2}mixing of $i_{13/2}$ single-neutron configuration and $f_{7/2}\\otimes 3^-$ configuration in $13/2^+_1$ states of $N=83$ isotones.

Y. Lei; H. Jiang

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

339

Algal growth potentials and heavy-metal concentrations of the primary streams to upper Beaver Lake. Technical completion report  

SciTech Connect

Algal-growth potential was inhibited by heavy metals in upper Beaver Lake, Arkansas. Upper Beaver Lake receives water from three tributaries. One contains a small reservoir and the combined streams receive sewage input. Collections were made approximately monthly at eight sites for the Algal Assay Bottle Test (AABT) and heavy-metal analysis. In general, AABT results indicated that the collections above the sewage input were phosphorus-limited while those below were nitrogen- or combined nitrogen- and phosphorus-limited. Growth inhibition occurred during summer and early fall at various sites with greater inhibition at the confluence of the streams. No inhibitions occurred at the site below the sewage input. Heavy-metal concentrations had an overall tendency to increase downstream. Values within the small reservoir were 50-100% higher than in the feeder stream. Highest values of Pb were observed below the reservoir. SO/sub 4/, Cl, Mg, Ca, Na and K had high values during low flow in August-October. Mn, Pb, and Fe exceeded EPA-recommended standards for drinking water.

Meyer, R.L.; Green, W.R.; Steele, K.F.; Wickliff, D.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

DETERMINATION OF AN UPPER LIMIT FOR THE WATER OUTGASSING RATE OF MAIN-BELT COMET P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS)  

SciTech Connect

A new Main-Belt Comet (MBC) P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS) was discovered on 2012 October 6, approximately one month after its perihelion, by the Pan-STARRS1 survey based in Hawaii. It displayed cometary activity upon its discovery with one hypothesis being that the activity was driven by sublimation of ices; as a result, we searched for emission assumed to be driven by the sublimation of subsurface ices. Our search was of the H{sub 2}O 1{sub 10}-1{sub 01} ground state rotational line at 557 GHz from P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS) with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on board the Herschel Space Observatory on 2013 January 16, when the object was at a heliocentric distance of 2.504 AU and a geocentric distance of 2.064 AU. Perihelion was in early 2012 September at a distance of 2.411 AU. While no H{sub 2}O line emission was detected in our observations, we were able to derive sensitive 3{sigma} upper limits for the water production rate and column density of <7.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} molecules s{sup -1} and of <1.61 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, respectively. An observation taken on 2013 January 15 using the Very Large Telescope found the MBC to be active during the Herschel observation, suggesting that any ongoing sublimation due to subsurface ice was lower than our upper limit.

O'Rourke, L.; Teyssier, D.; Kueppers, M. [European Space Astronomy Centre, ESAC, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Snodgrass, C.; De Val-Borro, M.; Hartogh, P. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max-Planck-Str. 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Biver, N.; Bockelee-Morvan, D. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris-Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Hsieh, H.; Micheli, M. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Fernandez, Y., E-mail: lorourke@esa.int [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A Policy Management System for Ambient Networks K. Jean and A. Galis, {kjean, agalis}@ee.ucl.ac.uk,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Policy Management System for Ambient Networks K. Jean and A. Galis, {kjean, agalis of Ambient Networks necessitate a new dynamic, distributed policy management system. Existing policy management systems do not provide the required support for mobility, dynamicity and heterogeneity

Haddadi, Hamed

342

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO 2 S. D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. Doughty (CADoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453 ) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 P. R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313), Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 510-495-2461) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 K. Pruess(K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116,

343

Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 6001000Hz  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 6001000Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of ?GW(f)=?3(f/900??Hz)3, of ?3<0.32, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of h100=0.71. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

J. Abadie et al. (LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration)

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

344

Upper limits to surface-force disturbances on LISA proof masses and the possibility of observing galactic binaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured surface-force noise on a hollow replica of a LISA proof mass surrounded by its capacitive motion sensor. Forces are detected through the torque exerted on the proof mass by means of a torsion pendulum in the 0.130mHz range. The sensor and electronics have the same design as for the flight hardware, including 4mm gaps around the proof mass. The measured upper limit for forces would allow detection of a number of galactic binaries signals with signal-to-noise ratio up to ?40 for 1yr integration. We also discuss how LISA Pathfinder will substantially improve this limit, approaching the LISA performance.

Ludovico Carbone; Giacomo Ciani; Rita Dolesi; Mauro Hueller; David Tombolato; Stefano Vitale; William Joseph Weber; Antonella Cavalleri

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Reproductive success and mortality rates of Ceriodaphnia dubia maintained in water from Upper Three Runs, Pen Branch, and Fourmile Branch  

SciTech Connect

It is anticipated that the new SRS NPDES permit will require toxicity testing of at numerous outfalls and receiving streams, using the standard test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Because SRS surface waters differ markedly from the standard culture water that is used for Ceriodaphnia, studies were undertaken to determine if unimpacted SRS surface waters will support this species. Three SRS surface waters were evaluated; Upper Three Runs at Road 8-1, Pen Branch at Road B, and Fourmile Branch at Road F. Toxicity tests were performed monthly on each water source for eleven months. All three water sources exhibited varying degrees of toxicity to Ceriodaphnia, with Pen Branch being the least toxic and Fourmile Branch being the most toxic. These results indicate that if in-stream toxicity testing is required, it may not be possible to separate the naturally occurring toxic effects of the receiving water from possible toxic effects of SRS effluents.

Specht, W.L.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Angular-dependent upper critical field of overdoped Ba(Fe1-xNix)2As2  

SciTech Connect

In-plane resistivity measurements as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and its orientation with respect to the crystallographic ab plane were used to study the upper critical field, Hc2, of two overdoped compositions of the iron-based superconductor Ba(Fe1-xNix)2As2, x=0.054 and x=0.072. Measurements were performed using precise alignment (with accuracy less than 0.1?) of magnetic field with respect to the Fe-As plane. The dependence of the Hc2 on angle ? between the field and the ab plane was measured in isothermal conditions in a broad temperature range. We found that the shape of Hc2(?) clearly deviates from the Ginzburg-Landau functional form.

Murphy, J. [Ames Laboratory; Tanatar, Michael A. [Ames Laboratory; Graf, D. [Florida State University; Brooks, J. S. [Florida State University; Budko, Sergey L. [Ames Laboratory; Canfield, Paul C. [Ames Laboratory; Kogan, V. G. [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, Ruslan [Ames Laboratory

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

The absorption chiller in large scale solar pond cooling design with condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of using solar ponds as low-cost solar collectors combined with commercial absorption chillers in large scale solar cooling design is investigated. The analysis is based on the combination of a steady-state solar pond mathematical model with the operational characteristics of a commercial absorption chiller, assuming condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone (U.C.Z.). The numerical solution of the nonlinear equations involved leads to results which relate the chiller capacity with pond design and environmental parameters, which are also employed for the investigation of the optimum pond size for a minimum capital cost. The derived cost per cooling kW for a 350 kW chiller ranges from about 300 to 500 $/kW cooling. This is almost an order of magnitude lower than using a solar collector field of evacuated tube type.

Tsilingiris, P.T. (Commercial Bank of Greece, Athens (Greece))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up  

SciTech Connect

This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Upper Burbank Disposal Cell, Uravan, Colorado, DOE/AL/62350-250, Revision 1, July 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DISPOSAL CELL URAUAN, COLORADO July 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Dhrision U MTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico DOElAU62350-250 REV. 1 Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico This page intentionally left blank LONG-TERM GURMIWNCE P U N FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DrsPosAL CEU. WYAAI. COhORAOD TABLE OF DONENTe TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSEANDSCOPE .............................................................................................. 1-1 2 . 1 1 FINAL SlTE CONDITIONS ................... ...-.... ...............................................*.............. 2-1 ..................................................................... ................... 2

350

Upper Limit on a Stochastic Background of Gravitational Waves from Seismic Measurements in the Range 0.05 Hz to 1 Hz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an upper limit of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}<1.2\\times 10^{8}$ on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave (GW) background integrated over a year in the frequency range 0.05 Hz - 1 Hz, which improves current upper limits from high-precision laboratory experiments by about 9 orders of magnitude. The limit is obtained using the response of Earth itself to GWs via a free-surface effect described more than 40 years ago by F.J. Dyson. The response was measured by a global network of broadband seismometers selected to maximize the sensitivity.

Michael Coughlin; Jan Harms

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Sequence stratigraphy, depositional environments, and regional mapping of the late Devonian interval, upper Three Forks Formation, Sanish Member, and lower Bakken Shale, U.S. portion of the Williston Basin.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cores of the Late Devonian upper Three Forks, Sanish, and lower Bakken units from eight wells were examined and described at the North Dakota core (more)

Sesack, Steven A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN COMPACT The state of Arizona, the state of Colorado, the state of New Mexico, the state of Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN COMPACT The state of Arizona, the state of Colorado, the state of New for the state of Arizona, Clifford H. Stone for the state of Colorado, Fred. E. Wilson for the state of New of the United States of America, have agreed, subject to the provisions of the Colorado River Compact [72

Johnson, Eric E.

353

A relativistic beam of monochromatic muons produced in the upper atmo-sphere is incident vertically on the earth's surface at velocity v z c, where c  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the muons. Express your answer in terms of the energy E of a muon as measured by an observer at restPart A A relativistic beam of monochromatic muons produced in the upper atmo- sphere is incident of the muon number reaching the ground to the number at a height H above sea level. Assume that the beam moves

Ha, Taekjip

354

Jordan Canonical Form Given d N and K, the Jordan block Jd() is the upper-triangular (d d)-matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordan Canonical Form Given d N and K, the Jordan block Jd() is the upper-triangular (d ? d. Observations/Facts. (a) The number m of Jordan blocks (counting multiple occurrences of the same block. (c) The number of Jordan blocks corresponding to a given eigenvalue is the geometric multi- plicity

Smith, Gregory G.

355

Ten Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part I: Climatology, Variability, Transport, and Relation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). 1. Introduction Water vapor is the key atmosphericTen Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part I: Climatology, Variability, Transport, and Relation to Deep Convection ZHENGZHAO LUO, DIETER KLEY,* AND RICHARD H. JOHNSON

Lombardi, John R.

356

Johns creek valley: a mountainous catchment for long-term interdisciplinary human-environment system research in Upper Styria (Austria)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Johns creek valley (Johnsbachtal) is presented as a long-term, interdisciplinary cooperation platform in upper Styria...2...with elevations between 600 and 700 m in the valley to over 2,300m in the ...C i...

U. Strasser; T. Marke; O. Sass; S. Birk; G. Winkler

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Upper critical field of Ti and ?-TiAl alloys: Evidence of an intrinsic type-II superconductivity in pure Ti  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The upper critical field Hc2 of ?-Ti1-xAlx(0Fermi velocity obtained here is substantially lower than predicted by band calculation. The present work gives clear evidence that pure Ti is an intrinsic type-II superconducting element due to its very low renormalized Fermi velocity.

Liu Shumei; Zhang Dianlin; Jing Xiunian; Lu Li; Li Shanlin; Kang Ning; Wu Xiaosong; J. J. Lin

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

An upper limit on the ratio between the Extreme Ultraviolet and the bolometric luminosities of stars hosting habitable planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large number of terrestrial planets in the classical habitable zone of stars of different spectral types has already been discovered and many are expected to be discovered in near future. However, owing to the lack of knowledge on the atmospheric properties, the ambient environment of such planets are unknown. It is known that sufficient amount of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation from the star can drive hydrodynamic outflow of hydrogen that may drag heavier species from the atmosphere of the planet. If the rate of mass loss is sufficiently high then substantial amount of volatiles would escape causing the planet to become uninhabitable. Considering energy-limited hydrodynamical mass loss with an escape rate that causes oxygen to escape along with hydrogen, I present an upper limit for the ratio between the EUV and the bolometric luminosities of stars which constrains the habitability of planets around them. Application of the limit to planet-hosting stars with known EUV luminosities implies that many M-t...

Sengupta, Sujan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Potential for future development of salt cavern storage in the upper Silurian Syracuse Formation of south-central New York  

SciTech Connect

Although depleted reservoirs remain the dominant structures used for storage fulfilling the demand for base load gas supply during the heating season, the current general surge in storage projects, nationwide, takes advantage of opportunities in Order 636, and makes greater use of salt caverns for gas storage. This reflects the increasing need by gas users, local distribution companies in particular, to quickly cycle a storage facility`s gas supply for services such as peak shaving, emergency supply, and system balancing to meet hourly swings. Occurrence of thick deposits of bedded salt deposits provides New York the capability to develop high deliverability salt cavern storage facilities. Furthermore, New York is uniquely positioned at the gateway to major northeastern markets to provide peak load storage services of natural gas supply. The thickest units of bedded salt in New York occur in the {open_quotes}F{close_quotes} horizon of the Upper Silurian Syracuse Formation. Three bedded salt cavern storage facilities have been recently proposed in New York. Two of these projects is much larger (with 5 Bcfg ultimate capacity), is under construction, and will provide valuable storage service to the Ellisburg-Leidy market center hub in Pennsylvania. Identification of possible sites for future salt cavern storage projects has been achieved chiefly by defining areas of thick beds of salt at sufficient depths close to gas transmission lines, with access to a freshwater supply for leaching, and possessing an acceptable method of brine disposal.

Bass, J.P.; Sarwar, G.; Guo, B. [Brooklyn College of the City Univ. of New York, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

New upper bound on the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The scattering of slow neutron beams provides unique, non-destructive, quantitative information on the structure and dynamics of materials of interest in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology, geology, and other fields. Liquid hydrogen is a widely-used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. In particular the rapid drop of the slow neutron scattering cross section of liquid parahydrogen below 15 meV, which renders the moderator volume transparent to the neutron energies of most interest for scattering studies, is therefore especially interesting and important. We have placed an upper bound on the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 meV and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge Nati...

Grammer, K B; Barrn-Palos, L; Blyth, D; Bowman, J D; Calarco, J; Crawford, C; Craycraft, K; Evans, D; Fomin, N; Fry, J; Gericke, M; Gillis, R C; Greene, G L; Hamblen, J; Hayes, C; Kucuker, S; Mahurin, R; Maldonado-Velzquez, M; Martin, E; McCrea, M; Mueller, P E; Musgrave, M; Nann, H; Penttil, S I; Snow, W M; Tang, Z; Wilburn, W S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Depositional setting and sandstone diagenesis of the Upper Pennsylvanian (Missourian) Hepler Formation, Cherokee Shelf of the midcontinent  

SciTech Connect

The Hepler Formation marks the base of the Pleasanton Group which is recognized as the base of the Upper Pennsylvanian in southeastern Kansas. This formation consists of interstratified units of shales, siltstones, and sandstones, as well as a localized coal bed. These lithologies are interpreted as having formed in a prograting, fluvially-dominated deltaic sequence that was deposited as the Late Pennsylvanian sea temporarily withdrew from the Cherokee shelf. Hepler sandstone bodies in the study area are predominantly quartz arenites and sublitharenites. The diagenetic history of the Hepler consisted of alternating periods of authigenic mineral precipitation and dissolution of both detrital grains and cements. Petrographic observations indicate that silica cementation, in the form of quartz overgrowths, took place early in the paragenetic sequence. Changes in the meteoric water chemistry, resulted in partial quartz and feldspar dissolution, and alteration of feldspars to clays. Precipitation of carbonate into dissolution features was initiated by acidic surface waters (fluvial) followed by a sea level rise allowing carbonate-saturated marine waters to flush these sediments. Further burial and compaction destroyed much of remaining porosity and left concavo-convex contacts and sutured quartz grains. This was followed by anoxic conditions which allowed pyrite crystallization to take place. A subsequent fall in sea level exposed Hepler deposits once again to meteoric, low pH waters, resulting in carbonate dissolution. All observed porosity is secondary, formed by carbonate dissolution. Surface samples were subjected to weathering of iron-bearing components to iron-oxide, a product not observable in subsurface core samples.

Gilmer, M.H.; Brenner, R.L. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Modeling Storm Water Runoff and Soil Interflow in a Managed Forest, Upper Coastal Plain of the Southeast US.  

SciTech Connect

The Forest Service-Savannah River is conducting a hectare-scale monitoring and modeling study on forest productivity in a Short Rotation Woody Crop plantation at the Savannah River Site, which is on Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Detailed surveys, i.e., topography, soils, vegetation, and dainage network, of small (2-5 ha) plots have been completed in a 2 square-km watershed draining to Fourmile Creek, a tributary of the Savannah River. We wish to experimentally determine the relative importance of interflow on water yield and water quality at this site. Interflow (shallow subsurface lateral flow) can short-circuit rainfall infiltration, preventing deep seepage and resulting in water and chemical residence times in the watershed much shorter than that if deep seepage were the sole component of infiltration. The soil series at the site (Wagram, Dothan, Fuquay, Ogeechee, and Vaucluse) each have a clay-rich B horizon of decimeter-scale thickness at depths of 1-2 m below surface. As interflow is affected by rainfall intensity and duration and soil properties such as porosity, permeability, and antecedent soil moisture, our calculations made using the Green and Ampt equation show that the intensity and duration of a storm event must be greater than about 3 cm per hour and 2 hours, respectively, in order to initiate interflow for the least permeable soils series (Vaucluse). Tabulated values of soil properties were used in these preliminary calculations. Simulations of the largest rainfall events from 1972-2002 data using the Green and Ampt equation provide an interflow: rainfall ratio of 0 for the permeable Wagram soil series (no interflow) compared to 0.46 for the less permeable Vaucluse soil series. These initial predictions will be compared to storm water hydrographs of interflow collected at the outflow point of each plot and refined using more detailed soil property measurements.

Callahan, T.J.; Cook, J.D.; Coleman, Mark D.; Amatya, Devendra M.; Trettin, Carl C.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study  

SciTech Connect

In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Upper Asymptotic Giant Branch of the Elliptical Galaxy Maffei 1, and Comparisons with M32 and NGC 5128  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep near-infrared images obtained with adaptive optics systems on the Gemini North and Canada-France-Hawaii telescopes are used to investigate the bright stellar content and central regions of the nearby elliptical galaxy Maffei 1. Stars evolving on the upper asymptotic giant branch (AGB) are resolved in a field 3 arcmin from the center of the galaxy. The locus of bright giants on the (K, H-K) color-magnitude diagram is consistent with a population of stars like those in Baade's Window reddened by E(H-K) = 0.28 +/- 0.05 mag. This corresponds to A_V = 4.5 +/- 0.8 mag, and is consistent with previous estimates of the line of sight extinction computed from the integrated properties of Maffei 1. The AGB-tip occurs at K = 20.0, which correponds to M_K = -8.7; hence, the AGB-tip brightness in Maffei 1 is comparable to that in M32, NGC 5128, and the bulges of M31 and the Milky-Way. The near-infrared luminosity functions (LFs) of bright AGB stars in Maffei 1, M32, and NGC 5128 are also in excellent agreement, both in terms of overall shape and the relative density of infrared-bright stars with respect to the fainter stars that dominate the light at visible and red wavelengths. It is concluded that the brightest AGB stars in Maffei 1, NGC 5128, M32, and the bulge of M31 trace an old, metal-rich population, rather than an intermediate age population. It is also demonstrated that Maffei 1 contains a distinct red nucleus, and this is likely the optical signature of low-level nuclear activity and/or a distinct central stellar population. Finally, there is an absence of globular clusters brighter than the peak of the globular cluster LF in the central 700 x 700 parsecs of Maffei 1.

T. J. Davidge

2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

365

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources failed to find much realization in actual stocks data. The idea that stocks are still languishing at below-normal levels is particularly persuasive when one views current levels (for key consuming regions) relative to "normal" values which account for the long-term trend in OECD stocks. We believe that monthly average WTI prices will stay around $30 per barrel for the first part of 2001. This is a noticeable upward shift in our projected average prices from even a month ago. The shift reflects greater emphasis on the lack of stock builds and less emphasis on the assumption that supply from OPEC and non-OPEC suppliers may be exceeding demand by 1-2

366

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

367

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Spot WTI crude oil prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

368

Confidence Boosting: Improving the Introspectiveness of a Boosted Classifier for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rudolph Triebel Hugo Grimmett Ingmar Posner Mobile Robotics Group, Dep. of Engineering Science, Univ ciency in terms of memory requirements, computation time and energy consumption as well as plasticity presented in [1]. Our modification specifically applies to the standard Ad- aBoost [2] algorithm. However

Cremers, Daniel

369

The stress field in Europe: optimal orientations with confidence limits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Apennines, the Southern Tyrrhenian and Cyprus) are characterised by high data densities...Busetti M., Ramella R., Volpi V. Gas seeps linked to salt structures in the...mapping Mediterranean region Middle East natural hazards neotectonics orientation risk assessment......

M. M. C. Carafa; S. Barba

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

5. A Crisis of Confidence: Shifting Stakeholder Perspectives on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programs (Little Hoover Commission, 2005) and put institutional reform of CALFED on the administration

Pasternack, Gregory B.

371

Detailed search Dutch ministers quietly confident about achieving Presidency priorities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of European cooperation in the field of research infrastructures, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and European technology platforms, explained the ministers. Speaking about the European Research Council, Ms

372

Confidence-Driven Image Co-matting Linbo Wanga  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the task of estimating accurate foreground opacity from a given image, is a severely ill stack than applying state-of-the-art single image matting techniques individually on each image fore- ground opacity from natural images. Specifically, given an input image I, it estimates

Wang, Jue

373

Using Subjective Confidence to Improve Metacognitive Monitoring Accuracy and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are known as monitoring and control respectively. The relationship between accurate monitoring and improved control and performance has been borne out in multiple research studies. Unfortunately, people's metacognitive judgments are far from perfect; for low...

Miller, Tyler

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

374

Mathematics Teaching in Schools?The Growth of Confidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......with "8"? Fig. 3 cial message that the organised, well-ordered and systematic approach is the one most likely to suc- ceed. Students with a higher level of attainment are sometimes prone to attack the problem along somewhat more sophisticated lines......

KEITH HEDGER

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Confidence, uncertainty and decision-support relevance in climate predictions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmospheric chemistry, the carbon cycle, stratospheric dynamics, ice dynamics, etc.) as they develop into Earth System Models (ESMs). For these processes, and therefore for climate forecasting, there is no possibility of a true cycle...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Confidence regions for maximum response and associated design optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BECAUSE I GF IRREGULAR (TIES IN THE DATA ) GO TG 1 6 STOP END SUBROUTINE iVEWT (ApB&C yD&E pXp I pN) 060 010 C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C 1 2 10 15 20 25 26 30 h I S 4 U. '. Clfr, =!~SICNAL ARRAY CF COEFFICIENTS. 8 I 5 TIJ...65?60 R 1=R5 GO TO 53 I=I+1 X( I)=85 GO TO 15 RETURN ENO SUBROUTINE SUBRTl (NgM?NM&Ct 8 ~ XKy Al) 380 390 400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 610 THIS SUBRCUTINE SETS UP...

Hartmann, Norbert Alfred

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Metacognition in human decision-making: confidence and error monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...some 20 cm away. This design allowed the researchers...information in the processing pipeline drives the DV across...detected as successive crossings of decision boundaries...31,32] or as double crossings of a single decision...paths at a fork in the road. However, most of our...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Simultaneous Parametric Confidence Bands for Cumulative Distributions from Censored Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), a function that is used to assess nondestructive evaluation (NDE) capability. Keywords: Bootstrap, likelihood example is the need to quantify nondestructive evaluation (NDE) capability. NDE methods are used

379

Upper limit of the energy of the photon and the phase change of photon to material particles at the Scwartzschild radius  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of Scwartzschild radius is extended to the photon and the upper limit imposed on the energy of a photon as a result of the three characteristics of the photon--the constancy of the velocity of light, the spin value of $1\\hslash$ and the zero rest mass of the photon--is shown. Further the phase change that occurs to the photon at the Scwartzschild radius, from energy to matter as a result of vacuum fluctuations is indicated.

C. Radhakrishnan Nair

2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

380

Diagenesis and petrophysics of the Upper Cretaceous, Pictured Cliffs Formation of the San Juan Basin, North West New Mexico and South West Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. Berg (Member) Ronald M. Brirnhall (Member) Philip D. Rabinowitz (Head of Department) December 1996 Major Subject: Geology ABSTRACT Diagenesis and Petmphysics of the Upper Cretaceous, Pictured Cliffs Formation of the San Juan Basin, North... of normalized detrital constituents of the Pictured Cliffs sandstones. The sands plot as litharenites and feldspathic litharenites according to the Folk (1974) classification scheme. 38 BSE image of a dolomite grain (D) surrounded by an iron enriched...

Goberdhan, Helene C

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Spatial patch patterns and altered forest structure in middle elevation versus upper ecotonal mixed-conifer forests, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the American Southwest, mixed-conifer forest experienced altered disturbance regimes with the exclusion of fire since the early 1900s. This research analyzes patch development and tree spatial patterns in the middle versus upper mixed-conifer forests at Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona (USA). The methods used include: (1) sizestructure analyses, to compare species patch development; (2) dendrochronological dating of tree establishment and fire history; (3) tree ring master chronology, to determine periods of suppressed growth, compared to a palmer drought severity index; (4) spatial analyses by size and age, with univariate and bivariate analyses of spatial association as well as spatial autocorrelation. Results show that unlike the lower ecotone of the mixed-conifer zone, both the middle elevation and upper ecotone were mixed-conifer forests before Euro-American settlement. At the upper ecotone, two decades (1870s and 1880s) had no successful conifer establishment but instead aspen cohorts, corresponding to the fire history of synchronized fires. Overall, the upper ecotone has shifted in composition in the absence of surface fires from mixed conifer to encroachment of subalpine species, particularly Engelmann spruce. Spatial patterns of tree sizes and tree ages imply development of a size hierarchy in an aging patch. In addition, shifts in species composition from ponderosa pine and white fir overstory to Engelmann spruce and Douglas-fir understory affected within-patch spatial patterns. These results provide quantitative evidence of past and present forest conditions for the development of restoration strategies for Southwestern mixed-conifer forests.

Joy Nystrom Mast; Joy J. Wolf

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Inoceramid fauna and biostratigraphy of the upper Middle Coniacianlower Middle Santonian of the Pueblo Section (SE Colorado, US Western Interior)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Middle Coniacian to Middle Santonian inoceramid succession of the Pueblo section, southeastern Colorado, US Western Interior, is reviewed in the context of the zonal scheme applied in Europe. The Middle Coniacian record starts with the upper Middle Coniacian Volviceramus involutus Zone, because the base of the succession is characterised by a hitherto unsuspected stratigraphical gap, spanning the topmost Lower and lower Middle Coniacian in European inoceramid terms. The base of the Upper Coniacian is recognised by the entry of Magadiceramus; this substage is divided into a Magadiceramus subquadratus Interval Zone and a Magadiceramus crenelatus Taxon Range Zone. The base of the Santonian is taken at the base of the Cladoceramus undulatoplicatus Taxon Range Zone. The Middle Santonian is assigned to the Cordiceramus bueltenensis Zone, and the base of the Upper Santonian is placed at the base of the zone of Cordiceramus muelleri. The inoceramid faunas of the Pueblo succession are similar to those known from southern Europe, south of the regular occurrence of sphenoceramids. The apparent differences reported in the previous literature between the inoceramid faunas of Europe and of the Western Interior at this level resulted mainly from differences in the taxonomic concepts applied. The new data enable correlation between the proposed inoceramid zonal scheme and the scaphitid ammonite zones.

Ireneusz Walaszczyk; William A. Cobban

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Long-term patterns of fruit production in five forest types of the South Carolina upper coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Fleshy fruit is a key food resource for many vertebrates and may be particularly important energy source to birds during fall migration and winter. Hence, land managers should know how fruit availability varies among forest types, seasons, and years. We quantified fleshy fruit abundance monthly for 9 years (1995-2003) in 56 0.1-ha plots in 5 forest types of South Carolina's upper Coastal Plain, USA. Forest types were mature upland hardwood and bottomland hardwood forest, mature closed-canopy loblolly (Pinus taeda) and longleaf pine (P. palustris) plantation, and recent clearcut regeneration harvests planted with longleaf pine seedlings. Mean annual number of fruits and dry fruit pulp mass were highest in regeneration harvests (264,592 _ 37,444 fruits; 12,009 _ 2,392 g/ha), upland hardwoods (60,769 _ 7,667 fruits; 5,079 _ 529 g/ha), and bottomland hardwoods (65,614 _ 8,351 fruits; 4,621 _ 677 g/ha), and lowest in longleaf pine (44,104 _ 8,301 fruits; 4,102 _ 877 g/ha) and loblolly (39,532 _ 5,034 fruits; 3,261 _ 492 g/ha) plantations. Fruit production was initially high in regeneration harvests and declined with stand development and canopy closure (1995-2003). Fruit availability was highest June-September and lowest in April. More species of fruit-producing plants occurred in upland hardwoods, bottomland hardwoods, and regeneration harvests than in loblolly and longleaf pine plantations. Several species produced fruit only in 1 or 2 forest types. In sum, fruit availability varied temporally and spatially because of differences in species composition among forest types and age classes, patchy distributions of fruiting plants both within and among forest types, fruiting phenology, high inter-annual variation in fruit crop size by some dominant fruit-producing species, and the dynamic process of disturbance-adapted species colonization and decline, or recovery in recently harvested stands. Land managers could enhance fruit availability for wildlife by creating and maintaining diverse forest types and age classes. .

Greenberg, Cathryn H.; Levey, Douglas J.; Kwit, Charles; McCarty, John P.; Pearson, Scott F.; Sargent, Sarah; Kilgo, John

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Determining the influence of wind-wave breaking on the dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy in the upper ocean and on the dependence of the turbulent kinetic energy on the stage of wind-wave development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New experimental data that make it possible to explain and predict the observed variability of turbulent-energy dissipation in the upper ocean are discussed. ... For this purpose, the dependence of the energy dis...

S. A. Kitaigorodskii

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy Loss of Solar p Modes due to the Excitation of Magnetic Sausage Tube Waves: Importance of Coupling the Upper Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider damping and absorption of solar p modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of p modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by p modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux tube. The deficit of p-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, ?, and absorption coefficient, ?. The variation of ? and ? as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modeled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere. Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the p modes is very sensitive to the upper boundary condition, which, due to the lack of an upper atmosphere, have been imposed in a somewhat ad hoc manner. The model presented here avoids such problems by using an isothermal layer to model the overlying atmosphere (chromosphere, and, consequently, allows us to analyze the propagation of p-mode-driven sausage waves above the photosphere. In this paper, we restrict our attention to frequencies below the acoustic cut off frequency. We demonstrate the importance of coupling all waves (acoustic, magnetic) in the subsurface solar atmosphere with the overlying atmosphere in order to accurately model the interaction of solar f and p modes with sausage tube waves. In calculating the absorption and damping of p modes, we find that for low frequencies, below ?3.5 mHz, the isothermal atmosphere, for the two-region model, behaves like a stress-free boundary condition applied at the interface (z = z 0).

A. Gascoyne; R. Jain; B. W. Hindman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Latest Cretaceous mammals of upper part of Edmonton Formation of Alberta, Canada, and review of marsupial-placental dichotomy in mammalian evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

competent layers, thus the exposures are frequently slumped. LOCALITIES Only those localities in the upper part of the Edmon- ton Formation which have yielded fossil mammals are here recorded. The base map used is the 1960 Alberta Department of Lands... Tuff, is the most productive and heavily quarried locality yet found in the Edmon- ton Formation. Roughly 11 tons of matrix have been removed from a well-indurated clay and silt layer which varies laterally from less than 1 foot in thickness up to about...

Lillegraven, J. A.

1969-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

387

High-resolution seismic stratigraphic analysis of the Late Quaternary upper slope and shelf edge: Main Pass-Viosca Knoll area, Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution (800 Hz) sparker data from the Main Pass-Viosca Knoll area, offshore Louisiana, show shelf-edge deltas with oblique progradational clinoforms, parallel, and channel-fill reflections in the near-surface, latest Quaternary section of the upper slope. Sequence boundaries are indicated by onlap of slope facies onto older outershelf deltas and shelf margins, erosional truncation, and minor channel erosion on the top of progradational units and on the slope. The authors tentatively identify these sequence boundaries as Type I. Each depositional sequence consists of two seismic units: (1) a lower unit consisting of parallel, seaward-dipping reflections; (2) an upper unit consisting of parallel reflections and progradational clinoforms that converge or downlap downslope on top of the lower parallel unit. Precise correlation to absolute time and sea level awaits analysis and integration of shallow cores taken in the area by an industry consortium. Facies and isochron mapping of each sequence indicates an overall back-stepping of the shelf-edge deltas and shelf margins during the latest Quaternary. The Quaternary shelf edges are an area of isochron thicks and thins resulting from erosion and redeposition. Major channels commonly cross salt diapirs and may occupy the same site during successive lowstands. Comparison with multichannel seismic profiles shows that each shelf-edge delta seen on the high resolution profiles is represented by a single reflection on multichannel data. Steep clinoforms, downlap surfaces, and individual sequences are not seen on the multichannel data.

McMillen, K.J. (Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Winn, R.D. Jr. (Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States)); Damuth, J.E. (Mobile Oil Co., Dallas, TX (United States)); Weimer, P. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Upper limit on the gas density in the Beta-Pictoris system: On the effect of gas drag on the dust dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate in this paper the effect of gas drag on the dynamics of the dust particles in the edge-on Beta-Pictoris disc in order to derive an upper limit on the mass of gas in this system. Our study is motivated by the large uncertainties on the amount of gas in the Beta-Pictoris disc currently found in the literature. The dust particles are assumed to originate from a colliding annulus of planetesimals peaked around 100AU from the central star as proposed by Augereau et al.(2001). We consider the various gas densities that have been inferred from independent observing techniques and we discuss their impact on the dust dynamics and on the disc profile in scattered light along the midplane. We show that the observed scattered light profile of the disc cannot be properly reproduced if hydrogen gas number density at 117AU exceeds 10**4 cm**-3. This corresponds to an upper limit on the total gas mass of about 0.4 Mearth assuming the gas density profile inferred by Brandeker et al.(2004) and thus to a gas to dust mass ratio smaller than 1. Our approach therefore provides an independent diagnostic for a gas depletion in the Beta-Pictoris system relative to the dust disc. Such an approach could also be used to constrain the gas content of recently identified systems like the edge-on disc around AUmic.

P. Thebault; J. -C Augereau

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

389

Distribution of petroleum reservoirs relative to allocycles and autocycles, upper portion of the Cherokee Group (Middle Pennsylvanian, Desmoinesian), Mid-Continent Region, U. S. A  

SciTech Connect

Sequences of mud rocks, lenticular sandstones, coals, and thin carbonates form autocycles and allocycles in the upper portion of the Cherokee Group. Autocycles delineated in eastern Kansas and northern Oklahoma are relatively local in extent, while allocycles are traceable over the entire region. All autocycles delineated in this study are embedded within the regressive portions of allocycles. Petroleum-bearing sandstones consist of shoestring-shaped and thin sheetlike units in thicker sedimentary lobes. These lobes were deposited as deltaic complexes, which included fluvial and distributary channel sands, interdistributary muds, crevasse splay sands and muds, flood-basin muds, delta-front sands, and predeltaic muds. Delta lobes prograded across the margins of the Middle Pennsylvanian epeiric sea during times of eustatic stillstand or regression. When lobes were abandoned, waves and currents winnowed their upper portions, leaving thin sheetlike lenses of sand. These reworked sands along with marine muds above regressive deltaic sequences form the transgressive parts of autocyclothems. The transgressive parts of allocyclothems, generally consisting of marine shale, resulted from sea level rises that rapidly shifted shorelines far northeastward, moving siliciclastic sources away from the study area. The positions of reservoir-containing deltaic complexes were determined by strandline positions at various sea levels. Extent of eustatic sea level changes appears to have been the major mechanism that controlled the distribution of petroleum reservoir and source units. In addition, sea level changes probably were a significant factor in the nature of diagenetic alterations that affected reservoir properties.

Brenner, R.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Prediction of reservoir properties using diagenetic analysis of a template unit: example from Upper Cretaceous sandstones in Powder River basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Depositional and postdepositional histories of the Parkman formation in the Powder River basin, Wyoming, were studied in detail and compared with other Upper Cretaceous lenticular sandstone units of the Teapot, Sussex, and Shannon sandstones. Petrographic analysis was done using light, cathodoluminescent, scanning, scanning transmission, and backscattered microscopic techniques. X-ray microanalysis was done using energy and wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy systems. The primary diagenetic events observed in these Upper Cretaceous sandstones include ductile-grain deformation and original porosity reduction; formation of authigenic chlorite, kaolinite, illite, and smectite; quartz overgrowths; formation of authigenic feldspar; alteration of feldspar; carbonate cementation; and pyrite and iron oxide precipitation. The major effects upon reservoir properties include: porosity and permeability reduction due to formation of authigenic clays, quartz, and carbonate cement; and early formation of chlorite coatings preventing complete destruction of porosity by quartz overgrowths. Diagenetic alternations appear to be strongly influenced by depositional facies and chemistries of original interstitial waters. However, sources for authigenic silica and clays were predominantly exogenic, although some authigenic minerals had endogenic sources such as feldspar alteration to clay minerals. Authigenic minerals that have exogenic sources appear to have precipitated from fluids generated during diagenesis of the surrounding mud rocks. For this reason, major diagenetic trends in these lenticular sandstones are similar. A diagenetic model developed from the results of analysis of the Parkman formation was successfully used to predict reservoir properties in the Teapot, Sussex, and Shannon sandstones.

Dogan, A.U.; Brenner, R.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Variations in Mg/Ca as a control on distribution of strontium concentrations and delta/sup 18/O in upper Tertiary dolomites from Bahamas  

SciTech Connect

Strontium concentrations and delta/sup 18/O are commonly used to infer the gross composition of dolomitizing waters, yet the bases for such inferences are not firmly established. A new approach to calibrating these 2 parameters is suggested from analyses of a section of upper Tertiary dolomites from the Bahamas. In an interval of dolomite, 120 m (394 ft) from a core taken on San Salvador Island, mole % MgCO/sub 3/ is correlated positively with delta/sup 18/O, and negatively with strontium. Strontium substitutes mainly for calcium, thus the negative correlation with mole % MgCO/sub 3/. Dolomites are enriched between 3 to 7% in delta/sup 18/O as compared with coprecipitated calcite, and thus the positive correlation. These two covariations indicate the need to consider the stoichiometric coefficient of dolomites, and to normalize strontium concentrations and delta/sup 18/O with their respective stoichiometric coefficients before inferring their relationship with fluid composition.

Swart, P.K.; Dawans, J.M.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Applications of Quaternary stratigraphic, soil-geomorphic, and quantitative geomorphic analyses to the evaluation of tectonic activity and landscape evolution in the Upper Coastal Plain, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

Geomorphic analyses combined with mapping of fluvial terraces and upland geomorphic surfaces provide new approaches and data for evaluating the Quaternary activity of post-Cretaceous faults that are recognized in subsurface data at the Savannah River Site in the Upper Coastal Plain of southwestern South Carolina. Analyses of longitudinal stream and terrace profiles, regional slope maps, and drainage basin morphometry indicate long-term uplift and southeast tilt of the site region. Preliminary results of drainage basin characterization suggests an apparent rejuvenation of drainages along the trace of the Pen Branch fault (a Tertiary reactivated reverse fault that initiated as a basin-margin normal fault along the northern boundary of the Triassic Dunbarton Basin). This apparent rejuvenation of drainages may be the result of nontectonic geomorphic processes or local tectonic uplift and tilting within a framework of regional uplift.

Hanson, K.L.; Bullard, T.F.; de Wit, M.W. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Stieve, A.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Upper and lower limits on the Crab pulsar's astrophysical parameters set from gravitational wave observations by LIGO: braking index and energy considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory (LIGO) has recently reached the end of its fifth science run (S5), having collected more than a year worth of data. Analysis of the data is still ongoing but a positive detection of gravitational waves, while possible, is not realistically expected for most likely sources. This is particularly true for what concerns gravitational waves from known pulsars. In fact, even under the most optimistic (and not very realistic) assumption that all the pulsar's observed spin-down is due to gravitational waves, the gravitational wave strain at earth from all the known isolated pulsars (with the only notable exception of the Crab pulsar) would not be strong enough to be detectable by existing detectors. By August 2006, LIGO had produced enough data for a coherent integration capable to extract signal from noise that was weaker than the one expected from the Crab pulsar's spin-down limit. No signal was detected, but beating the spin-down limit is a considerable achievement for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). It is customary to translate the upper limit on strain from a pulsar into a more astrophysically significant upper limit on ellipticity. Once the spin-down limit has been beaten, it is possible to release the constraint that all the spin-down is due to gravitational wave emission. A more complete model with diverse braking mechanisms can be used to set limits on several astrophysical parameters of the pulsar. This paper shows possible values of such parameters for the Crab pulsar given the current limit on gravitational waves from this neutron star.

Giovanni Santostasi

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

On the Diurnal Cycle of Deep Convection, High-Level Cloud, and Upper Troposphere Water Vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework  

SciTech Connect

The Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF), also called superparameterization, embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM) at each grid column of a general circulation model to replace traditional parameterizations of moist convection and large-scale condensation. This study evaluates the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere water vapor by applying an infrared (IR) brightness temperature (Tb) and a precipitation radar (PR) simulator to the CRM column data. Simulator results are then compared with IR radiances from geostationary satellites and PR reflectivities from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). While the actual surface precipitation rate in the MMF has a reasonable diurnal phase and amplitude when compared with TRMM observations, the IR simulator results indicate an inconsistency in the diurnal anomalies of high-level clouds between the model and the geostationary satellite data. Primarily because of its excessive high-level clouds, the MMF overestimates the simulated precipitation index (PI) and fails to reproduce the observed diurnal cycle phase relationships among PI, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere relative humidity. The PR simulator results show that over the tropical oceans, the occurrence fraction of reflectivity in excess of 20 dBZ is almost 1 order of magnitude larger than the TRMM data especially at altitudes above 6 km. Both results suggest that the MMF oceanic convection is overactive and possible reasons for this bias are discussed. However, the joint distribution of simulated IR Tb and PR reflectivity indicates that the most intense deep convection is found more often over tropical land than ocean, in agreement with previous observational studies.

Zhang, Yunyan; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Chuntao; Tian, Baijun; Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yuying; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

395

Studia Universitatis Babe -Bolyai, Geologia, 2007, 52 (2), 67-71 Correspondence: M.A. Kaminski (m.kaminski@ucl.ac.uk)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Sea Drilling Project cores, Krasheninnikov (1974) was aware of the fact that some deep-water trochamminids did 2007 Abstract. Three species of agglutinated foraminifera from Cretaceous deep-water deposits that have. Species of "Trochammina" have been known from the Cretaceous deep-water deposits in the Polish Carpathians

Kaminski, Michael A.

396

Small-scale faulting in the Upper Cretaceous of the Groningen block (The Netherlands): 3D seismic interpretation, fault plane analysis and regional paleostress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over the last years, field-based studies have shown that fault surfaces can exhibit a considerable self-affine topography. It is reasonable to assume that similar undulations are also present in fault interpretations from 3D reflection seismic data, however both the interpretation uncertainty and geophysical resolution limits hinder their analysis. This study analyses a set of small-scale, non-reactivated faults in the Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group (Upper Ommelanden Formation) of the NW-part of the Groningen Block, the Netherlands, in a high quality Pre Stack Depth Migrated 3D seismic data set. The studied faults are fully contained inside the Chalk Group, in an area located between the major tectonic-bounding faults of the NW Groningen Block. Over 200 faults, with offsets in the order of 3050m, were interpreted across an area of ca. 150km2, showing a clear preferential orientation for strike, dip and dip-direction. Detailed interpretations and 3D fault plane analyses show undulations on the fault plane. We show that these undulations are not an interpretation or gridding artefact, and interpret these to indicate direction of fault slip. These results were used to calculate a paleostress tensor, using all faults to calculate a single stress tensor for the entire study area by Numerical Dynamic Analysis. Based on the orientation, position and a thickness analysis, it is interpreted that these faults formed due to the tectonic reactivation of salt structures in the Latest Cretaceous. The calculated paleostress state shows a general NWSE-extension, with a vertical maximum principle stress, and a stress ratio of about 0.3, indicating that the studied faults are not the result of dewatering. This interpretation agrees both with a nearby salt-tectonic reconstruction, as well as field-based paleostress results from the UK, Belgium and France. A first look at other surveys from the Dutch sector indicates that similar faults are present in other areas, with different orientations. We propose that a dedicated analysis of these faults across on- and offshore Europe would allow extending the stress map of the Late Cretaceous into areas where the Chalk is not outcropping.

Heijn van Gent; Stefan Back; Janos L. Urai; Peter Kukla

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been essentially completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The model represents an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic model served as the framework for the simulations. A technology workshop on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields was conducted to transfer the results of the project to the petroleum industry.

Ernest A. Mancini

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

398

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project has been reservoir description and characterization. This effort has included four tasks: (1) geoscientific reservoir characterization, (2) the study of rock-fluid interactions, (3) petrophysical and engineering characterization and (4) data integration. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 1. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been initiated. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization is progressing. Data on reservoir production rate and pressure history at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been tabulated, and porosity data from core analysis has been correlated with porosity as observed from well log response. Data integration is on schedule, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database for reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation for the reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs for each of these fields.

Ernest A. Mancini

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Analysis of water and soil from the wetlands of Upper Three Runs Creek. Volume 2A, Analytical data packages September--October 1991 sampling  

SciTech Connect

Shallow water and soils along Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and associated wetlands between SRS Road F and Cato Road were sampled for nonradioactive and radioactive constituents. The sampling program is associated with risk evaluations being performed for various regulatory documents in these areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC selected fifty sampling sites bordering the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB), and the Sanitary Landfill (SL). The analytical results from this study provided information on the water and soil quality in UTRC and its associated wetlands. The analytical results from this investigation indicated that the primary constituents and radiological indicators detected in the shallow water and soils were tritium, gross alpha, radium 226, total radium and strontium 90. This investigation involved the collection of shallow water samples during the Fall of 1991 and the Spring of 1992 at fifty (50) sampling locations. Sampling was performed during these periods to incorporate high and low water table periods. Samples were collected from three sections along UTRC denoted as Phase I (MWMF), Phase II (FHSB) and Phase III (SL). One vibracored soil sample was also collected in each phase during the Fall of 1991. This document is compiled solely of experimental data obtained from the sampling procedures.

Haselow, L.A.; Rogers, V.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Riordan, C.J. [Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (United States); Eidson, G.W.; Herring, M.K. [Normandeau Associates, Inc. (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Reservoir description of a sand-rich submarine fan complex for a steamflood project: upper Miocene Potter sandstone, North Midway Sunset field, California  

SciTech Connect

Nearly 650 m of cores from the upper Miocene Potter sandstone in Mobil's Alberta/Shale property, North Midway Sunset field, California, were examined to determine depositional facies, sand-body geometry, and reservoir quality for a proposed steamflood project. The Potter represents a sand-rich submarine fan complex with braided-channel, meandering-channel, levee, and crevasse-splay facies. The braided-channel facies (gravel and coarse sand) is thick (up to 100 m), sheetlike (> 500 m wide), and highly permeable (10,000 + md). The meandering-channel facies (coarse to medium sand) is up to 20 m thick, over 400 m long, lenticular in geometry, and exhibits an upward decrease in permeability (e.g., 9000 to 500 md) related to grain size that fines upward. The levee facies (in bioturbated sand) is up to 21 m thick, shows variable geometry, and is generally low in permeability (100-1500 md). The crevasse splay (medium sand) is up to 12 m thick, sheetlike (> 300 m wide), and shows moderately high permeability (2000-8000 md). The braided-channel facies was a product of density-modified grain flows, and the remaining three facies were deposited by turbidity currents. Steam flooding of the Potter reservoir should perform extremely well because the entire reservoir is composed of relatively clean sand and the reservoir lacks both horizontal and vertical permeability barriers.

Shanmugam, G.; Clayton, C.A.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN  

SciTech Connect

Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates are undertaking a focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling and an integrated field demonstration project at Womack Hill Oil Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The principal research efforts for Year 3 of the project have been recovery technology analysis and recovery technology evaluation. The research focus has primarily been on well test analysis, 3-D reservoir simulation, microbial core experiments, and the decision to acquire new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field area. Although Geoscientific Reservoir Characterization and 3-D Geologic Modeling have been completed and Petrophysical and Engineering Characterization and Microbial Characterization are essentially on schedule, a no-cost extension until September 30, 2003, has been granted by DOE so that new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field can be acquired and interpreted to assist in the determination as to whether Phase II of the project should be implemented.

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Approach to calculating upper bounds on maximum individual doses from the use of contaminated well water following a WIPP repository breach. Report EEG-9  

SciTech Connect

As part of the assessment of the potential radiological consequences of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), this report evaluates the post-closure radiation dose commitments associated with a possible breach event which involves dissolution of the repository by groundwaters and subsequent transport of the nuclear waste through an aquifer to a well assumed to exist at a point 3 miles downstream from the repository. The concentrations of uranium and plutonium isotopes at the well are based on the nuclear waste inventory presently proposed for WIPP and basic assumptions concerning the transport of waste as well as treatment to reduce the salinity of the water. The concentrations of U-233, Pu-239, and Pu-240, all radionuclides originally emplaced as waste in the repository, would exceed current EPA drinking water limits. The concentrations of U-234, U-235, and U-236, all decay products of plutonium isotopes originally emplaced as waste, would be well below current EPA drinking water limits. The 50-year dose commitments from one year of drinking treated water contaminated with U-233 or Pu-239 and Pu-240 were found to be comparable to a one-year dose from natural background. The 50-year dose commitments from one year of drinking milk would be no more than about 1/5 the dose obtained from ingestion of treated water. These doses are considered upper bounds because of several very conservative assumptions which are discussed in the report.

Spiegler, P.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Energy Loss of Solar $p$ Modes due to the excitation of Magnetic Sausage Tube Waves: Importance of Coupling the Upper Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider damping and absorption of solar $p$ modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of $p$ modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by $p$ modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux-tube. The deficit of $p$-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, $\\Gamma$ and absorption coefficient, $\\alpha$. The variation of $\\Gamma$ and $\\alpha$ as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modelled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere (Bogdan et al. (1996), Hindman & Jain 2008, Gascoyne et al. (2011)). Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the $p$ modes is very sensitiv...

Gascoyne, Andrew; Hindman, Bradley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hypervelocity Impact Effect of Molecules from Enceladus Plume and Titans Upper Atmosphere on NASAs Cassini Spectrometer from Reactive Dynamics Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The NASA/ESA Cassini probe of Saturn analyzed the molecular composition of plumes emanating from one of its moons, Enceladus, and the upper atmosphere of another, Titan. However, interpretation of this data is complicated by the hypervelocity (HV) flybys of up to ?18??km/sec that cause substantial molecular fragmentation. To interpret this data we use quantum mechanical based reactive force fields to simulate the HV impact of various molecular species and ice clathrates on oxidized titanium surfaces mimicking those in Cassinis neutral and ion mass spectrometer (INMS). The predicted velocity dependent fragmentation patterns and composition mixing ratios agree with INMS data providing the means for identifying the molecules in the plume. We used our simulations to predict the surface damage from the HV impacts on the INMS interior walls, which we suggest acts as a titanium sublimation pump that could alter the instruments readings. These results show how the theory can identify chemical events from hypervelocity impacts in space plumes and atmospheres, providing in turn clues to the internal structure of the corresponding sources (e.g., Enceladus). This may be valuable in steering modifications in future missions.

Andres Jaramillo-Botero, Qi An, Mu-Jeng Cheng, William A. Goddard, III, Luther W. Beegle, and Robert Hodyss

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

The GMRT-EoR Experiment: A new upper limit on the neutral hydrogen power spectrum at z \\approx 8.6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new upper limit to the 21cm power spectrum during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) which constrains reionization models with an unheated IGM. The GMRT-EoR experiment is an ongoing effort to make a statistical detection of the power spectrum of 21cm neutral hydrogen emission at redshift z~9. Data from this redshift constrain models of the (EoR), the end of the Dark Ages arising from the formation of the first bright UV sources, probably stars or mini-quasars. We present results from approximately 50 hours of observations at the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope in India from December 2007. We describe radio frequency interference (RFI) localisation schemes which allow bright sources on the ground to be identified and physically removed. Singular-value decomposition is used to remove remaining broadband RFI by identifying ground sources with large eigenvalues. Foregrounds are modelled using a piecewise linear filter and the power spectrum is measured using cross-correlations of foreground subtracted i...

Paciga, Gregory; Gupta, Yashwant; Nityanada, Rajaram; Odegova, Julia; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey; Roy, Jayanta; Sigurdson, Kris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): New Bedford Site, Upper and Lower Harbor Operable Units, New Bedford, MA, September 25, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Record of Decision sets forth the selected remedial action for the Upper and Lower Harbors of the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The major components of the selected remedy include: Approximately 450,000 cubic yards of sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be removed; In certain shoreline areas prone to beach combing, sediments between the high and low tide levels will be removed if above 25 ppm PCBs; Four shoreline CDFs will be constructed to contain and isolate the dredged sediments; Once the dredged sediments are placed in the CDFs, the large volumes of water brought in by the dredging process will be decanted and treated to low levels before discharge back to the Harbor; Once full, first an interim and then a final cap will be constructed at each CDF; The capped CDFs will be monitored and maintained over the long term to ensure their integrity; Institutional controls, including seafood advisories, no-fishing signs and educational campaigns will be implemented to minimize ingestion of local PCB-contaminated seafood until PCBs in seafood reach safe levels; Once completed, the CDFs will be available for beneficial reuse as shoreline open space, parks or, in the case of the lower harbor CDF, a commercial marine facility; and A review of the Site will take place every five years after the initiation of the remedial action to assure that the remedy continues to protect human health and the environment.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Man-made marine debris and sea turtle strandings on beaches of the upper Texas and southwestern Louisiana coasts, June 1987 through September 1989. Technical memo  

SciTech Connect

The upper Texas and southwestern Louisiana coastlines were divided into six sampling zones to survey the amounts, types and rates of accumulation of man-made marine debris, the number of sea turtle strandings, the incidence of sea turtle entanglements in marine debris and the incidence of ingestion of such debris by sea turtles. From June 1987 through September 1989, 473 sample plots were examined for marine debris. Significant differences were detected in mean number of debris items per 100 sq m of beach sampled by year, zone and month. Significant differences in mean weight of debris items per 100 sq m of beach sampled were detected by month and zone. Both number and weights (per 100 sq m) of debris were lowest in the winter months. Number per 100 sq m was greatest in August while weight per 100 sq m peaked in May. Tar balls and plastic items were the most frequently encountered marine debris items. Wooden items had the highest average weights while tar balls and polystyrene foam were the lightest items collected. A total of 171 sea turtles stranded on the surveyed beaches during the study. Of 26 gastrointestinal tracts examined, 16 had ingested some form of man-made debris. Six turtles were entangled in man-made debris and 9 were live stranded.

Duronslet, M.J.; Revera, D.B.; Stanley, K.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Temperature dependences of superconducting critical current density and upper critical field for V/sub 2/(Hf,Zr) multifilamentary wire  

SciTech Connect

The temperature dependences of the critical current density, J /SUB c/ , and the upper critical field, uH /SUB c2/ , have been studied for newly developed V/sub 2/(Hf,Zr) multifilamentary wires. At 4.2 K, a ..mu..H /SUB c2/ of 22 T and an overall J /SUB c/ of 1 x 10/sup 4/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 17 T are obtained for these wires. At 1.8 K, overall J /SUB c/ in 15 T of these wires are twice as large as that of the bronze-processed Nb/sub 3/Sn multifilamentary wire. The enhanced J /SUB c/ at reduced temperatures may be attributed to the rapid increase in ..mu..H /SUB c2/ by using the temperature scaling law of the pinning force density. ..mu..H /SUB c2/ measured in pulsed fields is about 28 T at 2.0 K. According to the temperature scaling law, the overall J /SUB c/ for 1.8 K and at 20 T is estimated to be 2 x 10/sup 4/ A/cm/sup 2/. Thus, the present V/sup 2/(Hf,Zr) multifilamentary wires are very promising for use of generating high magnetic fields in the superfluid liquid helium environment.

Inoue, K.; Kuroda, T.; Tachikawa, K.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Modern Taurine Cattle Descended from Small Number of Near-Eastern Founders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Anthropology, University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany 3 UCL Genetics Institute (UGI), Darwin Building, Gower Street

411

Upper Great Plains Rates information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates and Repayment Services Rates and Repayment Services Rates 2010 Firm Power Rate (effective January 1, 2010) Rate Adjustments 2010 Firm Power Rate Adjustment 2009 Firm Power Rate Adjustment IS Rate Adjustments Rate Adjustment Process Rate Orders Signed, December 23, 2009 (16kb pdf) Announcements Firm Electric Service Customer Letter - Preliminary Review of Drought Adder Component, June 27, 2013 (74kb pdf) Customer Letter - Final Notice of Drought Adder Component, October 2, 2013 (68kb pdf) Integrated System (IS) Rates 2014 IS Rates Customer Information Meeting Presentation, October 15, 2013 (611kb pdf) Customer Letter - Notification of 2014 Rates, September 13, 2013 (160kb pdf) 2014 Transmission and Ancillary Services Rate Calculation and 2012 Rate True-up Calculation (4.9mb pdf) 2013 IS Rates

412

Upper Estimates for Banach Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banach space with an FDD (En), and X is a closed subspace of Z then any weakly null even tree in X has a branch (n2? 1;xn1;:::;n2?)1?=1 such that (xn1;:::;n2?)1?=1 is equivalent to a block sequence (y?)1?=1 with respect to (En) so that 5 minsupp(y?) = n2... of the form (xn1;:::;n2? 1;k)1k=n2? 1+1 are called nodes. Sequences of the form (n2? 1;xn1;:::;n2?)1?=1 are called branches. A normalized tree, i.e. one with jjx jj= 1 for all 2Teven1 , is called weakly null if every node is a weakly null sequence. If Z is a...

Freeman, Daniel B.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

413

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on reservoir architecture and geographic distribution of Smackover reservoirs is the fabric and texture of the depositional lithofacies, diagenesis (chiefly dolomitization) is a significant factor that preserves and enhances reservoir quality. The evaporative pumping mechanism is favored to explain the dolomitization of the thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone reservoir flow units at Appleton and Vocation Fields. Geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and the testing and applying the resulting integrated geologic-engineering models have shown that little oil remains to be recovered at Appleton Field and a significant amount of oil remains to be recovered at Vocation Field through a strategic infill drilling program. The drive mechanisms for primary production in Appleton and Vocation Fields remain effective; therefore, the initiation of a pressure maintenance program or enhanced recovery project is not required at this time. The integrated geologic-engineering model developed for a low-relief paleohigh (Appleton Field) was tested for three scenarios involving the variables of present-day structural elevation and the presence/absence of potential reef thrombolite lithofacies. In each case, the predictions based upon the model were correct. From this modeling, the characteristics of the ideal prospect in the basement ridge play include a low-relief paleohigh associated with dendroidal/chaotic thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone that has sufficient present-day structural relief so that these carbonates rest above the oil-water contact. Such a prospect was identified from the modeling, and it is located northwest of well Permit No. 3854B (Appleton Field) and south of well No. Permit No.11030B (Northwest Appleton Field).

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

414

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

415

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2002 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Hatchery reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Remedial investigation work plan for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, located within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. The entire ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) of CERCLA sites in November 1989. Following CERCLA guidelines, sites under investigation require a remedial investigation (RI) to define the nature and extent of contamination, evaluate the risks to public health and the environment, and determine the goals for a feasibility study (FS) of potential remedial actions. The need to complete RIs in a timely manner resulted in the establishment of the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Characterization Area (CA) and the Bear Creek CA. The CA approach considers the entire watershed and examines all appropriate media within it. The UEFPC CA, which includes the main Y-12 Plant area, is an operationally and hydrogeologically complex area that contains numerous contaminants and containment sources, as well as ongoing industrial and defense-related activities. The UEFPC CA also is the suspected point of origin for off-site groundwater and surface-water contamination. The UEFPC CA RI also will address a carbon-tetrachloride/chloroform-dominated groundwater plume that extends east of the DOE property line into Union Valley, which appears to be connected with springs in the valley. In addition, surface water in UEFPC to the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek CA boundary will be addressed. Through investigation of the entire watershed as one ``site,`` data gaps and contaminated areas will be identified and prioritized more efficiently than through separate investigations of many discrete units.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Upper critical fields and thermally-activated transport of Nd(0.7Fe0.3) FeAs single crystal  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the resistivity and the upper critical field H{sub c2} of Nd(O{sub 0.7}F{sub 0.3})FeAs single crystals in strong DC and pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T and 60 T, respectively. We found that the field scale of H{sub c2} is comparable to {approx}100 T of high T{sub c} cuprates. H{sub c2}(T) parallel to the c-axis exhibits a pronounced upward curvature similar to what was extracted from earlier measurements on polycrystalline samples. Thus this behavior is indeed an intrinsic feature of oxypnictides, rather than manifestation of vortex lattice melting or granularity. The orientational dependence of H{sub c2} shows deviations from the one-band Ginzburg-Landau scaling. The mass anisotropy decreases as T decreases, from 9.2 at 44K to 5 at 34K. Spin dependent magnetoresistance and nonlinearities in the Hall coefficient suggest contribution to the conductivity from electron-electron interactions modified by disorder reminiscent that of diluted magnetic semiconductors. The Ohmic resistivity measured below T{sub c} but above the irreversibility field exhibits a clear Arrhenius thermally activated behavior over 4--5 decades. The activation energy has very different field dependencies for H{parallel}ab and H{perpendicular}ab. We discuss to what extent different pairing scenarios can manifest themselves in the observed behavior of H{sub c2}, using the two-band model of superconductivity. The results indicate the importance of paramagnetic effects on H{sub c2}(T), which may significantly reduce H{sub c2}(0) as compared to H{sub c2}(0) {approx}200--300 T based on extrapolations of H{sub c2}(T) near T{sub c} down to low temperatures.

Balakirev, Fedor F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jaroszynski, J [NHMFL, FSU; Hunte, F [NHMFL, FSU; Balicas, L [NHMFL, FSU; Jo, Youn - Jung [NHMFL, FSU; Raicevic, I [NHMFL, FSU; Gurevich, A [NHMFL, FSU; Larbalestier, D C [NHMFL, FSU; Fang, L [CHINA; Cheng, P [CHINA; Jia, Y [CHINA; Wen, H H [CHINA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A data reconnaissance on the effect of suspended-sediment concentrations on dissolved-solids concentrations in rivers and tributaries in the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The Colorado River is one of the most important sources of water in the western United States, supplying water to over 35 million people in the U.S. and 3 million people in Mexico. High dissolved-solids loading to the River and tributaries are derived primarily from geologic material deposited in inland seas in the mid-to-late Cretaceous Period, but this loading may be increased by human activities. High dissolved solids in the River causes substantial damages to users, primarily in reduced agricultural crop yields and corrosion. The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Program was created to manage dissolved-solids loading to the River and has focused primarily on reducing irrigation-related loading from agricultural areas. This work presents a reconnaissance of existing data from sites in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) in order to highlight areas where suspended-sediment control measures may be useful in reducing dissolved-solids concentrations. Multiple linear regression was used on data from 164 sites in the UCRB to develop dissolved-solids models that include combinations of explanatory variables of suspended sediment, flow, and time. Results from the partial t-test, overall likelihood ratio, and partial likelihood ratio on the models were used to group the sites into categories of strong, moderate, weak, and no-evidence of a relation between suspended-sediment and dissolved-solids concentrations. Results show 68 sites have strong or moderate evidence of a relation, with drainage areas for many of these sites composed of a large percentage of clastic sedimentary rocks. These results could assist water managers in the region in directing field-scale evaluation of suspended-sediment control measures to reduce UCRB dissolved-solids loading.

Fred D Tillman; David W. Anning

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Comparative study of upper critical field Hc2 and second magnetization peak Hsp in hole- and electron-doped BaFe2As2 superconductor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comparative study of the upper critical field Hc2 and second magnetization peak Hsp was performed using high-quality single crystals of hole-doped Ba0.68K0.32Fe2As2 and electron-doped BaFe1.85Co0.15As2 and BaFe1.91Ni0.09As2. The Hc2 was extracted from both resistivity and magnetization measurements using varying magnetic fields on H?c and H?c orientations. The anisotropic ratio, ?=Hc2?c/Hc2?c, was observed to decrease to ?2.5 for the hole-doped and ?3.0 for both electron-doped samples as the magnetic fields were increased up to 9 T. It demonstrates that the anisotropic properties only show slight change by doping aliovalent ions either in or out-of the basal plane of FeAs. For the hole-doped Ba0.68K0.32Fe2As2 the Hc2 and Hsp shift toward the higher temperature and higher field regime in the temperature-normalized (T/Tc) vortex phase diagram, suggesting a stronger vortex pinning by the comparison with the electron-doped BaFe1.85Co0.15As2 and BaFe1.91Ni0.09As2. In contrast to the As-deficiency or inhomogeneous doping distribution of K, Co, and Ni, the dense pinning centers in Ba0.68K0.32Fe2As2 may be attributed to the disordered structural domains and suggested to be responsible for the intrinsic disorder and anisotropy of iron arsenides.

D. L. Sun; Y. Liu; C. T. Lin

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The Nearest OB Association: Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco OB2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize observational results on the stellar population and star formation history of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association (Sco OB2), the nearest region of recent massive star formation. It consists of three subgroups, Upper Scorpius (US), Upper Centaurus-Lupus (UCL), and Lower Centaurus-Crux (LCC) which have ages of about 5, 17, and 16 Myr. In Upper Scorpius, numerous studies have recently revealed hundreds of low-mass association members, including dozens of brown dwarfs. The empirical mass function could be established over the full stellar mass range from 0.1 M_sun up to 20 M_sun, and was found to be consistent with recent determinations of the field initial mass function. A narrow range of ages around 5 Myr was found for the low-mass stars, the same age as had previously (and independently) been derived for the high-mass members. This supports earlier indications that the star formation process in US was triggered, and agrees with previous conjectures that the triggering event was a supernova- and wind-driven shock-wave originating from the nearby UCL group. In the older UCL and LCC regions, large numbers of low-mass members have recently been identified among X-ray and proper-motion selected candidates. In both subgroups, low-mass members have also been serendipitously discovered through investigations of X-ray sources in the vicinity of better known regions (primarily the Lupus and TW Hya associations). While both subgroups appear to have mean ages of ~16 Myr, they both show signs of having substructure. Their star-formation histories may be more complex than that of the younger, more compact US group. ... (abstract abbreviated; see paper for full abstract).

Thomas Preibisch; Eric Mamajek

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

423

Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina. Final report on macroinvertebrate stream assessments for F/H area ETF effluent discharge, July 1987--February 1990  

SciTech Connect

In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F?H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

Specht, W.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Remedial investigation report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes  

SciTech Connect

This report comprises appendices A--J which support the Y-12 Plant`s remedial action report involving Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (filled coal ash pond/Upper McCoy Branch). The appendices cover the following: Sampling fish from McCoy Branch; well and piezometer logs; ecological effects of contaminants in McCoy Branch 1989-1990; heavy metal bioaccumulation data; microbes in polluted sediments; and baseline human health risk assessment data.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reservoir Characterization, Formation Evaluation, and 3D Geologic Modeling of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Microbial Carbonate Reservoir and Associated Reservoir Facies at Little Cedar Creek Field, Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., 2001). Basin subsidence and erosion of the southern Appalachian Mountain chain during the Callovian and Oxfordian stages of the Upper Jurassic resulted in the widespread deposition of the Norphlet Formation (Mancini et al., 1985; Salvador, 1987... of the offshore Gulf of Mexico shelf area. The Norphlet is approximately 30 meters (98 feet) thick along the northern and northwestern rims of the basin (Mancini et al., 1985; Salvador, 1987). On a carbonate ramp surface, intertidal to subtidal laminated lime...

Al Haddad, Sharbel

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

426

Recent Approaches to Modeling Transport of Mercury in Surface Water and Groundwater - Case Study in Upper East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, TN - 13349  

SciTech Connect

In this case study, groundwater/surface water modeling was used to determine efficacy of stabilization in place with hydrologic isolation for remediation of mercury contaminated areas in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watershed in Oak Ridge, TN. The modeling simulates the potential for mercury in soil to contaminate groundwater above industrial use risk standards and to contribute to surface water contamination. The modeling approach is unique in that it couples watershed hydrology with the total mercury transport and provides a tool for analysis of changes in mercury load related to daily precipitation, evaporation, and runoff from storms. The model also allows for simulation of colloidal transport of total mercury in surface water. Previous models for the watershed only simulated average yearly conditions and dissolved concentrations that are not sufficient for predicting mercury flux under variable flow conditions that control colloidal transport of mercury in the watershed. The transport of mercury from groundwater to surface water from mercury sources identified from information in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System was simulated using a watershed scale model calibrated to match observed daily creek flow, total suspended solids and mercury fluxes. Mercury sources at the former Building 81-10 area, where mercury was previously retorted, were modeled using a telescopic refined mesh with boundary conditions extracted from the watershed model. Modeling on a watershed scale indicated that only source excavation for soils/sediment in the vicinity of UEFPC had any effect on mercury flux in surface water. The simulations showed that colloidal transport contributed 85 percent of the total mercury flux leaving the UEFPC watershed under high flow conditions. Simulation of dissolved mercury transport from liquid elemental mercury and adsorbed sources in soil at former Building 81-10 indicated that dissolved concentrations are orders of magnitude below a target industrial groundwater concentration beneath the source and would not influence concentrations in surface water at Station 17. This analysis addressed only shallow concentrations in soil and the shallow groundwater flow path in soil and unconsolidated sediments to UEFPC. Other mercury sources may occur in bedrock and transport though bedrock to UEFPC may contribute to the mercury flux at Station 17. Generally mercury in the source areas adjacent to the stream and in sediment that is eroding can contribute to the flux of mercury in surface water. Because colloidally adsorbed mercury can be transported in surface water, actions that trap colloids and or hydrologically isolate surface water runoff from source areas would reduce the flux of mercury in surface water. Mercury in soil is highly adsorbed and transport in the groundwater system is very limited under porous media conditions. (authors)

Bostick, Kent; Daniel, Anamary [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States)] [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States); Tachiev, Georgio [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States)] [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States); Malek-Mohammadi, Siamak [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)] [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5)DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Analysis of data collected to date show that: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites, and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Data analysis focusing on relating the aerometric measurements to local and regional scale emissions of sources of primary and secondary fine particles using receptor-based air quality models will follow.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Slump and debris-flow dominated upper slope facies in the Cretaceous of the Norwegian and northern North Seas (61-67{degrees}N): Implications for sand distribution  

SciTech Connect

A regional sedimentological study of Cretaceous sequences in the Mid-Norway region (Norwegian Sea) and in the Agat region (Agat field area, northern North Sea) reveals that these sequences were predominantly deposited in an upper continental slope environment by slumps and debris flows. Examination of nearly 500 m of core from 14 wells shows eight distinct lithofacies: facies 1 (contorted conglomerate and pebbly sandstone) represents deposits of sandy slumps and debris flows, possibly in a channel setting; facies 2 (contorted sandstone) is the most widespread and is the product of sandy slumps and debris flows; facies 3 (contorted mudstone) indicates deposition from muddy slumps and debris flow; facies 4 (rippled sandstone) suggests bottom-current reworking; facies 5 (graded sandstone) represents turbidity-current deposits and is very rare; facies 6 (laminated mudstone) is a product of pelagic or hemipelagic deposition; facies 7 (cross-bedded sandstone) is indicative of tidal processes, and facies 8 (laminated sandstone) represents delta-front and shelf deposits. These facies and their association suggest a shelf-edge delta to upper slope environment of deposition. Existing core data document deltaic facies only in the Mid-Norway region. The proposed shelf-edge delta and upper slope model has important implications for sand distribution. (1) This model provides and alternative to the conventional submarine-fan model previously applied to these sequences. (2) Although slump and debris-flow emplaced sands are usually discontinuous and unpredictable, highly amalgamated slump and debris-flow sands may develop thick reservoirs. (3) By using the Eocene Frigg Formation as an analog, it is predicted that externally mounded seismic facies in the study area may be composed of sandy slumps and debris flows.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Lehtonen, L.R. [Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S.Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States); Straume, T.; Syvertsen, S.E.; Hodgkinson, R.J.; Skibeli, M. [Mobil Exploration Norway Inc., Stavanger (Norway)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A new approach for deriving the solar irradiance from non-flaring solar upper atmosphere plasmas at 2 x 10^4<-T<-2 x 10^7 K  

SciTech Connect

We propose a new approach for deriving the solar irradiance in the X-ray to VUV range due to the emission by solar upper atmosphere plasmas at 2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 7} K. Our approach is based on new understanding of the properties of the solar upper atmosphere; specifically, the discovery that the majority of emission from the non-flaring solar upper transition region and corona in the temperature range 3 x 10{sup 5} {le} T {le} 3 x 10{sup 6} K arises from isothermal plasmas that have four distinct temperatures: 0.35, 0.9, 1.4 and 3 x 10{sup 6} K. In the lower transition region (2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 5} K) of coronal holes, quiet regions or active regions, although multithermal and variable in brightness, the shape of emission measure vs. temperature curves is almost constant. Flaring plasmas are for most part isothermal, although their emission measure and temperature continuously change. In this paper we review these recent results and propose a set of simple spectrometers for recording the solar spectrum in several narrow bands. The solar emission measure, average plasma temperature, and composition can be derived using the measured line fluxes. By combining the emission measure and other plasma properties with the output of a suite of atomic physics codes, which are also described here, the solar irradiance in the temperature range 2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 7} K can be calculated.

Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdallaf, Jr., Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fontes, Christopher J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sherrill, Manolo E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feldmn, U [NON LANL; Landi, E [NON LANL; Brown, C M [NON LANL; Seely, J F [NON LANL; Doschek, G A [NON LANL; Dammasch, I E [NON LANL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evaluation of Calendar Year 1997 Groundwater and Surface Water Quality Data For The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

1 1.0 INTRODUCTION This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater quality monitoring data reported in: Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwatw Monitoring Report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologtc Rep-meat the US. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (AJA Technical Services, Inc. 1998), which is hereafter referenced as the Annual Monitoring Report. Section 2.0 presents background information for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) that is relevant to data evaluation, including brief descriptions of the geology, the groundwater flow system, the contaminant source areas, and the extent of groundwater contamination in the regime. Section 3.0 provides an overview of the groundwater sampling and analysis activities petiormed during calendar year (CY) 1997, including monitoring well locations, sampling frequency and methods, and laboratory analyses. Evaluation and interpretation of the monitoring da% described in Section 4.0, is generally focused on an overview of data quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), long-term concentration trends for selected inorganic, organic, and radiological contaminants, and consistency with applicable site-specific conceptual contaminant transport models described in: Report on the Remedial Investigation of the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Characterization Area at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (U.S. Department of Energy 1998), which is referenced hereafter as the Remedial Investigation @I) Report. Findings of the data evaluations are summarized :in Section 5.0 and a list of technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed irdormation (Section 6.0) concludes the report. All of the illustrations (maps and trend graphs) and data summary tables referenced in the text are presented in Appendm A and Appendix B, respectively. Appendix C provides a summary of the analytical results that meet applicable data quality objectives (DQOS) of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program.

Jones, S.B.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Defining a Technical Basis for Confidence in PV Investments - A Pathway to Service Life Prediction (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Four levels of accelerated test standards for PV modules are described in the context of how the community can most quickly begin using these.

Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kempe, M.; Bosco, N.; Hacke, P.; Jordan, D.; Miller, D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Offering Community Engagement Activities To Increase Chemistry Knowledge and Confidence for Teachers and Students  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Established in 2000, this club, Khanya Maths and Science Club (KMSC; Khanya means light in isiXhosa, the African language of the area),(28, 29) is coordinated and run by staff and graduate and undergraduate students of the Department of Chemistry. ... The club meets every Saturday morning in term time and lessons and workshops are presented by scientists and Chemistry students in an accessible and easy to understand manner. ... Relevant IYC objectives include increasing the public appreciation and understanding of chem. in meeting world needs, encouraging the interest of young people in chem., and generating enthusiasm for the creative future of chem. ...

Joyce D. Sewry; Sarah R. Glover; Timothy G. Harrison; Dudley E. Shallcross; Kenneth M. Ngcoza

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

433

Approximately optimum confidence bounds on series system reliability for exponential time to failure data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......exponential time to failure data NANCY R. MANN FRANK E. GRUBBS Rocketdyne, North American Rockwell Corporation U.S. Army Aberdeen...reliability for exponential time to failure data BY NANCY R. MANN Rocketdyne, North American Rockwell Corporation AND FRANK E. GRUBBS......

NANCY R. MANN; FRANK E. GRUBBS

1972-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Cheap talk and credibility: The consequences of confidence and accuracy on advisor credibility and persuasiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

con?ict in judge-advisor decision making. Organizationaland expertise in a judge- advisor system. Organizational= .71, p = .40. Unlike the advisor credibility rating, there

Sah, Sunita; Moore, Don A; MacCoun, Robert J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

jfpe_425 1220..1233 BOOTSTRAP CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR THE KINETIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.073 m) was heated in a steam retort at 126.7C. Antho- cyanin retention was measured by high bands, allows more accurate process design and cost-savings, potentially leading to higher-quality design and cost-savings, potentially leading to higher- quality nutraceutical products. INTRODUCTION

436

New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities  

SciTech Connect

An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSAs Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilitiesin this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVAhybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

437

Computing confidence intervals on solution costs for stochastic grid generation expansion problems.  

SciTech Connect

A range of core operations and planning problems for the national electrical grid are naturally formulated and solved as stochastic programming problems, which minimize expected costs subject to a range of uncertain outcomes relating to, for example, uncertain demands or generator output. A critical decision issue relating to such stochastic programs is: How many scenarios are required to ensure a specific error bound on the solution cost? Scenarios are the key mechanism used to sample from the uncertainty space, and the number of scenarios drives computational difficultly. We explore this question in the context of a long-term grid generation expansion problem, using a bounding procedure introduced by Mak, Morton, and Wood. We discuss experimental results using problem formulations independently minimizing expected cost and down-side risk. Our results indicate that we can use a surprisingly small number of scenarios to yield tight error bounds in the case of expected cost minimization, which has key practical implications. In contrast, error bounds in the case of risk minimization are significantly larger, suggesting more research is required in this area in order to achieve rigorous solutions for decision makers.

Woodruff, David L..; Watson, Jean-Paul

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Model-Based Methodology for Building Confidence in a Dynamic Measuring System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experimentation and computational simulation methods will be used to build trust in this measurement system. This process of establishing credibility will be presented in the form of a proposed methodology. This proposed methodology will utilize verification...

Reese, Isaac Mark

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

439

Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation of geothermal reservoirs is useful and necessary in understanding and evaluating reservoir structure and behavior, designing field development, and predicting performance. Models vary in complexity depending on processes considered, heterogeneity, data availability, and study objectives. They are evaluated using computer codes written and tested to study single and multiphase flow and transport under nonisothermal conditions. Many flow and heat transfer processes modeled in geothermal reservoirs are expected to occur in anthropogenic thermal (AT) systems created by geologic disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste. We examine and compare geothermal systems and the AT system expected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and their modeling. Time frames and spatial scales are similar in both systems, but increased precision is necessary for modeling the AT system, because flow through specific repository locations will affect long-term ability radionuclide retention. Geothermal modeling experience has generated a methodology, used in the AT modeling for Yucca Mountain, yielding good predictive results if sufficient reliable data are available and an experienced modeler is involved. Codes used in geothermal and AT modeling have been tested extensively and successfully on a variety of analytical and laboratory problems.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Increased confidence in concept design through trade space exploration and multiobjective optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growing size, complexity and demands of engineering systems requires paying greater attention to the initial design of the system concept. To improve the process by which concept design is carried out, this thesis ...

Odegard, Ryan Glenn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Object-level fusion and confidence management in a multi-sensor pedestrian tracking system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-sensor fusion system dedicated to detect, recognize and track pedestrians. The fusion by tracking method is used multi-sensor pedes- trian detection, recognition and tracking system, is introduced. However, sensors and estimate vehicle and pedestrians' kinematical state. Section IV presents the detection and recogni- tion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

442

A Learning-based Approach to Confident Event Detection in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and surveillance, have stringent accuracy requirements for detecting or classifying events and demand long system-specified accuracy. Event detection systems are also challenged to provide a generic system that effi- ciently adapts-specified accuracy. Through evaluation with real vehicle detection trace data and a building traffic monitoring

Zhou, Gang

443

On Estimating the Size and Confidence of a Statistical Audit Javed A. Aslam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this formula never exceeds the optimal sample size by more than 3 for c 0.9975, and by more than (- ln(1 - c

Rivest, Ronald L.

444

Confidence Intervals Estimation in the Identification of Electromechanical Modes from Ambient Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from ambient data resulting from random load switching throughout the day in power systems effectiveness in reducing the number of trials, which would be beneficial for on-line power system monitoring-- Power system oscillations, modal analysis, power system monitoring, system identification, prediction

Cañizares, Claudio A.

445

The committee says that although public confidence in agriculture is at an all-time low  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deserves the funding which it asks for," says Michael Lubell, head of public affairs at the American Physical Society in Washington. Lubell says that the field badly needs to make more of the spin- offs from

McDonald, Kirk

446

Earthquake source parameters and their confidence regions by a genetic algorithm with a 'memory'  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......splitting of the complete rupture process The RJ plot in Fig. 19 indicates...curve rising upwards rupture process (Fig. 16). As far as subevent...Miller, A.D., 1994. Rupture process of large earthquakes, eruptions...Geophysicists, 6oth Ann. Int. Mtg Exposition, September 2327......

J. leny

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Self-confidence and the re-entry experience for North American women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seven themes emerged in a review of the literatureregarding the experience of North American re-entrywomen. The two most salient appeared to be linked tothe concept of transitions in adulthood and issuesrelate...

Karen E. Killy; William A. Borgen

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Resampling confidence regions and test procedures for second degree stochastic efficiency with respect to a function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

â??s utility function. By maximizing expected utility, an agent seeks to balance expected returns with the inherent risk in each investment alternative. This can be accomplished by ranking prospects based on the certainty equivalent associated with each...

Schumann, Keith Daniel

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Numerical Code Comparison Project - A Necessary Step Towards Confidence in Geothermal Reservoir Simulators  

SciTech Connect

A necessary first step in resolving differences and in evaluating the usefulness of numerical simulators for geothermal reservoir analysis is the comparison of simulator results for a set of well-specified problems involving processes applicable in reservoir analysis. Under the direction of DOE'S Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Management Program (GREMP), a set of six test problems has been developed in an attempt to meet this need. The problem set covers a range of reservoir situations including single- and two-phase flow under 1, 2, and 3 dimensional conditions. Each problem has been test run to insure that the parameter specifications will yield workable solutions, and in several cases analytical solutions are available for comparison. Brief descriptions of the problems are given in each problem, the desired grid and time-step sizes were specified to minimize differences in results due to numerical discretization.

Sorey, Michael L.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

450

Calendar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The East Fork Regime encompasses several confirmed and suspected sources of groundwater contamination within industrialized areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Groundwater and surface water monitoring in the East Fork Regime are performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Included are the groundwater monitoring data obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the East Fork Regime issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on August 30, 1996. The post-closure permit addresses post-closure monitoring requirements for two closed RCRA-regulated surface impoundments: the S-3 Ponds and New Hope Pond.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Geologic controls on transgressive-regressive cycles in the upper Pictured Cliffs sandstone and coal geometry in the lower Fruitland Formation, Northern San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Three upper Pictured Cliffs Sandstone tongues in the northern part of the San Juan Basin record high-frequency transgressive episodes during the Late Cretaceous and are inferred to have been caused by eustatic sea level rise coincident with differential subsidence. Outcrop and subsurface studies show that each tongue is an amalgamated barrier strand-plain unit up to 100 ft (30 m) thick. Upper Pictured Cliffs barrier strand-plain sandstones underlie and bound thickest Fruitland coal seams on the seaward side. Controls on Fruitland coal-seam thickness and continuity are a function of local facies distribution in a coastal-plain setting, shoreline positions related to transgressive-regressive cycles, and basin subsidence. During periods of relative sea level rise, the Pictured Cliffs shoreline was temporarily stabilized, allowing thick, coastal-plain peats to accumulate. Although some coal seams in the lower Fruitland tongue override abandoned Pictured Cliffs shoreline deposits, many pinch out against them. Differences in the degree of continuity of these coal seams relative to coeval shoreline sandstones are attributed to either differential subsidence in the northern part of the basin, multiple episodes of sea level rise, local variations in accommodation and progradation, stabilization of the shoreline by aggrading peat deposits, or a combination of these factors. Fruitland coalbed methane resources and productivity are partly controlled by coal-seam thickness; other important factors include thermal maturity, fracturing, and overpressuring. The dominant production trend occurs in the northern part of the basin and is oriented northwestward, coinciding with the greatest Fruitland net coal thickness.

Ambrose, W.A.; Ayers, W.B. [University of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

The Case for an Informed Path Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Université catholique de Louvain IP Networking Lab - http://inl.info.ucl.ac.be April 24th, 2008 1 #12 of IDIPS is available - http://inl.info.ucl.ac.be 14 #12;15 #12;

Bonaventure, Olivier

453

O. Bonaventure, 2007ISP-model 1 Issues in modelling ISP networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

François Bruno Quoitin Université catholique de Louvain Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium http://inl, available form http://inl.info.ucl.ac.be Totem toolbox : http://totem.info.ucl.ac.b

Bonaventure, Olivier

454

Experimenting with Multipath TCP Sebastien Barre*, Olivier Bonaventure*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

selection heuristics To download MPTCP for Linux: http://inl.info.ucl.ac.be/mptcp Acknowledegments in this document. http://inl.info.ucl.ac.be/mptcp sebastien.barre@uclouvain.be #12;

Bonaventure, Olivier

455

Evolution of Cocirculating Varicella-Zoster Virus Genotypes during a Chickenpox Outbreak in Guinea-Bissau  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Medical Virology grant G0900950, the NIHR UCL/UCLH Biomedical Research Centre, and the use of the UCL Legion High Performance Computing Facility, and associated support services, in the completion of this research. This study was also supported...

Daniel P. Depledge; Eleanor R. Gray; Samit Kundu; Samantha Cooray; Anja Poulsen; Peter Aaby; Judith Breuer

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Infinite Hidden Markov Model Matthew J. Beal Zoubin Ghahramani Carl Edward Rasmussen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Infinite Hidden Markov Model Matthew J. Beal Zoubin Ghahramani Carl Edward Rasmussen Gatsby://www.gatsby.ucl.ac.uk fm.beal,zoubin,edwardg@gatsby.ucl.ac.uk Abstract We show that it is possible to extend hidden Markov

Ghahramani, Zoubin

457

The Infinite Hidden Markov Model Matthew J. Beal Zoubin Ghahramani Carl Edward Rasmussen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Infinite Hidden Markov Model Matthew J. Beal Zoubin Ghahramani Carl Edward Rasmussen Gatsby://www.gatsby.ucl.ac.uk {m.beal,zoubin,edward}@gatsby.ucl.ac.uk Abstract We show that it is possible to extend hidden Markov

Ghahramani, Zoubin

458

Th`ese de Doctorat de l'Universite Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lindgren, doctorant `a l'Universit´e de Lulea maintenant `a l'UCL, pour les travaux passionnants de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

459

Molecules, ices and astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Features Molecules, ices and astronomy David A Williams, Wendy A Brown, Stephen...brown@ucl.ac.uk Dept of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street...of Chemistry, UCL Dept of Physics and Astronomy, UCL Over the past 40 years, about......

D A Williams; W A Brown; S D Price; J M C Rawlings; S Viti

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Risk Sharing and Contagion in Networks Antonio Cabrales Piero Gottardi Fernando Vega Redondo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, EUI, Bocconi Systemic Risk Workshop, Cambridge, August 2014 Cabrales, Gottardi, Vega (UCL, EUI default in the system) Cabrales, Gottardi, Vega (UCL, EUI, Bocconi) Risk Sharing/Contagion Systemic Risk their liabilities must default, and this is costly Cabrales, Gottardi, Vega (UCL, EUI, Bocconi) Risk Sharing

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Head of Safety 020 7679 1948  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Head of Safety Paul Stirk 020 7679 1948 (Internal 41948) p.stirk@ucl.ac.uk Deputy Head of Safety & Biological Safety Advisor Jillian Deans 020 7679 1814 (Internal 41814) j.deans@ucl.ac.uk Safety Training Manager Kuen Yip Porter 020 7679 1299 (Internal 41299) k.yip-porter@ucl.ac.uk Safety Advisors Rhona Brown

Guillas, Serge

462

The Variational Kalman Smoother Matthew J. Beal and Zoubin Ghahramani  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Variational Kalman Smoother Matthew J. Beal and Zoubin Ghahramani Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit {m.beal,zoubin}@gatsby.ucl.ac.uk http://www.gatsby.ucl.ac.uk May 22, 2000. last revision) described in this report can be obtained from the tar file at http://www.gatsby.ucl.ac.uk/~beal

Beal, Matt J.

463

The Variational Kalman Smoother Matthew J. Beal and Zoubin Ghahramani  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Variational Kalman Smoother Matthew J. Beal and Zoubin Ghahramani Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit {m.beal,zoubin}@gatsby.ucl.ac.uk http://www.gatsby.ucl.ac.uk May 22, 2000. last revision file at http://www.gatsby.ucl.ac.uk/~beal/papers/vks.tar.gz 1 #12;By applying Jensen's inequality we

Beal, Matt J.

464

Radioactive waste isolation in salt: peer review of the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology's report on the Petrographic, Stratigraphic, and Structural Evidence for Dissolution of Upper Permian Bedded Salt, Texas Panhandle  

SciTech Connect

The following recommendations for improving the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology (TBEG) report entitled Petrographic, Stratigraphic, and Structural Evidence for Dissolution of Upper Permian Bedded Salt, Texas Panhandle have been abstracted from the body of this review report. The TBEG report should be resided to conform to one of the following alternatives: (1) If the report is intended to be a review or summary of previous work, it should contain more raw data, be edited to give equal treatment to all types of data, and include summary tables and additional figures. (2) If the report is intended to be a description and interpretation of petrographic evidence for salt dissolution, supported by collateral stratigraphic and structural evidence, the relevant indirect and direct data should become the focal point of the report. The following recommendations apply to one or both of the options listed above. (1) The text should differentiate more carefully between the data and inferences based on those data. (2) The authors should retain the qualifiers present in cited works. Statements in the report that are based on earlier papers are sometimes stronger than those in the papers themselves. (3) The next revision should present more complete data. (4) The authors should achieve a more balanced presentation of alternative hypotheses and interpretations. They could then discuss the relative merits of the alternative interpretations. (5) More attention should be given to clear exposition.

Fenster, D.F.; Anderson, R.Y.; Gonzales, S.; Baker, V.R.; Edgar, D.E.; Harrison, W.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Instability regions in the upper HR diagram  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Champagne 1995) are indicative of nuclear fusion products. The same applies...For the computations, the input parameters of the models are...developed to obtain M/Mo for input L/Lo and T eff values...part of the HR diagram. Since input data are needed for a consistent......

Cornelis de Jager; Alex Lobel; Hans Nieuwenhuijzen; Richard Stothers

2001-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

466

INTRODUCTION The Upper Permian (Guadalupian) Brushy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for oils being produced from reservoirs in the Brushy Canyon Formation to the east of the outcrop (Hays crustal shortening in the Marathon fold- and-thrust belt (Hills, 1984). During Leonardian- Guadalupian

Sageman, Brad

467

About Upper Great Plains Regional Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that interconnect with Western facilities. To serve these customer needs, we work from 22 duty stations throughout the Region. We keep the power flowing while ensuring...

468

Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................................................10 POTENTIAL CONSERVATION SITE PLANNING BOUNDARIES........................................12 Off-Site

469

Upper Middle Mainstem Prepared for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Utilities District Shane Bickford Bob Clubb Roy Miller Ecosystem Diagnostic & Treatment, Basinwide Conservation District Allen Miller Wade Troutman #12;vi Farm Services Administration Terry Ludeman Michel Ruud

470

Sputtering and heating of Titan's upper atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Although, the plasma energy deposition...viable, but the plasma heating is inadequate...be true: another non-thermal process must be active...composition of the ambient plasma near Titan's orbit...used to test the atmospheric loss rate. Prior...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

CONSTRAINED BUNDLE METHODS FOR UPPER INEXACT ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the numerical experience of this paper we focus on a specific energy ...... either come from some price decomposition scheme ([5, 23, 37]) or from the market.

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

472

SPS environmental effects on the upper atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The ionospheric effects and associated environmental impacts which may be produced during the construction and operation of a solar power satellite system are reviewed. Propellant emissions from heavy lift-launch vehicles are predicted to cause widespread ionospheric depletions in electron and ion densities. Collisional damping of the microwave power beam in the lower ionosphere can significantly enhance the local free electron temperatures. Thermal self-focusing of the power beam in the ionosphere may excite variations in the beam power-flux density and create large-scale field-aligned electron density irregularities. These large-scale irregularities may also trigger the formation of small-scale plasma striations. Ionospheric modifications can lead to the development of potentially serious telecommunications and climate impacts. A comprehensive research program is being conducted to understand the physical interactions driving these ionospheric effects and to determine the scope and magnitude of the associated environmental impacts.

Duncan, L.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Quaternary upper plate deformation in coastal Oregon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...number in the alphanumeric soil code iden- tifies the terrace: 1...Ridge; 6, Alder Grove. Soil codes with lower-case f are sites...cm) texture* (% clay)* NS2 65 N.D. 145 sicl N.D. 2mkpf...table: lowest terrace south = NS2, TH2, LC2; second-lowest...

474

Sputtering and heating of Titan's upper atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2008JA013352 ) Strobel, D.F Aeronomic systems on planets, moons, and comets. In Comparative aeronomy in the Solar System M Mendillo, A Nagy, and H WaiteGeophysical...Shinagawa, and S Machida2004Global hybrid model of the solar wind interaction with the Venus ionosphere...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

UPPER CAMBRIAN STRATIGRAPHY IN THE CENTRAL APPALACHIANS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conglomerate with crystal- line matrix grading up into lime- stone 1 9. Black finely crystalline to aphanitic limestone weathering steel blue and with yellow mottling 2 47-1lw.2, float at approximately this position, primitive orthoid, Taeni...

476

Water in the Earth's upper mantle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to -1,100 "C in the presence of excess water (the wet peridotite solidus WPS, in Fig. 1). Liu41 extrapolated these results to 15 GPa to provide a ... 1). Liu41 extrapolated these results to 15 GPa to provide a wet mantle solidus (WPS-Liu in Fig. 1). Two more-recent results42'43 have been used to ...

Alan Bruce Thompson

1992-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

477

Resistivity sections, Upper Arkansas River Basin, Colorado |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservancy District, and the Colorado Division of Water Resources, Colorado State Engineer. As part of the investigation, surface geophysical electrical resistivity surveys...

478

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Topics of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocious male salmon monitoring (abundance); (4) performance of growth modulation in reducing precocious males during spawning; (5) incidence of predation by residualized chinook salmon; and (6) benefits of salmon carcasses to juvenile salmonids. This report is organized into six chapters to represent these topics of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2004 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003; 2004). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

OxfordRoadOxfordRoadOxfordRoad UpperBrookStreetUpperBrookStreet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

West Whitworth Street Fairfield Street Charles Street Charles St Altrincham Street Mancunian Way St OXFORD RD STATION OXFORD RD STATION PICCADILLY TRAIN STATION AND METROLINK BBC CITY CENTRE, Platt Church of England 47. Platt Fields Park, open space with a lake. 48. Allen Hall 49. The Islah

480

Unifying Domain Ontology with Agent-Oriented Modeling of Services Key Lab. of High Confidence Software Tech.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of modeling. The architecture combines agent-oriented models of software systems in which service providers of service-oriented architectures is the dynamic service composition through discovering and invokingUnifying Domain Ontology with Agent-Oriented Modeling of Services Zhi Jin Key Lab. of High

Zhu, Hong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Self-motivated readers and confident writers : how literacy in ASL can help develop written English literacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cookie do you eat? Can you help me? How are you? you canExplain that this will help them become better readers, bythe illustrations? Do they help you to better understand the

Wudel, Madelyn Celeste

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

fMRI activation to visible and invisible faces and houses using Continuous Flash Suppression with a confidence rating task  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-0.25 -0.2 -0.15 -0.1 -0.05 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 fMRI activation to visible and invisible faces AreaundertheROC Mask Contrast F 12.5% H F 25% H F 50% H F 100% H 0 5 10 15 20 Visible Borderline Invisible mask invisible and to investigate the associated unconscious neuronal processes. Evidence for a significant BOLD

Adolphs, Ralph

483

Upper Nyack, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1070404°, -73.9201371° 1070404°, -73.9201371° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1070404,"lon":-73.9201371,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

484

Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saddle River, New Jersey: Energy Resources Saddle River, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.0584299°, -74.0984756° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0584299,"lon":-74.0984756,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

485

Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 3 Biological Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assume a naturally functioning ecosystem provides the basis for sustainable populations of organisms are adapted, resulting in decreases or limits in habitats, components, or processes that maintain native processes to the detriment of many native fish and wildlife species (ICBEMP 1997). Information collected

486

Fossils of Uncertain Affinity from the Upper Devonian of Iowa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4. T. A. Jones, J. Sediment. Petrol. 39, 1622 (1969); level of significance 0.05. 5. J. B. Hayes, Marathon Oil Co.. Littleton, 253 -.-7,.. Colorado, gave advice on interpretation of x-ray patterns (including those...

Richard Arnold Davis; Holmes A. Semken Jr.

1975-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

487

The 2005 Upper Taum Sauk Dam Failure: A Case History  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...they began testing the turbine generators in late August...uplift problems in the turbines at high rpm values...to upgrade the pump/turbine units in 1999, which...deep. AmerenUE thought wind-whipped waves from...postponed until the annual maintenance period, scheduled for...

J. DAVID ROGERS; CONOR M WATKINS; JAE-WON CHUNG

488

Upper tropospheric jet streams over North America during summer 1988  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STREAM. . . . 23 A. Maximum Speed B. Average Speed C. Persistence. D. Height Fields E. Vertical Sections F. Zonally Averaged Wind 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 39 . . 50 . 61 Components. . . . . . 65 JET REGIME SIGNATURES A. Q..., to those at the 250 mb level, with the exception that average speeds decrease at higher pressure 50 27 15 80 7 70' 15 50' 50 ~ 30 1 2D 2 25 15 10 3" 2D 30 7 7 130 120 110 IDD 90 LDN8ITUDE BO ~ 70 DD FIG. 10. Average wind speed at 250...

Landers, David Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

489

A SURVEY OF UPPER ONTOLOGIES FOR SITUATION AWARENESS Norbert Baumgartner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retschitzegger Department of Information Systems (IFS) Johannes Kepler University Linz Altenbergerstrasse 69 4040

Hochreiter, Sepp

490