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1

UCL MEDICAL SCHOOL world class  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UCL MEDICAL SCHOOL world class medicine in the heart of London Guide for prospective students 2012/2013 #12;Vice Provost (Health), Head of UCL School of Life and Medical Sciences and Head of UCL Medical School Professor Sir John Tooke Vice Dean, Director of Medical Education and the Division of Medical

Saunders, Mark

2

UCL Science Library Map Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UCL Science Library Map Floor 4 Engineering Engineering Periodicals Guter Collection Sta Training Room Floor 3 Chemistry Computer Science Geology Geosciences Periodicals History of Science Maths Maths Periodicals Physical Sciences Periodicals Physics Computer Cluster Group Study Area Information Library

Crawford, Ian

3

New directions in Bentham Studies Friday 9 December 2011, Bentham House, UCL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's Geometrics as Applied to the Internet Age and the Global Economy 1.00 ­ 2.00 Lunch 2.00 ­ 3.30 Peter Niesen Comes First, Bentham's Chicken of Utility, or His Egg of Truth? 3.30 ­ 4.00 Tea 4.00 ­ 5.00 Philip This event is supported by the JISC-funded UCL E-Publishing Infrastructure Capitalising on UCL's Repository

Saunders, Mark

4

http:// discovery.ucl.ac.uk How to deposit in simple steps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.ucl.ac.uk/silva/isd/staff/adminsystems/documentation#rps for more details. Where fields have a blue and white cross, details should be added and the cross clicked Composition Conference presentation Dataset Design Digital resource Discussion paper Exhibition Journal (full/ special) Lecture Pamphlet Patent Performance Poster Proceeding paper Report Scholarly edition Software

Guillas, Serge

5

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

6

A REVISED AGE FOR UPPER SCORPIUS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY AMONG THE F-TYPE MEMBERS OF THE SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS OB ASSOCIATION  

SciTech Connect

We present an analysis of the ages and star formation history of the F-type stars in the Upper Scorpius (US), Upper Centaurus-Lupus (UCL), and Lower Centaurus-Crux (LCC) subgroups of Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen), the nearest OB association. Our parent sample is the kinematically selected Hipparcos sample of de Zeeuw et al., restricted to the 138 F-type members. We have obtained classification-resolution optical spectra and have also determined the spectroscopic accretion disk fraction. With Hipparcos and 2MASS photometry, we estimate the reddening and extinction for each star and place the candidate members on a theoretical H-R diagram. For each subgroup we construct empirical isochrones and compare to published evolutionary tracks. We find that (1) our empirical isochrones are consistent with the previously published age-rank of the Sco-Cen subgroups; (2) subgroups LCC and UCL appear to reach the main-sequence turn-on at spectral types {approx}F4 and {approx}F2, respectively. An analysis of the A-type stars shows US reaching the main sequence at about spectral type {approx}A3. (3) The median ages for the pre-main-sequence members of UCL and LCC are 16 Myr and 17 Myr, respectively, in agreement with previous studies, however we find that (4) Upper Sco is much older than previously thought. The luminosities of the F-type stars in US are typically a factor of {approx}2.5 less luminous than predicted for a 5 Myr old population for four sets of evolutionary tracks. We re-examine the evolutionary state and isochronal ages for the B-, A-, and G-type Upper Sco members, as well as the evolved M supergiant Antares, and estimate a revised mean age for Upper Sco of 11 {+-} 1 {+-} 2 Myr (statistical, systematic). Using radial velocities and Hipparcos parallaxes we calculate a lower limit on the kinematic expansion age for Upper Sco of >10.5 Myr (99% confidence). However, the data are statistically consistent with no expansion. We reevaluate the inferred masses for the known substellar companions in Upper Sco using the revised age and find that the inferred masses are typically {approx}20%-70% higher than the original estimates which had assumed a much younger age; specifically, we estimate the mass of 1RXS J1609-2105b to be 14{sup +2}{sub -3} M{sub Jup}, suggesting that it is a brown dwarf rather than a planet. Finally, we find the fraction of F-type stars exhibiting H{alpha} emission and/or a K-band excess consistent with accretion to be 0/17 (<19%; 95% CL) in US at {approx}11 Myr, while UCL has 1/41 (2{sup +5}{sub -1}%; 68% CL) accretors and LCC has 1/50 (2{sup +4}{sub -1}%; 68% CL) accretors at {approx}16 Myr and {approx}17 Myr, respectively.

Pecaut, Mark J.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Bubar, Eric J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

7

Hydrogen production using fusion energy and thermochemical cycles. [Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/-FeO, CrCl/sub 3/-CrCl/sub 2/, and UCl/sub 4/-UCl/sub 3/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermochemical cycles for the production of synthetic fuels would be especially suited for operation in conjunction with controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors because of the very high temperature energy which such reactors could supply. Furthermore, fusion energy when developed is considered to be an inexhaustable supply of energy. Several high-temperature two-step thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen are examined. A thermodynamic analysis of the Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/--FeO, CrCl/sub 3/--CrCl/sub 2/, and UCl/sub 4/--UCl/sub 3/ pairs reveals the feasibility of the process. A more detailed process analysis is given for the Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/--FeO system using steam as the heat transfer medium for decomposing the higher valent metal oxide for oxygen production, and hydrolysing the lower oxide for hydrogen production. The steam could be heated to high temperatures by refractory materials absorbing the 14-MeV neutrons in the blanket region of a fusion reactor. Process heat transfer and recovery could be accomplished by regenerative reactors. Proposed operating conditions, the energy balance and the efficiency of the water decomposition process are presented. With a fusion blanket temperature of 2500/sup 0/K, thermal efficiencies for hydrogen production of 74.4% may be obtained.

Steinberg, M.; Dang, V.D.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

9

Confidence Probability versus Detection Probability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a discovery sampling activity the auditor seeks to vet an inventory by measuring (or inspecting) a random sample of items from the inventory. When the auditor finds every sample item in compliance, he must then make a confidence statement about the whole inventory. For example, the auditor might say: ''We believe that this inventory of 100 items contains no more than 5 defectives with 95% confidence.'' Note this is a retrospective statement in that it asserts something about the inventory after the sample was selected and measured. Contrast this to the prospective statement: ''We will detect the existence of more than 5 defective items in this inventory with 95% probability.'' The former uses confidence probability while the latter uses detection probability. For a given sample size, the two probabilities need not be equal, indeed they could differ significantly. Both these probabilities critically depend on the auditor's prior belief about the number of defectives in the inventory and how he defines non-compliance. In other words, the answer strongly depends on how the question is framed.

Axelrod, M

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

10

Confidence in ASCI scientific simulations  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program calls for the development of high end computing and advanced application simulations as one component of a program to eliminate reliance upon nuclear testing in the US nuclear weapons program. This paper presents results from the ASCI program`s examination of needs for focused validation and verification (V and V). These V and V activities will ensure that 100 TeraOP-scale ASCI simulation code development projects apply the appropriate means to achieve high confidence in the use of simulations for stockpile assessment and certification. The authors begin with an examination of the roles for model development and validation in the traditional scientific method. The traditional view is that the scientific method has two foundations, experimental and theoretical. While the traditional scientific method does not acknowledge the role for computing and simulation, this examination establishes a foundation for the extension of the traditional processes to include verification and scientific software development that results in the notional framework known as Sargent`s Framework. This framework elucidates the relationships between the processes of scientific model development, computational model verification and simulation validation. This paper presents a discussion of the methodologies and practices that the ASCI program will use to establish confidence in large-scale scientific simulations. While the effort for a focused program in V and V is just getting started, the ASCI program has been underway for a couple of years. The authors discuss some V and V activities and preliminary results from the ALEGRA simulation code that is under development for ASCI. The breadth of physical phenomena and the advanced computational algorithms that are employed by ALEGRA make it a subject for V and V that should typify what is required for many ASCI simulations.

Ang, J.A.; Trucano, T.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Luginbuhl, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Building Trust & Confidence in Voting Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building Trust & Confidence in Voting Systems, Dec 10-11, 2003. Dec 10, 2003. ... Openness & Security David Dill Stanford University. ...

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

HERS experiment cause for confidence.  

SciTech Connect

At last April's Affordable Comfort conference, I conducted a small HERS (home energy ratings) experiment to examine the relative variability of ratings in new and older homes. The experiment grew out of discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Senior Researcher Mark Ternes and EPA Energy Specialist Mia South about how good the HERS tools currently employed in the new homes market are at identifying cost-effective conservation measures in existing homes. Older homes present challenges for raters that may not generally exist in new construction. These include the absence of blueprints, the inability to interview the builder, the difficulty of identifying the operating efficiency of installed equipment, and different envelope characteristics within the home caused by partial remodels over the years. For precisely these reasons, the need for accurate ratings of older homes is acute. The efficacy of ratings in existing homes hinges on two questions: How accurate are the ratings in existing homes? and, How much does accuracy matter to the selection of conservation measures? A small experiment was organized to test the variability of ratings. Two homes were chosen to represent the very broad spectra that raters can find in the new-construction and existing-home housing stock. The new home in Park Ridge, Illinois, is typical in size and layout of the homes being built in the suburbs around Chicago. This four-bedroom, two-story house with finished basement measures slightly more than 4,000 ft{sup 2}, including the basement. The older home is located in Elgin, Illinois, and was built before 1940, probably sometime in the '20s or '30s. This two-bedroom house has a basement in which the furnace, water heater, clothes washer, and dryer are located. The raters disagreed as to whether the basement should be considered part of the conditioned space. Excluding the basement area, the house measurement approximately 1,000 ft{sup 2}. The rating process included a site visit to measure the homes features, inspection of the blueprints for the new home (none existed for the Elgin home), and a blower door test. After the raters completed their analysis, I examined the effect that the variability of ratings for the Elgin home had on choices for energy conservation measures. Although the sample was small, the results of this experiment are valuable. They may be summarized as follows: First, the ratings that different analysts estimated varied more widely for the older home than they did for the new home. Second, for the older home, the identification of cost-effective energy conservation measures was insensitive to the variation in ratings. Clearly, these findings need to be verified in further experiments. But it is noteworthy that the separate ratings of the new home were in such good agreement, and that cost-effective efficiency recommendations can be arrived at even when divergences exist in the absolute rating value. These findings also suggest that it is appropriate to have confidence in ratings as a tool for identifying cost-effective energy measures in older housing stock.

Cavallo, J. D.; Energy Systems

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Curvewise DET confidence regions and pointwise EER confidence intervals using radial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Curvewise DET confidence regions and pointwise EER confidence intervals using radial sweep methodology to create pointwise confidence intervals for the equal error rate (EER). The EER is the rate or bootstrap methods to estimate the variability in both the DET and the EER. Our radial sweep is based

Schuckers, Michael E.

14

Confidence Regions and PoolingSome Statistics for Weather Experimentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of confidence intervals for assessing the results of weather modification experiments is demonstrated and is shown to be more informative than tests of significance. Multivariate tests, confidence regions, and simultaneous confidence ...

K. Ruben Gabriel

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

West Texas Intermediate crude oil price and NYMEX 95% confidence ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Texas Intermediate crude oil price and NYMEX 95% confidence intervals January 2007 October 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook Note: Confidence intervals for the ...

16

Henry Hub natural gas price and NYMEX 95% confidence intervals ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Henry Hub natural gas price and NYMEX 95% confidence intervals January 2007 October 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook Note: Confidence intervals for the following ...

17

Asymptotic confidence intervals for Poisson regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let (X,Y) be a R^dxN"0-valued random vector where the conditional distribution of Y given X=x is a Poisson distribution with mean m(x). We estimate m by a local polynomial kernel estimate defined by maximizing a localized log-likelihood function. We ... Keywords: 62G08, 62G15, 65H12, Confidence interval, Local polynomial kernel estimate, Poisson regression

Michael Kohler; Adam Krzy?ak

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Recent North Sea successes build confidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent application of underbalanced drilling (UBD) techniques in Shell`s southern North Sea gas fields has provided evidence of the benefits these techniques can deliver compared to a conventional program. In addition, the success of these operations has demonstrated that with the right approach to system design and regulatory compliance within a legislative environment, the techniques developed for land operations can be adapted to mitigate all offshore safety, environmental and operational concerns. Impeccable planning and a team effort resulted in two wells successfully drilled using underbalanced techniques. With confidence in the safety and efficacy of the system, future projects will concentrate on improving efficiency and well productivity.

Nessa, D.O.; Munro, C. [Smedvig Offshore, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Relating confidence to measured information uncertainty in qualitative reasoning  

SciTech Connect

Qualitative reasoning makes use of qualitative assessments provided by subject matter experts to model factors such as security risk. Confidence in a result is important and useful when comparing competing results. Quantifying the confidence in an evidential reasoning result must be consistent and based on the available information. A novel method is proposed to relate confidence to the available information uncertainty in the result using fuzzy sets. Information uncertainty can be quantified through measures of non-specificity and conflict. Fuzzy values for confidence are established from information uncertainty values that lie between the measured minimum and maximum information uncertainty values.

Chavez, Gregory M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zerkle, David K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Key, Brian P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shevitz, Daniel W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2000. Projections

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Development of Confidence Limits for Fatigue Strength Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past several years, extensive databases have been developed for the S-N behavior of various materials used in wind turbine blades, primarily fiberglass composites. These data are typically presented both in their raw form and curve fit to define their average properties. For design, confidence limits must be placed on these descriptions. In particular, most designs call for the 95/95 design values; namely, with a 95% level of confidence, the designer is assured that 95% of the material will meet or exceed the design value. For such material properties as the ultimate strength, the procedures for estimating its value at a particular confidence level is well defined if the measured values follow a normal or a log-normal distribution. Namely, based upon the number of sample points and their standard deviation, a commonly-found table may be used to determine the survival percentage at a particular confidence level with respect to its mean value. The same is true for fatigue data at a constant stress level (the number of cycles to failure N at stress level S{sub 1}). However, when the stress level is allowed to vary, as with a typical S-N fatigue curve, the procedures for determining confidence limits are not as well defined. This paper outlines techniques for determining confidence limits of fatigue data. Different approaches to estimating the 95/95 level are compared. Data from the MSU/DOE and the FACT fatigue databases are used to illustrate typical results.

SUTHERLAND,HERBERT J.; VEERS,PAUL S.

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

22

The effect of terrorism on public confidence : an exploratory study.  

SciTech Connect

A primary goal of terrorism is to instill a sense of fear and vulnerability in a population and to erode confidence in government and law enforcement agencies to protect citizens against future attacks. In recognition of its importance, the Department of Homeland Security includes public confidence as one of the metrics it uses to assess the consequences of terrorist attacks. Hence, several factors--including a detailed understanding of the variations in public confidence among individuals, by type of terrorist event, and as a function of time--are critical to developing this metric. In this exploratory study, a questionnaire was designed, tested, and administered to small groups of individuals to measure public confidence in the ability of federal, state, and local governments and their public safety agencies to prevent acts of terrorism. Data were collected from the groups before and after they watched mock television news broadcasts portraying a smallpox attack, a series of suicide bomber attacks, a refinery bombing, and cyber intrusions on financial institutions that resulted in identity theft and financial losses. Our findings include the following: (a) the subjects can be classified into at least three distinct groups on the basis of their baseline outlook--optimistic, pessimistic, and unaffected; (b) the subjects make discriminations in their interpretations of an event on the basis of the nature of a terrorist attack, the time horizon, and its impact; (c) the recovery of confidence after a terrorist event has an incubation period and typically does not return to its initial level in the long-term; (d) the patterns of recovery of confidence differ between the optimists and the pessimists; and (e) individuals are able to associate a monetary value with a loss or gain in confidence, and the value associated with a loss is greater than the value associated with a gain. These findings illustrate the importance the public places in their confidence in government and law enforcement and also indicate that the level of importance is clearly of a magnitude on the order of other major terrorist event consequences, such as loss of human life and impacts to the economy.

Berry, M. S.; Baldwin, T. E.; Samsa, M. E.; Ramaprasad, A.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

APPLIED BIOLOGY, AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT AT UCL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

also appeared to have an abundance of ionized sulfur and oxygen, both as high- energy plasma accom- plished through a series of workshops com- paring the output of the four microwave sensors regular, continuous spraying of coal, a requirement for gasification and other conversion processes

Nesterov, Yurii

24

Avoiding nuclear war, Confidence-building measures for crisis stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Confidence-building measures (CBMs) may offer one way out of the contemporary arms control morass. Instead of focusing on limiting the number and types of weaponry, CBMs are designed to control how, when, where, and why military activities are employed. By clarifying military intentions and regulating the operations of military forces in times of both crisis and calm, CBMs can help diminish the opportunities for war arising from surprise attack or from miscalculation, accident, or failure of communication. This volume assembles CBM experts from government and academia to assess the utility of CBMs in a wide variety of areas. CONTENTS: Foreword; Prologue; Introduction; The World of CBMs; The Accidents Measures Agreement; Avoiding Incidents at Sea; The Stockholm CDE Conference; CBMs in the UN Setting; Soviet Views of CBMs; Beyond the Hotline: Controlling a Nuclear Crisis; CBMs for Stabilizing the Strategic Nuclear Competition; Risk Reduction and Crisis Prevention; An East-West Center for Military Cooperation; The Limits of Confidence.

Borawski, J.; Goodby, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Specs add confidence in use of wet welding. [Underwater welding  

SciTech Connect

Underwater wet welding can now be utilized with the same confidence as dry welding, provided certain guidelines are followed. A new electrode is discussed that has been delivering exceptionally high quality welds by a diving firm in Houston. With the issuance of the American Welding Society's specifications (ANS/LAWS D3.6-83) much of the confusion surrounding underwater welding should be eliminated. The new specifications establish the levels of quality for underwater welding and gives everyone in the business a common language.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Inter-Korean military confidence building after 2003.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tensions on the Korean Peninsula remain high despite a long-term strategy by South Korea to increase inter-Korean exchanges in economics, culture, sports, and other topics. This is because the process of reconciliation has rarely extended to military and security topics and those initiatives that were negotiated have been ineffective. Bilateral interactions must include actions to reduce threats and improve confidence associated with conventional military forces (land, sea, and air) as well as nuclear, chemical, and biological activities that are applicable to developing and producing weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The purpose of this project is to develop concepts for inter-Korean confidence building measures (CBMs) for military and WMD topics that South Korea could propose to the North when conditions are right. This report describes the historical and policy context for developing security-related CBMs and presents an array of bilateral options for conventional military and WMD topics within a consistent framework. The conceptual CBMs address two scenarios: (1) improved relations where construction of a peace regime becomes a full agenda item in inter-Korean dialogue, and (2) continued tense inter-Korean relations. Some measures could be proposed in the short term under current conditions, others might be implemented in a series of steps, while some require a higher level of cooperation than currently exists. To support decision making by political leaders, this research focuses on strategies and policy options and does not include technical details.

Tae-woo, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Littlefield, Adriane C.; Vannoni, Michael Geoffrey; Sang-beom, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Koelm, Jennifer Gay; Olsen, John Norman; Myong-jin, Kim (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea); Sung-tack, Shin (Korea Institute for Defense Analyses, Seoul, Republic of Korea)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Multiply Connected Topological Economics, Confidence Relation and Political Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the similar formulas of the preference relation and the utility function, we propose the confidence relations and the corresponding influence functions that represent various interacting strengths of different families, cliques and systems of organization. Since they can affect products, profit and prices, etc., in an economic system, and are usually independent of economic results, therefore, the system can produce a multiply connected topological economics. If the political economy is an economy chaperoned polity, it will produce consequentially a binary economy. When the changes of the product and the influence are independent one another, they may be a node or saddle point. When the influence function large enough achieves a certain threshold value, it will form a wormhole with loss of capital. Various powers produce usually the economic wormhole and various corruptions.

Yi-Fang Chang

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Priority/Confidence Model as a Framework for Soccer Agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose the Priority/Confidence model as a reasoning model for agents. Decisions are made according to a confidence measure which is based on the importance of actions (priority) and the satisfaction of a priori preconditions.We implemented the Priority/Confidence ...

Jan Lubbers; Rogier R. Spaans

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Upper Stage Explosion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The explosion of a failed launch vehicle upper stage on 16 October created thousands of new debris which pose collision risks to hundreds of satellites operating in low Earth orbit (LEO), including the International Space Station (ISS). Fortunately, the threat will be relatively short-lived with the majority of the debris expected to reenter the atmosphere within one year. The explosion of the Proton Briz-M stage (International Designator 2012-044C, U.S. Satellite Number 38746) occurred just a day after the publication of the October 2012 issue of the Orbital Debris Quarterly News, which contained an article describing the potential for just such a breakup (ODQN, October 2012, pp. 2-3). The stage

Places Leo; Satellites Risk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Located along Los Alamos Canyon from 7th Street to the Pajarito Ski Hill, the Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves examining sites in present and former Laboratory technical areas to see if any further environmental cleanup actions are needed. If not, the Laboratory can apply to have these sites removed permanently from LANL's Hazardous Waste Permit, meaning that no further actions are needed at those sites. Among the 115 sites included in the Upper LA Canyon Project, 54 have been

31

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

septic tanks, sanitary and industrial waste lines, storm drains, incinerators, transformer sites, and areas in which soil has been contaminated. The Upper Los Alamos Canyon...

32

Increasing Confidence In Geothermal Heat Pump Design Methods  

SciTech Connect

Sizing the ground heat exchanger is one of the most important tasks in the design of a geothermal heat pump (GHP) system. Undersizing the heat exchanger can result in poor operating efficiency, reduced comfort, and nuisance heat pump lockouts on safety controls, while an oversized heat exchanger increases the installation cost of the system. The cost of ground loop installation may mean the difference between a feasible and an unfeasible project. Thus there are strong incentives to select heat exchanger lengths which allow satisfactory performance under all operating conditions within a feasible project budget. Sizing a ground heat exchanger is not a simple calculation. In the first place, there is usually some uncertainty in the peak block and annual space conditioning loads for the building to be served by the GHPs. The thermal properties of the soil formation may be unknown as well. Drilling logs and core samples can identify the soil type, but handbook values for the thermal properties of soils vary widely. Properly-done short-term on-site tests and data analysis to obtain thermal properties provide more accurate information, but since these tests are expensive they are usually only feasible in large projects. Given the uncertainties inherent in the process, if designers were truly working 'close to the edge' - selecting the absolute minimum heat exchanger length required to meet the predicted loads - one would expect to see more examples of undersized heat exchangers. Indeed there have been a few. However, over the past twenty years GHPs have been installed and successfully operated at thousands of locations all over the world. Conversations with customers and facility managers reveal a high degree of satisfaction with the technology, but studies of projects reveal far more cases of generously sized ground heat exchangers than undersized ones. This indicates that the uncertainties in space conditioning loads and soil properties are covered by a factor of safety. These conservative designs increase the installed cost of GHP systems, limiting their use and applicability. Moreover, as ground heat exchanger sizing methods have improved, they have suggested (and field tests are beginning to verify) that standard bore backfill practices lead to unnecessarily large ground heat exchangers. Growing evidence suggests that in many applications use of sand backfill with a grout plug at the surface, or use of bottom-to-top thermally enhanced grout, may provide groundwater protection equal to current practice at far less cost. Site tests of thermal properties provides more accurate information, but since these tests are expensive they are usually only performed in large projects. Even so, because soil properties can vary over a distance as small as a few feet, the value of these tests is limited. One objective of ongoing research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is to increase designers confidence in available ground heat exchanger sizing methods that lead to reliable yet cost-effective designs. To this end we have developed research-grade models that address the interactions between buildings, geothermal heat pump systems and ground heat exchangers The first application of these models was at Fort Polk, Louisiana, where the space conditioning systems of over 4,000 homes were replaced with geothermal heat pumps (Shonder and Hughes, 1997; Hughes et. al., 1997). At Fort Polk, the models were calibrated to detailed data from one of the residences. Data on the energy use of the heat pump, combined with inlet and outlet water temperature and flow rate in the ground heat exchangers, allowed us to determine the thermal properties of the soil formation being experienced by the operating GHP system. Outputs from the models provide all the data required by the various commercially-available ground loop sizing programs. Accurate knowledge of both the building loads and the soil properties eliminated the uncertainty normally associated with the design process, and allowed us to compare the predictions of the commercially-available

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Multiplicative scale uncertainties in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated how uncertainties in the estimation of the detection efficiency affect the 90% confidence intervals in the unified approach for constructing confidence intervals. The study has been conducted for experiments where the number of detected events is large and can be described by a Gaussian probability density function. We also assume the detection efficiency has a Gaussian probability density and study the range of the relative uncertainties $\\sigma_\\epsilon$ between 0 and 30%. We find that the confidence intervals provide proper coverage and increase smoothly and continuously from the intervals that ignore scale uncertainties with a quadratic dependence on $\\sigma_\\epsilon$.

Smith, E S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Challenging government: institutional arrangements, policy shocks, and no-confidence motions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our understanding of parliamentary politics suggests that no-confidence motions have a critical place in government continuation, reorganization and termination. More specifically, we know that opposition parties use no-confidence motions as a way of removing the government and potentially inducing early elections. Up until now, we know little about either the causes or the consequences of no-confidence motions. In this dissertation, I first develop a formal model of the conditions under which an opposition party will threaten to propose (and eventually propose) a no-confidence motion in the government. The model provides a number of intuitive observations about the behavior of opposition parties and the reactions of governments to challenges. I develop a competence-based theory where opposition parties signal their perception of the government's competence with no-confidence motions. In the game, opposition parties act both in terms of short-term gains as well as long-term electoral gains. This model provides intuitive answers that help us understand the circumstances under which the opposition will challenge the government. The model also provides empirical expectations regarding the probability that the motion is successful, in addition to its long-term electoral consequences. Next, I test the theoretical propositions regarding the occurrence of noconfidence motions on a cross-sectional time-series data set of all no-confidence motions in a sample of parliamentary democracies in the post-World War II era. Even though successful no-confidence motions are relatively rare, they can have profound consequences on policy outcomes. The next section illustrates these consequences, as I find that having a no-confidence motion proposed against them makes governments more likely to be targeted by other states in international conflicts. In the conclusion I summarize the key findings, present the broad implications for the study of parliamentary decision making, and discuss avenues for future research.

Williams, Laron Kenneth

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/18: Maritime Cooperation Between India and Pakistan: Building Confidence at Sea  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses ways in which the navies of both India and Pakistan can cooperate on issues of maritime and naval significance. Although the militaries and navies of the two countries have traditionally seen each other as rivals, international economic developments make cooperation imperative. South Asia requires an approach that can alter the existing hostile images and perceptions. This can be achieved through developing an incremental approach towards confidence building that would allow consistency and help build confidence gradually. The aim is to make confidence building a sustainable activity that would help transform hostile images and build cooperative and nonhostile relationships. This paper proposes a five-step model to suggest what the two navies can do jointly to build confidence, with the ultimate goal of naval arms control. The steps include (1) the Signaling Stage to initiate communication between the two navies, (2) the Warming-Up Stage to build confidence through nonmilitary joint ventures, (3) the Handshake Stage to build confidence between the two navies through military joint ventures, (4) the Problem-Solving Stage to resolve outstanding disputes, and (5) the Final Nod Stage to initiate naval arms control. This model would employ communication, navigation, and remote sensing technologies to achieve success.

SIDDIQA-AGHA,AYESHA

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Approach and development strategy for an agent-based model of economic confidence.  

SciTech Connect

We are extending the existing features of Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool, and introducing new features to simulate the role of confidence in economic activity. The new model is built from a collection of autonomous agents that represent households, firms, and other relevant entities like financial exchanges and governmental authorities. We simultaneously model several interrelated markets, including those for labor, products, stocks, and bonds. We also model economic tradeoffs, such as decisions of households and firms regarding spending, savings, and investment. In this paper, we review some of the basic principles and model components and describe our approach and development strategy for emulating consumer, investor, and business confidence. The model of confidence is explored within the context of economic disruptions, such as those resulting from disasters or terrorist events.

Sprigg, James A.; Pryor, Richard J.; Jorgensen, Craig Reed

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Confidence building in Northeast Asia: Possible first steps for cooperation on the Korean peninsula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International relations are often devoted to establishing agreements that define, control, or regulate issues of potential conflict or dispute. These agreements span a full range of national and international issues from human rights to resource allocations and national security. The scope of these agreements can vary from bilateral arrangements to global treaties or control regimes. In many cases, elements of the agreement are monitored to verify compliance or increase confidence among parties that the terms of the agreement are being met. This article outlines options for cooperation on the Korean peninsula that could build confidence and reduce tension. The role of monitoring technology in helping to implement such agreements is also described.

Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

UCL Universit catholique de Louvain APPLIED BIOLOGY, AGRICULTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

also appeared to have an abundance of ionized sulfur and oxygen, both as high- energy plasma accom- plished through a series of workshops com- paring the output of the four microwave sensors regular, continuous spraying of coal, a requirement for gasification and other conversion processes

Nesterov, Yurii

39

April 15, 2011 UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ordinate investigations and outbreak control · Laboratory services · Advise government · Respond to international health · Population status o Health status, lifeline services and response o Health care facilities and staff o alerts #12;· Co-ordinate investigations and outbreak control · Laboratory services · Advise government

Guillas, Serge

40

The Comprehensive Historical Upper-Air Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better understand variability in weather and climate, it is vital to address past atmospheric circulation. This need requires meteorological information not just from the surface but also at upper levels. Current global upper-level datasets ...

A. Stickler; A. N. Grant; T. Ewen; T. F. Ross; R. S. Vose; J. Comeaux; P. Bessemoulin; K. Jylh; W. K. Adam; P. Jeannet; A. Nagurny; A. M. Sterin; R. Allan; G. P. Compo; T. Griesser; S. Brnnimann

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A confidence-based framework for business to consumer (B2C) mobile commerce adoption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) has been considered to be fundamental in determining the acceptance of new technology in the past decades. The two beliefs, ease of use and usefulness, in the model may not, however, fully explain the consumers' ... Keywords: Buying decision making process, Confidence, Mobile commerce adoption, Technology acceptance model

Yuk Kuen Wong; Chao Jung Hsu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE CONFIDENCE IN THE IDENTIFICATION OF NUCLEAR TRANSIENTS BY A BAGGED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the feedwater system of a nuclear Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). The obtained results indicate that the bagging-fuzzy system for fault detection and isolation in nuclear reactors," Advanced Engineering Informatics, 19 (1A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE CONFIDENCE IN THE IDENTIFICATION OF NUCLEAR TRANSIENTS BY A BAGGED

43

Improving Posterior Based Confidence Measures in Hybrid HMM/ANN Speech Recognition Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In this paper, building upon previous work by others [7], we define and investigate a set of confidence measures based on hybrid Hidden Markov Model/Artificial Neural Network (HMM/ANN) acoustic models. All these measures are using the neural network to estimate the local phone posterior probabilities, which are then combined and normalized in different ways. Experimental results will indeed show that the use of an appropriate duration normalization is very important to obtain good estimates of the phone and word confidences. The different measures are evaluated at the phone and word levels on both an isolated word task (PHONEBOOK) and a continuous speech recognition task (BREF). It will be shown that one of those confidence measures is well suited for utterance verification, and that (as one could expect) confidence measures at the word level perform better than those at the phone level. Finally, using the resulting approach on PHONEBOOK to rescore the N-best list is shown to yield a...

Martigny Valais Suisse; Giulia Bernardis; Herve Bourlard

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Upper Estimates for Banach Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the relationship of dominance for sequences and trees in Banach spaces. In the context of sequences, we prove that domination of weakly null sequences is a uniform property. More precisely, if $(v_i)$ is a normalized basic sequence and $X$ is a Banach space such that every normalized weakly null sequence in $X$ has a subsequence that is dominated by $(v_i)$, then there exists a uniform constant $C\\geq1$ such that every normalized weakly null sequence in $X$ has a subsequence that is $C$-dominated by $(v_i)$. We prove as well that if $V=(v_i)_{i=1}^\\infty$ satisfies some general conditions, then a Banach space $X$ with separable dual has subsequential $V$ upper tree estimates if and only if it embeds into a Banach space with a shrinking FDD which satisfies subsequential $V$ upper block estimates. We apply this theorem to Tsirelson spaces to prove that for all countable ordinals $\\alpha$ there exists a Banach space $X$ with Szlenk index at most $\\omega^{\\alpha \\omega +1}$ which is universal for all Banach spaces with Szlenk index at most $\\omega^{\\alpha\\omega}$.

Freeman, Daniel B.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Estimating relative confidence of conditional world oil supply and demand equilibrium  

SciTech Connect

This paper draws from the survey by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) of industry representatives and consulting/forecasting organizations on the likely market configuration under two different world oil price scenarios. The pseudo-data approach treats the forecast price and quantity variables from the various forecasts as pooled time-series, cross-sectional data, and applies traditional econometric techniques to estimate supply and demand curves. We focus on estimating US domestic supply and demand curves and respondent-specific shift factors from a subsample of the NPC survey. We find that all respondents in the survey are more confident about demand than supply forecasts. The underlying differences in individual GNP forecasts account for much of the uncertainty in demand for most respondents, but are still 2 to 6 times more confident of demand than supply. 4 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Boyd, G.A.; Hanson, D.A.; Hochheiser, H.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Scenario development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Building confidence in the assessment  

SciTech Connect

Scenario development is part of the iterative performance assessment (PA) process for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Scenario development for the WIPP has been the subject of intense external review and is certain to be the subject of continued scrutiny as the project proceeds toward regulatory compliance. The principal means of increasing confidence in this aspect of the PA will be through the use of the systematic and thorough procedure toward developing the scenarios and conceptual models on which the assessment is to be based. Early and ongoing interaction with project reviewers can assist with confidence building. Quality of argument and clarity of presentation in PA will be of key concern. Appropriate tools are required for documenting and tracking assumptions, through a single assessment phase, and between iterative assessment phases. Risks associated with future human actions are of particular concern to the WIPP project, and international consensus on the principles for incorporation of future human actions in assessments would be valuable.

Galson, D.A.; Swift, P.N.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Integrity-directed sequential state estimation: Assessing high reliability requirements via safe confidence intervals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study deals with the problem of dynamic state estimation of continuous-time systems from discrete-time measurements in the context of high-integrity applications. The objective of integrity-directed estimation is to provide confidence intervals ... Keywords: Bayesian framework, Dynamic estimation, Dynamic multiple-model estimator, Fault detection, Gaussian mixture, Integrity, Kalman filter, Kullback-Leibler distance, Markov chains, Odometry, Overbounding, Rail navigation, Robust estimation, Safe navigation systems

Olivier Bilenne

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Promotion of EFL Student Motivation, Confidence, and Satisfaction Via a Learning Spiral, Peer-Scaffolding, and CMC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents an EFL English as a Foreign Language instructional model in which peer interaction improves motivation, confidence, satisfaction, and actual performance of students. Researchers used peer interaction for repeated assignments via Computer-Mediated ... Keywords: Actual Performance, Computer Mediated Communication, Confidence, Constructivism, EFL, Instrumental Motivation, Integrative Motivation, Learning Spiral, Peer Interaction, Satisfaction, Scaffolding

Wen-Chi Vivian Wu; Michael Marek; Ling Ling Yen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Crisis prevention centers as confidence building measures: Suggestions for Northeast Asia  

SciTech Connect

Relationships between countries generally exist somewhere in the grey area between war and peace. Crisis prevention activities are particularly important and should have two goals: stabilizing tense situations that could push countries toward war, and supporting or reinforcing efforts to move countries toward peace. A Crisis Prevention Center (CPC) should facilitate efforts to achieve these goals. Its functions can be grouped into three broad, inter-related categories: establishing and facilitating communication among participating countries; supporting negotiations and consensus-building on regional security issues; and supporting implementation of agreed confidence and security building measures. Technology will play a critical role in a CPC. First, technology is required to establishing communication systems and to provide the means for organizing and analyzing this information. Second, technically-based cooperative monitoring can provide an objective source of information on mutually agreed issues. In addition, technology can be a neutral subject of interaction and collaboration between technical communities from different countries. Establishing a CPC in Northeast Asia does not require the existence of an Asian security regime. Potential first steps for such a CPC should include establishing communication channels and a dedicated communications center in each country, together with an agreement to use the system as a {open_quotes}Hot Line{close_quotes} in bilateral and multilateral emergency situations. A central CPC could also be established as a regional communications hub. The central CPC could coordinate a number of functions aimed at stabilizing regional tensions and supporting confidence building activities, perhaps initially in an unofficial capacity. Specific recommendations for confidence building measures are discussed.

Pregenzer, A.L.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Statistical variability and confidence intervals for planar dose QA pass rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The most common metric for comparing measured to calculated dose, such as for pretreatment quality assurance of intensity-modulated photon fields, is a pass rate (%) generated using percent difference (%Diff), distance-to-agreement (DTA), or some combination of the two (e.g., gamma evaluation). For many dosimeters, the grid of analyzed points corresponds to an array with a low areal density of point detectors. In these cases, the pass rates for any given comparison criteria are not absolute but exhibit statistical variability that is a function, in part, on the detector sampling geometry. In this work, the authors analyze the statistics of various methods commonly used to calculate pass rates and propose methods for establishing confidence intervals for pass rates obtained with low-density arrays. Methods: Dose planes were acquired for 25 prostate and 79 head and neck intensity-modulated fields via diode array and electronic portal imaging device (EPID), and matching calculated dose planes were created via a commercial treatment planning system. Pass rates for each dose plane pair (both centered to the beam central axis) were calculated with several common comparison methods: %Diff/DTA composite analysis and gamma evaluation, using absolute dose comparison with both local and global normalization. Specialized software was designed to selectively sample the measured EPID response (very high data density) down to discrete points to simulate low-density measurements. The software was used to realign the simulated detector grid at many simulated positions with respect to the beam central axis, thereby altering the low-density sampled grid. Simulations were repeated with 100 positional iterations using a 1 detector/cm{sup 2} uniform grid, a 2 detector/cm{sup 2} uniform grid, and similar random detector grids. For each simulation, %/DTA composite pass rates were calculated with various %Diff/DTA criteria and for both local and global %Diff normalization techniques. Results: For the prostate and head/neck cases studied, the pass rates obtained with gamma analysis of high density dose planes were 2%-5% higher than respective %/DTA composite analysis on average (ranging as high as 11%), depending on tolerances and normalization. Meanwhile, the pass rates obtained via local normalization were 2%-12% lower than with global maximum normalization on average (ranging as high as 27%), depending on tolerances and calculation method. Repositioning of simulated low-density sampled grids leads to a distribution of possible pass rates for each measured/calculated dose plane pair. These distributions can be predicted using a binomial distribution in order to establish confidence intervals that depend largely on the sampling density and the observed pass rate (i.e., the degree of difference between measured and calculated dose). These results can be extended to apply to 3D arrays of detectors, as well. Conclusions: Dose plane QA analysis can be greatly affected by choice of calculation metric and user-defined parameters, and so all pass rates should be reported with a complete description of calculation method. Pass rates for low-density arrays are subject to statistical uncertainty (vs. the high-density pass rate), but these sampling errors can be modeled using statistical confidence intervals derived from the sampled pass rate and detector density. Thus, pass rates for low-density array measurements should be accompanied by a confidence interval indicating the uncertainty of each pass rate.

Bailey, Daniel W.; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Attwood, Kristopher; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Podgorsak, Matthew B. [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States) and Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Department of Biostatistics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States) and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Confidence building measures at sea:opportunities for India and Pakistan.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sea presents unique possibilities for implementing confidence building measures (CBMs) between India and Pakistan that are currently not available along the contentious land borders surrounding Jammu and Kashmir. This is due to the nature of maritime issues, the common military culture of naval forces, and a less contentious history of maritime interaction between the two nations. Maritime issues of mutual concern provide a strong foundation for more far-reaching future CBMs on land, while addressing pressing security, economic, and humanitarian needs at sea in the near-term. Although Indian and Pakistani maritime forces currently have stronger opportunities to cooperate with one another than their counterparts on land, reliable mechanisms to alleviate tension or promote operational coordination remain non-existent. Therefore, possible maritime CBMs, as well as pragmatic mechanisms to initiate and sustain cooperation, require serious examination. This report reflects the unique joint research undertaking of two retired Senior Naval Officers from both India and Pakistan, sponsored by the Cooperative Monitoring Center of the International Security Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Research focuses on technology as a valuable tool to facilitate confidence building between states having a low level of initial trust. Technical CBMs not only increase transparency, but also provide standardized, scientific means of interacting on politically difficult problems. Admirals Vohra and Ansari introduce technology as a mechanism to facilitate consistent forms of cooperation and initiate discussion in the maritime realm. They present technical CBMs capable of being acted upon as well as high-level political recommendations regarding the following issues: (1) Delimitation of the maritime boundary between India and Pakistan and its relationship to the Sir Creek dispute; (2) Restoration of full shipping links and the security of ports and cargos; (3) Fishing within disputed areas and resolution of issues relating to arrest and repatriation of fishermen from both sides; and (4) Naval and maritime agency interaction and possibilities for cooperation.

Vohra, Ravi Bhushan Rear Admiral (; ); Ansari, Hasan Masood Rear Admiral (; )

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Upper Scioto Valley School | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley School Valley School Jump to: navigation, search Name Upper Scioto Valley School Facility Upper Scioto Valley School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Upper Scioto Valley Schools Energy Purchaser Upper Scioto Valley Schools Location McGuffey OH Coordinates 40.691542°, -83.786353° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.691542,"lon":-83.786353,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

PV Frontogenesis and Upper-Tropospheric Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-tropospheric fronts and frontogenesis are viewed from a potental vorticity (PV) perspective. The rudiments of this approach are to regard such a front as a zone of strong PV gradient on isentropic surfaces, and to treat the accompanying ...

H. C. Davies; A. M. Rossa

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Neutrally Buoyant, Upper Ocean Sediment Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have designed and deployed a neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) intended for use in the upper ocean. The aim was to minimize hydrodynamic flow interference by making a sediment trap that drifted freely with the ambient current. ...

James R. Valdes; James F. Price

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Balanced and Unbalanced Upper-Level Frontogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of frontogenesis at upper levels are investigated using a hierarchy of three numerical models. They are, in order of decreasing sophistication, the anelastic (AN), the geostrophic momentum (GM), and the quasi-geostrophic (QG) ...

Michael J. Reeder; Daniel Keyser

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

About Upper Great Plains Regional Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Upper Great Plains Region carries out Western's mission in Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, and Minnesota. We sell more than 9 billion kilowatt-hours of...

57

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper...

58

Sieve-based confidence intervals and bands for L\\'{e}vy densities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The estimation of the L\\'{e}vy density, the infinite-dimensional parameter controlling the jump dynamics of a L\\'{e}vy process, is considered here under a discrete-sampling scheme. In this setting, the jumps are latent variables, the statistical properties of which can be assessed when the frequency and time horizon of observations increase to infinity at suitable rates. Nonparametric estimators for the L\\'{e}vy density based on Grenander's method of sieves was proposed in Figueroa-L\\'{o}pez [IMS Lecture Notes 57 (2009) 117--146]. In this paper, central limit theorems for these sieve estimators, both pointwise and uniform on an interval away from the origin, are obtained, leading to pointwise confidence intervals and bands for the L\\'{e}vy density. In the pointwise case, our estimators converge to the L\\'{e}vy density at a rate that is arbitrarily close to the rate of the minimax risk of estimation on smooth L\\'{e}vy densities. In the case of uniform bands and discrete regular sampling, our results are consis...

Figueroa-Lpez, Jos E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Intercomparison tests of moored current measurements in the upper ocean  

SciTech Connect

During the August-September 1977 Mixed Layer Experiment (Mile) and the July-September 1978 Joint Air-Sea (Jasin) project, moored current measurements were made in the upper ocean with Savonius rotor and vane vector-averaging current meters (VACM), dual orthogonal propeller vector-measuring current meters (VMCM), and dual orthogonal acoustic travel-time vector-averaging current meters (ACM). Wind speeds and significant wave heights reached 20 m s/sup -1/ and 5m. The influence of mooring motion upon ACM, VACM, and VMCM measurements are described. In the mixed layer above about 30 m depth where mean currents are relatively large, the effect of a surface-following buoy upon ACM, VACM, and VMCM velocity fluctuations at frequencies less than 0.3 cph was negligible; at frequencies above 4 cph, the VACM data contained the largest amount of mooring induced contamination. Below the mixed layer at depths greater than about 75 m, a subsurface mooring should be used; however, when a surface-following buoy was used, then VMCM data better approximated the spectrum of the fluctuations than VACM data. A spar-buoy should not be used to measure currents at depths as deep as 80 m. The frequency-dependent differences between VACM and VMCM and between VACM and ACM measurements are described. At frequencies less than 0.3 cph, the differences between the VACM and ACM or the VMCM records were not significant with 95% confidence limits, were always positive, and above 80 m depth were less than 20%. At frequencies above 4 cph, the VACM-VMCM differences were about 5 times larger than the VACM-ACM differences.

Halpern, D.; Weller, R.A.; Briscoe, M.G.; Davis, R.E.; McCullough, J.R.

1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

Upper Ocean Response to a Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper ocean response to a moving hurricane is studied using historical air-sea data and a three-dimensional numerical ocean model. Sea surface temperature (SST) response is emphasized. The model has a surface mixed-layer (ML) that entrains ...

James F. Price

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

62

Climatic Aspects of the 1993 Upper Mississippi River Basin Flood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1993 record-breaking summer flood in the Upper Mississippi River Basin resulted from an unprecedentedly persistent heavy rain pattern. Rainfall totals for the Upper Mississippi River Basin were, by a large margin, the largest of this century ...

Kenneth E. Kunkel; Stanley A. Changnon; James R. Angel

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor from UARS MLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial results of upper-tropospheric water vapor obtained from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are presented. MLS is less affected by clouds than infrared or visible techniques, and the UARS ...

W. G. Read; J. W. Waters; D. A. Flower; L. Froidevaux; R. F. Jarnot; D. L. Hartmann; R. S. Harwood; R. B. Rood

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Upper-Tropospheric Humidity from MLS and ECMWF Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares upper-tropospheric humidity from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) data. MLS measurements are not included in the ECMWF ...

H. L. Clark; R. S. Harwood

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Marginal Sea Overflows and the Upper Ocean Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marginal sea overflows and the overlying upper ocean are coupled in the vertical by two distinct mechanismsby an interfacial mass flux from the upper ocean to the overflow layer that accompanies entrainment and by a divergent eddy flux ...

Shinichiro Kida; Jiayan Yang; James F. Price

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

67

Observed and Simulated Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite measurements from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the upper troposphere over 4.5 yr are used to assess the covariation of upper-tropospheric humidity and temperature with surface temperatures, which can be used to constrain ...

A. Gettelman; Q. Fu

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Life History of Mobile Troughs in the Upper Westerlies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing evidence indicates that surface cyclogenesis is predominantly a response to the approach of a preexisting trough at upper levels. A question then arises about the origin of the upper-level predecessor. As an initial approach to this ...

Frederick Sanders

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Frontogenesis Processes in the Middle and Upper Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basic issues regarding upper-level frontogenesis addressed in this paper are: (i) simulated frontogenesis influenced by the initial flow, (ii) upper-level frontogenesis as essentially a two-dimensional process, and (iii) frontal-scale positive ...

Keith M. Hines; Carlos R. Mechoso

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Experimental optimal maximum-confidence discrimination and optimal unambiguous discrimination of two mixed single-photon states  

SciTech Connect

We present an experimental implementation of optimum measurements for quantum state discrimination. Optimum maximum-confidence discrimination and optimum unambiguous discrimination of two mixed single-photon polarization states were performed. For the latter the states of rank 2 in a four-dimensional Hilbert space are prepared using both path and polarization encoding. Linear optics and single photons from a true single-photon source based on a semiconductor quantum dot are utilized.

Steudle, Gesine A.; Knauer, Sebastian; Herzog, Ulrike; Benson, Oliver [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, AG Nanooptik, Newtonstrasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Stock, Erik; Bimberg, Dieter [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hardenbergstrasse 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Haisler, Vladimir A. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Lavrenteva Avenue 13, Novosibirsk RU-630090 (Russian Federation)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Upper-Ocean Response to Surface Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moored observations of atmospheric variables and upper-ocean temperatures from the Long-Term Upper-Ocean Study (LOTUS) and the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX) are used to examine the upper-ocean response to surface heating. ...

Craig M. Lee; Daniel L. Rudnick

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Upper Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Heat Pump: $150 per unit Commercial Heat Pump: $150 per three tons Water Heater: $100 Provider Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (UCEMC), in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers incentives for its customers to purchase and install energy efficient equipment through the Energy Right

73

Upper Peninsula Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peninsula Power Co Peninsula Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Upper Peninsula Power Co Place Michigan Utility Id 19578 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A-1 - Residential Seasonal Service Power Supply Service Residential A-1 - Residential Service Seasonal Residential A-2 - Residential Service Seasonal Residential Capacity Buyback Rider CP-IB

74

Understanding Nuclei in the upper sd - shell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclei in the upper-$sd$ shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A$\\simeq$ 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

M. Saha Sarkar; Abhijit Bisoi; Sudatta Ray; Ritesh Kshetri; S. Sarkar

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

BAYESIAN CONFIDENCE LIMITS OF ELECTRON SPECTRA OBTAINED THROUGH REGULARIZED INVERSION OF SOLAR HARD X-RAY SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect

Many astrophysical observations are characterized by a single, non-repeatable measurement of a source brightness or intensity, from which we are to construct estimates for the true intensity and its uncertainty. For example, the hard X-ray count spectrum from transient events such as solar flares can be observed only once, and from this single spectrum one must determine the best estimate of the underlying source spectrum I({epsilon}), and hence the form of the responsible electron spectrum F(E). Including statistical uncertainties on the measured count spectrum yields a 'confidence strip' that delineates the boundaries of electron spectra that are consistent with the observed photon spectrum. In this short article, we point out that the expectation values of the source brightness and its variance in a given photon energy bin are in general not (as has been assumed in prior works) equal to n, the number of counts observed in that energy bin. Rather, they depend both on n and on prior knowledge of the overall photon spectrum. Using Bayesian statistics, we provide an explicit procedure and formulas for determining the 'confidence strip' (Bayesian credible region) for F(E), thus providing rigorous bounds on the intensity and shape of the accelerated electron spectrum.

Emslie, A. Gordon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Massone, Anna Maria, E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu, E-mail: annamaria.massone@cnr.it [CNR-SPIN, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

76

Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration...

77

Stretches of Upper Mississippi River near record-low levels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

As a result of last year's drought, stretches of the Upper Mississippi River have approached record lows. These low water levels have jeopardized commercial barge ...

78

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada...

79

The Pentagon-S process: A systematic approach for achieving high confidence in high-consequence products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has developed a systematic approach for achieving high confidence in major products requiring high reliability for use in high-consequence applications. A high-consequence application is one in which product failure could result in significant loss of life, damage to major systems or to the environment, financial loss, or political repercussions. The application of this process has proven to be of significant benefit in the early identification, verification, and correction of potential product design and manufacturing process failure modes. Early identification and correction of these failures modes and the corresponding controls placed on safety-critical features, ensures product adherence to safety-critical design requirements, and enhances product quality, reliability, and the cost effectiveness of delivered products. Safety-critical features include design features such as materials and dimensions, as well as manufacturing features such as assembly processes, inspections, and testing.

D`Antonio, P.E.; Covan, J.M.; Ekman, M.E.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

EFSA sets upper intake level for LC-PUFA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article, from our Health & Nutrition News department, discusses EFSAs establishment of an upper intake level for DHA and EPA and the agencys work on health claims. EFSA sets upper intake level for LC-PUFA Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper oceanic temporal response to tropical cyclone (TC) passage is investigated using a 6-yr daily record of data-driven analyses of two measures of upper ocean energy content based on the U.S. Navys Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation System ...

John A. Knaff; Mark DeMaria; Charles R. Sampson; James E. Peak; James Cummings; Wayne H. Schubert

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/12: ENTNEA: A Concept for Enhancing Nuclear Transparency for Confidence Building in Northeast Asia  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear energy continues to be a strong and growing component of economic development in Northeast Asia. A broad range of nuclear energy systems already exists across the region and vigorous growth is projected. Associated with these capabilities and plans are various concerns about operational safety, environmental protection, and accumulation of spent fuel and other nuclear materials. We consider cooperative measures that might address these concerns. The confidence building measures suggested here center on the sharing of information to lessen concerns about nuclear activities or to solve technical problems. These activities are encompassed by an Enhanced Nuclear Transparency in Northeast Asia (ENTNEA) concept that would be composed of near-term, information-sharing activities and an eventual regional institution. The near-term activities would address specific concerns and build a tradition of cooperation; examples include radiation measurements for public safety and emergency response, demonstration of safe operations at facilities and in transportation, and material security in the back end of the fuel cycle. Linkages to existing efforts and organizations would be sought to maximize the benefits of cooperation. In the longer term, the new cooperative tradition might evolve into an ENTNEA institution. In institutional form, ENTNEA could combine the near-term activities and new cooperative activities, which might require an institutional basis, for the mutual benefit and security of regional parties.

Nam, Man-Kwon; Shin, Sung-Tack

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area (Redirected from Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

84

Effects of Penetrative Radiation on the Upper Tropical Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of penetrative radiation on the upper tropical ocean circulation have been investigated with an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with attenuation depths derived from remotely sensed ocean color data. The OGCM is a reduced ...

Raghu Murtugudde; James Beauchamp; Charles R. McClain; Marlon Lewis; Antonio J. Busalacchi

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Influence of an Upper Thermocline Current on Intrathermocline Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of an upper-layer current on the propagation of intermediate vortices, such as Mediterranean Water eddies, is investigated. The author discusses the advection mechanism proposed by Hogg and Stommel and shows how the ...

Y. G. Morel

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Initiation and Evolution of an Intense Upper-Level Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within confluent northwesterly flow of an intensifying baroclinic wave over North America in late October 1963, an intense frontal zone developed in 12 h near the inflection point in the middle and upper troposphere. By 24 h after its initial ...

Frederick Sanders; Lance F. Bosart; Chung-Chieng Lai

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Strategic Energy Planning Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe was honored with a grant through the DOE's Tribal Energy Program - Golden Field Office to develop a Strategic Energy Plan for the Tribal Lands.

Lauren Rich

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

88

The Circulation Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Upper Ocean Density Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper extends a previous hydrodynamic circulation model of established, persistent upper ocean density fronts by including a thermodynamic or buoyancy equation in the integral treatment. An analysis is also conducted of the variables related ...

Richard W. Garvine

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Convectively Driven Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two experiments were performed to study the characteristics of turbulence in convective mixed layers in the upper Ocean. In the first, a diurnal convective mixed layer developed in the Bahamas under the influence of the cycle of daytime solar ...

T. J. Shay; M. C. Gregg

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Conflicting Signals of Climatic Change in the Upper Indus Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperature data for seven instrumental records in the Karakoram and Hindu Kush Mountains of the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) have been analyzed for seasonal and annual trends over the period 19612000 and compared with neighboring mountain regions ...

H. J. Fowler; D. R. Archer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Upper Skagit Indian Tribe Strategic Energy Planning Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Skagit Indian Tribe was honored with a grant through the DOE's Tribal Energy Program - Golden Field Office to develop a Strategic Energy Plan for the Tribal Lands.

Lauren Rich

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Upper Equatorial Indian Ocean. The Climatological Seasonal Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climatological seasonal cycle of the upper equatorial Indian Ocean is discussed. A summary of the observations is given. Near the surface and below the equatorial thermocline, the observations indicate an intense variability of the equatorial ...

Gilles Reverdin

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Radiative Processes in Upper Tropospheric Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffusional mass evolution of hydrometeors in upper tropospheric clouds for various radiative conditions in the cloud and for varying ambient moisture Supply is simulated using a time dependent microphysical model. Radiation can play an ...

Douglas A. Wesley; Stephen K. Cox

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

An Objective Isobaric/Isentropic Technique for Upper Air Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective meteorological analysis technique has been developed to provide both horizontal and vertical (cross-sectional) upper air analyses. The horizontal analyses are made at grid points that lie on isobaric levels in a conventional manner. ...

Robert L. Mancuso; Roy M. Endlich; L. J. Ehernberger

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Climatic Review of Summer 1983 in the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The review of the climate of the summer of 1983 and associated economic impacts were collated by the state climatologists of 12 states of the Upper Midwest. Their data archives and facilities permitted relatively fast analysis of cooperative ...

W. M. Wendland; L. D. Bark; D. R. Clark; R. B. Curry; J. W. Enz; K. G. Hubbard; V. Jones; E. L. Kuehnast; W. Lytle; J. Newman; F. V. Nurnberger; P. Waite

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Upper-Layer Circulation in the South China Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-layer circulation is investigated by using all available historical temperature profiles combined with climatological temperaturesalinity relationships in the South China Sea. Two cyclonic eddies are revealed: one is located east of ...

Tangdong Qu

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

An Upper-Tropospheric Low over Texas during Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Meteorological Center 200-mb analyses are used to develop an abridged six-year climatology of the tropical upper-tropospheric trough (TUTT) over the Gulf of Mexico. The climatology reveals large intraseasonal and interannual variability ...

Mary Beth Whitfield; Steven W. Lyons

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ecological persistence in the Late Mississippian (Serpukhovian, Namurian A) Megafloral record of the Upper Silesian Basin, Czech Republic  

SciTech Connect

The Serpukhovian (Namurian A) stratigraphy of the Ostrava Formation, Upper Silesian Coal Basin, Czech Republic, consists of coal-bearing paralic sediments underlain by marine deposits in a cyclothemic nature similar to those in the Pennsylvanian of Euramerica. The thickness of the formation exceeds 3000 m, in which >170 coals are identified in a foreland basin setting. Fifty-five genetic cycles are identified in the present study, using transgressional erosional surfaces as lower and upper boundaries. Terrestrial plant-macrofossil assemblages are preserved within each cycle, mostly associated with coals, and these represent a sampling of the coastal plain vegetation. New high-precision isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry U-Pb ages on zircons from tonsteins of two coals provide chronometric constraints for the Serpukhovian. Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean clustering and Bayesian statistical classification group macrofloral assemblages into four distinct stratigraphic clusters, with assemblages persisting for <18 cycles before compositional change. Cycle duration, based on Ludmila (328.84{+-}0.16 Ma) and Karel (328.01{+-}0.08 Ma) tonsteins, overlaps the short-period (100 kyr) eccentricity cycle at the 95% confidence interval. These dates push the beginning of the Serpukhovian several million years deeper in time. An estimate for the Visean-Serpukhovian boundary is proposed at similar to 330 Ma. Late Mississippian wetland ecosystems persisted for >1.8 million years before regional perturbation, extirpation, or extinction of taxa occurred. Significant changes in the composition of macrofloral clusters occur across major marine intervals.

Gastaldo, R.A.; Purkynova, E.; Simunek, Z.; Schmitz, M.D. [Colby College, Waterville, ME (United States). Dept. of Geology

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

The development of an index for the proximal upper extremity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis techniques specific to the proximal upper extremity have historically been overlooked in the field of ergonomics. This research effort provides a methodology that will allow the ergonomics practitioner to analyze a job and predict whether or not that job exposes workers to increased risk of proximal upper extremity disorders. Literature from the fields of physiology, biomechanics, and epidemiology was assimilated in order to understand the theories of pathogenesis of disorders in the rotator cuff and to identify the risk factors associated with proximal upper extremity disorders. A retrospective epidemiological study was conducted to identify job task variables that may contribute to the occurrence of proximal upper extremity disorders. Two proximal upper extremity constructs were proposed: a fatigue-based model and a compressive load-based model. The constructs incorporated lessons learned from the literature and results from the epidemiological study. Validation of the models was performed using data from the epidemiological study. It was determined that the fatigue-based model was a good predictor of proximal upper extremity disorders.

Walline, Erin Kurusz

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Upper ocean processes observed by underwater gliders in the California Current System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 5 Upper ocean thermohaline structure in thevariability in the upper ocean, J. Geophys. Res. , 105 (C7),Gill, A. E. (1982), Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics, Int. Geophys.

Todd, Robert E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Comparison of Education, Business, and Engineering Undergraduate Students Internet Use and their Experience, Confidence, and Competence in Using New Literacies of the Internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored beginning and advanced pre-service teachers Internet use and their experience, confidence, and competence in using new literacies of the Internet. In addition, this study compared the pre-service teachers to same-aged business and engineering students. Through using an online survey, this study recruited 1350 students from the various disciplines. This study conducted comparisons between a) underclassmen across the three majors, b) seniors across the majors, and c) underclassmen and seniors within the majors. This study found that as digital natives, education, business, and engineering students used the Internet frequently. However, they were relatively unfamiliar with using new literacies of the Internet during their high school and university educational experiences. Overall, the three majors students were confident but they were not competent in using new literacies of the Internet including locating and evaluating information on the Internet. Comparisons between and within the majors revealed that education underclassmen were less confident and competent than engineering underclassmen peers and senior education students in evaluating information on the Internet. Education seniors were comparable to business and engineering seniors in their confidence and competence in both locating and evaluating information on the Internet. The findings imply that teacher educators need to understand the weaknesses of their pre-service teachers and provide them with appropriate opportunities and training to know how to effectively use and furthermore teach new literacies of the Internet.

Kim, Su Yeon

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

103

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Upper Ohio River Valley Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Ohio River Valley Project Upper Ohio River Valley Project In cooperation with key stakeholders including EPA, local and state environmental agencies, industry, and academia, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), a network for monitoring and characterizing PM2.5 in the Upper Ohio River Valley. This region was chosen because it has a high density of coal-fired electric utilities, heavy industries (e.g. coke and steel making), light industry, and transportation emission sources. It is also ideally situated to serve as a platform for the study of interstate pollution transport issues. This region, with its unique topography (hills and river valleys) as well as a good mix of urban and rural areas, has a high population of elderly who are susceptible to health impacts of fine particulate as well as other related environmental issues (e.g., acid rain, Hg deposition, ozone). A world-class medical research/university system is also located in the region, which will facilitate the subsequent use of the air quality data in studies of PM2.5 health effects.

104

A General Circulation Model for Upper Ocean Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general circulation model (GCM) of the ocean that emphasizes the simulation of the upper ocean has been developed. This emphasis is in keeping with its future intent, that of an air-sea coupled model. The basic model is the primitive equation ...

A. Rosati; K. Miyakoda

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ENSO Signals in Global Upper-Ocean Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-space evolution of the El Nio-Southern Oscillation in sea surface temperature (SST) and heat storage of the upper 400 m (HS400) for the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans is investigated for 13 years (19791991). EOF and rotated EOF (...

Yves M. Tourre; Warren B. White

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Closed-Form Upper Bounds in Static Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classical approach to automatic cost analysis consists of two phases. Given a program and some measure of cost, the analysis first produces cost relations (CRs), i.e., recursive equations which capture the cost of the program in ... Keywords: Abstract interpretation, Automatic complexity analysis, Closed-form upper bounds, Cost analysis, Programming languages, Resource analysis, Static analysis

Elvira Albert; Puri Arenas; Samir Genaim; Germn Puebla

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 5 References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hyndman. 1989. Roadside geology of Idaho. Mountain Press Publishing, Missoula, MT. 394 pp. American Fisheries Society (AFS), Idaho Chapter. 2000. Website. http://www.fisheries.org/idaho/. Accessed November. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: an ecological treasure on the upper Snake River Plain. Rangelands

108

Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 6. Participants and Affiliations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Upper Snake Provincial Assessment Idaho Department of Fish and Game: Gregg Servheen Jon Beals Lance-Bannock Tribes Jim Fredericks Idaho Fish and Game Dan Garren Idaho Fish and Game Lauri Hanauska-Brown Idaho Fish Management Jim Mende Idaho Fish and Game Kevin Meyer Idaho Fish and Game Deb Mignogno US Fish and Wildlife

109

Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork (IUGONET)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.iugonet.org/en IUGONET Development of analysis software The IUGONET project - objectives Metadata DB for Upper Atmosphere on TDAS (THEMIS Data Analysis Software Suite) composed of IDL routines. The software will have capability AE index MAGAS KTB Meteor EAR MU GUI mode Loaded data list Time-range set Choice of instrument Choice

Takada, Shoji

110

Upper-Ocean Heat Balance in the Kuroshio Extension Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A horizontally two-dimensional mixed-layer model is used to study the upper-ocean heat balance in the Kuroshio Extension region (3040N, 141175E). Horizontal dependency is emphasized because, in addition to vertical entrainment and surface ...

Bo Qiu; Kathryn A. Kelly

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions  

SciTech Connect

There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; (CIW); (RITS)

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

Upper Limits from Counting Experiments with Multiple Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms, or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

Patrick J. Sutton

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

113

Channeling and Countercurrent in the Upper Rhine Valley: Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the upper Rhine Valley, located in the southwest part of the Federal Republic of Germany, a pronounced channeling of the airflow is observed and occasionally also a countercurrent, although the valley is very flat and very broad (35 km), and ...

G. Gross; F. Wippermann

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/13: Cooperative monitoring for confidence building: A case study of the Sino-Indian border areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This occasional paper identifies applicable cooperative monitoring techniques and develops models for possible application in the context of the border between China and India. The 1993 and 1996 Sino-Indian agreements on maintaining peace and tranquility along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) and establishing certain confidence building measures (CBMs), including force reductions and limitation on military exercises along their common border, are used to examine the application of technically based cooperative monitoring in both strengthening the existing terms of the agreements and also enhancing trust. The paper also aims to further the understanding of how and under what conditions technology-based tools can assist in implementing existing agreements on arms control and confidence building. The authors explore how cooperative monitoring techniques can facilitate effective implementation of arms control agreements and CBMS between states and contribute to greater security and stability in bilateral, regional, and global contexts.

SIDHU,WAHEGURU PAL SINGH; YUAN,JING-DONG; BIRINGER,KENT L.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Upper Cumberland E M C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Cumberland E M C Upper Cumberland E M C Place Tennessee Utility Id 19574 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial GSA 1 Commercial Commercial GSA 2 Commercial Commercial GSA 3 Commercial Industrial GSA 1 Industrial Industrial GSA 2 Industrial Industrial GSA 3 Industrial Residential Residential outdoor light(Mercury 175 Watt) Lighting outdoor light(Mercury 400 Watt) Lighting outdoor light(Metal Halide 1000 watt FL) Lighting outdoor light(Metal Halide 250 watt FL) Lighting

116

EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interiors Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota Westerns Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

117

Prepared for 1 st Upper Midwest Regional Freight Transportation Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are here at this workshop because of a common interest in freight. We bring a wide variety of perspectives the typically longer-range perspective of the public providers of highways; the often short-range perspective of the private sector carriers, shippers and logistics managers; and the independent perspective of university researchers. Our immediate goal is to identify critical issues in facilitating regional freight transportation in the Upper Midwest. What are the gaps in current planning, organizational and financial methods? What key infrastructure improvements are needed to make the region competitive in the twenty first century? A regional perspective is logical because most freight does not stay within the borders of an individual state. For the Upper Midwest region Figures 1 and 2 show that the proportion of all ton-miles of truck shipments that stay within a state ranges from a low of 17 % in Indiana to a high of 46 % in Michigan. The regional average is 26 % which is essential the same as the national average of 27 % (1). Because rail shipments tend to be much longer than truck shipments, the proportion of rail shipments that stay within a state are likely to be even smaller. Thus, most freight shipments are affected by conditions outside of the state of origin or destination. By working together states, carriers, shippers and other stakeholders in the Upper

Dr. Robert; L. Smith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Regression Forecasting of the Onset of the Indian Summer Monsoon with Antecedent Upper Air Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the recorded onset dates of the summer monsoon in southwestern India can be closely related functionally to the antecedent upper air conditions. The antecedent upper air conditions are represented by April mean values of the ...

Ernest C. Kung; Taher A. Sharif

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

North Woods River: The St. Croix River in Upper Midwest History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

>, PhD Student, Department of History, PO Box 6023, BuildingRiver in Upper Midwest History. By McMahon, Eileen M. andRiver in Upper Midwest History. Madison, WI: University of

Karalus, Daniel E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Can Lightning Observations be Used as an Indicator of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Variability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lightning activity in thunderstorms is closely related to the intensity of vertical updrafts indeep convective clouds that also transport large amounts of moisture into the upper troposphere. Small changes in the amount of upper-tropospheric ...

Colin Price; Mustafa Asfur

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Global Observations of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Derived from TOVS Radiance Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a physically based method for the retrieval of upper-tropospheric humidity (UTH) and upper-tropospheric column water vapor (UTCWV) based an the use of radiance data collected by the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS), ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Darren L. Jackson; Ian Wittmeyer

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Observational Analysis of an Upper-Level Inverted Trough during the 2004 North American Monsoon Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-level inverted troughs (IVs) associated with midlatitude breaking Rossby waves or tropical upper-troposphere troughs (TUTTs) have been identified as important contributors to the variability of rainfall in the North American monsoon (NAM) ...

Zachary O. Finch; Richard H. Johnson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h_{rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h_{rss} ~ 10^{-19} - 10^{-17} strain/rtHz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A N; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S V; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barker-Patton, C; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff,S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Bland-Weaver, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R G; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Brozek, S; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, R; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Ebeling, C; Edlund, J; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Flanagan, E; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; Gonzlez, G; Goler, S; Grandclment, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grnewald, S; Gnther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ingley, R; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Kloevekorn, P; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lck, H B; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K O; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNamara, P; Mendell, G; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mller, G; Mukherjee, S; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Naundorf, H; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Papa, M A; Parameswariah, C; Parameshwaraiah, V; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Pratt, M; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schofield, R; Schrempel, M; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P S; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Skeldon, K D; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traeger, S; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Vallisneri, M; Van, M; Putten; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A procedure for finding an improved upper bound on the number of optimal design points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowing an upper bound on the number of optimal design points greatly simplifies the search for an optimal design. Caratheodory's Theorem is commonly used to identify an upper bound. However, the upper bound from Caratheodory's Theorem is relatively ... Keywords: Carathodory's theorem, Cardinality of design, Experimental design, Nonlinear regression

Seung Won Hyun; Min Yang; Nancy Flournoy

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effects of tensile loading on upper shelf fracture toughness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constraint has been an important consideration in fracture mechanics from the earliest work that was done to develop the 1974 version of the ASTM Standard E399. O`Dowd and Shih (1991) have proposed that the difference in crack tip stress fields can be quantified in terms of a field quantity that they have call Q. The Q quantity is a function of J, the crack shape and size, the structural geometry, mode of loading and on the level of deformation and can only be calculated from a high resolution elastic-plastic computational analysis. A similar, simpler, but more controversial approach has been suggested by Betegon and Hancock (1991), who use the non-singular term of the elastic, crack singularity solution, called the T-Stress, as a measure of elastic-plastic crack tip constraint. The objective of this work is to develop some upper shelf, elastic-plastic experimental results to attempt to investigate the applicability of the Q and T stress parameters to the correlation of upper shelf initiation toughness and J resistance curves. The first objective was to obtain upper shelf J resistance curves, J{sub Ic}, and tearing resistance results for a range of applied constraint. The J-Q and J-T stress loci were developed and compared with the expectations of the O`Dowd and Shih and the Betegon and Hancock analyses. Constraint was varied by changing the crack length and also by changing the mode of loading from bending to predominantly tensile. The principle conclusions of this work are that J{sub Ic} does not appear to be dependent on T stress or Q while the material tearing resistance is dependent on T stress and Q, with the tearing modulus increasing as constraint decreases.

Joyce, J.A. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Link, R.E. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Upper critical field of Mo-Ni heterostructures  

SciTech Connect

Upper critical field and its anisotropy have been measured on two very short wavelength Mo-Ni heterostructures of different degrees of perfection, lambda = 13.8A (disordered structure) and lambda = 16.6A (layered structure). In both cases the parallel critical field has an unexpected temperature dependence, a large and temperature dependent anisotropy, and over 60% enhancement over the Clogston-Chandrasekhar limit. Data are fit to the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg theory and the spin-orbit scattering times are found to be 1.79 x 10 T s and 2 x 10 T s, respectively.

Uher, C.; Watson, W.J.; Cohn, J.L.; Schuller, I.K.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Disassembly and defueling of the upper core support assembly  

SciTech Connect

During normal operation of the reactor plant, the upper core support assembly (UCSA) holds the fuel assemblies in a defined geometry and establishes the flow path of the reactor coolant in the reactor vessel. Sometime during the course of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident, molten core material melted through a portion of the UCSA and flowed outside the confines of the core region into normally inaccessible areas. As a result, the UCSA must now be disassembled to remove the relocated core material. The paper includes UCSA description, a discussion of equipment design basis, and a discussion of the defueling approach.

Rodabaugh, J.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Upper Limits on a Stochastic Background of Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has performed a third science run with much improved sensitivities of all three interferometers. We present an analysis of approximately 200 hours of data acquired during this run, used to search for a stochastic background of gravitational radiation. We place upper bounds on the energy density stored as gravitational radiation for three different spectral power laws. For the flat spectrum, our limit of Omega_0<8.4e-4 in the 69-156 Hz band is ~10^5 times lower than the previous result in this frequency range.

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; Gonzlez, G; Goler, S; Grandclment, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grnewald, S; Gnther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Visible and Infrared Optical Design for the ITER Upper Ports  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the results of an optical design scoping study of visible-light and infrared optics for the ITER upper ports, performed by LLNL under contract for the US ITER Project Office. ITER is an international collaboration to build a large fusion energy tokamak with a goal of demonstrating net fusion power for pulses much longer than the energy confinement time. At the time of this report, six of the ITER upper ports are planned to each to contain a camera system for recording visible and infrared light, as well as other diagnostics. the performance specifications for the temporal and spatial resolution of this system are shown in the Section II, Functional Specifications. They acknowledge a debt to Y. Corre and co-authors of the CEA Cadarache report ''ITER wide-angle viewing and thermographic and visible system''. Several of the concepts used in this design are derived from that CEA report. The infrared spatial resolution for optics of this design is diffraction-limited by the size of the entrance aperture, at lower resolution than listed in the ITER diagnostic specifications. The size of the entrance aperture is a trade-off between spatial resolution, optics size in the port, and the location of relay optics. The signal-to-noise ratio allows operation at the specified time resolutions.

Lasnier, C; Seppala, L; Morris, K; Groth, M; Fenstermacher, M; Allen, S; Synakowski, E; Ortiz, J

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Underground Test Area Project of the Nevada Test Site: Building Confidence in Groundwater Flow and Transport Models at Pahute Mesa Through Focused Characterization Studies  

SciTech Connect

Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site contains about 8.0E+07 curies of radioactivity caused by underground nuclear testing. The Underground Test Area Subproject has entered Phase II of data acquisition, analysis, and modeling to determine the risk to receptors from radioactivity in the groundwater, establish a groundwater monitoring network, and provide regulatory closure. Evaluation of radionuclide contamination at Pahute Mesa is particularly difficult due to the complex stratigraphy and structure caused by multiple calderas in the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field and overprinting of Basin and Range faulting. Included in overall Phase II goals is the need to reduce the uncertainty and improve confidence in modeling results. New characterization efforts are underway, and results from the first year of a three-year well drilling plan are presented.

Pawloski, G A; Wurtz, J; Drellack, S L

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

131

Upper Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources (Redirected from Upper Marlboro, MD) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.8159473°, -76.7496909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8159473,"lon":-76.7496909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

132

Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso Range, eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central Coso Range, eastern California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Range is an extensional domain in a releasing stepover between major dextral strike-slip faults along the southeastern margin of the Sierra Nevada Microplate. New multifold seismic reflection data from the Coso geothermal field in the central Coso Range image reflectors that resemble suites of structural and magmatic features exposed in many exhumed metamorphic core complexes (MCC). The Coso Wash Fault, a Holocene-active normal fault that is a locus of surface geothermal activity, is imaged as a

133

Free Energies of Dilute Bose gases: upper bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive a upper bound on the free energy of a Bose gas system at density $\\rho$ and temperature $T$. In combination with the lower bound derived previously by Seiringer \\cite{RS1}, our result proves that in the low density limit, i.e., when $a^3\\rho\\ll 1$, where $a$ denotes the scattering length of the pair-interaction potential, the leading term of $\\Delta f$ the free energy difference per volume between interacting and ideal Bose gases is equal to $4\\pi a (2\\rho^2-[\\rho-\\rhoc]^2_+)$. Here, $\\rhoc(T)$ denotes the critical density for Bose-Einstein condensation (for the ideal gas), and $[\\cdot ]_+$ $=$ $\\max\\{\\cdot, 0\\}$ denotes the positive part.

Jun Yin

2009-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Upper crustal faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control on permeability and production in the Coso Geothermal Field, eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal faulting in an obliquely extending orogen, structural control on permeability and production in the Coso Geothermal Field, eastern California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New multifold seismic reflection data from the Coso geothermal field in the central Coso Range, eastern California, image brittle faults and other structures in a zone of localized crustal extension between two major strike-slip faults. The Coso Wash fault, a Quaternary-active normal fault that is a locus of surface geothermal activity, is well-imaged as a

135

Possible Upper limits on Lorentz Factors in High Energy Astrophysical Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe. The relativistic effect on the blast wave associated with the GRB introduces the gamma factor. Here we put an upper limit on the gamma factor via constraints on maximal power allowed by general relativity and hence set upper limits on other observable quantities such as deceleration distance. Also upper limits are set on the high energy particle radiation due to constraints set by cosmic microwave background radiation.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian stratigraphy of Northwestern Montana: a petroleum system approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian stratigraphy in the Antler foreland basin of northwestern Montana is the current focus of exploration for several petroleum companies. (more)

Schietinger, Paul S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

138

Upper bound on the efficiency of certain nonimaging concentrators in the physical-optics model  

SciTech Connect

A simple treatment by scalar-wave theory yields upper bounds to the efficiency of nonimaging concentrators that are lower than those given by geometrical optics.

Welford, W.T.; Winston, R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":66.35744679,"lon":-156.7663995,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

140

New petrofacies in upper Cretaceous section of southern California  

SciTech Connect

A distinctive sandstone-conglomerate petrofacies is recognized throughout the Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian-late Campanian) Chatsworth Formation in the Simi Hills. It is named the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies after the district where it was first recognized. The petrofacies is also recognized in the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian and possibly early Maestrichtian) Tuna Canyon Formation of the central Santa Monica Mountains. The conglomerates in the petrofacies are composed predominantly of angular pebble-size clasts of argillite, quartz-rich rocks (orthoquartzarenite, metaorthoquartzarenite, mice quartz schist) and leucocratic plutoniate (granite-granodiorite). The conglomerate texture and composition are mirrored in the sandstone. The uniformly angular character of the conglomerate clasts and the survival of argillite clasts indicate that the detritus underwent no more than 5 mi of subaerial transport before it entered the deep marine realm. Foraminifers collected from mudstones interbedded with the conglomerates indicate upper bathyal water depth at the site of deposition. A source terrane of low to moderate relief is indicated by the absence of cobbles and boulders. Bed forms, sedimentary structures, and textural features indicate the detritus moved north from its source terrane to be deposited by turbidity currents, debris flows, and grain flows on the Chatsworth Submarine Fan. The detritus of the Woolsey Canyon petrofacies was derived from basement rocks, now largely buried beneath the Los Angeles basin, that were being eroded during the formation of the Cretaceous Los Angeles erosion surface. The detritus came from the Los Angeles arch of that surface.

Colburn, I.P.; Oliver, D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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141

Upper hybrid solitons and oscillating-two-steam instabilities  

SciTech Connect

A warm two-fluid theory of soliton formation near the upper-hybrid frequency is developed. Several forms of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation are obtained, depending on whether the electric field is completely perpendicular to the dc magnetic field or whether it has an additional small component parallel to the magnetic field. For the perpendicular case, the character of the soliton depends on its scale length, L, and on $beta$. For low $beta$, when L is less than c/$omega$/sub pe/, one finds stationary envelope and hole solitons, whereas when L is greater than c/$omega$/sub pi/ we obtain the super-Alfvenic solitons described by Kaufman and Stenflow by MHD theory. However, the case E/sub parallel/ not equal to 0 may be of more interest, since it couples the pump to the excited waves more efficiently. In the limit of linearization about an infinite wavelength pump, the nonlinear Schroedinger equations yield purely growing (oscillating-two-stream) instabilities in both cases. (auth)

Porkolab, M.; Goldman, M.V.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Discovery of carbon monoxide in the upper atmosphere of Pluto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pluto's icy surface has changed colour and its atmosphere has swelled since its last closest approach to the Sun in 1989. The thin atmosphere is produced by evaporating ices, and so can also change rapidly, and in particular carbon monoxide should be present as an active thermostat. Here we report the discovery of gaseous CO via the 1.3mm wavelength J=2-1 rotational transition, and find that the line-centre signal is more than twice as bright as a tentative result obtained by Bockelee-Morvan et al. in 2000. Greater surface-ice evaporation over the last decade could explain this, or increased pressure could have caused the atmosphere to expand. The gas must be cold, with a narrow line-width consistent with temperatures around 50 K, as predicted for the very high atmosphere, and the line brightness implies that CO molecules extend up to approximately 3 Pluto radii above the surface. The upper atmosphere must have changed markedly over only a decade since the prior search, and more alterations could occur by the...

Greaves, J S; Friberg, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

What is the upper size limit for cosmopolitan distribution in free-living microorganisms?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is the upper size limit for cosmopolitan distribution in free-living microorganisms? ABSTRACT distance apart) is used to try and answer the question `What is the upper size limit for cosmopolitan to 230 lm while the largest cosmopolitan species was 135 lm in size. Comparison of the testate

Brown, Richard

144

Variability in the Upper-Ocean Internal Wave Field at a Sargasso Sea Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two 3.5 month time series records of upper-ocean current and density profiles collected in opposite seasons as part of the LOTUS (Long-Term Upper-Ocean Study) project at 34N, 70W indicate substantial variation in the shape of horizontal current ...

Charles C. Eriksen

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Upper-Level Frontogenesis: Two Case Studies from the FRONTS 87 Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes the structure of two cold fronts observed during the European experiment FRONTS 87. The selection of these two particular cases is based on the existence of well-marked upper-level features, such as strong jet streams, upper-...

Konstantinos Lagouvardos; Vassiliki Kotroni

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS 8: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS Summary This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota - Western's Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 22, 2013 EIS-0408: Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Upper Great Plains Programmatic Wind EIS

147

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. References Dick Benoit, David Blackwell (2006) Exploration Of The Upper Hot

148

Method of using in situ porosity measurements to place an upper bound on geothermal reservoir compaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Placing an upper bound on reservoir compaction requires placing a lower bound on the reservoir effective compaction modulus. Porosity-depth data can be used to find that lower-bound modulus in a young sedimentary basin. Well-log and sample porosity data from a geothermal field in the Imperial Valley, CA, give a lower-bound modulus of 7.7 x 10{sup 3} psi. This modulus is used with pressure drops calculated for a reservoir to determine an upper bound on reservoir compaction. The effects of partial reinjection and aquifer leakage on upper-bound subsidence estimated from the compaction are illustrated for a hypothetical reservoir and well array.

Schatz, J.F.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Cheney, J.A.

1979-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

149

Upper Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We establish the cutoff-dependent upper Higgs boson mass bound by means of direct lattice computations in the framework of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same chiral Yukawa coupling structure as in the Higgs-fermion sector of the Standard Model. As expected from the triviality picture of the Higgs sector, we observe the upper mass bound to decrease with rising cutoff parameter $\\Lambda$. Moreover, the strength of the fermionic contribution to the upper mass bound is explored by comparing to the corresponding analysis in the pure $\\Phi^4$-theory.

P. Gerhold; K. Jansen

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

150

TWO UPPER LIMITS ON THE ROSSITER-MCLAUGHLIN EFFECT, WITH DIFFERING IMPLICATIONS: WASP-1 HAS A HIGH OBLIQUITY AND WASP-2 IS INDETERMINATE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present precise radial-velocity (RV) measurements of WASP-1 and WASP-2 throughout transits of their giant planets. Our goal was to detect the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect, the anomalous RV observed during eclipses of rotating stars, which can be used to study the obliquities of planet-hosting stars. For WASP-1, a weak signal of a prograde orbit was detected with {approx}2{sigma} confidence, and for WASP-2 no signal was detected. The resulting upper bounds on the RM amplitude have different implications for these two systems because of the contrasting transit geometries and the stellar types. Because WASP-1 is an F7V star, and such stars are typically rapid rotators, the most probable reason for the suppression of the RM effect is that the star is viewed nearly pole-on. This implies that the WASP-1 star has a high obliquity with respect to the edge-on planetary orbit. Because WASP-2 is a K1V star, and is expected to be a slow rotator, no firm conclusion can be drawn about the stellar obliquity. Our data and our analysis contradict an earlier claim that WASP-2b has a retrograde orbit, thereby revoking this system's status as an exception to the pattern that cool stars have low obliquities.

Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Hirano, Teruyuki [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Johnson, John Asher [California Institute of Technology, Department of Astrophysics, MC249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Paul Butler, R. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Narita, Norio [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sato, Bun'ei [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Enya, Keigo [Department of Infrared Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Fischer, Debra [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity soundings in the Upper Raft River Valley and in parts of the Raft River Valley. These soundings complement the seventy-nine soundings made previously in the Raft River Valley (Zohdy and others, 1975) and bring the total number of soundings to 149. This work was done as part of a hydrogeologic study of the area. The location, number, and azimuth of all 149 Schlumberger sounding stations are presented. The location of the new

152

A Radiative Upper Boundary Condition Adapted for f-Plane Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the assumption of weak background rotational and wind shear effects, an attractive computational upper boundary condition capable of transmitting gravity waves is generalized for use in a variety of f-plane models. Issues relating to ...

Stephen T. Garner

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effects of the Upper Flow Asymmetry on the Future Direction of Motion of Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of 200-mb streamlines indicate the existence of a confluence between a tropical cyclones main anticyclonic outflow channel aloft and the large-wale environmental upper flow. The confluence produces in the poleward semicircle a ...

F. A. Lajoie

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Evaluation of SSMIS Upper Atmosphere Sounding Channels for High-Altitude Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper atmosphere sounding (UAS) channels of the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) were assimilated using a high-altitude version of the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) in order to investigate their potential for operational ...

Karl W. Hoppel; Stephen D. Eckermann; Lawrence Coy; Gerald E. Nedoluha; Douglas R. Allen; Steven D. Swadley; Nancy L. Baker

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Cloud Layer Thicknesses from a Combination of Surface and Upper-Air Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud layer thicknesses are derived from base and top altitudes by combining 14 years (19751988) of surface and upper-air observations at 63 sites in the Northern Hemisphere. Rawinsonde observations are employed to determine the locations of ...

Kirk D. Poore; Junhong Wang; William B. Rossow

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A Review of the Structure and Dynamics of Upper-Level Frontal Zones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a review of upper-level fronts with the intent of synthesizing observational and modeling studies into a conceptual and dynamical description of these fronts and their evolution relative to the life cycle of midlatitude ...

Daniel Keyser; M. A. Shapiro

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Remote Sensing of Flooding in the U.S. Upper Midwest during the Summer of 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. upper Midwest was subjected to severe flooding during the summer of 1993. Heavy rainfall in the Mississippi River basin from April through July caused flooding of many Midwest rivers, including the Mississippi, Illinois, Missouri, and ...

Liam E. Gumley; Michael D. King

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some

159

Microsoft Word - Upper Jocko River Final Draft CX 7-15-2013.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Upper Jocko River Property funding Upper Jocko River Property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-007168 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real property transfers for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, and wildlife management Location: Township 16 North, Range 19 West, Section 10, Lake County, MT Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the Salish and Kootenai Tribes for the purchase of 5 acres of property, referred to as the Upper Jocko River Land Acqusition in Lake County, MT. The Salish and Kootenai Tribes will own and manage the Upper Jocko River property for fish and wildlife conservation purposes and BPA will receive a conservation

160

A New Method for the Measurement of the Optical Volume Scattering Function in the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to measure the optical volume scattering function (VSF) of seawater is presented. The VSF is a fundamental property used in the calculation of radiative transfer for applications as diverse as upper-ocean heating by solar radiation ...

Michael E. Lee; Marlon R. Lewis

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sensitivity of the Upper Mesosphere to the Lorenz Energy Cycle of the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of a mechanistic general circulation model that explicitly simulates the gravity wave drag in the extratropical upper mesosphere in a self-consistent fashion is proposed. The methodology consists of 1) a standard spectral dynamical ...

Erich Becker

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

An Integrated Approach to Mid- and Upper-Level Turbulence Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated procedure for forecasting mid- and upper-level turbulence that affects aircraft is described. This procedure, termed the Graphical Turbulence Guidance system, uses output from numerical weather prediction model forecasts to derive ...

R. Sharman; C. Tebaldi; G. Wiener; J. Wolff

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Satellite Observations of Variations in Tropical Cyclone Convection Caused by Upper-Tropospheric Troughs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mutual adjustment between upper-tropospheric troughs and the structure of western Atlantic Tropical Cyclones Florence (1988) and Irene (1981) are analyzed using satellite and in situ data. Satellite-observed tracers (e.g., cirrus clouds, ...

Edward B. Rodgers; Simon W. Chang; John Stout; Joseph Steranka; Jainn-Jong Shi

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Geochemical and rheological constraints on the dynamics of the oceanic upper mantle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I provide constraints on mantle convection through observations of the rheology and composition of the oceanic upper mantle. Convection cannot be directly observed, yet is a fundamental part of the plate tectonic cycle. ...

Warren, Jessica Mendelsohn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A Non-Reflective Upper Boundary Condition for Limited-Height Hydrostatic Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple upper boundary condition for hydrostatic, Boussinesq models is derived from a linear internal wave theory, assuming a uniform stratification and no Coriolis effects. This condition is applied in a two-dimentional nonlinear model of the ...

Philippe Bougeault

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Heavy Precipitation Events in New Jersey: Attendant Upper-Air Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first of an anticipated multipart study of atmospheric conditions occurring before and during heavy precipitation events in New Jersey, representative of the mid-Atlantic region, is presented. Upper-air data parameters were analyzed for 81 ...

Robert P. Harnack; Kirk Apffel; Joseph R. Cermak III

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Nonreflecting Upper Boundary Condition for Anelastic Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Gravity-Wave Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sponge layer is formulated to prevent spurious reflection of vertically propagating quasi-stationary gravity waves at the upper boundary of a two-dimensional numerical anelastic nonhydrostatic model. The sponge layer includes damping of both ...

Young-Joon Kim; Sajal K. Kar; Akio Arakawa

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Effects of Precipitation on the Upper-Ocean Response to a Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of precipitation on the upper-ocean response during a tropical cyclone passage is investigated using a numerical model in this paper. For realistic wind forcing and empirical rain rates based on satellite climatology, numerical ...

S. Daniel Jacob; Chester J. Koblinsky

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A Diagnostic Study of Upper Tropospheric Cold Lows Over the Western North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four summers (1967, 1969, 1970, 1971) of rawinsonde data from four western North Pacific island stations (Guam, Midway, Johnston and Wake) were used to form a three-dimensional composite of the subtropical upper-tropospheric cold-core lows ...

Walker E. Kelly Jr.; Donald R. Mock

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Global Isopycnal OGCM: Validations Using Observed Upper-Ocean Variabilities during 199293  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a global isopycnal ocean model (GIM) is described and used for a simulation of variabilities of the global upper ocean during 199293. The GIM simulations are compared and validated with both the available observations and ...

Dingming Hu; Yi Chao

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Composite Study of the Interactions between Tropical Cyclones and Upper-Tropospheric Troughs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to understand how interactions with upper-tropospheric troughs affect the intensity of tropical cyclones. The study includes all named Atlantic tropical cyclones between 1985 and 1996. To minimize other factors ...

Deborah Hanley; John Molinari; Daniel Keyser

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Review of the Unusual Winter of 198283 In the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatologists from the climate centers of 12 states of the upper Midwest contributed temperature, precipitation, and related data for December 1982, January and February 1983. Analyses present the month-to-month spatial anomaly patterns of these ...

W. M. Wendland; L. D. Bark; D. R. Clark; R. B. Curry; J. W. Enz; K. G. Hubbard; V. Jones; E. L. Kuehnast; W. Lytle; J. Newman; F. V. Nurnberger; P. Waite

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Tropical CycloneInduced Upper-Ocean Mixing and Climate: Application to Equable Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical cyclones instigate an isolated blast of vigorous mixing in the upper tropical oceans, stirring warm surface water with cooler water in the thermocline. Previous work suggests that the frequency, intensity, and lifetime of these storms ...

Robert L. Korty; Kerry A. Emanuel; Jeffery R. Scott

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Comparison of in Situ, Reanalysis, and Satellite Water Budgets over the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using in situ, reanalysis, and satellite-derived datasets, surface and atmospheric water budgets of the Upper Colorado River basin are analyzed. All datasets capture the seasonal cycle for each water budget component. For precipitation, all ...

Rebecca A. Smith; Christian D. Kummerow

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Horizontal Wavenumber Spectra of Vertical Vorticity and Horizontal Divergence in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author shows that the horizontal two-point correlations of vertical vorticity and the associated vorticity wavenumber spectrum can be constructed from previously measured velocity structure functions in the upper troposphere and lower ...

Erik Lindborg

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Piecewise Tendency Diagnosis of Dynamical Processes Governing the Development of an Upper-Tropospheric Mobile Trough  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensification and evolution of midlatitude upper-tropospheric mobile troughs may be viewed in terms of the isentropic advection and deformation of the tropopause potential vorticity gradient. The potential vorticity viewpoint allows one to ...

John W. Nielsen-Gammon; Randy J. Lefevre

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Potential Vorticity Diagnostic Approach to Upper-Level Frontogenesis within a Developing Baroclinic Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of tropopause folding is studied in the context of the life cycle of baroclinic waves. Previous studies of upper-level frontogenesis have emphasized the role of the vertical circulation in driving stratospheric air down into the ...

Matthew S. Wandishin; John W. Nielsen-Gammon; Daniel Keyser

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Interannual Variability of the Upper Ocean in the Southeast Pacific Stratus Cloud Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persistent stratus/stratocumulus cloud decks in the southeast Pacific near the coasts of Peru and northern Chile play an important role in regional and global climate variability. Interannual variability of the upper ocean under stratus cloud ...

Toshiaki Shinoda; Jialin Lin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A Synoptic Climatology of the Bimodal Precipitation Distribution in the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation of the synoptic climatology of the precipitation regime in the Upper Midwest. The annual march of precipitation is characterized by a bimodal distribution, with maxima occurring during the months of June and ...

Michael J. Keables

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Is the Upper Ocean Warming? Comparisons of 50-Year Trends from Different Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is great interest in World Ocean temperature trends, yet the historical global ocean database has very uneven coverage in space and time. Previous work on 50-yr upper ocean temperature trends from the NOAA ocean data archive is extended ...

Mark Carson; D. E. Harrison

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The upper crustal P-wave velocity structure of Newberry volcano, Central Oregon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The upper-crustal seismic-velocity structure of Newberry volcano, central Oregon, is imaged using P-wave travel time tomography. The inversion combines a densely-spaced seismic line collected (more)

Beachly, Matthew William

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Upper Crustal P-wave Velocity Structure of Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The upper-crustal seismic-velocity structure of Newberry volcano, central Oregon, is imaged using P-wave travel time tomography. The inversion combines a densely-spaced seismic line collected in (more)

Beachly, Matthew William, 1986-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Multimodel Analysis of the Water Vapor Feedback in the Tropical Upper Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relationships between the mean humidity in the tropical upper troposphere and tropical sea surface temperatures in 17 coupled oceanatmosphere global climate models were investigated. This analysis builds on a prior study of humidity and surface ...

Ken Minschwaner; Andrew E. Dessler; Parnchai Sawaengphokhai

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Validation of the Upper Tropospheric Relative Humidity Determined from METEOSAT Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this note is to validate the upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) operationally extracted from the 6.3 ?m channel data of METEOSAT. The validation is carded out by comparing the satellite data with observed humidifies from the ...

Olli M. Turpeinen; Johannes Schmetz

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A Combined Barotropic-Baroclinic Instability Study of the Upper Tropospheric Tropical Easterly Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined barotropic-baroclinic stability analysis is performed for an upper tropospheric tropical easterly jet representing the observed mean monsoon zonal flow during summer. Numerical solutions are obtained by time integration of a 20-layer ...

S. K. Mishra; M. Y. Tandon

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Upper-Ocean Temperature Response to Hurricane Felix as Measured by the Bermuda Testbed Mooring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Felix passed over the Bermuda testbed mooring on 15 August 1995, providing a unique opportunity to observe the response of the upper ocean to a hurricane. In the vicinity of Bermuda, Felix was a particularly large hurricane with ...

Tommy Dickey; Dan Frye; Joe McNeil; Derek Manov; Norm Nelson; David Sigurdson; Hans Jannasch; David Siegel; Tony Michaels; Rod Johnson

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Observations of 20-Day Period Meridional Current Oscillations in the Upper Ocean along the Pacific Equator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prominent oscillations of the meridional current, with a mean period of approximately 20 days, have been observed in the upper ocean over several years from May 1979 to October 1985 using moored current measurements along the Pacific equator at ...

David Halpern; Robert A. Knox; Douglas S. Luther

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

An Upper Boundary Condition Permitting Internal Gravity Wave Radiation in Numerical Mesoscale Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiative upper boundary condition is proposed for numerical mesoscale models which allows vertically propagating internal gravity waves to pass out of the computational domain with minimal reflection. In this formulation, the pressure along ...

Joseph B. Klemp; Dale R. Durran

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Near-N Oscillations and Deep-Cycle Turbulence in an Upper-Equatorial Undercurrent Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to investigate the role of shear instabilities in turbulent mixing in a model of the upper Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC). The background flow consists of a westward-moving surface mixed layer above a ...

Hieu T. Pham; Sutanu Sarkar; Kraig B. Winters

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

In Situ Measurements of OH and H02 in the Upper Troposphere and Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent aircraft and balloon borne measurements of OH and H02 are reviewed. The authors demonstrate the ability of the laser-induced fluorescence technique to provide accurate, high signal to noise ratio measurements of OH throughout the upper ...

P. O. Wennberg; T. F. Hanisco; R. C. Cohen; R. M. Stimpfle; L. B. Lapson; J. G. Anderson

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Objective Use of Upper Air Soundings to Specify Precipitation Type  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear screening regression is used to derive relationships between parameters computed from observed upper air soundings (RAOBS) and concurrent observations of precipitation type. Precipitation type is defined as three categories: liquid (rain ...

Joseph R. Bocchieri

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Resolution Dependence of the Tropopause Inversion Layer in an Idealized Model for Upper-Tropospheric Anticyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note investigates the dependence of the extratropical tropopause inversion layer (TIL) on numerical resolution in an idealized modeling framework. Axisymmetric upper-tropospheric anticyclones are constructed by specifying potential vorticity ...

Andreas Mller; Volkmar Wirth

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Intraseasonal Variability of the Upper-Ocean Thermal Structure Observed at 0 and 165E  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to perturbations in surface wind and energy fluxes associated with the atmospheric MaddenJulian oscillation (MJO), the thermal structure of the upper ocean (surface to 300 m) in the equatorial western Pacific exhibits prominent and ...

Chidong Zhang

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Subsidence and Upper-Tropospheric Drying along Trajectories in a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A trajectory analysis of the Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3) moisture simulation is used to show that the model simulates upper-tropospheric moisture observations better than would be inferred from a traditional geographical comparison. ...

Eric P. Salath Jr.; Dennis L. Hartmann

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Asymmetry of Western Boundary Currents in the Upper Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of upper-ocean western boundary current (WBC) transports reveal asymmetries between the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres of the Atlantic Ocean. To find out what mechanism might cause these asymmetries the linearized steady-state ...

Reiner Onken

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Depiction of Upper/Lower Vortex Interaction Associated with Extratropical Cyclogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using observed data and model simulations, an attempt is made to verify that baroclinic instability can be viewed as an interaction and mutual amplification of a pair of upper- and lower-tropospheric potential vorticity (PV) perturbations. This ...

Rainer Bleck

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A Satellite-Based Assessment of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Measurements during AFWEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consistency of upper-tropospheric water vapor measurements from a variety of state-of-the-art instruments was assessed using collocated Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-8 (GOES-8) 6.7-?m brightness temperatures as a common ...

Eui-Seok Chung; Brian J. Soden

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Dynamical and Physical Processes Leading to Tropical Cyclone Intensification under Upper-Level Trough Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid intensification of Tropical Cyclone (TC) Dora (2007, southwest Indian Ocean) under upper-level trough forcing is investigated. TCtrough interaction is simulated using a limited-area operational numerical weather prediction model. The ...

Marie-Dominique Leroux; Matthieu Plu; David Barbary; Frank Roux; Philippe Arbogast

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Upper-Tropospheric Winds Derived from Geostationary Satellite Water Vapor Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coverage and quality of remotely sensed upper-tropospheric moisture parameters have improved considerably with the deployment of a new generation of operational geostationary meteorological satellites: GOES-8/9 and GMS-5. The GOES-8/9 water ...

Christopher S. Velden; Christopher M. Hayden; Steven J. Nieman; W. Paul Menzel; Steven Wanzong; James S. Goerss

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Restratification of the Upper Ocean after the Passage of a Tropical Cyclone: A Numerical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of baroclinic instability in the restratification of the upper ocean after the passage of a tropical cyclone (TC) is determined by means of numerical simulations. Using a regional ocean model, the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), a ...

Wei Mei; Claudia Pasquero

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Initial Ice Microparticle Sublimation Measurements from the Levitating Upper-Tropospheric Environmental Simulator (LUTES)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial ice particle sublimation data are presented from the new Levitating Upper-Tropospheric Environmental Simulator (LUTES) at The College of New Jersey. This experimental system mimics the conditions of a typical cirrus cloud in order to ...

Nathan Magee; Kayla Spector; Yi-Hsuan Lin; Corey Tong; John Beatty

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Deep-Water Renewal in the Upper Basin of Loch Sunart, a Scottish Fjord  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recording current meters were deployed near the surface and bottom in the upper basin of Loch Sunart during the summers of 1987, 1989, and 1990. The measurements revealed frequent, though irregular, deep-water renewal events when the basin water ...

Philip A. Gillibrand; William R. Turrell; Alan J. Elliott

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Global Distribution of Supersaturation in the Upper Troposphere from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is analyzed to examine regions of the upper troposphere that are supersaturated: where the relative humidity (RH) is greater than 100%. AIRS data compare well to other in situ and ...

Andrew Gettelman; Eric J. Fetzer; Annmarie Eldering; Fredrick W. Irion

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Mechanisms Governing Interannual Variability of Upper-Ocean Temperature in a Global Ocean Hindcast Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interannual variability in upper-ocean (0400 m) temperature and governing mechanisms for the period 196897 are quantified from a global ocean hindcast simulation driven by atmospheric reanalysis and satellite data products. The ...

Scott C. Doney; Steve Yeager; Gokhan Danabasoglu; William G. Large; James C. McWilliams

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Seasonal Variations of Upper Ocean Transport from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean via Indonesian Straits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal variations of upper-ocean mass transport between the Pacific and Indian Oceans via the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) are examined using numerical experiments with a 1-layer, reduced-gravity model forced with specific climatological ...

James T. Potemra

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Lower-Stratospheric and Upper-Tropospheric Disturbances Observed by Radiosondes over Thailand during January 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lower-stratospheric and upper-tropospheric disturbances over Thailand during 1221 January 2000 were studied using the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment-Tropics (GAME-T) intensive rawinsonde observations ...

Shin-Ya Ogino; Kaoru Sato; Manabu D. Yamanaka; Akira Watanabe

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

SkinDeEP: A Profiling Instrument for Upper-Decameter Sea Surface Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin Depth Experimental Profiler (SkinDeEP) is an autonomous, self-contained, hydrodynamic instrument capable of making repeated, high-resolution profiles of temperature and conductivity within the ocean's upper decameter. Autonomous ...

Brian Ward; Rik Wanninkhof; Peter J. Minnett; Michael J. Head

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Dominant Modes of Wintertime Upper-Tropospheric Temperature Variations over Asia and Links to Surface Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors investigate the variations and predictability of wintertime upper-tropospheric temperature (UTT) over Asia, which are often linked to severe climate anomalies, and the associated features of large-scale circulation and ...

Xingwen Jiang; Song Yang; Yueqing Li; Zongjian Ke; Jianping Li; Haoran Hu

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high quality reference measurements. Here we show an experimental approach ...

R. Philipona; A. Kruchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

210

Interannual Variability and Ensemble Forecast of Upper Blue Nile Basin Kiremt Season Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethiopian agriculture and Nile River flows are heavily dependent upon the Kiremt season (JuneSeptember) precipitation in the upper Blue Nile basin, as a means of rain-fed irrigation and streamflow contribution, respectively. Climate diagnostics ...

Paul Block; Balaji Rajagopalan

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Aviation and Chemistry and Transport Processes in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft emissions impact the atmosphere in a variety of ways, including enhancing greenhouse gases, especially water vapor and carbon dioxide, in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, forming persistent contrails, and altering the ...

Darin Toohey; John McConnell; Linnea Avallone; Wayne Evans

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

An Approach to the Detection of Long-Term Trends in Upper Stratospheric Ozone from Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A central problem in the detection of long-term trends in upper stratospheric ozone from orbiting remote sensors involves the separation of instrument drifts from true geophysical changes. Periodic flights of a Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet ...

John E. Frederick; Xufeng Niu; Ernest Hilsenrath

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluation of NMC Upper-Stratospheric Temperature Analyses Using Rocketsonde and Lidar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily NMC analyses, constructed from operational TOVS data since 1978, are used to monitor behavior of middle atmospheric temperature. Capability of the upper-stratospheric analyses (5, 2, 1, and 0.4 mb) to provide temporally consistent ...

F. G. Finger; M. E. Gelman; A. J. Miller; J. D. Wild; M. L. Chanin; A. Hauchecorne

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Reference Upper-Air Observations for Climate: Rationale, Progress, and Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the global upper-air observing network has provided useful observations for operational weather forecasting for decades, its measurements lack the accuracy and long-term continuity needed for understanding climate change. Consequently, the ...

Dian J. Seidel; Franz H. Berger; Franz Immler; Michael Sommer; Holger Vmel; Howard J. Diamond; John Dykema; David Goodrich; William Murray; Thomas Peterson; Douglas Sisterson; Peter Thorne; Junhong Wang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

ENSO and PDO Effects on Hydroclimatic Variations of the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linkages between tropical Pacific Ocean monthly climatic variables and the Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) hydroclimatic variations from 1909 to 1998 are analyzed at interseasonal timescales. A study of the changes in these linkages through the ...

Hugo G. Hidalgo; John A. Dracup

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Role of the Seasonal Cycle in the Subduction Rates of UpperSouthern Ocean Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A kinematic approach is used to diagnose the subduction rates of upperSouthern Ocean waters across seasonally migrating density outcrops at the base of the mixed layer. From an Eulerian viewpoint, the term representing the temporal change in the ...

Eun Young Kwon; Stephanie M. Downes; Jorge L. Sarmiento; Riccardo Farneti; Curtis Deutsch

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Linear and Nonlinear Diagnostic Models of Stationary Eddies in the Upper Troposphere during Northern Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper tropospheric circulation during northern summer produced by a general circulation model (GCM) is studied using linear and nonlinear barotropic models and by analysing a streamfunction budget. The model experiments and the budget ...

In-Sik Kang; Isaac M. Held

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Evolution of upper mantle beneath East Asia and the Tibetan Plateau from P-wave tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of the research presented in this thesis is to improve our understanding for the evolution of the upper mantle beneath East Asia and the Tibetan Plateau through high resolution P-wave tomography. The ...

Li, Chang, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Characteristics of Wave Packets in the Upper Troposphere. Part II: Seasonal and Hemispheric Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gridded 300-hPa meridional wind data produced by the ECMWF reanalysis project were analyzed to document the seasonal and hemispheric variations in the properties of upper-tropospheric wave packets. The properties of the wave packets are mainly ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

MODELING OF TSUNAMI GENERATION, PROPAGATION AND REGIONAL IMPACT ALONG THE UPPER U.S. EAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the entire upper US East Coast (USEC), in addition to Puerto Rico and many of the Caribbean islands (e USEC (north of Virginia), here, we simulate tsunami generation and transoceanic propagation to the USEC

Kirby, James T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Observed Oceanic Response over the Upper Continental Slope and Outer Shelf during Hurricane Ivan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Ivan passed directly over an array of 14 acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed along the outer continental shelf and upper slope in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Currents in excess of 200 cm s?1 were generated during this ...

W. J. Teague; E. Jarosz; D. W. Wang; D. A. Mitchell

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Variability of Upper Pacific Ocean Overturning in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability of subtropical cell (STC) overturning in the upper Pacific Ocean is examined in a coupled climate model in light of large observed changes in STC transport. In a 1000-yr control run, modeled STC variations are smaller than observed, ...

William J. Merryfield; George J. Boer

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Heating Rate within the Upper Ocean in Relation to its Biooptical State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation absorption and local heating within the upper layers of the open ocean are strongly influenced by the abundance of phytoplankton as depicted by the chlorophyll concentration. According to whether this concentration is high or low, ...

Andr Morel; David Antoine

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Interannual Variability of Meridional Heat Transport in a Numerical Model of the Upper Equatorial Pacific ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interannual heat budget of the Pacific equatorial upwelling zone is studied using a primitive equation, a reduced gravity model of the upper Pacific equatorial ocean. The model is forced with monthly mean FSU winds from 1971 to 1990. A ...

Esther C. Brady

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Solar and Thermal Radiation Errors on Upper-Air Radiosonde Temperature Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles are important for weather prediction, but climate change has increased the interest in upper-air observations asking for very high-quality reference measurements. This paper discusses an experimental ...

R. Philipona; A. Kruchi; G. Romanens; G. Levrat; P. Ruppert; E. Brocard; P. Jeannet; D. Ruffieux; B. Calpini

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Ice Formation by Sulfate and Sulfuric Acid Aerosol Particles under Upper-Tropospheric Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice formation in ammoniated sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under upper-tropospheric conditions was studied using a continuous flow thermal diffusion chamber. This technique allowed for particle exposure to controlled temperatures and ...

Yalei Chen; Paul J. DeMott; Sonia M. Kreidenweis; David C. Rogers; D. Eli Sherman

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

TOGA COARE Upper-Air Sounding Data Archive: Development and Quality Control Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most important datasets to wine from the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) is the most complete, high-resolution upper-air sounding dataset ever collected in the equatorial ...

Scot M. Loehrer; Todd A. Edmands; James A. Moore

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

An Intercomparison of Microphysical Retrieval Algorithms for Upper-Tropospheric Ice Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large horizontal extent, with its location in the cold upper troposphere, and ice composition make cirrus clouds important modulators of the Earth's radiation budget and climate. Cirrus cloud microphysical properties are difficult to measure ...

Jennifer M. Comstock; Sally A. McFarlane; Robert d'Entremont; Daniel DeSlover; David D. Turner; Gerald G. Mace; Sergey Y. Matrosov; Matthew D. Shupe; Patrick Minnis; David Mitchell; Kenneth Sassen; Zhien Wang

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Observations of Planetary Mixed RossbyGravity Waves in the Upper Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational evidence is presented for planetary scale (zonal wave number 12) mixed Rossbygravity (MRG) waves in the equatorial upper stratosphere (3550 km). These waves are detected in Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) ...

William J. Randel; Byron A. Boville; John C. Gille

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Measurements and modeling of the effect of convective clouds on the upper tropospheric moisture budget  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study is to determine the upper tropospheric moisture budget associated with convective events, and in particular to extend process models to higher altitudes than have been achieved previously. Although upper tropospheric moisture concentrations are several orders of magnitude lower than those near the surface, upper tropospheric moisture exerts an important influence on climate. On a per-molecule basis, greenhouse absorption due to water vapor is about one hundred times more effective at high altitudes than at low altitudes. Several one-dimensional radiative convective models have been used to demonstrate the importance of upper tropospheric moisture on climate. These models show that for a given fractional increase in water vapor at a given altitude the response or change in surface temperature is qualitatively the same. At present, considerable controversy exists over the nature of the vertical redistribution of water vapor in a changing climate, and particularly the distribution of water vapor in the upper troposphere. Lacking suitable data, this controversy is also reflected in the cumulus parameterization schemes that are currently used in models. Understanding upper tropospheric moistening processes are therefore of prime importance in addressing the water vapor feedback question.

Bisson, S.E.; Goldsmith, J.E.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Del Genio, A.D. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F?Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume?proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non?overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analytes measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, G.

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

232

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F?Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume?proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non?overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analytes measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Analysis Of The Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 6F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.; Shine, G.

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogeneous across composite samples.

Shine, E.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

236

Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Analysis of the Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm- 243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Use of instrumented charpy tests to determine onset of upper-shelf energy  

SciTech Connect

The Charpy V-notch (C/sub v/) upper-shelf energy is usually defined as that temperature range in which the surface of the C/sub v/ specimen exhibits an appearance indicative of a 100 percent ductile fracture. In an attempt to avoid the need for interpretation, the selection of the C/sub v/ upper-shelf energy is based on the results from an instrumented impact test which provides a permanent record of the load-deflection history of a C/sub v/ specimen during the testing sequence. In the brittle-ductile transition temperature regime, a precipitous drop in the load trace occurs. The amount of the drop decreases at higher temperatures until it is zero, and the zero-drop-in-load temperature is identical to the onset of the C/sub v/ upper shelf. This relationship between the drop in load and energy in an instrumented impact test provides incontestable assurance that the C/sub v/ upper shelf has been obtained. This relationship between drop in load and temperature permits a prediction of the onset of the upper-shelf temperature with as few as two instrumented impact tests. It is also shown that nil-ductility temperature (NDT) (determined by the drop-weight test) is released to the C/sub v/ upper shelf. For the SA-508 Class 2 and SA-533 Grade B Class 1 steels employed in the fabrication of pressure vessels for light-water reactors, C/sub v/ testing at NDT + 180$sup 0$F (100$sup 0$C) will provide upper-shelf energy values. (DLC)

Canonico, D.A.; Stelzman, W.J.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Previous interpretations of seismic data collected by the Kenya Rift International Seismic Project (KRISP) experiments indicate the presence of crustal thickening within the rift valley area beneath the Kenya dome, an uplift centred on the southern part of the Kenya rift. North of the dome, these interpretations show thinning of the crust and an increase in crustal extension. To the south near the Kenya/Tanzania border, crustal thinning associated with the rift is modest. Our study was aimed at further investigating crustal structure from this dome southwards via a

240

A Case Study Of The Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Case Study Of The Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geochemical and geophysical investigations in the Bohai Gulf and adjacent areas, China, indicate that uplift of the high-conductivity layer in the lithosphere coincides with the area of high heat flow. In this area are distributed abundant oil and gas fields in a Tertiary fault basin and also large quantities of basaltic rocks. Gas fields, mostly CO2 bearing, occur at the basin margins, where a widespread alkaline olivine basalt has high contents of gold. Geochemical prospecting of the surface (soil and soil gas) in the area indicates that there is an anomaly zone of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Although commonly obscured by simple shear, pure shear fabrics occur locally within many metamorphic core complexes. The cover rocks to the Raft River metamorphic core complex exposed within the Black Pine Mountains display an early coaxial strain history which developed prior to the formation of low-angle fault-bounded allochthons. At higher structural levels this is documented by pressure shadows with straight sutures, and

242

Upper oriented chromatic number of undirected graphs and oriented colorings of product graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The oriented chromatic number of an oriented graph $\\vec G$ is the minimum order of an oriented graph $\\vev H$ such that $\\vec G$ admits a homomorphism to $\\vev H$. The oriented chromatic number of an undirected graph $G$ is then the greatest oriented chromatic number of its orientations. In this paper, we introduce the new notion of the upper oriented chromatic number of an undirected graph $G$, defined as the minimum order of an oriented graph $\\vev U$ such that every orientation $\\vec G$ of $G$ admits a homomorphism to $\\vec U$. We give some properties of this parameter, derive some general upper bounds on the ordinary and upper oriented chromatic numbers of Cartesian, strong, direct and lexicographic products of graphs, and consider the particular case of products of paths.

Sopena, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Reduction of Statistical Power Per Event Due to Upper Lifetime Cuts in Lifetime Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cut on the maximum lifetime in a lifetime fit not only reduces the number of events, but also, in some circumstances dramatically, decreases the statistical significance of each event. The upper impact parameter cut in the hadronic B trigger at CDF, which is due to technical limitations, has the same effect. In this note we describe and quantify the consequences of such a cut on lifetime measurements. We find that even moderate upper lifetime cuts, leaving event numbers nearly unchanged, can dramatically increase the statistical uncertainty of the fit result.

Jonas Rademacker

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

244

Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix C Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird Introduction The red-winged black bird is one of the most abundant birds in North America (Marshall et al. 2003). Red-winged Blackbirds are extremely adaptable; successfully colonizing many small

245

Spatially Broad Observations of Internal Waves in the Upper Ocean at the Hawaiian Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The density and current structure at the Hawaiian Ridge was observed using SeaSoar and Doppler sonar during a survey extending from Oahu to Brooks Banks. Across- and along-ridge changes in internal wave statistics in the upper ocean within 200 km ...

Joseph P. Martin; Daniel L. Rudnick; Robert Pinkel

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Consistency Check for Trends in Surface Temperature and Upper-Level Circulation: 19501992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time series of 43 years of observed monthly mean air temperature at 109 sites in the 48 contiguous United States is compared to monthly mean air temperature specified from hemispheric gridded 700-mb heights. Because both upper-air and surface ...

Huug M. van den Dool; Edward A. O'Lenic; William H. Klein

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Impact of monsoon circulations on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of monsoon circulations on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere Andrew Gettelman the impact of Northern Hemisphere summer monsoon circulations on stratosphere-troposphere exchange. A long-term model climatology resembles the satellite climatology of water vapor and ozone in the monsoon regions

Gettelman, Andrew

248

Local Dephasing Rates Set an Upper Bound for the Dephasing of Entangled States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I derive an inequality in which the dephasing rates of single qubits set an upper bound for the dephasing rate of GHZ-type entangled states of many qubits. The derivation is based on two assumptions, first, that the dephasing can be described by a dissipator in Lindblad form and, second, that the dephasing preserves the population of qubit states in a given basis.

Drr, Stephan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Measuring Upper Ocean Variability from an Array of Surface Moorings in the Subtropical Convergence Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of upper ocean variability were made in the subtropical convergence zone southwest of Bermuda from an array of five surface moorings set with spacings of 16 to 53 km. The intent was to observe oceanic fronts and to quantify the ...

Robert A. Weller; Daniel L. Rudnick; Nancy J. Pennington; Richard P. Trask; James R. Valdes

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Low-Frequency Variability in the Arctic Atmosphere, Sea Ice, and Upper-Ocean Climate System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low-frequency natural variability of the arctic climate system is modeled using a single-column, energy balance model of the atmosphere. sea ice, and upper-ocean system. Variability in the system is induced by forcing with realistic, random ...

C. M. Bitz; D. S. Battisti; R. E. Moritz; J. A. Beesley

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

On the Formation of Potential-Vorticity Anomalies in Upper-Level Jet-Front Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review and discuss a difference in interpretation of the role of turbulence in modifying the potential-vorticity distribution in the vicinity of upper-level jet-front systems. In the late 1970s, M. A. Shapiro presented observational evidence ...

Daniel Keyser; Richard Rotunno

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

ARIZONA COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT OCTOBER 2005 Upper Temperature Tolerance of Loach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tolerance. Furthermore, the results of a low-cost method may be useful for identifying the range (45% protein), and 2 parts tropical fish flakes made from brine shrimp, bloodmeal, and spirulina (40 costs associated with remaining at temperatures close to the upper thermal limit for a long period

Bonar, Scott A.

253

Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified.

Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Inferences and Observations of Turbulent Dissipation and Mixing in the Upper Ocean at the Hawaiian Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hawaiian Ridge is one of the most energetic generators of internal tides in the pelagic ocean. The density and current structure of the upper ocean at the Hawaiian Ridge were observed using SeaSoar and Doppler sonar during a survey extending ...

Joseph P. Martin; Daniel L. Rudnick

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

ORIGINAL ARTICLE An interactive Internet-based system for tracking upper limb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL ARTICLE An interactive Internet-based system for tracking upper limb motion in home-based home-based rehabi- litation using some form of assistive technology [3]. Telerehabilitation enables be found in [11], where a home-based haptic telerehabilitation system is described. The system focuses

Hu, Huosheng

256

Respiration simulation of human upper airway for analysis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a disease that the pharyngeal portion collapses repeatedly during sleep and finally results in the cessation of breathing. So far the potential pathogenesis factors that may cause OSAS are discussed from two ... Keywords: FEM, OSAS, fluid-structure interaction, upper airway

Renhan Huang; Qiguo Rong

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Rocket Observations of Kelvin Waves in the Upper Stratosphere over India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper atmospheric winds (2040 km) at two Indian stations, Sriharikota Range (SHAR 13.7N, 80.2E) and Balasore (2 1.5N, 86.93E) during the years 197980 were analyzed for short scale vertical variations (616 km) of the zonal wind. The ...

M. Devarajan; C. A. Reddy; C. Ragrava Reddi

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Trajectory Analysis of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Moisture and Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the distribution of upper-tropospheric humidity (UTH) in the cloud-free Tropics can be simulated with a simple model in which air expelled from moist convective regions is dried by subsidence along its trajectory. The ...

Eric P. Salath Jr.; Dennis L. Hartmann

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. of Geology and Anthropology, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway NJ, USA e Dept. of Human, magnetostratigraphy, Olduvai chron, Pre-Olduvai event, strontium isotope ratios, precession, eccentricity, climate and strontium (Sr) isotope stratigraphy, to improve age control on hominin-bearing upper Burgi (UBU) deposits

260

Upper Ocean Shear and Density Variability at the Equator during TROPIC HEAT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A four and one-half day time series of upper-ocean shear and density observations was collected in the tropical Pacific Ocean in November 1984. The measurements were made on the equator at 13950?W during a period when the equatorial undercurrent ...

John M. Toole; Hartmut Peters; Michael C. Gregg

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH b¯b channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

Fermilab

262

Design and Performance of a Horizontal Mooring for Upper-Ocean Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and performance of a two-dimensional moored array for sampling horizontal variability in the upper ocean. The mooring was deployed in Massachusetts Bay in a water depth of 84 m for the purpose of measuring the ...

Mark Grosenbaugh; Steven Anderson; Richard Trask; Jason Gobat; Walter Paul; Bradford Butman; Robert Weller

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Changes in the CFC Inventories and Formation Rates of Upper Labrador Sea Water, 19972001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbon (component CFC-11) and hydrographic data from 1997, 1999, and 2001 are presented to track the large-scale spreading of the Upper Labrador Sea Water (ULSW) in the subpolar gyre of the North Atlantic Ocean. ULSW is CFC rich and ...

Dagmar Kieke; Monika Rhein; Lothar Stramma; William M. Smethie; Deborah A. LeBel; Walter Zenk

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

An Attempt to Estimate the Thermal Resistance of the Upper Ocean to Climatic Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to estimate the thermal inertia of the upper ocean, relevant to climatic change. This is done by assuming that the annual variation in sea surface temperature (SST) can, to a first-order approximation, be described by a simple ...

H. M. Van Den Dool; J. D. Horel

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Mouse and touchscreen selection in the upper and lower visual fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neuroanatomical evidence indicates the human eye's visual field can be functionally divided into two vertical hemifields, each specialized for specific functions. The upper visual field (UVF) is specialized to support perceptual tasks in the distance, ... Keywords: Fitts Law, interactive displays, mice, pointing, touchscreens, visual fields

Barry A. Po; Brian D. Fisher; Kellogg S. Booth

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Airflow structures and nano-particle deposition in a human upper airway model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering a human upper airway model, or equivalently complex internal flow conduits, the transport and deposition of nano-particles in the 1-150 nm diameter range are simulated and analyzed for cyclic and steady flow conditions. Specifically, using ... Keywords: computational fluid-particle dynamics simulation, human airways, inspiratory flow, nano-size particle deposition

Z. Zhang; C. Kleinstreuer

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

A Diagnosis of Unbalanced Flow in Upper Levels during the AYE-SESAME I Period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terms of the balance equation were calculated at 300 mb to diagnose unbalanced flow in the upper troposphere both prior to and during a period of strong convection which took place during the AVE-SESAME I period. The sum of the balance equation ...

James T. Moore; William A. Abeling

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil L, Brazil d Université de Provence, Aix Marseille 1, France e Departamento de Geografia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Três Lagoas, Brazil f Laboratoire de Géomophologie Appliquée, Université de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

269

Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 3 Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological 1:'_i 'I I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green email: mgani@uno.edu t",. The Green River Formation comprises the world's largest deposit of oil-shale characterization of these lacustrine oil-shale deposits in the subsurface is lacking. This study analyzed ~300 m

Gani, M. Royhan

270

About the Upper Bound of the Chiral Index of Multivariate Distributions  

SciTech Connect

A family of distributions in R{sup d} having a chiral index greater or equal to a constant arbitrarily close to 1/2 is exhibited. It is deduced that the upper bound of the chiral index lies in the interval [1/2; 1], for any dimension d.

Petitjean, Michel [DSV/iBiTec-S/SB2SM (CNRS URA 2096), CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

271

Upper Ocean Heat Budget During the Hawaii-to-Tahiti Shuttle Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat flux, CTD and current profile data from the Hawaii-to- Tahiti Shuttle Experiment are used to study the upper ocean heat budget in order to better understand the seasonal evolution of sea surface temperature (SST) in the central tropical ...

James W. Stevenson; Pearn P. Niiler

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Observed Coherent Trends of Surface and Upper-Air Wind Speed over China since 1960  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies indicated that surface wind speed over China declined during past decades, and several explanations exist in the literature. This study presents long-term (19602009) changes of both surface and upper-air wind speeds over China ...

Changgui Lin; Kun Yang; Jun Qin; Rong Fu

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

FY 2007 Progress Report for Upper Columbia United Tribes' Regional Coordination.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of activities conducted over the fiscal year 2007 contract period to fulfill requirements to coordinate Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) interests within the Columbia River Basin. This coordination was specific to the implementation of portions of the Integrated Fish and Wildlife Program within the purview of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and Bonneville Power Administration.

Michel, D.R.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Shear wave splitting in SE Brazil: an eect of active or fossil upper mantle ow, or both?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shear wave splitting in SE Brazil: an e¡ect of active or fossil upper mantle £ow, or both?§ Maggy, Brazil c Universidade de SaBrazil Received 26 the structure of the upper mantle beneath southeastern Brazil using teleseismic shear wave splitting

Barruol, Guilhem

275

Essays on the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois Waterway and U.S. grain market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines several issues regarding the congestion on the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois Waterway. Chapter II identifies and measures the impact of lock congestion on grain barge rates on these waterways. Results indicate grain barge rates on both rivers are not affected by lagged lock congestion. In present time, however, lock congestion in the lower reaches of the upper Mississippi and Illinois Rivers are found to increase barge rates that link the north central United States to the lower Mississippi Gulf port area. The findings suggest the impact of lock congestion on grain barge rates is moderate. Chapter III explores the interaction between grain prices in export and domestic markets and transportation rates linking these markets over time. Three model frameworks were evaluated and some consistent results are observed. In general, shocks in transportation rates (barge, rail, and ocean) explain a great proportion of the variation in corn and soybean market prices in the long run, suggesting the importance of transportation in grain price determination. The volatile ocean freight rates are the mostimportant transportation rates contributing to the variation in grain prices, while shocks in barge rates on the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois Waterway generally explain less than 15 percent of the variation in grain prices. The dynamic interrelationships among the six evaluated transportation rates are also found. In addition, the north central corn markets likely have the most influence over other markets while soybean export price dominates the soybean market in the long run. Chapter IV estimates the structural demand for grain barge transportation on both the upper Mississippi and Illinois Rivers. Results suggest foreign grain demand is the most influential force affecting grain barge demand on both rivers. Also, results indicate an inelastic demand for grain barge transportation on the Upper Mississippi in the short run; demand is price elastic in the long run. The price elasticity for grain barge demand on the Illinois River is consistently inelastic. Additionally, the winter season and floods affect demand on the Upper Mississippi negatively, while barge demand increases on the Illinois River in winter.

Yu, Tun-Hsiang

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Multiple-choice Assessment for Upper-division Electricity and Magnetism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Colorado Upper-division Electrostatics (CUE) diagnostic was designed as an open-ended assessment in order to capture elements of student reasoning in upper-division electrostatics. The diagnostic has been given for many semesters at several universities resulting in an extensive database of CUE responses. To increase the utility and scalability of the assessment, we used this database along with research on students' difficulties to create a multiple-choice version. The new version explores the viability of a novel test format where students select multiple responses and can receive partial credit based on the accuracy and consistency of their selections. This format was selected with the goal of preserving insights afforded by the open-ended format while exploiting the logistical advantages of a multiple-choice assessment. Here, we present examples of the questions and scoring of the multiple-choice CUE as well as initial analysis of the test's validity, item difficulty, discrimination, and overall consi...

Wilcox, Bethany R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Effects of a potential fourth fermion generation on the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effect of a potential fourth fermion generation on the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds. This investigation is based on the numerical evaluation of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same Higgs-fermion coupling structure as in the Higgs sector of the electroweak Standard Model. In particular, the considered model obeys a Ginsparg-Wilson version of the underlying ${SU}(2)_L\\times {U}(1)_Y$ symmetry, being a global symmetry here due to the neglection of gauge fields in this model. We present our results on the modification of the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds induced by the presence of a hypothetical very heavy fourth quark doublet. Finally, we compare these findings to the standard scenario of three fermion generations.

Philipp Gerhold; Karl Jansen; Jim Kallarackal

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

278

Naturalness lowers the upper bound on the lightest Higgs boson mass in supersymmetry  

SciTech Connect

We quantify the extent to which naturalness is lost as experimental lower bounds on the Higgs boson mass increase, and we compute the natural upper bound on the lightest supersymmetric Higgs boson mass. We find that it would be unnatural for the mass of the lightest supersymmetric Higgs boson to saturate its maximal upper bound. In the absence of significant fine-tuning, the lightest Higgs boson mass should lie below 120 GeV, and in the most natural cases it should be lighter than 108 GeV. For modest tan{beta}, these bounds are significantly lower. Our results imply that a failure to observe a light Higgs boson in experiments previous to the CERN LHC becoming operational could provide a serious challenge to the principal motivation for weak-scale supersymmetry. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Anderson, G.W. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Castano, D.J. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); Riotto, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

ACER: An Analytic Framework for Students' Use of Mathematics in Upper-Division Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many students in upper-division physics courses struggle with the mathematically sophisticated tools and techniques that are required for advanced physics content. We have developed an analytical framework to assist instructors and researchers in characterizing students' difficulties with specific mathematical tools when solving the long and complex problems that are characteristic of upper-division. In this paper, we present this framework, including its motivation and development. We also describe an application of the framework to investigations of student difficulties with direct integration in electricity and magnetism (i.e., Coulomb's Law) and approximation methods in classical mechanics (i.e., Taylor series). These investigations provide examples of the types of difficulties encountered by advanced physics students, as well as the utility of the framework for both researchers and instructors.

Wilcox, Bethany R; Rehn, Daniel A; Pollock, Steven J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Naturalness Lowers the Upper Bound on the Lightest Higgs boson Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We quantify the extent to which naturalness is lost as experimental lower bounds on the Higgs boson mass increase, and we compute the natural upper bound on the lightest supersymmetric Higgs boson mass. We find that it would be unnatural for the mass of the lightest supersymmetric Higgs boson to saturate its maximal upper bound. In the absence of significant fine-tuning, the lightest Higgs boson mass should lie below 120 GeV, and in the most natural cases it should be lighter than 108 GeV. For modest tan ?, these bounds are significantly lower. Our results imply that a failure to observe a light Higgs boson in pre-LHC experiments could provide a serious challenge to the principal motivation for weak-scale supersymmetry. 1

In Supersymmetry; Greg W. Anderson; Diego J. Castao; Antonio Riotto

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Upper limit on spontaneous supercurrents in Sr2RuO4  

SciTech Connect

It is widely believed that the perovskite Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is an unconventional superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. It has been predicted that superconductors with broken time reversal symmetry should have spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls. We have done careful imaging of the magnetic fields above Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystals using scanning Hall bar and SQUID microscopies, and see no evidence for such spontaneously generated supercurrents. We use the results from our magnetic imaging to place upper limits on the spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls as a function of domain size. For a single domain, this upper limit is below the predicted signal by two orders of magnitude. We speculate on the causes and implications of the lack of large spontaneous supercurrents in this very interesting superconducting system.

Chung, Suk Bum

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

282

Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500' deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400' encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The

283

Stratigraphy and depositional environment of upper Cambrian Red Lion Formation, southwestern Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Red Lion Formation was examined along a northwest-southeast transect from Missoula to Bozeman, Montana. Lateral equivalents are the Snowy Range Formation east of Bozeman and the upper Fishtrap Dolomite in northwest Montana. The basal Dry Creek Member (0-5 m) consists of shale interbedded with quartz siltstones and sandstones. The overlying Sage Member, up to 115 meters in thickness, is characterized by ribbon carbonate beds containing lime mudstone and quartzose calcisiltite couplets arranged in fining-upward sequences 1-5 cm thick. Couplets are interlayered in places with thin (1-5 cm) to medium bedded (6-70 cm) units of laminated and non-laminated calcareous siltstones, flat-pebble conglomerates, trilobite packstones, cryptalgal boundstones, bioturbated lime mudstones and shales. In places, the upper Sage contains columnar and domal algal features. The Red Lion Formation is considered to be one Grand Cycle with the Dry Creek representing a lower inner detrital half-cycle and the Sage an upper carbonate half-cycle. The Dry Creek formed as the result of a westward clastic pulse from the inner detrital belt across an intrashelf basin onto outer middle carbonate peritidal complexes of the underlying Pilgrim Formation. Lower Sage ribbon rocks were deposited in storm-crossed, below wave-base areas. During deposition of the upper Sage, shallowing formed discontinuous algal-peritidal complexes over much of western and central Montana. These complexes were less extensive than earlier Cambrian buildups owing to slower rates of basin subsidence and clastic input suppressing carbonate production.

Hayden, L.L.; Bush, J.H.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

D Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D? Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production from the D?) Searches for standard model Higgs boson production in p¯p collisions at s = 1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (mH) in the range 100 mH 200 GeV/c2 . The contributing production processes include

Quigg, Chris

285

Materials Reliability Program: Utility Preparation for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Vessel Upper Head Penetrations (MRP-360)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide nuclear power plant owners with recommendations for planning and executing reactor vessel upper head (RVUH) penetration examinations in a manner that will minimize the occurrence of human errors while maximizing the probability of success. RVUH penetrations include control rod drive mechanism, control element drive mechanism, in-core instrumentation, and vent line penetrations. These encompass the standard nomenclatures for domestic utilities but might not ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Confirmatory Survey Results for the Reactor Building Dome Upper Surfaces, Rancho Saco Nuclear Generating Station  

SciTech Connect

Results from a confirmatory survey of the upper structural surfaces of the Reactor Building Dome at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station (RSNGS) performed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the NRC. Also includes results of interlaboratory comparison analyses on several archived soil samples that would be provided by RSNGS personnel. The confirmatory surveys were performed on June 7 and 8, 2006.

Wade C. Adams

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

287

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

Variable neighborhood search for extremal graphs. 22. Extending bounds for independence to upper irredundance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of vertices S in a graph G is independent if no neighbor of a vertex of S belongs to S. A set of vertices U in a graph G is irredundant if each vertex v of U has a private neighbor, which may be v itself, i.e., a neighbor of v which is not a neighbor ... Keywords: AGX, Extremal graph, Invariant, Upper irredundance

Mustapha Aouchiche; Odile Favaron; Pierre Hansen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Model Independent Upper Bound on the Lightest Higgs Boson Mass in Supersymmetric Standard Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main features of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is the existence of an absolute tree-level upper bound $m_h$ on the mass of the $CP=+1$ lightest Higgs boson, equal to $m_Z$, that could affect detectability at future colliders. The above bound is spoiled by {\\bf radiative corrections} and by an {\\bf enlarged Higgs sector}, as {\\em e.g.} a gauge singlet. Radiative corrections in the MSSM can push the upper bound up to $115\\ GeV$ for $m_t \\simlt 150\\ GeV$. The presence of an enlarged Higgs sector changes the previous upper bound to one depending on the electroweak scale, $\\tan \\beta$ and the gauge and Yukawa couplings of the theory. When radiative corrections are included, the allowed region in the $(m_h,m_t)$ plane depends on the scale $\\Lambda$ below which the theory remains perturbative. In particular, for models with arbitrary Higgs sectors and couplings saturating the scale $\\Lambda=10^{16}\\ GeV$ we find $m_h \\simlt 155\\ GeV$ and $m_t \\simlt 190\\ GeV$.

Mariano Quiros

1993-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

290

An investigation of the processes controlling ozone in the upper stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photolysis of vibrationally excited oxygen produced by ultraviolet photolysis of ozone in the upper stratosphere is incorporated into the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2-D zonally averaged chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere. The importance of this potential contributor of odd oxygen to the concentration of ozone is evaluated based upon recent information on vibrational distributions of excited oxygen and upon preliminary studies of energy transfer from the excited oxygen. When the energy transfer rate constants of previous work are assumed, increases in model ozone concentrations of up to 40 percent in the upper stratosphere are found, and the ozone concentrations of the model agree with measurements, including data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. However, the increase is about 0.4 percent when the larger energy transfer rate constants suggested by more recent experimental work are applied in the model. This indicates the importance of obtaining detailed information on vibrationally excited oxygen properties, particularly the state-specific energy transfer rate constants, to evaluation of tills precess for stratospheric modeling.

Patten, K.O. Jr.; Connell, P.S.; Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Waters, J.; Froidevaux, L. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); Slanger, T.G. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Confidence Intervals of a Climatic Signal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to interpret climate statistics correctly, the definitions of climate change, signal-to-noise ratio and statistical significance are clarified.

Yoshikazu Hayashi

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Gaining Confidence in Distributed Systems Gleb Naumovich,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Massachusetts 01003 (413) 545­2013 fnaumovicjclarkejljog@cs.umass.edu Matthew B. Dwyer Kansas State University, to help pinpoint the cau

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

294

2012 BNL Water Quality Consumer Confidence Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

because it comes from one of the two drinking- water wells that produces water naturally low in iron water is produced with pride by the staff of BNL's Water Treatment Facility (WTF) of the Energy & Utilities Division. Producing BNL's finished water are five water- treatment engineers, each having NYSDOH

Ohta, Shigemi

295

RECIPE : REGression Confidence Intervals for PErcentiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... PDF (Portable Document Format) and requires Adobe Acrobat to be loaded to allow ... is recommended that you install the reader as a plug-in rather ...

296

Combined CDF and D0 upper limits on $gg\\to H\\to W^+W^-$ and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and gg {yields} H {yields} ZZ in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. With 8.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 8.1 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.01 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.40 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.47 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 124 and 286 GeV.

Benjamin, Doug; /Tufts U.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Real-time upper-ocean temperature observations from aircraft during operational hurricane reconnaissance missions: AXBT Demonstration Project year one results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thousands of aircraft observations of upper-ocean thermal structure have been obtained during hurricane and typhoon research field experiments in recent decades. The results from these experiments suggest a strong correlation between upper-ocean ...

Elizabeth R. Sanabia; Bradford S. Barrett; Peter G. Black; Sue Chen; James A. Cummings

298

The Relationships between Climatic and Hydrological Changes in the Upper Mississippi River Basin: A SWAT and Multi-GCM Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in major climatic and hydrological quantities in the upper Mississippi River basin and their interrelationships are studied with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool being driven by the contemporary climate and future scenario simulations ...

Er Lu; Eugene S. Takle; Jha Manoj

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Dynamics and Geometry of Extratropical Cyclones in the Upper Troposphere by a Neighbor Enclosed Area Tracking Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study shows that the morphological characteristics of upper-tropospheric extratropical eddies are closely related to the background flow in the Northern Hemisphere winter. Enclosed surfaces of 300-hPa relative vorticity are identified by ...

Masaru Inatsu; Shotaro Amada

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A Report on the Upper-Level Wind Conditions Preceding and During the Shuttle Challenger (STS 51L) Explosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The synoptic-scale weather conditions preceding and following the ill-fated Space Shuttle Challenger launch are documented, with particular emphasis on the upper-level winds for central and northern Florida. Operational radiosonde data collected ...

Louis W. Uccellini; Ralph A. Petersen; Daniel Keyser; Paul J. Kocin; Mary des Jardins; Keith F. Brill; Robert Aune

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Estimating Regional Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes above Prairie Cropland from Surface and Upper-Air Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-air budget methods can be used to estimate the surface sensible and latent heat flux densities on a regional scale. This study assesses the application of radiosonde-based budget methods above homogeneous cropland. Serial daytime soundings ...

Alan G. Barr; G. S. Strong

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A One-Dimensional Time-Dependent Model for the Vertical Stratification of the Upper Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional time-dependent model of the upper Arctic Ocean is presented. It describes the circulation above a dynamically passive reservoir of Atlantic water. The model is driven by freshwater runoff from land, ice production and export, ...

Gran Bjrk

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Leading Modes of the Upper-Ocean Temperature Interannual Variability along the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean in NCEP GODAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the authors analyze the physical mechanisms of interannual variability of the upper-ocean temperature anomaly (OTA) in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, using ocean reanalysis from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)...

Zeng-Zhen Hu; Arun Kumar; Bohua Huang; Jieshun Zhu

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

SeaCycler: A Moored Open-Ocean Profiling System for the Upper Ocean in Extended Self-Contained Deployments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper ocean, including the biologically productive euphotic zone and the mixed layer, has great relevance for studies of physical, biogeochemical, and ecosystem processes and their interaction. Observing this layer with a continuous presence, ...

Uwe Send; George Fowler; Greg Siddall; Brian Beanlands; Merle Pittman; Christoph Waldmann; Johannes Karstensen; Richard Lampitt

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Employing Satellite-Derived Sea Ice Concentration to Constrain Upper-Ocean Temperature in a Global Ocean GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of Southern Ocean sea ice simulations in a global ocean general circulation model (GCM) depends decisively on the simulated upper-ocean temperature. This is confirmed by assimilating satellite-derived sea ice concentration to ...

Achim Stssel

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Variations in Supercell Morphology. Part I: Observations of the Role of Upper-Level Storm-Relative Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that the precipitation intensity beneath a supercell updraft is strongly influenced by the amount of hydrometeors that are reingested into the updraft after being transported away in the divergent upper-level flow of the anvil. ...

Erik N. Rasmussen; Jerry M. Straka

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Basinwide Estimate of Vertical Mixing in the Upper Pycnocline: Spreading of Bomb Tritium in the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical diffusivity KV in the upper half-kilometer of the North Pacific subtropical pycnocline is estimated from observations of the spreading rate of anthropogenic tritium. The calculation is based on approximately 300 ocean tritium ...

Dan E. Kelley; Kim A. Van Scoy

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A Simple Ocean Data Assimilation Analysis of the Global Upper Ocean 195095. Part II: Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors explore the accuracy of a comprehensive 46-year retrospective analysis of upper-ocean temperature, salinity, and currents. The Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) analysis is global, spanning the latitude range 62S62N. The SODA ...

James A. Carton; Gennady Chepurin; Xianhe Cao

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Heat and Energy Balances in the Upper Ocean at 50N, 140W during November 1980 (STREX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface temperature data and surface meteorological data are analyzed from thermistor chain moorings deployed near 50N, 140W during the Storm Transfer and Response Experiment (STREX). The upper-ocean heat and potential energy (PE) contents ...

S. D. Paduan; R. A. DeSzoeke

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Dynamics and Geometry of Extratropical Cyclones in the Upper Troposphere by a Neighbor Enclosed Area Tracking Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study shows that the morphological characteristics of upper-tropospheric extratropical eddies are closely related to the background flow in the Northern Hemisphere winter. Enclosed surfaces of 300-hPa relative vorticity are identified by ...

Masaru Inatsu; Shotaro Amada

311

Equatorial Waves in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere Forced by Latent Heating Estimated from TRMM Rain Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equatorial atmospheric waves in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), excited by latent heating, are investigated by using a global spectral model. The latent heating profiles are derived from the 3-hourly Tropical Rainfall ...

Jung-Hee Ryu; M. Joan Alexander; David A. Ortland

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Universality of the Modeled Small-Scale Response of the Upper Tropical Ocean to Squall Wind Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper ocean response to idealized surface wind forcing that is representative of conditions observed during the TOGA-COARE Intensive Observation Period is studied by numerical simulations using a second-moment closure model. A set of ...

R. A. Richardson; G. G. Sutyrin; D. Hebert; L. M. Rothstein

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

MLS and CALIOP cloud ice measurements in the upper troposphere: A constraint from microwave on cloud microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the consistency and microphysics assumptions among satellite ice water content (IWC) retrievals in the upper troposphere with collocated A-Train radiances from MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) and lidar backscatters from CALIOP (...

Dong L. Wu; Alyn Lambert; William G. Read; Patrick Eriksson; Jie Gong

314

A Monthly Upper-Air Dataset for North America Back to 1922 from the Monthly Weather Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-air observations with kites, aircraft, and radiosondes were performed in the United States operationally since the 1890s. In this paper, the authors present a reevaluation of newly digitized monthly mean values from the Monthly Weather ...

Tracy Ewen; Andrea Grant; Stefan Brnnimann

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Zonal gradients in the lower atmosphere and upper ocean across the windward Antilles in mid-summer 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This observational study examines zonal gradients in the lower atmosphere and upper ocean across the windward Antilles in mid-summer of 2012. While earlier work reported on meridional confluence, here the focus is on zonal enrichment of trade ...

Mark R. Jury

316

Velocity and Temperature Structure Functions in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere from High-Resolution Aircraft Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution measurements obtained from NOAA best atmospheric turbulence (BAT) probes mounted on an EGRETT high-altitude research aircraft were used to characterize turbulence in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere at scales from 2 ...

Donald E. Wroblewski; Owen R. Cot; Jorg M. Hacker; Ronald J. Dobosy

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Source and Pathway of the Western Arctic Upper Halocline in a Data-Constrained Coupled Ocean and Sea Ice Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A coupled ocean and sea ice model is used to investigate dense water (DW) formation in the Chukchi and Bering shelves and the pathways by which this water feeds the upper halocline. Two 19922008 data-constrained solutions ...

Nguyen, An T.

318

Upper-Ocean Heat Budget in Response to the MaddenJulian Oscillation in the Western Equatorial Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper-ocean heat budget in response to the atmospheric MaddenJulian oscillation (MJO) in the western equatorial Pacific is examined using a tropical Pacific basin general circulation model. The model is forced with surface fluxes associated ...

Toshiaki Shinoda; Harry H. Hendon

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Response of Upper Clouds in Global Warming Experiments Obtained Using a Global Nonhydrostatic Model with Explicit Cloud Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a global nonhydrostatic model with explicit cloud processes, upper-cloud changes are investigated by comparing the present climate condition under the perpetual July setting and the global warming condition, in which the sea surface ...

Masaki Satoh; Shin-ichi Iga; Hirofumi Tomita; Yoko Tsushima; Akira T. Noda

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Assessing the Performance of Multiple Regional Climate Model Simulations for Seasonal Mountain Snow in the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the performance of the regional climate model (RCM) simulations from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) for the Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB), U.S. Rocky Mountains. The UCRB is a major ...

Nadine Salzmann; Linda O. Mearns

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Seasonal and Interannual Variability in Temperature of the Upper Layer of the Northwest Pacific, 19641983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available BT data in the northwest Pacific were analyzed to reveal seasonal and interannual variability in thermal structure of the upper 400 m layer in the northwest Pacific. Bimonthly temperature averaged over a 2 2 square data in the area ...

Heung-Jae Lie; Masahiro Endoh

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Heat and Buoyancy Budgets and Mixing Rates in the Upper Thermocline of the Indian and Global Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diapycnal and diathermal diffusivity values in the upper thermocline are estimated from buoyancy and heat budgets for water volumes bounded by isopycnals and isotherms, the airsea interface, and coastline where applicable. Comprehensive analysis ...

Huai-Min Zhang; Lynne D. Talley

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Analysis of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Brightness Temperatures from SSM/T2, HIRS, and GMS-5 VISSR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite microwave and infrared instruments sensitive to upper-tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) are compared using both simulated and observed cloud-cleared brightness temperatures (Tbs). To filter out cloudy scenes, a cloud detection algorithm ...

Wesley Berg; John J. Bates; Darren L. Jackson

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A PAN-STARRS + UKIDSS SEARCH FOR YOUNG, WIDE PLANETARY-MASS COMPANIONS IN UPPER SCORPIUS  

SciTech Connect

We have combined optical and NIR photometry from Pan-STARRS 1 and UKIDSS to search the young (5-10 Myr) star-forming region of Upper Scorpius for wide ( Almost-Equal-To 400-4000 AU) substellar companions down to {approx}5 M{sub Jup}. Our search is Almost-Equal-To 4 mag deeper than previous work based on the Two Micron All Sky Survey. We identified several candidates around known stellar members using a combination of color selection and spectral energy distribution fitting. Our follow-up spectroscopy has identified two new companions as well as confirmed two companions previously identified from photometry, with spectral types of M7.5-M9 and masses of {approx}15-60 M{sub Jup}, indicating a frequency for such wide substellar companions of {approx}0.6% {+-} 0.3%. Both USco 1610-1913B and USco 1612-1800B are more luminous than expected for their spectral type compared with known members of Upper Sco. HIP 77900B has an extreme mass ratio (M{sub 2}/M{sub 1} Almost-Equal-To 0.005) and an extreme separation of 3200 AU. USco 1602-2401B also has a very large separation of 1000 AU. We have also confirmed a low-mass stellar companion, USco 1610-2502B (730 AU, M5.5). Our substellar companions appear both non-coeval with their primary stars according to evolutionary models and, as a group, are systematically more luminous than the Upper Sco cluster sequence. One possible reason for these luminosity discrepancies could be different formation processes or accretion histories for these objects.

Aller, Kimberly M.; Kraus, Adam L.; Liu, Michael C.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugene A. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Price, Paul A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

CHANGES IN SANDSTONE DISTRIBUTIONS BETWEEN THE UPPER, MIDDLE, AND LOWER FAN IN THE ARKANSAS JACKFORK GROUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is a statistical analysis of the sandstone distribution within the Arkansas Jackfork Group which is a passive margin fan complex. Passive margin fan systems are typically associated with long fluvial transport, fed by deltas, wide shelf, efficient basin transport, that result in a bypassing system. Passive margin fans are generally fine-grained, mud rich, and well sorted. These fans can be separated into three units (upper, middle, and lower fan) based on their location within the fan and how the sediments are deposited. Five outcrops from the Arkansas Jackfork Group have been chosen for this study and each were divided into different facies dependent on sandstone percentages in certain bed sets. The amount of sandstone for each facies was calculated and a statistical approximation for each outcrop was determined. Sandstone distribution curves were made for each outcrop to show a graphic representation of how the sandstone is dispersed. After analyzing different upper, middle, and lower fan outcrops, it is clear there is an obvious change in the sandstone percentage and distribution. The upper fan deposit has an overall sandstone percentage of approximately 77.5% and is deposited in beds that are mainly amalgamated; 10-30m thick. Sandstone is deposited moderately even and is quite concentrated throughout the exposure. The middle fan outcrops contain approximately 72.6% sandstone and show similar patterns, except that the amalgamated sandstone beds are not as thick, 5-15m and contain more shale in between layers. As expected the lower fan outcrop is completely different in both sandstone percentage and distribution. The lower fan has approximately 65.4% sandstone. The distribution of sandstone is more concentrated in each of the individual units, or systems, but the overall complex has two systems separated by a massive marine shale bed, 33.5 m, that contains virtually no sand.

Mack, Clayton P.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Upper Trimble Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Upper Trimble property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in March 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Upper Trimble Project provides a total of 250.67 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Wet meadow provides 136.92 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Mixed forest habitat provides 111.88 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 1.87 HUs for yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Upper Trimble Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations-- -2010 Update (MRP-234)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Issues Task Group (ITG) to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head penetrations. This new qualification program is being implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for the upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably throughout th...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations - - 2012 Update (MRP-311, Revision 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Technical Advisory Committee to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head (RPVUH) penetrations. This qualification program is being implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

329

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations 2 011 Update (MRP-311)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head penetrations (RPVUHs). This new qualification program was implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably th...

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Geothermal resources: Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast. Geological circular 76-3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major sand trends were identified in the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast as part of the evaluation of its potential for producing geothermal energy. Electrical logs from 465 wells spaced 5 to 10 miles apart were used in the study. Maps illustrating total net sand and total sand percentage of the Frio Formation are included. It was found that subsurface fluid temperatures of greater than 250/sup 0/F occur in the Frio sand bodies up to 100 ft thick downdip of the high-sand trends. LA broad band in Brazoria and Galveston Counties was delineated as having geothermal potential. (JGB)

Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Bosch, S.C.; Dorfman, M.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Experimental study of upper sd shell nuclei and evolution of sd-fp shell gap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intruder orbitals from the fp shell play important role in the structure of nuclei around the line of stability in the upper sd shell. Experimentally we have studied {sup 35}Cl, {sup 30}P, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 37}Ar and {sup 34}Cl in this mass region using the INGA setup. Large basis cross-shell shell model calculations have indicated the need for change of the sd-fp energy gap for reliable reproduction of negative parity and high spin positive parity states. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. Theoretical interpretation of these states has been discussed.

Sarkar, M. Saha [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata - 700064 (India)

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

332

Advanced Cutset Upper Bound Estimator(TM) (ACUBE), Version 1.0, Test Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Cutset Upper Bound Estimator (ACUBE) (EPRI product 1022992) is used to calculate the probability or frequency of a Boolean function that is expressed by minimal cut sets. Minimal cutsets are typically developed from a fault tree model, and they can be manipulated by a number of tools such as the EPRI CAFTA software. This report documents the testing of ACUBE, Version 1.0. The objective of the testing is to verify the correctness of the internal calculations and the associated reporting of th...

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

333

Agricultural implications of reduced water supplies in the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of the energy sector in the energy-rich but water-restricted Western US has presented a potential conflict with the irrigated agricultural sector. This study measures the direct impacts on farm income and employment resulting from the transfer of water from agriculture to energy in two specific geographical areas - the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins. We used a linear programming model to evaluate the impacts of reduced water supplies. Through the use of regional multipliers, we expanded our analysis to include regional impacts. Volume I provides the major analysis of these impacts. Volume II provides further technical data.

Lansford, R. R.; Roach, F.; Gollehon, N. R.; Creel, B. J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Upper limits to fusion rates of isotopic hydrogen molecules in Pd  

SciTech Connect

We have calculated upper bounds for {ital p}-{ital d} and {ital d}-{ital d} fusion rates at octahedral and tetrahedral sites in saturated PdH. Our molecular potentials include Thomas-Fermi screening for two centers and realistic Pd crystal potentials. Accurate numerical techniques were used to solve for radial wave functions down to {ital r}=0. From these wave functions we find rates that are considerably enhanced over those for the free molecules, but 10--20 orders of magnitude lower than the claims of early experiments.

Alberg, M.A. (Department of Physics, Seattle University, Seattle, Washington 98122 (USA) Department of Physics, Institute for Nuclear Theory, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA)); Wilets, L. (Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA) Institute for Nuclear Theory, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA)); Rehr, J.J.; Mustre de Leon, J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Freshwater oligochaeta in mining subsidence ponds in the Upper Silesia region of southern Poland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I surveyed the benthic oligochaetes in three coal mining subsidence ponds in a heavily industrialized region of Upper Silesia, southern Poland. The fauna present differed in many respects from that living in natural and unpolluted water bodies. Nineteen species (11 Naididae and eight Tubificidae) were found. The two most consistently abundant species in all three ponds were Limnodrilus hoffimeisteri and Tubifex tubifex, both of which are ubiquitous and common in Poland. Polamothrix bavaricus, which is considered a rare species in Poland, was found consistently in the ponds.

Krodkiewska, M. [Silesian University, Katowice (Poland). Dept. of Hydrobiology

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Upper limits on the strength of periodic gravitational waves from PSR J1939+2134  

SciTech Connect

The first science run of the LIGO and GEO gravitational wave detectors presented the opportunity to test methods of searching for gravitational waves from known pulsars. Here we present new direct upper limits on the strength of waves from the pulsar PSR J1939+2134 using two independent analysis methods, one in the frequency domain using frequentist statistics and one in the time domain using Bayesian inference. Both methods show that the strain amplitude at Earth from this pulsar is less than a few times 10{sup -22}.

B. Allen et al.

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

337

Improving Earthquake-Explosion Discrimination using Attenuation Models of the Crust and Upper Mantle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past year, we have made significant progress on developing and calibrating methodologies to improve earthquake-explosion discrimination using high-frequency regional P/S amplitude ratios. Closely-spaced earthquakes and explosions generally discriminate easily using this method, as demonstrated by recordings of explosions from test sites around the world. In relatively simple geophysical regions such as the continental parts of the Yellow Sea and Korean Peninsula (YSKP) we have successfully used a 1-D Magnitude and Distance Amplitude Correction methodology (1-D MDAC) to extend the regional P/S technique over large areas. However in tectonically complex regions such as the Middle East, or the mixed oceanic-continental paths for the YSKP the lateral variations in amplitudes are not well predicted by 1-D corrections and 1-D MDAC P/S discrimination over broad areas can perform poorly. We have developed a new technique to map 2-D attenuation structure in the crust and upper mantle. We retain the MDAC source model and geometrical spreading formulation and use the amplitudes of the four primary regional phases (Pn, Pg, Sn, Lg), to develop a simultaneous multi-phase approach to determine the P-wave and S-wave attenuation of the lithosphere. The methodology allows solving for attenuation structure in different depth layers. Here we show results for the P and S-wave attenuation in crust and upper mantle layers. When applied to the Middle East, we find variations in the attenuation quality factor Q that are consistent with the complex tectonics of the region. For example, provinces along the tectonically-active Tethys collision zone (e.g. Turkish Plateau, Zagros) have high attenuation in both the crust and upper mantle, while the stable outlying regions like the Indian Shield generally have low attenuation. In the Arabian Shield, however, we find that the low attenuation in this Precambrian crust is underlain by a high-attenuation upper mantle similar to the nearby Red Sea Rift. Applying this 2-D MDAC methodology with the new attenuation models can significantly improve earthquake-explosion discrimination using regional P/S amplitude ratios. We demonstrate applications of this technique, including a study at station NIL (Nilore, Pakistan) using broad area earthquakes and the 1998 Indian nuclear explosion using a number of regional amplitude ratio discriminants. We are currently applying the technique in the YSKP region as well.

Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R; Matzel, E M; Rodgers, A J; Ford, S R; Gok, R; Sweeney, J J

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

338

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest As part of a Cooperative Agreement with DOE-NETL, the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing advanced sampling and analysis methodologies for particulate matter that can be used for source apportionment and to assist in health studies. These techniques will be used to determine sources of fine particulate matter in rural states such as North Dakota. Ambient particulate matter (PM) sampling and automated scanning electron microscopy, (ASEM) are being used to characterize and evaluate the sources of PM2.5 at three rural sites. Land use in the sampling site locations is dominated by ranching and small grain farming. Potential sources of PM in these areas include diesel- and gasoline-fueled motor vehicles, fugitive dust from gravel roads and agriculture, vegetation and fires, an oil refinery, and coal-fired power plants. PM2.5 samples were collected using an automatic cartridge collection unit for ASEM analysis. An ASEM method has been developed to size and chemically classify individual particles composing PM2.5.

339

New brown dwarfs in Upper Sco using UKIDSS Galactic Cluster Survey science verification data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present first results from a deep (J = 18.7), wide-field (6.5 square degrees) infrared (ZYJHK) survey in the Upper Sco association conducted within the science verification phase of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey Galactic Cluster Survey (GCS). Cluster members define a sequence well separated from field stars in the (Z-J,Z) colour-magnitude diagram. We have selected a total of 164 candidates with J = 10.5-18.7 mag from the (Z-J,Z) and (Y-J,Y) diagrams. We further investigated the location of those candidates in the other colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams to weed out contaminants. The cross-correlation of the GCS catalogue with the 2MASS database confirms the membership of 116 photometric candidates down to 20 Jupiter masses as they lie within a 2 sigma circle centred on the association mean motion. The final list of cluster members contains 129 sources with masses between 0.3 and 0.007 Msun. We extracted a dozen new low-mass brown dwarfs below 20 Mjup, the limit of previous surveys in the region. Finally, we have derived the mass function in Upper Sco over the 0.3-0.01 Msun mass range, best fit by a single segment with a slope of index alpha = 0.6+/-0.1, in agreement with previous determination in open clusters.

N. Lodieu; N. C. Hambly; R. F. Jameson; S. T. Hodgkin; G. Carraro; T. R. Kendall

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

340

Salinity and hydrodynamics of the Holocene and upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands from electrical measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual hydrodynamic model in the Holocene and upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands is described in terms of safety distributions. Porewater safety is calculated from electrical measurements, including resistivity soundings, electric logs, and electromagnetic profiling. Electrical measurements support the primary, basin-wide groundwater flow model; however, the data also indicate secondary contributions from expulsion of fluids under geopressure along active growth faults and from original waters of deposition. Expulsion of water from growth faults has been described previously for deeper sections of the Pleistocene, but has not been reported for the Holocene or upper Pleistocene beneath the Louisiana wetlands. Porewater chemistry variations beneath the coastal wetlands are a consequence of the following (in order of importance): (1) environment of deposition; (2) a basin-wide, regional flow system; (3) expulsion from deep-seated growth faults; and (4) pore water extrusion due to compaction. Water chemistry in Holocene clays and muds is influenced primarily by the deposition environment In Pleistocene sands, the chemistry is a function of the other three factors.

McGinnis, L.D.; Thompson, M.D.; Kuecher, G.J.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Isaacson, H.R. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SouOhern Hiecr OlfNucl Company, Inc. Office of Nuclear Reactor RegulationAVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

Vogtfe Ebectrdc; Generating Rant

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Upper bound on parity-violating neutron spin rotation in {sup 4}He  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report an upper bound on parity-violating neutron spin rotation in {sup 4}He. This experiment is the most sensitive search for neutron-weak optical activity yet performed and represents a significant advance in precision in comparison to past measurements in heavy nuclei. The experiment was performed at the NG-6 slow-neutron beamline at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research. Our result for the neutron spin rotation angle per unit length in {sup 4}He is d{phi}/dz=[+1.7{+-}9.1(stat.){+-}1.4(sys.)]x10{sup -7} rad/m. The statistical uncertainty is smaller than current estimates of the range of possible values of d{phi}/dz in n+{sup 4}He.

Snow, W. M.; Luo, D.; Walbridge, S. B. [Indiana University/CEEM, 2401 Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Bass, C. D.; Bass, T. D.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Crawford, B. E. [Gettysburg College, 300 North Washington Street, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325 (United States); Gan, K.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Opper, A. K. [The George Washington University, 725 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Heckel, B. R.; Swanson, H. E. [University of Washington/CENPA, Box 354290, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Markoff, D. M. [North Carolina Central University/TUNL, 1801 Fayetteville Street, Durham, North Carolina 27707 (United States); Sarsour, M. [Georgia State University, 29 Peachtree Center Avenue, Atlanta, Georgia 30303-4106 (United States); Sharapov, E. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Zhumabekova, V. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Al-Farabi Ave. 71, 050038 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity soundings in the Upper Raft River Valley and in parts of the Raft River Valley. These soundings complement the seventy-nine soundings made previously in the Raft River Valley (Zohdy and others, 1975) and bring the total number of soundings to 149. This work was done as part of a hydrogeologic study of the area. The location, number, and azimuth of all 149 Schlumberger sounding stations are presented. The location of the new stations is shown with solid circles, whereas the location of the previous stations is shown with open circles. The new stations are numbered from 201 to 270. The data and interpretation of the new soundings are presented.

Zohdy, A.A.R.; Bisdorf, R.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Steamflooding in a waterdrive reservoir; Upper Tulare sands, South Belridge field  

SciTech Connect

A steamflood project in the strong edgewater-drive Upper Tulare reservoir at South Belridge recovered about 31% of the original oil in place (OOIP) at a cumulative steam/oil ratio (SOR) of 2.7 vol/vol. Seven years of downdip steam injection depressed water influx and created an oil bank updip from the injectors. Response continued under the influence of returning aquifer water and heat scavenging after the injectors were shut down. Numerical reservoir simulation of the historical steamflood performance indicate that the high production/injection capacity (P/I) ratio induced early water encroachment and partial quenching of the growing steam zone. Restarting downdip steam injection at much higher rates after 6 years without injection is shown to recover more oil than continuing the steamflood with either a seven-spot or inverted nine-spot pattern.

Dietrich, J.K. (Dietrich Corp., Durango, CO (US))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Simulating the Upper Barren Zone and the Ore Zone tests performed with the EMC logging tool  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the Multispectral Nuclear Logging project is to assess the effectiveness of applying nuclear borehole-logging techniques to the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) program, adapt the technology to improve these capabilities, and transfer that technology to industry. The purpose of the Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP is to predict the minimum concentration levels for environmental contaminants that could be detected by Multispectral Logging (MSL). The Monte Carlo code used for this type of simulation, MCNP, should be benchmarked against experimental data to show that the user can accurately reproduce the proper gamma-ray spectrum. Experimental data was obtained from Westinghouse-Hanford Company using the Environmental Measurements Corp. (EMC) logging tool in the Upper Barren Zone (UBZ) and Ore Zone (OZ) calibration models at Grand Junction. This paper continues the discussion of benchmarking MCNP using the UBZ and OZ data.

Frankle, S.C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Thermal properties of an upper tidal flat sediment on the Texas Gulf Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased land use change near fragile ecosystems can affect the ecosystem energy balance leading to increased global warming. One component of surface energy balance is soil storage heat flux. In past work, a complex thermal behavior was noticed in the shrink-swell sediment of the upper Nueces Delta (upper Rincon) during summer months as it dried. Soil storage heat flux was found to first increase, then decrease, as the soil dried. It was suggested that the complex behavior was due to the relationship between thermal diffusivity and soil moisture, where thermal diffusivity increases to a local maximum before decreasing with respect to decreasing soil moisture. This study explores the observed phenomenon in a controlled laboratory environment by relating the sediment shrinkage curve to changing heat transfer properties. Due to the complicated nature of the drying-shrinking sediment, it was necessary to measure the sediment shrinkage curve and heat transfer properties in separate experiments. The shrinkage curve was found by correlating measured sample volume with gravimetric moisture content. Heat transfer properties were found using a single needle heat pulse probe. A normalized gravimetric moisture content was used as a common variable to relate the shrinkage curve and heat transfer data. Data suggests that the shrink-swell Rincon sediment portrays different behavior in drying than that which occurs for a non-shrink-swell soil. For the shrink-swell Rincon sediment, thermal conductivity is seen to increase with decreasing moisture, the suggested mechanism being increased surface area contact between particles as the shrinking sediment dries.

Cramer, Nicholas C.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Upper Campanian and lower Maestrichtian depositional systems and gas production, southern Sacramento basin, California  

SciTech Connect

Upper Campanian and lower Maestrichtian strata of the southern Sacramento basin include four west- and southwest-prograding submarine-fan/slope/delta systems. The Winters, Lathrop, Tracy, and Blewett formations consist of submarine-fan and related slope/basin-plain deposits that were fed by various deltaic complexes of the Starkey Formation. Four major basinwide transgressive shale units (Sacramento Shale, Sawtooth Shale, Ragged Valley Shale, and H and T Shale) help intrasystem correlations. The Winters, Tracy, and Blewett fans are small, radial, coalescing sand-rich systems that contain the following principal facies: (1) sandstone-filled inner fan channel deposits, (2) mudstone-dominated inner fan interchannel deposits, (3) middle-fan amalgamated suprafan-type sandstone-rich channel deposits, and (4) mudstone-dominated outer fan deposits. The Lathrop fans are larger, elongate, mixed-sediment systems that contain basin-plain, outer fan lobe, middle fan-channel, levee, interchannel, and inner fan channel facies. The Sierran-derived fluvio-deltaic Starkey Formation can be divided into six sand-rich deltaic cycles that can be subdivided on the basis of log signaturres and spatial distribution into prodelta, delta-front, lower delta-plain, and upper delta-plain/fluvial facies. More than 50 gas fields produce from these systems. Stratigraphic traps include updip pinchouts of submarine canyon/gullies and inner fan channels into slope shale, especially in the many overlapping and coalescing sand-rich systems. Lateral pinchouts of outer fan lobes and middle-fan suprafan-type bodies are also productive. Structural traps generally characterize production from deltaic deposits because of the more continuous nature of these bodies.

Moore, D.W.; Nilsen, T.H. (Applied Earth Technology, Inc., Redwood City, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Summary and evaluation of hydraulic property data available for the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system. For the past 40 years, hydrologic testing of the upper basalt confined aquifer has been conducted by a number of Hanford Site programs. Hydraulic property estimates are important for evaluating aquifer flow characteristics (i.e., ground-water flow patterns, flow velocity, transport travel time). Presented are the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydraulic properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). Available hydrologic test data were reevaluated using recently developed diagnostic test analysis methods. A comparison of calculated transmissivity estimates indicates that, for most test results, a general correspondence within a factor of two between reanalysis and previously reported test values was obtained. For a majority of the tests, previously reported values are greater than reanalysis estimates. This overestimation is attributed to a number of factors, including, in many cases, a misapplication of nonleaky confined aquifer analysis methods in previous analysis reports to tests that exhibit leaky confined aquifer response behavior. Results of the test analyses indicate a similar range for transmissivity values for the various hydro-geologic units making up the upper basalt confined aquifer. Approximately 90% of the calculated transmissivity values for upper basalt confined aquifer hydrogeologic units occur within the range of 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 2} m{sup 2}/d, with 65% of the calculated estimate values occurring between 10{sup 1} to 10{sup 2} m{sup 2}d. These summary findings are consistent with the general range of values previously reported for basalt interflow contact zones and sedimentary interbeds within the Saddle Mountains Basalt.

Spane, F.A. Jr.; Vermeul, V.R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

ESTIMATED UPPER BOUNDS TO THE HALF-LIFE OF THERMAL DECOMPOSITION OF AMMONIA, HYDROGEN, METHANE, AND PROPANE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An estimate was made of the upper bound for the half-time of dissociation at 100 atm for ammonia, methane, and propane at 2500 deg K and hydrogen at 5000 deg K. In each case a unimolecular reactron in the homogeneous gas phase was chosen as most suitable for this purpose. Slater's theory has been used to estimate the necessary frequency factors. The upper bounds to the half- time for dissociation range from 3 x 10/sup -7/ to 6 x 10/sup -6/ sec. Extrapolation of decomposition rate data obtained at --1000 deg C and 1 atm pressure gives smaller values for the half-time of dissociation. (auth)

Herschbach, D.

1955-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Technical Report: Impacts of Land Management and Climate on Agroecosystem Greenhouse Gas Exchange in the Upper Midwest United States  

SciTech Connect

Our research is designed to improve the scientific understanding of how carbon is cycled between the land and atmosphere within a heavily managed landscape that is characteristic of the Upper Midwest. The Objectives are: 1) Quantify the seasonal and interannual variation of net ecosystem CO2 exchange of agricultural ecosystems in the Upper Midwest grown under different management strategies; 2) Partition net ecosystem CO2 exchange into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration by combining micrometeorological and stable isotope techniques; 3) Examine the seasonal variation in canopy-scale photosynthetic discrimination and the isotope ratios of ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis.

Timothy J. Griffis; John M. Baker

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

An upper limit on hypertriton production in collisions of Ar(1.76 AGeV)+KCl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-statistic data sample of Ar(1.76 AGeV)+KCl events recorded with HADES is used to search for a hypertriton signal. An upper production limit per centrality-triggered event of $1.04$ x $10^{-3}$ on the $3\\sigma$ level is derived. Comparing this value with the number of successfully reconstructed $\\Lambda$ hyperons allows to determine an upper limit on the ratio $N_{_{\\Lambda}^3H}/N_{\\Lambda}$, which is confronted with statistical and coalescence-type model calculations.

HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; D. Belver; A. Blanco; M. Bhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; M. Destefanis; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Frhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzn; R. Gernhuser; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzlez-Daz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kmpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; A. Krsa; F. Krizek; R. Krcken; H. Kuc; W. Khn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Miche; E. Morinire; J. Mousa; C. Mntz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; L. Rehnisch; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; T. Scheib; A. Schmah; H. Schuldes; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spatarof; B. Spruck; H. Strbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; M. Wisniowski; J. Wstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

Final Report - Inspection Limit Confirmation for Upper Head Penetration Nozzle Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ASME Code Case N-729-1 defines alternative examination requirements for the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) upper head penetration nozzle welds. The basis for these examination requirements was developed as part of an Industry program conducted by the Materials Reliability Program (MRP) through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The results of this program were published in MRP-95 Rev. 1 and document a set of finite element weld residual stress analyses conducted on a variety of upper head penetration nozzles. The inspection zone selected by the industry was based on the stress where it was assumed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) would not initiate. As explained in MRP-95 Rev. 1, it has been illustrated that PWSCC does not occur in the Alloy 600 tube when the stresses are below the yield strength of that tube. Typical yield strengths at operating conditions for Alloy 600 range from 35 ksi to 65 ksi. A stress less than 20-ksi tension was chosen as a conservative range where PWSCC would not initiate. Over the last several years, Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2) has conducted welding residual stress analyses on upper head penetration J-welds made from Alloy 182 weld metal for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. These efforts were performed as a confirmatory evaluation of the industrys analyses conducted as part of their MRP-95 Rev. 1 effort. To this point, the analyses conducted by Emc2 have not been compared to the MRP-95 Rev. 1 results or the examination zones defined in the Code Case. Therefore, this report summarizes the past Emc2 CRDM welding analyses and investigates the regions where the welding stresses may be sufficiently high to promote stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In all, 90 welding residual stress analyses were conducted by Emc2 and the largest distance below the weld where the stress drops below 20 ksi was 5 inches for the uphill weld of the 53-degree nozzle case. For the largest distance above the weld where stress drops below 20 ksi, the worst case was 1.5 inches above the downhill side of the 25-degree nozzle case. The inspection zones described in both MRP-95 Rev. 1 and Code Case N-729-1 were set at 1.0 inch for nozzle angles greater than 30 degrees or 1.5 inches for nozzle angles less than 30 degrees, above the highest or below the lowest point on the weld. In all cases analyzed by Emc2 in this effort, there was only one case where the stress was above 20 ksi outside of this inspection zone. For that case, the stresses were very close to 20 ksi at the inspection zone limit and were considered acceptable.

Anderson, Michael T.; Rudland, David L.; Zhang, Tao; Wilkowski, Gery M.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

353

Upper bounds on r-mode amplitudes from observations of LMXB neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The r-mode oscillations of neutron stars can be potentially powerful probes of cold ultra-dense matter. In this paper we present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations, and their gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates, in low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) neutron stars under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. We compute results for neutron star models constructed with the APR equation of state for masses of 1.4, 2 and 2.21 M_{sun}. For the lower mass models (1.4 and 2 M_{sun}) we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1x10^{-8} to 1.5x10^{-6}. For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP) sources with known quiescent spin-down rates these limits suggest that about 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the AMXP with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6640, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all the sources considered here our amplitude limits suggest that their gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21 M_{sun}) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. This can be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they are made of normal nuclear matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

Simin Mahmoodifar; Tod Strohmayer

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

354

Ichnology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, and trace fossil-permeability relationships in the Upper Cretaceous Medicine Hat Member, Medicine Hat gas field, southeast Alberta, Canada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Upper Cretaceous Medicine Hat Member (Niobrara Formation) in western Canada contains abundant reserves of biogenic natural gas. In the Medicine Hat gas field area (more)

La Croix, Andrew David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Heat and Mass Budgets of the Warm Upper Layer of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean in 197999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mass and heat budgets of the warm upper-ocean layer are investigated in the equatorial Atlantic using in situ observations during the period 197999, which encompassed a series of warm events in the equatorial Atlantic. The warm water layer ...

F. Vauclair; Y. du Penhoat; G. Reverdin

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

263ESTUARINE MICROFOSSILS AND CRETACEOUS COAL-BEARING STRATA RECOGNITION OF RELATIVE SEA-LEVEL CHANGE IN UPPER CRETACEOUS COAL-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

263ESTUARINE MICROFOSSILS AND CRETACEOUS COAL-BEARING STRATA RECOGNITION OF RELATIVE SEA-LEVEL CHANGE IN UPPER CRETACEOUS COAL- BEARING STRATA: A PALEOECOLOGICAL APPROACH USING AGGLUTINATED, Holyoke, Massachusetts 01040, U.S.A. ABSTRACT: Microfossils from Cretaceous coal-bearing strata can

Leckie, Mark

357

Persistent Low Overcast Events in the U.S. Upper Midwest: A Climatological and Case Study Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persistent low overcast conditions, defined as continuous overcast conditions (100% cloud cover) with ceiling heights at or below 2 km for a minimum of 5 days, are found to occur in the cold season in the U.S. upper Midwest on average slightly ...

Paul J. Roebber; James M. Frederick; Thomas P. DeFelice

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Source and Pathway of the Western Arctic Upper Halocline in a Data-Constrained Coupled Ocean and Sea Ice Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled ocean and sea ice model is used to investigate dense water (DW) formation in the Chukchi and Bering shelves and the pathways by which this water feeds the upper halocline. Two 19922008 data-constrained solutions at 9- and 4-km ...

An T. Nguyen; Ronald Kwok; Dimitris Menemenlis

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Influence of ENSO in the Flows of the Upper Paran River of South America over the Past 100 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper Paran River is the main tributary of the La Plata River basin, the second largest in South America, contributing with an annual mean flow of 12 000 m3 s?1 to more than one-half of the total water flowing in the La Plata River system. ...

Guillermo J. Berri; Marcela A. Ghietto; Norberto O. Garca

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Comparison of Aura MLS Water Vapor Measurements with GFS and NAM Analyses in the Upper TroposphereLower Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water vapor mixing ratios in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere measured by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) version 2.2 instrument have been compared with Global Forecast System (GFS) analyses at five levels within the 300100-hPa ...

Le Van Thien; William A. Gallus Jr.; Mark A. Olsen; Nathaniel Livesey

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Ten Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part II: Assessing the ECMWF Humidity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent publication (Part I), the authors introduced a data sourceMeasurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC)for monitoring and studying upper-tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) and analyzed 10 yr (19942004) of ...

Zhengzhao Luo; Dieter Kley; Richard H. Johnson; Herman Smit

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A Multilayer Upper-Boundary Condition for Longwave Radiative Flux to Correct Temperature Biases in a Mesoscale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An upper-level cold bias in potential temperature tendencies of 10 K day?1, strongest at the top of the model, is observed in Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model forecasts. The bias originates from the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model ...

Steven M. Cavallo; Jimy Dudhia; Chris Snyder

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Towards application of a climate-index for Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indonesia Ramon van Bruggen De Bilt, 2013 | Internal report; IR-2013-06 #12;#12;Towards application of a climate-index for dengue incidence Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia Master Thesis during this work and for their warm welcome during my stay in Indonesia. At last my thanks go

Haak, Hein

364

Spring Season Colorado Cyclones. Part I: Use of Composites to Relate Upper and Lower Tropospheric Wind Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of 70 cases of spring season Colorado cyclone events is used to form composites which describe the upper (300 mb) and lower (850 mb) tropospheric wind fields during the early stages of cyclone formation. The 70 cases are partitioned into ...

Thomas H. Achtor; Lyle H. Horn

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Model Performance of Downscaling 19992004 Hydrometeorological Fields to the Upper Rio Grande Basin Using Different Forcing Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study downscaled more than five years of data (19992004) for hydrometeorological fields over the upper Rio Grande basin (URGB) to a 4-km resolution using a regional model [fifth-generation Pennsylvania State UniversityNational Center for ...

J. Li; X. Gao; S. Sorooshian

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Quality-Controlled Upper-Air Sounding Dataset for TiMREX/SoWMEX: Development and Corrections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Terrain-Influenced Monsoon Rainfall Experiment (TiMREX), which coincided with Taiwans Southwesterly Monsoon Experiment2008 (SoWMEX-08), the upper-air sounding network over the Taiwan region was enhanced by increasing the radiosonde (...

Paul E. Ciesielski; Wen-Ming Chang; Shao-Chin Huang; Richard H. Johnson; Ben Jong-Dao Jou; Wen-Chau Lee; Po-Hsiung Lin; Ching-Hwang Liu; Junhong Wang

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Upper-Tropospheric Forcing on Late July Monsoon Transition in East Asia and the Western North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By investigating the large-scale circulation in the upper troposphere, it is demonstrated that the rapid late July summer monsoon transition in the East Asia and western North Pacific (EA-WNP) is associated with a weakened westerly at the exit of ...

Chi-Hua Wu; Ming-Dah Chou

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Methodology for Water Monitoring in the Upper Troposphere with Raman Lidar at the Haute-Provence Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Raman water vapor lidar has been developed at the Haute-Provence Observatory to study the distribution of water in the upper troposphere and its long-term evolution. Some investigations have been proposed and described to ensure a pertinent ...

Christophe Hoareau; Philippe Keckhut; Alain Sarkissian; Jean-Luc Baray; Georges Durry

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Detecting Discontinuities in Time Series of Upper-Air Data: Development and Demonstration of an Adaptive Filter Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognizing the need for a long-term database to address the problem of global climate change, the National Climatic Data Center has embarked on a project called the Comprehensive Aerological Reference Data Set to create an upper-air database ...

I. Zurbenko; P. S. Porter; R. Gui; S. T. Rao; J. Y. Ku; R. E. Eskridge

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean XIAOMING received 27 March 2009, in final form 23 June 2009) ABSTRACT Wind-induced near-inertial energy has been find that nearly 70% of the wind-induced near-inertial energy at the sea surface is lost to turbulent

Miami, University of

371

FEASIBILITY OF WIND TO SERVE UPPER SKAGIT'S BOW HILL TRIBAL LANDS AND FEASIBILITY UPDATE FOR RESIDENTIAL RENEWABLE ENERGY.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two year wind resource assessment was conducted to determine the feasibility of developing a community scale wind generation system for the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe?s Bow Hill land base, and the project researched residential wind resource technologies to determine the feasibility of contributing renewable wind resource to the mix of energy options for our single and multi-family residential units.

RICH, LAUREN

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

Buzatu Adrian

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

373

Food web architecture in natural and impounded rivers of the Upper Parana drainage basin, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freshwater ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the planet. Efforts to conserve, restore, or otherwise manage large rivers and the services they provide are hindered by limited understanding of the functional dynamics of these systems. This shortcoming is especially evident with regard to trophic structure and energy flow. In this study I use natural abundances of carbon and nitrogen isotopes to examine patterns of energy flow and food-chain length of large-river food webs characterized by different landscape-scale hydrologic features. Ten locations along an approximately 500 km stretch of the Upper Paran?¡ River Basin, Brazil, provided the setting for this work. Carbon derived from C3 plants and phytoplankton were the dominant energy sources across all webs, but relative contributions differed among landscape types (low-gradient river, high-gradient river, river stretches downstream of reservoirs, and reservoirs). Increases in food chain length corresponded with higher relative importance of phytoplankton derived carbon, likely due to size-structured effects of the phytoplankton-zooplankton-secondary consumer trophic link. River impoundment corresponded with decreased ecological and economic efficiency of fisheries production, an important ecosystem service provided by many tropical rivers.

Hoeinghaus, David Joseph

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Ammonite zonation in condensed zone, middle Ozan formation (Taylor group, upper Cretaceous) in Northeast Texas  

SciTech Connect

Recognition of condensed zones is important because they may be marker horizons that are useful in exploration. Such a zone is demonstrated by the occurrence of ammonites belonging to 12 species and 9 genera from the middle Ozan Formation (lower Taylor Marl) in northeast Texas. The 1-foot (0.3-m) thick bed of bioturbated glauconitic biomicrite contains many specimens of disarticulated vertebrates, molluscs, remanie' fossils (blackened phosphatic internal molds), and hiatus concretions. Four of 6 midcontinent ammonite range zones proposed by Cobban and others appear to be represented in the fauna, in ascending order, by Baculites aquilaensis Reeside, Delawarella delawarensis (Morton) (= zones of two unnamed species of Baculites), Baculites obtusus Meek, and Trachyscaphites spiniger porchi Adkins (=zones of Baculites mclearni and B. asperiformis). Young may be correct in assuming that the occurrence of Delawarella delawarensis and Baculites aquilaensis in the Ozan Formation may mean that rocks of the upper Austin Group and parts of the lower Taylor Group are the same age. If correlation with the midcontinent zonation is correct, then the sediments that formed the condensed zone slowly accumulated from 81 to 79 m.y. (mid early Campanian to early late Campanian). Several species of the fauna are preserved as both normal and remanie' fossils, indicating that members of these species lived in the area for an extended period of time, perhaps as a relict fauna. The fauna includes a mixture of cosmopolitan and endemic species (indicating open shelf environment) with several types of heteromorphs (indicating moderate water depths).

Echols, J.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in Germany in high altitude is several days earlier than on ground.

Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

376

IRAS-based whole-sky upper limit on Dyson Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Dyson Sphere is a hypothetical construct of a star purposely cloaked by a thick swarm of broken-up planetary material to better utilize all of the stellar energy. A clean Dyson Sphere identification would give a significant signature for intelligence at work. A search for Dyson Spheres has been carried out using the 250,000 source database of the IRAS infrared satellite which covered 96% of the sky. The search has used the Calgary data collection of the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer (LRS) to look for fits to blackbody spectra. Searches have been conducted for both pure (fully cloaked) and partial Dyson Spheres in the blackbody temperature region 100 {le} T {le} 600 K. Other stellar signatures that resemble a Dyson Sphere are reviewed. When these signatures are used to eliminate sources that mimic Dyson Spheres very few candidates remain and even these are ambiguous. Upper limits are presented for both pure and partial Dyson Spheres. The sensitivity of the LRS was enough to find solar-sized Dyson Spheres out to 300 pc, a reach that encompasses a million solar-type stars.

Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Geothermal exploration assessment and interpretation, Upper Klamah Lake Area, Klamath Basin, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data from public and private sources on the Klamath Basin geothermal resource are reviewed, synthesized, and reinterpreted. In this, the second and final phase of the work, geological, remote sensing, geochemical, temperature gradient, gravity, aeromagnetic, and electrical resistivity data sets are examined. These data were derived from surveys concentrated on the east and west shores of Upper Klamath Lake. The geological, remote sensing, and potential field data suggest a few northeast-trending discontinuities, which cross the regional north-westerly strike. The near-surface distribution of warm water appears to be related to the intersections of these lineaments and northwest-trending faults. The groundwater geochemical data are reviewed and the various reservoir temperature estimates compared. Particular attention is given to specific electrical conductivities of waters as an interpretational aid to the subsurface resistivity results. A clear trend emerges in the Klamath Falls/Olene Gap area; hotter waters are associated with higher specific conductivities. In the Nuss Lake/Stukel Mountain area the opposite trend prevails, although the relationship is somewhat equivocal.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A New Upper Bound on the Capacity of a Class of Primitive Relay Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain a new upper bound on the capacity of a class of discrete memoryless relay channels. For this class of relay channels, the relay observes an i.i.d. sequence $T$, which is independent of the channel input $X$. The channel is described by a set of probability transition functions $p(y|x,t)$ for all $(x,t,y)\\in \\mathcal{X}\\times \\mathcal{T}\\times \\mathcal{Y}$. Furthermore, a noiseless link of finite capacity $R_{0}$ exists from the relay to the receiver. Although the capacity for these channels is not known in general, the capacity of a subclass of these channels, namely when $T=g(X,Y)$, for some deterministic function $g$, was obtained in [1] and it was shown to be equal to the cut-set bound. Another instance where the capacity was obtained was in [2], where the channel output $Y$ can be written as $Y=X\\oplus Z$, where $\\oplus$ denotes modulo-$m$ addition, $Z$ is independent of $X$, $|\\mathcal{X}|=|\\mathcal{Y}|=m$, and $T$ is some stochastic function of $Z$. The compress-and-forward (CAF) achievability...

Tandon, Ravi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Surface energy and radiation budgets in a steppe ecosystem in the Upper Columbia River Gorge  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of radiation and surface energy budget components are presented for a semiarid grassland-steppe ecosystem in the Upper Columbia River Gorge (45{degrees}45`25.6 inches N, 120{degrees}01`39.3 inches W, 190 m) for June 2-27, 1991. Over this period, the ratio of sensible to latent heat flux (the Bowen ratio) averaged 5.0, and mean daily surface energy balance totals were: net radiation, 9.23; ground heat flux, 1.25; latent heat flux, 1.32; and sensible heat flux, 6.66 MJ m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1}, where the mean daily nonradiative fluxes were directed away from the surface, and the mean daily radiative flux was directed toward the surface. On clear days, the site received from 0.71 to 0.76 of the theoretical extraterrestrial solar radiation. Albedo over the 26-d period varied from 0.17 to 0.21. Daily and daytime average values of the components are summarized, and a plot is presented of the 30-min average values of all components for the entire period.

Whiteman, C.D.; Allwine, K.J.; Bian, X.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

CANCER OF THE UPPER ALIMENTARY TRACT AND LARYNX IN POLAND AND IN POLISH-BORN AMERICANS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary.-Mortality for cancers of the buccal cavity and pharynx, oesophagus and larynx in Poland in 1959-72 was analysed and compared with cancer incidence regis-tered in the selected regions of Poland, with cancer mortality and incidence in other countries, and with mortality among Polish-born migrants to the U.S.A. The patterns of occurrence of these cancers in Poland appear to be similar to those of other European and American countries, except perhaps for the rather high and still increasing incidence of laryngeal cancer. Among male Polish migrants, however, mortality for these cancers was distinctly higher than either in Poland or among native Americans. This contrast, largest for oesophageal and laryngeal cancer, decreased between 1950 and 1959-61, but only for those aged below 65. Similarity of these shifts with those observed for lung cancer is stressed and explanations are looked for. Factors associated with the studied cancers and outlines for the further studies are discussed briefly. CANCERS of the upper alimentary tract and the larynx have been discussed

J. Staszew-ski

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Practices and Processes of Leading High Performance Home Builders in the Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team proposed this study to gain insight into the business, sales, and construction processes of successful high performance builders. The knowledge gained by understanding the high performance strategies used by individual builders, as well as the process each followed to move from traditional builder to high performance builder, will be beneficial in proposing more in-depth research to yield specific action items to assist the industry at large transform to high performance new home construction. This investigation identified the best practices of three successful high performance builders in the upper Midwest. In-depth field analysis of the performance levels of their homes, their business models, and their strategies for market acceptance were explored. All three builders commonly seek ENERGY STAR certification on their homes and implement strategies that would allow them to meet the requirements for the Building America Builders Challenge program. Their desire for continuous improvement, willingness to seek outside assistance, and ambition to be leaders in their field are common themes. Problem solving to overcome challenges was accepted as part of doing business. It was concluded that crossing the gap from code-based building to high performance based building was a natural evolution for these leading builders.

Von Thoma, E.; Ojczyk, C.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the advent of the Large Hadron Collider the aim of the present work is the non-perturbative determination of the cutoff-dependent upper and lower mass bounds of the Standard Model Higgs boson based on first principle calculations, in particular not relying on additional information such as the triviality property of the Higgs-Yukawa sector or indirect arguments like vacuum stability considerations. For that purpose the lattice approach is employed to allow for a non-perturbative investigation of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model, serving here as a reasonable simplification of the full Standard Model, containing only those fields and interactions which are most essential for the intended Higgs boson mass determination. These are the complex Higgs doublet as well as the top and bottom quark fields and their mutual interactions. To maintain the chiral character of the Standard Model Higgs-fermion coupling also on the lattice, the latter model is constructed on the basis of the Neuberger overlap operator, obeying then an exact global lattice chiral symmetry.

P. Gerhold

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

383

Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Protect and Restore the Upper Lochsa : Annual Progress Report, May 2008 April 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Lochsa watersheds included in the project contain critical spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish (Clearwater National Forest 1999). Species that depend on the tributary habitat include spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Snake River summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentes), and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Steelhead and bull trout populations are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing. Both out-of-basin and in-basin factors threaten fish populations in the Lochsa Drainage (Clearwater Subbasin Plan 2003). Out-of-basin factors include the hydroelectric system and ocean conditions, while in-basin factors include a variety of management activities leading to habitat degradation. This project is implemented under Bonneville Power Administration's Fish and Wildlife program in order to meet National Marine Fisheries Service requirements to offset losses caused by the operation of the hydrosystem by improving tributary habitats to promote increased productivity of salmon and steelhead. The Clearwater Subbasin Plan (2003) defines limiting factors to fisheries in the area as watershed disturbances, habitat degradation, sediment, temperature, and connectivity.

Lloyd, Rebecca; Forestieri, David [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

385

Implementation Study of Energy Conservation Recommendations in the Upper Midwest Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The South Dakota State University (SDSU) Industrial Energy Optimization Program (IEOP) and Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program perform energy audits for industrial companies in the Upper Midwest region of the United States. Each audited company has or will receive a written report which includes recommendations based on data collected through a pre-audit questionnaire and a site visit to the facility. The fourteen companies represented in this study were interviewed nine to twelve months after their audit to obtain data for an implementation study. The study examines the implementation rates of the given recommendations, analyzes why some recommendations were not implemented, and determines how much of the report's predicted energy and cost savings were realized by the company. This study is a follow-up of the presentation "Energy Consumption Characteristics of Light Manufacturing Facilities in the Northern Plains" which was given at the 1994 IETC. It considered ten audits to determine which types of recommendations would most likely be implemented. The same ten audits are included in this study.

Heisinger, K. P.; Bassett, K.; Twedt, M. P.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Response of breeding seaside sparrows to fire on the upper Texas Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire is one of the primary tools for managing coastal marshes in parts of the range of the Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus). This study examined changes in Seaside Sparrow densities between breeding seasons following fire in marshes of the upper Texas coast. I measured habitat characteristics and relative abundances of Seaside Sparrows on two 250-m transects for three breeding seasons post-fire on one site, and four breeding seasons on two sites. The number of sparrows/survey the second year post-fire averaged 2.8 (2.2-3.2) times higher than any other year post-fire. Two sites had significantly more sparrows/survey in the second year post-fire than the first, third, or fourth. The third site had a significant increase in sparrows/survey from the first to second year after burning, but the third year was not different from the first or second year. The increase in sparrows/survey from the first to second year post-fire coincided with a significant increase in the cover of dead vegetation. Dead vegetation may be an important factor for suitable nesting conditions, at least in the second year after burning.

Whitbeck, Matthew W

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

SWAT UNGAUGED: HYDROLOGICAL BUDGET AND CROP YIELD PREDICTIONS IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physically based, distributed hydrologic models are increasingly used in assessments of water resources, best management practices, and climate and land use changes. Model performance evaluation in ungauged basins is an important research topic. In this study, we propose a framework for developing Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) input data, including hydrography, terrain, land use, soil, tile, weather, and management practices, for the Upper Mississippi River basin (UMRB). We also present a performance evaluation of SWAT hydrologic budget and crop yield simulations in the UMRB without calibration. The uncalibrated SWAT model ably predicts annual streamflow at 11 USGS gauges and crop yield at a four?digit hydrologic unit code (HUC) scale. For monthly streamflow simulation, the performance of SWAT is marginally poor compared with that of annual flow, which may be due to incomplete information about reservoirs and dams within the UMRB. Further validation shows that SWAT can predict base flow contribution ratio reasonably well. Compared with three calibrated SWAT models developed in previous studies of the entire UMRB, the uncalibrated SWAT model presented here can provide similar results. Overall, the SWAT model can provide satisfactory predictions on hydrologic budget and crop yield in the UMRB without calibration. The results emphasize the importance and prospects of using accurate spatial input data for the physically based SWAT model. This study also examines biofuel?biomass production by simulating all agricultural lands with switchgrass, producing satisfactory results in estimating biomass availability for biofuel production.

Srinivasan, Raghavan; Zhang, Xuesong; Arnold, J. G.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Upper-Ocean Salinity Variability in the Tropical Pacific: Case Study for Quasi-Decadal Shift during the 2000s Using TRITON Buoys and Argo Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-ocean salinity variation in the tropical Pacific is investigated during the 2000s, when TRITON buoys and Argo floats were deployed and more salinity data were observed than in previous periods. We focus on upper-ocean salinity variability ...

Takuya Hasegawa; Kentaro Ando; Iwao Ueki; Keisuke Mizuno; Shigeki Hosoda

389

Diagenesis and porosity development associated with major sea level fluctuations, Upper Permian, Jameson land, east Greenland  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Permian of Jameson Land includes two major carbonate sequences, represented by the Karstryggen and Wegener Halvoe formations. The initial Karstryggen transgression led to the development of a shallow marine platform with structurally controlled evaporite basins (salinas) separated by stromatolitic, peloidal, or micritic carbonate depositional areas. The Wegener Havloe sequence reflects more rapid and extensive transgression with the deposition of three subcycles of fully marine, platform, or biohermal carbonates containing minor evaporites near the basin margins. Bioherms (bryozoan-brachiopod-marine cement mounds) show > 100 m of relief, indicating that large relative sea level changes were involved. Both the Karstryggen and Wgener Havloe cycles were terminated by major regressions, which led to karstic and/or fluvial incision of the underlying sequences. Not surprisingly, carbonate and evaporite diagenesis was greatly affected by these regional or eustatic sea level fluctuations. Evaporites dissolved or were replaced by calcite and celestite under the influence of meteoric waters. Limestones show collapse brecciation, grain leaching, soil development, and characteristic vadose and phreatic cements. Most significantly meteoric flushing led to massive dissolution of botryoidal marine cements (aragonite and probable high-Mg calcite) within biohermal facies on the Wegener Peninsula. This early porosity resurrection led to the preservation of porous bioherm core zones until hydrocarbon migration. Only late (posthydrocarbon), probably hydrothermal fluid flow led to cementation of the bioherm cores while expelling most of the reservoired hydrocarbons. If the sea level changes affecting the Greenlandic Permian are eustatic, then this study may provide significant clues to porosity development throughout the largely unexplored northern Zechstein basin.

Scholle, P.A.; Ulmer, D.S. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (USA)); Stemmerik, L. (Greenland Geological Survey, Copenhagen (Denmark))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Slump dominated upper slope reservoir facies, Intra Qua Iboe (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria  

SciTech Connect

An integration of sedimentologic and 3D seismic data provides a basis for unraveling complex depositional processes and sand distribution of the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Nearly 3,000 feet of conventional core was examined in interpreting slump/slide/debris flow, bottom current, turbidity current, pelagic/hemipelagic, wave and tide dominated facies. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated seaward, deposition began with a turbidite channel dominated slope system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated slope system (IQI 3, the principal reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated, collapsed shelf-edge deltaic system (IQI 4). Using seismic time slices and corresponding depositional facies in the core, a sandy {open_quotes}fairway{open_quotes} has been delineated in the IQI 3. Because of differences in stacking patterns of sandy and muddy slump intervals, seismic facies show: (1) both sheet-like and mounded external forms (geometries), and (2) parallel/continuous as well as chaotic/hummocky internal reflections. In wireline logs, slump facies exhibits blocky, coarsening-up, fining-up, and serrated motifs. In the absence of conventional core, slump facies may be misinterpreted and even miscorrelated because seismic facies and log motifs of slumps and debris flows tend to mimic properties of turbidite fan deposits. The slump dominated reservoir facies is composed of unconsolidated fine-grained sand. Thickness of individual units varies from 1 to 34 feet, but amalgamated intervals reach a thickness of up to 70 feet and apparently form connected sand bodies. Porosity commonly ranges from 20 to 35%. Horizontal permeability commonly ranges from 1,000 to 3,000 md.

Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is a well known source rock and fractured reservoir. Production is mainly from fractures, and the mechanism by which oil migrates from the matrix into the fractures is not well understood. Microfracturing due to oil generation offers a possible explanation for the mechanism of the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. Detailed petrographic analysis was undertaken to study the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. The important components of the primary migration system are the solution seams, swarms of horizontal microfractures associated with the solution seams and the tectonic fractures from which the oil is recovered. Pressure solution is manifest in the Austin Chalk as millimeter-scale solution seams and smaller microseams. The solution seams are composites formed by the superposition of the microseams in an anastomosing network. Evidence for pressure solution is the presence of truncated fossils along seams and the high concentration of insolubles within them. A significant amount of organic matter and bitumen was observed to be concentrated within the seams. Associated with the solution seams are swarms of horizontal microftactures, many of them filled with calcite. Numerous vertical, tectonic fractures are found intersecting the solution seams. Pressure solution serves to concentrate organic matter within the solution seams and oil is generated here. It is postulated that the accompanying increase in fluid volume raises the pore pressures and fractures the rock. These newly created microfractures are avenues for migration of fluids from the seams. It is likely that oil migrates from the seams into the tectonic fractures via the microftactures. Oil may also be migrating directly from the seams into the fractures along an organic network. The matrix recharges the fractures by the mechanism postulated in this study. Thus, production can be sustained at low rates even after the initial period of decline. Further studies should attempt to correlate the carbonate in the matrix with that in the microfractures, and the oil in the seams with that in the fractures.

Chanchani, Jitesh

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Evaluate the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds on Satellite Retrievals of Low-Level Cloud Droplet Effective Radius  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds the Effect of Upper-Level Cirrus Clouds on Satellite Retrievals of Low-Level Cloud Droplet Effective Radius F.-L. Chang and Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction The earth's radiation budget is sensitive to changes in the microphysical properties of low-level stratiform clouds. Their extensive coverage can significantly reduce the solar energy absorbed by the earth system. An estimate of reducing the global-mean droplet effective radius (r e ) of these low-level clouds by ~2 µm, while keeping the column liquid water constant would balance the warming due to CO 2 doubling in the atmosphere (Slingo 1990). Accurate determination of the droplet r

393

A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch  

SciTech Connect

We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Ziemssenstrasse 1, D-80336 Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology (Germany)

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds from a lattice Higgs-Yukawa model with dynamical overlap fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same Higgs-fermion coupling structure as in the Higgs sector of the electroweak Standard Model, in particular, obeying a Ginsparg-Wilson version of the underlying SU(2) x U(1) symmetry, being a global symmetry here due to the neglection of gauge fields in this model. In this paper we present our results on the cutoff-dependent upper Higgs boson mass bound at several selected values of the cutoff parameter.

P. Gerhold; K. Jansen

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey I: New upper limits on radio halos and mini-halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fraction of galaxy clusters host diffuse radio sources called radio halos, radio relics and mini-halos. We present the sample and first results from the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS)- an extension of the GMRT Radio Halo Survey (GRHS, Venturi et al. 2007, 2008). It is a systematic radio survey of galaxy clusters selected from the REFLEX and eBCS X-ray catalogs . Analysis of GMRT data at 610/ 235/ 325 MHz on 12 galaxy clusters are presented. We report the detection of a newly discovered mini-halo in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021 at 610 MHz. A small scale relic (~200 kpc) is suspected in the cluster Z348. We do not detect cluster-scale diffuse emission in 11 clusters. Robust upper limits on the detection of radio halo of size of 1 Mpc are determined. We also present upper limits on the detections of mini-halos in a sub-sample of cool-core clusters. The upper limits for radio halos and mini-halos are plotted in the radio power- X-ray luminosity plane and the correlations are discussed. Diffuse extended e...

Kale, R; Giacintucci, S; Dallacasa, D; Cassano, R; Brunetti, G; Macario, G; Athreya, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500 deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400 encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105 but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500 deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400 encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105 but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A petrophysics and reservoir performance-based reservoir characterization of Womack Hill (Upper Smackover) Field (Alabama)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Womack Hill is one of the 57 Smackover fields throughout the Gulf Coast region. Since its discovery in 1970, Womack Hill Field has produced 30 million STB from the Upper Smackover sequence of carbonate reservoirs. Since production reached its peak in 1977, oil and gas rates have declined substantially. During the last ten years, the production decline has accelerated despite an increase in the water injection rate. This production decline along with the increase in the operating costs has caused a considerable drop in profitability of the field. The field currently produces 640 STB/D of oil and 330 MSCF/D of gas, along with 6,700 STB/D of water, which implies a water cut of over 90 percent. In order to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Womack Hill Field, we need to develop an integrated reservoir study. This thesis addresses the creation of an integrated reservoir study and specifically provides a detailed reservoir description that represents the high level of heterogeneity that exists within this field. Such levels of heterogeneity are characteristic of carbonate reservoirs. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. We used a non-parametric regression algorithm (ACE) to develop correlations between the core and well log data. These correlations allow us to estimate reservoir permeability at the "flow unit" scale. We note that our efforts to reach an overall correlation were unsuccessful. We generated distributions of porosity and permeability throughout the reservoir area using statistically derived estimates of porosity and permeability. The resulting reservoir description indicates a clear contrast in reservoir permeability between the western and eastern areas - and in particular, significant variability in the reservoir. We do note that we observed an essentially homogenous porosity distribution. We provided analysis of the production and injection data using various techniques (history plots, EUR plots, and decline type curve analysis) and we note this effort yielded a remaining recoverable oil of 1.9 MMSTB (under the current operating conditions). This analysis suggests a moderate flow separation between the western and eastern areas and raised some questions regarding the suitability of the hydraulic "jet pumps" (the water rate increased coincidentally with the installation of the jet pumps).

Avila Urbaneja, Juan Carlos

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata in the Piceance basin, western Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas samples were collected for geochemical analyses from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata of the Piceance basin in western Colorado to: 1) determine the origin of gases (i.e., microbial versus thermogenic), 2) determine the thermogenic source rock(s) for the gas-rich Williams Fork Formation, and 3) assess the nature of gas migration. Mud logging gases were sampled approximately every 60 m between 350 and 2800 m and analyzed for "C compositions and CI/C,-3 ratios. Samples collected from low gas content intervals above 1950 m define two parallel trends of increasing "Cc, content with depth. Data from the first trend are based on eighteen analyses and range from-69.9 to-38.3%o (R 2 = 0.92). These data suggest a microbial and mixed microbial/thermogenic origin for methane. Only one sample from above 1950 m contained sufficient amounts of C2for isotopic analysis (813 CC2 =-27.0%o at 1718 m). Data from the second trend are based on seven analyses and are offset by approximately +20%o compared with the primary trend at comparable depths. These data range from-65.0 to-38.5%0 (R' = 0.84). 813c ci and C,/CI-3data from both trends are similar when viewed on a crossplot, thus suggesting that large-scale, vertical gas migration has occurred. Migration was probably aided by fractures that formed during maximum burial and peak gas generation. Except for one sample collected at 1718 m, "CC2compositions above 1950 m were not determined due to insufficient sample sizes. Below 1950 m, gas contents abruptly increase and approach 10-4' gas units. These gases have "C compositions indicative of thermogenic origin. Gases between 1950 and 2450 m have relatively uniform geochemistries (8"Cc, =-39.9 0?.3%ol 613C C2 =-27.4 I?.i%ol CI/Cl-3 = 0-91 0?.03), and are chemically distinct and therefore Renetically different from gases between 2450 and 2791 M (513C ci =-37.9 +-O.2%og 813C C2 =-26.4 0?.5%09 CI/Cl-3 = 0.88 0?.01). Gases of the latter group were probably derived from coalbeds that comprise the Cameo Group, as abundant coals are found between 2450 and 2630 m. Only three thin coalbeds occur within the Coal Ridge Group between 1950 and 2450 m, so gases from this interval were probably derived from interbedded shales. Core and cuttings samples were also collected and sealed in cans from several intervals for geochemical analyses. Canned methanes at or above 858 m are "C-enriched by 13 to 33%o compared with logging methanes at equivalent intervals. Below 1934 m, however, 813C ci values for core and cuttings are comparable to logging gas values. This observation suggests that 813 Cc, discrepancies above 858 m are related to low gas contents in the core and cutting samples. Therefore, geochemical data from core and cuttings were not used to assess migration or to interpret gas origin.

Katz, David Jonathan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Bio-Climatic Analysis and Thermal Performance of Upper Egypt A Case Study Kharga Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of the change and development of Egyptian society, Egyptian government has focused its attention of comprehensive development to various directions. One of these attentions is housing, construction and land reclamation in desert and Upper Egypt. In the recent century the most attentions of the government is the creation of new wadi parallel to Nile wadi in the west desert. Kharga Oasis is 25 degrees 26'56?North latitude and 30 degrees 32'24?East longitude. This oasis, is the largest of the oases in the westren desert of Egypt. It required the capital of the new wadi (Al Wadi Al Gadeed Government). The climate of this oasis is caricaturized by; aridity, high summer daytime temperature, large diurnal temperature variation, low relative humidity and high solar radiation. In such conditions, man losses his ability to work and to contribute effectively in the development planning due to the high thermal stress affected on him. In designing and planning in this region, it is necessary not only to understand the needs of the people but to create an indoor environment which is suitable for healthy, pleasant, and comfortable to live and work in it. So, efforts have been motivated towards the development of new concepts for building design and urban planning to moderate the rate, direction and magnitudes of heat flow. Also, reduce or if possible eliminate the energy expenditure for environmental control. In order to achieve this, attention has to be focused on building design to improve its thermal performance, which is a function of building form, orientation, location, and materials used and produce comfortable environmental conditions without increasing of energy consumed. This can be valid in three stage, the first one by using the bio-climatic analysis, the 2nd one by the handle and simplified calculation methods (Uvalue, Thermal time constant, and Degree day), and the 3rd one is by the simulation method. The admittance procedure is a technique for estimating cooling/heating load and temperature changes under cyclic conditions by using the thermal characteristics (Y-value, lambda, phi, Sf) of the building structure. It dependent on determining the daily means value and the swing about the mean. The admittance method is used and a computer program is developed to predict the heating and cooling load as well as the environmental air temperature by the author. This study deals with the bio-climatic analysis and thermal performance of building in Kharga Oasis. The results show that, the air catcher, court and Passive cooling systems (evaporative cooling), maintained the indoor climate in the thermal human comfort zone during the hottest period under the effect of climatic conditions of Kharga. Also shading devices, and suitable orientation achieve a harmony building with environment. Using insulating materials in exposed walls and roof save energy by about 60%. The Thermal insulation thicknesses between 0.03-0.05m for exposed walls and 0.05m for exposed roofs are suitable to valid the required thermal resistance in Kharga Oasis according to the Egyptian Residential Buildings Energy Code, ECP 306-2005.

Khalil, M. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

VHF-ST Radar Observations of an Upper-Level Front Using Vertical and Oblique-Beam C2N Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoscale aspects of an upper-level front that moved over Brittany (France) during the Mesoscale Frontal Dynamical Project 1987 experiment are investigated using very high frequency stratospherictropospheric (VHF-ST) radar data and European ...

J-L. Caccia; J-P. Cammas

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

An Evaluation of the National Meteorological Center Weekly Hindcast of Upper-Ocean Temperature along the Eastern Pacific Equator in January 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper-ocean temperature distribution along the Pacific equator from 139 to 103W was observed in January 1992 with temperature profiles recorded from a ship and inferred from an ocean general circulation model calculation involving data ...

David Halpern; Ming Ji

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Estimation of daily actual evapotranspiration from remotely sensed data under complex terrain over the upper Chao river basin in North China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily actual evapotranspiration over the upper Chao river basin in North China on 23 June 2005 was estimated based on the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), in which the parameterization schemes for calculating the instantaneous solar ...

Yanchun Gao; Di Long; Zhao-Liang Li

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Mesoscale Forcing of a Midlatitude Upper-Tropospheric Jet Streak by a Simulated Convective System. Part II: Kinetic Energy and Resolution Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A kinetic energy (KE) analysis of the forcing of a mesoscale upper-tropospheric jet streak by organized diabaaic processes within the simulated convective system (SCS) that was discussed in Part I is presented in this study. The relative ...

Bart J. Wolf; Donald R. Johnson

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Characteristic Life Cycle of Upper-Tropospheric Cyclogenetic Precursors during the Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper documents a characteristic life cycle of upper-tropospheric precursors to surface cyclogenesis observed during the field phase of the Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA, December 1988February 1989). ...

Gary M. Lackmann; Daniel Keyser; Lance F. Bosart

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Vegetation Control in the Long-Term Self-Stabilization of the Liangzhou Oasis of the Upper Shiyang River Watershed of West-Central Gansu, Northwest China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the relationship between vegetation in the Liangzhou Oasis in the Upper Shiyang River watershed (USRW) of west-central Gansu, China, and within-watershed precipitation, soil water storage, and oasis self-support. Oases along ...

Charles P-A. Bourque; Quazi K. Hassan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Quantifying the Imprint of a Severe Hector Thunderstorm during ACTIVE/SCOUT-O3 onto the Water Content in the Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a severe Hector thunderstorm that formed over the Tiwi Islands, north of Australia, during the Aerosol and Chemical Transport in Tropical Convection/Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower ...

Charles Chemel; Maria R. Russo; John A. Pyle; Ranjeet S. Sokhi; Cornelius Schiller

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Practical Considerations in the Use of Rotated Principal Component Analysis (RPCA)in Diagnostic Studies of Upper-Air Height Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rotated principal component analysis (RPCA) is a powerful tool for studying upper air height data because of its ability to distill information about the variance existing in a large number of maps to a much smaller set of physically meaningful ...

Edward A. O'Lenic; Robert E. Livezey

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Examination of Coupling between an Upper-Tropospheric Cloud System and Synoptic-Scale Dynamics Diagnosed from Wind Profiler and Radiosonde Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of synoptic-scale dynamics associated with a middle and upper tropospheric cloud event that occurred on 26 November 1991 is examined. The case under consideration occurred during the FIRE Cirrus-II Intensive Field Observing Period ...

Gerald G. Mace; David O'C. Starr; Thomas P. Ackerman; Patrick Minnis

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Crust and upper mantle P wave velocity structure beneath Valles caldera, New Mexico: Results from the Jemez teleseismic tomography experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New results are presented from the teleseismic component of the Jemez Tomography Experiment conducted across Valles caldera in northern New Mexico. We invert 4872 relative {ital P} wave arrival times recorded on 50 portable stations to determine velocity structure to depths of 40 km. The three principle features of our model for Valles caldera are: (1) near-surface low velocities of {minus}17{percent} beneath the Toledo embayment and the Valle Grande, (2) midcrustal low velocities of {minus}23{percent} in an ellipsoidal volume underneath the northwest quadrant of the caldera, and (3) a broad zone of low velocities ({minus}15{percent}) in the lower crust or upper mantle. Crust shallower than 20 km is generally fast to the northwest of the caldera and slow to the southeast. Near-surface low velocities are interpreted as thick deposits of Bandelier tuff and postcaldera volcaniclastic rocks. Lateral variation in the thickness of these deposits supports increased caldera collapse to the southeast, beneath the Valle Grande. We interpret the midcrustal low-velocity zone to contain a minimum melt fraction of 10{percent}. While we cannot rule out the possibility that this zone is the remnant 1.2 Ma Bandelier magma chamber, the eruption history and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks erupted in Valles caldera following the Bandelier tuff make it more likely that magma results from a new pulse of intrusion, indicating that melt flux into the upper crust beneath Valles caldera continues. The low-velocity zone near the crust-mantle boundary is consistent with either partial melt in the lower crust or mafic rocks without partial melt in the upper mantle. In either case, this low-velocity anomaly indicates that underplating by mantle-derived melts has occurred. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

Steck, Lee K.; Fehler, Michael C.; Roberts, Peter M.; Baldridge, W. Scott; Stafford, Darrik G. [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Lutter, William J.; Sessions, Robert [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Upper Limits on the Number of Small Bodies in Sedna-Like Orbits by the TAOS Project  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a search for occultation events by objects at distances between 100 and 1000 AU in lightcurves from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS). We searched for consecutive, shallow flux reductions in the stellar lightcurves obtained by our survey between 7 February 2005 and 31 December 2006 with a total of {approx} 4.5 x 10{sup 9} three-telescope simultaneous photometric measurements. No events were detected, allowing us to set upper limits on the number density as a function of size and distance of objects in Sedna-like orbits, using simple models.

Wang, J; Lehner, M J; Zhang, Z; Bianco, F B; Alcock, C; Chen, W; Axelrod, T; Byun, Y; Coehlo, N K; Cook, K H; Dave, R; de Pater, L; Porrata, R; Kim, D; King, S; Lee, T; Lin, H; Lissauer, J J; Marshall, S L; Protopapas, P; Rice, J A; Schwamb, M E; Wang, S; Wen, C

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

413

RELAP/MOD3.2 Assessment Using an 11% Upper Plenum Break Experiment in the PSB Facility  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using an 11% upper plenum break experiment in the PSB test facility at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem PSBV1, the test addressed several important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well. The code was judged to reasonably model the phenomena of two-phase flow natural circulation in the primary coolant system, asymmetric loop behavior, leak flow, loop seal clearance in the cold legs, heat transfer in a covered core, heat transfer in a partially covered core, pressurizer thermal-hydraulics, and integral system effects. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data for the mixture level and entrainment in the core, leading to a user recommendation to assess the sensitivity of transient calculations to the interphase drag modeling in the core. No judgments were made for the phenomena of phase separation without mixture level formation, mixture level and entrainment in the steam generators, pool formation in the upper plenum, or flow stratification in horizontal pipes because either the phenomenon did not occur in the test or there were insufficient measurements to characterize the behavior.

Bayless, P.D.

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

414

RELAP-5/MOD 3.2 Assessment Using an 11% Upper Plenum Break Experiment in the PSB Facility  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using an 11% upper plenum break experiment in the PSB test facility at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem PSBV1, the test addressed several important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well. The code was judged to reasonably model the phenomena of two-phase flow natural circulation in the primary coolant system, asymmetric loop behavior, leak flow, loop seal clearance in the cold legs, heat transfer in a covered core, heat transfer in a partially covered core, pressurizer thermal-hydraulics, and integral system effects. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data for the mixture level and entrainment in the core, leading to a user recommendation to assess the sensitivity of transient calculations to the interphase drag modeling in the core. No judgments were made for the phenomena of phase separation without mixture level formation, mixture level and entrainment in the steam generators, pool formation in the upper plenum, or flow stratification in horizontal pipes because either the phenomenon did not occur in the test or there were insufficient measurements to characterize the behavior.

Paul D. Bayless

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO 2 S. D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. Doughty (CADoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453 ) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 P. R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313), Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 510-495-2461) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 K. Pruess(K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116,

416

Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gspr; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. . Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Krlak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

417

The absorption chiller in large scale solar pond cooling design with condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of using solar ponds as low-cost solar collectors combined with commercial absorption chillers in large scale solar cooling design is investigated. The analysis is based on the combination of a steady-state solar pond mathematical model with the operational characteristics of a commercial absorption chiller, assuming condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone (U.C.Z.). The numerical solution of the nonlinear equations involved leads to results which relate the chiller capacity with pond design and environmental parameters, which are also employed for the investigation of the optimum pond size for a minimum capital cost. The derived cost per cooling kW for a 350 kW chiller ranges from about 300 to 500 $/kW cooling. This is almost an order of magnitude lower than using a solar collector field of evacuated tube type.

Tsilingiris, P.T. (Commercial Bank of Greece, Athens (Greece))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagli, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Daz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gspr, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L ; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzlez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krlak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Review and evaluation of contingency plans for oil and hazardous substances in the upper Great Lakes region. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to update and supplement a contingency plan review conducted for the Corps in 1979 by the St. Lawrence-Eastern Ontario Commission for handling oil and hazardous-substance spills on the upper Great Lakes and their connecting channels. Special attention was given to cleanup and control methods described for ice conditions that may exist in the region in winter. The report identifies existing contingency plans in the study area; tabulates amounts, types, and locations of equipment and manpower that exist to implement the plans; describes methods to contain and recover oil in ice conditions; describes spill-mitigation plans and techniques to protect natural resources; describes techniques of deflecting oil in swift flowing waters; and describes disposal plans identified in the contingency plans.

Gundlach, E.R.; Murday, M.; Fanning, W.L.

1986-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Influence of vegetation and seasonal forcing on carbon dioxide fluxes across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for regional scaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER and GEP to be 290 89, 408, 48, and 698, 73 gC m-2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then reaggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

Desai, Desai Ankur R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Cook, Bruce D [University of Minnesota, St Paul; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Euskirchen, Eugenie S [University of Alaska; Gough, Christopher M [Ohio State University; Martin, Jonathan G [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Schmid, Hans Peter [Indiana University; Tang, Jianwu [Chicago Botanical Garden, Glencoe, Illiinois; Wang, Weiguo [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Influence of Vegetation and Seasonal Forcing on Carbon Dioxide Fluxes Across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for Regional Scaling  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in the Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystematmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens, and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER, and GEP to be ?290 89, 408 48, and 698 73 gC m?2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER, and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447 m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then re-aggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER, and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error, and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

Desai, Ankur R.; Noormets, Asko; Bolstad, Paul V.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, Bruce D.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S.; Gough, Christopher; Martin, Jonathan G.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Schmid, Hans P.; Tang, Jianwu; Wang, Weiguo

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

422

Sedimentology, petrology, and gas potential of the Brallier Formation: upper Devonian turbidite facies of the Central and Southern Appalachians  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Devonian Brallier Formation of the central and southern Appalachian basin is a regressive sequence of siltstone turbidites interbedded with mudstones, claystones, and shales. It reaches 1000 meters in thickness and overlies basinal mudrocks and underlies deltaic sandstones and mudrocks. Facies and paleocurrent analyses indicate differences between the depositional system of the Brallier Formation and those of modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences. The Brallier system is of finer grain size and lower flow intensity. In addition, the stratigraphic transition from turbidites to deltaic sediments is gradual and differs in its facies succession from the deposits of the proximal parts of modern submarine fans. Such features as massive and pebbly sandstones, conglomerates, debris flows, and massive slump structures are absent from this transition. Paleocurrents are uniformly to the west at right angles to basin isopach, which is atypical of ancient turbidite systems. This suggests that turbidity currents had multiple point sources. The petrography and paleocurrents of the Brallier Formation indicate an eastern source of sedimentary and low-grade metasedimentary rocks with modern relief and rainfall. The depositional system of the Brallier Formation is interpreted as a series of small ephemeral turbidite lobes of low flow intensity which coalesced in time to produce a laterally extensive wedge. The lobes were fed by deltas rather than submarine canyons or upper fan channel systems. This study shows that the present-day turbidite facies model, based mainly on modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences, does not adequately describe prodeltaic turbidite systems such as the Brallier Formation. Thickly bedded siltstone bundles are common features of the Brallier Formation and are probably its best gas reservoir facies, especially when fracture porosity is well developed.

Lundegard, P.D.; Samuels, N.D.; Pryor, W.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Sequence stratigraphy of the upper San Andres and Grayburg formations, Waddell Field, Crane County, Texas: implications for hydrocarbon reservoir distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The upper San Andres and Grayburg formations (Guadalupian) were deposited on carbonate platforms around the Permian Basin region and are extensive hydrocarbon reservoirs in the region. The Waddell Field (East Waddell Ranch) on the eastern margin of the Central Basin Platform has been producing hydrocarbons since 1935 and current engineering activity includes infill drilling and varying enhanced recovery strategies. This study establishes a sequence stratigraphic framework for the upper San Andres and Grayburg formations-nations in the Waddell Field using cores, well logs, and outcrop analogs. The sequence stratigraphic interpretation was correlated to equivalent. strata on the Northwest Shelf and compared to known reservoir horizons in the Waddell Field. On the western margin of the field, production is dominant in deep to shallow subtidal lithofacies in two high-frequency sequences. These two high-frequency sequences correspond to Guadalupian 12 and 13 high-frequency sequences described on the Northwest Shelf. The San Andres and Grayburg formations are separated by a Type I sequence boundary during which subaerial exposure of the platform and siliciclastic progradation occurred. Production from the Grayburg Formation is also dominated by subtidal peloidal facies and migrates towards the eastern margin of the field, higher in the stratigraphy. The Grayburg sequence model divides the formation into two highfrequency cycles which correspond to Guadalupian 14 and 15 high-frequency cycles on the Northwest Shelf based on sequence geometry, platform position and high-frequency cycle type. Reservoirs in the Waddell Field (East Waddell Ranch) produce almost exclusively from the deep to shallow subtidal facies in the transgressive systems tracts of each high-frequency sequence and only down-dip from the inter-and supratidal facies. Up-dip shallow and peritidal facies within the transgressive systems tracts and in the overlying high-stand systems tracts provide up-dip and overlying seals.

Pinsonnault, Scott Michael

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Stratigraphy, petrology, and depositional environments of upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary Sabbath Creek section, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 9387-ft (2816-m) section of Upper Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary strata is exposed along Sabbath Creek in the northern ANWR of north-eastern Alaska and represents a regressive depositional sequence. The entire section is divided into four lithologic units (A-D), each characterized by distinct depositional assemblages. Unit A, at the base of the section, consists of several coarsening-upward sequences of alternating thick organic-rich siltstones an fine-grained litharenites, representing deposition in subaqueous to lower delta-plain environments. Unit B stratigraphically overlies Unit A and is characterized by multiple, mutually erosive, fining-upward sequences of fine to coarse pebble litharenites typical of point-bar sequences in a meandering stream environment (lower to upper delta plain). Unit C consists of multiple, poorly developed fining-upward sequences of dominantly clast- and matrix-supported pebble conglomerate interpreted as braided stream deposits. At the top of the section, Unit D is characterized by multiple fining- and a few coarsening-upward sequences of organic-rich shale with minor amounts of medium to coarse litharenite and pebble conglomerate representing meandering stream deposition. The Sabbath Creek section is lithologically dissimilar to coeval units to the west. The Sagavanirktok Formation and Colville Group contain pyroclastic material and thick coal beds not seen in the Sabbath Creek section. Instead, this section is lithologically similar to the Moose Channel formation - a regressive, fluvial, deltaic sequence exposed in the MacKenzie delta area of northwestern Canada. Consequently , detailed interpretation of the sabbath Creek section has important implications concerning the petroleum potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and offshore beaufort Sea.

Buckingham, M.L.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reservoir characterization of the Upper and Lower Repetto reservoirs of the Santa Clara field-federal waters, offshore California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the characterization of the Upper and Lower Repetto reservoirs of the Santa Clara field, which lies seven miles offshore of Ventura County, California. The approaches that we adopted for this reservoir characterization are based on the analysis of field production data. These reservoir characterization approaches include: The application of the Fetkovich/McCray decline type curve to estimate original oil-in-place, drainage area, flow capacity, and a skin factor for each well. This approach requires converting the field production data for each well to dimensionless decline flowrate, dimensionless rate integral, and dimensionless rate integral-derivative functions. These functions are then simultaneously plotted against dimensionless decline time so that a unique match of these plots can be obtained using the Fetkovich/McCray decline type curve (in this research, data conversion and type curve matching are performed using a software package). The analysis of plots of reciprocal production rate versus material balance time to estimate "movable" or recoverable oil reserves. This new material balance approach is used in conjunction with a semi-analytical method of graphical analysis (pressure drop normalized rate versus cumulative oil production), which also provides estimates of recoverable oil reserves. Together, these plotting techniques provide good estimates of the estimated ultimate recovery for each well. Our approaches for the analysis of field production data allow us to provide recovery factors for each well (using our estimates of original oil-in-place and estimated ultimate recovery). Furthermore, we were able to generate maps of original oil-in-place, estimated ultimate recovery, flow capacity, and permeability for both the Upper and Lower Repetto reservoirs.

Roco, Craig Emmitt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Upper Burbank Disposal Cell, Uravan, Colorado, DOE/AL/62350-250, Revision 1, July 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DISPOSAL CELL URAUAN, COLORADO July 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Dhrision U MTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico DOElAU62350-250 REV. 1 Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico This page intentionally left blank LONG-TERM GURMIWNCE P U N FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DrsPosAL CEU. WYAAI. COhORAOD TABLE OF DONENTe TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSEANDSCOPE .............................................................................................. 1-1 2 . 1 1 FINAL SlTE CONDITIONS ................... ...-.... ...............................................*.............. 2-1 ..................................................................... ................... 2

427

XLS - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Forecast Volatility Expiry Lower Upper Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook, January 2014. Note: Confidence interval derived from options market ...

428

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

429

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Spot WTI crude oil prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

430

Confidence bounds for sampling-based group by estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling is now a very important data management tool, to such an extent that an interface for database sampling is included in the latest SQL standard. In this article we reconsider in depth what at first may seem like a very simple problemcomputing ... Keywords: Approximate query processing, multiple hypothesis testing, sampling

Fei Xu; Christopher Jermaine; Alin Dobra

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources failed to find much realization in actual stocks data. The idea that stocks are still languishing at below-normal levels is particularly persuasive when one views current levels (for key consuming regions) relative to "normal" values which account for the long-term trend in OECD stocks. We believe that monthly average WTI prices will stay around $30 per barrel for the first part of 2001. This is a noticeable upward shift in our projected average prices from even a month ago. The shift reflects greater emphasis on the lack of stock builds and less emphasis on the assumption that supply from OPEC and non-OPEC suppliers may be exceeding demand by 1-2

432

Point-Wise Confidence Interval Estimation by Neural Networks: A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the human errors cannot be accurately captured (or corrected) by a neural network, it is considered that the values in the map are reasonably accurate and ...

433

Confidence Intervals for the Hyperparameters in Structural Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gerais, 31270-901 - Belo Horizonte - MG, Brazil E-mail: {glauraf,thiagors,jujujar,fcruz}@ufmg.br November. The performance of this procedure is empirically obtained through Monte Carlo simulations implemented in Ox. Asymp

Cruz, Frederico

434

Informatively optimal levels of confidence for measurement uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evolutionary trend to optimization in human activity, one can obviously expect a ..... redundancy, i.e. from 92% to 96%) correspond according to the error function

435

Estimating Realistic Confidence Intervals for the Activation Energy Determined from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Simul- taneous Measurement of Calorimetric and Rheological Evolutions", Rev. Sci. Instr., 79, 023905-008-0273-4 Titomanlio, G., et al., "On the Simulation of Thermoplastic Injection Moulding Process. 2 Relevance Lags during Poly- mer Solidification", Thermochim. Acta, 413, 101­110 (2004), DOI:10.1016/j.tca.2003

Utah, University of

436

Natural Gas Spot Prices: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Spot prices at the Henry Hub traded at a midpoint of $6.91 per MMBtu on Wednesday. This is the first time the price has been below $7.00 since December 1, ...

437

Filters and Approximate Confidence Intervals for Interpreting Rainfall Anomaly indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rainfall anomaly index (RAI) has been widely used to study variations over time in Sahelian rainfall. Its interpretation is often complicated by excessive missing data and changes in station network, both of which prevent a precise ...

L. Brring; M. Hulme

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi disruption added to a market sense of oversupply. Relatively mild weather in Europe allowed distillate ...

439

Status Update: Extended Storage and Transportation Waste Confidence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation made by David W. Pstrak for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY.

440

Confidence Builders: Evaluating Seasonal Climate Forecasts from User Perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water managers, cattle ranchers, and wildland fire managers face several barriers to effectively using climate forecasts. Repeatedly, these decision makers state that they lack any quantitative basis for evaluating forecast credibility. That is ...

Holly C. Hartmann; Thomas C. Pagano; S. Sorooshian; R. Bales

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ucl upper confidence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, ...

442

Research to understand and predict geopressured reservoir characteristics with confidence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Geopressured Geothermal Program has sponsored a series of geoscience studies to resolve key uncertainties in the performance of geopressured reservoirs. The priority areas for research include improving the ability to predict reservoir size and flow capabilities, understanding the role of oil and gas in reservoir depletion and evaluating mechanisms for reservoir pressure maintenance. Long-term production from the Gladys McCall well has provided the basis for most of the current research efforts. The well was shut-in on October 29, 1987, for pressure recovery after producing over 27 million barrels of brine with associated gas. Geologic investigations are evaluating various mechanisms for pressure maintenance in this reservoir, including recharge from adjacent reservoirs or along growth faults, shale dewatering, and laterally overlapping and connected sandstone layers. Compaction studies using shale and sandstone core samples have provided data on the relationship between rock compression and reservoir pressure decline and the correlation to changes in porosity and permeability. The studies support the use of a porosity-coupled reservoir simulation model which has provided an excellent match to the well's production history. 10 refs., 3 figs.

Stiger, S.G.; Prestwich, S.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Utilization of the upper Houston Ship Channel by fish and macroinvertebrates with respect to water quality trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nektonic utilization of the upper Houston Ship Channel (HSC) was assessed through characterization of species composition, abundance and community structure of finfish and macroinvertebrate populations. Impact of basic water quality trends on utilization was evaluated. seine, gillnet and revolving screen collections from two deep-water and six shoreline sampling stations in upper HSC stream segments 1006 (downstream) and 1007 (upstream) during May 1988 through July 1989 yielded 33,042 nektonic organisms comprising 84 taxa. Spatial and temporal trends in catch statistics, species diversity, and hydrological variables were assessed for each sampling gear type. Seasonal composition by dominant taxa was determined and effect of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen on catch statistics examined. Mean surface (shoreline) water temperature and dissolved oxygen levels were similar between segments and followed expected seasonal trends. Mean bottom dissolved oxygen levels in segment 1007 during May through September were consistently 1 to 1.5 mg/l lower than segment 1006 and exhibited hypoxic conditions. Significantly greater catch and biomass were observed in segment 1007 as compared to those of segment 1006. Species diversity and number of taxa were comparable between segments. Distinct reductions in catch, number of taxa and species diversity characterized winter seine collections in segment 1006. Surface water temperatures appeared to exert the greatest hydrological influence on shoreline catch statistics. Revolving screen catches were greatest in Segment 1007 during November through March when bottom dissolved oxygen levels peaked and water temperatures ebbed. Significantly reduced catches in segment 1007 during May through October coincided with highest water temperatures and near-anoxic dissolved oxygen levels. By contrast, catch statistics from segment 1006 were highest during summer and early fall when mean bottom temperature and dissolved oxygen levels were highest and lowest, respectively. Cumulative number of taxa was highest in both segments during winter. HSC segment 1006 maintains healthy shoreline and bottom nekton communities year-round. Low dissolved oxygen in bottom waters restrict nekton utilization of segment 1007 during summer. Richness and abundance in segment 1007 during winter equaled or exceeded that of segment 1006.

Seiler, Richard Dale

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Large-Scale SST Variability in the Western North Atlantic Subtropical Convergence Zone during FASINEX. Part II: Upper Ocean Heat Balance and Frontogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyzed the influence of wind-deriven horizontal heat advection on the large-scale [O(1000) km wavelength] variability of both the upper-ocean mixed-layer heat content and the subtropical frontal zone (SFZ) within an 11 by 10 domain in the ...

George R. Halliwell Jr.; Peter Cornillon

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Synergistic Interactions between an Upper-Level Jet Streak and Diabatic Processes that Influence the Development of a Low-Level Jet and a Secondary Coastal Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of numerical simulations is presented for the February 1979 Presidents' Day cyclone in order to understand more fully the roles played by upper-level jet streaks the oceanic planetary boundary layer (PBL), and latent heat release in the ...

Louis W. Uccellini; Ralph A. Petersen; Paul J. Kocin; Keith F. Brill; James J. Tuccillo

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

CFD Analysis for Flow Behavior Characteristics in the Upper Plenum during low flow/low pressure transients for the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas coolant at low pressure exhibits poor heat transfer characteristics. This is an area of concern for the passive response targeted by the Generation IV GCFR design. For the first 24 hour period, the decay heat removal for the GCFR design is dependent on an actively powered blower, which also would reduce the temperature in the fuel during transients, before depending on the passive operation. Natural circulation cooling initiates when the blower is stopped for the final phase of the decay heat removal, as under forced convection the core decay heat is adequately cooled by the running blower. The ability of the coolant to flow in the reverse direction or having recirculation, when the blowers are off, necessitates more understanding of the flow behavior characteristics in the upper plenum. The work done here focuses primarily on the period after the blower has been turned off, as the core is adequately cooled when the blowers are running, thus there was no need to carry out the analysis for the first 24 hours. In order to understand the plume behavior for the GCFR upper plenum several cases were run, with air, helium and helium-air mixture. For each case, the FLUENT was used to characterize the steady state velocity vectors and corresponding temperature in the upper plenum under passive decay heat removal conditions. This study will provide better insight into the plume interaction in the upper plenum at low flow and low pressure conditions.

Piyush Sabharwall; Theron Marshall; Kevan Weaver; Hans Gougar

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

H.E.S.S. upper limit on the very high energy gamma-ray emission from the globular cluster 47 Tucanae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104), which contains at least 23 millisecond pulsars, were performed with the H.E.S.S. telescope system. The observations lead to an upper limit of F(E>800 GeV) conversion efficiency of spin-down power to gamma-ray photons or to relativistic leptons.

Aharonian, F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method: Application to liquid argon and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method The hypothetical scanning HS method is a general approach for calculating the absolute entropy S and free energy F to provide the free energy through the analysis of a single configuration. © 2004 American Institute

Meirovitch, Hagai

449

Ten Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part I: Climatology, Variability, Transport, and Relation to Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten years (19942004) of measurements of tropical upper-tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) by the Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) are investigated over three regionsthe tropical Atlantic, tropical Africa, ...

Zhengzhao Luo; Dieter Kley; Richard H. Johnson; Herman Smit

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Observations and Numerical Simulation of Upper Boundary Layer Rapid Drying and Moistening Events during the International H2O Project (IHOP_2002)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the morning of 12 June 2002, a series of upper boundary layer (UBL) rapid drying and moistening events (RDEs and RMEs, respectively) occurred at the Homestead site of the International H2O Project (IHOP_2002). Over a period of 10 h, ...

Robin L. Tanamachi; Wayne F. Feltz; Ming Xue

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A Model for the Thickness and Salinity of the Upper Layer in the Arctic Ocean and the Relationship between the Ice Thickness and Some External Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a dynamical model for the salinity and thickness of the upper layer in the Arctic. The parameters are the river runoff to the Arctic, the buoyancy supply through the Bering Strait, the export of ice from the Arctic and a ...

Anders Stigebrandt

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Vertical Reynolds Stress Divergence in the Upper Ocean Associated with Linear Wind-Driven, Near-Inertial Waves of Finite Wavelength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Study of a schematic linear, wind-driven, inertiogravity wave model in the upper ocean finds resonant, near-inertial waves of finite horizontal wavelength to have both horizontal and vertical motions. The mean product of these horizontal motions ...

Warren B. White

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Evaluations of Upper-Level Turbulence Diagnostics Performance Using the Graphical Turbulence Guidance (GTG) System and Pilot Reports (PIREPs) over East Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The forecast skill of upper-level turbulence diagnostics is evaluated using available turbulence observations [viz., pilot reports (PIREPs)] over East Asia. The six years (200308) of PIREPs used in this study include null, light, and moderate-or-...

Jung-Hoon Kim; Hye-Yeong Chun; Robert D. Sharman; Teddie L. Keller

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

A Case Study of Coupling between Low- and Upper-Level JetFront Systems: Investigation of Dynamical and Diabatic Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An example of coupling between an upper-level and a low-level jetfront system is analyzed using the mesoscale hydrostatic model SALSA. The case study chosen is the cold front sampled during the intensive observation period 2 of the Mesoscale ...

Jean-Luc Sortais; Jean-Pierre Cammas; Xiao Ding Yu; Evelyne Richard; Robert Rosset

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Numerical Simulations of a Transverse Indirect Circulation and Low-Level Jet in the Exit Region of an Upper-Level Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uccellini and Johnson present a case study of a severe weather event in Ohio on 1011 May 1973 to show evidence for coupling between an upper-tropospheric jet streak and a low-level jet within an indirect transverse circulation found in the exit ...

Keith F. Brill; Louis W. Uccellini; Richard P. Burkhart; Thomas T. Warner; Richard A. Anthes

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

After the fire is out: A post in-situ combustion audit, Upper Miocene deepwater sands, San Joaquin Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

An audit of small-scale, air in-situ combustion projects developed in the upper Miocene Monarch and Webster unconsolidated, arkosic sand reservoirs, Midway Sunset field, Kern County, California, demonstrates minor rock diagenesis. Burn distribution and progression is controlled by reservoir continuity, layering, and original permeability variations. Air in-situ combustion projects were operated between 1962 and 1976. Injected air drives a burning oil (coke) front through a reservoir reaching maximum temperatures of 650C. Dense new well control including 3,000 ft of core is part of a large steamdrive development. Fireflood-induced diagenesis was clearly visible in core. Altered zones include sands with reduced oil saturations, burn zones with remaining coke, and reddish (oxidized) zones with no hydrocarbons. Wireline log response in these zones have been highly modified. Detailed mapping by subzone using pre- and post-burn logs permits the determination of three-dimensional burn and reduced saturation geometries. Little rock alteration occurred in these sands. The only diagenesis of the sand fraction was to calcite grains, where oil/calcite reactions produced calcium sulfate rims and CO{sub 2} gas. X-ray diffraction of finer 'matrix' reveals no recrystallization of opal-CT, no irreversible collapse of smectite, and only minor removal of kaolinite. Partial dissolution of opal and zeolites was visible in SEM. This nonequilibrium mineral suite probably reflects kinetic control by grain size, protective grain coatings, and alteration time.

Eagan, J.M.; Barrett, M.L. (Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Soustek, P.G. (Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Utilizing upper hybrid resonance for high density plasma production and negative ion generation in a downstream region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Localized wave-induced resonances are created by microwaves launched directly into a multicusp (MC) plasma device in the k Up-Tack B mode, where k is the wave vector and B is the static magnetic field. The resonance zone is identified as upper hybrid resonance (UHR), and lies r = {approx}22 mm away from the MC boundary. Measurement of radial wave electric field intensity confirms the right hand cutoff of the wave (r = 22.5-32.1 mm) located near the UHR zone. A sharp rise in the corresponding electron temperature in the resonance region by {approx}13 eV from its value away from resonance at r = 0, is favorable for the generation of vibrationally excited molecules of hydrogen. A transverse magnetic filter allows cold electrons ({approx}1-2 eV) to pass into the downstream region where they generate negative ions by dissociative attachment. Measurements of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) support the viewpoint. H{sup -} current density of {approx}0.26 mA/cm{sup 2} is obtained at a wave power density of {approx}3 W/cm{sup 2} at 2.0 mTorr pressure, which agrees reasonably well with results obtained from a steady state model using particle balance equations.

Sahu, Debaprasad; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Pressurizer tank upper support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

459

Pressurizer tank upper support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

Baker, Tod H. (O' Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Township, Armstrong County, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Pyrolysis and hydrocarbon source bed potential of the Upper Devonian Woodford Shale, Hovey Channel, southern Permian basin, west Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper Devonian Woodford Shale in the Hovey Channel area, southern Permian basin, is 50 m thick and composed largely of brown to black, pyritic, spore-bearing, organic-rich, fissile shale an chert. Total organic carbon, distillable hydrocarbons, genetic potential, organic carbon index, hydrogen index, temperature of maximum hydrocarbon generation, and kerogen transformation index of the Woodford Shale suggest a matured to overmatured, gas-generating source bed. The total organic carbon content of the formation ranged from a low of 0.77% in the cherty samples to a high of 4.59% in a shaley sample, averaging 2.18%. Distillable hydrocarbon content of the samples is fairly high (averaging 1.72 mg HC/gm{degree} rock), varying from 0.90 mg HC/gm{degree} rock to 3.22 mg HC/gm{degree} rock. Genetic potential evaluated in terms of both residual and total generative potential showed above average potential, averaging 3.25 mg HC/gm{degree} rock for the residual and 4.90 mg HC/gm{degree} rock for the total, respectively. Live organic carbon index values ranged from 11-28%, characterizing the formation as a moderate to good source bed. Hydrogen index values ranged from 73 mg HC/gm{degree} C org to 155 mg HC/gm{degree} C org, suggesting overmaturity and gas-generation potential of the source bed. Temperature of maximum hydrocarbon generation values and kerogen transformation ratio values (averaging 0.34) also indicate overmatured nature of the Woodford Shale.

Hussain, M.; Bloom, M.A. (Sul Ross State Univ., Alpine, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Proceedings of the workshop on the modification of the upper atmosphere by Satellite Power System (SPS) propulsion effluents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a workshop held in June 1979, to identify research needs for evaluating environmental impacts on the upper atmosphere (here defined as greater than 70 km) due to Satellite Power System (SPS) transport, i.e., propulsion and reentry are presented. The substantial injections of water and hydrogen therefrom may lead to global-scale regions of reduced ionization in the ionospheric F-Region that may have a serious impact on worldwide HF radio communications; and the resulting possibly significant increases in mesospheric humidity and probable cloudiness could afffect climate and remote sensing from satellites. The large injections of argon ions of kilovolt energy between low earth orbit and geostationary orbit may alter substantially the trapped radiation environment of the magnetosphere and thus the hazard for personnel and electronic equipment. During the workshop it became clear that the highest priority for SPS environmental assessment goes to theoretical studies needed before acceptable atmospheric experiments can be designed. Problems to be addressed include: the extent, magnitude, and variability of the predicted depletion in F-region ionization together with descriptions of water and hydrogen injections into the atmosphere characteristic of SPS vehicles and flight profiles; the long-term variations in mesospheric humidity and cloudiness with and without SPS operations; and the description of condensation and evaporation processes of water exhausted from high-altitude rockets in order to predict mesospheric contrail formation and dissipation. Furthermore, in considering argon ion rocket transport to geosynchronous orbit, the stopping and lifetime of the argon ion beams and consequent changes in the radiation belts, especially as they affect spacecraft, should also be addressed.

Bauer, E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Climatic implications of correlated upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits on the Cinca and Gallego rivers, NE Spain  

SciTech Connect

We correlate Upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits of the Cinca and Gallego River valleys (south central Pyrenees and Ebro basin, Spain) using geomorphic position, luminescence dates, and time-related trends in soil development. The ages obtained from glacial deposits indicate glacial periods at 85 {+-} 5 ka, 64 {+-} 11 ka, and 36 {+-} 3 ka (from glacial till) and 20 {+-} 3 ka (from loess). The fluvial drainage system, fed by glaciers in the headwaters, developed extensive terrace systems in the Cinca River valley at 178 {+-} 21 ka, 97 {+-} 16 ka, 61 {+-} 4 ka, 47 {+-} 4 ka, and 11 {+-} 1 ka, and in the Gallego River valley at 151 {+-} 11 ka, 68 {+-} 7 ka, and 45 {+-} 3 ka. The times of maximum geomorphic activity related to cold phases coincide with Late Pleistocene marine isotope stages and heinrich events. The maximum extent of glaciers during the last glacial occurred at 64 {+-} 11 ka, and the terraces correlated with this glacial phase are the most extensive in both the Cinca (61 {+-} 4 ka) and Gallego (68 {+-} 7 ka) valleys, indicating a strong increase in fluvial discharge and availability of sediments related to the transition to deglaciation. The global Last Glacial Maximum is scarcely represented in the south central Pyrenees owing to dominantly dry conditions at that time. Precipitation must be controlled by the position of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation system. The glacial systems and the associated fluvial dynamic seem sensitive to (1) global climate changes controlled by insolation, (2) North Atlantic thermohaline circulation influenced by freshwater pulses into the North Atlantic, and (3) anomalies in atmospheric circulation in the North Atlantic controlling precipitation on the Iberian peninsula. The model of glacial and fluvial evolution during the Late Pleistocene in northern Spain could be extrapolated to other glaciated mountainous areas in southern Europe.

Lewis, Claudia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcdonald, Eric [NON LANL; Sancho, Carlos [NON LANL; Pena, Jose- Luis [NON LANL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

LED-s Urban Carpet: A portable Interactive Installation for Urban Environments. MSc thesis, UCL, London (unpublished) EQUATOR: Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration on integration of physical and digital interaction http://www.equator.ac.uk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this paper project is to generate a new kind of physical scenario where people can interact by means of technology with the urban and social environment. This paper suggests that introducing a new kind technological interactive platform, in this case a LED-s Urban Carpet, in a public space could enhance social awareness and interaction between people nearby. In order to achieve the paper goal, a theoretical framework for understanding and designing interactive computing systems to be embedded in an urban landscape is developed. Also, the experiences in building and field testing the LED-s Urban Carpet prototype in three different urban locations in the heritage city of Bath are reported. Initial findings about how people move, congregate and socialize around the interactive installation are presented, and the levels and types of interaction around the installation as well. In addition, some social factors that can cause embarrassment or that can inspire social interaction around the public display are explored. The design and test of the LED-s Urban Carpet is evaluated in relation with the theoretical background. Finally suggestions are made for improve the prototype and develop further systems. This project was partially funded by MSc. Adaptive Architecture and Computation and

Carolina Briones

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Upper limit on the flux of photons with energies above 10^19 eV using the Telescope Array surface detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for ultra-high energy photons by analyzing geometrical properties of shower fronts of events registered by the Telescope Array surface detector. By making use of an event-by-event statistical method, we derive upper limits on the absolute flux of primary photons with energies above 10^19, 10^19.5 and 10^20 eV based on the first three years of data taken.

T. Abu-Zayyad; R. Aida; M. Allen; R. Anderson; R. Azuma; E. Barcikowski; J. W. Belz; D. R. Bergman; S. A. Blake; R. Cady; B. G. Cheon; J. Chiba; M. Chikawa; E. J. Cho; W. R. Cho; H. Fujii; T. Fujii; T. Fukuda; M. Fukushima; D. Gorbunov; W. Hanlon; K. Hayashi; Y. Hayashi; N. Hayashida; K. Hibino; K. Hiyama; K. Honda; T. Iguchi; D. Ikeda; K. Ikuta; N. Inoue; T. Ishii; R. Ishimori; D. Ivanov; S. Iwamoto; C. C. H. Jui; K. Kadota; F. Kakimoto; O. Kalashev; T. Kanbe; K. Kasahara; H. Kawai; S. Kawakami; S. Kawana; E. Kido; H. B. Kim; H. K. Kim; J. H. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. Kitamoto; S. Kitamura; Y. Kitamura; K. Kobayashi; Y. Kobayashi; Y. Kondo; K. Kuramoto; V. Kuzmin; Y. J. Kwon; J. Lan; S. I. Lim; S. Machida; K. Martens; T. Matsuda; T. Matsuura; T. Matsuyama; J. N. Matthews; M. Minamino; K. Miyata; Y. Murano; I. Myers; K. Nagasawa; S. Nagataki; T. Nakamura; S. W. Nam; T. Nonaka; S. Ogio; M. Ohnishi; H. Ohoka; K. Oki; D. Oku; T. Okuda; A. Oshima; S. Ozawa; I. H. Park; M. S. Pshirkov; D. C. Rodriguez; S. Y. Roh; G. I. Rubtsov; D. Ryu; H. Sagawa; N. Sakurai; A. L. Sampson; L. M. Scott; P. D. Shah; F. Shibata; T. Shibata; H. Shimodaira; B. K. Shin; J. I. Shin; T. Shirahama; J. D. Smith; P. Sokolsky; B. T. Stokes; S. R. Stratton; T. Stroman; S. Suzuki; Y. Takahashi; M. Takeda; A. Taketa; M. Takita; Y. Tameda; H. Tanaka; K. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; S. B. Thomas; G. B. Thomson; P. Tinyakov; I. Tkachev; H. Tokuno; T. Tomida; S. Troitsky; Y. Tsunesada; K. Tsutsumi; Y. Tsuyuguchi; Y. Uchihori; S. Udo; H. Ukai; G. Vasiloff; Y. Wada; T. Wong; M. Wood; Y. Yamakawa; R. Yamane; H. Yamaoka; K. Yamazaki; J. Yang; Y. Yoneda; S. Yoshida; H. Yoshii; X. Zhou; R. Zollinger; Z. Zundel

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

466

Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining reserves of the Leona Este Field, which is located in the southern portion of the Eastern Venezuela Basin. Two or more of these reservoir sands, which are interbedded with shales, have been simultaneously produced pursuing an increase in the oil production rate, but an unexpected production performance was obtained: the accelerated and early increase of the water volume associated to the produced oil has caused the shut down of some wells in the Leona Este Field. In order to understand this productive performance and to re-evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of the study interval, it is important to describe these reservoirs in terms of their depositional origin and trap formation. An integrated reservoir model was constructed using all the available geological, geophysical and production data. The hydrocarbon trapping mechanism of each studied stratigraphic interval, traditionally known as the "S5", "TU", "TL", "U1U", "U1L", "U2U", "U2MA", "U2MB" and "U2L" sands, includes two components: ? Stratigraphic component: each stratigraphic interval presents one or more reservoir zones composed by sandy deposits that fill belts of stacked tidal-fluvial channels in a SSE-NNW trending tide-dominated estuarine system. In most intervals, these contemporaneous-in-deposition reservoir zones are not connected due to the lateral variation of facies present in the tide-dominated estuary. ? Structural component: northward dipping strata have been offset by a W-E trending major normal fault and secondary normal faults striking parallel to the major one. The major fault is the southern seal of the hydrocarbon traps. The most important prospects of the study interval are the reservoir zones 1 and 2 of the "U1L" sand, the reservoir zone 3 of the "U2MB" sand, and the "U1U" sand, which show more than 15 feet of average net sand thickness, and contain the largest volume of recoverable oil per reservoir zone in the Leona Este Field.

Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Facies architecture of the upper Calvert Bluff Formation exposed in the highwall of Big Brown Mine, Fairfield, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The facies architecture and geometry of stratigraphic surfaces within a lignite bearing interval of the Paleocene upper Calvert Bluff Formation is mapped on a photomosaic of the 150 ft (50 m) high and 12,000 ft (4km) long â??Câ? area highwall of Big Brown Mine, near Fairfield, Texas. Observed bedding and facies architecture are interpreted in terms of temporal changes, depositional environments and sequence stratigraphic setting. A three dimensional grid of 89 subsurface logs is correlated to this photomosaic to characterize log response patterns of facies. Six facies are observed: 1) lignite, 2) interdistributary bay mud, 3) prograding delta, 4) delta top mud, 5) distributary channels, and 6) incised valley fill. The six facies were defined by a combination of mapped photomosaic observations and subsurface log correlations. The lignite deposit formed in a low depositional energy, low sediment input, high-organic productivity interchannel basin. Overlying mud records overbank flooding followed by avulsion and progradation of delta deposits. Tidal-flat deposits overlying prograding delta deposits record fluctuating energy conditions on the emerging delta top. Channel deposits cutting into the delta top record lateral channel migration across delta top floodplains. These regressive delta deposits are capped by a local incised sequence boundary overlain by fluvial channel deposits inferred to have allowed sediment to bypass further basinward during lowstand. A sheet of channel deposits capping this highwall exposure records more recent erosion, followed by development of modern soil horizons. The Big Brown Mine highwall exposes a relatively complete high-frequency Paleocene stratigraphic sequence developed in an area landward of the shoreline position during maximum transgression, that progresses upsection from: 1) highstand alluvial flood basin coals, 2) a thin condensed maximum flooding interdistributary shale, 3) a thick succession of regressive deltaic strata, and 4) a high-relief, sequence-bounding erosion surface overlain by a lowstand to transgressive fill of channel deposits. Correlations with regional Wilcox Group stratigraphic studies spanning coeval shoreline and shelf strata indicate that this high-frequency sequence is within the transgressive systems tract of a 3rd order stratigraphic sequence. It appears that high-frequency sequences of sub-regional extent control the complex distribution of coal seams within central Texas.

Sturdy, Michael Dale

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SAMPLING OF TANK 19 IN F TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect

Representative sampling is required for characterization of the residual material in Tank 19 prior to operational closure. Tank 19 is a Type IV underground waste storage tank located in the F-Tank Farm. It is a cylindrical-shaped, carbon steel tank with a diameter of 85 feet, a height of 34.25 feet, and a working capacity of 1.3 million gallons. Tank 19 was placed in service in 1961 and initially received a small amount of low heat waste from Tank 17. It then served as an evaporator concentrate (saltcake) receiver from February 1962 to September 1976. Tank 19 also received the spent zeolite ion exchange media from a cesium removal column that once operated in the Northeast riser of the tank to remove cesium from the evaporator overheads. Recent mechanical cleaning of the tank removed all mounds of material. Anticipating a low level of solids in the residual waste, Huff and Thaxton [2009] developed a plan to sample the waste during the final clean-up process while it would still be resident in sufficient quantities to support analytical determinations in four quadrants of the tank. Execution of the plan produced fewer solids than expected to support analytical determinations in all four quadrants. Huff and Thaxton [2009] then restructured the plan to characterize the residual separately in the North and the South regions: two 'hemispheres.' This document provides sampling recommendations to complete the characterization of the residual material on the tank bottom following the guidance in Huff and Thaxton [2009] to split the tank floor into a North and a South hemisphere. The number of samples is determined from a modification of the formula previously published in Edwards [2001] and the sample characterization data for previous sampling of Tank 19 described by Oji [2009]. The uncertainty is quantified by an upper 95% confidence limit (UCL95%) on each analyte's mean concentration in Tank 19. The procedure computes the uncertainty in analyte concentration as a function of the number of samples, and the final number of samples is determined when the reduction in the uncertainty from an additional sample no longer has a pra