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Sample records for uc-950 quarterly coal

  1. DOE/EIA-0487(96) Distribution Category UC-950 Petroleum Marketing...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6) Distribution Category UC-950 Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 October 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585...

  2. DOE/EIA-0487(95) Distribution Category UC-950 Petroleum Marketing...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5) Distribution Category UC-950 Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 September 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC...

  3. DOE/EIA-0191(99) Distribution Category UC-950

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Origin and Destination of Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Fossil-Fuel Data at the Electric Utility and Plant Level . . ... During 1999 several coal-fired electric plants were sold and ...

  4. EIA -Quarterly Coal Distribution

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - Coal Distribution Quarterly Coal Distribution Archives Release Date: August 17, 2016 Next Release Date: December 22, 2016 The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. domestic coal distribution by coal origin, coal destination, mode of transportation and consuming sector. All data are preliminary and superseded by the final Coal Distribution - Annual Report. Year/Quarters By origin State By destination State Report Data File Report Data File 2009

  5. Quarterly coal report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.

    1996-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1995 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1987 through the third quarter of 1995. Appendix A displays, from 1987 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  6. Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Release Date: August 17, 2016 | Next Release Date: December 22, 2016 | full report The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of transportation, and consuming sector. All quarterly data are preliminary and will be superseded by the release of the corresponding "Annual Coal Distribution Report." Highlights for the fourth quarter 2015: Total

  7. Quarterly coal report, July--September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks. Coke production consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for July through September 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the second quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 72 tabs.

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2013 ... Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 4th Quarter 2013 ...

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2013 ... Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 3rd Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama ...

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012 ... Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 4th Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama ...

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012 ... Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2012 ...

  12. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2012 ... Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 4th Quarter 2012 ...

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2014 ... Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 2nd Quarter 2014 Origin: Alabama ...

  14. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2013 ... Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 3rd Quarter 2013 ...

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013 ... Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 2nd Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama ...

  16. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2013 ... Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 4th Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama ...

  17. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2012 ... Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama ...

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012 ... Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2012 ...

  19. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2014 ... Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 1st Quarter 2014 ...

  20. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2014 ... Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 1st Quarter 2014 Origin: Alabama ...

  1. Quarterly coal report, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for April through June 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the first quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 73 tabs.

  2. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.

    1998-08-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1992 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the United States, historical information has been integrated in this report. 58 tabs.

  3. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1996 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1990 through the third quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 72 tabs.

  4. Quarterly coal report, July--September 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for July through September 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the second quarter of 1998. 58 tabs.

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2015 Alabama _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2015 Alabama _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2015 Alabama _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2015 Alabama _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2014 Alabama _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2014 Alabama _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal

  11. Quarterly coal report, April--June, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for April through June 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the first quarter of 1998. Appendix A displays, from 1992 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 58 tabs.

  12. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the third quarter of 1998. Appendix A displays, from 1992 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 58 tabs.

  13. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly status...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    July--September 1995 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly status report, July--September 1995 You are accessing...

  14. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    This report presents detailed quarterly data for March 1996 and historical data for 1988 through 1995 on coal production, distribution, imports and exports, prices, consumption, and stocks.

  15. Quarterly coal report, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-02

    The Quarterly Coal Report provides comprehensive information about US coal production, exports, imports, receipts, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. This issue presents detailed quarterly data for April 1990 through June 1990, aggregated quarterly historical data for 1982 through the second quarter of 1990, and aggregated annual historical data for 1960 through 1989 and projected data for selected years from 1995 through 2010. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the United States, historical information and forecasts have been integrated in this report. 7 figs., 37 tabs.

  16. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities. This report presents detailed quarterly data for october through December 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the third quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 73 tabs.

  17. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2015 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2015 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic

  19. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2015 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic

  20. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2015 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic

  1. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2014 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2014 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic

  3. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-20

    The United States produced 242 million short tons of coal in the first quarter of 1993, a decrease of 6 percent (14 million short tons) from the amount produced during the first quarter of 1992. The decrease was due to a decline in production east of the Mississippi River. All major coal-producing States in this region had lower coal production levels led by West Virginia, which produced 5 million short tons less coal. The principal reasons for the overall drop in coal output compared to a year earlier were: A decrease in demand for US coal in foreign markets; a slower rate of producer/distributor stock build-up; and a drawn-down of electric utility coal stocks. Distribution of US coal in the first quarter of 1993 was 10 million short tons lower than in the first quarter of 1992, with 5 million short tons less distributed to both electric utilities and overseas markets. The average price of coal delivered to electric utilities during the first quarter of 1993 was $28.65 per short ton, the lowest value since the first quarter of 1980. Coal consumption in the first quarter of 1993 was 230 million short tons, 4 percent higher than in the first quarter of 1992, due primarily to a 5-percent increase in consumption at electric utility plants. Total consumer stocks, at 153 million short tons, and electric utility stocks, at 144 million short tons, were at their lowest quarterly level since the end of 1989. US. coal exports totaled 19 million short tons, 6 million short tons less than in the first quarter of 1992, and the lowest quarterly level since 1988. The decline was primarily due to a 1-million-short-ton drop in exports to each of the following destinations: Italy, France, Belgium and Luxembourg, and Canada.

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 1st Quarter 2013 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2013 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 1st Quarter 2013 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2013 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 2nd Quarter 2013 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2014 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination State, 2nd Quarter 2014 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State

  9. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-24

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1995 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1987 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Appendix A displays, from 1987 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  10. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-23

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1994 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1986 through the third quarter of 1994. Appendix A displays, from 1986 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  11. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    This Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience,including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  12. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-24

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1994 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1986 through the fourth quarter of 1993. Appendix A displays, from 1986 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  13. Quarterly Coal Report, April-June 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-18

    The Quarterly Coal Report provides comprehensive information about coal production, exports, imports, receipts, consumption, and stocks in the United States. The data presented in this report were collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-275) as amended. This issue shows detailed quarterly data for April-June 1985, aggregated quarterly historical and projected data for 1980 through 1986, and aggregated annual historical and projected data for 1960 through 1995. All data for 1984 and previous years are final. All 1985 data are preliminary and subject to revision. During the first and second quarters of 1985, the US coal industry continued to return to normal operations after the threat of a strike by US coal miners in 1984. For the first 6 months of 1985 the industry showed the following developments: Coal production was only 2.4% less than in the same period of 1984, when it reached a record January-June total. Coal exports were 10.0% higher than their 1984 level for the same time period. The United States imported 52.3% more coal than it did in the first 6 months of 1984, chiefly from Colombia. Domestic coal consumption reached a record-setting level for January-June, 3.6% greater than the previous record in 1984.

  14. Review of a Proposed Quarterly Coal Publication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This Review of a Proposed Quartery Coal Publication contains findings and recommendations regarding the content of a new summary Energy Information Administration (EIA) coal and coke publication entitled The Quarterly Coal Review (QCR). It is divided into five sections: results of interviews with selected EIA data users; identification of major functions of the coal and coke industries; analysis of coal and coke data collection activities; evaluation of issues conerning data presentation including recommendations for the content of the proposed QCR; and comparison of the proposed QCR with other EIA publications. Major findings and recommendations are as follows: (1) User interviews indicate a definite need for a compehensive publication that would support analyses and examine economic, supply and demand trends in the coal industry; (2) the organization of the publication should reflect the natural order of activities of the coal and coke industries. Based on an analysis of the industries, these functions are: production, stocks, imports, exports, distribution, and consumption; (3) current EIA coal and coke surveys collect sufficient data to provide a summary of the coal and coke industries on a quarterly basis; (4) coal and coke data should be presented separately. Coke data could be presented as an appendix; (5) three geographic aggregations are recommended in the QCR. These are: US total, coal producing districts, and state; (6) coal consumption data should be consolidated into four major consumer categories: electric utilities, coke plants, other industrial, and residential commercial; (7) several EIA publications could be eliminated by the proposed QCR.

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June ...

  16. Quarterly coal report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This document provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, distribution, imports, exports, prices, and consumption. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports are also provided. This report presents compiled data for April thru June, and historical data for 1987 thru the first quarter of 1995.

  17. Quarterly coal report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-18

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended.

  18. Quarterly coal report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-26

    In the second quarter of 1993, the United States produced 235 million short tons of coal. This brought the total for the first half of 1993 to 477 million short tons, a decrease of 4 percent (21 million short tons) from the amount produced during the first half of 1992. The decrease was due to a 26-million-short-ton decline in production east of the Mississippi River, which was partially offset by a 5-million-short-ton increase in coal production west of the Mississippi River. Compared with the first 6 months of 1992, all States east of the Mississippi River had lower coal production levels, led by West Virginia and Illinois, which produced 9 million short tons and 7 million short tons less coal, respectively. The principal reasons for the drop in coal output for the first 6 months of 1993 compared to a year earlier were: a decrease in demand for US coal in foreign markets, particularly the steam coal markets; a draw-down of electric utility coal stocks to meet the increase in demand for coal-fired electricity generation; and a lower producer/distributor stock build-up. Distribution of US coal in the first half of 1993 was 15 million short tons lower than in the first half of 1992, with 13 million short tons less distributed to overseas markets and 2 million short tons less distributed to domestic markets.

  19. Quarterly coal report July--September 1996, February 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for July through September 1996 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1990 through the second quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 8 figs., 72 tabs.

  20. Quarterly coal report July--September 1995, February 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-16

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for July through September 1995 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1987 through the second quarter of 1995. Appendix A displays, from 1987 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  1. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July-September 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    The status of coal liquefaction pilot plants supported by US DOE is reviewed under the following headings: company involved, location, contract, funding, process name, process description, flowsheet, history and progress during the July-September 1979 quarter. Supporting projects such as test facilities, refining and upgrading coal liquids, catalyst development, and gasification of residues from coal gasification plants are discussed similarly. (LTN)

  2. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, August 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P.

    1991-12-31

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  3. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly status...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. ... organic base catalysts for arene hydrogenation and the hydrotreating of the coal liquids. ...

  4. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. ... organic base catalysts for arene hydrogenation and the hydrotreating of the coal liquids. ...

  5. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. ... Task 2, organic base-catalyzed arene hydrogenation and hydrotreating of the coal liquids. ...

  6. Quarterly Coal Report - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Coal Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting and mapping) Summary Prices Reserves Consumption Production Stocks Imports, exports & distribution Coal-fired electric power plants Transportation costs to electric power sector International All coal data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Consumption Environment Imports & exports Industry characteristics Prices Production Projections Recurring Reserves Stocks All

  7. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coal liquids can be hydrogenated catalyzed by Catalyst 2 include monocyclic aromatic ... PROGRESS REPORT; ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA Word Cloud More Like ...

  8. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic coal liquid ... It was found that the rhodium catalyst works well under biphase conditions rather than ...

  9. Coal gasification. Quarterly report, July-September 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    The status of 18 coal gasification pilot plants or supporting projects supported by US DOE is reviewed under the following headings: company involved, location, contract number, funding, gasification process, history, process description, flowsheet and progress in the July-September 1979 quarter. (LTN)

  10. Quarterly coal report, April 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    This report provides information about U.S. coal production, distribution; exports, imports, prices, consumption, and stocks. Data on coke production is also provided. This report presents data for April 1996 thru June 1996.

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Coal Stocks, 2008 - 2014 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Table 37. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2008 - 2014 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Coal Consumers Last Day of Quarter Electric Power Sector 1 Coke Plants Other Industrial 2 Commercial and Institutional Users Total Coal Producers and Distributors Total 2008 March 31 146,497 1,462 4,818 448 153,225 34,876

  12. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, April-June 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-04-01

    DOE's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels was begun by two of DOE's predecessor agencies: Office of Coal Research (OCR) in 1962, and Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior, in the 1930's. Current work is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and non-catalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, especially boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, and gasoline, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquids have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To provide efficient and practical means of utilizing coal resources, DOE is supporting the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. DOE, together with the Electric Power Research Institue, has contracted with fourteen projects are described brieflly: funding, description, status, history, and progress in the current quarter. (LTN)

  13. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January-March 1979. [US DOE supported

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    Progress in DOE-supported coal liquefaction pilot plant projects is reported: company, location, contract, funding, process description, history and progress in the current quarter. Related projects discussed are: coking and gasification of liquefaction plant residues, filtration of coal liquids and refining of coal liquids by hydrogenation. (LTN)

  14. Molecular accessibility in oxidized and dried coals. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kispert, L.D.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this research project is to determine the molecular and structural changes that occur in swelled coal as a result of oxidation and moisture los both in the presence and absence of light using our newly developed EPR spin probe method. The proposed study will make it possible to deduce the molecular accessibility distribution swelled, {ital oxidized} APCS coal for each rank as a function of (1) size (up to 6 nm) and shape, (2) the relative acidic/basic reactive site distributions, and (3) the role of hydrogen bonding as a function of swelling solvents. The advantage of the EPR method is that it permits molecules of selected shape, size and chemical reactivity to be used as probes of molecular accessible regions of swelled coal. From such data an optimum catalyst can be designed to convert oxidized coal into a more convenient form and methods can be devised to lessen the detrimental weathering process. This quarter we have continued to examine the effect of exposure of light before alkylation versus after O-alkylation of the coal structure. The variation in uptake of spin probe VII (amine group) is depicted in figure 1 for Wyodak-Anderson. Before O-alkylation, a significant decrease occurred in the uptake of VII with increasing exposure to ambient light. This suggests that partial break-up of the hydrogen bond network occurs, making it possible to wash out more of the spin probes. This effect was eliminated if the coal was O-alkylated after exposure to sunlight (Figure 2). The removal of the source of hydrogen bonding is responsible for the lack of spin probe up-take variation with time of exposure to light. Further experiments have shown that the data in Figures 1 and 2 is reproducible with a deviation of less than {+-} 10%. It has also been observed that if Wyodak-Anderson coal is exposed to sunlight before swelling, the oscillatory up-take of spin probe VII as a function of percent pyridine is essentially removed.

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Table 39. Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Census Division and State June 30, 2014 March 31, 2014 June 30, 2013 Percent Change (June 30) 2014 versus 2013 New England 8 8 13 -34.3 Maine 2 2

  16. Low-rank coal research. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    Papers in the quarterly technical progress report for the period April-June, 1984, of the Low-Rank Coal Research project have been entered individually into EDB and ERA (17 items). (LTN)

  17. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Quarterly technical progress report, June--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    This report describes work completed during the fourth quarter of a three year project to study the effects of mild chemical pretreatment on coal dissolution reactivity during low severity liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing. The overall objective of this research is to elucidate changes in the chemical and physical structure of coal by pretreating with methanol or other simple organic solvent and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid and measure the influence of these changes on coal dissolution reactivity. This work is part of a larger effort to develop a new coal liquefaction or coal/oil coprocessing scheme consisting of three main process steps: (1) mile pretreatment of the feed coal to enhance dissolution reactivity and dry the coal, (2) low severity thermal dissolution of the pretreated coal to obtain a very reactive coal-derived residual material amenable to upgrading, and (3) catalytic upgrading of the residual products to distillate liquids.

  18. Low-rank coal research. Quarterly report, January--March 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This document contains several quarterly progress reports for low-rank coal research that was performed from January-March 1990. Reports in Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research are in Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, and Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains. Reports in Advanced Research and Technology Development are presented in Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Reports in Combustion Research cover Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Coal Fuels, Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals, and Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications. Liquefaction Research is reported in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction. Gasification Research progress is discussed for Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coal and for Chemistry of Sulfur Removal in Mild Gas.

  19. Desulfurization of coal with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. [Quarterly] report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, Ruozhi; Cheng, Jianjun

    1994-12-31

    This project proposes a new method for removing organic sulfur from Illinois coals using readily available farm products. It proposes to use air and vegetable oils to disrupt the coal matrix, oxidize sulfur forms, increase volatiles, and desulfurize coal. This will be accomplished by impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of the solid products. Preliminary experiments showed that EBC 104 coal catalyzes the formation of hydroperoxides in safflower oil and that more sulfur is extracted from the treated than untreated coal. During this first quarter the requirement of an added photosensitizer has been eliminated, the catalytic effect of coal has been confirmed, and the existence of a complex set of reactions revealed. These reactions between the oxygen, oil, hydroperoxides, and coal are hydroperoxide formation, which is catalyzed by the coal surface and by heat, an unknown coal-hydroperoxide reaction, and oil polymerization. Additionally, diffusion phenomena must be playing a role because oil polymerization occurs, but the importance of diffusion is difficult to assess because less polymerization occurs when coal is present. The first task has been completed and we are now ready to determine the ability of linseed oil hydroperoxides to oxidize organic sulfur in EBC 108 coal.

  20. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Table 41. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Census Division June 30, 2014 March 31, 2014 June 30, 2013 Percent Change (June 30) 2014 versus 2013 Middle Atlantic 215 126 54 296.0 East North Central 627 635 724

  1. Energy Information Administration quarterly coal report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-21

    The United States produced just over 1 billion short tons of coal in 1992, 0.4 percent more than in 1991. Most of the 4-million-short-ton increase in coal production occurred west of the Mississippi River, where a record level of 408 million short tons of coal was produced. The amount of coal received by domestic consumers in 1992 totaled 887 million short tons. This was 7 million short tons more than in 1991, primarily due to increased coal demand from electric utilities. The average price of delivered coal to each sector declined by about 2 percent. Coal consumption in 1992 was 893 million short tons, only 1 percent higher than in 1991, due primarily to a 1-percent increase in consumption at electric utility plants. Consumer coal stocks at the end of 1992 were 163 million short tons, a decrease of 3 percent from the level at the end of 1991, and the lowest year-end level since 1989. US coal exports fell 6 percent from the 1991 level to 103 million short tons in 1992. Less coal was exported to markets in Europe, Asia, and South America, but coal exports to Canada increased 4 million short tons.

  2. Coal gasification. Quarterly report, January-March 1979. [US DOE supported

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    Progress in DOE-supported coal gasification pilot plant projects is reported: company, location, contract number, funding, process description, history and progress in the current quarter. Two support projects are discussed: preparation of a technical data book and mathematical modeling of gasification reactors. (LTN)

  3. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bool, L.E. III; Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.

    1997-01-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UKy), the University of Connecticut, and Princeton University to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI`s existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). During the past quarter the final program coal, from the Wyodak seam in the Powder River Basin, was acquired and distributed. Extensive coal characterization and laboratory work is underway to develop and test new sub-models. Coal characterization in the past quarter included direct identification of the modes of occurrence of various trace inorganic species in coal and ash using unique analytical techniques such as XAFS analysis and selective leaching. Combustion testing of the bituminous coals continued and additional data were obtained on trace element vaporization in the combustion zone. Studies of post-combustion trace element transformations, such as mercury speciation in the flue gas, were also begun in the last quarter.

  4. Coal gasification. Quarterly report, April-June 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-04-01

    In DOE's program for the conversion of coal to gaseous fuels both high-and low-Btu gasification processes are being developed. High-Btu gas can be distributed economically to consumers in the same pipeline systems now used to carry natural gas. Low-Btu gas, the cheapest of the gaseous fuels produced from coal, can be used economically only on site, either for electric power generation or by industrial and petrochemical plants. High-Btu natural gas has a heating value of 950 to 1000 Btu per standard cubic foot, is composed essentially of methane, and contains virtually no sulfur, carbon monoxide, or free hydrogen. The conversion of coal to High-Btu gas requires a chemical and physical transformation of solid coal. Coals have widely differing chemical and physical properties, depending on where they are mined, and are difficult to process. Therefore, to develop the most suitable techniques for gasifying coal, DOE, together with the American Gas Association (AGA), is sponsoring the development of several advanced conversion processes. Although the basic coal-gasification chemical reactions are the same for each process, each of the processes under development have unique characteristics. A number of the processes for converting coal to high-Btu gas have reached the pilot plant Low-Btu gas, with a heating value of up to 350 Btu per standard cubic foot, is an economical fuel for industrial use as well as for power generation in combined gas-steam turbine power cycles. Because different low-Btu gasification processes are optimum for converting different types of coal, and because of the need to provide commercially acceptable processes at the earliest possible date, DOE is sponsoring the concurrent development of several basic types of gasifiers (fixed-bed, fluidized-bed, and entrained-flow).

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2008 - 2014 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy ... independent power producers) comprises electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

  6. Lignin-assisted coal depolymerization. [Quarterly] report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalvani, S.B.; Muchmore, C.B.; Koropchak, J.A.; Kim, Jong Won

    1992-10-01

    In the last report, it was shown that when lignin is added to coal, the rate of coal depolymerization is enhanced. The results,-reported were based upon a number of experiments conducted for the following three reasons: (i) to generate enough quantities of liquid products so that their stability in various environments can be ascertained, (ii) to closely characterize the reaction products, so that individual atomic mass balances can be performed, and (iii) to determine the reproducibility of the experiments conducted. The stability of liquid products was characterized by determining their solubility in pentane and benzene. Exposure of the coal- and coal+lignin-derived liquids to air at 40 and 80{degrees}C led to a decrease in the pentane-soluble and asphaltene fractions with a concomitant enhancement in the benzene insoluble fraction. However, relatively no degradation was observed for the liquid samples exposed to an inert (N{sub 2}) atmosphere. Preliminary data show that the coal+lignin-derived liquids are more stable than that obtained by coal liquefaction. In this quarterly report, individual atomic mass balances on various experiments conducted with coal, lignin and coal+lignin mixtures are also reported. Although the overall mass recoveries of 95--98% of the total mass charged to the reactor were obtained, the atomic mass balance data are somewhat difficult to interpret due to the possible incorporation of tetralin (solvent) in the reaction products.

  7. Preliminary evaluation of resinite recovery from Illinois coal. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crelling, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    Resinite is a naturally occurring substance found in coal and derived from original plant resins. It is ubiquitous in North American coals. It makes up one to four percent by volume of most Illinois coals. It has been commercially exploited in the western USA for use in adhesives, varnishes and thermal setting inks. The overall objective of this project is to compare the properties of the resinite contained in Illinois Basin coals to resinite being commercially exploited in the western United States, and to recover the resinite from Illinois coals by microbubble column floatation techniques. The significance of this study is that it has the potential to show the way to recover a valuable chemical, resinite, from coal using only physical processing techniques. The value of the resinite at $1.00/kg or $0.50/lb makes it about fifty times more valuable than steam coal. The removal of resinite from coal does not decrease the value of the remaining coal in any way. The unique aspects are that: (1) it is the first examination of the resinite recovery potential of Illinois coal, (2) it integrates the latest characterization techniques such as density Gradient centrifugation, microspectrofluorometry, and gas chromatography- mass spectrometry, and (3) it uses microbubble column flotation to determine the resinite recovery potential. During this quarter samples were obtained, information from both the databases of both the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) and the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was obtained and evaluated, and EBCSP samples from the Herrin No. 6, the Springfield No. 5 and the Colchester No. 2 seams were analyzed petrographically and the resinites in these samples were characterized by fluorescence spectral analysis.

  8. By Coal Destination State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Destination State ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal

  9. By Coal Origin State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Origin State ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal

  10. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). Accomplishments during the quarter are described on the following tasks and subtasks: Development of near-term applications (engineering development and dewatering studies); Engineering development of selective agglomeration (bench-scale testing and process scale-up); PDU and advanced column flotation module (coal selection and procurement and advanced flotation topical report); Selective agglomeration module (module operation and clean coal production with Hiawatha, Taggart, and Indiana 7 coals); Disposition of the PDU; and Project final report. Plans for next quarter are discussed and agglomeration results of the three tested coals are presented.

  11. Mechanisms governing fine particulate emissions from coal flames. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1989--September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, G.H.; Schieber, C.; Socha, R.G.; Clark, W.D.; Kramlich, J.C.

    1989-10-01

    During this reporting period the global experiments were concluded. The final activities under these experiments involved measuring mineral content of coals as a function of coal particle size. The principal activities during this quarter involved the mechanistic experiments. Three baseline coals were cleaned and two of these sized. The ash from these various cuts were sampled from a bench scale reactor. The ash size distributions were compared to distributions predicted by the breakup model.

  12. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L.

    1993-12-31

    Six runs on the bench unit were successfully completed this quarter. The runs covered twenty five different operating conditions and yield periods, and involved 336 hours of operation. In the bench unit, increased temperature of first stage operation (410{degree}C) and direct addition of the powdered solid sodium aluminate to the feed as first stage catalyst improved both coal and carbon monoxide conversion. To achieve 90%+ overall coal conversion, temperatures of 430{degree}C+ were required in the second stage. Oil yields (pentane soluble liquid product) in excess of 65 wt % based on MAF Black Thunder coal, were achieved both with iron oxide/dimethyl disulfide and ammonium molybdate/carbon disulfide second stage catalysts. C{sub l}-C{sub 3} hydrogen gas yields were modest, generally 7-8 wt % on MAF coal, and overall hydrogen consumption (including first stage shift hydrogen) was in the order of 7-8 wt % on MAF coal. The ammonium molybdate catalyst system appeared to give slightly higher oil yields and hydrogen consumption, as was expected, but the differences may not be significant.

  13. Desulfurization of coal with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. [Quarterly progress report], December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, Ruozhi; Cheng, Jianjun; Shi, Feng; Gholson, K.L.; Ho, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    This project proposes a new method for removing organic sulfur from Illinois coals using readily available farm products. It proposes to use air and vegetable oils to disrupt the coal matrix, oxidize sulfur forms, increase volatiles, and desulfurize coal. This will be accomplished by impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of the solid products. Preliminary experiments showed that IBC 104 coal catalyzes the formation of hydroperoxides in safflower oil and that more sulfur is extracted from the treated than untreated coal. During the first quarter the requirement of an added photosensitizer was eliminated, the catalytic effect of coal was confirmed, and the existence of a complex set of reactions was revealed. During this second quarter working with IBC-108 coal (2.3% organic S. 0.4% pyrite S), the effects of different ratios of oil:coal, different extraction solvents, and different temperatures were examined. A new pretreatment which combines alkali with linseed oil was discovered. Best organic sulfur removal is approximately 26% using alkali pretreatment combined with linseed oil at 1OO{degree}C. BTU loses can be kept to a minimum of 3% with proper use of solvents.

  14. Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Quarterly report, October - December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, W.-P.; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1996-12-01

    The objectives of this quarter of study on the co-firing of high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels project were two-fold. First, the effect of S0{sub 2} on the formation of chlorine during combustion processes was examined. To simulate the conditions used in the AFBC system, experiments were conducted in a quartz tube in an electrically heated furnace. The principle analytical technique used for identification of the products from this study was GC/MS. The evolved gas was trapped by an absorbent and analyzed with a GC/MS system. The preliminary results indicate an inhibiting effect of S0{sub 2} on the Deacon Reaction. Secondly, information on the evolution of chlorine, sulfur and organic compounds from coals 95031 and 95011 were studied with the AFBC system. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W.

    1992-07-27

    Low severity coal liquefaction allows for solubilization of coal with reduced gas make. These lower severity conditions may result in some selective bond rupture. Promotion of coal solubilization through hydrogen transfer using highly active and effective hydrogen donors is the objective of this study. The highly effective donors being tested are cyclic olefins. Representative cyclic olefins are isotetralin, which is 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracene. These compounds are hydroaromatics without aromatic rings and have been shown to be highly effective donors. The objective of the work performed in this study during this quarter was to evaluate reaction parameters for low severity liquefaction reactions using the cyclic olefin, hexahydroanthracene, and the aromatic, anthracene. These model compounds were reacted under a variety of conditions to evaluate their reactivity without coal. The reactions were performed under both thermal and catalytic conditions. Finely divided catalysts from different molybdenum precursors were used to determine their activity in promoting hydrogenation and hydrogen transfer at low severity conditions. The catalysts used were Molyvan L, sulfurized oxymolybdenum dithiocarbamate, molybdenum naphthenate, and Molyvan 822, organo molybdenum dithiocarbamate.

  16. Synthesis of methyl methacrylate from coal-derived syngas: Quarterly report,, October 1-December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of three steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Over the last quarter, Eastman developed two new processes which have resulted in two new invention reports. One process deals with carbonylation of benzyl ether which represents a model for coal liquefaction and the second focuses on the acceleration of carbonylation rates for propionic acid synthesis, via use of polar aprotic solvents. These two inventions are major improvements in the novel Mo-catalyzed homogeneous process for propionic acid synthesis technology, developed by Eastman. Over the last quarter, RTI completed three reaction cycles and two regeneration cycles as a part of long-term reaction regeneration cycle study on a 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Si0{sub 2} catalyst, for vapor phase condensation reaction of formaldehyde with propionic acid.

  17. Refining and end use of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An intregral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop, an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PICS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1994 were in the areas of: subcontract preparation and negotiation; and linear programming modeling.

  18. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    Bechtel, with South west research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with Process Industry Modeling System software. The objective of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major effort conducted during the fourth quarter of 1995 were in the areas of: IL catalytic cracking--microactivity tests were conducted on various wax blends; IL wax hydrocracking--a pilot plant run was conducted on a wax/petroleum blend; and DL2 characterization and fractionation.

  19. Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali, Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, F.; Wang, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Organic sulfur is removed from coals by treatment with aqueous base, air, and vegetable oils with minimal loss of BTU. Such results were revealed during exploratory experiments on an ICCI funded project to remove organic sulfur from Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. In fact, prewashing IBC-108 coal with dilute alkali prior to treating with linseed oil and air results in 26% removal of sulfur. This new method is being investigated by treating coals with alkali, impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. During the first quarter the selection of base fro pretreatment and extraction was completed. NaOH is better than NH{sub 4}OH for the pretreatment and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is better than NaOH for the oil extraction. During the second quarter the effectiveness of linseed oil and NaOH for sulfur removal from IBC-108 coal was further tested by pretreating the coal with two base concentrations at four different times followed by treatment with linseed oil at 125{degrees}C for three different times and finally washing with 5% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and methanol. During this third quarter more experimental parameters were systematically varied in order to study the effectiveness of linseed oil and NaOH for sulfur removal from IBC- 108 coal.

  20. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1979-June 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Project for the period March 25, 1979, through June 24, 1979. SRC-I turnaround activities at the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant and several other problems delayed successful startup until April 11. Slurry was injected to the Lummus Deashing Unit for the first time April 12. After approximately eight days, slurry feed was diverted because of indications that solids were accumulating in the settler vessel. The Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down from April 28 to May 12, 1979, while the Lummus Unit settler vessel was hydroblasted. Cleaning of the settler vessel was complete May 10. Modifications to the unit were nearly complete at the end of the reporting period. Slurry feed to the Lummus Unit was reestablished June 15. To date, continuous production of specification product at design rates has not been achieved. One material balance run, MBR 79-1, was completed using Kentucky No. 9/14 coal at proposed design conditions for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Process Development Unit P-99 was on-stream for all of the second quarter of 1979, with the exception of a two-week scheduled turn-around. Six different run conditions were tested feeding Pittsburgh Seam coal from the Powhatan No. 5 Mine.

  1. Coal air turbine ``CAT`` program, invention 604. Fifth quarter project report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster-Pegg, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    The primary objective of this ``CAT`` (Coal Air Turbine) project is to complete a conceptual design of this unique new combination of existing technology with cost estimates to show that the CAT system offers the economic incentive with low technical risk for a plant to be built which will demonstrate its viability. The technologies involved in the components of a CAT plant are proven, and the integration of the components into a complete plant is the only new developmental activity involved. Industry and the Federal General Services Administration (GSA), require the demonstration of a commercial plant before the viability of a new concept is accepted. To satisfy this requirement the construction of a plant of commercially viable size in excess of 15 MW if cogeneration and above 30 MW if all power, is proposed. This plant will produce economical power and heat for the owner. The plant will operate for a full commercial life and continue as an operating demonstration of the viability of the technology, gathering long term life and maintenance data, all adding to the credibility of the concept. The major components of CAT plants are an air turbine, a heater of compressed air, a coal combustion system, means to recover waste heat and a steam turbine when appropriate. The plant burns raw coal in a fluid bed at atmospheric pressure. The air turbine operates on clean compressed air heated inside tubes immersed in the fluid bed. Progress during the fifth quarter is described.

  2. Advanced coal liquefaction research. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1983-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1984-04-01

    Work this quarter focused on staged liquefaction. The effect of residence time on conversion in single pass experiments was found to be quite different for the subbituminous Belle Ayr Mine and bituminous Illinois No. 6 coals studied. With bituminous coal, conversion to soluble material is quite high and the limit of conversion is approached in only a few minutes. With a subbituminous coal, however, conversion is much lower and the limit of conversion is approached much more slowly. Short contact time (SCT) dissolution of Belle Ayr coal was studied as a possible first stage in a two-stage process. Conversion, hydrocarbon gas yield and hydrogen consumption were increased as residence time or temperature were increased. Conversion was also significantly increased by partial slurry recycle. Pyrite was found to be the most effective slurry catalyst for increasing conversion, followed by ammonium molybdate emulsion and finally nickel-molybdenum on alumina. Illinois No. 6 coal was liquefied in two stages. Conditions in the first stage dissolution were varied to determine the effect on upgradability in the second stage. An SCT (6 minute) coal dissolution stage is preferred over one at 30 minutes because hydrocarbon gas yield was much lower while overall oil yields for the combined dissolution and upgrading stages were nearly the same. Use of a NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst in a trickle-bed second stage resulted in a higher oil yield and lower product heteroatom content than use of the same catalyst in the slurry phase. The total oil yield was lower with a pyrite slurry catalyst than with a NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ slurry catalyst. With Belle Ayr coal and added pyrite, there was no change in total oil yield, conversion or product quality brought about by adding an 8-minute first stage at 450/sup 0/C (842/sup 0/F) to a 2-hour second stage operated at 420/sup 0/C (788/sup 0/F). 39 figures, 12 tables.

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report (Abbreviated), Ja

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2010 - 2016 (short tons and dollars per short ton) Year and Quarter Australia Canada Colombia Indonesia China Venezuela Other Countries Total 2010 380,404 1,766,896 14,583,950 1,904,040 52,869 581,700 82,828 19,352,687 2011 61,745 1,680,490 9,500,387 856,038 22,128 778,887 187,931 13,087,606 2012 - 1,107,727 6,951,515 517,532 77,738 287,147 217,598 9,159,257 2013 22 1,116,076 6,575,927 886,920 51,944 42,428 233,108 8,906,425 2014 532

  4. Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection. [Quarterly] technical report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crelling, J.C.

    1994-06-01

    A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1992--1993 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco Inc. Steel Company and to initiate a new cooperative study along somewhat similar lines with the Inland Steel Company. The results of this study will lead to the development of a testing and evaluation protocol that will give a unique and much needed understanding of the behavior of coal in the injection process and prove the potential of Illinois coals for such use. During this quarter a sample of the feed coal that is being used for injection into the No. 7 Blast Furnace of Inland Steel has been analyzed petrographically and compared to both the Herrin No. 6 coal and Armco feed coal. Additional characterization is underway and an advanced program of pyrolysis and reactivity testing has been initiated.

  5. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.D.; Lancet, M.S.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-11-01

    This is the eleventh Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: (1) The results of a study designed to determine the effects of the conditions employed at the Wilsonville slurry preheater vessel on coal conversion is described. (2) Stable carbon isotope ratios were determined and used to source the carbon of three product samples from Period 49 of UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 37. The results from this coprocessing run agree with the general trends observed in other coprocessing runs that we have studied. (3) Microautoclave tests and chemical analyses were performed to ``calibrate`` the reactivity of the standard coal used for determining donor solvent quality of process oils in this contract. (4) Several aspects of Wilsonville Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) resid conversion kinetics were investigated; results are presented. Error limits associated with calculations of deactivation rate constants previously reported for Runs 258 and 261 are revised and discussed. A new procedure is described that relates the conversions of 850{degrees}F{sup +} , 1050{degrees}F{sup +}, and 850 {times} 1050{degrees}F material. Resid conversions and kinetic constants previously reported for Run 260 were incorrect; corrected data and discussion are found in Appendix I of this report.

  6. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July - September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the third quarter of 1996 were in the areas of hydrotreating production runs and FCC production run. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1996 were in the areas of: DL2 light distillate hydrotreating; and DL2 heave distillate catalytic cracking.

  8. Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zondlo, J.; Stiller, A.

    1996-10-25

    This quarterly report covers activities during the period from July 1, 1996 through September 30, 1996 on the development of carbon products precursor materials from coal. The first year of the project ended in February, 1996; however, the WVU research effort continued through August 14, 1997 on a no-cost extension of the original contract. PETC chose to exercise the option for continuation of the projects and $100,000 became available on August 9, 1996. The objective for year two is to focus on development of those carbon products from coal-based solvent extract precursors which have the greatest possibility for commercial success.

  9. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-05-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. During this quarter, analyses were completed on 65 process samples from representative periods of HRI Run POC-2 in which coal, coal/plastics, and coal/rubber were the feedstocks. A sample of the oil phase of the oil/water separator from HRI Run POC-1 was analyzed to determine the types and concentrations of phenolic compounds. Chemical analyses and microautoclave tests were performed to monitor the oxidation and measure the reactivity of the standard coal (Old Ben Mine No. 1) which has been used for the last six years to determine solvent quality of process oils analyzed in this and previous DOE contracts.

  10. Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crelling, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1993--94 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900{degrees}C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter there were two major accomplishments.

  11. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-12-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. Some of the contract activities for this quarter are: We completed many of the analyses on the 81 samples received from HTI bench-scale run CMSL-9, in which coal, coal/mixed plastics, and coal/high density polyethylene were fed; Liquid chromatographic separations of the 15 samples in the University of Delaware sample set were completed; and WRI completed CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR analyses on the Delaware sample set.

  12. MHD Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly/annual technical progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dicks, J. B.; Chapman, J. N.; Crawford, L. W.

    1980-02-01

    In this Fourth Quarterly/Annual Report submitted under DOE contracts EX-76-C-01-1760 and DE-AC02-79ET10815, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) reports on significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, and development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Research and Development Laboratory. Work on the CFFF progressed with only minor problems. Total construction activity for all site work presently awarded is nearly 98% complete. Water analysis shows that Woods Reservoir baseline conditions are within EPA or Tennessee drinking water standards. For the primary combustor, the vitiation heater and primary combustor fabrication drawings were completed and the nozzle design was completed. The drum module for the radiant slagging furnace was awarded. On the MHD Power Generator, development continued in several areas of advanced analysis including development of time-dependent models for use with the one-dimensional code. For seed regeneration, the tentative determination is that the Tomlinson Tampella is the most economically viable method. With regard to capped electrode erosion, investigations have shown that the major degradation of the cladding still present is at the leading edge of the capped anode. To alleviate this, plans are to hot work the noble metal in the bending operation. In resolving another problem, a system employing the modified line-reversal method has been assembled and successfully tested to measure absolute plasma temperatures.

  13. Utilization of coal associated minerals. Quarterly report No. 11, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slonaker, J. F.; Akers, D. J.; Alderman, J. K.

    1980-08-29

    The purpose of this research program is to examine the effects of coal mineral materials on coal waste by-product utilization and to investigate new and improved methods for the utilization of waste by-products from cleaning, combustion and conversion processing of coal. The intermediate objectives include: (1) the examination of the effects of cleaning, gasification and combustion on coal mineral materials; and (2) the changes which occur in the coal wastes as a result of both form and distribution of mineral materials in feed coals in conjunction with the coal treatment effects resulting from coal cleaning or either gasification or combustion.

  14. Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants. Quarterly progress report, [July 1, 1988--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, E.S.

    1988-10-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report of DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-87PC79864, entitled ``Modeling of Integrated Environmental Control Systems for Coal-Fired Power Plants.`` This report summarizes accomplishments during the period July 1, 1988 to September 30, 1988. Our efforts during the last quarter focused primarily on the completion, testing and documentation of the NO{sub x}SO process model. The sections below present the details of these developments.

  15. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, May 1, 1993--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, G.P.

    1994-07-01

    This report summarizes progress in four areas of research under the general heading of Coal Liquefaction. Results of studies concerning the coliquefaction of coal with waste organic polymers or chemical products of these polymers were reported. Secondly, studies of catalytic systems for the production of clean transportation fuels from coal were discussed. Thirdly, investigations of the chemical composition of coals and their dehydrogenated counterparts were presented. These studies were directed toward elucidation of coal liquefaction processes on the chemical level. Finally, analytical methodologies developed for in situ monitoring of coal liquefaction were reported. Techniques utilizing model reactions and methods based on XAFS, ESR, and GC/MS are discussed.

  16. Mechanisms and kinetics of coal hydrogenation. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, J. H.; Baldwin, R. M.; Bain, R. L.

    1980-02-01

    Colorado School of Mines is conducting coal hydrogenation research with the following objectives and scope of work: (1) Comparison of the rates of coal hydrogenation in continuous flow stirred tank and tube flow reactors using pure hydrogen, catalyzed CO-STEAM, and syngas processing conditions; (2) Investigation of the influence of coal rank on the rate of hydrogenation of coal to preasphaltene, asphaltenes, and oil in batch reactors; (3) Batch evaluation of the effect of operating conditions (temperature and pressure) on the rate of hydrogenation of coal-derived preasphaltanes and asphaltenes; (4) Determination of the effect of selected disposable catalysts on the rate of batch hydrogenation of preasphaltenes and asphaltenes and selected bituminous coals. Testing and evaluation of promising catalyst systems in the contunuous processing unit; (5) Formulation of a unified kinetic/mechanistic model for coal liquefaction taking into account petrography of the feed coal and hydrocarbon lumps in the product oil.

  17. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Twenty-second quarterly report, January 2, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1992-12-01

    The objectives of this proposed study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines. This report describes progress during twenty second quarter of the program. Specifically, the paper discusses progress in three task areas: (1) Submodel development and evaluation: coal to char chemistry submodel; fundamental high-pressure reaction rate data; secondary reaction of pyrolysis product and burnout submodels; ash physics and chemistry submodel; large particle submodels; large char particle oxidation at high pressures; and SO{sub x}-NO{sub x} submodel development and evaluation; (2) Comprehensive model development and evaluation: integration of advanced submodels into entrained-flow code, with evaluation and documentation; comprehensive fixed-bed modeling review, development evaluation and implementation; and generalized fuels feedstock submodel; and (3) Application of integrated codes: application of generalized pulverized coal comprehensive code and application of fixed-bed code.

  18. Design and fabrication of advanced materials from Illinois coal wastes. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, V.M.; Wright, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    The main goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to design and fabricate advanced brake and structural composite materials from Illinois coal combustion residues. During the first two quarters of the project, the thrust of the work directed towards characterizing the various coal combustion residues and FGD residue, i.e., scrubber sludge. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and transmission-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) were conducted on PCC fly ash (Baldwin), FBC fly ash (ADK unit l-6), FBC fly ash (S.I. coal), FBC spent bed ash (ADM, unit l-6), bottom ash, and scrubber sludge (CWLP) residues to characterize their geometrical shapes, mineral phases, and thermal stability. Our spectroscopic results indicate that the scrubber sludge is mainly composed of a gypsum-like phase whose lattice structure is different from the lattice structure of conventional gypsum, and sludge does not contain hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3}.0.5H{sub 2}O) phase. Our attempts to fabricate brake frictional shoes, in the form of 1.25 inch disks, from PCC fly ash, FBC spent bed ash, scrubber sludge, coal char, iron particles, and coal tar were successful. Based on the experience gained and microscopic analyses, we have now upscaled our procedures to fabricate 2.5 inch diameter disk,- from coal combustion residues. This has been achieved. The SEM and Young`s modulus analyses of brake composites fabricated at 400 psi < Pressure < 2200 psi suggest pressure has a strong influence on the particle packing and the filling of interstices in our composites. Also, these results along with mechanical behavior of the fabricated disks lead us to believe that the combination of surface altered PCC fly ash and scrubber sludge particles, together ed ash particles are ideal for our composite materials.

  19. Molecular accessibility in solvent swelled coals. Quarterly report, [April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kispert, L.D.

    1993-08-01

    The effect of weathering (oxidation and dehydration upon exposure to air) on the molecular accessibility of potential catalysts was studied by the EPR spin probe technique. Fresh samples of all 8 APCS coals were exposed to air for periods up to 36 days. Weathering produced significant effects on the retention of spin probes in most of the APCS coals under 91 % carbon (dmmf). It was determined that the lower ranked coal (Beulah Zap and Wyodak) under went a structural collapse which precluded retention of even spin probe VIII. However, medium ranked coals exhibited improved retention upon weathering when swelled in toluene. Swelling with pyridine opened up small pores for 81--86% carbon which is not observed for swelling with toluene. Changes in coal structure were successfully followed by the EPR spin probe method. A detailed analysis of the data collected from the swelling of coals oxidized in a moisture free environment was completed to differentiate between weathering and oxidation. Eight vacuum dried APCS coals were oxidized in an enclosed, pure oxygen, moisture free environment, and the effects of oxidation alone on coal structure were studied by the intercalation of EPR spin probes. The data shows a factor of 5 increase in spin probe retention for some coals oxidized in O{sub 2} versus air., suggesting a large increase in oxidized material. Particular care was taken during the swelling procedures to avoid exposure of the coal samples to air or moisture. EPR spectra were then obtained for these 300 samples.

  20. Installation of a stoker-coal preparation plant in Krakow, Poland. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, January--March, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozelle, P.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the progress made during this reporting period of a two year project to demonstrate that the air pollution from a traveling-grate stoker being used to heat water at a central heating plant in Krakow, Poland can be reduced significantly by (1) substituting the unwashed, unsized coal currently being used with a mechanically cleaned, double-sized stoker fuel and by (2) optimizing the operating parameters of the stoker. It is anticipated that these improvements will prove to be cost-effective and hence will be adopted by the other central heating plants in Krakow and ideally, throughout Eastern European cities where coal continues to be the primary source of fuel. EFH Coal Company has formed a partnership with two Polish institutions -- MPEC, a central heating company in Krakow, and Naftokrak-Naftobudowa, preparation plant designers and fabricators-for the execution of this effort. Five potential candidate sources have been located and contracts for coal deliveries should be executed early next quarter. TInitial delays in formalizing the EFH/Polish Partners agreement delayed finalizing the coal supply contracts and hence, precluded collecting the Polish coal samples for characterization and combustion performance studies. Work on this Task will be initialed next quarter after the raw coal supply contracts are executed. A conceptual design for a plant to wash 25mm x 0 raw coal fines at a need rate of 300 mtph was completed. This plant will receive raw coals ranging in ash content from 20 to 30 percent and produce a compliance coal containing about 1 percent ash, 0.8 percent sulfur and 27, 840 KJ/kg (12,000 Btu/lb). A heavy-media cyclone will be used to wash the 20mm x 1mm stoker coal. Discussions with financial institutions regarding the cost of producing a quality stoker coal in Poland and A for identifying sources of private capital to help cost share the project continued.

  1. Design and fabrication of advanced materials from Illinois coal wastes. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, V.M.; Wright, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    The main goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to design and fabricate advanced brake and structural composite materials from Illinois coal combustion residues. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and transmission-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) were conducted on PCC fly ash (Baldwin), FBC fly ash (ADM unit1-6), FBC fly ash (S.I. coal), FBC spent bed ash (ADM unit1-6), bottom ash, and scrubber sludge (CWLP) residues to characterize their geometrical shapes, mineral phases, and thermal stability. Our spectroscopic results indicate that the scrubber sludge is mainly composed of a gypsum-like phase whose lattice structure is different from the lattice structure of conventional gypsum, and sludge does not contain hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3}0.5H{sub 2}O) phase. In the second and third quarters the focus of research has been on developing protocols for the formation of advanced brake composites and structural composites. Our attempts to fabricate brake frictional shoes, in the form of 1.25 inch disks, from PCC fly ash, FBC spent bed ash, scrubber sludge, coal char, iron particles, and coal tar were successful. Based on the experience gained and microscopic analyses, we have now upscaled our procedures to fabricate 2.5 inch diameter disks from coal combustion residues. The SEM and Young`s modulus analyses of brake composites fabricated at 400 psi < Pressure < 2200 psi suggest pressure has a strong influence on the particle packing and the filling of interstices in our composites.

  2. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low rank coals. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1991-12-31

    significant achievements were: (1) Coal decarboxylation was achieved by batch bioreactor systems using adapted anaerobic microbial consortium. (2) Two new isolates with coal decarboxylation potential were obtained from adapted microbial consortia. (3) CHN and TG anaysis of anaerobically biotreated coals have shown an increase in the H/C ratio and evolution rate of volatile carbon which could be a better feedstock for the liquefaction process.

  3. Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection; [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crelling, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it will be the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1992--1993 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco Inc. steel company and to initiate a new cooperative study along somewhat similar lines with the Inland Steel Company. The results of this study will lead to the development of a testing and evaluation protocol that will give a unique and much needed understanding of the behavior of coal in the injection process and prove the potential of Illinois coals f or such use.

  4. Molecular biological enhancement of coal desulfurization: Cloning and expression of the sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate genes in Pseudomonads and Thiobacillae. Eleventh quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, S.

    1992-08-01

    Research continues on desulfurization of coal using microorganisms. Topics reported on this quarter include: desulfurization with N1-36 (presumptively identified as Rhodochrous erythropolis), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA`s of Thiobacillus spp., and fresh isolates with the presumptive capacity to desulfurize dibenzothiophenes.

  5. Short contact time direct coal liquefaction using a novel batch reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1995--January 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, He

    1996-01-26

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) f or coal liquefaction at short contact times (0.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times, and to investigate the role of the organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved and others are still in progress. This quarterly report covers further progress toward those objectives.

  6. Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed: Technical progress report for the third quarter, April 1, 1989-June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boysen, J.E.; Barbour, F.A.; Turner, T.F.; Cha, C.Y.; Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

    1989-07-01

    This research project is for the development of a technical and economical feasible process for drying and stability fine particles of high-moisture subbituminous coal. Research conducted in this quarter focused upon thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of both feed coals; continuation of the bench-scale IFB drying experiments; and initiation of the characterization of the products from the bench-scale drying experiments to determine their moisture reabsorption, dustiness, and spontaneous ignition properties. Thirty 4-hr and six 12-hr bench-scale IFB drying tests were conducted this quarter making a total of forty-one 4-hr (19 using Eagle Butte feed coal and 22 using Usibelli feed coal) and six 12-hr (3 using each feed coal) tests conducted thus far. IFB reactor slopes of 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 degrees were investigated for each feed coal. During the tests using Eagle Butte coal, gas-to-solids ratios ranging from approximately 0.7 to 9.7 lb/lb (kg/kg) and average IFB reactor temperatures ranging from approximately 370 to 700/degree/F (188 to 371/degree/C) were tested. 5 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Exploratory research on solvent refined coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Exploratory Research on Solvent Refined Coal Liquefaction project by The Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Company's Merriam Laboratory for the period April 1, 1979 through June 30, 1979. Experimental work included a number of short residence time runs, but discussion of that work has been delayed until a later report. Experimental work reported focuses on an investigation of the decline in solvent quality experienced by the Wilsonville Pilot Plant during runs in support of the SRC I Demonstration Plant. A four run series was initiated with Wilsonville solvent; both the coal used at Wilsonville (Kentucky 6/11 - Pyro Mine) and Kentucky 9/14 coal from the Colonial Mine were used. The effect of pyrite addition to the Pyro Mine coal was investigated. No solvent quality or coking problems were experienced in the Merriam runs. Significant changes in solvent composition were apparent and equilibrated solvent samples were returned to Wilsonville for solvent quality testing.

  8. Improvement of storage, handling and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-16

    The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost, harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: The Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant. The wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation. A wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. During this third quarter of the contract period, activities were underway under Tasks 2 and 3. Sufficient characterization of the feedstock coal options at the Chetopa Plant was conducted and mulling characteristics determined to enable a decision to be made regarding the feedstock selection. It was decided that the froth concentrate will be the feedstock wet fine coal used for the project. On that basis, activities in the areas of design and procurement were initiated.

  9. Investigation of pyrite as a contributor to slagging in eastern bituminous coals. Quarterly progress report 9, October 1-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryers, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    The objective of this program is to examine slags formed as a result of firing coals with varying concentration levels, size distribution, and orientation of pyrite with regard to mineral matter in the coal in a laboratory furnace. The program tasks are: (1) selection of eight candidate coals; (2) chemical characterization of the coal samples and identification of the pyrite size, distribution, and orientation with respect to other mineral matter and concentration levels; (3) testing of the candidate coals in a laboratory furnace; (4) chemical and physical characterization of the slag and fly ash samples created by the impurities in the coal sample; (5) influence of coal beneficiation on furnace slagging; and (6) analysis of data and identification of parameters influencing the contribution of pyrite to slagging problems. Washing of the Upper Freeport coal from Indiana County, Pennsylvania, was completed by the last quarter of 1983. The washed product was characterized for mineral content, and a combustion test was performed. Kentucky No. 9 from Henderson County, Kentucky, selected as the sixth coal to be investigated, was characterized using size and gravity fractionation techniques and was combusted in the laboratory furnace to evaluate its slagging and fouling potential. The remaining two coals to be characterized and combusted were identified as Illinois No. 5 and Lower Kittanning from Clarion County, Pennsylvania. 80 figures, 27 tables.

  10. Chemistry and structure of coal derived asphaltenes and preasphaltenes. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yen, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    It is the objective of this project to isolate the asphaltene and preasphaltene fractions from coal liquids from a number of liquefaction processes. These processes consist of in general: catalytic hydrogenation, staged pyrolysis and solvent refining. These asphaltene fractions may be further separated by both gradient elution through column chromatography, and molecular size distribution through gel permeation chromatography. Those coal-derived asphaltene and preasphaltene fractions will be investigated by various chemical and physical methods for characterization of their structures. After the parameters are obtained, these parameters will be correlated with the refining and conversion variables which control a given type of liquefaction process. The effects of asphaltene in catalysis, ash or metal removal, desulfurization and denitrification will also be correlated. It is anticipated that understanding the role of asphaltenes in liquefaction processes will enable engineers to both improve existing processes, and to make recommendations for operational changes in planned liquefaction units in the United States. The objective of Phase 1 was to complete the isolation and separation of coal liquid fractions and to initiate their characterization. The objective of Phase 2 is to continue the characterization of coal asphaltenes and other coal liquid fractions by use of physical and instrumental methods. The structural parameters obtained will be used to postulate hypothetical average structures for coal liquid fractions. The objective of Phase 3 is to concentrate on the characterization of the preasphaltene (benzene insoluble fraction) of coal liquid fraction by the available physical and chemical methods to obtain a number of structural parameters.

  11. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1979-March 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Project by the Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. for the Department of Energy for the period January 1, 1979 to March 31, 1979. Activities included the operation and modification of the Solvent Refined Coal Pilot Plant at Fort Lewis, Washington; the Process Development Unit P-99 at Harmarville, Pennsylvania; and research at Merriam Laboratory in Merriam, Kansas. The Pilot Plant processed Powhatan No. 5 Coal in the SRC-II mode of operation studying the effect of coal particle size and system temperature on coal slurry blending and the effect of carbon monoxide concentration in the reaction feed gas on process yields. January and February were spent completing installation of a fourth High Pressure Separator on Process Development Unit P-99 to better simulate operating conditions for the proposed Demonstration Plant. During March, one run was completed at P-99 feeding Pittsburgh Seam Coal from the Powhatan No. 5 Mine. Merriam investigations included a study of the effect of iron containing additives on SRC-I operation, the addition of carbon monoxide to the feed gas, utilization of a hydrogenated solvent (Cresap process solvent) in the SRC-I mode under both normal and short residence time operating conditions, and development of a simulated distillation technique to determine the entire boiling range distribution of product oils.

  12. Spin-mapping of coal structures with ESE and ENDOR. Thirteenth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.

    1991-12-01

    The goals of this program include developing a system for the analysis of the chemical forms of organic sulfur in coal and for study of coal particle surfaces by multifrequency EPR spectroscopy, ENDOR, and ESE spectroscopy and Applying it to coals, to the effects of treatment upon their sulfur-containing organic components, and to related carbonaceous materials (chars and the like). The approach is to utilize the naturally-occurring unpaired electrons in the organic structures of coals as spies to provide molecular structure information, reading out the information with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Several forms of EPR are employed: Multifrequency continuous-wave (CW) EPR, from 1 GHz to 240 GHz source frequency; electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), in which NMR spectra at paramagnetic centers are obtained by EPR detection; and pulsed EPR, including ESE (Electron Spin Echo) spectroscopy.

  13. Desulfurization of coal: enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1996-12-31

    Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development in viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigated the application phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst is expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions that otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidation for selective sulfur oxidation are also being studied. If successful, this project could lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would significantly improve the marketability of Illinois coal.

  14. Solvent tailoring in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarrer, A.R.; Curtis, C.W.; Guin, J.A.; Williams, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    A series of twenty-three aromatic compounds were ranked for their donor solvent efficacy for the dissolution of Western Kentucky No. 9/14 coal. The transfer of hydrogen from the solvent to the coal fragments, as measured by coal conversion, was examined at three levels of available hydrogen. The hydrogen donors are ranked according to their ability to convert coal to THF solubles. Aromatic analogs of the donors showed little ability to convert coal to THF solubles. Factors which influence hydrogen donation include the presence of heteroatoms or substituents both internal and external to the aromatic or hydroaromatic rings, the degree of hydrogenation, the aromaticity or nonaromaticity of the hydroaromatics, and the presence of five-membered rings. A relationship between heats of formation and hydrogen donor ability is shown for hydroaromatics within two ring or three ring homologous series. A model hydrogen acceptor, benzophenone, is also used to rank donors. No correlation exists in the ranking of hydrogen donors by the model acceptor used in this work and in other experimental studies and that obtained by conversion of Western Kentucky coal at typical liquefaction conditions. 24 references.

  15. By Coal Origin State

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    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  16. By Coal Origin State

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    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  17. By Coal Destination State

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    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  18. By Coal Origin State

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    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  19. By Coal Destination State

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    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  20. By Coal Destination State

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    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  1. By Coal Origin State

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    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  2. By Coal Origin State

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    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  3. By Coal Origin State

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    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  4. By Coal Destination State

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    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  5. By Coal Origin State

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    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  6. By Coal Destination State

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    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  7. By Coal Origin State

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    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  8. By Coal Destination State

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    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  9. By Coal Destination State

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    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  10. By Coal Destination State

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    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  11. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 11, April--June, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-07-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 tons of each of three project coals, by each process. During Quarter 11 (April--June, 1995), work continued on the Subtask 3.2 in-plant testing of the Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn Preparation Plant with the installation and calibration of a refurbished 30-inch diameter column. The evaluation of toxic trace element data for column flotation samples continued, with preliminary analysis indicating that reasonably good mass balances were achieved for most elements, and that significant reductions in the concentration of many elements were observed from raw coal, to flotation feed, to flotation product samples. Significant progress was made on Subtask 6.5 selective agglomeration bench-scale testing. Data from this work indicates that project ash specifications can be met for all coals evaluated, and that the bulk of the bridging liquid (heptane) can be removed from the product for recycle to the process. The detailed design of the 2 t/hr selective agglomeration module progressed this quarter with the completion of several revisions of both the process flow, and the process piping and instrument diagrams. Procurement of coal for PDU operation began with the purchase of 800 tons of Taggart coal. Construction of the 2 t/hr PDU continued through this reporting quarter and is currently approximately 60% complete.

  12. Coal Distribution Database, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4Q 2009 April 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 4Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal...

  13. Coal Distribution Database, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3Q 2009 February 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 3Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal...

  14. Design and fabrication of advanced materials from Illinois coal wastes. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, V.M.; Wright, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    The main goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to design and fabricate advanced brake and structural composite materials from Illinois coal combustion residues. During the first quarter of the project, the thrust of the work was directed towards setting up the experimental facilities and undertaking preliminary tests to gauge the ability of coal tar derived binder in fabricating the brake skeletons. In addition systematic scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were conducted on PCC fly ash (Baldwin), fly ash (ADM), FBC fly ash, FBC spent bed bottom ash, bottom ash (ADM), and scrubber sludge residues to characterize their geometrical shape and thermal stability. The PCC fly ash particles being highly spherical in shape and thermally inert up to 1100{degrees}C will make an excellent raw material for our composites. This is born out by fabricating brake skeletons from PCC fly ash colloids. Unlike the PCC fly ash and FBC fly ash, the scrubber sludge particles are not suitable hosts for our brake lining materials because of a whisker-like particle structure. Six different compositions of various combustion residues were tested in the fabrication of brake skeletons, and our tar derived binder shows great promise in the fabrication of composite materials.

  15. Brick manufacture with fly ash from Illinois coals. Quarterly technical report, September 1, 1994--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.E.; Dreher, G.; Frost, J.; Moore, D.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Fiocchi, T.; Swartz, D.

    1995-03-01

    This investigation seeks to utilize fly ash in fired-clay products such as building and patio bricks, ceramic blocks, field and sewer tile, and flower pots. This goal is accomplished by (1) one or more plant-scale, 5000-brick tests with fly ash mixed with brick clays at the 20% or higher level; (2) a laboratory-scale study to measure the firing reactions of a range of compositions of clay and fly ash mixtures; (3) a technical and economic study to evaluate the potential environmental and economic benefits of brick manufacture with fly ash. Bricks and feed materials will be tested for compliance with market specifications and for leachability of pollutants derived from fly ash. The laboratory study will combine ISGS databases, ICCI-supported characterization methods, and published information to improve predictions of the firing characteristics of Illinois fly ash and brick clay mixtures. Because identical methods are used to test clay firing and coal ash fusion, and because melting mechanisms are the same, improved coal ash fusion predictions are an expected result of this research. If successful, this project should convert an environmental problem (fly ash) into valuable products - bricks. During this quarter, the authors set up the manufacturing run at Colonial Brick Co., provided an expanded NEPA questionnaire for DOE, made preliminary arrangements for a larger brick manufacturing run at Marseilles Brick Co., revised laboratory procedures for selective dissolution analysis, and began characterization of brick clays that could be mixed with fly ash for fired-clay products.

  16. Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process Development Unit. Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, M. H.

    1981-01-20

    This represents the second quarterly progress report on Phase 2 of the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process Development Unit (PDU) Program. Phase 1 of this program started in March 1976 and included the design, construction, and initial operation of the PDU. On June 25, 1980, Phase 2 of the program was initiated. It covers a 1-year operations program utilizing the existing PDU and is planned to include five runs with a targeted total operating time of 9 weeks. During this report period, Run 6, the initial run of the Phase 2 program was completed. The gasification system was operated for a total of 95 h at pressures up to 10 atm. Average product gas HHV values of 100 Btu/scf were recorded during 10-atm operation, while gasifying coal at a rate of 1100 lb/h. The run was terminated when the melt overflow system plugged after 60 continuous hours of overflow. Following this run, melt withdrawal system revisions were made, basically by changing the orifice materials from Monofrax to an 80 Cobalt-20 Chromium alloy. By the end of the report period, the PDU was being prepared for Run 7.

  17. Flash hydropyrolysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 13, April 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.; Bhatt, B.L.

    1980-12-01

    The emphasis for the program at this time is to obtain results for specific process conditions of short residence time (< 2 sec.) and low H/sub 2//coal feed ratio (< 1.0) for select coals. The following conclusions can be drawn from this work: (1) The hydropyrolysis of New Mexico sub-bituminous coal produced considerable tar and less gaseous yields at short (< 1 second) residence times than at longer residence times. (2) The hydropyrolysis of Montana Rosebud sub-bituminous coal at 900/sup 0/C, 1000 psi, H/sub 2//coal ratios of approximately 0.8 to 0.6 and a residence time of 0.8 seconds produce yields of 23% gaseous hydrocarbons and 12% liquids. (3) Decreasing the H/sub 2//coal ratio to 0.25 at the same conditions results in a higher gaseous hydrocarbon yield and a reduced liquid yield. (4) Decreasing the residence time to 0.5 seconds, at the same conditions, decreases both the liquid and gaseous yields. (5) The liquid yield from the hydropyrolysis of the Montana Rosebud at 1000 psi maximizes as 12 to 14% at approximately 900/sup 0/C while the gaseous yield appears to continue to increase with temperature beyond the 27% measured at 940/sup 0/C. (6) Kentucky No. 9 coal produces approximately equal yields of liquids and gases (17%) at 900/sup 0/C and 1000 psi. (7) Carbon balances continue to improve but need further attention. (8) The calculated activation energy for the initial formation of hydrocarbons from both the lignite and sub-bituminous coals are almost identical (42,700 and 43,200 cal/gmole, respectively). (9) The correlation of the lignite data gave a slightly better overall correlation coefficient than the sub-bituminous data at the same 95% confidence limit (0.83 vs 0.78). (10) The free fall velocity of the coal particle at 900/sup 0/C and 1000 psi (0.8 ft/sec) becomes less significant at residence times less than 1 second.

  18. Coal transformation chemistry. Second quarterly progress report, June 1, 1980-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stock, Leon M.; Alemany, L. B.; Handy, C. I.; King, H. -H.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the information concerning the structure of Illinois No. 6 coal obtained in this laboratory and elsewhere provides the basis for a proposed structure for this bituminous coal. All the available facts concerning reduction, reductive alkylation, hydrogen atom exchange, oxidation, functional group analysis and so forth have been used to define a structural segment consisting of about 1000 atoms with a molecular weight in excess of 6000. This work is discussed in Part A. The study of the reductive alkylation reaction of Illinois No. 6 coal in liquid ammonia has been directed toward the optimization of the reaction conditions for the achievement of maximum solubility. The latest results indicate that about 55% of the original Illinois No. 6 coal can be converted to products which are soluble in tetrahydrofuran using potassium in liquid ammonia as the reducing agent and n-butyl iodide in tetrahydrofuran as the reducing alkylating agent. These observations are treated in Part B. The effort on donor solvent coal chemistry was directed to the role played by pericyclic reactions in the liquefaction process. The reactivity of a number of donors has been examined including 1,2- and 1,4-dihydronaphthalene. Although the research is not yet complete, the preliminary results indicate that free radical processes occur preferentially. Thus, the pericyclic reactions appear to be unimportant at the threshold reaction temperatures of 350 to 425/sup 0/C. This work is described in Part C.

  19. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    This is the Technical Progress Report for the twelfth quarter of activities. Described in this report are the following activities: (1) Thirty-nine samples from four run conditions of HTI Run PB-07 were received. Appropriate samples were characterized by proton NMR spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vacuum distillation, and solvent quality tests. (2) The University of Delaware completed their subcontract this quarter. A meeting was held on April 30, 1997 at the University to close out the subcontract. (3) Twelve sets of samples were chosen from the CONSOL sample bank for the study of the insoluble and presumed unreactive material from process stream samples. Each set consists of the whole process stream and the 454 C{sup +} (850 F{sup +}) distillation resid derived from that process stream. Processing data for all samples were compiled. The samples represent four Wilsonville pilot plant runs and two HTI runs.

  20. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Heunisch, G.W.; Winschel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    Described in this report are the following activities: CONSOL characterized process stream samples from HTI Run ALC-2, in which Black Thunder Mine coal was liquefied using four combinations of dispersed catalyst precursors. Oil assays were completed on the HTI Run PB-05 product blend. Fractional distillation of the net product oil of HTI Run POC-1 was completed. CONSOL completed an evaluation of the potential for producing alkylphenyl ethers from coal liquefaction phenols. At the request of DOE, various coal liquid samples and relevant characterization data were supplied to the University of West Virginia and the Federal Energy Technology Center. The University of Delaware is conducting resid reactivity tests and is completing the resid reaction computer model. The University of Delaware was instructed on the form in which the computer model is to be delivered to CONSOL.

  1. Advanced direct coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, September-November 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranjape, A.S.

    1984-02-07

    Wyoming subbituminous coal was liquefied using three different two-stage process configurations in bench-scale tests. These process configurations differed in the type of fractionated deashing resid being recycled to the individual stages. The objective of these runs was to determine whether, by recycle of specific resid streams to the thermal stage, the second stage catalyst life could be improved without detrimentally affecting distillate yield or hydrogen consumption. The results indicate that the two-stage process configuration consisting of hydrotreating the Light Deashed Resid and direct recycle of heavy Deashed Resid to the thermal stage produced the best results. This process configuration resulted in a distillate yield of 54 wt % (MAF coal basis) and overall coal conversion in the 93 to 95% range, as measured by pyridine-soluble analytical test while operating in a total distillate mode. These results are very encouraging from the lower rank Wyoming subbituminous coal. Among the three two-stage process configurations tested, the particular process configuration of hydrotreating Light Deashed Resid resulted in the least amount of catalyst deactivation. As a part of this research effort, a test procedure for quick evaluation of various resids and catalysts in terms of coke precursors was also developed. This procedure utilizing as-produced oxide-form extrudates of catalyst is able to simulate closely in a batch reactor test the performance of a presulfided and extrudate form of catalyst in a continuous reactor. The CSD unit, being able to not only deash but also fractionate the resid, greatly increased the flexibility of options for coal liquefaction. New process concepts evolved incorporating reside fractionation and selective resid recycle in coal liquefaction. 17 figures, 28 tables.

  2. Flash hydropyrolysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 11, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.; Bhatt, B.L.

    1980-02-01

    The following conclusions can be drawn from this work: (1) when the caking bituminous coals are used with diluents, only 20% Pittsburgh No. 8 coal can be added to the diluent swhile 40% Illinois No. 6 could be added due to the higher free swelling index of the Pittsburgh No. 8; (2) When limestone is used as a diluent, considerably more sulfur is retained in the char than when using sand; (3) when the char from an experiment using limestone is recycled as the diluent for another experiment, the char continually retains additional sulfur through at least three recycles; (4) decomposition of the limestone and reduction is indicated by the high concentrations of CO observed at 900/sup 0/C; (5) increasing the coal feed rate by a factor of 4 from 2.4 to 10.7 lb/hr at low H/sub 2//Coal ratios (approx. = 0.6) results in no appreciable change in gaseous HC yields (approx. = 27%) or concentration (approx. = 45%) but higher BTX yields (1.1% vs. 5.4%); (6) although only one experiment was conducted, it appears that hydrogasification of untreated New Mexico sub-bituminous coal at 950/sup 0/C does not give an increase in yield over hydrogasification at 900/sup 0/C; (7) the hydrogasification of Wyodak lignite gives approximately the same gaseous HC yields as that obtained from North Dakota lignite but higher BTX yields particularly at 900/sup 0/C and 1000 psi (9% vs. 2%); (8) treating New Mexico sub-bituminous coal with NaCO/sub 3/ does not increase its hydrogasification qualities between 600/sup 0/C and 900/sup 0/C at 1000 psi but does decrease the BTX yield.

  3. Thermodynamics and surface structure of coals. Quarterly report, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, A.S.; Larsen, J.W.; Quay, D.M.; Roberts, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    NMR relaxation and shift reagents are being deposited on the surface of coals. The dipolar coupling of the unpaired electron spin of the relaxation agent and the carbon atom should significantly shorten the carbon T, which should broaden it away. We propose to record the NMR spectrum of a coal before and after deposition and subtract the spectra. The difference spectra will arise from the functionalities within approximately one nanometer of the surface and reveal the surface composition of the coal. In order to determine the surface concentration of the dysprosium in the coal, we are using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) also known as electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). XPS is a surface technique that can be used for the elucidation of chemical structure. The binding energy for each electron in each element is unique. The measurement of the binding energy in XPS allows the identification of the element and its oxidation state. The relative atomic concentrations of each element can also be determined using XPS spectra.

  4. Effects of coal combustion and gasification upon lung structure and function. Quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinton, Dr., David E.

    1980-12-12

    The effects on lungs of emissions from fluidized-bed combustion and coal gasification on man are being studied by inhalation experiments and intratracheal administration of fly ash to hamsters. The hamsters are sacrificed at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 30 days and the lungs examined by methods which are described. (LTN)

  5. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellog Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993 for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. The work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to characterize the coal liquids, develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids, and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PIMS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program, produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks, conduct engine emission tests, and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts during the reporting period, October through December 1996, were in the areas of Option 1 blending and Option 1 FCC production run.

  6. Photoassisted electrolysis applied to coal gasification. Third quarterly report, 1 January 1982-31 Mar 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    The literature search on electrochemical studies of various carbons has been completed. Two conclusions were reached: (1) The surfaces of various carbons are covered by oxide films to different extents and the oxides resemble either the quinone-like structure in their oxidized form or the hydroquinone-like structure in the reduced form. (2) When carbonaceous materials are oxidized chemically, electrochemically, or thermally, the first stage involves formation of the oxide film and the later stages oxide gas (CO or CO/sub 2/) evolution. The catalytic reaction mechanism of coal oxidation was substantiated by adding Fe/sup 3 +/ or Ce/sup 4 +/ to a cell containing a coal slurry without passing any electrical current and by monitoring the amount of CO/sub 2/ evolved. Also, studies were performed on current efficiencies of CO/sub 2/ production reaction as a function of the particle size of coal samples. Finally, the catalytic rate constants of various redox catalysts for the coal oxidation reaction are reported. These results indicate that the thermodynamics of the reaction systems play a predominant role in determining the rate constants. Methods of studying the stability of semiconductor electrodes were established employing rotating ring-disk electrode techniques. The long-term stability of semiconductor electrodes would be needed to carry out the photoassisted coal gasification reaction. In the method we developed, the semiconductor was used as a disk electrode while the noble metal, e.g., Au or Pt, is used as a ring electrode. The species generated at the semiconductor electrode by light illumination is detected at the ring electrode by applying the proper electrode potential. If the ring detection current is lower than its expected value, the disk may undergo the photocorrosion reaction.

  7. Coal conversion processes. Quarterly report, December 13, 1983-March 12, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Biloen, P.; Holder, G.D.; Klinzing, G.E.; Tierney, J.W.

    1984-05-01

    Experimental work is continuing on four separate projects related to coal conversion processes. The direct digital control of exothermic multiphase reactions is being studied in an experimental adiabatic flow reactor. The existence of two stable steady states for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction network at the same temperature and feed condition has been verified and quantified. Various absorbents for SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub X/ are being studied. The absorption of NO/sub 2/ by methanol and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone has been extensively examined. Preliminary data have been obtained with triethylene-tetraamine. Hindered amines will be studied next. Procedures for the preparation of liquid membranes have been tested and the incorporation of hindered amines in them will now be examined. Isotopic switching is being used to study the way in which promoters affect supported metal catalysts. With improved resolution from the mass spectrometer, early quantitative results give indications of three different surface species and of non-statistical ingrowth of /sup 13/C into the product molecules. A program for the study of the extraction of coal and oil shale using supercritical fluids is being carried out. The effect of the presence of piperidine on the amount of toluene solubles produced by supercritical extraction of coal with toluene/piperidine mixture has been determined. A new kinetic model for the extraction/liquefaction of coal by supercritical toluene and THF has been developed and proven satisfactory. Bruceton coal and Hi Na lignite have been extracted with supercritical water. 3 references, 7 figures, 6 tables.

  8. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 12, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-10-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit. The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by June, 1997. During Quarter 12 (July--September 1995), work continued on the Subtask 3.2 in-plant testing of the Microcel{trademark} flotation column at Lady Dunn. Under Subtask 4.4, additional toxic trace element analysis of column flotation samples finalized the data set. Data analysis indicates that reasonably good mass balances were achieved for most elements. The final Subtask 6.3 Selective Agglomeration Process Optimization topical report was issued this quarter. Preliminary Subtask 6.4 work investigating coal-water-fuel slurry formulation indicated that selective agglomeration products formulate slurries with lower viscosities than advanced flotation products. Work continued on Subtask 6.5 agglomeration bench-scale testing. Results indicate that a 2 lb ash/MBtu product could be produced at a 100-mesh topsize with the Elkhorn No. 3 coal. The detailed design of the 2 t/hr selective agglomeration module neared completion this quarter with the completion of additional revisions of both the process flow, and the process piping and instrument diagrams. Construction of the 2 t/hr PDU and advanced flotation module was completed this quarter and startup and shakedown testing began.

  9. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-02-01

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74{mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultrafine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high sulfur and low sulfur clean coal. Accomplishments for the past quarter are described.

  10. Novel microorganism for selective separation of coal from ash and pyrite; First quarterly technical progress report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, M.; Smith, R.W.; Raichur, A.M.

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes the progress made during the first quarter of the research project entitled ``A Novel Microorganism for Selective Separation of Coal from Ash and Pyrite,`` DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-93PC93215. The objective of this project is to study the effectiveness of a novel hydrophobic microorganism, Mycobacterium phlei (M. phlei), for the selective flocculation of coal from pyrite and ash-forming minerals. During the reporting period, three different coal samples: Illinois No. 6 coal, Kentucky No. 9 coal and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, were collected to be used in the investigation. The microorganism, M. phlei, was obtained as freeze-dried cultures and the growth characteristics of the bacteria were studied. Scanning electron microphotographs revealed that M. phlei cells are coccal in shape and are approximately 1 {mu}m in diameter. Electrokinetic measurements showed that the Illinois No. 6 and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal samples had an isoelectric point (IEP) around pH 6 whereas M. phlei had an IEP around pH 1.5. Electrokinetic measurements of the ruptured microorganisms exhibited an increase in IEP. The increase in IEP of the ruputured cells was due to the release of fatty acids and polar groups from the cell membrane.

  11. Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of > 47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x} SO {sub x} and Particulates < 25% NSPS; Cost of electricity 10% lower; coal > 65% of heat input and all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. Most of this report discusses the details of work on these components, and the R&D Plan for future work. The discussion of the combustor designs illustrates how detailed modeling can be an effective tool to estimate NO{sub x} production, minimum burnout lengths, combustion temperatures and even particulate impact on the combustor walls. When our model is applied to the long flame concept it indicates that fuel bound nitrogen will limit the range of coals that can use this approach. For high nitrogen coals a rapid mixing, rich-lean, deep staging combustor will be necessary. The air heater design has evolved into two segments: a convective heat exchanger downstream of the combustion process; a radiant panel heat exchanger, located in the combustor walls; The relative amount of heat transferred either radiatively or convectively will depend on the combustor type and the ash properties.

  12. Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine Current Edition: Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Quarterly News, Vol. 2, Issue 3 (April 2016) Archived Editions: Coal ...

  13. Quarterly Update January through March - DOE Directives, Delegations, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Release Date: August 17, 2016 | Next Release Date: December 22, 2016 | full report The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of transportation, and consuming sector. All quarterly data are preliminary and will be superseded by the release of the corresponding "Annual Coal Distribution Report." Highlights for the fourth quarter 2015: Total

  14. Brick manufacture with fly ash from Illinois coals. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.E.; Dreher, G.; Frost, J.; Moore, D.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Fiocchi, T.; Swartz, D.

    1995-12-31

    This investigation seeks to utilize fly ash in fired-clay products such as building and patio bricks, ceramic blocks, field and sewer tile, and flower pots. This goal is accomplished by (1) one or more plant-scale, 5000-brick tests with fly ash mixed with brick clays at the 20% or higher level; (2) a laboratory-scale study to measure the firing reactions of a range of compositions of clay and fly ash mixtures; (3) a preliminary study to evaluate the potential environmental and economic benefits of brick manufacture with fly ash. Bricks and feed materials will be tested for compliance with market specifications and for leachability of pollutants derived from fly ash. The laboratory study will combine ISGS databases, ICCI-supported characterization methods, and published information to improve predictions of the firing characteristics of Illinois fly ash and brick clay mixtures. Because identical methods are used to test clay firing and coal ash fusion, and because melting mechanisms are the same, improved coal ash fusion predictions are an additional expected result of this research. If successful, this project should convert a disposal problem (fly ash) into valuable products-bricks. During this quarter we set up the manufacturing run at Colonial Brick Co., finalized arrangements for a larger brick manufacturing run at Marseilles Brick Co. in YR2, revised our laboratory procedures for selective dissolution analysis, obtained information to select three standard fly ashes, and continued our characterization of brick clays that could be mixed with fly ash for fired-clay products. Due to delays in other areas, we began construction of the optimization program for year 2. We discovered recently that fly ash dust will be an unanticipated problem at the brick plant.

  15. An advanced control system for fine coal flotation. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1997-03-04

    A model-based flotation control scheme is being implemented to achieve optimal performance in the handling and treatment of fine coal. The control scheme monitors flotation performance through on-line analysis of ash content. Then, based on the economic and metallurgical performance of the circuit, variables such as reagent dosage, pulp density and pulp level are adjusted using model-based control algorithms to compensate for feed variations and other process disturbances. Recent developments in sensor technology are being applied for on-line determination of slurry ash content. During the fourth quarter of this project, a final attempt was made to calibrate a video-based ash analyzer for use in this application. It was concluded that the low ash content and the coarse particle size of the flotation tailings slurry at the Maple Meadow plant site made the video-based system unsuitable for this application. Plans are now underway to lease a nuclear-based analyzer as the primary sensor for this project.

  16. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (Moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Seventeenth quarterly status report, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1992-01-20

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the seventeenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  17. Separation and characterization of coal derived components. Quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtubise, R.J.; Silver, H.F.

    1983-10-17

    The field-ionization mass spectral hydrocarbon data from F-45 (Wyodak coal-derived SRC) and F-51 (Kentucky 9/14 coal-derived SRC) were recalculated so the various hydrocarbon fractions could be compared directly on a weight percent basis. A computer program was developed which allows the field-ionization mass spectral hydrocarbon data to be compared in a three dimensional fashion. This approach provides for a rapid general comparson of all the field-ionization hydrocarbon data. The solubility of preasphaltenes was tested in several solvents. The preasphaltenes-2 were found to be largely soluble in pyridine:chloroform 9:1(v/v) or 7:3(v/v) and pyridine:chloroform:tetrahydrofuran 7:1:2(v/v/v). Experiments were carried out in which Chromasorb T was tested as a replacement for Fluoropak in the Fluoropak-basic alumina procedure. The results indicated Chromasorb T would be an adequate substitute for Fluoropak, but additional experiments will be run to confirm this. The chromatographic characteristics of numerous hydroxyl aromatics, nitrogen heterocycles, and aromatic amines were obtained on several normal-phase and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic systems. 30 references, 30 figures, 10 tables.

  18. Kinetics of MN based sorbents for hot coal gas. Quarterly report, September--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    Manganese-based sorbents have been investigated for the removal of hydrogen sulfide (the primary sulfur bearing compound) from hot coal gases prior to its use in combined cycle turbines. Four formulations of Mn-based sorbents were tested in an ambient-pressure fixed-bed reactor to determine steady state H{sub 2}S concentrations, breakthrough times and effectiveness of the sorbent when subjected to cyclic sulfidation and regeneration testing. In a previous report, the sulfidation results were presented. Manganese-based sorbents with molar ratios > 1:1 Mn:Substrate were effective in reducing the H{sub 2}S concentration in simulated coal gases to less than 100 ppmv over five cycles. Actual breakthrough time for formulation C6-2-1100 was as high as 73% of breakthrough time based on wt% Mn in sorbent. In this report, the regeneration results will be presented. Regeneration tests determined that loaded pellets can be fully regenerated in air/steam mixture at 750{degrees}C with minimal sulfate formation. 16 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Data base for the analysis of compositional characteristics of coal seams and macerals. Quarterly technical progress report, May-July 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Alan; Suhr, N. H.; Spackman, W.; Painter, P. C.; Walker, P. L.; Given, P. H.

    1980-10-01

    The basic objectives of this new program are, firstly, to understand the systematic relationships between the properties of coals and macerals, and, secondly, to determine the lateral and vertical variability in the properties of a single seam imposed by varying environmental conditions at the time of coal formation. Thirty-four coal samples were collected during the quarter from Pennsylvania and Illinois. To date, 54 vitrinite concentrates have been hand picked and will be studied by a range of physical and chemical techniques. One hundred and forty coal samples and 53 printouts of coal data were provided on request to the coal research community. The Lower Kittanning seam has been selected for the study of the variability in chemical, petrographic, mineralogic, fluid, and conversion properties of a single seam. A description of the structural and stratigraphic settings of the important coal seam as they relate to this investigation is given. Bivariate plots of data from the Lower Kittanning seam are presented. The fluid temperature range as measured with the Gieseler plastometer reaches a maximum at a reflectance of 1.10 to 1.15% and carbon content of 87 to 88% dmmf. Liquefaction conversion in a tubing-bomb reactor with tetralin shows a linear decrease with rank (reflectance). The problems associated with the application Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to the characterization of coal structure are critically discussed. The micropore surface areas and micropore volumes of three selected coals and a vitrinite concentrate, as measured from uptake of CO/sub 2/ at 25/sup 0/C, increased with decreasing particle size. Work on measurements of apparent densities and uptake of methanol and water is in progress.

  20. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 13, October--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1996-01-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit. During Quarter 13 (October--December 1995), testing of the GranuFlow dewatering process indicated a 3--4% reduction in cake moisture for screen-bowl and solid-bowl centrifuge products. The Orimulsion additions were also found to reduce the potential dustiness of the fine coal, as well as improve solids recovery in the screen-bowl centrifuge. Based on these results, Lady Dunn management now plans to use a screen bowl centrifuge to dewater their Microcel{trademark} column froth product. Subtask 3.3 testing, investigating a novel Hydrophobic Dewatering process (HD), continued this quarter. Continuing Subtask 6.4 work, investigating coal-water-slurry formulation, indicated that selective agglomeration products can be formulated into slurries with lower viscosities than advanced flotation products. Subtask 6.5 agglomeration bench-scale testing results indicate that a very fine grind is required to meet the 2 lb ash/MBtu product specification for the Winifrede coal, while the Hiawatha coal requires a grind in the 100- to 150-mesh topsize range. Detailed design work remaining involves the preparation and issuing of the final task report. Utilizing this detailed design, a construction bid package was prepared and submitted to three Colorado based contractors for quotes as part of Task 9.

  1. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report (Abbreviated), Ja

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2010 - 2016 (thousand short tons) January - March April - June July - September October - December Total Year Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 2010 17,807 4,803 21,965 5,058 21,074 4,680 20,870 4,811 81,716 19,353 2011 26,617 3,381 26,987 3,419 25,976 3,588 27,679 2,700 107,259 13,088 2012 28,642 2,022 37,534 2,329 31,563 2,415 28,006 2,394 125,746 9,159 2013 31,835 1,429 29,427 2,756 28,589 2,398 27,809 2,323

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report (Abbreviated), Ja

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2010 - 2016 (dollars per short ton) January - March April - June July - September October - December Total Year Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports Exports Imports 2010 106.52 62.02 121.36 71.91 125.45 77.12 126.16 76.18 120.41 71.77 2011 139.34 86.00 153.00 105.86 155.88 112.06 147.38 110.19 148.86 103.32 2012 134.88 103.82 118.95 100.89 115.12 93.25 104.64 90.39 118.43 96.78 2013 99.68 86.87 96.77 83.18 91.64 81.66

  3. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis. Quarterly report, April--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  4. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  5. DOE/EIA-E-0109 Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    produces light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, causing the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce. Excluded are compact fluorescent light bulbs, which are listed...

  6. DOE/EIA-0625(95) Distribution Category UC-950 A Look

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    that Con- gressional mandate, the EIA conducts two types of surveys: * Supply surveys gather information annually or more frequently from energy suppliers and marketers on the...

  7. DOE/EIA-0340(98)/2 Distribution Category UC-950 Petroleum Supply

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... foreign or commercial storage agreements. (s) Less ... Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System. Domestic crude oil ...

  8. DOE/EIA-0340(98)/2 Distribution Category UC-950 Petroleum Supply

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    January 1998 Crude Oil Field Production (1) Alaska .......................................................................................................... 38,097 1,229 (2) Lower 48 States ........................................................................................... 164,660 5,312 (3) Total U.S. ................................................................................................ 202,756 6,541 Net Imports (4) Imports (Gross Excluding Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR))

  9. Production of low sulfur binder pitich from high-sulfur Illinois coals. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to produce electrode binder pitch with sulfur content below 0.6 wt% from high-sulfur Illinois coal mild gasification liquids. Previously, flash thermocracking (FTC) was used to successfully upgrade the properties of mild gasification pitch, yielding a suitable blending stock for use as a binder in the production of carbon electrodes for the aluminum industry. However, in pitches from high-sulfur (4%) Illinois coal, the pitch sulfur content (2%) was still higher than preferred. In this project two approaches to sulfur reduction are being explored in conjunction with FTC: (1) the use of a moderate-sulfur (1.2%) Illinois coal as mild gasification feedstock, and (2) direct biodesulfurization of the liquids from high-sulfur coal prior to FTC. In Case 1, the liquids are being produced by mild gasification of IBC-109 coal in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor, followed by distillation to isolate the crude pitch. In Case 2, biodesulfurization with Rhodococcus Rhodochrous IGTS8 biocatalyst is being performed on crude pitch obtained from Illinois No. 6 coal tests conducted in the IGT MILDGAS PRU in 1990. Following preparation of the crude pitches, pitch upgrading experiments are being conducted in a continuous FTC reactor constructed in previous ICCI-sponsored studies. This quarter, mild gasification of IBC-109 coal was completed, producing 450 g of coal liquids, which were then distilled to recover 329 g of Case 1 crude pitch. Next month, the pitch will be subjected to FTC treatment and evaluated. Biodesulfurization experiments were performed on Case 2 pitch dispersed in l-undecanol, resulting in sulfur reductions of 15.1 to 21.4%. This was marginally lower than the 24.8% desulfurization obtained in l-dodecanol, but separation of pitch from the dispersant was facilitated by the greater volatility of l-undecanol.

  10. AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly report, August--October 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, J.M.

    1996-03-01

    The project objective is to design, construct, install provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation. This would permit full capacity operation of the FBC year round in spite of the VA laundry that was shut down as well as efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste and steam generation. The State permitting process required for construction will be completed in early November to allow installation and construction to be completed. Operating permits will be obtained after construction has been completed. A request for proposal for stack sampling and biospore tests was released to four (4) vendors in mid-October. The proposals shall be reviewed during November and the stack sampler will be selected. Funding was approved as of August 1, 1995. Construction and installation resumed on August 21, 1995 at the LVAMC. Construction and installation continues and will be completed by late December 1995.

  11. Synthesis of acrylates and methacrylates from coal-derived syngas. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-02

    Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center. This three-step process consists of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Eastman has focused on the propionate synthesis step. the resultant Mo catalysts work efficiently at much less severe conditions (170{degrees}C and 30 atm) than the conventional Ni catalysts (270{degrees}C and 180 atm). Bechtel has performed an extensive cost analysis which shows that Eastman`s propionate synthesis step is competitive with other technologies to produce the anhydride. In the second step, RTI and Eastman have developed active and stable V-Si-P ternary metal oxide catalysts Nb/SiO{sub 2} and Ta/SiO{sub 2} catalysts for the condensation of propionic anhydride and acid with formaldehyde. RTI has demonstrated a novel correlation among the catalyst acid-base properties, condensation reaction yield, and long-term catalyst activity. Current research focuses on enhancing the condensation reaction yields by better understanding of the acid-base property correlation, in situ condensation in a high-temperature, high- pressure (HTHP) slurry reactor, and alternate formaldehyde feedstocks. Based on Eastman and RTI laboratory data, a cost estimate is also being developed for the integrated process.

  12. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, November 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This second quarterly report describes work during the second three months of the University of Pittsburgh`s (Pitt`s) project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quotes} Participating with Pitt on this project are Dravo Lime Company (DLC), Mill Service, Inc. (MSI) and the Center for Hazardous Materials Research (CHMR). The report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon the acquisition of by-product samples and their initial analysis. Other efforts during the second quarter have been directed toward identifying the first hazardous waste samples and preparing for their treatment and analysis. Relatively little data has yet been collected. Major presentation of technical details and data will appear for the first time in the third quarterly report. The activity on the project during the second quarter of Phase One, as presented in the following sections, has fallen into seven areas: (1) Acquiring by-products, (2) Analyzing by-products, (3) Identifying, analyzing and treating suitable hazardous wastes, (4) Carrying out the quality assurance/quality control program, (5) Developing background, and (6) Initiating public relations

  13. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document a quarterly report prepared in accordance with the project reporting requirements covering the period from July 1, 1992 to September 30, 1992. This report provides a summary of the technical work undertaken during this period, highlighting the major results. A brief description of the work done prior to this quarter is provided in this report under the task headings. The overall project scope of the engineering development project is to conceptually develop a commercial flowsheet to maximize pyritic sulfur reduction at practical energy recovery values. This is being accomplished by utilizing the basic research data on the surface properties of coal, mineral matter and pyrite obtained from the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Fine Coal Flotation Project, to develop this conceptual flowsheet. The conceptual flowsheet must be examined to identify critical areas that need additional design data. This data will then be developed using batch and semi-continuous bench scale testing. In addition to actual bench scale testing, other unit operations from other industries processing fine material will be reviewed for potential application and incorporated into the design if appropriate. The conceptual flowsheet will be revised based on the results of the bench scale testing and areas will be identified that need further larger scale design data verification, to prove out the design.

  14. Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine Current Edition: Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Quarterly News, Vol. 2, Issue 3 (April 2016) Archived Editions: Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Quarterly News, Vol. 2, Issue 2 (Jan 2016) Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Quarterly News, Vol. 2, Issue 1 (Oct 2015) Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Quarterly News, Vol. 1, Issue 4 (July 2015) Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Quarterly News, Vol.

  15. Low-rank coal research under the UND/DOE cooperative agreement. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1983-June 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, Jr., G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) gasification wastewater treatment and reuse; (2) fine coal cleaning; (3) coal-water slurry preparation; (4) low-rank coal liquefaction; (5) combined flue gas cleanup/simultaneous SO/sub x/-NO/sub x/ control; (6) particulate control and hydrocarbons and trace element emissions from low-rank coals; (7) waste characterization; (8) combustion research and ash fowling; (9) fluidized-bed combustion of low-rank coals; (10) ash and slag characterization; (11) organic structure of coal; (12) distribution of inorganics in low-rank coals; (13) physical properties and moisture of low-rank coals; (14) supercritical solvent extraction; and (15) pyrolysis and devolatilization.

  16. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

  17. Methane modeling: predicting the inflow of methane gas into coal mines. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1982-June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, C.M. II; Hoysan, P.M.; Pavone, A.M.; Richmond, O.; Schwerer, F.C.; Smelser, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Work on Phase I of the Contract program is essentially complete and was reported in the Phase I Technical Report which has been reviewed and accepted by the Contract Technical Project Officer. Phase I work included a survey of relevant technical literature and development, demonstration and documentation of a computer model, MINE1D, for flow of methane and water in coal strata for geometries corresponding to an advancing mine face and to a mine pillar. The Phase I models are one-dimensional in the space variable but describe time-dependent (nonsteady) phenomena and include gas sorption phenomena. Some revisions have been made to input/output sections of MINE1D and the documentation has been expanded. These modifications will be reported in the next Quarterly Technical Report. Preliminary test scenarios have been formulated and reviewed with the Contract Technical Project Officer for measurement of emissions during room-and-pillar and longwall mining operations. These preliminary scenarios are described in this report. A mathematical model has been developed to describe the increased stresses on the coal seam near mine openings. The model is based on an approximate elastic/plastic treatment of the coal seam and an elastic treatment of surrounding strata. In this model, elastic compaction of the coal seam decreases porosity and permeability, whereas plastic deformation increases the porosity of the natural fracture network and thereby increases the permeability. The model takes into account the effect of changes in pore fluid pressure (in the natural fracture network of the coal seam) on the deformation of the coal seam. This model is described in this report, and will be programmed for inclusion in revised versions of MINE1D and for use in the two-dimensional computer models now under development. 8 figures.

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and Institutional: Form EIA-3, "Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report, Manufacturing and TransformationProcessing Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Coal...

  19. Development and testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system, Phase 3. Sixteenth quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zauderer, B.

    1996-01-03

    In the fourth quarter of calendar year 1995 the installation and checkout of the 20 MMBtu/hr combustor and auxiliary equipment in Philadelphia was completed. The task 5, Site Demonstration Testing, combustor-boiler tests on gas, oil, and coal were initiated. The task 5 effort involves testing the combustor over extended periods under conditions that fully simulate commercial operation and that meet the combustion and environmental specifications for this project. To meet this project objective within the current work scope requires up to 500 hours of testing. The focus of this testing will be on the component and environmental performance of combustor, boiler, coal preparation and feeding, and the stack gas equipment. The facility can be converted to a 500 kW power plant by the addition of a steam turbine, condenser, and cooling tower. However, this added effort is beyond the current work scope and its implementation will depend on recovering the added costs by placing the steam production from the boiler to beneficial use. During the present quarterly reporting period, all the components needed to implement the initial 100 hours of testing under task 5 were installed at the test site, and checkout of this equipment was performed. Since the present installation contained substantial improvements and simplifications to all sub-systems that had been used in the Williamsport facility, each component and sub-system had to be tested individually.

  20. Coal air turbine {open_quotes}CAT{close_quotes} program invention 604. Fourth quarter project report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster-Pegg, R.W.

    1995-10-31

    A coal air turbine `CAT` generates electric power and heat from coal combustion. The purpose of this project is the conceptual design of a `CAT` plant, and to make a comparison of the capital cost and and cost of power and steam from the `CAT` plant with power produced by alternate plants at the same site. Three configurations investigated include: condensing plant utilizing coal fuel and a condenser tower, or river, for cooling; a cogeneration plant utilizing coal and a steam turbine; and a cogeneration plant utilizing steam export and injection with waste coal fuel.

  1. Coal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coal is the largest domestically produced source of energy in America and is used to generate a significant amount of our nation’s electricity.

  2. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. 19th quarterly report, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1991-09-25

    The objectives of this study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines. (VC)

  3. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Twenty-first quarterly report, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines.

  4. Production of Illinois base compliance coal using enhanced gravity separation. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, B.C.; Honaker, R.Q.; Ho, K.

    1993-12-31

    Illinois Basin coal often contains a significant portion of finely dispersed pyrite. Most of the free pyrite particles exist in the fine size fractions, which are generally treated using froth flotation. An inherent problem of the froth flotation process is the inefficient treatment of middling particles containing a small amount of coal on their surface. On the other hand, gravity-based processes can effectively remove middling particles containing only a small amount of coal. Falcon Concentrators Inc. and Knelson Gold Concentrators Inc. have developed full-scale, enhanced gravity separators for the treatment of heavy minerals. This project will evaluate the potential of using these concentrators to de-ash and de-sulfurize Illinois coal fines, thus, producing coal products that meet the requirements for Phase I of the Clean Air Act. Since both continuous separators are commercially available, the results obtained in this investigation should be applicable to industrial operations.

  5. Role of temperature, solvent and agitation in coal dissolution and liquefaction. Quarterly report, December 1981-February 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, D.E.; Ebnesajjad, S.

    1982-03-01

    A Plexiglas reactor was constructed and experiments carried out with three mixer configurations in a sand-water system to determine the best mixer configuration and the minimum rpm to produce uniform conditions during coal dissolution. Coal dissolution experiments on Kentucky No. 9 coal were made with combinations of tetralin and 2-methylnaphthalene to obtain the optimum ratio in the solvent. The effect of ..beta..-naphthol addition to the solvent on the dissolution of Kentucky No. 9 coal was studied. The effect of holding time at 400/sup 0/C on the dissolution of Kentucky No. 9 coal in a solvent containing 46.1 wt % tetralin, 46.1 wt % 2-methylnaphthalene, 2.9 wt % ..gamma..-picoline and 4.9 wt % ..beta..-naphthol was studied.

  6. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-01-25

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by March, 1997. During Quarter 9 (October--December, 1995), parametric and optimization testing was completed for the Taggart, Sunnyside, and Indiana VII coal using a 12-inch Microcel{trademark} flotation column. The detailed design of the 2-t/hr PDU grinding, flotation, and dewatering circuits neared completion with the specification of the major pieces of capital equipment to be purchased for these areas. Selective agglomeration test work investigated the properties of various industrial grades of heptane for use during bench- and PDU-scale testing. It was decided to use a hydrotreated grade of commercial heptane due to its low cost and low concentration of aromatic compounds. The final Subtask 6.4 CWF Formulation Studies Test Plan was issued. A draft version of the Subtask 6.5 Preliminary Design and Test Plan Report was also issued, discussing the progress made in the design of the bench-scale selective agglomeration unit. PDU construction work moved forward through the issuing of 26 request for quotations and 21 award packages for capital equipment.

  7. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Twenty-sixth quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1993-09-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The program includes: (i) validation of the submodels by comparison with laboratory data obtained in this program, (ii) extensive validation of the modified comprehensive code by comparison of predicted results with data from bench-scale and process scale investigations of gasification, mild gasification and combustion of coal or coal-derived products in heat engines, and (iii) development of well documented user friendly software applicable to a ``workstation`` environment. Success in this program will be a major step in improving the predictive capabilities for coal conversion processes including: Demonstrated accuracy and reliability and a generalized ``first principles`` treatment of coals based on readily obtained composition data.

  8. Integration of advanced preparation with coal liquefaction. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1-June 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steedman, W.G.; Longanbach, J.R.; Muralidhara, H.S.; Folsom, D.W.; Droege, J.W.

    1984-07-24

    The objective of this work is to explore the technoeconomic feasibility of a series of unit operations involving: (1) wet grinding of coal in water; (2) removal of chlorine and sodium, release of undesirable mineral matter, and chemical incorporation, if needed, of a disposable liquefaction catalyst in coal via hot water teatment; (3) oil agglomeration to dewater and deash coal while retaining most of the pyrite; and (4) solvent drying of coal agglomerates to eliminate oxidation of coal, improve coal liquefaction reactivity, save energy and prepare the coal/solvent slurry for liquefaction. An apparatus capable of running five microautoclaves simultaneously has been designed and constructed. The autoclaves are shaken along the long axis to insure good mixing and pressure and temperature can be monitored in each autocalve during the run. Reproducibility experiments indicate that the standard deviation on the conversion to THF solubles is about 2.5 percent. The standard deviations in conversions to preasphaltenes and asphaltenes are much higher. A five-autoclave experiment has confirmed earlier results which indicate that wet grinding and hot-water treatment have little effect on conversion to THF solubles but that oil agglomeration followed by drying in a vacuum oven causes a large increase and oil agglomeration followed by solvent drying causes a significant but smaller increase in conversion. 5 references, 13 figures.

  9. Annual Coal Distribution

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2016-01-01

    The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing state. All data for the report year are final and this report supersedes all data in the quarterly distribution reports.

  10. Annual Coal Distribution

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing state. All data for the report year are final and this report supersedes all data in the quarterly distribution reports.

  11. Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection. [Quarterly] technical report, 1 March 1993--31 May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crelling, J.C.; Case, E.R.

    1993-09-01

    A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. The basic program is designed to determine the reactivity of both coal and its derived char under blast furnace conditions and to compare the results to similar properties of blast furnace coke. The results of the first two experiments in which coal char pyrolyzed in nitrogen at 1000{degrees}C in an EPR were reacted isothermally in air at 1000{degrees}C and 1200{degrees}C. The reactivity values of the same char in these two experiments were different by an order of magnitude. The char reactivity at 1000{degrees}C was 9.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} grams per minute while the reactivity. of the char at 1200{degrees}C was 1.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} grams per minute. These results suggest that the temperature of the blast air in the tuyere may be critical in achieving complete carbon burnout.

  12. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Technical progress report, second & third quarters, 1993, April 1993--June 1993, July 1993--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese, and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by constructing and operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The demonstration is being performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Ontario Hydro. SCS is the participant responsible for managing all aspects of this project.

  13. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report: First quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. During this quarter, long-term testing of the LNB + AOFA configuration continued and no parametric testing was performed. Further full-load optimization of the LNB + AOFA system began on March 30, 1993. Following completion of this optimization, comprehensive testing in this configuration will be performed including diagnostic, performance, verification, long-term, and chemical emissions testing. These tests are scheduled to start in May 1993 and continue through August 1993. Preliminary engineering and procurement are progressing on the Advanced Low NOx Digital Controls scope addition to the wall-fired project. The primary activities during this quarter include (1) refinement of the input/output lists, (2) procurement of the distributed digital control system, (3) configuration training, and (4) revision of schedule to accommodate project approval cycle and change in unit outage dates.

  14. Data base for analysis of compositional characteristics of coal seams and macerals. Quarterly technical progress report, November-January 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A; Suhr, N H; Spackman, W; Painter, P C; Walker, P L; Given, P H

    1981-04-01

    The basic objectives of this program are, first, to understand the systematic relationships between the properties of coals, and, second, to determine the nature of the lateral and vertical variability in the properties of a single seam. Multivariate statistical analyses applied to the Coal Data Base confirm a number of known trends for coal properties. In addition, nitrogen and some components of the ash analysis bear interesting relationships to rank. The macroscopic petrography of column samples of the Lower Kittanning seam reveals a significant difference between the sample from a marine-influenced environment and those from toward the margins of the basin where conditions were non-marine. The various methods of determining the amount and mineralogy of the inorganic fraction of coals are reviewed. General trends in seam thickness, ash, sulfur, volatile matter yield, and vitrinite reflectance of the Lower Kittanning seam of western Pennsylvania are presented. Controls of sedimentation are discussed in relation to the areal variability which has been observed. Differential subsidence and paleotopography appear to have played a major role during the deposition of the coal. The same controls may have maintained some influence upon the coalification process after deposition, especially along the eastern margin of the Lower Kittanning basin.

  15. Superacid Catalyzed Coal Conversion Chemistry. 1st and 2nd Quarterly Technical Progress Reports, September 1, 1983-March 30, 1984.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Olah, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    In our laboratories we have previously developed a mild coal conversion process. This involves the use of a superacid system consisting of HF and BF{sub 3} in presence of hydrogen and/or a hydrogen donor solvent. In order to understand the chemistry involved in the process of depolymerization of coal by the HF:BF{sub 3}:H{sub 2} system we are carrying out a systematic study of a number of coal model compounds. The model compounds selected for present study have two benzene rings connected with various bridging units such as alkylidene, ether, sulfide etc. From studies so far carried out it appears that high pyridine extractibilities achieved by treating coal at temperature below 100 degrees C results from the cleavage of bridges such as present in bibenzyl, diphenyl methane, dibenzyl ether, dibenzyl sulfide etc. On the other hand the increased cyclohexane extractibility and distillability observed at relatively higher temperatures and hydrogen pressures reflects the hydrogenation and cleavage of the aromatic backbone in coal structure similar to what is seen in the conversion of model compounds such as biphenyl, diphenyl ether, diphenyl sulfide, anthracene, etc.

  16. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Twenty-seventh quarterly report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1993-09-01

    Significant advances have been made at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive two-dimensional computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification and pulverized coal combustion. During the same time period, significant advances have been made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in the mechanisms and kinetics of coal pyrolysis and secondary reactions of pyrolysis products. This program presents a unique opportunity to merge the technology developed by each organization to provide detailed predictive capability for advanced coal characterization techniques in conjunction with comprehensive computer models to provide accurate process simulations. The program will streamline submodels existing or under development for coal pyrolysis chemistry, volatile secondary reactions, tar formation, soot formation, char reactivity, and SO{sub x}-NO{sub x} pollutant formation. Submodels for coal viscosity, agglomeration, tar/char secondary reactions, sulfur capture, and ash physics and chemistry will be developed or adapted. The submodels will first be incorporated into the BYU entrained-bed gasification code and subsequently, into a fixed-bed gasification code (to be selected and adapted). These codes will be validated by comparison with small scale laboratory and PDU-scale experiments. Progress is described.

  17. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. 23rd quarterly report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specific conversion behavior is AFR`s Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU`s comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. The program includes: (i) validation of the submodels by comparison with laboratory data obtained in this program, (ii) extensive validation of the modified comprehensive code by comparison of predicted results with data from bench-scale and process scale investigations of gasification, mild gasification and combustion of coal or coal-derived products in heat engines, and (iii) development of well documented user friendly software applicable to a ``workstation`` environment.

  18. Exploratory study of coal-conversion chemistry. Quarterly report, June 20, 1980-September 19, 1980. [Diphenylmethane, diphenyl ether

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-04

    This report describes work accomplished under two task: Task A, Mechanism of Cleavage of Key Bond types Present in Coals, and Task B, Catalysis of Conversion in CO-H/sub 2/O Systems. Under Task A, we have made additional measurements of catalytic carbon-carbon and carbon-oxygen bond cleavage in coal-related diphenylmethane and diphenyl ether structures. The results provide further support for, but do not definitely confirm, the tentative conclusion that the highly effective iron oxide catalysts involves oxidation to radical cation species. The homogeneous scission of carbon-oxygen bonds in diphenyl ether structure has also been studied. In the Task B studies of CO-H/sub 2/O systems, we typically obtain 50% benzene-soluble product material from 20 min. reaction of beneficiated Illinois No. 6 coal. This conversion level is obtained with aqueous solutions either at a starting pH above 12.6 or in neutral solutions with water-soluble catalysts present. We have studied a number of catalysts, including the potassium or sodium salts of molybdate, chromate, manganate, and tungstate; all are effective in the 3000 to 6000 ppM range. A striking result is that sodium nitrate at 6000 ppM is as effective as the metal salts. We found that the nitrate was converted to ammonium ion; also, formate was detected in the product aqueous phase. Finally, we find that catalytic quantities of sodium formate in CO/H/sub 2/O at pH 7 are effective in the conversion. However, in a control run in N/sub 2//H/sub 2/O, with a quantity of sodium formate equivalent to twice the molar quantity of hydrogen transferred to the coal in a successful run, the coal was converted to a product totally insoluble in benzene and with a lower hydrogen content than the starting coal.

  19. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emissions boiler systems. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    This progress report is on the project by Babcock and Wilcox Company to develop an advanced coal-fired low-emissions boiler system. The topics of the report include project management, the NO{sub x} subsystem, the SO{sub 2}/particulate/air toxics/solid by-product subsystem, boiler subsystem, balance of plant subsystem, and controls and sensors subsystems.

  20. Low-rank coal research annual report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1990 including quarterly report, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    Research programs in the following areas are presented: control technology and coal preparation; advance research and technology development; combustion; liquefaction; and gasification. Sixteen projects are included. Selected items have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. Production of a pellet fuel from Illinois coal mines. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.; Berger, R.; Ho, Ken

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this research is to produce a pellet fuel from low-sulfur Illinois coal fines which could burn with emissions of less than 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu in stoker-fired boilers. The significance of 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu is that in the Chicago (9 counties) and St. Louis (2 counties) metropolitan areas, industrial users of coal currently must comply with this level of emissions. Stokers are an attractive market for pellets because pellets are well-suited for this application and because western coal is not a competitor in the stoker market. Compliance stoker fuels come from locations such as Kentucky and West Virginia and the price for fuels from these locations is high relative to the current price of Illinois coal. This market offers the most attractive near-term economic environment for commercialization of pelletization technology. For this effort, we will be investigating the use of fines from two Illinois mines which currently mine relatively low-sulfur reserves and that discard their fines fraction (minus 100 mesh). The research will involve investigation of multiple unit operations including column flotation, filtration and pellet production. The end result of the effort will allow for an evaluation of the commercial viability of the approach.

  2. Mass transfer and biodegradation of PAH compounds from coal tar. Quarterly technical report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramaswami, A.; Ghoshal, S.; Luthy, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    This study examines the role of physico-chemical mass transfer processes on the rate of biotransformation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds released from non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) coal tar present at residual saturation within a microporous medium. A simplified coupled dissolution-degradation model is developed that describes the concurrent mass transfer and biokinetic processes occurring in the system. Model results indicate that a dimensionless Damkohler number can be utilized to distinguish between systems that are mass transfer limited, and those that are limited by biological phenomena. The Damkohler number is estimated from independent laboratory experiments that measure the rates of aqueous phase dissolution and biodegradation of naphthalene from coal tar. Experimental data for Stroudsburg coal tar imbibed within 236 {mu}m diameter silica particles yield Damkohler numbers smaller than unity, indicating, for the particular system under study, that the overall rate of biotransformation of naphthalene is not limited by the mass transfer of naphthalene from coal tar to the bulk aqueous phase. There is a need for investigation of mass transfer for larger particles and/or other PAH compounds, and study of microbial rate-limiting phenomena including toxicity, inhibition and competitive substrate utilization.

  3. Coal Study Guide - High School | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High School Coal Study Guide - High School Coal Study Guide - High School (658.82 KB) More Documents & Publications Coal Study Guide - Middle School Coal Study Guide for Elementary School Fossil Energy Today - First Quarter, 2011

  4. Field study of disposed wastes from advanced coal processes. Quarterly technical progress report, January to April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has initiated research on the disposal solid processes. The objective of this research is to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for planning waste disposal practices associated with advanced coal processes. To accomplish this objective, DOE has contracted Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to design, construct, and monitor a limited number of field disposal tests with advanced coal process wastes. These field tests will be monitored over a three year period with the emphasis on collecting data on the field disposal of these wastes. Information on field disposal behavior is needed (a) as input to predictive models being developed, (b) as input to the development of rule of thumb design guidelines for the disposal of these wastes, and (c) as evidence of the behavior of these wastes in the natural environment.This study is organized into four major Tasks. Task 1 and 2 were devoted to planning the Task 3 field study. Task 4 uses the results of the field testing to produce an Engineering Design Manual for the utilities and industrial users who manage wastes from advanced coal combustion technologies.

  5. Exploratory research on solvent-refined coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-02-01

    Work continued on the study of disposable catalysts and the effect of specific additives in both the SRC I and SRC II processing modes. At 450/sup 0/C, 2250 psig and 1.0 hour residence time with Loveridge coal in the SRC II mode, yields and hydrogen consumptions were essentially the same for runs with 5 wt % added pyrite or 3.3 wt % added ferric oxide. When Loveridge coal was impregnated with 0.7 wt % molybdenum, slightly higher oil yields and slightly lower hydrocarbon gas, SRC and IOM yields were obtained than with the iron compounds above. When Loveridge coal was processed in the SRC I mode at 450/sup 0/C, 1900 psig and 26 minutes residence time, there was a 3.7% increase in total oil yield with a corresponding decrease in SRC yield when pyrite was added to the feed slurry. There was a smaller effect with a FeS/sub 2//Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ combination and little or no effect when ferric oxide alone was added.

  6. Chemistry and catalysis of coal liquefaction catalytic and thermal upgrading of coal liquid and hydrogenation of CO to produce fuels. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, W.H.

    1981-02-01

    Studies on the basic properties of supported sulfide catalysts showed that different supports have a profound influence on catalytic activities of CoMo catalysts. The three functions of hydrodesulfurization, hydrogenation and cracking were differently affected depending on the support used and the manner of preparation of the catalyst. Also, incorporation of additives to the support showed that the different catalytic functions can be selectively affected. A systematic study concerned with catalytic cracking of coal-derived liquids, viz., an SRC-II middle-heavy distillate and four hydrotreated SRC-II products was carried out in the range of 375 to 500/sup 0/C (LHSV, 0.2 to 3.9 h/sup -1/). Hydrotreatment, even to a limited extent, results in a remarkable improvement in the yield of gasoline-range products from the SRC-II distillate. This improvement is ascribed to: (a) hydrogenolysis reactions leading to lower molecular weight feedstock components and (b) limited hydrogenation of aromatic rings leading to polycyclic feed components with sufficient concentration of hydroaromatic rings needed for effective cracking. The results with model compounds and the data on hydrogen consumption during hydrotreatment of SRC-II liquids indicate that for tricyclic, tetracyclic, and pentacyclic coal-liquid components the optimal concentration of hydroaromatic rings for effective subsequent cracking is at least two rings per molecule.

  7. Synthesis of acrylates and methacrlyates from coal-derived syngas. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tischer, R.E.; Spivey, J.J.

    1995-08-01

    The objective Task 1, Synthesis of Propionates, is to develop the technology for the synthesis of low-cost propionates. These propionates are the basic feedstock for the subsequent reaction with formaldehyde to produce the target molecule, methyl methacrylate (MMA). Eastman has explored several possible routes to the propionates and has concluded that the most promising is the synthesis of propionic anhydride from the reaction of propionic acid from and ethylene (and also hydrogen in some cases). The main advantage of the anhydride over the acid is that its subsequent reaction with formaldehyde does not produce water, which can lead to undesired byproducts. Bechtel is carrying out a cost analysis of the Eastman route to the anhydride to determine if it is potentially competitive with commercially practiced routes to the same molecule. The answer is expected next quarter. The objective Task 2, Condensation Catalysis to develop catalysts for the condensation of the propionate (propionic anhydride is our target molecule) with formaldehyde. This reaction produces methacrylic acid (MAA), which would then be reacted with methanol to produce MMA in the slurry reactor. We have synthesized a wide range of catalysts and the results show that there is substantial byproduct formation, including 3-pentanone and some propionic acid. Our results show the highest yields of MAA using an alkalized alumina (1%Na/{sub y}-AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Although the condensation of propionic acid with formaldehyde is well studied in the literature, little is reported on the condensation of the anhydride. Although it is likely that the same general types of acid/base catalysts that promote the acid condensation will also promote that of the anhydride, the strength and balance of the acid and base sites is likely to be different. We plan to explore the relationship of the catalyst properties and MMA yields using the Altamira system, due to be delivered this next quarter.

  8. Study of ebullated bed fluid dynamics for H-Coal. Quarterly progress report No. 1, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, R. J.; Rundell, D. N.

    1980-12-01

    Cold flow experiments were completed with kerosene, nitrogen, and HDS-2A (3/16'' length) catalyst. Percent bed expansion, gas/liquid/catalyst holdups, and drift fluxes were determined for each test. Fluid dynamics data were obtained at HRI during Run PDU-10 (Wyodak coal and Amocat-1A catalyst). Reactor liquid samples were taken for later viscosity determination. A 6'' diameter test stand for bubble coalescence experiments was constructed and delivered to Northwestern University. A search was initiated to select suitable model fluids.

  9. Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed: Technical progress report for the second quarter, January 19--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

    1989-05-01

    This research project is for the development of a technically and economically feasible process for drying and stabilizing of fine particles of high-moisture subbituminous coal. Research activities were initiated with efforts concentrating on characterization of the two feed coals: Eagle Butte coal from AMAX Coal Company's mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming; and coal from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc.'s mine located in central Alaska. Both of the feed coals are high-moisture subbituminous coals with ''as received'' moisture contents of 29% and 22% for the Eagle Butte and Usibelli coals, respectively. However, physical analyses of the crushed coal samples (--28-mesh particle size range) indicate many differences. The minimum fluidization velocity (MFV) of the feed coals were experimentally determined. The MFV for --28-mesh Eagle Butte coal is approximately 1 ft/min, and the MFV for --28-mesh Usibelli coal is approximately 3 ft/min. 2 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Assessment of pulverized-coal-fired combustor performance. Seventh quarterly technical progress report, April 1-June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, W.; Clark, W.; Payne, R.

    1982-08-01

    There are substantial economic incentives to explore the possibility of converting boilers and other industrial processes from natural gas or oil to pulverized-fuel firing; however, such a change can have a considerable impact on the thermal performance of the system, due mainly to: fuel specific adiabatic flame temperatures; different flow and combustion patterns in the furnace; differences in the type and concentration of radiative species, especially particles, in the combustion products; and ash deposition on heat transfer surfaces. This program is concerned with the provision of a technology base to expedite the conversion of industrial processes from oil and gas to coal and other pulverized fuels. It addresses primarily the impact of fuel type on the thermal performance of a combustor. The program incorporates two experimental tasks and is constructed around an analytical task (Task 1) which will identify and upgrade a family of computer programs required to undertake thermal performance analysis studies. These analytical tools will thus be used to predict the effects of parameters such as fuel type and furnace variables on combustor performance, and to identify those properties which have a major impact on thermal performance. The second task uses a combustion reactor to screen the key variable identified in Task 1 and to provide data on the properties of coal particulate matter which affect heat transfer performance. Verification of the engineering analytical approach will be provided by measurements made in a pilot-scale furnace in the third task.

  11. Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived syngas. Quarterly status report No. 6, January 1--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.M.

    1992-05-19

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated fuels, hydrocarbon fuels, fuel intermediates, and octane enhancers; and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE`s LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). BASF continues to have difficulties in scaling-up the new isobutanol synthesis catalyst developed in Air Products` laboratories. Investigations are proceeding, but the proposed operation at LaPorte in April is now postponed. DOE has accepted a proposal to demonstrate Liquid Phase Shift (LPS) chemistry at LaPorte as an alternative to isobutanol. There are two principal reasons for carrying out this run. First, following the extensive modifications at the site, operation on a relatively ``benign`` system is needed before we start on Fischer-Tropsch technology in July. Second, use of shift catalyst in a slurry reactor will enable DOE`s program on coal-based Fischer-Tropsch to encompass commercially available cobalt catalysts-up to now they have been limited to iron-based catalysts which have varying degrees of shift activity. In addition, DOE is supportive of continued fuel testing of LaPorte methanol-tests of MIOO at Detroit Diesel have been going particularly well. LPS offers the opportunity to produce methanol as the catalyst, in the absence of steam, is active for methanol synthesis.

  12. Studies in coal liquefaction with application to the SRC and related processes. Quarterly report, May-July 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guin, J. A.; Curtis, C. W.; Tarrer, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    This report discusses a kinetic investigation of the Fe-S-H/sub 2/ system conducted as an outgrowth of current research in the SRC-I (solvent refined coal) process to better understand the effects of naturally occurring iron sulfides in coal hydrogenation and hydrodesulfurization. A total of twelve closed system reactions were carried out in which 48 to 60 mesh pyrite, in the presence of hydrogen gas, underwent transformation to 1C hexagonal pyrrhotite. Reaction temperatures were 350/sup 0/C and 400/sup 0/C with four sample runs at temperature. Initial pressure of hydrogen gas was 1250 psig (8617 KPa). A comparison of the results for each reaction series was evaluated with time and temperature as variables. The transformation rate of pyrite to pyrrhotite was found to increase over the range of reaction temperatures with the 400/sup 0/C samples showing the greatest amount of transformation per unit time. For the 375/sup 0/C and 400/sup 0/C runs pyrrhotite formation decreased after approximately 15 minutes of reaction time due to (1) reduced availability of pyrite, and (2) resistance to diffusion in the topochemical product layer.

  13. Kinetics of Mn-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization. Quarterly report, September 15 - December 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1996-12-31

    Manganese-based sorbents have been investigated for the removal of hydrogen sulfide (the primary sulfur bearing compound) from hot coal gases prior to its use in combined cycle turbines. Four formulations of Mn-based sorbents were tested in an ambient-pressure fixed-bed reactor to determine steady state H{sub 2}S concentrations, breakthrough times and effectiveness of the sorbent when subjected to cyclic sulfidation and regeneration testing. In a previous report, the sulfidation results were presented. Manganese-based sorbents with molar ratios > 1:1 Mn:Substrate were effective in reducing the H{sub 2}S concentration in simulated coal gases to less than 100 ppmv over five cycles. Actual breakthrough time for formulation C6-2-1100 was as high as 73% of breakthrough time based on wt% Mn in sorbent. In this report, the regeneration results will be presented. Regeneration tests determined that loaded pellets can be fully regenerated in air/steam mixture at 750{degrees}C with minimal sulfate formation. 16 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS process). Eleventh quarterly report, [January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-09

    During this reporting period comparison was made between theoretical and actual biogas production in the upflow reactors, where Texas lignite (TxL) was loaded at 0% (control) and 10% solids loadings. Data for methane and total gas production from task 4 were used. Calculations were made on the assumption that Texas lignite contains 60% carbon and theoretically all of this carbon is converted to CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}. Analysis of the data obtained from the bioreactor experiments showed that higher biogas production is due to more efficient biogasification of Texas lignite in bioreactor with reethanol (Table 1) . As it was previously mentioned, methanol (at 0.5% concentration of the total volume of reactants) can be used as hydrogen donor for biogasification (data presented in the 10th Quarterly report). Data in Table 1 clearly indicates, that the theoretical CH{sub 4} and biogas production from methanol is negligible and net biomethanation of TxL is enhanced by the addition of methanol. Observation of high methane production in the reactor where Texas lignite was supplemented with methanol, supports our hypothesis that methanol acts as an additional hydrogen donor.

  15. Kinetics of Mn-based sorbents for hot coal gas desulfurization. Quarterly report, December 15, 1993--March 15, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1997-03-03

    Manganese-based sorbents have been investigated for the removal of hydrogen sulfide (the primary sulfur bearing compound) from hot coal gases prior to its use in combined cycle turbines. Four formulations of Mn-based sorbents were tested in an ambient-pressure fixed-bed reactor to determine steady state H{sub 2}S concentrations, breakthrough times and effectiveness of the sorbent when subjected to cyclic sulfidation and regeneration testing. In previous reports, the sulfidation and regeneration results from cyclic testing done at 600{degrees}C were presented. Manganese-based sorbents, with molar ratios > 1:1 Mn:Substrate were effective in reducing the H{sub 2}S concentration in simulated coal gases to less than 100 ppmv over five cycles. Actual breakthrough time for formulation C6-2-1100 was as high as 73% of breakthrough time based on wt% Mn in sorbent. Regeneration tests determined that loaded pellets can be fully regenerated in air/steam mixture at 750{degrees}C with minimal sulfate formation. In this report, the results from cyclic crush strength tests, Sulfur profile tests and cyclic testing at 550{degrees}C and lower flowrate cyclic testing are presented. Crush strength testing done after 5 cycles showed decreases in strength from 12.6% to 57.9%. Cyclic testing at 550{degrees}C showed pre breakthrough concentrations as low as 10 ppmv. Cyclic testing done at 2 L/min and 3 L/min did not show any significant difference in pre breakthrough concentrations or capacity.

  16. Low-rank coal research under the UND/DOE cooperative agreement. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, G.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Two long gasification tests were accomplished (66 and 72 hours of slagging operation) this quarter, and the balance of the wastewater needed for the second cooling tower (CT) test (approx. 11,000 gallons) was generated. Eleven thousand gallons of slagging fixed-bed gasifier (SFBG) wastewater were solvent extracted and ammonia stripped (AS) to nominal levels of 160 mg/1 phenol and 600 mg/1 NH/sub 3/. This wastewater is being further treated by activated sludge (AS) and granular activated carbon (GAC) processing to prepare a high quality makeup for the second CT test. Phenol mass balances indicated that > 90 pct of the phenol was stripped from the tower, indicating that previous assumptions of high levels of biodegradation were erroneous. Over 80 pct of the ammonia and about 25 pct of the methanol were also stripped. Data collected during steady state operation of the bench-scale rotating biological contractor indicate complete removal of phenolics and alcohols, and 94 pct removal of BOD. Nitrification also occurred in this unit, with over 30 pct removal of ammonia. Problems due to individual bacteria, present in the biotreated wastewater, passing through the multi-media filter and thus decreasing the carbon adsorption efficiency of the GAC system, have resulted in lower treatment rates than originally anticipated. As a result, to achieve the desired treatment, the contact time of the wastewater with the carbon in the granular activated carbon system has been increased. Since this has decreased the treatment rate, a larger carbon adsorption system has been designed and is presently being constructed.

  17. AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly progress report, February 1, 1995--April 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The project objective is to design, construct, install, provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing inexpensive and efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste and steam generation. The steam generated is as follows: (1) Steam = 20,000 lb/hr, (2) Temperature = 353 F (saturated), (3) Pressure = 125 psig, and (4) Steam quality ={approximately}98.5%. On February 3, 1995 DONLEE notified Lebanon VA and DOE-METC that additional funding would be required to complete the project. This funding, in the amount of $1,140,127, is needed to complete the facility, start-up and shakedown the facility, perform the test program and write the final report. On March 7, 1995 the vendors were notified that the Lebanon VA Steam Plant Project was shut down and that all work outside DONLEE was stopped pending obtaining additional funding.

  18. Pyrolysis and gasification of coal at high temperatures. Quarterly progress report No. 5, September 15, 1988--December 15, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zygourakis, K.

    1988-12-31

    Coals of different ranks will be pyrolyzed in a microscope hot-stage reactor using inert and reacting atmospheres. The macropore structure of the produced chars will be characterized using video microscopy and digital image processing techniques to obtain pore size distributions. Comparative studies will quantify the effect of pyrolysis conditions (heating rates, final heat treatment temperatures, particle size and inert or reacting atmosphere) on the pore structure of the devolatilized chars. The devolatilized chars will be gasified in the regime of strong intraparticle diffusional limitations using O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/N{sub 2}2 mixtures. Constant temperature and programmed-temperature experiments in a TGA will be used for these studies. Additional gasification experiments performed in the hot-stage reactor will be videotaped and selected images will be analyzed to obtain quantitative data on particle shrinkage and fragmentation. Discrete mathematical models will be developed and validated using the experimental gasification data.

  19. Structural characterization/correlation of calorimetric properties of coal fluids: Fifth quarterly report, September 1, 1986-December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starling, K.E.; Mallinson, R.G.; Li, M.H.; Peters, M.W.; Hulvey, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Calibrations for the determination of hydroxyl, primary amine, and secondary amine functional groups by infrared (IR) spectroscopy have been completed. The model compounds 1-naphthol, 1-aminonaphthalene, and carbazole were used for these calibrations. The IR analysis of the coal fluids is nearly complete. Elemental analysis of the samples is also proceeding and is nearing completion. Functional group contributions to ideal gas heat capacities and enthalpies were extended, based on model compounds, to low temperature regions. The functional group contributions were determined for temperatures ranging from 0 K to 1000 K. The results of the evaluation are tabulated for ideal gas heat capacity and enthalpy in Tables 2 and 3, respectively. The ideal gas heat capacity and enthalpy calculations were performed for pure compounds based on the following two cases: Case I. The ideal gas calorimetric properties were determined using functional group contributions by Benson's Method (Benson, 1968; Benson et al., 1969). Case II. The ideal gas calorimetric properties were determined using functional group contributions based on model compounds. A summary of the results is presented for ideal gas heat capacities and enthalpies. 3 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char. [Quarterly] report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, C.W.

    1992-08-01

    The first step in the integrated, mufti-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal is the production of ultra low-ash coal. Subsequent steps convert low-ash coal to high-value, coal-derived, products. The ultra low-ash coal is produced by solubilizing coal in a phenolic solvent under ChemCoal{trademark} process conditions, separating the coal solution from insoluble ash, and then precipitating the clean coal by dilution of the solvent with methanol. Two major products, liquids and low-ash char, are then produced by mild gasification of the low-ash coal. The low ash-char is further upgraded to activated char, and/or an oxidized activated char which has catalytic properties. Characterization of products at each stage is part of this project.

  1. Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS Process). Fifteenth quarterly report, [January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, K.C.

    1994-04-26

    Maximum methane production was obtained in the experimental vials that contained 0.2% SNTM supplemented with 10 mM sodium citrate and 1% TxL (144 cc), while in the control vials CH{sub 4} production was only 58 cc. The conversion efficiency was 24%. This clearly shows citrate to be an important mediator for the formation of acetate (main precursor for CH{sub 4} formation) in the glyoxylate cycle, on the one hand, and as a sequestering agent, on the other. These results further indicate that citrate can, be successfully used as co-substrate for enhancement of the TxL biogasification process. The results obtained reconfirmed our hypothesis that the metals (such as Fe{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, CO{sup 2+}, Zr{sup 2+}, etc., present in the coal structure) are chelated/sequestered by the addition of citrate. Mass balance calculations show that this increase in CH{sup 4} production is due to the biomethanation of TxL and not because of the chemical conversion of co-substrate(s) to CH{sub 4} (Table 1). The effect of sodium citrate on biomethanation of TXL from the first experiment ``Effect of co-substrate addition No. 1`` was reconfirmed in this experiment. The peak in acetate concentration (1317 ppm) on day 7 was followed by a rapid conversion of this precursor to CH{sub 4} (Figure 16). The VFA data obtained from both experiments (``Effect of co-substrate addition No. 1 and No. 2``) confirms the hypothesis that citrate and methanol can significantly enhance the biomethanation of TxL (Figure 17).

  2. Fossil Energy Today - Second Quarter, 2011 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fossil Energy Today - Second Quarter, 2011 Topics In This Issue... Office Reorganization McConnell Joins FE Staff Coal Cleaning Commercial Success Sonar Survey Program Heating Oil ...

  3. {sup 31}P NMR analysis of coal moieties bearing -OH, -NH, and -SH functions. Quarterly report, January 1, 1991--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verkade, J.G.

    1991-12-31

    Research on coal structural analysis continues. This paper discusses the use of {sup 31}P, {sup 119}Sn, and {sup 195}Pt as NMR tagging reagents in the probing of coal structure. (VC)

  4. Low-rank coal research. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--June 30, 1989, including quarterly report, April--June 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  5. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-02-01

    Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

  6. Coal liquefaction: investigation of reactor performance, role of catalysts and PCT properties. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1984-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, A.J.; Shah, Y.T.; Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Badgujar, M.; Joseph, S.; Kerkar, A.; Ozturk, S.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate areas of science and technology that have been defined as being of prime interest to coal processing technology development. These areas include properties of coal liquids and slurries, reactor design, and performance in relation to reaction mechanisms. The work comprises the following tasks: (1) reaction kinetics and reactor performance in direct coal liquefaction; (2) role of catalysts in indirect liquefaction and direct coal liquefaction; and (3) physical, chemical, and thermodynamic properties of coal liquefaction products. This report summarizes work done during the period October 1, 1984 through December 31, 1984. A detailed description of work in each of the three tasks is presented.

  7. EIA's Energy in Brief: What is the role of coal in the United...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Power Monthly Quarterly Coal Report Monthly Energy ... data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. ... while coal-fired generation has generally declined. ...

  8. Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-21

    The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost, harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. Based on laboratory- and bench-scale testing, Mulled Coal can be stored, shipped, and burned without causing any of the plugging, pasting, carryback and freezing problems normally associated with wet coal. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: the Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant; the wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation; and a wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. During this reporting period, virtually all of the technical activities and progress was made in the areas of circuit installation and startup operations. Work in these activity areas are described.

  9. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, June 1, 1991--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiang-Huai

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surfaces reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of the pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The product as well as their structure, the mechanism and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. The surface chemical studies and the studies of floatability of coal-pyrite and the effect of various parameters such as grinding media and environment, aging under different atmospheres, etc., are directed at identifying the cause and possible solutions of the pyrite rejection problems in coal cleaning.

  10. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. Third quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1991--May 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiang-Huai; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Raichur, A.M.; Jiang, Chengliang

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The products as well as their structure, the mechanisms and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. The surface chemical studies and the studies of floatability of coal-pyrite and the effect of various parameters such as grinding media and environment, aging under different atmospheres, etc. on thereof will lead to identifying the causes and possible solutions of the pyrite rejection problems in coal cleaning.