National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for u3o8 equivalent inventories

  1. Calibration Model Assignments expressed as U3O8, Summary Table ES-1 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Model Assignments expressed as U3O8, Summary Table ES-1 Calibration Model Assignments expressed as U3O8, Summary Table ES-1 Calibration Model Assignments expressed as U3O8, Summary Table ES-1 PDF icon Calibration Model Assignments expressed as U3O8, Summary Table ES-1 More Documents & Publications Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis Report 2013 Natural

  2. Thermal Reactions of Uranium Metal, UO2, U3O8, UF4, and UO2F2 with NF3 to Produce UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Edwards, Matthew K.

    2009-11-01

    he objective of this paper is to demonstrate that NF3 fluorinates uranium metal, UO2, UF4, UO3, U3O8, and UO2F2ē2H2O to produce the volatile UF6 at temperatures between 100 and 500?C. Thermogravimetric reaction profiles are described that reflect changes in the uranium oxidation state and discrete chemical speciation. Differences in the onset temperatures for each system indicate that NF3-substrate interactions are important for the temperature at which NF3 reacts: U metal > UO3 > UO2 > UO2F2 > UF4 and in fact may indicate different fluorination mechanisms for these various substrates. These studies demonstrate that NF3 is a potential replacement fluorinating agent in the existing nuclear fuel cycle and in oft-proposed actinide volatility reprocessing.

  3. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3. Inventories of uranium by owner as of end of year, 2010-14 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Inventories at the end of the year Owner of uranium inventory 2010 2011 2012 2013...

  4. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2. Inventories of natural and enriched uranium by material type as of end of year, 2010-14 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Inventories at the end of the year Type of uranium...

  5. Plutonium Equivalent Inventory for Belowground Radioactive Waste at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B.; Shuman, Rob

    2012-04-18

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Many aspects of the management of this waste are conducted at Technical Area 54 (TA-54); Area G plays a key role in these management activities as the Laboratory's only disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Furthermore, Area G serves as a staging area for transuranic (TRU) waste that will be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. A portion of this TRU waste is retrievably stored in pits, trenches, and shafts. The radioactive waste disposed of or stored at Area G poses potential short- and long-term risks to workers at the disposal facility and to members of the public. These risks are directly proportional to the radionuclide inventories in the waste. The Area G performance assessment and composite analysis (LANL, 2008a) project long-term risks to members of the public; short-term risks to workers and members of the public, such as those posed by accidents, are addressed by the Area G Documented Safety Analysis (LANL, 2011a). The Documented Safety Analysis uses an inventory expressed in terms of plutonium-equivalent curies, referred to as the PE-Ci inventory, to estimate these risks. The Technical Safety Requirements for Technical Area 54, Area G (LANL, 2011b) establishes a belowground radioactive material limit that ensures the cumulative projected inventory authorized for the Area G site is not exceeded. The total belowground radioactive waste inventory limit established for Area G is 110,000 PE-Ci. The PE-Ci inventory is updated annually; this report presents the inventory prepared for 2011. The approach used to estimate the inventory is described in Section 2. The results of the analysis are presented in Section 3.

  6. Materials Data on U3O8 (SG:189) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8. Contracts signed in 2014 by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent...

  8. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0. U.S. broker and trader purchases of uranium by origin, supplier, and delivery year, 2010-14 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries 2010...

  9. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent; dollars per pound U 3 O 8 equivalent Deliveries ...

  10. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent 2010 2011 2012 2013 P2014 Owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors inventories 86,527 89,835 97,647 113,077 116,047 Uranium concentrate (U 3 O 8 ) 13,076 14,718 15,963 18,131 20,501 Natural UF 6 35,767 35,883 29,084 38,332 40,972 Enriched UF 6 25,392 19,596 38,428 40,841

  11. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent 2010 2011 2012 2013 P2014 Owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors 86,527 89,835 97,647 113,007 116,047 U.S. brokers and traders 11,125 6,841 5,677 7,926 5,798 U.S. converter, enrichers, fabricators, and producers 13,608 15,428 17,611 13,416 12,766 Total commercial inventories 111,259 112,104 120,936 134,418 134,611 thousand pounds U 3 O 8

  12. CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY Revision 1 10/31/07 Approved by: DOE Records Management Division, IM-23 PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY 1. GENERAL. A records inventory is compiling a descriptive list of each record series or system, including the location of the records and any other pertinent data. A records inventory is not a list of each document or each folder. 2. DEFINE THE RECORDS INVENTORY GOAL(S). The goals of a records inventory should be to: a. Gather

  13. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Hsu, Hsiao-Hua (Los Alamos, NM); Casson, William H. (Los Alamos, NM); Vasilik, Dennis G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kleck, Jeffrey H. (Menlo Park, CA); Beverding, Anthony (Foster City, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  14. Personal Computer Inventory System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-10-04

    PCIS is a database software system that is used to maintain a personal computer hardware and software inventory, track transfers of hardware and software, and provide reports.

  15. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History U.S. 145,534 147,972 144,086 152,538 148,859 150,870 1973-2015

  16. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  17. Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory A content inventory and analysis will help identify content that needs to be updated, edited, added, or removed for maintenance. They're also recommended prior to starting a website redesign. This content template and sample inventory were created in Excel. The sample lists URLs, page names, navigation, navigation hierarchy, and section

  18. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a. Foreign purchases, foreign sales, and uranium inventories owned by U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2014 million pounds U3O8...

  19. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Rebecca D.

    2012-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility encompassing approximately 800 square kilometers near Aiken, South Carolina which began operations in the 1950's with the mission to produce nuclear materials. The SRS contains fifty-one tanks (2 stabilized, 49 yet to be closed) distributed between two liquid radioactive waste storage facilities at SRS containing carbon steel underground tanks with storage capacities ranging from 2,800,000 to 4,900,000 liters. Treatment of the liquid waste from these tanks is essential both to closing older tanks and to maintaining space needed to treat the waste that is eventually vitrified or disposed of onsite. Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) provides the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), a methodology to determine that certain waste resulting from prior reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are not high-level radioactive waste if it can be demonstrated that the waste meets the criteria set forth in Section 3116(a) of the NDAA. The Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, signed a determination in January 2006, pursuant to Section 3116(a) of the NDAA, for salt waste disposal at the SRS Saltstone Disposal Facility. This determination is based, in part, on the Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site and supporting references, a document that describes the planned methods of liquid waste treatment and the resulting waste streams. The document provides descriptions of the proposed methods for processing salt waste, dividing them into 'Interim Salt Processing' and later processing through the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Interim Salt Processing is separated into Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) and Actinide Removal Process/Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU). The Waste Determination was signed by the Secretary of Energy in January of 2006 based on proposed processing techniques with the expectation that it could be revised as new processing capabilities became viable. Once signed, however, it became evident that any changes would require lengthy review and another determination signed by the Secretary of Energy. With the maturation of additional salt removal technologies and the extension of the SWPF start-up date, it becomes necessary to define 'equivalency' to the processes laid out in the original determination. For the purposes of SRS, any waste not processed through Interim Salt Processing must be processed through SWPF or an equivalent process, and therefore a clear statement of the requirements for a process to be equivalent to SWPF becomes necessary. (authors)

  20. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as 2030 and 2033, depending on the type of waste. TSPA-LA uses the results of this analysis to decay the inventory to the year of repository closure projected for the year of 2060.

  1. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9. Contracted purchases of uranium by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, signed in 2014, by delivery year, 2015-24 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Year...

  2. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type and material type, 2014 deliveries thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars...

  3. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent Year Maximum ...

  4. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent U.S.-origin Foreign- origin Total U.S.-origin ...

  5. PMCDP Certification and Equivalency Guidelines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Certification and Equivalency Guidelines (CEG) establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) competency requirements for all DOE federal project management personnel to be certified as DOE...

  6. Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    They're also recommended prior to starting a website redesign. This content template and sample inventory were created in Excel. The sample lists URLs, page names, navigation, ...

  7. PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING Form supports nuclear materials control and accountability. PDF icon PHYSICAL INVENTORY LISTING More Documents & Publications DOE/NRC F 742C Material Balance Report DOE F 74

  8. Fair Act Inventory | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fair Act Inventory Fair Act Inventory This page provides guidance for submission of the DOE FAIR Act Inventory, or otherwise known as the Inherently Governmental Commercial Activities (IGCA) Inventory. The FAIR Act directs Federal agencies to issue each year an inventory of all commercial activities performed by Federal employees. OMB reviews each agency's commercial activities inventory and consults with the agency regarding content. Upon the completion of this review and consultation, the

  9. California Statewide Property Inventory Website | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inventory Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Statewide Property Inventory Website Abstract The Statewide Property...

  10. FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inventories," provided additional guidance to agencies on how to prepare and analyze a survey of service contracting actions awarded in FY 2010. The service contract inventory...

  11. Clean Lead Facility (CLF) Inventory System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-07-13

    The CLF Inventory System records shipments of clean or nonradioactive contaminated lead stored at the CLF. The Inventory System provides reports and inventory information to Facility operators. Annual, quarterly, monthly, and current inventory reports may be printed. Profile reports of each shipment of lead may also be printed for verification and documentation of lead transactions.

  12. Service Contract Inventory | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Service Contract Inventory Service Contract Inventory DOE will develop the basic inventory in accordance with OMB guidance using FPDS-NG data to address a number of the inventory requirements consistent with the Consolidated Appropriations Act. A list of special interest functions by Product Service Code (PSC) for contracts to be reviewed in response to the criteria required by Section 743 is shown below. PDF icon DOE_FY10_Service_ Contract_Inventory_Analysis.pdf File

  13. E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho ...

  14. RFID Technology for Inventory Management

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is leveraging the use and application of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology to a variety of markets. Tagging and tracking of individual items for inventory control is revealing rich rewards through increased time efficiency and reduced human intervention.

  15. FY 2013 Service Contract Inventory Analysis

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Department of Energy Office of Acquisition and Project Management Strategic Programs Division (MA-622) December 2014 FY 2013 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Department of Energy Contents Page Section 1: Scope 2 Section 2: Methodology 4 Section 3: Findings 6 Section 4: Actions Taken or Planned 7 FY 2013 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Department of Energy 2 Section 1: Scope Service Contract Inventories Section 743 of Division C of the FY 2010

  16. Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization

  17. Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Experience | Department of Energy Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience The referenced document has been used by the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to grant equivalencies to candidates undergoing qualification as a Facility Representative (FR) using the FR Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS). Since the generation of the referenced

  18. PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY PDF icon PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A RECORDS INVENTORY More Documents & Publications Records Management Handbook Records Management Handbook Information and Records Management Transition Guidance

  19. 2015 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activity (IGCA) Inventory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activity (IGCA) Inventory Submission Guidance 2015 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activity (IGCA) Inventory Submission Guidance The...

  20. Natural gas inventories at record levels

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural gas inventories at record levels U.S. natural gas inventories at the end of October tied the all-time record high and inventories could climb to 4 trillion cubic feet in November for the first time. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said weekly injections of natural gas into storage may continue into November, after inventories at the close of October matched the record high of just over 3.9 trillion cubic feet. High inventories, along with rising

  1. course inventory | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    course inventory CMI Education Partner: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Rutgers, the state university of New Jersey, offers courses in several areas: Materials Science and Engineering, undergraduate level Read more about CMI Education Partner: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey CMI Education Partner: University of California, Davis The University of California, Davis offers courses in several areas: Chemical and Materials Science Engineering Chemistry Geology

  2. May market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Seven uranium transactions totalling nearly three million pounds equivalent U3O8 were reported during May, but only two, totalling less than 200 thousand pounds equivalent U3O8, involved concentrates. As no discretionary buying occurred during the month, and as near-term supply and demand were in relative balance, prices were steady, while both buyers and sellers appeared to be awaiting some new market development to signal the direction of future spot-market prices. The May 31, 1993, Exchange Value and the Restricted American market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates were both unchanged at $7.10, and $2.95 per pound U3O8, respectively. NUEXCO's judgement was that transactions for significant quantities of uranium concentrates that were both deliverable in and intended for consumption in the USA could have been concluded on May 31 at $10.05 per pound U3O8. Two near-term concentrate transactions were reported in which one US utility purchased less than 200 thousand pounds equivalent U3O8 from two separate sellers. These sales occurred at price levels at or near the May 31 Exchange Value plus RAMP. No long-term uranium transactions were reported during May. Consequently, the UF6 Value decreased $0.20 to $24.30 per kgU as UF6, reflecting some weakening of the UF6 market outside the USA.

  3. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  4. Chemical Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Inventory Use the following dropdown menus to filter the results for chemical records. To reset the results clear the entries and click "update". Facility - Any - SSRL LCLS Building - Any - 120 131 999 Room - Any - 109 113 209 257 Storage Area Storage Category Apply Title Facility Building Room Storage Area Storage Category Available to All Qty. Size Units Responsible Person 1,3-cyclohexadiene SSRL 131 209 CI L No 1 25 milliliters (ml) Tsu-Chien Weng 1,4- dioxane SSRL 120 257

  5. Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment Inventory ¬ę Equipment Resources Title Equipment Type Facility Laboratory Building Room Accumet Basic AB15 pH meter pH Meter SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 2 131 209 Agate Mortar & Pestle Sets Buchi V-700 Vacuum Pump & condenser Campden Instruments Vibrating Manual Tissue Cutter HA 752 Corning 430 pH Meter pH Meter SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 1 120 257 Corning 430 pH Meter pH Meter SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 2 131 209 Corning 476436 3-in-1 Combo Electrode pH Meter SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab

  6. Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at High Pressure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in 1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene at High Pressure ...

  7. FY 2012 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Plan

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Service Contract Inventory Analysis Plan Department of Energy Office of Acquisition and Project Management Strategic Programs Division (MA-622) December 2012 Department of Energy FY 2012 Service Contract Inventory Plan for Analysis The Department of Energy (DOE) approach will be performed in accordance with the criteria set out in Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010, (Pub. L. No. 111-117, § 743 (2009)) and Appendix D of the November 5, 2010 OMB Memorandum on Service Contract Inventories, and

  8. Life Cycle Inventory Database | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Past Projects ¬Ľ Life Cycle Inventory Database Life Cycle Inventory Database The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database serves as a central repository for information about the total energy and resource impacts of developing and using various commercial building materials, components, and assemblies. The database helps manufacturers, building designers, and developers select energy-efficient and environmentally friendly materials, products, and processes for their projects based on the

  9. The endotopism semigroups of an equivalence relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuchok, Yu V; Toichkina, E A

    2014-05-31

    In this work we investigate six types of endotopism semigroups for a given equivalence relation. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of all such endotopisms are presented. Conditions for the regularity and coregularity of each of the endotopism semigroups of a†given type are established. The notion of the endotype of a†binary relation with respect to its endotopisms is introduced and the endotype of an arbitrary equivalence relation is calculated. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  10. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by supplier and delivery year, 2010-14 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent, dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Purchased from U.S. producers Purchases of U.S.-origin and foreign-origin uranium 350 550 W W W Weighted-average price 47.13 58.12 W W W Purchased from U.S. brokers and traders Purchases of U.S.-origin and foreign-origin uranium 11,745 14,778 11,545 12,835 17,111

  11. 2014 Uranium Market Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Contracts signed in 2014 by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type" "thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent" "Purchase contract type (Signed in 2014)","Quantity of deliveries received in 2014","Weighted-average price","Number of purchase contracts for deliveries in 2014" "Spot","W","W",67 "Long-term","W","W",2

  12. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6a. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ranked by price and distributed by quantity, 2012-14 deliveries" "thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent" "Quantity distribution 1","Deliveries in 2012",,"Deliveries in 2013",,"Deliveries in 2014" ,"Quantity with reported price","Weighted-average price","Quantity with reported

  13. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ranked by price and distributed by purchaser, 2012-14 deliveries" "thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent" "Distribution of purchasers","Deliveries in 2012",,,"Deliveries in 2013",,,"Deliveries in 2014" ,"Number of purchasers","Quantity with reported price","Weighted-average price","Number of

  14. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by contract type and material type, 2014 deliveries" "thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent" "Material Type","Spot Contracts 1",,"Long-Term Contracts 2",,"Total" ,"Quantity with reported price","Weighted-average price","Quantity with reported price","Weighted-average price","Quantity

  15. IPCC Inventory Guidelines LULUCF | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Guidemanual, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jppublicgpglulucf...

  16. National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National System Templates: Building...

  17. IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 040512 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Inventory Sub Guide 040512 IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 040512 PDF icon IGCA_Inventory_Sub_Guide_040512.pdf More Documents & Publications 2015 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activity (IGCA) Inventory Submission Guidance Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 IGCA Training 2012

  18. Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 PDF icon Microsoft Word - IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 031611 More Documents & Publications IGCA Inventory Sub Guide 040512 2015 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activity (IGCA) Inventory Submission Guidance IGCA Training 2012

  19. Inventory Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kincaid, Charles T.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Miley, Terri B.; Nelson, Iral C.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Evans, John C.

    2006-06-01

    This document presents the basis for a compilation of inventory for radioactive contaminants of interest by year for all potentially impactive waste sites on the Hanford Site for which inventory data exist in records or could be reasonably estimated. This document also includes discussions of the historical, current, and reasonably foreseeable (1944 to 2070) future radioactive waste and waste sites; the inventories of radionuclides that may have a potential for environmental impacts; a description of the method(s) for estimating inventories where records are inadequate; a description of the screening method(s) used to select those sites and contaminants that might make a substantial contribution to impacts; a listing of the remedial actions and their completion dates for waste sites; and tables showing the best estimate inventories available for Hanford assessments.

  20. Equivalence between XY and dimerized models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Roncaglia, Marco

    2010-06-15

    The spin-1/2 chain with XY anisotropic coupling in the plane and the XX isotropic dimerized chain are shown to be equivalent in the bulk. For finite systems, we prove that the equivalence is exact in given parity sectors, after taking care of the precise boundary conditions. The proof is given constructively by finding unitary transformations that map the models onto each other. Moreover, we considerably generalized our mapping and showed that even in the case of fully site-dependent couplings the XY chain can be mapped onto an XX model. This result has potential application in the study of disordered systems.

  1. FAIR Act Inventory - FY13 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 FAIR Act Inventory - FY13 File FAIR Act Inventory - FY13.xlsx More Documents & Publications FAIR Act Inventory - FY12 Memorandum Summarizing Ex Parte Communication Adverse Diversity Analysis Guidance

  2. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  3. April market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The spot market price for uranium outside the USA weakened further during April, and at month end, the NUEXCO Exchange Value had fallen $0.35, to $7.10 per pound U3O8. This is the lowest Exchange Value observed in nearly twenty years, comparable to Values recorded during the low price levels of the early 1970s. The Restricted American Market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates increased $0.40, to $2.95 per pound U3O8. Transactions for significant quantities of uranium concentrates that are both deliverable in and intended for consumption in the USA could have been concluded on April 30 at $10.05 per pound U3O8, up $0.05 from the sum of corresponding March Values. Four near-term concentrates transactions were reported, totalling nearly 1.5 million pounds equivalent U3O8. One long-term sale was reported. The UF6 Value also declined, as increased competition among sellers led to a $0.50 decrease, to $24.50 per kgU as UF6. However, the RAMP for UF6 increased $0.65, to $5.90 per kgU as UF6, reflecting an effective US market level of $30.40 per kgU. Two near term transactions were reported totalling approximately 1.1 million pounds equivalent U3O8. In total, eight uranium transactions totalling 28 million pounds equivalent U3O8 were reported, which is about average for April market activity.

  4. IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories AgencyCompany...

  5. Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Managing the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process Agency...

  6. Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a Comprehensive National Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a ...

  7. Tunisia-Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tunisia-Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV Jump to: navigation, search Name Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia AgencyCompany Organization...

  8. Tunisia-Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development for GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia) Jump to: navigation, search Name Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia AgencyCompany Organization...

  9. EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building AgencyCompany Organization: United States Environmental...

  10. Moldova National Inventory Report - Lessons Learned | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Moldova National Inventory Report - Lessons Learned Jump to: navigation, search Name Moldova Second National Inventory Report - Lessons Learned AgencyCompany Organization United...

  11. UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program (Redirected from UNFCCC GHG Inventory Review Training Program) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: UNFCCC GHG...

  12. Emission Inventories and Projections (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Book: Emission Inventories and Projections Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Emission Inventories and Projections When the Executive Body to the Convention on Long-range...

  13. UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Review Training Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: UNFCCC GHG inventory Review Training Program The Basic Course of the updated training programme covers technical aspects of the review of GHG inventories under the...

  14. Building Trust in GHG Inventories from the United States and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trust in GHG Inventories from the United States and China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Counting the Gigatones: Building Trust in GHG Inventories from...

  15. Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in...

  16. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalenci...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6, Equivalencies and Exemptions Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalencies and Exemptions June 2015 2015 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan...

  17. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan- Chapter 16, Equivalencies and Exemptions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2016 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalencies and Exemptions Describes DOE Headquarters procedures for requesting Equivalencies and Exemptions to DOE security directives.

  18. National Coal Quality Inventory (NACQI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Finkelman

    2005-09-30

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted the National Coal Quality Inventory (NaCQI) between 1999 and 2005 to address a need for quality information on coals that will be mined during the next 20-30 years. Collaboration between the USGS, State geological surveys, universities, coal burning utilities, and the coal mining industry plus funding support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) permitted collection and submittal of coal samples for analysis. The chemical data (proximate and ultimate analyses; major, minor and trace element concentrations) for 729 samples of raw or prepared coal, coal associated shale, and coal combustion products (fly ash, hopper ash, bottom ash and gypsum) from nine coal producing States are included. In addition, the project identified a new coal reference analytical standard, to be designated CWE-1 (West Elk Mine, Gunnison County, Colorado) that is a high-volatile-B or high-volatile-A bituminous coal with low contents of ash yield and sulfur, and very low, but detectable contents of chlorine, mercury and other trace elements.

  19. Inventory of state energy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melcher, A.G.; Gist, R.L.; Underwood, R.G.; Weber, J.C.

    1980-03-31

    These models address a variety of purposes, such as supply or demand of energy or of certain types of energy, emergency management of energy, conservation in end uses of energy, and economic factors. Fifty-one models are briefly described as to: purpose; energy system; applications;status; validation; outputs by sector, energy type, economic and physical units, geographic area, and time frame; structure and modeling techniques; submodels; working assumptions; inputs; data sources; related models; costs; references; and contacts. Discussions in the report include: project purposes and methods of research, state energy modeling in general, model types and terminology, and Federal legislation to which state modeling is relevant. Also, a state-by-state listing of modeling efforts is provided and other model inventories are identified. The report includes a brief encylopedia of terms used in energy models. It is assumed that many readers of the report will not be experienced in the technical aspects of modeling. The project was accomplished by telephone conversations and document review by a team from the Colorado School of Mines Research Institute and the faculty of the Colorado School of Mines. A Technical Committee (listed in the report) provided advice during the course of the project.

  20. Annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Report - 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Page 4 of 382 Table of Figures Figure 1-1. U.S. Department of Energy TRU Waste Generator Sites ... 17 Figure 2-1. TRU Waste Inventory Process Flowchart...

  1. FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Plan

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Service Contract Inventory Analysis Plan Department of Energy Office of Procurement & Assistance Management Strategic Programs Division (MA-622) December 2011 Department of Energy FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory Plan for Analysis The Department of Energy (DOE) approach will be performed in accordance with the criteria set out in Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010, (Pub. L. No. 111-117, § 743 (2009)) and Appendix D of the November 5, 2010 OMB Memorandum on Service Contract

  2. State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory July 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other

  3. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of Hysteresis Motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitao, J J; Scharlemann, E T; Kirkendall, B A

    2009-08-31

    We performed a literature review and found that many equivalent circuit models of hysteresis motors in use today are incorrect. The model by Miyairi and Kataoka (1965) is the correct one. We extended the model by transforming it to quadrature coordinates, amenable to circuit or digital simulation. 'Hunting' is an oscillatory phenomenon often observed in hysteresis motors. While several works have attempted to model the phenomenon with some partial success, we present a new complete model that predicts hunting from first principles.

  4. Chapter_16_Equivalencies_and_Exemptions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Equivalencies and Exemptions DOE security orders and manuals often require certain measures to be taken to protect DOE security interests. In some cases, a DOE organization may be unable to comply with the requirements as specified in the directive, but can achieve the security goal in another equally effective manner. In other cases, the security requirement cannot be met as prescribed. DOE Order 251.1C, Departmental Directives Program, Paragraph 6a(3)(c), establishes a process for requesting

  5. Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2014-07-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, ‚ÄúChronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program‚ÄĚ (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOE‚Äôs 1997 Notice 440.1, ‚ÄúInterim Chronic Beryllium Disease.‚ÄĚ After DOE‚Äôs issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNL‚Äôs Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Site‚Äôs program. This document reconstructs PNNL‚Äôs baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

  6. PROCEDURE FOR PREPARING RECORDS INVENTORY AND DISPOSITION SCHEDULES (RIDS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy PREPARING RECORDS INVENTORY AND DISPOSITION SCHEDULES (RIDS) PROCEDURE FOR PREPARING RECORDS INVENTORY AND DISPOSITION SCHEDULES (RIDS) This document lists the procedures for preparing records inventory and disposition schedules PDF icon PROCEDURE FOR PREPARING RECORDS INVENTORY AND DISPOSITION SCHEDULES (RIDS) More Documents & Publications DOE F 1324.10 Computer System Retirement Guidelines DOE F 1324.9

  7. RADIOISOTOPE INVENTORY FOR TSPA-SR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Leigh; R. Rechard

    2001-01-30

    The total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR), on Yucca Mountain, as a site (if suitable) for disposal of radioactive waste, consists of several models. The Waste Form Degradation Model (i.e, source term) of the TSPA-SR, in turn, consists of several components. The Inventory Component, discussed here, defines the inventory of 26 radioisotopes for three representative waste categories: (1) commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), (2) US Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and (3) high-level waste (HLW). These three categories are contained and disposed of in two types of waste packages (WPs)--CSNF WPs and co-disposal WPs, with the latter containing both DSNF and HLW. Three topics are summarized in this paper: first, the transport of radioisotopes evaluated in the past; second, the development of the inventory for the two WP types; and third, the selection of the most important radioisotopes to track in TSPA-SR.

  8. INEEL Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Trend Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, David Earl; Teel, Dale Milton

    2000-02-01

    The objective of the INEEL GHG Inventory and Trend Analysis is to establish INEEL expertise in carbon management decision making and policy analysis. This FY-99 effort is the first step toward placing the INEEL in a leadership role within the DOE laboratories to support carbon management systems and analysis.

  9. FAIR Act Inventory - FY12 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 FAIR Act Inventory - FY12 File DOE 2015 FAIR More Documents & Publications FAIR Act Inventory - FY13 Memorandum Summarizing Ex Parte Communication Detailed Monthly and Annual LNG Import Statistics (2004-2012)

  10. Oil inventories in industrialized countries to reach record high...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil inventories in industrialized countries to reach record high at end of 2015 The amount of year-end oil inventories held in industrialized countries is expected to be the ...

  11. World oil inventories forecast to grow significantly in 2016...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    World oil inventories forecast to grow significantly in 2016 and 2017 Global oil inventories are expected to continue strong growth over the next two years which should keep oil ...

  12. EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Lessons learnedbest practices, Training materials, Softwaremodeling tools User...

  13. Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan 2008 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plan 2008 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan 2008 On March 11, 2008, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman signed a policy statement1 on the management of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) excess uranium inventory (Policy Statement). This Policy Statement provides the framework within which DOE will make decisions concerning future use and disposition of this inventory. The Policy Statement commits DOE to manage those inventories in a manner that: (1) is consistent with all applicable

  14. DOE Releases Excess Uranium Inventory Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Excess Uranium Inventory Plan DOE Releases Excess Uranium Inventory Plan December 16, 2008 - 8:51am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) today issued its Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan (the Plan), which outlines the Department's strategy for the management and disposition of its excess uranium inventories. The Plan highlights DOE's ongoing efforts to enhance national security and promote a healthy domestic nuclear infrastructure through the efficient

  15. Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan The 2013 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan describes a framework for the effective management of the Energy Department's surplus uranium inventory in support of meeting its critical environmental cleanup and national security missions. The Plan is not a commitment to specific activities beyond those that have already been contracted nor is it a restriction on actions that the Department may undertake in the

  16. E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PDF icon E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory More Documents & Publications PIA - INL Education Programs Business Enclave Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration,

  17. 2002 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 2 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory 2002 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory PDF icon 2002 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory More Documents & Publications 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls� 3REV2004DOEFAIR.xls� N:\My Documents\porfin.pdf�

  18. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  19. Market values summary/February market overview/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-03-01

    This article is the February 1994 uranium market summary. During this reporting period, there were six deals in the natural uranium market involving 2.5 Mlb equivalent U3O8. The restricted exchange value eased to $9.45 per pound U3O8, and the unrestricted value remained unchanged at $7.00. There two deals for uranium as UF6, and the restricted UF6 value decreased to $30.00 per kgU as UF6. The unrestricted UF6 value was unchanged at $24.50. There were no long-term deals during this period, but several utilities were evaluating offers for over 10 Mlb equivalent U3O8 for delivery through 2005. The unrestricted transaction value remained steady at $7.15 per pound U3O8, while the restricted value dropped slightly to $9.75. The unrestricted SWU value was unchanged at $68 per SWU, but the restricted value once again increased by a dollar to $86. Active uranium supply decreased slightly, while active demand increased considerably.

  20. Fuel-based motor vehicle emission inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, B.C.; Harley, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    A fuel-based methodology for calculating motor vehicle emission inventories is presented. In the fuel-based method, emission factors are normalized to fuel consumption and expressed as grams of pollutant emitted per gallon of gasoline burned. Fleet-average emission factors are calculated from the measured on-road emissions of a large, random sample of vehicles. Using this method, a fuel-based motor vehicle CO inventory was calculated for the South Coast Air Basin in California for summer 1991. Emission factors were calculated from remote sensing measurements of more than 70,000 in-use vehicles. Results of the study are presented and a conclusion is provided. 40 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Sandia Explosive Inventory and Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The Explosive Inventory and Information System (EIS) is being developed and implemented by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to incorporate a cradle to grave structure for all explosives and explosive containing devices and assemblies at SNL from acquisition through use, storage, reapplication, transfer or disposal. The system does more than track all material inventories. It provides information on material composition, characteristics, shipping requirements; life cycle cost information, plan of use; and duration of ownership. The system also provides for following the processes of explosive development; storage review; justification for retention; Resource, Recovery and Disposition Account (RRDA); disassembly and assembly; and job description, hazard analysis and training requirements for all locations and employees involved with explosive operations. In addition, other information systems will be provided through the system such as the Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL Explosive Safety manuals, the Navy`s Department of Defense (DoD) Explosive information system, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) Handbook of Explosives.

  2. Geoscience Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geoscience Equipment Inventory ¬ę Geoscience Laboratory Title Equipment Type Description Coy Anaerobic Chamber Inert Atmosphere Chamber Coy anaerobic chamber (Type C, model 7100-000) with auto airlock for wet and dry sample preparations, 5% H2/95% N2 mix atmosphere, and auto injection system. Fisher Scientific General Purpose Refrigerator Temperature Control Fisher Scientific General Purpose refrigerator. Fisher Scientific Isotemp Freezer Temperature Control Fisher Scientific Isotemp Freezer.

  3. PHOTOGRA'"' THIS SHEET LEVEL INVENTORY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    0 a PHOTOGRA'"' THIS SHEET LEVEL INVENTORY V/r- 760 DOCUMENT IDENTIFICATION A)¬ę y ^ DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for public releosej Distribution Unlimited DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT ACCESSION FOR NTIS GRA&I DTIC TAB UNANNOUNCH) JUSTIFICATION W √ú BY DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY CODES DIST AVAIL AND/OR SPECIAL DISTRIBUTION STAMP UNANNOUNCED DATE ACCESSIONED * Per: telecon w/Betty Fox, Chief, DNA Tech Libr'y. Div.: the Classifed References contained herein may remadin. ‚ô¶"Verified

  4. LCLS Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Equipment Inventory ¬ę LCLS Laboratory Title Equipment Type Description Corning 6795-420D Digital Stirring Hot Plate with Temperature Probe Temperature Control Digital stirring hot plate, 5 inch x 7 inch ceramic top, temperature range: 5¬į to 550¬įC; stir range: 60 to 1150rpm. Includes external temperature controller probe (Corning 6795PR). Denver Instrument Summit Series SI-114 Analytical Balance Analytical Balance Capacity 110 g, Readability ¬Ī0.1 mg Eppendorf 5424 Microcentrifuge

  5. Air Emission, Liquid Effluent Inventory and Reporting

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-08-18

    The IES maintains an inventory of radiological air and liquid effluents released to the atmosphere. The IES utilizes the official stack numbers. Data may be entered by generators for any monitoring time period. Waste volumes released as well as their radiological constituents are tracked. The IES provides data to produce a report for NESHAPS as well as several administrative action/anomaly reports. These reports flag unusual occurences (releases) that are above normal range releases.

  6. Physical Inventory Listing NRC 742cu

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    EXAMPLE 4 *** Company Name RIS 09/30/2008 A 864 0 0 90 J 1 1 A 864 0 0 90 J 2 2 1* 1* E4 E2 E1 864 0 90 J 3 2 A 0 4 *Reporting itemized inventory Total U U-235 E1 = 0.4 0.001 E2 = 0.4 0.11 E4 = 0.4 0.39 Total: 1.2 0.501

  7. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalencies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Exemptions | Department of Energy Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalencies and Exemptions Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalencies and Exemptions June 2015 2015 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalencies and Exemptions This chapter describes the actions that can be taken by HQ program elements when they cannot meet the security requirements set forth in DOE orders. It provides instructions on

  8. Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    combined with the properties of the intact rock to develop an equivalent continuum model ... Two appraoches are suggested for modeling the rock mass. In one approach, jointed are ...

  9. BCM 1 Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Equipment Inventory ¬ę Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Title Equipment Type Description Corning 430 pH Meter pH Meter The Corning 430 pH meter is designed to handle laboratory applications from the most routine to the highly complex. Encased in spill-resistant housings and feature chemical-resistant, sealed keypad. Model 430 (pH range 0.00 to 14.00) is a basic, yet reliable meter providing accurate, efficient digital measurements. Offers simplified, four-button operation,

  10. BCM 2 Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Equipment Inventory ¬ę Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 2 Title Equipment Type Description Accumet Basic AB15 pH meter pH Meter pH meters with combination Ag/AgCl electrode and ATC probe. Corning 430 pH Meter pH Meter (Cold Room) Corning 430 pH meter. Corning 6795-420D Digital Stirrer/Hot Plate w/ temp probe Temperature Control Digital Hot Plate/Stirrer, 5 inch x 7 inch ceramic top, temperature range: 5¬į to 550¬įC; stir range: 60 to 1100rpm. The hot plate is equipment with

  11. Annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Report - 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ANNUAL TRANSURANIC WASTE INVENTORY REPORT - 2015 (Data Cutoff Date 12/31/2014) DOE/TRU-15-3425 Revision 0 December 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office This document has been submitted as required to: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information PO Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Phone: (865) 576-8401 Additional information about this document may be obtained by calling 1-800-336-9477. Unlimited, publicly available full-text scientific and technical reports

  12. Plutonium inventory characterization technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittman, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-10

    This is a technical report on the data, gathered to date, under WHC- SD-CP-TP-086, Rev. 1, on the integrity of the food pack cans currently being used to store plutonium or plutonium compounds at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Workplan PFP-96-VO-009, `Inspection of Special Nuclear Material Using X-ray`, was used to gather data on material and containment conditions using real time radiography. Some of those images are included herein. A matrix found in the `Plutonium Inventory Characterization Implementation Plan` was used to categorize different plutonium items based upon the type of material being stored and the life expectancy of the containers.

  13. Plutomium inventory characterization technical evaluation report II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittman, G.R.

    1996-09-06

    This is a technical report on the data gathered between May 1 and August 30, 1996 under WHC-SD-CP-TP-086, Rev. 1, on the integrity of stored special nuclear material at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Work Plan PFP-96-VO-009, `Inspection of Special Nuclear Material Using X-ray` was used to gather data on material and containment conditions using real time radiography. Some of those images are included herein. A matrix found in the `Plutonium Inventory Characterization Implementation Plan` was used to categorize different plutonium items based upon the type of material being stored and the life expectancy of the containers.

  14. USE OF CHEMICAL INVENTORY ACCURACY MEASUREMENTS AS LEADING INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuntamukkula, M.

    2011-02-10

    Chemical safety and lifecycle management (CSLM) is a process that involves managing chemicals and chemical information from the moment someone begins to order a chemical and lasts through final disposition(1). Central to CSLM is tracking data associated with chemicals which, for the purposes of this paper, is termed the chemical inventory. Examples of data that could be tracked include chemical identity, location, quantity, date procured, container type, and physical state. The reason why so much data is tracked is that the chemical inventory supports many functions. These functions include emergency management, which depends upon the data to more effectively plan for, and respond to, chemical accidents; environmental management that uses inventory information to aid in the generation of various federally-mandated and other regulatory reports; and chemical management that uses the information to increase the efficiency and safety with which chemicals are stored and utilized. All of the benefits of having an inventory are predicated upon having an inventory that is reasonably accurate. Because of the importance of ensuring one's chemical inventory is accurate, many have become concerned about measuring inventory accuracy. But beyond providing a measure of confidence in information gleaned from the inventory, does the inventory accuracy measurement provide any additional function? The answer is 'Yes'. It provides valuable information that can be used as a leading indicator to gauge the health of a chemical management system. In this paper, we will discuss: what properties make leading indicators effective, how chemical inventories can be used as a leading indicator, how chemical inventory accuracy can be measured, what levels of accuracies should realistically be expected in a healthy system, and what a subpar inventory accuracy measurement portends.

  15. Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan The 2013 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan describes a framework for the effective management of the Energy Department's surplus uranium inventory in support of meeting its critical environmental cleanup and national security missions. The Plan is not a commitment to specific activities beyond those that have already been contracted nor is it a restriction on actions that the Department may undertake in the future as a result of changing

  16. 2015 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activity (IGCA) Inventory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Submission Guidance | Department of Energy Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activity (IGCA) Inventory Submission Guidance 2015 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activity (IGCA) Inventory Submission Guidance The Department of Energy (DOE) has not received the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) 2015 inventory guidance yet, but anticipates that an OMB alert, which is largely a reminder document, will be issued soon. The alert is expected to say Agencies are to use FY2012

  17. FY13 Energy Department Federal Program Inventory | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY13 Energy Department Federal Program Inventory FY13 Energy Department Federal Program Inventory Per the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Modernization Act, DOE's Federal Program Inventory (FPI) is part of a Federal-wide program list intended to facilitate coordination by making it easier to find programs that contribute to a shared goal. The FPI is also intended to improve public understanding of Federal programs operations and linkages to budget, performance, and other

  18. Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas...

  19. Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of carbon in forests are crucial for forest carbon management, carbon credit trading, national reporting of greenhouse gas inventories to the United Nations Framework...

  20. Building GHGs National Inventory Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    order to enable all developing countries with REDD potential to compile and present their national greenhouse gas inventories, it is absolutely essential that all available...

  1. SF 6110-AC Residual Inventory of Material or Equipment Furnished...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specification No. and whether item is Classified, Furnished, Acquired, Esplosive, Toxic, Raw Mat'l, Good Part, or Scrap. The above listing is a COMPLETE inventory of residual...

  2. CESP Tool 7.1: Financing Inventory Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CESP Tool 7.1: Financing Inventory Template from Step 7: Put Together a Financing Strategy, Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning.

  3. EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capacity Building) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building AgencyCompany Organization: United States Environmental Protection...

  4. Global Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atmospheric Pollution Forum Air Pollutant Emission Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Atmospheric Pollution (GAP) Forum Air Pollutant...

  5. Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development in Asia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Research Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Guidemanual, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.nies.go.jpgaiyomediakit9.WGIAI067.pdf...

  6. UNFCCC Individual Reviews of GHG Inventories | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name UNFCCC Individual Reviews of GHG Inventories AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector Energy, Land Topics GHG...

  7. UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Methodological Documents and Training Materials...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Lessons learnedbest practices, Training...

  8. UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Data | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset...

  9. Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    divisionsfuture-perfect Country: South Korea Eastern Asia Language: English References: Greenhouse Gas Training Program for Inventory and Mitigation Modeling1...

  10. Greenhouse Gas Regional Inventory Protocol (GRIP) Website | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentgreenhouse-gas-regional-inventory-pro Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: "Lead by Example" is not...

  11. Choice of an equivalent black body solar temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrott, J.E. )

    1993-09-01

    In the course of modeling the performance of photovoltaic solar cells for space use, it became desirable to set up a black body spectrum equivalent to the standard Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar spectrum. A method of calculating the equivalent black body solar surface temperature, based on irradiance and photon number flux derived from the AMO spectrum, is presented. It does not require knowledge of the angle subtended by the sun at the earth's surface. The value obtained is 5730 +/- 90 K.

  12. Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses Authors: Gutierrez, Marte ; Youn, Dong-Joon Publication Date: 2015-12-01 OSTI Identifier: 1224355

  13. Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media This study presents discrete and continuum simulations of shock wave propagating through jointed media. The simulations were performed using the Lagrangian hydrocode GEODYN-L with joints treated explicitly using an advanced contact algorithm. They studied both

  14. Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ratio | Department of Energy Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence Ratio Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence Ratio Our research shows that fuel can be blended to have a low ignition quality, which is desirable for high-efficiency advanced combustion, and with a high n-paraffin content to reduce CO and THC. PDF icon deer12_lilik.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel

  15. 2013 guidance fo real Property Inventory Reporting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    guidance fo real Property Inventory Reporting 2013 guidance fo real Property Inventory Reporting PDF icon SIGNED_FY13_Rpt_Instructions REV - 2013.08.15.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2012 Federal Real Property Reporting Requirement FY09_Federal_Real_Property_Reporting_Requirements.pdf Guidance for Fiscal Year 2015 Facilities Information Management System Data Validations

  16. Smoothing method aids gas-inventory variance trending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.G. )

    1992-03-23

    This paper reports on a method for determining gas-storage inventory and variance in a natural-gas storage field which uses the equations developed to determine gas-in-place in a production field. The calculations use acquired data for shut-in pressures, reservoir pore volume, and storage gas properties. These calculations are then graphed and trends are developed. Evaluating trends in inventory variance can be enhanced by use of a technique, described here, that smooths the peaks and valleys of an inventory-variance curve. Calculations using the acquired data determine inventory for a storage field whose drive mechanism is gas expansion (that is, volumetric). When used for a dry gas, condensate, or gas-condensate reservoir, the formulas require no further modification. Inventory in depleted oil fields can be determined in this same manner, as well. Some additional calculations, however, must be made to assess the influence of oil production on the gas-storage process.

  17. NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Life-Cycle Inventory Database Buildings Research Photo of a green field with an ocean in the background. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database NREL and its partners created the U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database to help life cycle assessment (LCA) practitioners answer questions about environmental impact. This database provides individual gate-to-gate, cradle-to-gate and cradle-to-grave accounting of the energy and material flows into and out of the environment that are associated with

  18. Estonian greenhouse gas emissions inventory report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punning, J.M.; Ilomets, M.; Karindi, A.; Mandre, M.; Reisner, V.; Martins, A.; Pesur, A.; Roostalu, H.; Tullus, H.

    1996-07-01

    It is widely accepted that the increase of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere due to human activities would result in warming of the Earth`s surface. To examine this effect and better understand how the GHG increase in the atmosphere might change the climate in the future, how ecosystems and societies in different regions of the World should adapt to these changes, what must policymakers do for the mitigation of that effect, the worldwide project within the Framework Convention on Climate Change was generated by the initiative of United Nations. Estonia is one of more than 150 countries, which signed the Framework Convention on Climate Change at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. In 1994 a new project, Estonian Country Study was initiated within the US Country Studies Program. The project will help to compile the GHG inventory for Estonia, find contemporary trends to investigate the impact of climate change on the Estonian ecosystems and economy and to formulate national strategies for Estonia addressing to global climate change.

  19. Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene at High Pressure (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in 1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene at High Pressure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in 1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene at High Pressure Authors: Manaa, M R ; Fried, L E Publication Date: 2011-10-24 OSTI Identifier: 1226974 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-508473 DOE

  20. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development...

  1. US Releases Updated Plutonium Inventory Report | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    details the current plutonium inventory of the U.S. Titled The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009, the document serves as an update to Plutonium: the First 50 Years,...

  2. Forecasting Crude Oil Spot Price Using OECD Petroleum Inventory Levels

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a short-term monthly forecasting model of West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) petroleum inventory levels.

  3. Hawaii Information Package for Chemical Inventory Form (HCIF...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information Package for Chemical Inventory Form (HCIF)Tier II Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Hawaii Information Package for Chemical...

  4. Departmental Vital Records Inventory Sheet | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Departmental Vital Records Inventory Sheet Version Number: 0 Document Number: Form 48202.001 Effective Date: 01/2012 File (public): PDF icon form_48202.001_rev0

  5. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.

    2009-08-01

    Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

  6. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-01

    Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

  7. Toxic Chemical Release Inventory reporting ``Qs & As``. Environmental Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This document offers guidance on toxic chemical release inventory reporting, pursuant to Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) at DOE sites.

  8. DOE Announces Policy for Managing Excess Uranium Inventory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released a Policy Statement on the management of the Department of Energy's (DOE) excess uranium inventory, providing the framework...

  9. High natural gas output and inventories contribute to lower prices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High natural gas output and inventories contribute to lower prices High natural gas production and ample gas inventories are expected to keep natural gas prices relatively low for the rest of 2015. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration says that while expected production growth is slowing from last year's torrid pace, domestic natural gas production in 2015 is still expected to be almost 6 percent above the 2014 level. Higher production has pushed U.S. natural

  10. CMI Course Inventory: Mining Engineering | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Course Inventory: Mining Engineering Mining Engineering Of the six CMI Team members that are educational institutions, one offers a major in Mining Engineering: Colorado School of Mines. CMI Education and Outreach group at Colorado School of Mines developed an inventory of courses offered by CMI Team members that are related to rare earths and critical materials. Other courses are available in these areas: Geology Engineering/Geochemistry Metallurgical Engineering/Materials Science Chemistry

  11. CMI Course Inventory: Recycling/Industrial Engineering | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Course Inventory: Recycling/Industrial Engineering Recycling/Industrial Engineering Of the six CMI Team members that are educational institutions, one offers courses in Recycling/Industrial Engineering: Iowa State University. CMI Education and Outreach group at Colorado School of Mines developed an inventory of courses offered by CMI Team members that are related to rare earths and critical materials. Other courses are available in these areas: Geology Engineering/Geochemistry

  12. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    S2. Uranium feed deliveries, enrichment services, and uranium loaded by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2014 million pounds U3O8 equivalent million separative work units (SWU) Year Feed deliveries by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors Uranium in fuel assemblies loaded into U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors U.S.-origin enrichment services purchased Foreign-origin enrichment services purchased Total purchased enrichment services

  13. Equivalence of optical and electrical noise equivalent power of hybrid NbTiN-Al microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssen, R. M. J.; Endo, A.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2014-11-10

    We have measured and compared the response of hybrid NbTiN-Al Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) to changes in bath temperature and illumination by sub-mm radiation. We show that these two stimulants have an equivalent effect on the resonance feature of hybrid MKIDs. We determine an electrical noise equivalent power (NEP) from the measured temperature responsivity, quasiparticle recombination time, superconducting transition temperature, and noise spectrum, all of which can be measured in a dark environment. For the two hybrid NbTiN-Al MKIDs studied in detail, the electrical NEP is within a factor of two of the optical NEP, which is measured directly using a blackbody source.

  14. Bounding Radionuclide Inventory and Accident Consequence Calculation for the 1L Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelsey, Charles T. IV

    2011-01-01

    A bounding radionuclide inventory for the tungsten of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) IL Target is calculated. Based on the bounding inventory, the dose resulting from the maximum credible incident (MCI) is calculated for the maximally exposed offsite individual (MEOl). The design basis accident involves tungsten target oxidation following a loss of cooling accident. Also calculated for the bounding radionuclide inventory is the ratio to the LANSCE inventory threshold for purposes of inventory control as described in the target inventory control policy. A bounding radionuclide inventory calculation for the lL Target was completed using the MCNPX and CINDER'90 codes. Continuous beam delivery at 200 {micro}A to 2500 mA{center_dot}h was assumed. The total calculated activity following this irradiation period is 205,000 Ci. The dose to the MEOI from the MCI is 213 mrem for the bounding inventory. The LANSCE inventory control threshold ratio is 132.

  15. 2002 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory 12/23/2002 10:51 AM Org Unit Additional Information 2002ID Agency Bureau Organization unit City StateCode Country Total FTEs FunctionCode Status ReasonCode ReasonSub_Code YrFirstOnInventory YearofCostComapre CIF/FTESavings EstAnnualSavings MEOPerfReview 444 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 15 K999 I 1999 452 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 R660 I 1999 436 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 Y220 I 1999 437 019 05 AL ALBUQUERQUE NM US 1 Y999 I 1999

  16. 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Commercial and Inherently Governmental FTE Inventory Worksheet Org Unit Additional Information ID Agency Bureau Organization unit City StateCode Country Total FTEs FunctionCode Status ReasonCode YrFirstOnInventory YearofCostComapre CIF/FTESavings EstAnnualSavings MEOPerfReview 3659 019 60 AB Washington, DC DC US 1 Y210 I 1999 3660 019 60 AB Washington, DC DC US 1 Y210 I 1999 3661 019 60 AB Washington, DC DC US 1 Y000 C B 1999 3662 019 60 AB Washington, DC DC US 1 Y815 C B 2003 3663 019 60 AB

  17. Distributed resonance self-shielding using the equivalence principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altiparmakov, D.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an extension of the equivalence principle to allow distributed resonance self-shielding in a multi-region fuel configuration. Rational expansion of fuel-to-fuel collision probability is applied in order to establish equivalence between the actual fuel configuration and a homogeneous mixture of hydrogen and resonant absorber, which is a commonly used model to calculate library tables of resonance integrals. The main steps in derivation are given along with the basic physics assumptions on which the presented approach relies. The method has been implemented in the lattice code WIMS-AECL and routinely used for calculation of CANDU-type reactor lattices. Its capabilities are illustrated by comparison of WIMS-AECL and MCNP results of {sup 238}U resonance capture in a CANDU lattice cell. In order to determine optimal rational expansion of fuel-to-fuel collision probability, the calculations were carried out by varying the number of rational terms from 1 to 6. The results show that 4 terms are sufficient. The further increase of the number of terms affects the computing time, while the impact on accuracy is negligible. To illustrate the convergence of the results, the fuel subdivision is gradually refined varying the number of fuel pin subdivisions from 1 to 32 equal-area annuli. The results show very good agreement with the reference MCNP calculation. (authors)

  18. Waste Inventory for Near Surface Repository (NSR) - 13482

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaidotas, Algirdas

    2013-07-01

    The main characteristics, physical, chemical as well as radiological of the waste intended to be disposed of in the planned NSR are described. This description is mainly based on the waste inventory investigations performed by the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP). The four different waste streams to be disposed of in the NSR are described and investigated. (authors)

  19. 'Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strohmeyer, Wendy J.

    2015-11-16

    The photos on Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #4 is another in an ongoing effort to catalog all artifacts held by the Museum. Photos will be used as part of the condition report for the artifact, and will become part of the collection record in the collections database for that artifact. The collections database will be publically searchable on the Museum website.

  20. Gas-storage calculations yield accurate cavern, inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.G. )

    1990-07-02

    This paper discusses how determining gas-storage cavern size and inventory variance is now possible with calculations based on shut-in cavern surveys. The method is the least expensive of three major methods and is quite accurate when recorded over a period of time.

  1. Inventory Tracking and Management: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Inventory Tracking and Management: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery

  2. US Releases Updated Plutonium Inventory Report | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Releases Updated Plutonium Inventory Report | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  3. CESP Tool 4.2: Activity Inventory Template | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tool 4.2: Activity Inventory Template from the Step 4: Assess the Current Energy Profile, Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning. File CESP Tool 4.2: Activity Inventory ...

  4. 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls� 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls� PDF icon 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls� More Documents & Publications 3REV2004DOEFAIR.xls� N:\My Documents\porfin.pdf� 2002 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory

  5. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  6. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  7. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  8. Microsoft Word - PPL 970-Materials and Inventory 5-9-05.doc | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy PPL 970-Materials and Inventory 5-9-05.doc Microsoft Word - PPL 970-Materials and Inventory 5-9-05.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - PPL 970-Materials and Inventory 5-9-05.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - al95-06.doc DOE-HDBK-1139-2006 ppl970-3.pdf

  9. An inventory of wells of Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rush, R.M.; Gryder, R.K.; Baxter, F.P.

    1993-02-01

    The well inventory described in this report is a database of well information being developed for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Groundwater Coordinator and the ORNL Groundwater Protection Program. Data are presented on 2071 ORNL wells as maps and as tabular data. A table of well identification aliases is given to permit correlation with earlier reports. Information is incomplete for many of the wells, and a form is provided for readers to provide missing or updated data. The goal of the developers of this data base is to produce a comprehensive inventory of wells at ORNL. This data base is being maintained to provide current information for the operational management of the ORNL groundwater monitoring system and for various users of groundwater data at ORNL.

  10. The Information Role of Spot Prices and Inventories

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Role of Spot Prices and Inventories James L. Smith, Rex Thompson, and Thomas Lee June 24, 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. WORKING PAPER SERIES June 2014 James L. Smith, Rex Thomas, and Thomas K.

  11. COMPILATION OF REGIONAL TO GLOBAL INVENTORIES OF ANTHROPOGENIC EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENKOVITZ,C.M.

    2002-11-01

    The mathematical modeling of the transport and transformation of trace species in the atmosphere is one of the scientific tools currently used to assess atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and climatic conditions. From the scientific but also from the management perspectives accurate inventories of emissions of the trace species at the appropriate spatial, temporal, and species resolution are required. There are two general methodologies used to estimate regional to global emissions: bottom-up and top-down (also known as inverse modeling). Bottom-up methodologies to estimate industrial emissions are based on activity data, emission factors (amount of emissions per unit activity), and for some inventories additional parameters (such as sulfur content of fuels). Generally these emissions estimates must be given finer sectoral, spatial (usually gridded), temporal, and for some inventories species resolution. Temporal and spatial resolution are obtained via the use of surrogate information, such as population, land use, traffic counts, etc. which already exists in or can directly be converted to gridded form. Speciation factors have been and are being developed to speciate inventories of NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and hydrocarbons. Top-down (inverse modeling) methodologies directly invert air quality measurements in terms of poorly known but critical parameters to constrain the emissions needed to explain these measurements; values of these parameters are usually computed using atmospheric transport models. Currently there are several strong limitations of inverse modeling, but the continued evolution of top-down estimates will be facilitated by the development of denser monitoring networks and by the massive amounts of data from satellite observations.

  12. Development of Authorized Limits for Portsmouth Oil Inventory Disposition

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    safety ÔĀ∂ performance ÔĀ∂ cleanup ÔĀ∂ closure M E Environmental Management Development of Authorized Limits for Portsmouth Oil Inventory Disposition September 12, 2012 By Don Dihel and Dan Mosley Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office safety ÔĀ∂ performance ÔĀ∂ cleanup ÔĀ∂ closure M E Environmental Management PORTS Oil Disposition Problem in Late 2007 * Need to the dispose of approximately 2.5 million pounds or 350,000 gallons of lubricating oils contained in storage tanks and associated lines and

  13. CMI Course Inventory: Metallurgical Engineering/Materials Science |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute Course Inventory: Metallurgical Engineering/Materials Science Metallurgical Engineering/Materials Science Of the six CMI Team members that are educational institutions, all offer courses related to Metallurgical Engineering and/or Materials Science. The following links go to the class list on the CMI page for that school. Colorado School of Mines Iowa State University Purdue University University of California-Davis Rutgers University Brown University CMI

  14. CMI Education Course Inventory: Geology Engineering/Geochemistry | Critical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Institute Course Inventory: Geology Engineering/Geochemistry Geology Engineering/Geochemistry Of the six CMI Team members that are educational institutions, five offer courses in Geology. These are Colorado School of Mines, Iowa State University, Purdue University, University of California, Davis and Rutgers University. The following links go to the class list on the CMI page for that school. Colorado School of Mines Iowa State University Purdue University University of California,

  15. Web Content Analysis and Inventories | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) recommends periodic content inventories and analyses of its websites. They will help identify content that needs to be updated, edited, added, or removed for maintenance. They're also recommended prior to starting a website redesign. EERE asks that all Web Coordinators and their teams review their websites' content at least once a year. It is an important part of website maintenance. Ultimately, it ensures that your team is: Aware of what

  16. March market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The spot market price for uranium in unrestricted markets weakened further during March, and at month end, the NUEXCO Exchange Value had fallen $0.15, to $7.45 per pound U3O8. The Restricted American Market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates increased $0.15, to $2.55 per pound U3O8. Ample UF6 supplies and limited demand led to a $0.50 decrease in the UF6 Value, to $25.00 per kgU as UF6, while the RAMP for UF6 increased $0.75, to $5.25 per kgU. Nine near-term uranium transactions were reported, totalling almost 3.3 million pounds equivalent U3O8. This is the largest monthly spot market volume since October 1992, and is double the volume reported in January and February. The March 31 Conversion Value was $4.25 per kgU as UF6. Beginning with the March 31 Value, NUEXCO now reports its Conversion Value in US dollars per kilogram of uranium (US$/kgU), reflecting current industry practice. The March loan market was inactive with no transactions reported. The Loan Rate remained unchanged at 3.0 percent per annum. Low demand and increased competition among sellers led to a one-dollar decrease in the SWU Value, to $65 per SWU, and the RAMP for SWU declined one dollar, to $9 per SWU.

  17. The impact of equivalence ratio oscillations on combustion dynamics in a backward-facing step combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murat Altay, H.; Speth, Raymond L.; Hudgins, Duane E.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2009-11-15

    The combustion dynamics of propane-air flames are investigated in an atmospheric pressure, atmospheric inlet temperature, lean, premixed backward-facing step combustor. We modify the location of the fuel injector to examine the impact of equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame on the combustion dynamics. Simultaneous pressure, velocity, heat-release rate and equivalence ratio measurements and high-speed video from the experiments are used to identify and characterize several distinct operating modes. When the fuel is injected far upstream from the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame is steady and the combustion dynamics are controlled only by flame-vortex interactions. In this case, different dynamic regimes are observed depending on the operating parameters. When the fuel is injected close to the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame exhibits oscillations. In the presence of equivalence ratio oscillations, the measured sound pressure level is significant across the entire range of lean mean equivalence ratios even if the equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame are out-of-phase with the pressure oscillations. The combustion dynamics are governed primarily by the flame-vortex interactions, while the equivalence ratio oscillations have secondary effects. The equivalence ratio oscillations could generate variations in the combustion dynamics in each cycle under some operating conditions, destabilize the flame at the entire range of the lean equivalence ratios, and increase the value of the mean equivalence ratio at the lean blowout limit. (author)

  18. An Integrated RFID and Barcode Tagged Item Inventory System for Deployment at New Brunswick Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younkin, James R; Kuhn, Michael J; Gradle, Colleen; Preston, Lynne; Thomas, Brigham B.; Laymance, Leesa K; Kuziel, Ron

    2012-01-01

    New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has a numerous inventory containing thousands of plutonium and uranium certified reference materials. The current manual inventory process is well established but is a lengthy process which requires significant oversight and double checking to ensure correctness. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has worked with NBL to develop and deploy a new inventory system which utilizes handheld computers with barcode scanners and radio frequency identification (RFID) readers termed the Tagged Item Inventory System (TIIS). Certified reference materials are identified by labels which incorporate RFID tags and barcodes. The label printing process and RFID tag association process are integrated into the main desktop software application. Software on the handheld computers syncs with software on designated desktop machines and the NBL inventory database to provide a seamless inventory process. This process includes: 1) identifying items to be inventoried, 2) downloading the current inventory information to the handheld computer, 3) using the handheld to read item and location labels, and 4) syncing the handheld computer with a designated desktop machine to analyze the results, print reports, etc. The security of this inventory software has been a major concern. Designated roles linked to authenticated logins are used to control access to the desktop software while password protection and badge verification are used to control access to the handheld computers. The overall system design and deployment at NBL will be presented. The performance of the system will also be discussed with respect to a small piece of the overall inventory. Future work includes performing a full inventory at NBL with the Tagged Item Inventory System and comparing performance, cost, and radiation exposures to the current manual inventory process.

  19. Technetium Inventory, Distribution, and Speciation in Hanford Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Rapko, Brian M.

    2014-05-02

    The purpose of this report is three fold: 1) assemble the available information regarding technetium (Tc) inventory, distribution between phases, and speciation in Hanford’s 177 storage tanks into a single, detailed, comprehensive assessment; 2) discuss the fate (distribution/speciation) of Tc once retrieved from the storage tanks and processed into a final waste form; and 3) discuss/document in less detail the available data on the inventory of Tc in other "pools" such as the vadose zone below inactive cribs and trenches, below single-shell tanks (SSTs) that have leaked, and in the groundwater below the Hanford Site. A thorough understanding of the inventory for mobile contaminants is key to any performance or risk assessment for Hanford Site facilities because potential groundwater and river contamination levels are proportional to the amount of contaminants disposed at the Hanford Site. Because the majority of the total 99Tc produced at Hanford (~32,600 Ci) is currently stored in Hanford’s 177 tanks (~26,500 Ci), there is a critical need for knowledge of the fate of this 99Tc as it is removed from the tanks and processed into a final solid waste form. Current flow sheets for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant process show most of the 99Tc will be immobilized as low-activity waste glass that will remain on the Hanford Site and disposed at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF); only a small fraction will be shipped to a geologic repository with the immobilized high-level waste. Past performance assessment studies, which focused on groundwater protection, have shown that 99Tc would be the primary dose contributor to the IDF performance.

  20. 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory Riparian Inventory Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Elizabeth J.; Hansen, Leslie A.; Hathcock, Charles D.; Keller, David C.; Zemlick, Catherine M.

    2012-03-29

    A total length of 36.7 kilometers of riparian habitat were inventoried within LANL boundaries between 2007 and 2011. The following canyons and lengths of riparian habitat were surveyed and inventoried between 2007 and 2011. Water Canyon (9,669 m), Los Alamos Canyon (7,131 m), Pajarito Canyon (6,009 m), Mortandad Canyon (3,110 m), Two-Mile Canyon (2,680 m), Sandia Canyon (2,181 m), Three-Mile Canyon (1,883 m), Canyon de Valle (1,835 m), Ancho Canyon (1,143 m), Canada del Buey (700 m), Sandia Canyon (221 m), DP Canyon (159 m) and Chaquehui Canyon (50 m). Effluent Canyon, Fence Canyon and Potrillo Canyon were surveyed but no areas of riparian habitat were found. Stretches of inventoried riparian habitat were classified for prioritization of treatment, if any was recommended. High priority sites included stretches of Mortandad Canyon, LA Canyon, Pajarito Canyon, Two-Mile Canyon, Sandia Canyon and Water Canyon. Recommended treatment for high priority sites includes placement of objects into the stream channel to encourage sediment deposition, elimination of channel incision, and to expand and slow water flow across the floodplain. Additional stretches were classified as lower priority, and, for other sites it was recommended that feral cattle and exotic plants be removed to aid in riparian habitat recovery. In June 2011 the Las Conchas Wildfire burned over 150,000 acres of land in the Jemez Mountains and surrounding areas. The watersheds above LA Canyon, Water Canyon and Pajarito Canyon were burned in the Las Conchas Wildfire and flooding and habitat alteration were observed in these canyon bottoms (Wright 2011). Post fire status of lower priority areas may change to higher priority for some of the sites surveyed prior to the Las Conchas Wildfire, due to changes in vegetation cover in the adjacent upland watershed.

  1. On The Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    double counting are equivalent if dimensional regularization (DR) is used to regulate infrared (IR) divergences. We discuss in detail ambiguities in the calculation of one-loop...

  2. Natural gas inventories heading to record levels at start of winter heating season

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural gas inventories heading to record levels at start of winter heating season U.S. natural gas inventories are expected to be at record levels to start the winter heating season. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the amount of natural gas stored underground should total almost 4 trillion cubic feet by the beginning of November, reflecting record high natural gas production. Inventories could go even higher if heating demand is not strong during October

  3. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources.

  4. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure) U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure) Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results. PDF icon 45153.pdf More Documents & Publications Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Vehicle

  5. Uraninum-233 Inventory in Oak Ridge Lightened with First Shipment of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Material from Building 3019 | Department of Energy Uraninum-233 Inventory in Oak Ridge Lightened with First Shipment of Material from Building 3019 Uraninum-233 Inventory in Oak Ridge Lightened with First Shipment of Material from Building 3019 January 5, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The first shipment of inventory from Building 3019 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory arrived at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS) on December 22, marking the beginning of the end for the

  6. Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 The United States currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is stored onsite in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal envisioned in a deep mined geologic repository. This report provides an estimate of potential waste inventory and waste form characteristics for the DOE used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive

  7. Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a Comprehensive

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy | Department of Energy Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a Comprehensive National Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a Comprehensive National Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy The Office of Nuclear Energy has conducted a technical review and assessment of the total current inventory [~70,150 MTHM as of 2011] of domestic discharged used nuclear fuel (UNF) and estimated an amount to be

  8. Technetium Inventory, Distribution, and Speciation in Hanford Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Rapko, Brian M.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2014-11-13

    The purpose of this report is three fold: 1) assemble the available information regarding Tc inventory, distribution between phases, and speciation in Hanford‚Äôs 177 storage tanks into a single, detailed, comprehensive assessment; 2) discuss the fate (distribution/speciation) of Tc once retrieved from the storage tanks and processed into final waste forms; and 3) discuss/document in less detail the available data on the inventory of Tc in other ‚Äúpools‚ÄĚ such as the vadose zone below inactive cribs and trenches, below single-shell tanks (SSTs) that have leaked, and in the groundwater below the Hanford Site. This report was revised in September 2014 to add detail and correct inaccuracies in Section 5.0 on the fate of technetium (Tc) recycle from the off-gas systems downstream of the low-activity waste (LAW) melters back to the melters, based on several reports that were not found in the original literature search on the topic. The newly provided reports, from experts active in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) glass studies, the Vitreous State Laboratory at The Catholic University of America (VSL) melter and off-gas system demonstrations and overall WTP systems analysis, were not originally found on electronic databases commonly searched. The major revisions to Section 5.0 also required changes to Section 7.0 (Summary and Conclusions) and this executive summary.

  9. Process integrated modelling for steelmaking Life Cycle Inventory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iosif, Ana-Maria Hanrot, Francois Ablitzer, Denis

    2008-10-15

    During recent years, strict environmental regulations have been implemented by governments for the steelmaking industry in order to reduce their environmental impact. In the frame of the ULCOS project, we have developed a new methodological framework which combines the process integrated modelling approach with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method in order to carry out the Life Cycle Inventory of steelmaking. In the current paper, this new concept has been applied to the sinter plant which is the most polluting steelmaking process. It has been shown that this approach is a powerful tool to make the collection of data easier, to save time and to provide reliable information concerning the environmental diagnostic of the steelmaking processes.

  10. Inventory of power plants in the United States 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-18

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the US provides year-end statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the US (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of December 31, 1994. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal, and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. This is a report of electric utility data; in cases where summary data of nonutility capacity are presented, it is specifically noted as such.

  11. Inventory of power plants in the United States, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States is prepared annually by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  12. System and method for inventorying multiple remote objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrender, Curtis L.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2009-12-29

    A system and method of inventorying multiple objects utilizing a multi-level or a chained radio frequency identification system. The system includes a master tag and a plurality of upper level tags and lower level tags associated with respective objects. The upper and lower level tags communicate with each other and the master tag so that reading of the master tag reveals the presence and absence of upper and lower level tags. In the chained RF system, the upper and lower level tags communicate locally with each other in a manner so that more remote tags that are out of range of some of the upper and lower level tags have their information relayed through adjacent tags to the master tag and thence to a controller.

  13. System and method for inventorying multiple remote objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrender, Curtis L.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-10-23

    A system and method of inventorying multiple objects utilizing a multi-level or a chained radio frequency identification system. The system includes a master tag and a plurality of upper level tags and lower level tags associated with respective objects. The upper and lower level tags communicate with each other and the master tag so that reading of the master tag reveals the presence and absence of upper and lower level tags. In the chained RF system, the upper and lower level tags communicate locally with each other in a manner so that more remote tags that are out of range of some of the upper and lower level tags have their information relayed through adjacent tags to the master tag and thence to a controller.

  14. Microsoft Word - NEGTN02-#188646-v22B-INVENTORY_PLAN_UNCLASSIFIED.DOC

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan December 16, 2008 Office of Nuclear Energy 2008 Table of Contents Executive Summary................................................................................................ES-1 Excess Uranium Inventories..........................................................................................1 Unallocated U.S. HEU.........................................................................................1 U.S.-Origin NU as UF 6

  15. NWCF Evaporator Tank System 2001 Offgas Emissions Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, R.D.; Lamb, K.M.; Matejka, L.A.; Nenni, J.A.

    2002-02-27

    An offgas emissions inventory and liquid stream characterization of the Idaho New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Evaporator Tank System (ETS), formerly known as the High Level Liquid Waste Evaporator (HLLWE), has been completed. The emissions rates of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, multiple metals, particulate, and hydrochloric acid were measured in accordance with an approved Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) and Test Plan that invoked U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard sample collection and analysis procedures. Offgas samples were collected during the start up and at the end of evaporator batches when it was hypothesized the emissions would be at peak rates. Corresponding collection of samples from the evaporator feed overhead condensate, and bottoms was made at approximately the same time as the emissions inventory to support material balance determinations for the evaporator process. The data indicate that organic compound emissions are slightly higher at the beginning of the batch while metals emissions, including mercury, are slightly higher at the end of the evaporator batch. The maximum emissions concentrations are low for all constituents of primary concern. Mercury emissions were less than 5 ppbv, while the sum of HCl and Cl2 emissions was less than 1 ppmv. The sum of all organic emissions also was less than 1 ppmv. The estimated hazardous quotient (HQ) for the evaporator was 6.2e-6 as compared to 0.25 for the EPA target criteria. The cancer risk was 1.3e-10 compared to an EPA target of le-5.

  16. NWCF Evaporator Tank System 2001 Offgas Emissions Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, Richard Doin; Lamb, Kenneth Mitchel; Matejka, Leon Anthony; Nenni, Joseph A

    2002-02-01

    An offgas emissions inventory and liquid stream characterization of the Idaho New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Evaporator Tank System (ETS), formerly known as the High Level Liquid Waste Evaporator (HLLWE), has been completed. The emissions rates of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, multiple metals, particulate, and hydrochloric acid were measured in accordance with an approved Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) and Test Plan that invoked U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard sample collection and analysis procedures. Offgas samples were collected during the start up and at the end of evaporator batches when it was hypothesized the emissions would be at peak rates. Corresponding collection of samples from the evaporator feed overhead condensate, and bottoms was made at approximately the same time as the emissions inventory to support material balance determinations for the evaporator process. The data indicate that organic compound emissions are slightly higher at the beginning of the batch while metals emissions, including mercury, are slightly higher at the end of the evaporator batch. The maximum emissions concentrations are low for all constituents of primary concern. Mercury emissions were less than 5 ppbv, while the sum of HCl and Cl2 emissions was less than 1 ppmv. The sum of all organic emissions also was less than 1 ppmv. The estimated hazardous quotient (HQ) for the evaporator was 6.2e-6 as compared to 0.25 for the EPA target criteria. The cancer risk was 1.3e-10 compared to an EPA target of le-5.

  17. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime Ė materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items Ė fabrication, processing, splitting, and more Ė by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  18. Periodic equivalence ratio modulation method and apparatus for controlling combustion instability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Janus, Michael C. (Baltimore, MD); Griffith, Richard A. (Morgantown, WV)

    2000-01-01

    The periodic equivalence ratio modulation (PERM) method and apparatus significantly reduces and/or eliminates unstable conditions within a combustion chamber. The method involves modulating the equivalence ratio for the combustion device, such that the combustion device periodically operates outside of an identified unstable oscillation region. The equivalence ratio is modulated between preselected reference points, according to the shape of the oscillation region and operating parameters of the system. Preferably, the equivalence ratio is modulated from a first stable condition to a second stable condition, and, alternatively, the equivalence ratio is modulated from a stable condition to an unstable condition. The method is further applicable to multi-nozzle combustor designs, whereby individual nozzles are alternately modulated from stable to unstable conditions. Periodic equivalence ratio modulation (PERM) is accomplished by active control involving periodic, low frequency fuel modulation, whereby low frequency fuel pulses are injected into the main fuel delivery. Importantly, the fuel pulses are injected at a rate so as not to affect the desired time-average equivalence ratio for the combustion device.

  19. An analytical method to calculate equivalent fields to irregular symmetric and asymmetric photon fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Mohamad J.; Chegeni, Nahid; Zabihzadeh, Mansoor; Hamzian, Nima

    2014-04-01

    Equivalent field is frequently used for central axis depth-dose calculations of rectangular- and irregular-shaped photon beams. As most of the proposed models to calculate the equivalent square field are dosimetry based, a simple physical-based method to calculate the equivalent square field size was used as the basis of this study. The table of the sides of the equivalent square or rectangular fields was constructed and then compared with the well-known tables by BJR and Venselaar, et al. with the average relative error percentage of 2.5 Ī 2.5% and 1.5 Ī 1.5%, respectively. To evaluate the accuracy of this method, the percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured for some special irregular symmetric and asymmetric treatment fields and their equivalent squares for Siemens Primus Plus linear accelerator for both energies, 6 and 18 MV. The mean relative differences of PDDs measurement for these fields and their equivalent square was approximately 1% or less. As a result, this method can be employed to calculate equivalent field not only for rectangular fields but also for any irregular symmetric or asymmetric field.

  20. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1. U.S. Forward-Cost Uranium Reserves by State, Year-End 2008 State 50lb 100lb Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs) Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs)...

  1. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. U.S. Forward-Cost Uranium Reserves by Mining Method, Year-End 2008 Mining Method 50 per pound 100 per pound Ore (million tons) Gradea (percent U3O8) U3O8 (million pounds) Ore...

  2. Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1997-01-01

    Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attentuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power.

  3. Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, K.J.

    1997-01-14

    Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attenuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power. 4 figs.

  4. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume II, appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This document contains 2 appendices. The first documents the methodologies used to calculate production, unit energy consumption, fuel type and emission estimates for 16 industries and 35 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired industrial combustion processes, located in 26 states (and the District of Columbia) east of the Mississippi River. As discussed in the text of this report, a U.S. total of 16 industries and 45 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired combustion processes were identified by an elimination type method that was developed based on evaluation of fuel use in industrial SIC codes 20-39 to identify pollutant sources contributing to acid rain. The final population included only plants that have direct-fired fuel consumption greater than or equal to 100 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/yr of equivalent energy consumption. The goal for this analysis was to provide at least a 1980 base year for the data. This was achieved for all of the industries and in fact, 1981 data were used for a number of the industries evaluated. The second contains an analysis of all consumption of major fossil fuels to: (1) identify all fuel usage categories, and (2) identify the kinds of combustion equipment used within each category. This analysis provides a frame of reference for the balance of the study and permits using an energy accounting methodology to quantify the degree to which the inventoried sources in individual consuming sectors are complete and representative of the total population for the sector.

  5. Radionuclide Inventory Distribution Project Data Evaluation and Verification White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-05-17

    Testing of nuclear explosives caused widespread contamination of surface soils on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Atmospheric tests produced the majority of this contamination. The Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) was developed to determine distribution and total inventory of radionuclides in surface soils at the NTS to evaluate areas that may present long-term health hazards. The RIDP achieved this objective with aerial radiological surveys, soil sample results, and in situ gamma spectroscopy. This white paper presents the justification to support the use of RIDP data as a guide for future evaluation and to support closure of Soils Sub-Project sites under the purview of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Use of the RIDP data as part of the Data Quality Objective process is expected to provide considerable cost savings and accelerate site closures. The following steps were completed: - Summarize the RIDP data set and evaluate the quality of the data. - Determine the current uses of the RIDP data and cautions associated with its use. - Provide recommendations for enhancing data use through field verification or other methods. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final end states, and planning remedial actions. In addition, RIDP data may be used to identify specific radionuclide distributions, and augment other non-radionuclide dose rate data. Finally, the RIDP data can be used to estimate internal and external dose rates. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final end states, and planning remedial actions. In addition, RIDP data may be used to identify specific radionuclide distributions, and augment other non-radionuclide dose rate data. Finally, the RIDP data can be used to estimate internal and external dose rates.

  6. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Qin, Yining

    2011-03-31

    Although China became the world's largest emitter of energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007, China does not publish annual estimates of CO{sub 2} emissions and most published estimates of China's emissions have been done by other international organizations. Undertaken at the request of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy, this study examines the feasibility of applying the EIA emissions inventory methodology to estimate China's emissions from published Chinese data. Besides serving as a proof of concept, this study also helps develop a consistent and transparent method for estimating China's CO{sub 2} emissions using an Excel model and identified China-specific data issues and areas for improvement. This study takes a core set of data from the energy balances published in the China Energy Statistical Yearbook 2009 and China Petrochemical Corporation Yearbook 2009 and applies the EIA's eight-step methodology to estimate China's 2008 CO{sub 2} emissions. First, China's primary and secondary fuel types and consumption by end use are determined with slight discrepancies identified between the two data sources and inconsistencies in product categorization with the EIA. Second, energy consumption data are adjusted to eliminate double counting in the four potential areas identified by EIA; consumption data from China's Special Administrative Regions are not included. Physical fuel units are then converted to energy equivalents using China's standard energy measure of coal equivalent (1 kilogram = 29.27 MJ) and IPCC carbon emissions coefficients are used to calculate each fuel's carbon content. Next, carbon sequestration is estimated following EIA conventions for other petroleum products and non-energy use of secondary fuels. Emissions from international bunker fuels are also subtracted under the 'reference' calculation of estimating apparent energy consumption by fuel type and the 'sectoral' calculation of summing emissions across end-use sectors. Adjustments for the China-specific conventions of reporting foreign bunkers and domestic bunkers fueling abroad are made following IPCC definitions of international bunkers and EIA reporting conventions, while the sequestration of carbon in carbon steel is included as an additional adjustment. Under the sectoral approach, fuel consumption of bunkers and other transformation losses as well as gasoline consumption are reallocated to conform to EIA sectoral reporting conventions. To the extent possible, this study relies on official energy data from primary sources. A limited number of secondary sources were consulted to provide insight into the nature of consumption of some products and to guide the analysis of carbon sequestered in steel. Beyond these, however, the study avoided trying to estimate figures where directly unavailable, such as natural gas flaring. As a result, the basic calculations should be repeatable for other years with the core set of data from National Bureau of Statistics and Sinopec (or a similarly authoritative source of oil product data). This study estimates China's total energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2008 to be 6666 Mt CO{sub 2}, including 234.6 Mt of non-fuel CO{sub 2} emissions and 154 Mt of sequestered CO{sub 2}. Bunker fuel emissions in 2008 totaled 15.9 Mt CO{sub 2}, but this figure is underestimated because fuel use by Chinese ship and planes for international transportation and military bunkers are not included. Of emissions related to energy consumption, 82% is from coal consumption, 15% from petroleum and 3% from natural gas. From the sectoral approach, industry had the largest share of China's energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions with 72%, followed by residential at 11%, transport and telecommunications at 8%, and the other four (commerce, agriculture, construction and other public) sectors having a combined share of 9%. Thermal electricity and (purchased) heat (to a lesser degree) are major sources of fuel consumption behind sectoral emissions, responsible for 2533 Mt CO2 and 321 Mt CO{sub 2}, respec

  7. Appendix B - Chemical and Radiological Inventories for the CEMRC, pages 1-4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B-1 APPENDIX B CHEMICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL INVENTORIES FOR THE CEMRC The current inventories of chemicals and radiological materials at the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (CEMRC) are provided in Tables B-1 and B-2, respectively. These tables were provided by Joel Webb, Director of the CEMRC, New Mexico State University (Webb 2002). Table B-1. Onsite CEMRC Chemical Inventory Chemical Name Amount Units SARA Limit Acetic Acid, Glacial 5,400 mL NA a Acetone 38 L NA AA Modifier

  8. Heavy metal inventory and fuel sustainability of recycling TRU in FBR design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-06

    Nuclear fuel materials from spent fuel of light water reactors have a potential to be used for destructive devices with very huge energy release or in the same time, it can be utilized as a peaceful energy or civil applications, for generating electricity, desalination of water, medical application and others applications. Several research activities showed some recycled spent fuel can be used as additional fuel loading for increasing fuel breeding capability as well as improving intrinsic aspect of nuclear non-proliferation. The present investigation intends to evaluate the composition of heavy metals inventories and fuel breeding capability in the FBR design based on the loaded fuel of light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel (SF) of 33 GWd/t with 5 years cooling time by adopting depletion code of ORIGEN. Whole core analysis of FBR design is performed by adopting and coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes. Nuclear data library, JFS-3-J-3.2R which is based on the JENDL 3.2 has been used for nuclear data analysis. JSFR design is the basis design reference which basically adopted 800 days cycle length for 4 batches system. Higher inventories of plutonium of MOX fuel and TRU fuel types at equilibrium composition than initial composition have been shown. Minor actinide (MA) inventory compositions obtain a different inventory trends at equilibrium composition for both fuel types. Higher Inventory of MA is obtained by MOX fuel and less MA inventory for TRU fuel at equilibrium composition than initial composition. Some different MA inventories can be estimated from the different inventory trend of americium (Am). Higher americium inventory for MOX fuel and less americium inventory for TRU fuel at equilibrium condition. Breeding ratio of TRU fuel is relatively higher compared with MOX fuel type. It can be estimated from relatively higher production of Pu-238 (through converted MA) in TRU fuel, and Pu-238 converts through neutron capture to produce Pu-239. Higher breeding ratio of MOX fuel and TRU fuel types at equilibrium condition are estimated from converted fertile material during reactor operation into fissile material of plutonium such as converted uranium fuel (converted U-238 into Pu-239) or additional converted fuel from MA into Pu-238 and changes into Pu-239 by capturing neutron. Loading LWR SF gives better fuel breeding capability and increase inventory of MA for doping material of MOX fuel; however, it requires more supply MA inventory for TRU fuel type.

  9. Inventory of Power Plants in the United States, October 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-27

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States is prepared annually by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The report is organized into the following chapters: Year in Review, Operable Electric Generating Units, and Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions. Statistics presented in these chapters reflect the status of electric generating units as of December 31, 1992.

  10. Radionuclide inventory for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report updates the information previously submitted in the draft report DOE/WIPP 88-005, Radionuclide Source Term for the WIPP, dated 1987 (reference 1). The information in this report provides the projected radionuclide inventory at the WIPP based on the projected waste receipts through the year 2013. The information is based on the 1991 TRU Program Data submittals for the Integrated Data Base (DOE/RW-0006, Rev. 7) from each of the DOE sites generating or storing TRU waste for shipment to the WIPP. The data is based on existing characterization data on the waste in interim storage, waste estimates based on projected programs during the 1991 through 2013 time period, projected treatment processes required to meet WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), and a projection of the waste that will be declared low level waste when it is assayed as part of the certification program for waste shipments to WIPP. This data will serve as a standard reference for WIPP programs requiring radionuclide data, including safety programs, performance assessment, and regulatory compliance. These projections will continue to be periodically updated as the waste data estimates are refined by the generator sites as they participate in the annual update of the Integrated Data Base (IDB).

  11. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  12. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-03-12

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  13. Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aas, Christopher A.; Lenhart, James E.; Bray, Olin H.; Witcher, Christina Jenkin

    2004-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories was tasked with developing the Defense Nuclear Material Stewardship Integrated Inventory Information Management System (IIIMS) with the sponsorship of NA-125.3 and the concurrence of DOE/NNSA field and area offices. The purpose of IIIMS was to modernize nuclear materials management information systems at the enterprise level. Projects over the course of several years attempted to spearhead this modernization. The scope of IIIMS was broken into broad enterprise-oriented materials management and materials forecasting. The IIIMS prototype was developed to allow multiple participating user groups to explore nuclear material requirements and needs in detail. The purpose of material forecasting was to determine nuclear material availability over a 10 to 15 year period in light of the dynamic nature of nuclear materials management. Formal DOE Directives (requirements) were needed to direct IIIMS efforts but were never issued and the project has been halted. When restarted, duplicating or re-engineering the activities from 1999 to 2003 is unnecessary, and in fact future initiatives can build on previous work. IIIMS requirements should be structured to provide high confidence that discrepancies are detected, and classified information is not divulged. Enterprise-wide materials management systems maintained by the military can be used as overall models to base IIIMS implementation concepts upon.

  14. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    a. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2014 million pounds U3O8 equivalent Delivery year Total purchased Purchased from U.S. producers Purchased from U.S. brokers and traders Purchased from other owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, other U.S. suppliers, (and U.S. government for 2007)1 Purchased from foreign suppliers U.S.-origin uranium Foreign-origin uranium Spot contracts2 Short, medium, and long-term contracts3 1994

  15. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    b. Weighted-average price of uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2014 dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Delivery year Total purchased (weighted-average price) Purchased from U.S. producers Purchased from U.S. brokers and traders Purchased from other owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, other U.S. suppliers, (and U.S. government for 2007)1 Purchased from foreign suppliers U.S.-origin uranium (weighted-average price)

  16. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0. Contracted purchases of uranium from suppliers by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, in effect at the end of 2014, by delivery year, 2015-24 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Contracted purchases from U.S. suppliers Contracted purchases from foreign suppliers Contracted purchases from all suppliers Year of delivery Minimum Maximum Minimum Maximum Minimum Maximum 2015 8,405 8,843 31,468 34,156 39,873 42,999 2016 7,344 7,757 29,660 31,787 37,004 39,544 2017 5,980 6,561

  17. Uranium Marketing Annual Report - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Uranium Marketing Annual Report With Data for 2014 | Release Date: May 13, 2015 | Next Release Date: May 2016 | full report Previous reports Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 Go Uranium purchases and prices Owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ("civilian owner/operators" or "COOs") purchased a total of 53 million pounds U3O8e (equivalent1) of deliveries from U.S.

  18. Numerical research of the optimal control problem in the semi-Markov inventory model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorshenin, Andrey K.

    2015-03-10

    This paper is devoted to the numerical simulation of stochastic system for inventory management products using controlled semi-Markov process. The results of a special software for the systemís research and finding the optimal control are presented.

  19. EM Rolls Ahead of DOE Goals to Trim Vehicle Fleet Inventory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. Ė EM exceeded a DOE goal to reduce its vehicle fleet inventory, advancing the Departmentís broader initiative to cut greenhouse gas emissions and decrease petroleum consumption across the complex.

  20. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1992 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stirrup, T.S.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the 1992 Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Originally, this report was in response to the Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Agreement in 1989 between the State of Idaho and the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office, and a request from the Idaho Air Quality Bureau. The current purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to provide the basis for the preparation of the INEL Permit-to-Operate (PTO) an Air Emission Source Application, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. This report includes emissions calculations from 1989 to 1992. The Air Emission Inventory System, an ORACLE-based database system, maintains the emissions inventory.

  1. Record U.S. oil inventories continue increasing over next two...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of February. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the increase in oil inventories will moderate as refineries ramp up their processing of...

  2. EIS-0347: Long-Term Management of the National Defense Stockpile Inventory of Excess Mercury

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Defense Logistics Agency EIS evaluated alternatives for managing the Defense National Stockpile Center inventory of excess mercury. DOE was a cooperating agency for preparation of the draft EIS.

  3. The Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Public Outdoor Lighting Inventory: Phase I: Survey Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Smalley, Edward; Haefer, R.

    2014-09-30

    This document presents the results of a voluntary web-based inventory survey of public street and area lighting across the U.S. undertaken during the latter half of 2013.This survey attempts to access information about the national inventory in a ďbottoms-upĒ manner, going directly to owners and operators. Adding to previous ďtop downĒ estimates, it is intended to improve understanding of the role of public outdoor lighting in national energy use.

  4. Government-Owned Firearms Inventory at the Nevada National Security Site

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Government-Owned Firearms Inventory at the Nevada National Security Site INS-L-15-01 December 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 3, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, NEVADA FIELD OFFICE FROM: Marilyn E. Richardson Acting Assistant Inspector General for the Office of Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Government-Owned Firearms Inventory

  5. 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Markets | Department of Energy 4 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the Commercial Markets 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the Commercial Markets Energy Resources International (ERI), Inc conducted this independent market impact analysis on DOE planned uranium sales and transfers during the period 2014 to 2033, based on information concerning quantities and schedules provided to ERI by DOE. PDF icon ERI Market

  6. Inventory optimization in the US petroleum industry: empirical analysis and implications for energy emergency policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, R.G.; Weiner, R.

    1983-08-01

    This paper starts from the observation that the rapid increases in the price of crude oil during two of the last three supply disruptions can be attributed in part to increased private inventory demand stimulated by expectations of still higher prices (and hence speculative profits) in the future. To examine this phenomenon, we develop an optimizing model of inventory behavior in the petroleum industry and test it on United States data. Government intervention in any future disruption is likely to take the form of releases from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Given that the SPR accounts for but a small fraction of US oil inventories, the reaction of the private sector is critical in evaluating its impact. We incorporate inventory behavior in a small, empirically-estimated model of the world oil market, which is then linked to a short-run macro-econometric model of the US. We employ the linked energy-economy models to simulate a disruption and the effects of using the SPR on oil prices and private inventory behavior. Our simulations support the view that substantial inventory accumulation accompanies a supply disruption. In the debate over whether the SPR is potentially a potent or impotent resource in an emergency, we lean toward potency. We found that public releases were not absorbed in private stockpiles; indeed, their dampening price effects served, albeit slightly, to discourage speculative stock build. 20 references, 3 figures, 6 tables.

  7. A hybrid inventory management system respondingto regular demand and surge demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammad S. Roni; Mingzhou Jin; Sandra D. Eksioglu

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid policy for a stochastic inventory system facing regular demand and surge demand. The combination of two different demand patterns can be observed in many areas, such as healthcare inventory and humanitarian supply chain management. The surge demand has a lower arrival rate but higher demand volume per arrival. The solution approach proposed in this paper incorporates the level crossing method and mixed integer programming technique to optimize the hybrid inventory policy with both regular orders and emergency orders. The level crossing method is applied to obtain the equilibrium distributions of inventory levels under a given policy. The model is further transformed into a mixed integer program to identify an optimal hybrid policy. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the impact of parameters on the optimal inventory policy and minimum cost. Numerical results clearly show the benefit of using the proposed hybrid inventory model. The model and solution approach could help healthcare providers or humanitarian logistics providers in managing their emergency supplies in responding to surge demands.

  8. Uncertainty assessment and analysis of ITER in-VV tritium inventory determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cristescu, I. R.; Cristescu, I.; Glugla, M.; Murdoch, D.; Ciattaglia, S.

    2008-07-15

    Tracking of tritium inventories on ITER will be essential to ensure that the safety limits established for the mobilizable tritium inventory in the vacuum vessel are not violated. Tritium will be delivered to the ITER site from outside suppliers. Staring with the tritium imports the value of tritium inventory at ITER site will be known with a certain error that will propagate in time. During plasma operation, shot by shot measurements of the tritium delivered to the Torus and recovered will allow the amount of tritium trapped in the Torus to be computed at the end of the day. A case study for different measuring techniques and several measuring points for the tritium recovered from Torus have been done. An alternative method is to measure overnight the variation in the inventory of the storage and delivery system and the associated error when this method will be employed are presented. In order to reduce the errors on the tritium trapped in-vessel, at certain time intervals a method of global tritium inventory will be performed. The method envisages the transfer of all the mobilizable tritium from the plant and measurement of this inventory in the self-assay beds from the storage and delivery system. Evaluation of the most important sources of error for the tritium trapped in-vessel and means of minimization are eventually presented. (authors)

  9. Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-Explosive Charges (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges Authors: Fournier, K B ; Walton, O R ; Benjamin, R ; Dunlop, W H Publication Date: 2014-09-29 OSTI Identifier: 1171337 Report Number(s): LLNL-TR-662280 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344

  10. Creating dynamic equivalent PV circuit models with impedance spectroscopy for arc-fault modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Strauch, Jason E.; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2011-06-01

    Article 690.11 in the 2011 National Electrical Code{reg_sign} (NEC{reg_sign}) requires new photovoltaic (PV) systems on or penetrating a building to include a listed arc fault protection device. Currently there is little experimental or empirical research into the behavior of the arcing frequencies through PV components despite the potential for modules and other PV components to filter or attenuate arcing signatures that could render the arc detector ineffective. To model AC arcing signal propagation along PV strings, the well-studied DC diode models were found to inadequately capture the behavior of high frequency arcing signals. Instead dynamic equivalent circuit models of PV modules were required to describe the impedance for alternating currents in modules. The nonlinearities present in PV cells resulting from irradiance, temperature, frequency, and bias voltage variations make modeling these systems challenging. Linearized dynamic equivalent circuits were created for multiple PV module manufacturers and module technologies. The equivalent resistances and capacitances for the modules were determined using impedance spectroscopy with no bias voltage and no irradiance. The equivalent circuit model was employed to evaluate modules having irradiance conditions that could not be measured directly with the instrumentation. Although there was a wide range of circuit component values, the complex impedance model does not predict filtering of arc fault frequencies in PV strings for any irradiance level. Experimental results with no irradiance agree with the model and show nearly no attenuation for 1 Hz to 100 kHz input frequencies.

  11. Canister storage building compliance assessment SNF project NRC equivalency criteria - HNF-SD-SNF-DB-003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLACK, D.M.

    1999-08-11

    This document presents the Project's position on compliance with the SNF Project NRC Equivalency Criteria--HNF-SD-SNF-DE-003, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Path Forward Additional NRC Requirements. No non-compliances are shown The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion.

  12. Sex-specific tissue weighting factors for effective dose equivalent calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X.G. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Reece, W.D. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent was defined in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 26 in 1977 and later adopted by the U.S. Nuclear REgulatory Commission. To calculate organ doses and effective dose equivalent for external exposures using Monte Carlo simulations, sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms and sex-specific weighting factors are always employed. This paper presents detailed mathematical derivation of a set of sex-specific tissue weighting factors and the conditions which the weighting factors must satisfy. Results of effective dose equivalent calculations using female and male phantoms exposed to monoenergetic photon beams of 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV are provided and compared with results published by other authors using different sex-specific weighting factors and phantoms. The results indicate that females always receive higher effective dose equivalent than males for the photon energies and geometries considered and that some published data may be wrong due to mistakes in deriving the sex-specific weighting factors. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Effects of fuel type and equivalence ratios on the flickering of triple flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, K.B.; Kundu, A.; Ganguly, R.; Datta, A.

    2009-02-15

    An experimental study has been conducted in axisymmetric, co-flowing triple flames with different equivalence ratios of the inner and outer reactant streams (2<{phi}{sub in}<3 and 0{<=}{phi}{sub out}<0.7). Different fuel combinations, like propane/propane, propane/methane or methane/methane in the inner and outer streams respectively, have been used in the experiments. The structures of the triple flames have been compared for the different fuel combinations and equivalence ratios. The conditions under which triple flames exhibit oscillation have been identified. During the oscillation, the non-premixed flame and the outer lean premixed flame flicker strongly, while the inner rich premixed flame remains more or less stable. The flickering frequency has been evaluated through image processing and fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the average pixel intensity of the image frames. It is observed that, for all the fuel combinations, the frequency decreases with the increase in the outer equivalence ratio, while it is relatively invariant with the change in the inner equivalence ratio. However, an increase in the inner equivalence ratio affects the structure of the flame by increasing the heights of the inner premixed flame and non-premixed flame and also enlarges the yellow soot-laden zone at the tip of the inner flame. A scaling analysis of the oscillating flames has been performed based on the measured parameters, which show a variation of Strouhal number (St) with Richardson number (Ri) as St {proportional_to} Ri{sup 0.5}. The fuel type is found to have no influence on this correlation. (author)

  14. Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 2. inventories of transuranium elements in surface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Robison, W.L.

    1997-10-01

    This is the second of three reports on Bikini sediment studies, which discusses the concentrations and inventories of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu in sediments from the lagoon. Surface sediment samples were collected from 87 locations over the entire lagoon at Bikini Atoll during 1979. The collections were made to map the distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred in the composition of the sediment as a result of the testing program. Present inventories for {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu in the surface 2 cm of sediment are estimated to be 14 and 17 TBq, respectively. These values are estimated to represent only 14% of the total inventory in the sediment column. Sediment inventories of {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are changing only slowly with time through chemical- physical processes that continuously mobilize small amounts of the transuranics to the water column. The lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with deposits logoonward of the eastern reef.

  15. An SAR-compliant radionuclide inventory management system for a DOE research and development laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Kula, K.R.; Lux, C.R.; Clements, J.A.

    2000-07-01

    The US Department of Energy Complex contains many laboratories that require inventory management and control of large stores of radionuclides. While the overall quantities of radionuclides are bounded by Authorization-Basis (AB) documents, the spatial distribution may change rapidly according to facility experimentation and storage limits. Thus, the consequences of postulated accident events may be difficult to quantify as the location of radiological species becomes uncertain. Furthermore, a situation of this nature may be compounded by management of fissile materials in the same laboratory. Although radionuclide inventory management, fissile material control, and compliance with AB limits may be handled individually, a systematic and consistent approach would be to integrate all three functions. A system with these characteristics, an upgraded Radionuclide Inventory and Administrative Control (RI-AC) System, has been implemented for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) located on the Savannah River Site (SRS), and is summarized in this paper.

  16. Inventory of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Kora, Angela R.; Shankle, Steve A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

    2009-06-29

    The Carbon Management Strategic Initiative (CMSI) is a lab-wide initiative to position the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a leader in science, technology and policy analysis required to understand, mitigate and adapt to global climate change as a nation. As part of an effort to walk the talk in the field of carbon management, PNNL conducted its first carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the 2007 calendar year. The goal of this preliminary inventory is to provide PNNL staff and management with a sense for the relative impact different activities at PNNL have on the labís total carbon footprint.

  17. Integrated data base report--1995: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The information in this report summarizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data base for inventories, projections, and characteristics of domestic spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. This report is updated annually to keep abreast of continual waste inventory and projection changes in both the government and commercial sectors. Baseline information is provided for DOE program planning purposes and to support DOE program decisions. Although the primary purpose of this document is to provide background information for program planning within the DOE community, it has also been found useful by state and local governments, the academic community, and some private citizens.

  18. End of Year 2010 SNF & HLW Inventories | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    End of Year 2010 SNF & HLW Inventories End of Year 2010 SNF & HLW Inventories Map of the United States of America that shows the location of approximately 64,000 MTHM of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) & 275 High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Canisters. PDF icon Slide 1 More Documents & Publications Assessment of Disposal Options for DOE-Managed High-Level Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 Microsoft Word - TSLCC 2007_5_05_08 rev

  19. Flame Inhibition by Phosphorus-Containing Compounds over a Range of Equivalence Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayaweera, T M; Melius, C F; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Korobeinichev, O P; Shvartsberg, V M; Shmakov, A G; Rybitskaya, I V; Curran, H

    2004-03-17

    There is much interest in the combustion mechanism of organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) due to their role as potential halon replacements in fire suppression. A continuing investigation of the inhibition activity of organophosphorus compounds under a range of equivalence ratios was performed experimentally and computationally, as measured by the burning velocity. Updates to a previous mechanism were made by the addition and modification of reactions in the mechanism for a more complete description of the recombination reactions. In this work, the laminar flame speed is measured experimentally and calculated numerically for a premixed propane/air flame, under a range of equivalence ratios, undoped and doped with dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). A detailed investigation of the catalytic cycles involved in the recombination of key flame radicals is made for two equivalence ratios, lean and rich. From this, the importance of different catalytic cycles involved in the lean versus rich case is discussed. Although the importance of certain cycles is different under different stoichiometries, the OPCs are similarly effective across the range, demonstrating the robustness of OPCs as flame suppressants. In addition, it is shown that the phosphorus compounds are most active in the high temperature region of the flame. This may, in part, explain their high level of inhibition effectiveness.

  20. Combinatorial theory of the semiclassical evaluation of transport moments. I. Equivalence with the random matrix approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkolaiko, G.; Kuipers, J.

    2013-11-15

    To study electronic transport through chaotic quantum dots, there are two main theoretical approaches. One involves substituting the quantum system with a random scattering matrix and performing appropriate ensemble averaging. The other treats the transport in the semiclassical approximation and studies correlations among sets of classical trajectories. There are established evaluation procedures within the semiclassical evaluation that, for several linear and nonlinear transport moments to which they were applied, have always resulted in the agreement with random matrix predictions. We prove that this agreement is universal: any semiclassical evaluation within the accepted procedures is equivalent to the evaluation within random matrix theory. The equivalence is shown by developing a combinatorial interpretation of the trajectory sets as ribbon graphs (maps) with certain properties and exhibiting systematic cancellations among their contributions. Remaining trajectory sets can be identified with primitive (palindromic) factorisations whose number gives the coefficients in the corresponding expansion of the moments of random matrices. The equivalence is proved for systems with and without time reversal symmetry.

  1. Formulating a simplified equivalent representation of distribution circuits for PV impact studies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Matthew J.; Broderick, Robert Joseph; Grijalva, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    With an increasing number of Distributed Generation (DG) being connected on the distribution system, a method for simplifying the complexity of the distribution system to an equivalent representation of the feeder is advantageous for streamlining the interconnection study process. The general characteristics of the system can be retained while reducing the modeling effort required. This report presents a method of simplifying feeders to only specified buses-of-interest. These buses-of-interest can be potential PV interconnection locations or buses where engineers want to verify a certain power quality. The equations and methodology are presented with mathematical proofs of the equivalence of the circuit reduction method. An example 15-bus feeder is shown with the parameters and intermediate example reduction steps to simplify the circuit to 4 buses. The reduced feeder is simulated using PowerWorld Simulator to validate that those buses operate with the same characteristics as the original circuit. Validation of the method is also performed for snapshot and time-series simulations with variable load and solar energy output data to validate the equivalent performance of the reduced circuit with the interconnection of PV.

  2. RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION: FOURMILE BRANCH, PEN BRANCH, AND STEEL CREEK IOUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

    2014-04-29

    As a condition to the Department of Energy (DOE) Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Facility Review Group (LFRG) review team approving the Savannah River Site (SRS) Composite Analysis (CA), SRS agreed to follow up on a secondary issue, which consisted of the consolidation of several observations that the team concluded, when evaluated collectively, could potentially impact the integration of the CA results. This report addresses secondary issue observations 4 and 21, which identify the need to improve the CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis specifically by improving the CA inventory and the estimate of its uncertainty. The purpose of the work described herein was to be responsive to these secondary issue observations by re-examining the radionuclide inventories of the Integrator Operable Units (IOUs), as documented in ERD 2001 and Hiergesell, et. al. 2008. The LFRG concern has been partially addressed already for the Lower Three Runs (LTR) IOU (Hiergesell and Phifer, 2012). The work described in this investigation is a continuation of the effort to address the LFRG concerns by re-examining the radionuclide inventories associated with Fourmile Branch (FMB) IOU, Pen Branch (PB) IOU and Steel Creek (SC) IOU. The overall approach to computing radionuclide inventories for each of the IOUs involved the following components: ē Defining contaminated reaches of sediments along the IOU waterways ē Identifying separate segments within each IOU waterway to evaluate individually ē Computing the volume and mass of contaminated soil associated with each segment, or ďcompartmentĒ ē Obtaining the available and appropriate Sediment and Sediment/Soil analytical results associated with each IOU ē Standardizing all radionuclide activity by decay-correcting all sample analytical results from sample date to the current point in time, ē Computing representative concentrations for all radionuclides associated with each compartment in each of the IOUs ē Computing the radionuclide inventory of each DOE-added radionuclide for the compartments of each IOU by applying the representative, central value concentration to the mass of contaminated soil ē Totaling the inventory for all compartments associated with each of the IOUs Using this approach the 2013 radionuclide inventories for each sub-compartment associated with each of the three IOUs were computed, by radionuclide. The inventories from all IOU compartments were then rolled-up into a total inventory for each IOU. To put the computed estimate of radionuclide activities within FMB, PB, and SC IOUs into context, attention was drawn to Cs-137, which was the radionuclide with the largest contributor to the calculated dose to a member of the public at the perimeter of SRS within the 2010 SRS CA (SRNL 2010). The total Cs-137 activity in each of the IOUs was calculated to be 9.13, 1.5, and 17.4 Ci for FMB, PB, and SC IOUs, respectively. Another objective of this investigation was to address the degree of uncertainty associated with the estimated residual radionuclide activity that is calculated for the FMB, PB, and SC IOUs. Two primary contributing factors to overall uncertainty of inventory estimates were identified and evaluated. The first related to the computation of the mass of contaminated material in a particular IOU compartment and the second to the uncertainty associated with analytical counting errors. The error ranges for the mass of contaminated material in each IOU compartment were all calculated to be approximately +/- 9.6%, or a nominal +/-10%. This nominal value was added to the uncertainty associated with the analytical counting errors that were associated with each radionuclide, individually. This total uncertainty was then used to calculate a maximum and minimum estimated radionuclide inventories for each IOU.

  3. Life Cycle Inventory of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel for Use in an Urban Bus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehan, John; Camobreco, Vince; Duffield, James; Graboski, Michael; Graboski, Michael; Shapouri, Housein

    1998-05-01

    This report presents the findings from a study of the life cycle inventories (LCIs) for petroleum diesel and biodiesel. An LCI is a comprehensive quantification of all the energy and environmental flows associated with a product from ďcradle to grave.Ē It provides information on raw materials extracted from the environment; energy resources consumed; air, water, and solid waste emissions generated.

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 2. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    This document is the Baseline Inventory Report for the transuranic (alpha-bearing) wastes stored at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Waste stream profiles including origin, applicable EPA codes, typical isotopic composition, typical waste densities, and typical rates of waste generation for each facility are presented for wastes stored at the WIPP.

  5. Integrated data base report--1996: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Inventories of most of these materials are reported as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1996, which is September 30, 1996. Commercial SNF and commercial uranium mill tailings inventories are reported on an end-of-calendar year (CY) basis. All SNF and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are SNF, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through FY 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

  6. Integrated data base report - 1994: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Except for transuranic wastes, inventories of these materials are reported as of December 31, 1994. Transuranic waste inventories are reported as of December 31, 1993. All spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

  7. AX tank farm waste inventory study for the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, D.L.

    1997-12-22

    In May of 1996, the US Department of Energy implemented a four-year demonstration project identified as the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI). The HTI mission is to minimize technical uncertainties and programmatic risks by conducting demonstrations to characterize and remove tank waste using technologies and methods that will be needed in the future to carry out tank waste remediation and tank farm closure at the Hanford Site. Included in the HTI scope is the development of retrieval performance evaluation criteria supporting readiness to close single-shell tanks in the future. A path forward that includes evaluation of closure basis alternatives has been outlined to support the development of retrieval performance evaluation criteria for the AX Farm, and eventual preparation of the SEIS for AX Farm closure. This report documents the results of the Task 4, Waste Inventory study performed to establish the best-basis inventory of waste contaminants for the AX Farm, provides a means of estimating future soil inventories, and provides data for estimating the nature and extent of contamination (radionuclide and chemical) resulting from residual tank waste subsequent to retrieval. Included in the report are a best-basis estimate of the existing radionuclide and chemical inventory in the AX Farm Tanks, an estimate of the nature and extent of existing radiological and chemical contamination from past leaks, a best-basis estimate of the radionuclide and chemical inventory in the AX Farm Tanks after retrieval of 90 percent, 99 percent, and 99.9 percent of the waste, and an estimate of the nature and extent of radionuclide and chemical contamination resulting from retrieval of waste for an assumed leakage from the tanks during retrieval.

  8. National inventory of abandoned mine land problems: an emphasis on health, safety, and general welfare impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honea, R.B.; Baxter, F.P.

    1984-07-01

    In 1977 Congress passed the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, which provided for the abatement of abandoned mine land (AML) problems through a reclamation program funded by a severance tax on current mining. AML was defined as any land, including associated buildings, equipment, and affected areas, that was no longer being used for coal mining by August 1977. This act also created the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) in the Department of the Interior to administer the AML program and to assume other regulatory and research responsibilities. This report documents the design, implementation, and results of a National inventory of the most serious problems associated with past mining practices. One of the objectives of the Inventory was to help OSM and the participating states locate, identify, and rank AML problems and estimate their reclamation costs. Other objectives were to encourage states and Indian tribes to collect such data and to provide OSM with the information necessary to guide its decision-making processes and to quantify the progress of the reclamation program. Because only limited funds were available to design and implement the National inventory and because the reclamation fund established by the Act may never be sufficient to correct all AML problems, OSM has focused on only the top-priority problems. It is stressed that this is not an inventory of AML features but rather an inventory of AML impacts. It should be noted that the data and analysis contained in this report are based on a data collection effort conducted by the states, Indian tribes, and OSM contractors between 1979 and mid-1982.

  9. SU-E-T-329: Tissue-Equivalent Phantom Materials for Neutron Dosimetry in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halg, R; Lomax, A; Clarke, S; Wieger, B; Pryser, E; Arghal, R; Pozzi, S; Bashkirov, V; Schulte, R; Schneider, U

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize tissue equivalence of phantom materials in terms of secondary neutron production and dose deposition from neutrons produced in radiation therapy phantom materials in the context of proton therapy using Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. Methods: In order to study the influence of material choice on neutron production in therapeutic proton beams, Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 and MCNPX-PoliMi transport codes were performed to generate the neutron fields produced by protons of 155 and 200 MeV. A simple irradiation geometry was used to investigate the effect of different materials. The proton beams were stopped in slab phantoms to study the production of secondary neutrons. The investigated materials were water, Lucite, and tissue-equivalent phantom materials (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA). Neutron energy spectra and absorbed dose by neutrons and their secondary particles were scored. In addition, simulations were performed for reference tissues (ICRP/ICRU) to assess tissue equivalence with respect to neutron generation and transport. In order to benchmark the simulation results, measurements were performed with a system developed at the University of Michigan; organic liquid scintillators were used to detect the neutron emissions from the irradiation of tissue-equivalent materials. Additionally, the MPPost code was used to calculate the scintillator response from the MCNPX-PoliMi output. Results: The simulated energy spectra and depth dose curves of the neutrons produced in different phantom materials showed similar shape. The differences of spectra and fluences between all studied materials and reference tissues were well within the achievable precision of neutron dosimetry. The shape of the simulated detector response of the liquid scintillators agreed well with measurements on the proton beamline. Conclusion: Based on Geant4 and MCNPX-PoliMi simulations, the investigated materials appear to be suitable to study the production of neutrons in proton therapy. MC simulations were verified with neutron measurements in therapeutic proton beams. This work was funded in part by the ANDANTE grant of the European Commission in the 7th Framework Program.

  10. On the Equivalence of Trapped Colloids, Pinned Vortices, and Spin Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-04-23

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. The frustration of the two models, one describing colloids and vortices, the other describing spin ice, differs essentially. However, their effective energetics is made identical by the contribution of an emergent field associated to a topological charge. This equivalence extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, yet breaks down in lattices of mixed coordination, because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices.

  11. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO 2 concentration data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ogle, Stephen; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Schuh, Andrew E.; Cooley, Dan; West, Tristram O.; Heath, L.; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Breidt, F. Jay; et al

    2015-03-10

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country‚Äôs contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Verification could include a variety of evidence, but arguably the most convincing verification would be confirmation of a change in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere that is consistent with reported emissions to the UNFCCC. We report here on a case study evaluating this option based on a prototype atmospheric CO2 measurement network deployed in the Mid-Continent Region of themore¬†¬Ľ conterminous United States. We found that the atmospheric CO2 measurement data did verify the accuracy of the emissions inventory within the confidence limits of the emissions estimates, suggesting that this technology could be further developed and deployed more widely in the future for verifying reported emissions.¬ę¬†less

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory facilities radionuclide inventory assessment CY 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sula, M.J.; Jette, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    Assessments for evaluating compliance with airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subparts H and I) were performed for 33 buildings at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory on the Hanford Site, and for five buildings owned and operated by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, Washington. The assessments were performed using building radionuclide inventory data obtained in 1992 and 1993. Results of the assessments are summarized in Table S.1 for DOE-PNL buildings and in Table S.2 for Battelle-owned buildings. Based on the radionuclide inventory assessments, four DOE-PNL buildings (one with two emission points) require continuous sampling for radionuclides per 40 CFR 61. None of the Battelle-owned buildings require continuous emission sampling.

  13. Dismantling of the PETRA glove box: tritium contamination and inventory assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, R.

    2015-03-15

    The PETRA facility is the first installation in which experiments with tritium were carried out at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe. After completion of two main experimental programs, the decommissioning of PETRA was initiated with the aim to reuse the glove box and its main still valuable components. A decommissioning plan was engaged to: -) identify the source of tritium release in the glove box, -) clarify the status of the main components, -) assess residual tritium inventories, and -) de-tritiate the components to be disposed of as waste. Several analytical techniques - calorimetry on small solid samples, wipe test followed by liquid scintillation counting for surface contamination assessment, gas chromatography on gaseous samples - were deployed and cross-checked to assess the remaining tritium inventories and initiate the decommissioning process. The methodology and the main outcomes of the numerous different tritium measurements are presented and discussed. (authors)

  14. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  15. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program. Inventory of federally funded CFCC R&D projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richlen, S.; Caton, G.M.; Karnitz, M.A.; Cox, T.D.; Hong, W.

    1993-05-01

    Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) are a new class of materials that are lighter, stronger, more corrosion resistant, and capable of performing at elevated temperatures. This new type of material offers the potential to meet the demands of a variety of industrial, military, and aerospace applications. The Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) has a new program on CFCCs for industrial applications and this program has requested an inventory of all federal projects on CFCCs that relate to their new program. The purpose of this project is to identify all other ongoing CFCC research to avoid redundancy in the OIT Program. The inventory will be used as a basis for coordinating with the other ongoing ceramic composite projects. The inventory is divided into two main parts. The first part is concerned with CFCC supporting technologies projects and is organized by the categories listed below. (1) Composite Design; (2) Materials Characterization; (3) Test Methods; (4) Non-Destructive Evaluation; (5) Environmental Effects; (6) Mechanical Properties; (7) Database Life Prediction; (8) Fracture/Damage; and (9) Joining. The second part has information on component development, fabrication, and fiber-related projects.

  16. Lineal energy calibration of mini tissue-equivalent gas-proportional counters (TEPC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conte, V.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Grosswendt, B.

    2013-07-18

    Mini TEPCs are cylindrical gas proportional counters of 1 mm or less of sensitive volume diameter. The lineal energy calibration of these tiny counters can be performed with an external gamma-ray source. However, to do that, first a method to get a simple and precise spectral mark has to be found and then the keV/{mu}m value of this mark. A precise method (less than 1% of uncertainty) to identify this markis described here, and the lineal energy value of this mark has been measured for different simulated site sizes by using a {sup 137}Cs gamma source and a cylindrical TEPC equipped with a precision internal {sup 244}Cm alpha-particle source, and filled with propane-based tissue-equivalent gas mixture. Mini TEPCs can be calibrated in terms of lineal energy, by exposing them to {sup 137}Cesium sources, with an overall uncertainty of about 5%.

  17. An equivalent circuit model and power calculations for the APS SPX crab cavities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berenc, T. )

    2012-03-21

    An equivalent parallel resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit with beam loading for a polarized TM110 dipole-mode cavity is developed and minimum radio-frequency (rf) generator requirements are calculated for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) short-pulse x-ray (SPX) superconducting rf (SRF) crab cavities. A beam-loaded circuit model for polarized TM110 mode crab cavities was derived. The single-cavity minimum steady-state required generator power has been determined for the APS SPX crab cavities for a storage ring current of 200mA DC current as a function of external Q for various vertical offsets including beam tilt and uncontrollable detuning. Calculations to aid machine protection considerations were given.

  18. Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory (CEQ, 1980)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) procedures are designed to assist federal officials in complying with the President's directive to protect rivers in the Nationwide Inventory through the normal environmental analysis process.

  19. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  20. Lean-burn hydrogen spark-ignited engines: the mechanical equivalent to the fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Fuel cells are considered as the ideal power source for future vehicles, due to their high efficiency and low emissions. However, extensive use of fuel cells in light-duty vehicles is likely to be years away, due to their high manufacturing cost. Hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited, homogeneous-charge engines offer a near-term alternative to fuel cells. Hydrogen in a spark-ignited engine can be burned at very low equivalence ratios, so that NO[sub x] emissions can be reduced to less than 10 ppm without catalyst. HC and CO emissions may result from oxidation of engine oil, but by proper design are negligible (a few ppm). Lean operation also results in increased indicated efficiency due to the thermodynamic properties of the gaseous mixture contained in the cylinder. The high effective octane number of hydrogen allows the use of a high compression ratio, further increasing engine efficiency. In this paper, a simplified engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many 1345 experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. The experimental data are used to adjust the empirical constants in the heat release rate and heat transfer correlation. The adjusted engine model predicts pressure traces, indicated efficiency and NO,, emissions with good accuracy over the range of speed, equivalence ratio and manifold pressure experimentally covered.

  1. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Lloyd A.; Paresol, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report ďSRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping ReportĒ, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  2. DOSE ASSESSMENT OF THE FINAL INVENTORIES IN CENTER SLIT TRENCHES ONE THROUGH FIVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collard, L.; Hamm, L.; Smith, F.

    2011-05-02

    In response to a request from Solid Waste Management (SWM), this study evaluates the performance of waste disposed in Slit Trenches 1-5 by calculating exposure doses and concentrations. As of 8/19/2010, Slit Trenches 1-5 have been filled and are closed to future waste disposal in support of an ARRA-funded interim operational cover project. Slit Trenches 6 and 7 are currently in operation and are not addressed within this analysis. Their current inventory limits are based on the 2008 SA and are not being impacted by this study. This analysis considers the location and the timing of waste disposal in Slit Trenches 1-5 throughout their operational life. In addition, the following improvements to the modeling approach have been incorporated into this analysis: (1) Final waste inventories from WITS are used for the base case analysis where variance in the reported final disposal inventories is addressed through a sensitivity analysis; (2) Updated K{sub d} values are used; (3) Area percentages of non-crushable containers are used in the analysis to determine expected infiltration flows for cases that consider collapse of these containers; (4) An updated representation of ETF carbon column vessels disposed in SLIT3-Unit F is used. Preliminary analyses indicated a problem meeting the groundwater beta-gamma dose limit because of high H-3 and I-129 release from the ETF vessels. The updated model uses results from a recent structural analysis of the ETF vessels indicating that water does not penetrate the vessels for about 130 years and that the vessels remain structurally intact throughout the 1130-year period of assessment; and (5) Operational covers are included with revised installation dates and sets of Slit Trenches that have a common cover. With the exception of the modeling enhancements noted above, the analysis follows the same methodology used in the 2008 PA (WSRC, 2008) and the 2008 SA (Collard and Hamm, 2008). Infiltration flows through the vadose zone are identical to the flows used in the 2008 PA, except for flows during the operational cover time period. The physical (i.e., non-geochemical) models of the vadose zone and aquifer are identical in most cases to the models used in the 2008 PA. However, the 2008 PA assumed a uniform distribution of waste within each Slit Trench (WITS Location) and assumed that the entire inventory of each trench was disposed of at the time the first Slit Trench was opened. The current analysis considers individual trench excavations (i.e., segments) and groups of segments (i.e., Inventory Groups also known as WITS Units) within Slit Trenches. Waste disposal is assumed to be spatially uniform in each Inventory Group and is distributed in time increments of six months or less between the time the Inventory Group was opened and closed.

  3. 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  4. Investigation of critical equivalence ratio and chemical speciation in flames of ethylbenzene-ethanol blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therrien, Richard J.; Ergut, Ali; Levendis, Yiannis A.; Richter, Henning; Howard, Jack B.; Carlson, Joel B.

    2010-02-15

    This work investigates five different one-dimensional, laminar, atmospheric pressure, premixed ethanol/ethylbenzene flames (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 90% ethanol by weight) at their soot onset threshold ({phi}{sub critical}). Liquid ethanol/ethylbenzene mixtures were pre-vaporized in nitrogen, blended with an oxygen-nitrogen mixture and, upon ignition, burned in premixed one-dimensional flames at atmospheric pressure. The flames were controlled so that each was at its visual soot onset threshold, and all had similar temperature profiles (determined by thermocouples). Fixed gases, light volatile hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons were directly sampled at three locations in each flame. The experimental results were compared with a detailed kinetic model, and the modeling results were used to perform a reaction flux analysis of key species. The critical equivalence ratio was observed to increase in a parabolic fashion as ethanol concentration increased in the fuel mixture. The experimental results showed increasing trends of methane, ethane, and ethylene with increasing concentrations of ethanol in the flames. Carbon monoxide was also seen to increase significantly with the increase of ethanol in the flame, which removes carbon from the PAH and soot formation pathways. The PAH and oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbon values were very similar in the 0%, 25% and 50% ethanol flames, but significantly lower in the 75% and 90% ethanol flames. These results were in general agreement with the model and were reflected by the model soot predictions. The model predicted similar soot profiles for the 0%, 25% and 50% ethanol flames, however it predicted significantly lower values in the 75% and 90% ethanol flames. The reaction flux analysis revealed benzyl to be a major contributor to single and double ring aromatics (i.e., benzene and naphthalene), which was identified in a similar role in nearly sooting or highly sooting ethylbenzene flames. The presence of this radical was significantly reduced as ethanol concentration was increased in the flames, and this effect in combination with the lower carbon to oxygen ratios and the enhanced formation of carbon monoxide, are likely what allowed higher equivalence ratios to be reached without forming soot. (author)

  5. Electrically detected magnetic resonance modeling and fitting: An equivalent circuit approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leite, D. M. G.; Batagin-Neto, A.; Nunes-Neto, O.; Gůmez, J. A.; Graeff, C. F. O.

    2014-01-21

    The physics of electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) quadrature spectra is investigated. An equivalent circuit model is proposed in order to retrieve crucial information in a variety of different situations. This model allows the discrimination and determination of spectroscopic parameters associated to distinct resonant spin lines responsible for the total signal. The model considers not just the electrical response of the sample but also features of the measuring circuit and their influence on the resulting spectral lines. As a consequence, from our model, it is possible to separate different regimes, which depend basically on the modulation frequency and the RC constant of the circuit. In what is called the high frequency regime, it is shown that the sign of the signal can be determined. Recent EDMR spectra from Alq{sub 3} based organic light emitting diodes, as well as from a-Si:H reported in the literature, were successfully fitted by the model. Accurate values of g-factor and linewidth of the resonant lines were obtained.

  6. On the equivalence of the RTI and SVM approaches to time correlated analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Croft, S.; Favalli, A.; Henzlova, D.; Santi, P. A.

    2014-11-21

    Recently two papers on how to perform passive neutron auto-correlation analysis on time gated histograms formed from pulse train data, generically called time correlation analysis (TCA), have appeared in this journal [1,2]. For those of us working in international nuclear safeguards these treatments are of particular interest because passive neutron multiplicity counting is a widely deployed technique for the quantification of plutonium. The purpose of this letter is to show that the skewness-variance-mean (SVM) approach developed in [1] is equivalent in terms of assay capability to the random trigger interval (RTI) analysis laid out in [2]. Mathematically we could alsomore¬†¬Ľ use other numerical ways to extract the time correlated information from the histogram data including for example what we might call the mean, mean square, and mean cube approach. The important feature however, from the perspective of real world applications, is that the correlated information extracted is the same, and subsequently gets interpreted in the same way based on the same underlying physics model.¬ę¬†less

  7. A New Equivalence Theory Method for Treating Doubly Heterogeneous Fuel - II. Verifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Kong, Chidong; Lee, Deokjung; Williams, Mark L.

    2015-03-09

    A new methodology has been developed recently to treat resonance self-shielding in systems for which the fuel compact region of a reactor lattice consists of small fuel grains dispersed in a graphite matrix. The theoretical development adopts equivalence theory in both micro- and macro-level heterogeneities to provide approximate analytical expressions for the shielded cross sections, which may be interpolated from a table of resonance integrals or Bondarenko factors using a modified background cross section as the interpolation parameter. This paper describes the first implementation of the theoretical equations in a reactor analysis code. In order to reduce discrepancies caused by use of the rational approximation for collision probabilities in the original derivation, a new formulation for a doubly heterogeneous Bell factor is developed in this paper to improve the accuracy of doubly heterogeneous expressions. This methodology is applied to a wide range of pin cell and assembly test problems with varying geometry parameters, material compositions, and temperatures, and the results are compared with continuous-energy Monte Carlo simulations to establish the accuracy and range of applicability of the new approach. It is shown that the new doubly heterogeneous self-shielding method including the Bell factor correction gives good agreement with reference Monte Carlo results.

  8. A New Equivalence Theory Method for Treating Doubly Heterogeneous Fuel - I. Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark L.; Lee, Deokjung; Choi, Sooyoung

    2015-03-04

    A new methodology has been developed to treat resonance self-shielding in doubly heterogeneous very high temperature gas-cooled reactor systems in which the fuel compact region of a reactor lattice consists of small fuel grains dispersed in a graphite matrix. This new method first homogenizes the fuel grain and matrix materials using an analytically derived disadvantage factor from a two-region problem with equivalence theory and intermediate resonance method. This disadvantage factor accounts for spatial self-shielding effects inside each grain within the framework of an infinite array of grains. Then the homogenized fuel compact is self-shielded using a Bondarenko method to account for interactions between the fuel compact regions in the fuel lattice. In the final form of the equations for actual implementations, the double-heterogeneity effects are accounted for by simply using a modified definition of a background cross section, which includes geometry parameters and cross sections for both the grain and fuel compact regions. With the new method, the doubly heterogeneous resonance self-shielding effect can be treated easily even with legacy codes programmed only for a singly heterogeneous system by simple modifications in the background cross section for resonance integral interpolations. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the new method and a sensitivity study of double-heterogeneity parameters introduced during the derivation. The implementation of the method and verification results for various test cases are presented in the companion paper.

  9. A New Equivalence Theory Method for Treating Doubly Heterogeneous Fuel - II. Verifications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Kong, Chidong; Lee, Deokjung; Williams, Mark L.

    2015-03-09

    A new methodology has been developed recently to treat resonance self-shielding in systems for which the fuel compact region of a reactor lattice consists of small fuel grains dispersed in a graphite matrix. The theoretical development adopts equivalence theory in both micro- and macro-level heterogeneities to provide approximate analytical expressions for the shielded cross sections, which may be interpolated from a table of resonance integrals or Bondarenko factors using a modified background cross section as the interpolation parameter. This paper describes the first implementation of the theoretical equations in a reactor analysis code. In order to reduce discrepancies caused bymore†Ľuse of the rational approximation for collision probabilities in the original derivation, a new formulation for a doubly heterogeneous Bell factor is developed in this paper to improve the accuracy of doubly heterogeneous expressions. This methodology is applied to a wide range of pin cell and assembly test problems with varying geometry parameters, material compositions, and temperatures, and the results are compared with continuous-energy Monte Carlo simulations to establish the accuracy and range of applicability of the new approach. It is shown that the new doubly heterogeneous self-shielding method including the Bell factor correction gives good agreement with reference Monte Carlo results.ę†less

  10. A New Equivalence Theory Method for Treating Doubly Heterogeneous Fuel - I. Theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, Mark L.; Lee, Deokjung; Choi, Sooyoung

    2015-03-04

    A new methodology has been developed to treat resonance self-shielding in doubly heterogeneous very high temperature gas-cooled reactor systems in which the fuel compact region of a reactor lattice consists of small fuel grains dispersed in a graphite matrix. This new method first homogenizes the fuel grain and matrix materials using an analytically derived disadvantage factor from a two-region problem with equivalence theory and intermediate resonance method. This disadvantage factor accounts for spatial self-shielding effects inside each grain within the framework of an infinite array of grains. Then the homogenized fuel compact is self-shielded using a Bondarenko method to accountmore†Ľfor interactions between the fuel compact regions in the fuel lattice. In the final form of the equations for actual implementations, the double-heterogeneity effects are accounted for by simply using a modified definition of a background cross section, which includes geometry parameters and cross sections for both the grain and fuel compact regions. With the new method, the doubly heterogeneous resonance self-shielding effect can be treated easily even with legacy codes programmed only for a singly heterogeneous system by simple modifications in the background cross section for resonance integral interpolations. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the new method and a sensitivity study of double-heterogeneity parameters introduced during the derivation. The implementation of the method and verification results for various test cases are presented in the companion paper.ę†less

  11. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This project had three major objectives. The first objective was to develop a fossil fuel combustion source inventory (NO/sub x/, SO/sub x/, and hydrocarbon emissions) that would be relatively easy to use and update for analyzing the impact of combustion emissions on acid deposition in the eastern United States. The second objective of the project was to use the inventory data as a basis for selection of a number of areas that, by virtue of their importance in the acid rain issue, could be further studied to assess the impact of local and intraregional combustion sources. The third objective was to conduct an analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in the areas under study, along with pertinent physical characteristics, meteorological conditions, and emission patterns of these areas, to investigate probable relationships between local and intraregional combustion sources and the deposition of acidic material. The combustion source emissions inventory has been developed for the eastern United States. It characterizes all important area sources and point sources on a county-by-county basis. Its design provides flexibility and simplicity and makes it uniquely useful in overall analysis of emission patterns in the eastern United States. Three regions with basically different emission patterns have been identified and characterized. The statistical analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in conjunction with emission patterns, wind direction, and topography has produced consistent results for each study area and has demonstrated that the wet deposition in each area reflects the characteristics of the localized area around the monitoring sites (typically 50 to 150 miles). 8 references, 28 figures, 39 tables.

  12. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  13. Inventory of current environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glantz, C.S.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Chapman, E.G.

    1986-05-01

    This document presents the results of a study commissioned to survey and summarize major environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region. Projects with field sites located within 400 km (250 mi) of the border and active after 1980 were reviewed. The types of projects included: ambient air-quality monitoring, ambient water-quality monitoring, deposition monitoring, forest/vegetation monitoring and research, soil studies, and ecosystem studies. Ecosystem studies included projects involving the measurement of parameters from more than one monitoring category (e.g., studies that measured both water and soil chemistry). Individual descriptions were formulated for 184 projects meeting the spatial and temporal criteria. Descriptions included the official title for the project, its common abbreviation, program emphasis, monitoring site locations, time period conducted, parameters measured, protocols employed, frequency of sample collection, data storage information, and the principal contact for the project. A summary inventory subdivided according to the six monitoring categories was prepared using a computerized data management system. Information on major centralized data bases in the field of environmental monitoring was also obtained, and summary descriptions were prepared. The inventory and data base descriptions are presented in appendices to this document.

  14. Emissions inventory report summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for calendar year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory’s potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2008. LANL’s 2008 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  15. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Stockton

    2005-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), ''Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements''. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2004. LANL's 2004 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  16. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Environmental Stewardship Group

    2010-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2009. LANL's 2009 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  17. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2007-09-28

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. Modification Number 1 to this Title V Operating Permit was issued on June 15, 2006 (Permit No P-100M1) and includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2006. LANL's 2006 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  18. Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2014-05-15

    The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8?MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6?◊?10{sup 13} and ?0.3?g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.

  19. Package Equivalent Reactor Networks as Reduced Order Models for Use with CAPE-OPEN Compliant Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeks, E.; Chou, C. -P.; Garratt, T.

    2013-03-31

    Engineering simulations of coal gasifiers are typically performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, where a 3-D representation of the gasifier equipment is used to model the fluid flow in the gasifier and source terms from the coal gasification process are captured using discrete-phase model source terms. Simulations using this approach can be very time consuming, making it difficult to imbed such models into overall system simulations for plant design and optimization. For such system-level designs, process flowsheet software is typically used, such as Aspen Plus¬ģ [1], where each component where each component is modeled using a reduced-order model. For advanced power-generation systems, such as integrated gasifier/gas-turbine combined-cycle systems (IGCC), the critical components determining overall process efficiency and emissions are usually the gasifier and combustor. Providing more accurate and more computationally efficient reduced-order models for these components, then, enables much more effective plant-level design optimization and design for control. Based on the CHEMKIN-PRO and ENERGICO software, we have developed an automated methodology for generating an advanced form of reduced-order model for gasifiers and combustors. The reducedorder model offers representation of key unit operations in flowsheet simulations, while allowing simulation that is fast enough to be used in iterative flowsheet calculations. Using high-fidelity fluiddynamics models as input, Reaction Design‚Äôs ENERGICO¬ģ [2] software can automatically extract equivalent reactor networks (ERNs) from a CFD solution. For the advanced reduced-order concept, we introduce into the ERN a much more detailed kinetics model than can be included practically in the CFD simulation. The state-of-the-art chemistry solver technology within CHEMKIN-PRO allows that to be accomplished while still maintaining a very fast model turn-around time. In this way, the ERN becomes the basis for high-fidelity kinetics simulation, while maintaining the spatial information derived from the geometrically faithful CFD model. The reduced-order models are generated in such a way that they can be easily imported into a process flowsheet simulator, using the CAPE-OPEN architecture for unit operations. The ENERGICO/CHEMKIN-PRO software produces an ERN-definition file that is read by a dynamically linked library (DLL) that can be easily linked to any CAPE-OPEN compliant software. The plug-in unitoperation module has been successfully demonstrated for complex ERNs of coal gasifiers, using both Aspen Plus and COFE process flowsheet simulators through this published CAPE-OPEN interface.

  20. 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 19)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2011-06-01

    This 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 19) provides water use information (monthly annual average and total annual volume) for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2010. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and abandoned (decommissioned) wells and holes. Five new wells were drilled and completed in the latter part of Calendar Years 2009 and 2010. Two wells were modified in Calendar Year 2010 and 66 wells and boreholes reported as abandoned (decommissioned). Detailed construction information for the new and modified wells, along with abandonment information for older wells, is provided. Location maps are provided if survey information was available. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990) and the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003.

  1. Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1996. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress; Federal and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 as amended.

  2. Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1997. The publication also provides a 10-yr outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress; Federal and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  3. Inventory of power plants in the United States as of January 1, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States provides annual statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the US (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of January 1, 1998. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions and generating unit changes. This report is prepared annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience. This is a report of electric utility data; in cases where summary data or nonconfidential data of nonutilities are presented, it is specifically noted as nonutility data. 19 figs., 36 tabs.

  4. Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactorsí spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

  5. Assessment of Fleet Inventory for Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. Task 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schey, Stephen; Francfort, Jim

    2015-06-01

    Task 1includes a survey of the inventory of non-tactical fleet vehicles at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI) to characterize the fleet. This information and characterization are used to select vehicles for monitoring that takes place during Task 2. This monitoring involves data logging of vehicle operation in order to identify the vehicleís mission and travel requirements. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to PEV adoption. It also identifies whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively referred to as PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements and provide observations related to placement of PEV charging infrastructure. This report provides the results of the assessments and observations of the current non-tactical fleet, fulfilling the Task 1 requirements.

  6. Electric Vehicle Preparedness: Task 1, Assessment of Fleet Inventory for Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schey, Stephen; Francfort, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Several U.S. Department of Defense-based studies were conducted to identify potential U.S. Department of Defense transportation systems that are strong candidates for introduction or expansion of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). Task 1 included a survey of the inventory of non-tactical fleet vehicles at the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune (MCBCL) to characterize the fleet. This information and characterization will be used to select vehicles for monitoring that takes place during Task 2. This monitoring involves data logging of vehicle operation in order to identify the vehicleís mission and travel requirements. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to PEV adoption. It also identifies whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively referred to as PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements and provides observations related to placement of PEV charging infrastructure.

  7. LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY ANALYSIS IN THE PRODUCTION OF METALS USED IN PHOTOVOLTAICS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FTHENAKIS,V.M.; KIM, H.C.; WANG, W.

    2007-03-30

    Material flows and emissions in all the stages of production of zinc, copper, aluminum, cadmium, indium, germanium, gallium, selenium, tellurium, and molybdenum were investigated. These metals are used selectively in the manufacture of solar cells, and emission and energy factors in their production are used in the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of photovoltaics. Significant changes have occurred in the production and associated emissions for these metals over the last 10 years, which are not described in the LCA databases. Furthermore, emission and energy factors for several of the by-products of the base metal production were lacking. This report aims in updating the life-cycle inventories associated with the production of the base metals (Zn, Cu, Al, Mo) and in defining the emission and energy allocations for the minor metals (Cd, In, Ge, Se, Te and Ga) used in photovoltaics.

  8. 2014 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 23)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike

    2015-06-01

    This 2014 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 23) provides water use information for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2014. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and decommissioned wells and holes. One new well was drilled and completed in Calendar Year 2014. No modifications were performed on any wells. No wells were decommissioned in Calendar Year 2014. Detailed construction information and a location map for the new well is provided. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990), the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003, and the Final Unified Decree issued August 26, 2014.

  9. 2013 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 22)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-06-01

    This 2013 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 22) provides water use information for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2013. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and decommissioned wells and holes. Two new wells were drilled and completed in Calendar Year 2013. No modifications were performed on any wells. Seven wells were decommissioned in Calendar Year 2013. Detailed construction information for the new and decommissioned wells is provided. Location maps are included, provided survey information was available. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990) and the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003.

  10. Tagging CO2 to Enable Quantitative Inventories of Geological Carbon Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackner, Klaus; Matter, Juerg; Park, Ah-Hyung; Stute, Martin; Carson, Cantwell; Ji, Yinghuang

    2014-06-30

    In the wake of concerns about the long term integrity and containment of sub-surface CO2 sequestration reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification, and accounting methods for geo-sequestered CO2. Our project aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a system designed to tag CO2 with carbon isotope 14C immediately prior to sequestration to a level that is normal on the surface (one part per trillion). Because carbon found at depth is naturally free of 14C, this tag would easily differentiate pre-existing carbon from anthropogenic injected carbon and provide an excellent handle for monitoring its whereabouts in the subsurface. It also creates an excellent handle for adding up anthropogenic carbon inventories. Future inventories in effect count 14C atoms. Accordingly, we have developed a 14C tagging system suitable for use at the part-per-trillion level. This system consists of a gas-exchange apparatus to make disposable cartridges ready for controlled injection into a fast flowing stream of pressurized CO2. We built a high-pressure injection and tagging system, and a 14C detection system. The disposable cartridge and injection system have been successfully demonstrated in the lab with a high-pressure flow reactor, as well as in the field at the CarbFix CO2 sequestration site in Iceland. The laser-based 14C detection system originally conceived has been shown to possess inadequate sensitivity for ambient levels. Alternative methods for detecting 14C, such as saturated cavity absorption ringdown spectroscopy and scintillation counting, may still be suitable. KEYWORDS

  11. Evaluating atmospheric CO2 inversions at multiple scales over a highly-inventoried agricultural landscape.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuh, Andrew E.; Lauvaux, Thomas; West, Tristram O.; Denning, A.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Uliasz, Marek; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Cooley, Dan; Andrews, Arlyn; Ogle, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    An intensive regional research campaign was conducted by the North American Carbon Program (NACP) in 2005 to study the carbon cycle of the highly productive agricultural regions of the Midwestern United States. Forty-_ve di_erent associated projects were spawned across _ve U.S. agencies over the course of nearly a decade involving hundreds of researchers. The primary objective of the project was to investigate the ability of atmospheric inversion techniques to use highly calibrated CO2 mixing ratio data to estimate CO2 exchange over the major croplands of the U.S. Statistics from densely monitored crop production, consisting primarily corn and soybeans, provided the backbone of a well-studied\\bottom up"flux estimate that was used to evaluate the atmospheric inversion results. Three different inversion systems, representing spatial scales varying from high resolution mesoscale, to continental, to global, coupled to different transport models and optimization techniques were compared to the bottom up" inventory estimates. The mean annual CO2-C sink for 2007 from the inversion systems ranged from 120 TgC to 170 TgC, when viewed across a wide variety of inversion setups, with the best" point estimates ranging from 145 TgC to 155 TgC. Inversion-based mean C sink estimates were generally slightly stronger, but statistically indistinguishable,from the inventory estimate whose mean C sink was 135 TgC. The inversion results showed temporal correlations at seasonal lengths while week to week correlations remained low. Comparisons were made between atmospheric transport yields of the two regional inversion systems, which despite having different influence footprints in space and time due to differences in underlying transport models and external forcings, showed similarity when aggregated in space and time.

  12. Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

    1994-12-01

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

  13. INVENTORY AND DESCRIPTION OF COMMERCIAL REACTOR FUELS WITHIN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.

    2011-03-31

    There are currently 104 nuclear reactors in 31 states, operated by 51 different utilities. Operation of these reactors generates used fuel assemblies that require storage prior to final disposition. The regulatory framework within the United States (U.S.) allows for the licensing of used nuclear fuel storage facilities for an initial licensing period of up to 40 years with potential for license extensions in 40 years increments. Extended storage, for periods of up to 300 years, is being considered within the U.S. Therefore, there is an emerging need to develop the technical bases to support the licensing for long-term storage. In support of the Research and Development (R&D) activities required to support the technical bases, a comprehensive assessment of the current inventory of used nuclear fuel based upon publicly available resources has been completed that includes the most current projections of used fuel discharges from operating reactors. Negotiations with the nuclear power industry are ongoing concerning the willingness of individual utilities to provide information and material needed to complete the R&D activities required to develop the technical bases for used fuel storage for up to 300 years. This report includes a status of negotiations between DOE and industry in these regards. These negotiations are expected to result in a framework for cooperation between the Department and industry in which industry will provide and specific information on used fuel inventory and the Department will compensate industry for the material required for Research and Development and Testing and Evaluation Facility activities.

  14. Lithium-ion battery cell-level control using constrained model predictive control and equivalent circuit models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xavier, MA; Trimboli, MS

    2015-07-01

    This paper introduces a novel application of model predictive control (MPC) to cell-level charging of a lithium-ion battery utilizing an equivalent circuit model of battery dynamics. The approach employs a modified form of the MPC algorithm that caters for direct feed-though signals in order to model near-instantaneous battery ohmic resistance. The implementation utilizes a 2nd-order equivalent circuit discrete-time state-space model based on actual cell parameters; the control methodology is used to compute a fast charging profile that respects input, output, and state constraints. Results show that MPC is well-suited to the dynamics of the battery control problem and further suggest significant performance improvements might be achieved by extending the result to electrochemical models. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MODIFYING A 60 YEAR OLD STACK SAMPLING SYSTEM TO MEET ANSI N13.1-1999 EQUIVALENCY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2006-06-14

    The 291-T-1 stack was constructed in 1944 to support ongoing missions associated with the Hanford Project. Recent changes in the plant mission required a revision to the existing license of the stack that was operating as a minor emission unit. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington Department of Health (WDOH) deemed this revision to be a significant modification, thereby requiring the stack to operate to the ANSI N13.1-1999 sampling and monitoring requirements. Because the stack is similar to other stacks on the Hanford site, allowance was made by EPA to demonstrate equivalency to the ANSI standard via calculations in lieu of actual testing. Calculations were allowed for determining the deposition, nozzle transmission and aspiration ratios, but measurements were required for the stack flow coefficient of variation (COV). The equivalency determination was to be based on the requirements of Table 6 of the ANSI N13.1-1999 Standard.

  16. Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing: Supplemental Report on Penetration Software Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Costyk, D.; Narang, A.

    2005-03-01

    This report supplements the July 2003 report ''Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing'' (NREL/SR-560-33909). The original report presented methods for calculating penetration limits for distributed energy resources interconnected with distribution circuits of utility-owned electric power systems. This report describes the algorithms required to develop application software to calculate penetration limits. The original report can be found at http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy03osti/33909.pdf.

  17. Regional scale cropland carbon budgets: evaluating a geospatial agricultural modeling system using inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Sahajpal, Ritvik; West, Tristram O.; Thomson, Allison M.; Xu, Min; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification and clear understanding of regional scale cropland carbon (C) cycling is critical for designing effective policies and management practices that can contribute toward stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, extrapolating site-scale observations to regional scales represents a major challenge confronting the agricultural modeling community. This study introduces a novel geospatial agricultural modeling system (GAMS) exploring the integration of the mechanistic Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model, spatially-resolved data, surveyed management data, and supercomputing functions for cropland C budgets estimates. This modeling system creates spatially-explicit modeling units at a spatial resolution consistent with remotely-sensed crop identification and assigns cropping systems to each of them by geo-referencing surveyed crop management information at the county or state level. A parallel computing algorithm was also developed to facilitate the computationally intensive model runs and output post-processing and visualization. We evaluated GAMS against National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported crop yields and inventory estimated county-scale cropland C budgets averaged over 2000Ė2008. We observed good overall agreement, with spatial correlation of 0.89, 0.90, 0.41, and 0.87, for crop yields, Net Primary Production (NPP), Soil Organic C (SOC) change, and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), respectively. However, we also detected notable differences in the magnitude of NPP and NEE, as well as in the spatial pattern of SOC change. By performing crop-specific annual comparisons, we discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies between GAMS and the inventory method, such as data requirements, representation of agroecosystem processes, completeness and accuracy of crop management data, and accuracy of crop area representation. Based on these analyses, we further discuss strategies to improve GAMS by updating input data and by designing more efficient parallel computing capability to quantitatively assess errors associated with the simulation of C budget components. The modularized design of the GAMS makes it flexible to be updated and adapted for different agricultural models so long as they require similar input data, and to be linked with socio-economic models to understand the effectiveness and implications of diverse C management practices and policies.

  18. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 As of As of December 31, 2013 December 31, 2014 2015 45,498 48,206 2,708 2,708 2016 48,693 46,529 -2,164 544 2017 47,005 49,924 2,919 3,463 2018 52,138 51,169 -969 2,494 2019 50,041 46,184 -3,857 -1,363 2020 49,726 49,598 -128 -1,491 2021 50,455 51,793 1,338 -153 2022 49,320 50,286 966 813 2023 49,688 49,118 -570 243 2024 - 51,829 -- -- thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent Cumulative Figure 14. Shipments

  19. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 13, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Deliveries 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Foreign purchases 24,985 19,318 20,196 23,233 24,199 Weighted-average price 41.30 48.80 46.80 43.25 39.13 Foreign purchases 30,362 35,071 36,037 34,095 34,404 Weighted-average price 51.69 56.87 54.08 51.64 47.62 Foreign purchases 55,347 54,388 56,233 57,328 58,603 Weighted-average price 47.01 54.00 51.44 48.24 44.11 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent Figure 17.

  20. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. Deliveries of uranium feed by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by enrichment country and delivery year, 2012-14 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Feed deliveries in 2012 Feed deliveries in 2013 Feed deliveries in 2014 Enrichment country U.S.-origin Foreign-origin Total U.S.-origin Foreign-origin Total U.S.-origin Foreign-origin Total China 0 W W 0 W W W W W France 0 4,578 4,578 0 1,606 1,606 0 3.055 3,055 Germany W W 1,904 W W W W W 2,140 Netherlands W W 2,674 1,058

  1. On equivalence of high temperature series expansion and coupling parameter series expansion in thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sai Venkata Ramana, A.

    2014-04-21

    The coupling parameter series expansion and the high temperature series expansion in the thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids are shown to be equivalent if the interaction potential is pairwise additive. As a consequence, for the class of fluids with the potential having a hardcore repulsion, if the hard-sphere fluid is chosen as reference system, the terms of coupling parameter series expansion for radial distribution function, direct correlation function, and Helmholtz free energy follow a scaling law with temperature. The scaling law is confirmed by application to square-well fluids.

  2. New automated inventory/material accounting system (AIMAS) version for former Soviet Union countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzminski, Jozef; Ewing, Tom; Sakunov, Igor; Drapey, Sergey; Nations, Jim

    2009-01-01

    AIMAS (Automated Inventory/Material Accounting System) is a PC-based application for site-level nuclear material accountancy that was originally developed in the late 90's as a part of the U.S Department of Energy Assistance Program to Ukraine. Designed to be flexible and secure, plus place minimal demands on computing infrastructure, it was originally developed to run in early Windows operating system (OS) environments like W98 and W3.1. The development, support, and maintenance of AIMAS were transferred to Ukraine in 2002. Because it is highly flexible and can be configured to meet diverse end-user's needs, the software has been used at several facilities in Ukraine. Incorporating added functionality is planned to support nuclear installations in the Republic of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, as well. An improved 32-bit version of AIMAS has recently been developed to operate effectively on modern PCs running the latest Windows OS by AVIS, the Ukrainian developer. In the paper we discuss the status of AIMAS, plans for new functions, and describe the strategy for addressing a sustainable software life-cycle while meeting user requirements in multiple FSU countries.

  3. Inventory of Safety-Related Codes and Standards for Energy Storage Systems and Related Experiences with System Approval and Acceptance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PNNL-23618 Inventory of Safety-related Codes and Standards for Energy Storage Systems with some Experiences related to Approval and Acceptance DR Conover September 2014 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Energy Storage Program under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 i ii Summary Purpose The purpose of this document is to identify laws; rules; model codes; and codes, standards, regulations (CSR) specifications related to safety

  4. (Collection of data on tropical forest inventories, Rome, Italy, March 20--25, 1989): Foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.; Gillespie, A.

    1989-04-06

    All forestry information in the library of FAO was organized into country ''boxes,'' and all boxes for countries in tropical Asia and tropical America were searched for data on forest inventories. Information on location and extent of inventories and resulting stand and stock tables were obtained for (1) converting to biomass by using methods that were already developed and (2) calculating expansion factors (commercial volume to total biomass). This work was conducted by the University of Illinois (Drs. Sandra Brown, Principal Investigator, and Andrew Gillespie, Research Associate) for the Department of Energy's Energy Systems Program managed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The travelers were successful in obtaining copies of some data for most countries in tropical Asia and tropical America. Most of the inventories for Asia were for only parts of countries, whereas most in America were national in scale. With the information gathered, the travelers will be able to make biomass estimates, geographically referenced, for many forest types representing thousands of hectares in most countries in these two tropical regions.

  5. Integrated data base for 1993: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, J.A.; Storch, S.N.; Ashline, R.C.

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent fuel; also, commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1992. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest U.S. Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste (HLW), transuranic (TRU), waste, low-level waste (LLW), commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) LLW. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year (CY) 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal.

  6. Integrated Data Base report--1993: U.S. spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel; also, commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1993. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 256 refs., 38 figs., 141 tabs.

  7. Integrated Data Base for 1992: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payton, M. L.; Williams, J. T.; Tolbert-Smith, M.; Klein, J. A.

    1992-10-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1991. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal.

  8. Cesium-137 inventories in Alaskan Tundra, lake and marine sediments: An indicator of recent organic material transport?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grebmeier, J.M.; Cooper, L.W. |; Larsen, I.L.; Solis, C.; Olsen, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Tundra sampling was accomplished in 1989--1990 at Imnavait Creek, Alaska (68{degree}37` N, 149{degree}17` W). Inventories of {sup 137}Cs (102--162 mBq/cm{sup 2}) are close to expectations, based upon measured atmospheric deposition for this latitude. Accumulated inventories of {sup 137}Cs in tundra decrease by up to 50% along a transect to Prudhoe Bay (70{degree}13` N, 148{degree}30` W). Atmospheric deposition of {sup 137}Cs decreased with latitude in the Arctic, but declines in deposition would have been relatively small over this distance (200 km). This suggests a recent loss of {sup 137}Cs and possibly associated organic matter from tundra over the northern portions of the transect between Imnavait Creek and Prudhoe Bay. Sediments from Toolik Lake (68{degree}38` N, 149{degree}38` W) showed widely varying {sup 137}Cs inventories, from a low of 22 mBq/cm{sup 2} away from the lake inlet, to a high between 140 to >200 mBq/cm{sup 2} near the main stream inflow. This was indicative of recent accumulation of cesium and possibly organic material associated with it in arctic lakes, although additional sampling is needed.

  9. Development of a Life Cycle Inventory of Water Consumption Associated with the Production of Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, David J.; Cai, Hao; Wang, Zhichao; Keisman, Jennifer; Wu, May; Han, Jeongwoo; Dunn, Jennifer; Sullivan, John L.; Elgowainy, Amgad; Wang, Michael; Keisman, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    The production of all forms of energy consumes water. To meet increased energy demands, it is essential to quantify the amount of water consumed in the production of different forms of energy. By analyzing the water consumed in different technologies, it is possible to identify areas for improvement in water conservation and reduce water stress in energy-producing regions. The transportation sector is a major consumer of energy in the United States. Because of the relationships between water and energy, the sustainability of transportation is tied to management of water resources. Assessment of water consumption throughout the life cycle of a fuel is necessary to understand its water resource implications. To perform a comparative life cycle assessment of transportation fuels, it is necessary first to develop an inventory of the water consumed in each process in each production supply chain. The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is an analytical tool that can used to estimate the full life-cycle environmental impacts of various transportation fuel pathways from wells to wheels. GREET is currently being expanded to include water consumption as a sustainability metric. The purpose of this report was to document data sources and methodologies to estimate water consumption factors (WCF) for the various transportation fuel pathways in GREET. WCFs reflect the quantity of freshwater directly consumed per unit production for various production processes in GREET. These factors do not include consumption of precipitation or low-quality water (e.g., seawater) and reflect only water that is consumed (i.e., not returned to the source from which it was withdrawn). The data in the report can be combined with GREET to compare the life cycle water consumption for different transportation fuels.

  10. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W W W (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541

  11. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-14 Production / Mining method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Underground (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W W Open Pit (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching (thousand pounds U3O8) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W W W Other1 (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mine Production (thousand pounds U3O8) E2,200 2,452

  12. A discussion on the interpretation and characterization of metafilms/metasurfaces: the two-dimensional equivalent of metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'hara, John F; Azad, Abul K

    2008-01-01

    A metafilm (also referred to as a metasurface) is the surface equivalent of a metamaterial. More precisely, a metafilm is a surface distribution of suitable chosen electrically small scatterers. Metafilms are becoming popular as an alternative to full three-dimensional metamaterials. Unfortunately, many papers in the literature present incorrect interpretations and mischaracterizations of these metafilms. In fact, some of the characterizations presented in the literature result in non-unique parameters for a uniquely defined metafilm. In this paper we discuss an appropriate interpretation and characterization of metafilms and present a correct manner to characterize a metafilm. Additionally, we illustrate the error that results from an incorrect characterization of metafilms. We present various examples to emphasize these points. Finally we present a retrieval approach for determining the uniquely defined quantities (the electric and magnetic susceptibilities of its constituent scatterers) that characterize a metafilm.

  13. Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2013-07-09

    A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

  14. Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2010-2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Table B1. Summary statistics for natural gas in the United States, metric equivalents, 2010-2014 See footnotes at end of table. Number of Wells Producing at End of Year 487,627 514,637 482,822 R 484,994 514,786 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 375,127 348,044 354,080 R 304,676 294,045 From Oil Wells 165,220 167,294 140,617 R 153,044 167,695 From Coalbed Wells 54,277 50,377 43,591 R 40,374 36,392 From Shale Gas Wells 164,723 240,721 298,257 R 337,891 389,474

  15. Uranium-Loaded Water Treatment Resins: 'Equivalent Feed' at NRC and Agreement State-Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities - 12094

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camper, Larry W.; Michalak, Paul; Cohen, Stephen; Carter, Ted

    2012-07-01

    Community Water Systems (CWSs) are required to remove uranium from drinking water to meet EPA standards. Similarly, mining operations are required to remove uranium from their dewatering discharges to meet permitted surface water discharge limits. Ion exchange (IX) is the primary treatment strategy used by these operations, which loads uranium onto resin beads. Presently, uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be disposed as a waste product or processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities if that licensed facility has applied for and received permission to process 'alternate feed'. The disposal of uranium-loaded resin is costly and the cost to amend a uranium recovery license to accept alternate feed can be a strong disincentive to commercial uranium recovery facilities. In response to this issue, the NRC issued a Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) to clarify the agency's policy that uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities without the need for an alternate feed license amendment when these resins are essentially the same, chemically and physically, to resins that licensed uranium recovery facilities currently use (i.e., equivalent feed). NRC staff is clarifying its current alternate feed policy to declare IX resins as equivalent feed. This clarification is necessary to alleviate a regulatory and financial burden on facilities that filter uranium using IX resin, such as CWSs and mine dewatering operations. Disposing of those resins in a licensed facility could be 40 to 50 percent of the total operations and maintenance (O and M) cost for a CWS. Allowing uranium recovery facilities to treat these resins without requiring a license amendment lowers O and M costs and captures a valuable natural resource. (authors)

  16. Dose equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, Richard V. (Pleasanton, CA); Hankins, Dale E. (Livermore, CA); Tomasino, Luigi (Rome, IT); Gomaa, Mohamed A. M. (Heliopolis, EG)

    1983-01-01

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurements indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer containing conversion material such as .sup.6 Li and .sup.10 B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet. The density of conversion material in the radiator layer is of an amount which is chosen so that the density of tracks produced in the detecting sheet is proportional to the biological damage done by neutrons, regardless of whether the tracks are produced as the result of moderate energy neutrons striking the radiator layer or as the result of higher energy neutrons striking the sheet of track etch material.

  17. Establishing LED Equivalency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-10-01

    Solid-state lighting program technology fact sheet that provides guidance for comparing products based on LED or other light source technologies.

  18. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 1,066,366 1,134,473 1,250,012 1,356,709 1,608,148 1,717,894 1930-2015 Alabama 19,059 17,271 7,133 7,675 7,044 1969-2014 Alabama Onshore-Alabama 3,132 3,323 2012-2014 Alabama Offshore-Alabama 3,978 3,721 2012-2014 Alaska 20,835 21,554 21,470 20,679 18,434 1969-2014 Alaska Onshore 18,434

  19. EnergyEquivalents.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 1,066,366 1,134,473 1,250,012 1,356,709 1,608,148 1,717,894 1930-2015 Alabama 19,059 17,271 7,133 7,675 7,044 1969-2014 Alabama Onshore-Alabama 3,132 3,323 2012-2014 Alabama Offshore-Alabama 3,978 3,721 2012-2014 Alaska 20,835 21,554 21,470 20,679 18,434 1969-2014 Alaska Onshore 18,434

  1. GS Equivalency Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for General Schedule (i.e., annual) positions. The Chart provides guidance for Human Resource Specialists and Assistants in making qualification determinations when BPA...

  2. A fuel-based motor vehicle emission inventory for the San Francisco Bay area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D.R.; Singer, B.C.; Harley, R.A.; Martien, P.T.; Fanai, A.K.

    1997-12-31

    Traditionally, regional motor vehicle emission inventories (MVEI) have been estimated by combining travel demand model and emission factor model predictions. The accuracy of traditional MVEIs is frequently challenged, and development of independent methods for estimating vehicle emissions has been identified as a high priority for air quality research. In this study, an alternative fuel-based MVEI was developed for the San Francisco Bay Area using data from 1990--1992. To estimate CO emissions from motor vehicles in the Bay Area, estimates of gasoline sales were combined with infrared remote sensing measurements of CO and CO{sub 2} exhaust concentrations from over 10,000 light-duty vehicles in summer 1991. Once absolute estimates of CO emissions have been computed, it is possible to use ambient NO{sub x}/CO and NMOC/CO ratios from high traffic areas to estimate emissions for NO{sub x} and NMOC (excluding some resting loss and diurnal evaporative emissions). Ambient ratios were generated from special-study measurements of NMOC and CO in 1990 and 1992, and from routine sampling of NO{sub x} and CO in 1991. All pollutant concentrations were measured on summer mornings at Bay Area monitoring sites in areas with high levels of vehicle traffic and no other significant sources nearby. Stabilized CO emissions calculated by the fuel-based method for cars and light-duty trucks were 1720{+-}420 tons/day. This value is close to California`s MVEI 7G model estimates. Total on-road vehicle emissions of CO in the Bay Area were estimated to be 2900{+-}800 tons/day. Emissions of NMOC were estimated to be 570{+-}200 tons/day, which is 1.6{+-}0.6 times the value predicted by MVEI 7G. In the present study, emissions of NO{sub x} from on-road vehicles were estimated to be 250{+-}90 tons/day, which is 0.6{+-}0.2 times the value predicted by MVEI 7G.

  3. Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8, 2008 Page 1 of 8 Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Attendees: Representatives from Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff (NRC) met at the DOE offices in Germantown, Maryland on 28 May 2008. Representatives from Department of Energy- Savannah River (DOE-SR), Department of Energy-Richland (DOE-RL), and Department of Energy-River Protection (DOE-ORP)

  4. A reconsideration of the noise equivalent power and the data analysis procedure for the infrared imaging video bolometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandya, Shwetang N. Sano, Ryuichi; Peterson, Byron J.; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Pandya, Santosh P.

    2014-12-15

    The infrared imaging video bolometer (IRVB) used for measurement of the two-dimensional (2D) radiation profiles from the Large Helical Device has been significantly upgraded recently to improve its signal to noise ratio, sensitivity, and calibration, which ultimately provides quantitative measurements of the radiation from the plasma. The reliability of the quantified data needs to be established by various checks. The noise estimates also need to be revised and more realistic values need to be established. It is shown that the 2D heat diffusion equation can be used for estimating the power falling on the IRVB foil, even with a significant amount of spatial variation in the thermal diffusivity across the area of the platinum foil found experimentally during foil calibration. The equation for the noise equivalent power density (NEPD) is re-derived to include the errors in the measurement of the thermophysical and the optical properties of the IRVB foil. The theoretical value estimated using this newly derived equation matches closely, within 5.5%, with the mean experimental value. The change in the contribution of each error term of the NEPD equation with rising foil temperature is also studied and the blackbody term is found to dominate the other terms at elevated operating temperatures. The IRVB foil is also sensitive to the charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping from the plasma. The CX neutral contribution is estimated to be marginally higher than the noise equivalent power (NEP) of the IRVB. It is also established that the radiation measured by the IRVB originates from the impurity line radiation from the plasma and not from the heated divertor tiles. The change in the power density due to noise reduction measures such as data smoothing and averaging is found to be comparable to the IRVB NEPD. The precautions that need to be considered during background subtraction are also discussed with experimental illustrations. Finally, the analysis algorithm with all the improvements is validated and found to reproduce the input power well within 10% accuracy. This article answers many fundamental questions relevant to the IRVB and illustrates the care to be exercised while processing the IRVB data.

  5. SU-E-T-130: Dosimetric Evaluation of Tissue Equivalent Gel Dosimeter Using Saccharide in Radiotherapy System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Y; Lee, D; Jung, H; Ji, Y; Kim, K; Chang, U; Kwon, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, the dose responses of the MAGIC gel with various concentrations and type of saccharide are examined to clarify the roles of mono and disaccharide in the polymerization process. Then we focused on the tissue equivalence and dose sensitivity of MAGIC gel dosimeters. Methods: The gel is composed of HPLC, 8% gelatin, 2 ◊ 10-3 M L-ascorbic acid, 1.8 ◊ 10-2 M hydroquinone, 8 ◊ 10-5 M copper(II)sulfate and 9% methacrylic acid, new polymer gels are synthesized by adding glucose(monosaccharide), sucrose(disaccharide) and urea in the concentration range of 5?35%. For irradiation of the gel, cesium-137 gamma-ray irradiator was used, radiation dose was delivered from 5?50 Gy. MRI images of the gel were acquired by using a 3.0 T MRI system. Results: When saccharide and urea were added, the O/C, O/N and C/N ratios agreed with those of soft tissue with 1.7%. The dose-response of glucose and sucrose gel have slope-to-intercept ratio of 0.044 and 0.283 respectively. The slope-to-ratio is one important determinant of gel sensitivity. R-square values of glucose and sucrose gel dosimeters were 0.984 and 0.994 respectively. Moreover when urea were added, the slope-to-intercept ratio is 0.044 and 0.073 respectively. R-square values of mono and disaccharide gel were 0.973 and 0.989 respectively. When a saccharide is added into the MAGIC gel dosimeter, dose sensitivity is increased. However when urea were added, dose sensitivity is slightly decreased. Conclusion: In this study, it was possible to obtain the following conclusions by looking at the dose response characteristics after adding mono-, di-saccharide and urea to a MAGIC gel dosimeter. Saccharide was a tendency of increasing dose sensitivity with disaccharide. Sa.ccharide is cost effective, safe, soft tissue equivalent, and can be used under various experimental conditions, making it a suitable dosimeter for some radiotherapy applications.

  6. Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

    2005-09-30

    Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, the bu

  7. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)/Radioactive Waste Annual Inventory for Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, Deborah L.

    2015-06-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act, 40 CFR 761.65(a)(1) provides an exemption from the one year storage time limit for PCB/radioactive waste. PCB/radioactive waste may exceed the one year time limit provided that the provisions at 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(ii) and 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(iii) are followed. These two subsections require, (ii) "A written record documenting all continuing attempts to secure disposal is maintained until the waste is disposed of" and (iii) "The written record required by subsection (ii) of this section is available for inspection or submission if requested by EPA." EPA Region 10 has requested the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit an inventory of radioactive-contaminated PCB waste in storage at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the previous calendar year. The annual inventory is separated into two parts, INL without Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) (this includes Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, and the Naval Reactors Facility), and AMWTP.

  8. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)/Radioactive Waste Annual Inventory for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    no author on report

    2014-06-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act, 40 CFR 761.65(a)(1) provides an exemption from the one year storage time limit for PCB/radioactive waste. PCB/radioactive waste may exceed the one year time limit provided that the provisions at 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(ii) and 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(iii) are followed. These two subsections require, (ii) "A written record documenting all continuing attempts to secure disposal is maintained until the waste is disposed of" and (iii) "The written record required by subsection (ii) of this section is available for inspection or submission if requested by EPA." EPA Region 10 has requested the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit an inventory of radioactive-contaminated PCB waste in storage at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the previous calendar year. The annual inventory is separated into two parts, INL without Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) (this includes Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, and the Naval Reactors Facility), and AMWTP.

  9. Best available control technology (BACT) equivalent for the control of volatile organic emissions from paint dipping operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankenship, W.R.; Pugh, C.W. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides details of a study conducted to demonstrate an equivalent method of Best Available Control Technology (BACT) compliance for volatile organic emissions from dip coating of certain miscellaneous metal parts. The study was proposed to show that the total volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from 3.8 lb of VOC/gallon coating formulations were no greater than the total VOC emissions from 3.5 lb/gallon formulations used under the same conditions for coating steel joists. The presumptive BACT standard enforced by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for dip coating of steel joists is 3.5 lb/gallon. The requirement of 3.5 lb/gallon was derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency Guideline Series Control of Volatile Organic Emissions from Existing Stationary Sources--Volume 6: Surface Coating of Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products. On June 5, 1998 the source completed a 12 month, full scale comparison study under a consent order with the Virginia DEQ. During the study period, the source made daily measurements of product produced, paint used, and emissions from the control and test paint tanks, and reported data to EPA and the DEQ every two months. The study concluded that a 26 percent reduction in paint usage and a 20 percent reduction in emissions was achieved in the test tanks using a 3.8 lb/gal coating compared to the control tanks using a 3.5 lb/gal coating. This study enables the source to achieve greater emission reductions than the presumptive BACT level and at the same time reduce painting costs by 34%. This study provides positive results for the environment, the steel joist industry, and the construction industry. This study could impact EPA's current Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) rule development for Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products and national VOC rules for this source category under Section 183(e) of the Clean Air Act.

  10. International Assistance for Low-Emission Development Planning: Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Inventory of Activities and Tools--Preliminary Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, S.; Benioff, R.

    2011-05-01

    The Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) is a voluntary network of international practitioners supporting low-emission planning in developing countries. The network seeks to improve quality of support through sharing project information, tools, best practices and lessons, and by fostering harmonized assistance. CLEAN has developed an inventory to track and analyze international technical support and tools for low-carbon planning activities in developing countries. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the inventory to help identify trends in assistance activities and tools available to support developing countries with low-emission planning.

  11. U.S. Natural Gas System Methane Emissions: State of Knowledge from LCAs, Inventories, and Atmospheric Measurements (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G.

    2014-04-01

    Natural gas (NG) is a potential "bridge fuel" during transition to a decarbonized energy system: It emits less carbon dioxide during combustion than other fossil fuels and can be used in many industries. However, because of the high global warming potential of methane (CH4, the major component of NG), climate benefits from NG use depend on system leakage rates. Some recent estimates of leakage have challenged the benefits of switching from coal to NG, a large near-term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction opportunity. During this presentation, Garvin will review evidence from multiple perspectives - life cycle assessments (LCAs), inventories and measurements - about NG leakage in the US. Particular attention will be paid to a recent article in Science magazine which reviewed over 20 years of published measurements to better understand what we know about total methane emissions and those from the oil and gas sectors. Scientific and policy implications of the state of knowledge will be discussed.

  12. Draft Supplement Analysis for Location(s) to Dispose of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE'S Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR LOCATION(S) TO DISPOSE OF DEPLETED URANIUM OXIDE CONVERSION PRODUCT GENERATED FROM DOE'S INVENTORY OF DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE (DOE/EIS-0359-SA1 AND DOE/EIS-0360-SA1) March 2007 March 2007 i CONTENTS NOTATION........................................................................................................................... iv 1 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND ................................................................. 1 1.1 Why DOE Has Prepared This

  13. Measurement of the ambient gamma dose equivalent and kerma from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter and the small 60Co source at 2 meters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl, W. F.

    2015-07-30

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 100 cm from the 252Cf source and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 200 cm from the 60Co source for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). An Exradin A6 ion chamber with Shonka air-equivalent plastic walls in combination with a Supermax electrometer were used to measure the exposure rate and free-in-air kerma rate of the two sources at the requested distances. The measured gamma exposure, kerma, and dose equivalent rates are tabulated.

  14. Report for Westinghouse Hanford Company: Makeup procedures and characterization data for modified DSSF and modified remaining inventory simulated tank waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1996-03-01

    The majority of defense wastes generated from reprocessing spent reactor fuel at Hanford are stored in underground Double-Shell Tanks (DST) and in older Single-Shell Tanks (SST). The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program has the responsibility of safely managing and immobilizing these tank wastes for disposal. A reference process flowsheet is being developed that includes waste retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification. Melter technologies for vitrifying low-level tank wastes are being evaluated by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Chemical simulants are being used in the technology testing. For the first phase of low-level waste (LLW) vitrification simulant development, two waste stream compositions were investigated. The first waste simulant was based on the analyses of six tanks of double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) waste and on the projected composition of the wastes exiting the pretreatment operations. A simulant normalized to 6 M sodium was based on the anticipated chemical concentrations after ion exchange and initial separations. The same simulant concentrated to 10 M sodium would represent a waste that had been concentrated by evaporation to reduce the overall volume. The second LLW simulant, referred to as the remaining inventory (RI), included wastes not included in the DSSF tanks and the projected LLW fraction of single-shell tank wastes.

  15. final ERI-2142 18-1501 Analysis of Potential Effects on Domestic Industries of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory 2015-2024.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ERI-2142.18-1501 Analysis of the Potential Effects on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion and Enrichment Industries of the Introduction of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory During CY 2015 Through 2024 ENERGY RESOURCES INTERNATIONAL, INC. 1015 18 th Street, NW, Suite 650 Washington, DC 20036 USA Telephone: (202) 785-8833 Facsimile: (202) 785-8834 ERI-2142.18-1501 Analysis of the Potential Effects on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion and Enrichment Industries of the Introduction of DOE

  16. Use of system code to estimate equilibrium tritium inventory in fusion DT machines, such as ARIES-AT and components testing facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.P.C. Wong; B. Merrill

    2014-10-01

    ITER is under construction and will begin operation in 2020. This is the first 500 MWfusion class DT device, and since it is not going to breed tritium, it will consume most of the limited supply of tritium resources in the world. Yet, in parallel, DT fusion nuclear component testing machines will be needed to provide technical data for the design of DEMO. It becomes necessary to estimate the tritium burn-up fraction and corresponding initial tritium inventory and the doubling time of these machines for the planning of future supply and utilization of tritium. With the use of a system code, tritium burn-up fraction and initial tritium inventory for steady state DT machines can be estimated. Estimated tritium burn-up fractions of FNSF-AT, CFETR-R and ARIES-AT are in the range of 1Ė2.8%. Corresponding total equilibrium tritium inventories of the plasma flow and tritium processing system, and with the DCLL blanket option are 7.6 kg, 6.1 kg, and 5.2 kg for ARIES-AT, CFETR-R and FNSF-AT, respectively.

  17. Inventory of landslides in southern Illinois near the New Madrid Seismic Zone and the possible failure mechanism at three sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Wen June . Engineering Geology Section)

    1992-01-01

    A total of 221 landslides was inventoried along a 200-kilometer reach of the Ohio and the Mississippi Rivers from Olmsted to Chester, IL using Side-Looking Airborne Radar imagery, vertical, stereoscopic, black and white aerial photography at various scales, and low altitude, oblique color and color infrared photography. Features observed on aerial photographs were used to classify landslides into three types (rock/debris fall, block slide, and rotational/translational slide) at three levels of confidence: certain, probable, or possible. Some landslides combined two or more types at a single site. Only a few of the landslides showed evidence of repeated activity; most are ancient landforms. Most of the landslides were developed in the loess, alluvium, colluvium, and weak clay layers of the Chesterian Series or in the Porter's Creek Clay and McNairy Formation. Failure of three representative landslides was modeled under static (aseismic) and dynamic (seismic) situations using three different sliding mechanisms. Both the pseudo-static method and a simplified method of the Newmark displacement analysis were used to determine the stability of the slope under earthquake conditions. The three representative landslides selected for detailed slope stability analysis were the Ford Hill, Jones Ridge, and Olmsted landslides. The Ford Hill and Jones Ridge landslides have similar slope geometries. Their modes of failure were recognized as a translational block slide on a weak clay layer. The Olmsted landslide is a complex of several rotational slides of different ages and a mega block slide on weak clay layers. The stability analyses of these three landslides suggest that they would not have occurred under aseismic conditions. However, under earthquake loadings similar to those generated by the 1811-12 earthquakes, most of the slopes could have experienced large displacements leading to landslide initiation.

  18. FBP-DOE PPPO 17Aug2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to non-U.S. utilities * 50% of sales under mid and LT contracts, spot quantities very minimal * U3O8 and Conversion have sometimes been contracted separately 3 The DOE U barter ...

  19. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    b. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ranked by price and distributed by purchaser, 2012-14 deliveries thousand pounds U3O8...

  20. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2010-14 thousands pounds U3O8...

  1. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4. Deliveries of uranium feed for enrichment by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin country and delivery year, 2012-14 thousand pounds U3O8...

  2. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    a. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ranked by price and distributed by quantity, 2012-14 deliveries thousand pounds U3O8...

  3. Equivalence of ADM Hamiltonian and Effective Field Theory approaches at next-to-next-to-leading order spin1-spin2 coupling of binary inspirals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levi, Michele [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, Universitť Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS-UMR 7095, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Steinhoff, Jan, E-mail: michele.levi@upmc.fr, E-mail: jan.steinhoff@ist.utl.pt [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-12-01

    The next-to-next-to-leading order spin1-spin2 potential for an inspiralling binary, that is essential for accuracy to fourth post-Newtonian order, if both components in the binary are spinning rapidly, has been recently derived independently via the ADM Hamiltonian and the Effective Field Theory approaches, using different gauges and variables. Here we show the complete physical equivalence of the two results, thereby we first prove the equivalence of the ADM Hamiltonian and the Effective Field Theory approaches at next-to-next-to-leading order with the inclusion of spins. The main difficulty in the spinning sectors, which also prescribes the manner in which the comparison of the two results is tackled here, is the existence of redundant unphysical spin degrees of freedom, associated with the spin gauge choice of a point within the extended spinning object for its representative worldline. After gauge fixing and eliminating the unphysical degrees of freedom of the spin and its conjugate at the level of the action, we arrive at curved spacetime generalizations of the Newton-Wigner variables in closed form, which can also be used to obtain further Hamiltonians, based on an Effective Field Theory formulation and computation. Finally, we make use of our validated result to provide gauge invariant relations among the binding energy, angular momentum, and orbital frequency of an inspiralling binary with generic compact spinning components to fourth post-Newtonian order, including all known sectors up to date.

  4. Slowed demand ushers in summer season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This article is the June 1996 market summary in uranium market. During this reporting period, there were six deals in the U3O8 spot market and three long-term deals for U3O8. There were four deals for UF6 conversion, and the spot market for uranium separation services had no transactions. This was little change from the previous month`s activities, and this slowness was reflected in the price trends of little or no increase.

  5. Market review - market values summary/February market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This article is the February 1996 uranium market report. As reflected by the rising demand and decreasing supply of uranium, prices for UF6 and U3O8 increased. Separation services and conversion services prices remained constant. Data is presented for the recent trades, blocks or uranium for sale or loan, inquiries to purchase or borrow uranium, SWUs available and inquiries to purchase SWUs, and market values of U3O8 and UF6 expressed in selected currencies.

  6. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Table 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2014 Exploration and Development Surface Drilling Exploration and Development Drilling Expenditures 1 Mine Production of Uranium Uranium Concentrate Production Uranium Concentrate Shipments Employment Year (million feet) (million dollars) (million pounds U 3 O 8 ) (million pounds U 3 O 8 )

  7. Inventory Management Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Facilities/Property, (J1600) 1800 S. Rio Grande Avenue...

  8. Management of Fleet Inventory

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-27

    In fulfillment of Executive Order 13514, DOE began a 3-year, 3-phase strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and decrease petroleum use.

  9. The Inventory System

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Training Meeting Orlando, Florida-May 23-25, 2006 Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy & the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NM M SS NM M SS NM M SS NM M SS Database...

  10. STEM Education Program Inventory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    box to the right.)* Workforce Development Student Programs Public Engagement in Life Long Learning TeacherFaculty Prefessional Development Other Type of Program (Other) To select...

  11. Modeling global atmospheric CO2 with improved emission inventories and CO2 production from the oxidation of other carbon species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassar, Ray; Jones, DBA; Suntharalingam, P; Chen, j.; Andres, Robert Joseph; Wecht, K. J.; Yantosca, R. M.; Kulawik, SS; Bowman, K; Worden, JR; Machida, T; Matsueda, H

    2010-01-01

    The use of global three-dimensional (3-D) models with satellite observations of CO2 in inverse modeling studies is an area of growing importance for understanding Earth s carbon cycle. Here we use the GEOS-Chem model (version 8-02-01) CO2 mode with multiple modifications in order to assess their impact on CO2 forward simulations. Modifications include CO2 surface emissions from shipping (0.19 PgC yr 1), 3-D spatially-distributed emissions from aviation (0.16 PgC yr 1), and 3-D chemical production of CO2 (1.05 PgC yr 1). Although CO2 chemical production from the oxidation of CO, CH4 and other carbon gases is recognized as an important contribution to global CO2, it is typically accounted for by conversion from its precursors at the surface rather than in the free troposphere. We base our model 3-D spatial distribution of CO2 chemical production on monthly-averaged loss rates of CO (a key precursor and intermediate in the oxidation of organic carbon) and apply an associated surface correction for inventories that have counted emissions of CO2 precursors as CO2. We also explore the benefit of assimilating satellite observations of CO into GEOS-Chem to obtain an observation-based estimate of the CO2 chemical source. The CO assimilation corrects for an underestimate of atmospheric CO abundances in the model, resulting in increases of as much as 24% in the chemical source during May June 2006, and increasing the global annual estimate of CO2 chemical production from 1.05 to 1.18 Pg C. Comparisons of model CO2 with measurements are carried out in order to investigate the spatial and temporal distributions that result when these new sources are added. Inclusion of CO2 emissions from shipping and aviation are shown to increase the global CO2 latitudinal gradient by just over 0.10 ppm (3%), while the inclusion of CO2 chemical production (and the surface correction) is shown to decrease the latitudinal gradient by about 0.40 ppm (10%) with a complex spatial structure generally resulting in decreased CO2 over land and increased CO2 over the oceans. Since these CO2 emissions are omitted or misrepresented in most inverse modeling work to date, their implementation in forward simulations should lead to improved inverse modeling estimates of terrestrial biospheric fluxes.

  12. Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

    2013-10-10

    A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHG- emitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 ?m) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

  13. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR DOE STANDARD 3013 EQUIVALENCY SUPPORTING REDUCED TEMPERATURE STABILIZATION OF OXALATE-DERIVED PLUTONIUM OXIDE PRODUCED BY THE HB-LINE FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Berg, J.; Veirs, D.

    2012-07-02

    The HB-Line (HBL) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is designed to produce high-purity plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) which is suitable for future use in production of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. The MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) requires PuO{sub 2} feed to be packaged per the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3013 (DOE-STD-3013) to comply with the facility's safety basis. The stabilization conditions imposed by DOE-STD-3013 for PuO{sub 2} (i.e., 950 C for 2 hours) preclude use of the HBL PuO{sub 2} in direct fuel fabrication and reduce the value of the HBL product as MFFF feedstock. Consequently, HBL initiated a technical evaluation to define acceptable operating conditions for production of high-purity PuO{sub 2} that fulfills the DOE-STD-3013 criteria for safe storage. The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that within the defined operating conditions, the HBL process will be equivalent for meeting the requirements of the DOE-STD-3013 stabilization process for plutonium-bearing materials from the DOE complex. The proposed 3013 equivalency reduces the prescribed stabilization temperature for high-purity PuO{sub 2} from oxalate precipitation processes from 950 C to 640 C and places a limit of 60% on the relative humidity (RH) at the lowest material temperature. The equivalency is limited to material produced using the HBL established flow sheet, for example, nitric acid anion exchange and Pu(IV) direct strike oxalate precipitation with stabilization at a minimum temperature of 640 C for four hours (h). The product purity must meet the MFFF acceptance criteria of 23,600 {micro}g/g Pu (i.e., 2.1 wt %) total impurities and chloride content less than 250 {micro}g/g of Pu. All other stabilization and packaging criteria identified by DOE-STD-3013-2012 or earlier revisions of the standard apply. Based on the evaluation of test data discussed in this document, the expert judgment of the authors supports packaging the HBL product under a 3013 equivalency. Under the defined process conditions and associated material specifications, the high-purity PuO{sub 2} produced in HBL presents no unique safety concerns for packaging or storage in the 3013 required configuration. The PuO{sub 2} produced using the HBL flow sheet conditions will have a higher specific surface area (SSA) than PuO{sub 2} stabilized at 950 C and, consequently, under identical conditions will adsorb more water from the atmosphere. The greatest challenge to HBL operators will be controlling moisture content below 0.5 wt %. However, even at the 0.5 wt % moisture limit, the maximum acceptable pressure of a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and oxygen in the 3013 container is greater than the maximum possible pressure for the HBL PuO{sub 2} product.

  14. SU-E-T-411: Characterization of Novel Water-Equivalent PRESAGE for Megavoltage and Kilovoltage X-Ray Beam Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alqathami, M; Ibbott, G; Blencowe, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To introduce and characterize novel water-equivalent PRESAGE dosimeters for megavoltage and kilovoltage X-ray beam dosimetry. Methods: Three novel metal-optimized PRESAGE dosimeters referred to as MO-PRESAGE 1, 2 and 3 were formulated. The radiological properties were key factors that were considered when formulating the new dosimeters. All formulations were prepared in spectrophotometric cuvettes, irradiated with a 6 MV X-ray beam, and the change in optical density was measured using a spectrophotometer. Their sensitivity, post-response stability, and water equivalency were investigated. Results: The results showed that all three formulations exhibited radiological properties closer to water than any of the commercially available PRESAGE formulations. For example, the novel MO-PRESAGE 1, 2 and 3 have mass densities only 3.9-4.4% higher than that of water, whereas the mass density for the commercial formulation is 5.3% higher. The novel formulations have almost identical Zeff values to that of water (7.42), while the Zeff for the commercial formulation was 3.7% higher than that of water. In addition, the MO-PRESAGE 3 formulation showed mass and energy attenuation coefficients that deviated from those of water by less than 50% relative to the commercial formulation. Furthermore, the reduced Zeff of the three different MOPRESAGE formulations resulted in a maximum variation in the probability of photoelectric absorption of 1.3 times than of water, compared to 1.8 times that of water for the commercial formulation. MO-PRESAGE 3 was also more sensitive to radiation than the other two new formulations introduced in this work due to the presence of alkylbromide radical initiators in the MO-PRESAGE 3 formulation. Conclusion: All three novel MOPRESAGE dosimeter formulations displayed excellent radiological properties, superior to any of the commercially available PRESAGE formulations and thus can be used for the dosimetry of clinical megavoltage and kilovoltage X-ray beams.

  15. Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 3. Inventories of some long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides associated with lagoon surface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.

    1997-12-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected during 1979 from 87 locations in the lagoon at Bikini Atoll. The collections were made to better define the concentrations and distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred to the composition of the surface sediment from the nuclear testing program conducted by the United States at the Atoll between 1946 and 1958. This is the last of three reports on Bikini sediment studies. In this report, we discuss the concentrations and inventories of the residual long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides in sediments from the lagoon. The gamma-emitting radionuclides detected most frequently in sediments collected in 1979, in addition to Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) (discussed in the second report of this series), included Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), Bismuth-207 ({sup 207}Bi), Europium-155 ({sup 155}Eu), and Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Other man-made, gamma-emitting radionuclides such as Europium-152,154 ({sup 152,154}Eu), Antimony-125 ({sup 125}Sb), and Rhodium-101,102m ({sup 101,102m}Rh) were occasionally measured above detection limits in sediments near test site locations. The mean inventories for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 207}Ei, {sup 155}Eu, and {sup 60}Co in the surface 4 cm of the lagoon sediment to be 1.7, 0.56, 7.76, and 0.74 TBq, respectively. By June 1997, radioactive decay would reduce these values to 1.1, 0.38, 0.62, and 0.07 TBq, respectively. Some additional loss results from a combination of different processes that continuously mobilize and return some amount of the radionuclides to the water column. The water and dissolved constituents are removed from the lagoon through channels and exchange with the surface waters of the north equatorial Pacific Ocean. Highest levels of these radionuclides are found in surface deposits lagoonward of the Bravo Crater. Lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with sediment lagoonward of the eastern reef. The quantities in the 0-4 cm surface layer are estimated to be less than 35% of the total inventory to depth in the sediment column.

  16. US Department of Energy interim mixed waste inventory report: Waste streams, treatment capacities and technologies: Volume 4, Site specific---Ohio through South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to provide an inventory of its mixed wastes and treatment capacities and technologies in response to Section 105(a) of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) of 1992 (Pub. L. No. 102-386). As required by the FFCAct-1992, this report provides site-specific information on DOE`s mixed waste streams and a general review of available and planned treatment facilities for mixed wastes at the following five Ohio facilities: Battelle Columbus Laboratories; Fernald Environmental Management Project; Mound Plant; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and RMI, Titanium Company.

  17. Dose-equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, R.V.; Hankins, D.E.; Tomasino, L.; Gomaa, M.A.M.

    1981-01-07

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurement indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer contaning conversion material such as /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet.

  18. 2004 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Stockton

    2006-01-15

    Section 313 of Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. For reporting year 2004, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds, nitric acid, and nitrate compounds as required under the EPCRA Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2004 above the reportable thresholds. This document provides a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2004, as well as background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  19. 1998 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marjorie B. Stockton

    1999-11-01

    The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) of 1986 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA), Title III], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires that all federal facilities evaluate the need to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report as prescribed in Title III, Section 313 of this Act. This annual report is due every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators who manufacture, process, or otherwise use certain toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), no EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 1998 above the reportable threshold limits of 10,000 lb or 25,000 lb. Therefore LANL was not required to submit any Toxic Chemical Release Inventory reports (Form Rs) for 1998. This document was prepared to provide a detailed description of the evaluation on chemical usage and EPCRA Section 313 threshold determinations for LANL for 1998.

  20. High quality HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb(001) metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with 0.8?nm equivalent oxide thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Michael; Datta, Suman; Bruce Rayner, G.; McDonnell, Stephen; Wallace, Robert M.; Bennett, Brian R.; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2014-12-01

    We investigate in-situ cleaning of GaSb surfaces and its effect on the electrical performance of p-type GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) using a remote hydrogen plasma. Ultrathin HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition were used as a high permittivity gate dielectric. Compared to conventional ex-situ chemical cleaning methods, the in-situ GaSb surface treatment resulted in a drastic improvement in the impedance characteristics of the MOSCAPs, directly evidencing a much lower interface trap density and enhanced Fermi level movement efficiency. We demonstrate that by using a combination of ex-situ and in-situ surface cleaning steps, aggressively scaled HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb MOSCAP structures with a low equivalent oxide thickness of 0.8?nm and efficient gate modulation of the surface potential are achieved, allowing to push the Fermi level far away from the valence band edge high up into the band gap of GaSb.

  1. Soil concentration, vertical distribution and inventory of plutonium, [sup 241]Am, [sup 90]Sr and [sup 137]Cs in the Marche Region of Central Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, G.; Testa, C.; Desideri, D.; Guerra, F.; Meli, M.A.; Roselli, C. . Inst. of General Chemistry); Belli, M.E. )

    1999-07-01

    Soil concentrations of [sup 239+240]Pu, [sup 238]Pu, [sup 241]Am, [sup 90]Sr, and [sup 137]Cs are investigated in the Marche Region of Central Italy. Mean values in uncultivated soils are 3.5--8 times higher than the corresponding values in cultivated soils. Radionuclide inventories and ratios are consistent with values reported by the United nations Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation for this latitude. This suggests that radiocontamination in this region is mainly due to atmospheric deposition of nuclear weapon test fallout. The vertical distribution of these radionuclides is also studied. The results show that, with the exception of [sup 90]Sr, more than 90% of these radionuclides are contained in the first 20 cm of soil and that mobility follows the order [sup 90]Sr > [sup 241]Am > [sup 239+240]Pu, [sup 238]Pu > [sup 137]Cs.

  2. Emissions Inventory Report Summary Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Air Quality Group, ESH-17

    1999-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is subject to emissions reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The Laboratory has the potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, and volatile organic compounds. For 1998, combustion products from the industrial sources contributed the greatest amount of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory. Research and development activities contributed the greatest amount of volatile organic compounds. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20 NMAC 2.72 Construction Permits.

  3. Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margorie Stockton

    2003-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is subject to annual emissions-reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. For calendar year 2001, the Technical Area 3 steam plant was the primary source of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory, while research and development activities were the primary source of volatile organic compounds. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20.2.72 NMAC. Hazardous air pollutant emissions from chemical use for research and development activities were also reported.

  4. Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is subject to emissions reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73, (20 NMAC 2.73), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The Laboratory has the potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). For 1997, combustion products from the industrial sources contributed the greatest amount of regulated air emissions from the Laboratory. Research and development activities contributed the greatest amount of VOCs. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20 NMAC 2.72, Construction Permits.

  5. 1997 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heather McBride

    1997-07-01

    The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (EPCIL4), Title III, Section 313 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA)], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires all federal facilities to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators of manufacturing, processing, or production facilities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), nitric acid was the only toxic chemical used in 1997 that met the reportable threshold limit of 10,000 lb. Form R is the only documentation required by the Environmental Protection Agency, and it is included in the appendix of this report. This report, as requested by DOE, is provided for documentation purposes. In addition, a detailed description of the evaluation and reporting process for chemicals and processes at LANL has been included.

  6. 2002 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Stockton

    2003-11-01

    For reporting year 2002, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds and mercury as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2002 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical usage and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2002 as well as provide background information about the data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999 EPA promulgated a final rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable under EPCRA Section 313. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  7. 2006 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group (ENV-EAQ)

    2007-12-12

    For reporting year 2006, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2006 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2006, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  8. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, M; Pollard, J; Wen, Z; Gao, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam.

  9. A Cultural Resources Inventory and Historical Evaluation of the Smoky Atmospheric Nuclear Test, Areas 8, 9, and 10, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Robert C.; King, Maureen L.; Beck, Colleen M.; Falvey, Lauren W.; Menocal, Tatianna M.

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the results of a National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 cultural resources inventory and historical evaluation of the 1957 Smoky atmospheric test location on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Desert Research Institute (DRI) was tasked to conduct a cultural resources study of the Smoky test area as a result of a proposed undertaking by the Department of Energy Environmental Management. This undertaking involves investigating Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 for potential contaminants of concern as delineated in a Corrective Action Investigation Plan. CAU 550 is an area that spatially overlaps portions of the Smoky test location. Smoky, T-2c, was a 44 kt atmospheric nuclear test detonated at 5:30 am on August 31, 1957, on top of a 213.4 m (700 ft) 200 ton tower (T-2c) in Area 8 of the NNSS. Smoky was a weapons related test of the Plumbbob series (number 19) and part of the Department of Defense Exercise Desert Rock VII and VIII. The cultural resources effort involved the development of a historic context based on archival documents and engineering records, the inventory of the cultural resources in the Smoky test area and an associated military trench location in Areas 9 and 10, and an evaluation of the National Register eligibility of the cultural resources. The inventory of the Smoky test area resulted in the identification of structures, features, and artifacts related to the physical development of the test location and the post-test remains. The Smoky test area was designated historic district D104 and coincides with a historic archaeological site recorded as 26NY14794 and the military trenches designed for troop observation, site 26NY14795. Sites 26NY14794 and 26NY14795 are spatially discrete with the trenches located 4.3 km (2.7 mi) southeast of the Smoky ground zero. As a result, historic district D104 is discontiguous and in total it covers 151.4 hectares (374 acres). The Smoky test location, recorded as historic district D104 and historic sites 26NY14794 and 26NY14795, is the best preserved post-shot atmospheric nuclear tower test at the NNSS and possibly in the world. It is of local, national, and international importance due to nuclear testing’s pivotal role in the Cold War between the United States and the former Soviet Union. The district and sites are linked to the historic theme of atmospheric nuclear testing. D104 retains aspects of the engineering plan and design for the Smoky tower, instrument stations used to measure test effects, German and French personnel shelters, and military trenches. A total of 33 structures contribute to the significance of D104. Artifacts and features provide significant post-test information. Historic district D104 (discontiguous) and historic site 26NY14794 (the Smoky test area) are eligible for listing on the NRHP under Criteria A, B, C, and D. The historic site 26NY14795 (the Smoky military trenches) is eligible for listing under Criteria A, C, and D. Several items have been identified for removal by the CAU 550 investigation. However, none of them is associated with the Smoky atmospheric test, but with later activities in the area. The military trenches are not part of CAU 550 and no actions are planned there. A proposed closure of the Smoky test area with restrictions will limit access and contribute to the preservation of the cultural resources. It is recommended that the Smoky historic district and sites be included in the NNSS cultural resources monitoring program.

  10. Life cycle inventory analysis of regenerative thermal oxidation of air emissions from oriented strand board facilities in Minnesota - a perspective of global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    Life cycle inventory analysis has been applied to the prospective operation of regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology at oriented strand board plants at Bemidji (Line 1) and Cook, Minnesota. The net system destruction of VOC`s and carbon monoxide, and at Cook a small quantity of particulate, has a very high environmental price in terms of energy and water use, global warming potential, sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions, solids discharged to water, and solid waste deposited in landfills. The benefit of VOC destruction is identified as minor in terms of ground level ozone at best and possibly slightly detrimental. Recognition of environmental tradeoffs associated with proposed system changes is critical to sound decision-making. There are more conventional ways to address carbon monoxide emissions than combustion in RTO`s. In an environment in which global warming is a concern, fuel supplemental combustion for environmental control does not appear warranted. Consideration of non-combustion approaches to address air emission issues at the two operations is recommended. 1 ref., 5 tabs.

  11. Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC) for Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Stockton

    2005-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is subject to annual emissions-reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. For calendar year 2003, the Technical Area 3 steam plant and the air curtain destructors were the primary sources of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory, while the air curtain destructors and chemical use associated with research and development activities were the primary sources of volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20.2.72 NMAC. Hazardous air pollutant emissions were reported from chemical use as well as from all combustion sources. In addition, estimates of particulate matter with diameter less than 2.5 micrometers and ammonia were provided as requested by the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau.

  12. Radionuclide inventories : ORIGEN2.2 isotopic depletion calculation for high burnup low-enriched uranium and weapons-grade mixed-oxide pressurized-water reactor fuel assemblies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Ross, Kyle W.; Smith, James Dean; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory computer code, ORIGEN2.2 (CCC-371, 2002), was used to obtain the elemental composition of irradiated low-enriched uranium (LEU)/mixed-oxide (MOX) pressurized-water reactor fuel assemblies. Described in this report are the input parameters for the ORIGEN2.2 calculations. The rationale for performing the ORIGEN2.2 calculation was to generate inventories to be used to populate MELCOR radionuclide classes. Therefore the ORIGEN2.2 output was subsequently manipulated. The procedures performed in this data reduction process are also described herein. A listing of the ORIGEN2.2 input deck for two-cycle MOX is provided in the appendix. The final output from this data reduction process was three tables containing the radionuclide inventories for LEU/MOX in elemental form. Masses, thermal powers, and activities were reported for each category.

  13. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 3, Site team reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    A self assessment was conducted of those Hanford facilities that are utilized to store Reactor Irradiated Nuclear Material, (RINM). The objective of the assessment is to identify the Hanford inventories of RINM and the ES & H concerns associated with such storage. The assessment was performed as proscribed by the Project Plan issued by the DOE Spent Fuel Working Group. The Project Plan is the plan of execution intended to complete the Secretary`s request for information relevant to the inventories and vulnerabilities of DOE storage of spent nuclear fuel. The Hanford RINM inventory, the facilities involved and the nature of the fuel stored are summarized. This table succinctly reveals the variety of the Hanford facilities involved, the variety of the types of RINM involved, and the wide range of the quantities of material involved in Hanford`s RINM storage circumstances. ES & H concerns are defined as those circumstances that have the potential, now or in the future, to lead to a criticality event, to a worker radiation exposure event, to an environmental release event, or to public announcements of such circumstances and the sensationalized reporting of the inherent risks.

  14. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2014 Year Exploration and development surface drilling (million feet) Exploration and development drilling expenditures 1 (million dollars) Mine production of uranium (million pounds U3O8) Uranium concentrate production (million pounds U3O8) Uranium concentrate shipments (million pounds U3O8) Employment (person-years) 1993 1.1 5.7 2.1 3.1 3.4 871 1994 0.7 1.1 2.5 3.4 6.3 980 1995 1.3 2.6 3.5 6.0 5.5 1,107 1996 3.0 7.2 4.7 6.3

  15. Critical Materials Institute - course inventory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimations and limitations of reserves, and their sociological, political, and economic effects. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.-I. (I.) Verosub

  16. ...

  17. Records Inventory Data Collection Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    DATALINK was created to provide an easy to use data collection program for records management software products. It provides several useful tools for capturing and validating record index data in the field. It also allows users to easily create a comma delimited, ASCII text file for data export into most records management software products.

  18. CLEAN Inventory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Union (EU) United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Argentina...

  19. FY 2014 Service Contract Inventory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Contracts that do not include special interest functions, but were awarded on a non-competitive basis; and Tier 4: Contracts that do not include special interest...

  20. FY 2013 Service Contract Inventory ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Department of Energy 4 Section 2: Methodology The DOE and NNSA approach was performed ... DOE and NNSA took the following steps in the process of its analysis: Step 1: The ...

  21. DATA SHARING REPORT CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE PROJECT MISCELLANEOUS PROCESS INVENTORY WASTE ITEMS OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, Oak Ridge TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to provide technical and independent waste management planning support under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign to target certain items associated with URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) process inventory waste. Eight populations of historical and reoccurring S&M waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been identified in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012) for evaluation and processing for final disposal. This waste was generated during processing, surveillance, and maintenance activities associated with the facilities identified in the process knowledge (PK) provided in Appendix A. A list of items for sampling and analysis were generated from a subset of materials identified in the WHP populations (POPs) 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, plus a small number of items not explicitly addressed by the WHP. Specifically, UCOR S&M project personnel identified 62 miscellaneous waste items that would require some level of evaluation to identify the appropriate pathway for disposal. These items are highly diverse, relative to origin; composition; physical description; contamination level; data requirements; and the presumed treatment, storage, and disposal facility (TSDF). Because of this diversity, ORAU developed a structured approach to address item-specific data requirements necessary for acceptance in a presumed TSDF that includes the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF)óusing the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profileóthe Y-12 Sanitary Landfill (SLF) if appropriate; EnergySolutions Clive; and the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (ORAU 2013b). Finally, the evaluation of these wastes was more suited to a judgmental sampling approach rather than a statistical design, meaning data were collected for each individual item, thereby providing information for item-byitem disposition decisions. ORAU prepared a sampling and analysis plan (SAP) that outlined data collection strategies, methodologies, and analytical guidelines and requirements necessary for characterizing targeted items (ORAU 2013b). The SAP described an approach to collect samples that allowed evaluation as to whether or not the waste would be eligible for disposal at the EMWMF. If the waste was determined not to be eligible for EMWMF disposal, then there would be adequate information collected that would allow the waste to be profiled for one of the alternate TSDFs listed above.

  1. Two-dimensional [sup 1]H-NMR EXSY study of the fluxional behavior of the novel carbenium ion complex [FvMo[sub 2](CO)[sub 4]([mu],[eta][sup 2],[eta][sup 3]-MeC[equivalent to]CCH[sub 2])][BF[sub 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amouri, H.E.; Besace, Y.; Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Ball, G.E. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Vaissermann, J. )

    1993-03-01

    The title compound [FuMo[sub 2](CO)[sub 4]([mu],[eta][sup 2],[eta][sup 3]-MeC[equivalent to]CCH[sub 2])][BF[sub 4

  2. Information related to low-level mixed waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, B.D.; Dolak, D.A.; Wang, Y.Y.; Meshkov, N.K.

    1996-12-01

    This report was prepared to support the analysis of risks and costs associated with the proposed treatment of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) under management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The various waste management alternatives for treatment of LLMW have been defined in the DOE`s Office of Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. This technical memorandum estimates the waste material throughput expected at each proposed LLMW treatment facility and analyzes potential radiological and chemical releases at each DOE site resulting from treatment of these wastes. Models have been developed to generate site-dependent radiological profiles and waste-stream-dependent chemical profiles for these wastes. Current site-dependent inventories and estimates for future generation of LLMW have been obtained from DOE`s 1994 Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR-2). Using treatment procedures developed by the Mixed Waste Treatment Project, the MWIR-2 database was analyzed to provide waste throughput and emission estimates for each of the different waste types assessed in this report. Uncertainties in the estimates at each site are discussed for waste material throughputs and radiological and chemical releases.

  3. Designating Responsibility for Equivalencies or Exemptions from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (PPPO); Jack R. Craig, Director, Consolidated Business Center Ohio (CBC); James R. Cooper, Deputy Manager for Idaho Cleanup Project (ID); Susan M. Cange, Assistant Manager for...

  4. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent at Processing Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NA 2012-2012 Colorado 53,590 67,607 82,637 90,801 81,943 1967-2012 Florida 22 0 0 0 0 1968-2012 Illinois 42 31 345 1,043 0 1967-2012 Indiana 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2012 Kansas 28,302...

  5. Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    been revised several times. The purpose of this Memorandum is to provide guidance, Attachment 1, to Qualifying Officials (QO) on how to use the cross-walk, Attachment 2, in...

  6. Property:Equivalent URI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    anenergysolutions.orgcontent2010-vehicle-technologies-market-report + A A Compendium of Utility-Sponsored Energy-Efficient Rebate Programs + http:cleanenergysolutions.org...

  7. Time-temperature equivalence in Martensite tempering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackenberg, Robert E.; Thomas, Grant A.; Speer, John G.; Matlock, David K.; Krauss, George

    2008-06-16

    The relationship between time and temperature is of great consequence in many materials-related processes including the tempering of martensite. In 1945, Hollomon and Jaffe quantified the 'degree of tempering' as a function of both tempering time, t, and tempering temperature, T, using the expression, T(log t + c). Here, c is thought to be a material constant and appears to decrease linearly with increasing carbon content. The Hollomon-Jaffe tempering parameter is frequently cited in the literature. This work reviews the original derivation of the tempering parameter concept, and presents the use of the characteristics diffusion distance as an alternative time-temperature relationship during martensite tempering. During the tempering of martensite, interstitial carbon atoms diffuse to form carbides. In addition, austenite decomposes, dislocations and grain boundaries rearrange, associated with iron self diffusion. Since these are all diffusional processes, it is reasonable to expect the degree of tempering to relate to the extent of diffusion.

  8. Commercial considerations in conversion and UF{sub 6} transactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-02-01

    This article addresses various commercial considerations that result from the conversion of U3O8 into UF6 and the associated physical characteristics of natural UF6. Handling, transport, conversion, and enrichment of UF6 are discussed. Avenues of acquisition, including nation of origin, are also noted.

  9. U. S. monthly coal production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. U.S. Uranium Reserves by Forward-Cost Category, Year-End 1993-2008 (Million Pounds U3O8) Year Forward-cost Category Up to 30 per pound Up to 50 per pound Up to 100 per pound...

  10. Transuranic waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Folga, S.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

    1996-12-01

    Transuranic waste (TRUW) loads and potential contaminant releases at and en route to treatment, storage, and disposal sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex are important considerations in DOE`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Waste loads are determined in part by the level of treatment the waste has undergone and the complex-wide configuration of origination, treatment, storage, and disposal sites selected for TRUW management. Other elements that impact waste loads are treatment volumes, waste characteristics, and the unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. Treatment levels and site configurations have been combined into six TRUW management alternatives for study in the WM PEIS. This supplemental report to the WM PEIS gives the projected waste loads and contaminant release profiles for DOE treatment sites under each of the six TRUW management alternatives. It gives TRUW characteristics and inventories for current DOE generation and storage sites, describes the treatment technologies for three proposed levels of TRUW treatment, and presents the representative unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. The data presented are primary inputs to developing the costs, health risks, and socioeconomic and environmental impacts of treating, packaging, and shipping TRUW for disposal.

  11. Available for Checkout Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compatible cuvettes (1.5mL, 2.5mL). Specialty glassware Schlenk flasks, bubblers, distillation glassware. Specialty tapes and films K104 kapton tape, "sulfur free" mylar tape,...

  12. Ohio Hydropower Potential Inventory Phase I report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The dams researched in the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) files were those contained in a list of Ohio dams provided by the ODNR. The result of this file research is a list of 997 dams contained herein that tabulates information on hydraulic head, stream flow, drainage area, and usage. This listing indicated that all but 137 of the 997 dams can be eliminated from consideration for Phase II research. The second phase would be required to further identify which of the 137 dams might have viable hydroelectric potential and define their basic hydroelectric parameters.

  13. National Bridge Inventory Record Data Submission Requirement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Microsoft PowerPoint - 2009.10.27 Bridge Inspection Follow-up Information and Records Management Transition Guidance...

  14. Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  15. Physical Inventory Listing NRC 742cu

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 *** Company Name RIS 09/30/2008 A E4 864 1 1 90% J 1 STANDARD 5

  16. Physical Inventory Listing NRC 742cu

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 *** Company Name RIS 09/30/2008 A E4 864 1 1 90% J 1 STANDARD 3

  17. Physical Inventory Listing NRC 742cu

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3.A *** Company Name RIS 09/30/2008 A E4 864 2 2 90 J 1 STANDARDS 2 2 2 2

  18. Market values summary/August market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    This article is the August 1994 uranium market summary. There were 16 deals in the natural uranium market. The restricted exchange value dropped slightly to $9.10 per pound U3O8, while the unrestricted exchange value remained steady at $7.10. Similarly, the restricted UF6 value eased to $29.30 kgU as UF6, and the unrestricted value remained constant at $24.50. The restricted transaction value declined slightly to $9.15 per pound U3O8, while the unrestricted value increased to $7.15. Both active supply and demand increased by a comparable amount. The unrestricted SWU value was unchanged, but the restricted value decreased by a dollar to $86 per SWU.

  19. Market values summary/October market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    This article is the October uranium market summary. During this period, volume increased to 2.2 Mlb U3O8 on the spot concentrates market. The unrestricted and restricted exchange values remained steady at $7.00 and $9.05 per pound U3O8 respectively. There were two UF6 deals during this period, and with supply more than adequate to meet the demand, the restricted UF6 price remained unchanged at $29.00 per kgU as UF6. The unrestricted value increased slightly to $24.50. The conversion value was unchanged, and the enrichment services market/prices weakened. Both active supply and demand decreased during this period.

  20. Market values summary/April market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-05-01

    This article is the April 1994 uranium market summary. The near-term market was slow, with three near-term deals for concentrates and none for UF6. This was reflected in the decline of the concentrates restricted value $9.30 per pound U3O8 and the UF6 restricted value to $29.75 per kgU as UF6. In each market, the unrestricted value remained unchanged at $7.00 and $24.50 due to the lack of trades in the unrestricted market. Transaction values in both the restricted and unrestricted market were constant at $9.45 and $7.05 per pound U3O8. The restricted SWU value rose a dollar to $88 per SWU, and the unrestricted SWU value remained steady at $67 per SWU. Active demand continued to decrease, while active supply increased.

  1. Market values summary/December market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-01-01

    This article is the December 1993 uranium market summary. During this period, there were six deals in the restricted concentrates market and none in the unrestricted market. The restricted value dropped slightly to $9.85 per pound U3O8, while the unrestricted market rose slightly to $7.00. The UF6 market was also slow, with a slight decrease in the restricted UF6 value to $31.00 and no change in the unrestricted value ($24.00). The unrestricted transaction value was $7.15 per pound U3O8, and the restricted value was $10.25. In the enrichment services market, the unrestricted SWU value remained fixed at $68.00 per SWU, while the unrestricted value increased by a dollar to $84.00 per SWU. Active uranium supply decreased, while active demand increased.

  2. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Ore from Underground Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills 1 0 W W W 0 W W W W W W W Other Feed Materials 2 W W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W

  3. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3. U.S. uranium concentrate production, shipments, and sales, 2003-14 Activity at U.S. mills and In-Situ-Leach plants 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Estimated contained U3O8 (thousand pounds) Ore from Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills1 0 W W W 0 W W W W W W W Other Feed Materials 2 W W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate Produced at U.S. Mills (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate Produced at

  4. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2014" ,"Exploration and Development Surface ","Exploration and Development Drilling","Mine Production of Uranium ","Uranium Concentrate Production ","Uranium Concentrate Shipments ","Employment " "Year","Drilling (million feet)"," Expenditures 1 (million dollars)","Mine Production (million pounds U3O8)","(million pounds

  5. U

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -NON-CONFIDENTIAL VERSION- -- Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Sales on the U 3 O 8 Market Prepared for Fluor-B&W Portsmouth LLC April 2014 Redacted Version The information contained in this report has been prepared by NAC International Inc. (NAC) based upon data obtained from public sources and other sources we consider reliable and/or calculations consistent with technical principles we consider applicable. Neither NAC nor any individual author makes any warranty or representation, expressed

  6. Dark-Matter-Induced Violation of the Weak Equivalence Principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Sean M.; Mantry, Sonny [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Stubbs, Christoper W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2009-07-03

    A long-range fifth force coupled to dark matter can induce a coupling to ordinary matter if the dark matter interacts with standard model fields. We consider constraints on such a scenario from both astrophysical observations and laboratory experiments. We also examine the case where the dark matter is a weakly interacting massive particle, and derive relations between the coupling to dark matter and the coupling to ordinary matter for different models. Currently, this scenario is most tightly constrained by galactic dynamics, but improvements in Eoetvoes experiments can probe unconstrained regions of parameter space.

  7. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent at Processing Plants (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    45,534 147,972 144,086 152,538 148,859 150,870 1973

  8. Assessing Equivalent Viscous Damping Using Piping System test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, J.; Morante, R.

    2010-07-18

    The specification of damping for nuclear piping systems subject to seismic-induced motions has been the subject of many studies and much controversy. Damping estimation based on test data can be influenced by numerous factors, consequently leading to considerable scatter in damping estimates in the literature. At present, nuclear industry recommendations and nuclear regulatory guidance are not consistent on the treatment of damping for analysis of nuclear piping systems. Therefore, there is still a need to develop a more complete and consistent technical basis for specification of appropriate damping values for use in design and analysis. This paper summarizes the results of recent damping studies conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  9. Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

    2008-10-17

    This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

  10. Operation and biasing for single device equivalent to CMOS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, James D. (10328 Pinehurst Ave., Omaha, NE 68124)

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed are semiconductor devices including at least one junction which is rectifying whether the semiconductor is caused to be N or P-type, by the presence of field induced carriers. In particular, inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to conventional multiple device CMOS systems, which can be operated as modulators, are disclosed as are a non-latching SCR and an approach to blocking parasitic currents. Operation of the gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to multiple device CMOS systems under typical bias schemes is described, and simple demonstrative five mask fabrication procedures for the inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to multiple device CMOS systems are also presented.

  11. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent at Processing Plants (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    066,366 1,134,473 1,250,012 1,356,709 1,608,148 1,717,894 1930-2015 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 0 0 87,478 70,292 75,648 2007-2014 Alabama 19,059 17,271 7,133 7,675 7,044 1969-2014 Alaska 20,835 21,554 21,470 20,679 18,434 1969-2014 Arkansas 213 268 424 486 582 1967-2014 California 13,244 12,095 12,755 14,298 13,201 1967-2014 Colorado 82,637 90,801 82,042 87,513 85,198 1967-2014 Florida 0 0 0 0 1968-2014 Florida 233 2014-2014 Florida 233 1968-2014 Illinois 345 1,043 0 0 47 1967-2014 Illinois

  12. Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My ...

  13. Macroencapsulation Equivalency Guidance for Classified Weapon Components and NNSSWAC Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poling, J.

    2012-05-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has a surplus of classified legacy weapon components generated over the years with no direct path for disposal. The majority of the components have been held for uncertainty of future use or no identified method of sanitization or disposal. As more weapons are retired, there is an increasing need to reduce the amount of components currently in storage or on hold. A process is currently underway to disposition and dispose of the legacy/retired weapons components across the DOE complex.

  14. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 2, Working Group Assessment Team reports; Vulnerability development forms; Working group documents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Secretary of Energy`s memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability.

  15. Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    an Application of the EX-Ante Carbon-balance Tool (EX-ACT) Financial and Cost Assessment Model (FICAM) Forest Carbon Index Forest Carbon Portal Forest Monitoring for Action...

  16. LEDS Capacity Building and Training Inventory | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory United States Department of Energy Renewable Energy Hydrogen Introduction to Renewable Energy Technologies United States Department of Energy...

  17. EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    inventorycapacitybuildingswtoo Country: Nicaragua, Panama, Guatemala, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Belize Cost: Free Central America, Central America, Central America,...

  18. State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory - Energy Information

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Administration Analysis & Projections Glossary ‚Äļ FAQS ‚Äļ Overview Projection Data Monthly short-term forecasts to 2016 Annual projections to 2040 International projections All projections reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Annual Energy Outlook related Congressional & other requests International Energy Outlook related Presentations Recurring Short-Term Outlook Related Special outlooks Testimony All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud

  19. Software programs that address site-specific inventory characteristics issues.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dare, J. H.; Cournoyer, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    The proper characterization of Hazardous, Mixed Low-Level, and Mixed Transuranic waste enhances productivity and safety. Hazardous material criteria that need to be considered include physical and health hazards inherent to the waste stream. Other factors that may influence characterization include: particulate diameter, complexing or chelating agent properties, lead, and mercury content, pressurized containers, and P-listed wastes. To meet these requirements are only a simple matter of generating a database with the proper fields. Manufactures and institutional databases bank huge sources of information, such as, work control documents, substance identification, container types, components of mixtures, physical property data, and regulatory data. In this report, utilization of commercially available software programs to take advantage of these resources in addressing waste characterization issues are presented. The application of user-friendly programs eliminates part of the tediousness associated with the complex requirements of certifying to general waste acceptance criteria with minimal impact on programmatic work. In other words, tapping into manufacturer and institutional database provides a way to take advantage of the combined expertise of these resources in managing a cost effective waste certification program as well as adding a quality assurance element to the program.

  20. DYNA3D/ParaDyn Regression Test Suite Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J I

    2011-01-25

    The following table constitutes an initial assessment of feature coverage across the regression test suite used for DYNA3D and ParaDyn. It documents the regression test suite at the time of production release 10.1 in September 2010. The columns of the table represent groupings of functionalities, e.g., material models. Each problem in the test suite is represented by a row in the table. All features exercised by the problem are denoted by a check mark in the corresponding column. The definition of ''feature'' has not been subdivided to its smallest unit of user input, e.g., algorithmic parameters specific to a particular type of contact surface. This represents a judgment to provide code developers and users a reasonable impression of feature coverage without expanding the width of the table by several multiples. All regression testing is run in parallel, typically with eight processors. Many are strictly regression tests acting as a check that the codes continue to produce adequately repeatable results as development unfolds, compilers change and platforms are replaced. A subset of the tests represents true verification problems that have been checked against analytical or other benchmark solutions. Users are welcomed to submit documented problems for inclusion in the test suite, especially if they are heavily exercising, and dependent upon, features that are currently underrepresented.

  1. Development of Authorized Limits for Portsmouth Oil Inventory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pyranol in a dielectric fluid used in transformers. 5 safety performance cleanup ... analyzed for but not detected above instrument quantification level for this waste matrix. ...

  2. Life cycle inventory of biodiesel and petroleum diesel for use...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biodiesel is made by chemically combining any natural oil or fat with an alcohol such as methanol or ethanol. Methanol has been the most commonly used alcohol in the commercial ...

  3. Greater Than Class C Tracking, Inventory and Projections System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-06-28

    The GTIPS was developed as part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program''s effort to characterize GTCC waste. The primary purpose of this system is to store the Energy Information Administration''s (EIA) 1985 survey information (as well as future surveys by the program) in a central location; retrieve data with specific attributes or logical combinations of attributes; generate output in a textual or tabular form to aid in the preparation of reports and other documentsmore¬†¬Ľ required by the user; project a trend of disposal GTCC volumes and activities into the future to aid the user in decision making for the storage and disposal of GTCC waste.¬ę¬†less

  4. Life Cycle Inventory of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel for Use...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...162 Figure 73: Ranking of Electricity Requirements for Our Process Design Model and for Current Comparable Technology...

  5. FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while increasing resilience and productivity. The project will contribute to ongoing research and implementation...

  6. DOE Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    three-dimensional model of the Paducah Site's groundwater system. University of Kentucky College of Design students assembled the model for the Paducah Citizens Advisory Board....

  7. Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    Final issue of this report. Provides annual aggregate statistics on generating units operated by nonutilities in the United States and the District of Columbia. Provides a 5-year outlook for generating unit additions and changes.

  8. Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

  9. CMI Course Inventory: Chemistry Engineering | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry Engineering Chemistry Engineering Of the six CMI Team members that are educational institutions, five offer courses in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. These are Colorado School of Mines, Iowa State University, Purdue University, University of California-Davis and Rutgers. The following links go to the class list on the CMI page for that school. Colorado School of Mines Iowa State University Purdue University University of California-Davis Rutgers University CMI Education and

  10. CMI Course Inventory: Mineral Economics and Business | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Mineral Economics and Business Mineral Economics and Business Of the six CMI Team members that are educational institutions, two offer courses in Mineral Economics and Business. These are Colorado School of Mines and Brown University. The following links go to the class list on the CMI page for that school. Colorado School of Mines offers a major in these areas At Brown University, the Institute of Environment and Society offers several courses on economics and policy CMI Education

  11. State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory - Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Analysis & Projections Glossary ‚Äļ FAQS ‚Äļ Overview Projection Data Monthly short-term forecasts to 2016 Annual projections to 2040 International projections All projections reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Annual Energy Outlook related Congressional & other requests International Energy Outlook related Presentations Recurring Short-Term Outlook Related Special outlooks Testimony All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud

  12. LOW-HIGH VALUES FOR PETROLEUM AVERAGE INVENTORY RANGES (MILLION...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    PADD 1 Feb 2 12.9 14.9 3 CRUDE OIL (EXCLUDING STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE) PADD 1 Mar 3 13.1 15.0 4 CRUDE OIL (EXCLUDING STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE) PADD 1 Apr 4 14.1 16.1...

  13. Low Level Waste Disposition ‚Äď Quantity and Inventory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This study has been prepared by the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) campaign of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate of the...

  14. Chapter 09 - Accounting for Inventory and Related Property

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and credited to the process through a journal entry. ... financial reporting organization codes, names, ... the Nuclear Material Management & Safeguards System (NMMSS) to ...

  15. UNFCCC-GHG Inventory Data | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: unfccc.intghgdataghgdataunfcccitems4146.php References: UNFCCC GHG Emission Data1 Data can be sorted by Party,...

  16. Market values summary/October market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-11-01

    This article is the October 1993 uranium market summary. In spite of the substantial quantity of material that moved through the unrestricted market during this period, the unrestricted exchange value remained constant at $6.90 per pound U3O8, and the unrestricted value dipped to $10.15. There were four deals in the concentrates market during this period. Both the restricted and the unrestricted UF6 values remained constant at $31.75 and $24.75 per kgU as UF6 respectively, as did the restricted and unrestricted SWU values ($82 and $68 respectively). Active supply increased, while active demand decreased.

  17. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: April 30, 2015 Next Release Date: May 2016 million pounds U 3 O 8 $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 130.7 W W 154.6 Properties Under Development for Production and Development Drilling W 31.8 W W 38.2 W Mines in Production W 19.6 W

  18. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-14" "Production / Mining Method",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014 "Underground" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W" "Open Pit" "(estimated contained thousand pounds

  19. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. U.S. uranium concentrate production, shipments, and sales, 2003-14" "Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014 "Estimated contained U3O8 (thousand pounds)" "Ore from Underground Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills 1",0,"W","W","W",0,"W","W","W","W","W","W","W" "Other Feed Materials

  20. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2013 and 2014" "million pounds U3O8" ,"End of 2013",,,"End of 2014" "Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s)","Forward Cost 2" ,"$0 to $30 per pound","$0 to $50 per pound","$0 to $100 per pound","$0 to $30 per pound","$0 to $50 per pound","$0 to $100 per pound" "Properties with Exploration

  1. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2013 and 2014 million pounds U3O8 End of 2013 End of 2014 Forward Cost2 Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s) $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 130.7 W W 154.6 Properties Under Development for Production and Development Drilling W

  2. Market values summary/May market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-06-01

    This article is the May 1994 uranium market survey. In the spot concentrates market, there was only one new deal, and as a result, the restricted exchange value eased to $9.25 per pound U3O8. The unrestricted exchange value remained constant at $7.00. There were two deals in the UF6 spot market, and the restricted UF6 value decreased to $29.40 per kgU as UF6. The unrestricted UF6 value was unchanged. There were two deals in the long-term marketplace. The restricted transaction value declined to $9.40 per pound U3O8, and the unrestricted transaction value remained fixed at $7.05. There were three deals in the enrichment services market, and the restricted SWU value dropped to $87 per SWU, while the unrestricted SWU value remained constant at $67. Active uranium supply decreased this reporting period, while active demand increased. Supply continued to overwhelm demand, however.

  3. Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Costyk, D.; Narang, A.

    2003-07-01

    This study determines the magnitude of distributed resources that can be added to a distribution circuit without causing undesirable conditions or equipment damage.

  4. Disturbed subsurface microbial communities follow equivalent trajectories despite different structural starting points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Miller, Christopher S.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Kantor, Rose S.; Thomas, Brian C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-03-01

    We explored the impact of the starting community composition and structure on ecosystem response to perturbations using organic carbon amendment experiments. Subsurface sediment was partitioned into flow-through columns, and the microbial communities were initially stimulated in situ by addition of acetate as a carbon and electron donor source. This drove community richness and evenness down, and pushed the system into a new biogeochemical state characterized by iron reduction. Reconstructed near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated a concomitant enrichment of Desulfuromonadales, Comamonadaceae and Bacteroidetes lineages. After 10 to 12 days, acetate was exchange for lactate in a subset of columns. Following the clear onset of sulfate reduction (35 days after acetate-amendment), acetate was substituted for lactate in additional columns. Acetatestimulated communities differed markedly during each biogeochemical regime and at each lactate-switch. Regardless, however, of when communities were switched to lactate, they followed comparable trajectories with respect to composition and structure, with convergence evident one week after each switch, and marked after one month of lactate amendment. During sulfate reduction all treatments were enriched in Firmicutes and a number of species likely involved in sulfate reduction (notably Desulfobulbus, Desulfosporosinus, Desulfitobacterium and Desulfotomaculum). Lactate treatments were distinguished by substantially lower relative abundances of Desulfotomaculum and Bacteroidetes, and enrichments of Psychrosinus and Clostridiales species. Results imply that the structure of the starting community was not significant in controlling organism selection in community succession.

  5. Thermal lag test engines evaluated and compared to equivalent Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tailer, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal lag engines run both free piston and with pistons kinematically linked. Free piston, a thermal lag engine may be the simplest of all piston engines as it is valveless and has only one moving part, the piston. Horizontal and vertical thermal lag engines with substantially identical cooled pistons and cylinders are tested and evaluated, particularly as to power density. The horizontal engine has an elongated, small diameter heated chamber and the vertical engine has a large diameter flat heated chamber. Both heated chambers may be altered in volume to maximize engine power at optimum compression ratios. The power density of unpressurized thermal lag engines is compared to that of early commercial Stirling cycle unpressurized air engines. The comparison indicates the potential for applying well-known modern Stirling technology to thermal lag engines.

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF EQUIVALENCY OF CANE AND SOFTWOOD BASED CELOTEX FOR MODEL 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R; Jason Varble, J

    2008-05-27

    Cane-based Celotex{trademark} has been used extensively in various Department of Energy (DOE) packages as a thermal insulator and impact absorber. Cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard was only manufactured by Knight-Celotex Fiberboard at their Marrero Plant in Louisiana. However, Knight-Celotex Fiberboard shut down their Marrero Plant in early 2007 due to impacts from hurricane Katrina and other economic factors. Therefore, cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is no longer available for use in the manufacture of new shipping packages requiring the material as a component. Current consolidation plans for the DOE Complex require the procurement of several thousand new Model 9975 shipping packages requiring cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard. Therefore, an alternative to cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is needed. Knight-Celotex currently manufactures Celotex{trademark} fiberboard from other cellulosic materials, such as hardwood and softwood. A review of the relevant literature has shown that softwood-based Celotex{trademark} meets all parameters important to the Model 9975 shipping package.

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Billion

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 79 79 77 73 77 74 76 77 74 76 75 78 1974 79 72 78 73 76 71 75 74 72 73 71 74 1975 77 71 75 73 73 71 73 73 70 71 70 75 1976 75 71 73 69 72 70 72 70 67 70 70 75 1977 75 72 75 71 73 71 72 71 69 70 69 74 1978 74 70 75 71 71 69 72 71 67 70 69 73 1979 70 65 69 67 68 65 66 67 65 67 68 72 1980 70 66 70 64 65 61 62 61 61 63 64 69 1981 68 61 67 65 66 63 65 66 61 64 61 67 1982 71 65 69 65 64 62 63 61 59 60 61 62 1983 72 64 66 62 62

  8. Demonstration of the Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Facility, Newport News, VA Sponsoring Org: USDOE - Office of Energy Research (ER) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND...

  9. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Bcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","12/2015" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9060us1m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9060us1m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2/26/2016 2:30:49 PM" "Back to

  10. Estimation of Equivalent Sea Level Cosmic Ray Exposure for Low Background Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Austen T.; Orrell, John L.

    2012-08-25

    While scientists at CERN and other particle accelerators around the world explore the boundaries of high energy physics, the Majorana project investigates the other end of the spectrum with its extremely sensitive, low background, low energy detector. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR aims to detect neutrinoless double beta decay (0???), a rare theoretical process in which two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons, without the emission of the two antineutrinos that are a product of a normal double beta decay. This process is only possible if Ė and therefore a detection would prove ó the neutrino is a Majorana particle, meaning that it is its own antiparticle [Aaselth et al. 2004] . The existence of such a decay would also disprove lepton conservation and give information about the neutrino's mass.

  11. General Technical Base Qualification Equivalencies Based On Previous Experience, 12/12/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The header lists the general field of experience, Commercial Nuclear Power or Navy Nuclear PowerProgram, with all other categories under these two areas. The subheader lists the position title of...

  12. rbstmultiprince.f; Equivalent Dipole Polarizability Inversion of Time Domain Electromagnetic Induction Data

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-10-01

    This software, rbstmultiprince.f, computes polarizations and positions from electromagnetic data and is used in conjunction with technology to detect UXO. This software was funded by the ESTCP program of the DoD. This code makes use of third party code from the 1970s and 1980s that appears to have entered the public domain and is available for free download via the website netlib.org. The code was first developed by the author while he was employed atmore¬†¬ĽUCB and funded by the SERDP of the U.S. Army.¬ę¬†less

  13. Defense Program Equivalencies for Technical Qualification Standard Competencies12/12/1995

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Defense Programs has undertaken an effort to compare the competencies in the GeneralTechnical Base Qualification Standard and the Functional Area Qualification Standards withvarious positions in...

  14. Biasing, operation and parasitic current limitation in single device equivalent to CMOS, and other semiconductor systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, James D.

    2003-09-23

    Disclosed are semiconductor devices including at least one junction which is rectifying whether the semiconductor is caused to be N or P-type, by the presence of applied gate voltage field induced carriers in essentially intrinsic, essentially homogeneously simultaneously containing both N and P-type metallurgical dopants at substantially equal doping levels, essentially homogeneously simultaneously containing both N and P-type metallurgical dopants at different doping levels, and containing a single metallurgical doping type, and functional combinations thereof. In particular, inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to conventional multiple device CMOS systems, which can be operated as modulators, are disclosed as are a non-latching SCR and an approach to blocking parasitic currents utilizing material(s) which form rectifying junctions with both N and P-type semiconductor whether metallurigically or field induced.

  15. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Bcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","3/31/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9060us1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9060us1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2/26/2016 2:30:48 PM" "Back to

  16. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1930's 75 62 52 48 52 55 61 70 73 74 1940's 80 115 119 122 143 160 165 189 210 224 1950's 260 292 319 340 354 377 418 434 458 498 1960's 543 592 624 670 723 753 739 785 828 867 1970's 906 883 908 917 887 872 854 863 852 808 1980's 777 775 762 790 838 816 800 812 816 785 1990's 784 835 872 886 889 908 958 964 938 973 2000's 1,016 954 957 876 927 876 906 930 953 1,024 2010's 1,066 1,134 1,250 1,357 1,608

  17. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency using an equivalent circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G.

    2015-10-27

    A system and method for determining electric motor efficiency includes a monitoring system having a processor programmed to determine efficiency of an electric motor under load while the electric motor is online. The determination of motor efficiency is independent of a rotor speed measurement. Further, the efficiency is based on a determination of stator winding resistance, an input voltage, and an input current. The determination of the stator winding resistance occurs while the electric motor under load is online.

  18. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency using an equivalent circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G

    2015-11-06

    A system and method for determining electric motor efficiency includes a monitoring system having a processor programmed to determine efficiency of an electric motor under load while the electric motor is online. The determination of motor efficiency is independent of a rotor speed measurement. Further, the efficiency is based on a determination of stator winding resistance, an input voltage, and an input current. The determination of the stator winding resistance occurs while the electric motor under load is online.

  19. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency using an equivalent circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G.

    2011-06-07

    A system and method for determining electric motor efficiency includes a monitoring system having a processor programmed to determine efficiency of an electric motor under load while the electric motor is online. The determination of motor efficiency is independent of a rotor speed measurement. Further, the efficiency is based on a determination of stator winding resistance, an input voltage, and an input current. The determination of the stator winding resistance occurs while the electric motor under load is online.

  20. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project path forward: nuclear safety equivalency to comparable NRC-licensed facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1995-11-01

    This document includes the Technical requirements which meet the nuclear safety objectives of the NRC regulations for fuel treatment and storage facilities. These include requirements regarding radiation exposure limits, safety analysis, design and construction. This document also includes administrative requirements which meet the objectives of the major elements of the NRC licensing process. These include formally documented design and safety analysis, independent technical review, and oppportunity for public involvement.

  1. Demonstration of the Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA Sponsoring Org: USDOE - Office of Energy Research (ER) Country of Publication: United States ...

  2. On The Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 899217 Report Number(s): JLAB-THY-07-606; DOEER40150-4168; hep-ph0702022 TRN: US0701930 DOE Contract Number: AC05-85ER40150; FG02-05ER41368; FG02-05ER41376; ...

  3. Estimating Radiation Risk from Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) ISCORS Technical Report No. 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    an 0 Tw (an) Tj 10. Tw2 Tj 7.5 0t064 0 TD 0 Tc Radia ( )3.75 0 TD -0.IRRPC,0 Tw (an) Tj 10. Tw2 Tj 7.5 5 10 0 TD 0 Tc 0CTc itt 0 Tw (an) Tj 10.3 0 Tw (an) Tj 10.3 0 Tw (an) Tj 10.3 a ( )75 Tw5ndj 5.25 0 TD /F1 10.5 Tf -0.3 33twithsj 24 0 .75059 0 TD(FactorsTw ( 32 ) Tj 5.25 0 TD /F1 10.5 Tf -0.1925 Tc 0 0t165TD 0 Tc 0.37 No. 1Tj 5.25 0 TD 0.098 Tc 0 Tw (No.) Tj 15.755 -13.5 TD 0.3to Tw ( ) Tj 5.25 0 TD /F1 10.5 Tf -0.1925 Tc 0 5 Report 0 1Tj 5.25 0 TD 0.098 Tc 0 Tw 8No. 7 0 TD -0.IRRPC,

  4. Estimating Radiation Risk from Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) ISCORS Technical Report No. 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and UNSCEAR 1988 in Radiation Risk Assessment - Lifetime Total Cancer Mortality Risk Estimates at Low Doses and Low Dose Rates for Low-LET Radiation, Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination, December 1992. DOE, 1988a. E xternal Dose-Rate Conversion Factors for Calculation of Dose to the Public, DOE Report DOE/EH-0070, July 1988. DOE, 1988b. Internal Dose Conversion Factors for Calculation of Dose to the Public, DOE Report DOE/EH-0071, July 1988. EPA, 1988. Federal

  5. Market values summary/March market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-04-01

    This article is the March 1993 uranium market summary. In the natural uranium and concentrates market, there were eight transactions. Both the restricted and unrestricted values were unchanged at $9.45 and $7.00 per pound of U3O8 respectively. In the UF6 market, there were three deals. Both restricted and unrestricted values were also unchanged at $30.00 and $24.50 per kgU as UF6 respectively. The restricted transaction value dropped slightly to $9.45, and the unrestricted value dropped to $7.05. In the enrichment services market, there were six deals reported, with the restricted SWU value rising to $87.00 and the unrestricted SWU value dropping to $67.00. Active uranium demand decreased considerably, while active supply increased.

  6. Market values summary/March market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    This article is the March 1995 uranium market summary. There were 14 near-term deals is natural uranium market for a total of 5.2 Mlb. The restricted exchange value moved upward to $11.75 per pound U3O8, and the unrestricted value rose to $7.35. The UF6 market was quite active, with 8 deals and with restricted and unrestricted prices for UF6 both up ($34.75 and $22.50 per kgU as UF6 respectively). The restricted and unrestricted transaction values also rose to $10.05 and $7.25 respectively. Enrichment services followed the overall trend, with increases to $92 and $78 per SWU. Active uranium supply dropped, as did active demand.

  7. 4th Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Figure 1. Uranium concentrate production in the United States, 1996 - 4th quarter 2015 pounds U 3 O 8 0 500,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 2,000,000 2,500,000 3,000,000 3,500,000 4,000,000 4,500,000 5,000,000 5,500,000 6,000,000 6,500,000 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 P2015 1st quarter 2nd quarter 3rd quarter 4th quarter P = Preliminary data. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, "Domestic

  8. 4th Quarter 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Release Date: February 18, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2016 Table 1. Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States, 1996 - 4th quarter 2015 pounds U 3 O 8 Calendar-year quarter 1st quarter 2nd quarter 3rd quarter 4th quarter Calendar-year total 1996 1,734,427 1,460,058 1,691,796 1,434,425 6,320,706 1997 1,149,050 1,321,079 1,631,384 1,541,052 5,642,565 1998 1,151,587 1,143,942 1,203,042 1,206,003 4,704,574 1999 1,196,225 1,132,566 1,204,984 1,076,897 4,610,672 2000 1,018,683

  9. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States, 1996 - 4th quarter 2015 pounds U3O8 Calendar-year quarter 1st quarter 2nd quarter 3rd quarter 4th quarter Calendar-year total 1996 1,734,427 1,460,058 1,691,796 1,434,425 6,320,706 1997 1,149,050 1,321,079 1,631,384 1,541,052 5,642,565 1998 1,151,587 1,143,942 1,203,042 1,206,003 4,704,574 1999 1,196,225 1,132,566 1,204,984 1,076,897 4,610,672 2000 1,018,683 983,330 981,948 973,585 3,975,545 2001 709,177 748,298 628,720 553,060

  10. Actinide Foil Production for MPACT Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beller, Denis

    2012-10-31

    Sensitive fast-neutron detectors are required for use in lead slowing down spectrometry (LSDS), an active interrogation technique for used nuclear fuel assay for Materials Protection, Accounting, and Controls Technologies (MPACT). During the past several years UNLV sponsored a research project at RPI to investigate LSDS; began development of fission chamber detectors for use in LSDS experiments in collaboration with INL, LANL, and Oregon State U.; and participated in a LSDS experiment at LANL. In the LSDS technique, research has demonstrated that these fission chamber detectors must be sensitive to fission energy neutrons but insensitive to thermal-energy neutrons. Because most systems are highly sensitive to large thermal neutron populations due to the well-known large thermal cross section of 235U, even a miniscule amount of this isotope in a fission chamber will overwhelm the small population of higher-energy neutrons. Thus, fast-fission chamber detectors must be fabricated with highly depleted uranium (DU) or ultra-pure thorium (Th), which is about half as efficient as DU. Previous research conducted at RPI demonstrated that the required purity of DU for assay of used nuclear fuel using LSDS is less than 4 ppm 235U, material that until recently was not available in the U.S. In 2009 the PI purchased 3 grams of ultra-depleted uranium (uDU, 99.99998% 238U with just 0.2 √?¬?√?¬Ī 0.1 ppm 235U) from VNIIEF in Sarov, Russia. We received the material in the form of U3O8 powder in August of 2009, and verified its purity and depletion in a FY10 MPACT collaboration project. In addition, chemical processing for use in FC R&D was initiated, fission chamber detectors and a scanning alpha-particle spectrometer were developed, and foils were used in a preliminary LSDS experiment at a LANL/LANSCE in Sept. of 2010. The as-received U3O8 powder must be chemically processed to convert it to another chemical form while maintaining its purity, which then must be used to electro-deposit U or UO2 in extremely thin layers (1 to 2 mg/cm2) on various media such as films, foils, or discs. After many months of investigation and trials in FY10 and 11, UNLV researchers developed a new method to produce pure UO2 deposits on foils using a unique approach, which has never been demonstrated, that involves dissolution of U3O8 directly into room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) followed by electrodeposition from the RTIL-uDU solution (Th deposition from RTIL had been previously demonstrated). The high-purity dissolution of the U3O8 permits the use of RTIL solutions for deposition of U on metal foils in layers without introducing contamination. In FY10 and early FY11 a natural U surrogate for the uDU was used to investigate this and other techniques. In this research project UNLV will deposit directly from RTIL to produce uDU and Th foils devoid of possible contaminants. After these layers have been deposited, they will be examined for purity and uniformity. UNLV will complete the development and demonstration of the RTIL technology/ methodology to prepare uDU and Th samples for use in constructing fast-neutron detectors. Although this material was purchased for use in research using fast-fission chamber detectors for active inspection techniques for MPACT, it could also contribute to R&D for other applications, such as cross section measurements or neutron spectroscopy for national security

  11. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: A PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2009-10-01

    Eight Regional CHP Application Centers (RACs) are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies in all 50 states. The RACs build end-user awareness by providing CHP-related information to targeted markets through education and outreach; they work with the states and regulators to encourage the creation and adoption of favorable public policies; and they provide CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. The RACs were started by DOE as a pilot program in 2001 to support the National CHP Roadmap developed by industry to accelerate deployment of energy efficient CHP technologies (U.S. Combined Heat and Power Association 2001). The intent was to foster a regional presence to build market awareness, address policy issues, and facilitate project development. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported DOE with the RAC program since its inception. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort involving DOE and some CHP industry stakeholders to establish quantitative metrics for measuring the RACs accomplishments. This effort incorporated the use of logic models to define and describe key RAC activities, outputs, and outcomes. Based on this detailed examination of RAC operations, potential metrics were identified associated with the various key sectors addressed by the RACs: policy makers; regulatory agencies; investor owned utilities; municipal and cooperative utilities; financiers; developers; and end users. The final product was reviewed by a panel of representatives from DOE, ORNL, RACs, and the private sector. The metrics developed through this effort focus on major RAC activities as well as on CHP installations and related outcomes. All eight RACs were contacted in August 2008 and asked to provide data for every year of Center operations for those metrics on which they kept records. In addition, data on CHP installations and related outcomes were obtained from an existing DOE-supported data base. The information provided on the individual RACs was summed to yield totals for all the Centers combined for each relevant item.

  12. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-08-03

    The nation's power system is facing a diverse and broad set of challenges. These range from restructuring and increased competitiveness in power production to the need for additional production and distribution capacity to meet demand growth, and demands for increased quality and reliability of power and power supply. In addition, there are growing concerns about emissions from fossil fuel powered generation units and generators are seeking methods to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission intensity of power generation. Although these challenges may create uncertainty within the financial and electricity supply markets, they also offer the potential to explore new opportunities to support the accelerated deployment of cleaner and cost-effective technologies to meet such challenges. The federal government and various state governments, for example, support the development of a sustainable electricity infrastructure. As part of this policy, there are a variety of programs to support the development of ''cleaner'' technologies such as combined heat and power (CHP, or cogeneration) and renewable energy technologies. Energy from renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, hydro, and biomass, are considered carbon-neutral energy technologies. The production of renewable energy creates no incremental increase in fossil fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from all renewable resources, except biomass, produces no incremental increase in air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulate matter, and carbon monoxide. There are many more opportunities for the development of cleaner electricity and thermal energy technologies called ''recycled'' energy. A process using fossil fuels to produce an energy service may have residual energy waste streams that may be recycled into useful energy services. Recycled energy methods would capture energy from sources that would otherwise be unused and convert it to electricity or useful thermal energy. Recycled energy produces no or little increase in fossil fuel consumption and pollutant emissions. Examples of energy recycling methods include industrial gasification technologies to increase energy recovery, as well as less traditional CHP technologies, and the use of energy that is typically discarded from pressure release vents or from the burning and flaring of waste streams. These energy recovery technologies have the ability to reduce costs for power generation. This report is a preliminary study of the potential contribution of this ''new'' generation of clean recycled energy supply technologies to the power supply of the United States. For each of the technologies this report provides a short technical description, as well as an estimate of the potential for application in the U.S., estimated investment and operation costs, as well as impact on air pollutant emission reductions. The report summarizes the potential magnitude of the benefits of these new technologies. The report does not yet provide a robust cost-benefit analysis. It is stressed that the report provides a preliminary assessment to help focus future efforts by the federal government to further investigate the opportunities offered by new clean power generation technologies, as well as initiate policies to support further development and uptake of clean power generation technologies.

  13. Assessment of the KE Basin Sand Filter Inventory In Support of Hazard Categorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Steven B.; Young, Jonathan

    2005-09-28

    In 1978, the water cleaning system for the KE Basin was upgraded by adding a sand filter and ion exchange columns. Basin water containing finely divided solids is collected by three surface skimmers and pumped to the sand filter. Filtrate from the sand filter is further treated in the ion exchange modules. The suspended solids accumulate in the sand until the pressure drop across the filter reaches established operating limits, at which time the sand filter is backwashed. The backwash is collected in the NLOP, where the solids are allowed to settle as sludge. Figure 2-1 shows a basic piping and instrumentation diagram depicting the relationship among the basin skimmers, sand filter, and NLOP. During the course of deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of the K-Basins, the sand filter and its media will need to be dispositioned. The isotopic distribution of the sludge in the sand filter has been estimated in KE Basin Sand Filter Monolith DQO (KBC-24705). This document estimates the sand filter contribution to the KE hazard categorization using the data from the DQO.

  14. Baseline point source load inventory, 1985. 1991 reevaluation report No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-04

    The report finalizes and documents the Chesapeake Bay Agreement states' 1985 point source nutrient load estimates initially presented in the Baywide Nutrient Reduction Strategy (BNRS). The Bay Agreement states include Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia. Each of the states final, annual, discharged, 1985 point source total phosphorus and total nitrogen nutrient load estimates are presented. These estimates are to serve as the point source baseline for the year 2000 40% nutrient reduction goal. Facility by facility flows, nutrient concentrations and nutrient loads for 1985 from above the fall line (AFL) and from below the fall line (BFL) are presented. The report presents the percent change in the 1985 baseline loads for each of the Bay agreement states relative to 1991. Estimates of 1991 nutrient loads are not available for non-agreement states at this time.

  15. THE BIZARRE CHEMICAL INVENTORY OF NGC 2419, AN EXTREME OUTER HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Judith G.; Kirby, Evan N. E-mail: enk@astro.caltech.edu

    2012-11-20

    We present new Keck/HIRES observations of six red giants in the globular cluster (GC) NGC 2419. Although the cluster is among the most distant and most luminous in the Milky Way, it was considered chemically ordinary until very recently. Our previous work showed that the near-infrared Ca II triplet line strength varied more than expected for a chemically homogeneous cluster, and that at least one star had unusual abundances of Mg and K. Here, we confirm that NGC 2419 harbors a population of stars, comprising about one-third of its mass, that is depleted in Mg by a factor of eight and enhanced in K by a factor of six with respect to the Mg-normal population. Although the majority, Mg-normal population appears to have a chemical abundance pattern indistinguishable from ordinary, inner-halo GCs, the Mg-poor population exhibits dispersions of several elements. The abundances of K and Sc are strongly anti-correlated with Mg, and some other elements (Si and Ca among others) are weakly anti-correlated with Mg. These abundance patterns suggest that the different populations of NGC 2419 sample the ejecta of diverse supernovae in addition to asymptotic giant branch ejecta. However, the abundances of Fe-peak elements except Sc show no star-to-star variation. We find no nucleosynthetic source that satisfactorily explains all of the abundance variations in this cluster. Because NGC 2419 appears like no other GC, we reiterate our previous suggestion that it is not a GC at all, but rather the core of an accreted dwarf galaxy.

  16. Depleted and Recyclable Uranium in the United States: Inventories and Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Erich; Scopatza, Anthony; Deinert, Mark

    2007-07-01

    International consumption of uranium currently outpaces production by nearly a factor of two. Secondary supplies from dismantled nuclear weapons, along with civilian and governmental stockpiles, are being used to make up the difference but supplies are limited. Large amounts of {sup 235}U are contained in spent nuclear fuel as well as in the tails left over from past uranium enrichment. The usability of these inhomogeneous uranium supplies depends on their isotopics. We present data on the {sup 235}U content of spent nuclear fuel and depleted uranium tails in the US and discuss the factors that affect its marketability and alternative uses. (authors)

  17. Inventory of power plants in the United States 1990. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-23

    The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. The Summary Statistics chapter contains aggregate capacity statistics at the national and various regional levels for operable electric generating units and planned electric generating unit additions. Aggregate capacity data at the national level are presented by energy source and by prime mover. Aggregate capacity data at the various regional levels are presented by prime energy source. Planned capacity additions in new units are summarized by year, 1991 through 2000. Additionally, this chapter contains a summary of electric generating unit retirements, by energy source and year, from 1991 through 2000. The chapter on Operable Electric Generating Units contains data about each operable electric generating unit and each electric generating unit that was retired from service during the year. Additionally, it contains a summary by energy source of electric generating unit capacity additions and retirements during 1990. Finally, the chapter on Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions contains data about each electric generating unit scheduled by electric utilities to start operation between 1991 and 2000. 11 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Inventory of power plants in the United States 1989. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-21

    This document is prepared annually by the Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units in operation and to provide a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 states and the District of Columbia). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA, to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The report is organized into the following chapters: Summary Statistics; Operable Electric Generating Units; and Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions.

  19. Historic, enthnohistoric and prehistoric cultural resource inventory. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this study is to provide a literature search and write a historical narrative of the cultural significance of the study area for the proposed WyCoalGas Inc., pipeline, railroad, well fields, and coal gasification plant. The request for a cultural resource investigation states at a minimum the study shall be a literature search on the narrow one mile corridor along the proposed pipelines, areas included within the various facilities plus a one mile buffer surrounding these facilities. In addition, the study must be tied into appropriate local, state, and national history. The writer of this history has felt a responsibility for providing a realistic assessment of the themes of the study area's historical development. Several ideas have been concentrated upon: its American Indian heritage; the Euro-American's exploitive relationship with the region; and the overriding fragile, arid nature of its land. It is hoped that the government agencies and ultimately the energy company will feel a similiar responsibility toward the study area's historical integrity.

  20. Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

    2013-11-22

    The objective of this report is to build upon previous compilations of shale formations within many of the major sedimentary basins in the US by developing GIS data delineating isopach and structural depth maps for many of these units. These data are being incorporated into the LANL digital GIS database being developed for determining host rock distribution and depth/thickness parameters consistent with repository design. Methods were developed to assess hydrological and geomechanical properties and conditions for shale formations based on sonic velocity measurements.

  1. EFFECTS OF INTERMITTENT EMISSION: NOISE INVENTORY FOR THE SCINTILLATING PULSAR B0834+06

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwinn, C. R.; Johnson, M. D.; Smirnova, T. V.; Stinebring, D. R. E-mail: michaeltdh@physics.ucsb.edu E-mail: dan.stinebring@oberlin.edu

    2011-05-20

    We compare signal and noise for observations of the scintillating pulsar B0834+06, using very long baseline interferometry and a single-dish spectrometer. Comparisons between instruments and with models suggest that amplitude variations of the pulsar strongly affect the amount and distribution of self-noise. We show that noise follows a quadratic polynomial with flux density, in spectral observations. Constant coefficients, indicative of background noise, agree well with expectation; whereas second-order coefficients, indicative of self-noise, are {approx}3 times values expected for a pulsar with constant on-pulse flux density. We show that variations in flux density during the 10 s integration accounts for the discrepancy. In the secondary spectrum, {approx}97% of spectral power lies within the pulsar's typical scintillation bandwidth and timescale; an extended scintillation arc contains {approx}3%. For a pulsar with constant on-pulse flux density, noise in the dynamic spectrum will appear as a uniformly distributed background in the secondary spectrum. We find that this uniform noise background contains 95% of noise in the dynamic spectrum for interferometric observations; but only 35% of noise in the dynamic spectrum for single-dish observations. Receiver and sky dominate noise for our interferometric observations, whereas self-noise dominates for single-dish. We suggest that intermittent emission by the pulsar, on timescales <300 {mu}s, concentrates self-noise near the origin in the secondary spectrum, by correlating noise over the dynamic spectrum. We suggest that intermittency sets fundamental limits on pulsar astrometry or timing. Accounting of noise may provide means for detection of intermittent sources, when effects of propagation are unknown or impractical to invert.

  2. The carbon inventory in a quiescent, filamentary molecular cloud in G328

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Michael G.; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Braiding, Catherine; Storey, John W. V.; Kulesa, Craig; Hollenbach, David J.; Wolfire, Mark; GlŁck, Christian; Rowell, Gavin

    2014-02-20

    We present spectral line images of [C I] 809 GHz, CO J = 1-0 115 GHz and H I 1.4 GHz line emission, and calculate the corresponding C, CO and H column densities, for a sinuous, quiescent giant molecular cloud about 5 kpc distant along the l = 328į sightline (hereafter G328) in our Galaxy. The [C I] data comes from the High Elevation Antarctic Terahertz telescope, a new facility on the summit of the Antarctic plateau where the precipitable water vapor falls to the lowest values found on the surface of the Earth. The CO and H I data sets come from the Mopra and Parkes/ATCA telescopes, respectively. We identify a filamentary molecular cloud, ?75 ◊ 5 pc long with mass ?4 ◊ 10{sup 4} M {sub ?} and a narrow velocity emission range of just 4 km s{sup Ė1}. The morphology and kinematics of this filament are similar in CO, [C I], and H I, though in the latter appears as self-absorption. We calculate line fluxes and column densities for the three emitting species, which are broadly consistent with a photodissociation region model for a GMC exposed to the average interstellar radiation field. The [C/CO] abundance ratio averaged through the filament is found to be approximately unity. The G328 filament is constrained to be cold (T {sub Dust} < 20 K) by the lack of far-IR emission, to show no clear signs of star formation, and to only be mildly turbulent from the narrow line width. We suggest that it may represent a GMC shortly after formation, or perhaps still in the process of formation.

  3. Structural Inventory of Great Basin Geothermal Systems and Definition of Favorable Structural Settings

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    - A fault intersection is generally more complex, as it generally contains both multiple fault strands and can include discrete di...

  4. Inventory of U.S.-led International Activities on Building Energy Efficiency Initial Findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delgado, Alison; Evans, Meredydd

    2010-04-01

    Several U.S. Government agencies promote energy efficiency in buildings internationally. The types and scope of activities vary by agency. Those with the largest role include the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of State and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Both USAID and the Department of State have a substantial presence overseas, which may present some complementarities with the Department of Energy’s efforts to reach out to other countries. Generally speaking, USAID focuses on capacity building and policy issues; the Department of State focuses on broad diplomatic efforts and some targeted grants in support of these efforts, and EPA has more targeted roles linked to ENERGY STAR appliances and a few other activities. Several additional agencies are also involved in trade-related efforts to promote energy efficiency in buildings. These include the Department of Commerce, the Export-Import Bank, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation and the Trade and Development Agency (TDA). This initial synthesis report is designed to summarize broad trends and activities relating to international cooperation on energy efficiency in buildings, which can help the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in developing its own strategy in this area. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will develop a more complete synthesis report later in 2010 as it populates a database on international projects on building energy efficiency.

  5. Structural Inventory of Great Basin Geothermal Systems and Definition of Favorable Structural Settings

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - A fault intersection is generally more complex, as it generally contains both multiple fault strands and can include discrete di...

  6. Inventory of Sources of Available Saline Waters for Microalgae Mass Culture in the State of Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, L. G.; Olson, K. L.; Wallace, M. G.; Osborn, M. D.

    1986-06-25

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) is conducting research on the development of microalgae biomass systems for the production of liquid fuels. Particularly appealing at this time, is the idea of using indigenous resources of the Southwest for large-scale production of microalgae.

  7. Natural gas inventories to remain high at end of winter heating...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    20 percent higher than at this time last year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said that by the end of the winter heating season at the...

  8. 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Resources International (ERI), Inc conducted this independent market impact analysis on DOE planned uranium sales and transfers during the period 2014 to 2033, based on ...

  9. Inventory of Safety-Related Codes and Standards for Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... International Electrotechnical Commission IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics ... Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) www.ieee.org IEEE is dedicated to ...

  10. A methodology to estimate greenhouse gases emissions in Life Cycle Inventories of wastewater treatment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez-Garcia, G.; Moreira, M.T.

    2012-11-15

    The main objective of this paper is to present the Direct Emissions Estimation Model (DEEM), a model for the estimation of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This model is consistent with non-specific but widely used models such as AS/AD and ASM no. 1 and presents the benefits of simplicity and application over a common WWTP simulation platform, BioWin Registered-Sign , making it suitable for Life Cycle Assessment and Carbon Footprint studies. Its application in a Spanish WWTP indicates direct N{sub 2}O emissions to be 8 times larger than those associated with electricity use and thus relevant for LCA. CO{sub 2} emissions can be of similar importance to electricity-associated ones provided that 20% of them are of non-biogenic origin. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A model has been developed for the estimation of GHG emissions in WWTP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model was consistent with both ASM no. 1 and AS/AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O emissions are 8 times more relevant than the one associated with electricity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions are as important as electricity if 20% of it is non-biogenic.

  11. A Microcantilever Sensor Array for the Detection and Inventory of Desert Tortoises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venedam, R. J.; Dillingham, T. R.

    2008-07-01

    We†have†designed†and†tested†a†portable†instrument†consisting†of†a†small†infrared†camera†coupled†with†an†array†of†piezoresistive†microcantilever†sensors†that†is†used†to†provide†real-time,†non-invasive data on desert tortoise den occupancy. The piezoresistive microcantilever (PMC) sensors are used to obtain a chemical ďsignatureĒ of tortoise presence from the air deep within the dens, and provide data in cases where the camera cannot extend deep enough into the den to provide visual evidence of tortoise presence. The infrared camera was used to verify the PMC data during testing, and in many cases, such as shallower dens, may be used to provide exact numbers on den populations.

  12. Revision of species inventory checklists for Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, N.T. )

    1990-10-01

    This report revises and updates the 1974 report by W. C. Martin and W. L. Wagner, Biological Survey of Kirtland Air Force Base (East). The biological communities of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) are described with respect to the Biome classification system of Brown (1982), and a standardized system of habitat types is proposed based on biome and soil type. The potential occurrence of state or federally endangered species is discussed. No species listed as endangered or threatened is known to occur on KAFB, although five are identified as potentially occurring. Updated lists of amphibians, reptiles, breeding birds, mammals, and plants are presented. 18 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Green alternatives to toxic release inventory (TRI) chemicals in the process industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, I.; Baron, J.; Hamilton, C.

    1995-12-01

    Driven by TRI reporting requirements, the chemical process industry is searching for innovative ways to reduce pollution at the source. Distinct environmental advantages of biobased green chemicals (biochemicals) mean are attractive alternatives to petrochemicals. Biochemicals are made from renewable raw materials in biological processes, such as aerobic and anaerobic fermentation, that operate at ambient temperatures and pressures, and produce only nontoxic waste products. Key TRI chemicals and several classes of commodity and intermediate compounds, used on consumer end-products manufacturing, are examined and alternatives are suggested. Specific substitution options for chlorofluorocarbons, industrial solvents, and commodity organic and inorganic chemicals are reviewed. Currently encouraged pollution prevention alternatives in the manufacturing sector are briefly examined for their long-term feasibility such as bioalternatives to bleaching in the pulp & paper industry, solvent cleaning in the electronics and dry cleaning industries, and using petroleum-based feedstocks in the plastics industry. Total life cycle and cost/benefit analyses are employed to determine whether biochemicals are environmentally feasible and commercially viable as pollution prevention tools. Currently available green chemicals along with present and projected costs and premiums are also presented. Functional compatibility of biochemicals with petrochemicals and bioprocessing systems with conventional chemical processing methods are explored. This review demonstrates that biochemicals can be used cost effectively in certain industrial chemical operations due to their added environmental benefits.

  14. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2009 ¬Ö Main Text

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    xiii Table 4-82: HCFC-22 Production (Gg) .................................................................................................................. 4-61 Table 4-83: Quantitative Uncertainty Estimates for HFC-23 Emissions from HCFC-22 Production (Tg CO 2 Eq. and Percent) .................................................................................................................................................................... 4-62 Table 4-84: Emissions of HFCs and PFCs from ODS

  15. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2009 ¬Ö Main Text

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Emissions from Metallurgical Coke Production (Thousand Metric Tons) .............................................................................................................. 4-40 Table 4-56: Production and Consumption Data for the Calculation of CO 2 Emissions from Metallurgical Coke Production (million ft 3 ) ............................................................................................................................................ 4-41 Table 4-57: CO 2 Emission Factors

  16. SU-E-T-464: On the Equivalence of the Quality Correction Factor for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorriaux, J; Paganetti, H; Testa, M; Giantsoudi, D; Schuemann, J; Bertrand, D; Orban de Xivry, J.; Lee, J; Palmans, H; Vynckier, S; Sterpin, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In current practice, most proton therapy centers apply IAEA TRS-398 reference dosimetry protocol. Quality correction factors (kQ) take into account in the dose determination process the differences in beam qualities used for calibration unit and for treatment unit. These quality correction factors are valid for specific reference conditions. TRS-398 reference conditions should be achievable in both scattered proton beams (i.e. DS) and scanned proton beams (i.e. PBS). However, it is not a priori clear if TRS-398 kQ data, which are based on Monte Carlo (MC) calculations in scattered beams, can be used for scanned beams. Using TOPAS-Geant4 MC simulations, the study aims to determine whether broad beam quality correction factors calculated in TRS-398 can be directly applied to PBS delivery modality. Methods: As reference conditions, we consider a 10◊10◊10 cm{sup 3} homogeneous dose distribution delivered by PBS system in a water phantom (32/10 cm range/modulation) and an air cavity placed at the center of the spread-out-Bragg-peak. In order to isolate beam differences, a hypothetical broad beam is simulated. This hypothetical beam reproduces exactly the same range modulation, and uses the same energy layers than the PBS field. Ion chamber responses are computed for the PBS and hypothetical beams and then compared. Results: For an air cavity of 2◊2◊0.2 cm{sup 3}, the ratio of ion chamber responses for the PBS and hypothetical beam qualities is 0.9991 Ī 0.0016. Conclusion: Quality correction factors are insensitive to the delivery pattern of the beam (broad beam or PBS), as long as similar dose distributions are achieved. This investigation, for an air cavity, suggests that broad beam quality correction factors published in TRS-398 can be applied for scanned beams. J. Sorriaux is financially supported by a public-private partnership involving the company Ion Beam Applications (IBA)

  17. Final Report, Volume 4, The Develpoment of Qualification Standards forCast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation was carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890-5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890-5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly affected structure. It was also observed that when compared to the A890-4A grade A890-5A grade is more sensitive to heat treatment. From the ferrite and hardness measurement a correlation was developed between toughness, volume percentage ferrite and hardness of the material. From SEM and EDS the type of intermetallic phase present and its chemical composition was determined. The best method for calculating volume percentage ferrite was determined between the Ferits

  18. Final Report, Volume 4, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 √?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ě for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬ģ and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation was carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬ģ and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890 √?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬? 5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890 √?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬? 5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly

  19. Natural Gas Methane Emissions in the United States Greenhouse Gas Inventory: Sources, Uncertainties and Opportunities for Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Garvin; Warner, Ethan; Steinberg, Daniel; Brandt, Adam

    2015-11-19

    Presentation summarizing key findings of a Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Report at an Environmental Protection Agency workshop: 'Stakeholder Workshop on EPA GHG Data on Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems' on November 19, 2015. For additional information see the JISEA report, 'Estimating U.S. Methane Emissions from the Natural Gas Supply Chain: Approaches, Uncertainties, Current Estimates, and Future Studies' NREL/TP-6A50-62820.

  20. Inventory of Safety-related Codes and Standards for Energy Storage Systems with some Experiences related to Approval and Acceptance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.

    2014-09-11

    The purpose of this document is to identify laws, rules, model codes, codes, standards, regulations, specifications (CSR) related to safety that could apply to stationary energy storage systems (ESS) and experiences to date securing approval of ESS in relation to CSR. This information is intended to assist in securing approval of ESS under current CSR and to identification of new CRS or revisions to existing CRS and necessary supporting research and documentation that can foster the deployment of safe ESS.