National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for u-quark mass u-quark

  1. Phase Structure and Instability Problem in Color Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukushima

    2005-10-22

    We address the phase structure of color superconducting quark matter at high quark density. Under the electric and color neutrality conditions there appear various phases as a result of the Fermi surface mismatch among different quark flavors induced by finite strange quark mass; the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase where quarks are all energy gapped, the u-quark superconducting (uSC) phase where u-quarks are paired with either d- or s-quarks, the d-quark superconducting (dSC) phase that is the d-quark analogue of the uSC phase, the two-flavor superconducting (2SC) phase where u- and d-quarks are paired, and the unpaired quark matter (UQM) that is normal quark matter without pairing. Besides these possibilities, when the Fermi surface mismatch is large enough to surpass the gap energy, the gapless superconducting phases are expected. We focus our discussion on the chromomagnetic instability problem related to the gapless CFL (gCFL) onset and explore the instability regions on the phase diagram as a function of the temperature and the quark chemical potential. We sketch how to reach stable physical states inside the instability regions.

  2. Quark Contributions to Baryon Magnetic Moments in Full, Quenched and Partially Quenched QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derek B. Leinweber

    2004-06-02

    The chiral nonanalytic behaviour of quark-flavor contributions to the magnetic moments of octet baryons are determined in full, quenched and partially-quenched QCD, using an intuitive and efficient diagrammatic formulation of quenched and partially-quenched chiral perturbation theory. The technique provides a separation of quark-sector magnetic-moment contributions into direct sea-quark loop, valence-quark, indirect sea-quark loop and quenched valence contributions, the latter being the conventional view of the quenched approximation. Both meson and baryon mass violations of SU(3)-flavor symmetry are accounted for. Following a comprehensive examination of the individual quark-sector contributions to octet baryon magnetic moments, numerous opportunities to observe and test the underlying structure of baryons and the nature of chiral nonanalytic behavior in QCD and its quenched variants are discussed. In particular, the valence u-quark contribution to the proton magnetic moment provides the optimal opportunity to directly view nonanalytic behavior associated with the meson cloud of full QCD and the quenched meson cloud of quenched QCD. The u quark in Sigma^+ provides the best opportunity to display the artifacts of the quenched approximation.

  3. Quenched chiral perturbation theory for baryon form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derek B. Leinweber

    2001-12-17

    A new intuitive method for the rapid calculation of the leading nonanalytic behavior of hadronic observables in quenched chiral perturbation theory is presented. After proving the technique in a consideration of baryon masses, the quenched magnetic moments of octet baryons are addressed. The technique provides a separation of magnetic moment contributions into full, sea, valence and quenched valence contributions, the latter being the conventional view of the quenched approximation. Both baryon mass and meson mass violations of SU(3)-flavor symmetry are accounted for. A comprehensive examination of the individual quark-sector contributions to octet baryon magnetic moments reveals that the u-quark contribution to the proton magnetic moment provides an optimal opportunity to directly view nonanalytic behavior associated with the quenched meson cloud of baryons in the quenched approximation.

  4. Quark Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasser, Juerg

    2005-10-26

    In my talk, I reviewed some basic aspects of quark masses: what do they mean, how can they be determined, what is our present knowledge on them. The talk was addressed to non specialists in the field, and so is this write up.

  5. A simple solution of the proton spin crisis and supersymmetry crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladan Pankovic

    2014-12-15

    In this work we suggest a simple theoretical model of the proton able to effectively solve proton spin crisis. Within domain of applicability of this simple model proton consists only of two u quarks and one d quarks (two of which have spin opposite to proton and one identical to proton) and one neutral vector phi meson (with spin two times larger than proton spin and directed identically to proton spin). This model is in full agreement not only with existing DIS experiments, but also with spin and electric charge conservation as well as in a satisfactory agreement with rest mass-energy conservation (since phi meson mass is close to proton rest mass). Our model opens an interesting possibility of the solution of the quarks and leptons families problem (proton is not an absolutely non-strange particle, but only a particle with almost totally effectively hidden strange). Also we suggest a possible "first step" toward the solution of the supersymmetry crisis using so-called superexclusion principle. According to this principle usual particles (electron, neutrino,...) can exist actually and virtually, while their supersymmetric partners, s-particles (selectron, neutralino, ...) can exist (super)exclusively virtually but not actually.

  6. Nucleon tensor charges and electric dipole moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Pitschmann; Chien-Yeah Seng; Craig D. Roberts; Sebastian M. Schmidt

    2014-12-22

    A symmetry-preserving Dyson-Schwinger equation treatment of a vector-vector contact interaction is used to compute dressed-quark-core contributions to the nucleon $\\sigma$-term and tensor charges. The latter enable one to directly determine the effect of dressed-quark electric dipole moments (EDMs) on neutron and proton EDMs. The presence of strong scalar and axial-vector diquark correlations within ground-state baryons is a prediction of this approach. These correlations are active participants in all scattering events and thereby modify the contribution of the singly-represented valence-quark relative to that of the doubly-represented quark. Regarding the proton $\\sigma$-term and that part of the proton mass which owes to explicit chiral symmetry breaking, with a realistic $d$-$u$ mass splitting the singly-represented $d$-quark contributes 37% more than the doubly-represented $u$-quark; and in connection with the proton's tensor charges, $\\delta_T u$, $\\delta_T d$, the ratio $\\delta_T d/\\delta_T u$ is 18% larger than anticipated from simple quark models. Of particular note, the size of $\\delta_T u$ is a sensitive measure of the strength of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking; and $\\delta_T d$ measures the amount of axial-vector diquark correlation within the proton, vanishing if such correlations are absent.

  7. Semi-Inclusive Charged-Pion Electroproduction off Protons and Deuterons: Cross Sections, Ratios and Access to the Quark-Parton Model at Low Energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Asaturyan, R; Mkrtchyan, H; Navasardyan, T; Tadevosyan, V; Adams, G S; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Bertoncini, C; Blok, H P; Boeglin, W U; Bosted, P E; Breuer, H; Christy, M E; Connell, S H; Cui, Y; Dalton, M M; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; El Khayari, N; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Huber, G M; Hungerford, E; Jiang, X; Jones, M; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Kelly, J J; Keppel, C E; Kubarovsky, V; Li, Y; Liang, Y; Mack, D; Malace, S P; Markowitz, P; McGrath, E; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, A; Moziak, B; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Opper, A K; Ostapenko, T; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R; Stoler, P; Tang, L; Ungaro, M; Uzzle, A; Vidakovic, S; Villano, A; Vulcan, W F; Wang, M; Warren, G; Wesselmann, F R; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yuan, L

    2012-01-11

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (?±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2 > 4 GeV2 and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2 2 2, and cover a range in the Bjorken scaling variable 0.2 t2 2. The invariant mass that goes undetected, Mx or W', is in the nucleon resonance region, W' t2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for ?+ and ?-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.

  8. Semi-inclusive charged-pion electroproduction off protons and deuterons: Cross sections, ratios, and access to the quark-parton model at low energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Asaturyan, R.; Ent, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Adams, G. S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Angelescu, T.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, A.; et al

    2012-01-01

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (?±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2 > 4 GeV2 and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2 2 2, and cover a range in the Bjorken scaling variable 0.2 t2 2. The invariant mass that goes undetected, Mx or W',more »is in the nucleon resonance region, W' t2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for ?+ and ?-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.« less

  9. Semi-Inclusive Charged-Pion Electroproduction off Protons and Deuterons: Cross Sections, Ratios and Access to the Quark-Parton Model at Low Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Asaturyan; R. Ent; H. Mkrtchyan; T. Navasardyan; V. Tadevosyan; G. S. Adams; A. Ahmidouch; T. Angelescu; J. Arrington; A. Asaturyan; O. K. Baker; N. Benmouna; C. Bertoncini; H. P. Blok; W. U. Boeglin; P. E. Bosted; H. Breuer; M. E. Christy; S. H. Connell; Y. Cui; M. M. Dalton; S. Danagoulian; D. Day; J. A. Dunne; D. Dutta; N. El Khayari; H. C. Fenker; V. V. Frolov; L. Gan; D. Gaskell; K. Hafidi; W. Hinton; R. J. Holt; T. Horn; G. M. Huber; E. Hungerford; X. Jiang; M. Jones; K. Joo; N. Kalantarians; J. J. Kelly; C. E. Keppel; V. Kubarovsky; Y. Li; Y. Liang; D. Mack; S. P. Malace; P. Markowitz; E. McGrath; P. McKee; D. G. Meekins; A. Mkrtchyan; B. Moziak; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; A. K. Opper; T. Ostapenko; P. E. Reimer; J. Reinhold; J. Roche; S. E. Rock; E. Schulte; E. Segbefia; C. Smith; G. R. Smith; P. Stoler; L. Tang; M. Ungaro; A. Uzzle; S. Vidakovic; A. Villano; W. F. Vulcan; M. Wang; G. Warren; F. R. Wesselmann; B. Wojtsekhowski; S. A. Wood; C. Xu; L. Yuan; X. Zheng

    2011-12-15

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions ($\\pi^\\pm$) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared $W^2$ > 4 GeV$^2$ and range in four-momentum transfer squared $2 pion production mechanisms. The x, z and $P_t^2$ dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for $\\pi^+$ and $\\pi^-$) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of $d$ quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for $u$ quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.

  10. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  11. Mass spectrometric immunoassay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randall W (Phoenix, AZ); Williams, Peter (Phoenix, AZ); Krone, Jennifer Reeve (Granbury, TX)

    2007-12-04

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  12. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  13. Light Quark Mass Reweighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi Liu; Norman H. Christ; Chulwoo Jung

    2012-06-01

    We present a systematic study of the effectiveness of light quark mass reweighting. This method allows a single lattice QCD ensemble, generated with a specific value of the dynamical light quark mass, to be used to determine results for other, nearby light dynamical quark masses. We study two gauge field ensembles generated with 2+1 flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions with light quark masses m_l=0.02 (m_\\pi=620 MeV) and m_l=0.01 (m_\\pi=420 MeV). We reweight each ensemble to determine results which could be computed directly from the other and check the consistency of the reweighted results with the direct results. The large difference between the 0.02 and 0.01 light quark masses suggests that this is an aggressive application of reweighting as can be seen from fluctuations in the magnitude of the reweighting factor by four orders of magnitude. Never-the-less, a comparison of the reweighed topological charge, average plaquette, residual mass, pion mass, pion decay constant, and scalar correlator between these two ensembles shows agreement well described by the statistical errors. The issues of the effective number of configurations and finite sample size bias are discussed. An examination of the topological charge distribution implies that it is more favorable to reweight from heavier mass to lighter quark mass.

  14. Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

    2008-12-09

    Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

  15. Multiple mass solvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Jegerlehner

    1997-08-29

    We present a general method to construct multiple mass solvers from standard algorithms. As an example, the BiCGstab-M algorithm is derived.

  16. Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

  17. The Origins of Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-07-30

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  18. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

    1994-08-16

    The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

  19. Seismic mass Top electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Michael

    assembly process. For the measurements of the physical dimensions of the seismic mass a micrometer was usedSeismic mass Top electrode Bottom electrode x C1 C2 Chapter 4: The Micromachined Sensing Element supplied by Druck, Ltd., Groby, Leics. The manufacturing process at Druck was still in its experimental

  20. The Origins of Mass

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  1. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IEKP, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  2. Mass of Ca-36 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tribble, Robert E.; Cossairt, J. D.; Kenefick, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    VIK W C VO I. UMK 15, 5 UMBER 6 Mass of ~Cat R. E. Tribble, ~ J. D. Cossairt, and R. A. Kenefick Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas AChM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 14 October 1976) The ' Ca('He, He)' Ca... reaction has been used to provide the first observation of the nuclide ' Ca. The Q value and mass excess were found to be ?57.58~0.04 and ?6.44+0.04 MeV, respectively. The new mass completes four members of the A = 36 isobaric quintet and hence serves...

  3. Heavy Hybrid mesons Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Iddir; L. Semlala

    2006-11-25

    We estimate the ground state masses of the heavy hybrid mesons using a phenomenological QCD-type potential. 0^{- -},1^{- -},0^{- +},1^{- +} and 0^{+ -} J^{PC} states are considered.

  4. Solids mass flow determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Macko, Joseph E. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  5. Photon: history, mass, charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. B. Okun

    2006-02-13

    The talk consists of three parts. ``History'' briefly describes the emergence and evolution of the concept of photon during the first two decades of the 20th century. ``Mass'' gives a short review of the literature on the upper limit of the photon's mass. ``Charge'' is a critical discussion of the existing interpretation of searches for photon charge. Schemes, in which all photons are charged, are grossly inconsistent. A model with three kinds of photons (positive, negative and neutral) seems at first sight to be more consistent, but turns out to have its own serious problems.

  6. Static-light meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Static-light meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD Karl Jansen, Chris Michael, Andrea Shindler of Groningen. · Spain: University of Valencia. · Switzerland: University of Bern. Marc Wagner, "Static-light meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD", July 16, 2008 #12;Introduction · Static-light meson

  7. Engineering rock mass classifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a reference on rock mass classification, consolidating into one handy source information widely scattered through the literature. Includes new, unpublished material and case histories. Presents the fundamental concepts of classification schemes and critically appraises their practical application in industrial projects such as tunneling and mining.

  8. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  9. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  10. Deuterium Pellet Mass Redistribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    Deuterium Pellet Mass Redistribution G L Schmidt, S Jardin, E Fredrickson, G Taylor P2.10P2 ·Pellets of solid hydrogen are used routinely for plasma fuelling and perturbation studies in tokamak discharges.[1]. ·The pellet source function determines to a large extent the pellet's effectiveness either

  11. Residential Thermal Mass Construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thieken, J. S.

    1988-01-01

    The southwest has long known the value of building homes with high mass materials. The ancient Pueblo Indians found that by using "adobe" they could capture the energy necessary to survive the harsh desert climate. Our ancestors knew that a heavy...

  12. Riddle of the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yu. Smirnov

    2015-02-16

    We discuss some known approaches and results as well as few new ideas concerning origins and nature of neutrino mass. The key issues include (i) connections of neutrino and charged fermions masses, relation between masses and mixing, energy scale of new physics behind neutrino mass where possibilities spread from the Planck and GUT masses down to a sub-eV scale. The data hint two different new physics involved in generation of neutrino mass. Determination of the CP phase as well as mass hierarchy can play important role in identification of new physics. It may happen that sterile neutrinos provide the key to resolve the riddle.

  13. Riddle of the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirnov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    We discuss some known approaches and results as well as few new ideas concerning origins and nature of neutrino mass. The key issues include (i) connections of neutrino and charged fermions masses, relation between masses and mixing, energy scale of new physics behind neutrino mass where possibilities spread from the Planck and GUT masses down to a sub-eV scale. The data hint two different new physics involved in generation of neutrino mass. Determination of the CP phase as well as mass hierarchy can play important role in identification of new physics. It may happen that sterile neutrinos provide the key to resolve the riddle.

  14. Tera-Leptons Shadows over Sinister Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion; M. Khlopov

    2005-07-07

    The role of Sinister Heavy Fermions in recent Glashow's SU(3)*SU(2)*SU(2)'*U(1) model is to offer in a unique frame relic Helium-like products (an ingenious candidate to the dark matter puzzle), a solution to the See-Saw mechanism for light neutrino masses as well as to strong CP violation problem in QCD. The Sinister model requires a three additional families of leptons and quarks, but only the lightest of them Heavy U-quark and E-"electron" are stable. Final neutral Helium-like UUUEE state is an ideal evanescent dark-matter candidate. However it is reached by multi-body interactions along a tail of more manifest secondary frozen blocks. They should be now here polluting the surrounding matter. Moreover, in opposition to effective pair quark annihilations, there is no such an early or late tera-lepton pairs suppressions, because:a) electromagnetic interactions are "weaker" than nuclear ones and b) helium ion 4He++ is able to attract and capture, E-, fixing it into a hybrid tera helium "ion" trap. This leads to a pile up of relic (4HeE)+ traces, a lethal compound for any Sinister Universe. This capture leaves no Tera-Lepton frozen in Ep relic (otherwise an ideal catalyzer to achieve effective late E+E- annihilations possibly saving the model). The (4HeE)+ Coulomb screening is also avoiding the synthesis of the desired UUUEE hidden dark matter gas. The e(4HeE)+ behave chemically like an anomalous hydrogen isotope.Also tera-positronium (eE+) relics are over-abundant and they behave like an anomalous hydrogen atom: these gases do not fit by many orders of magnitude known severe bounds on hydrogen anomalous isotope, making grave shadows over a Sinister Universe. However a surprising and resolver role for Tera-Pions in UHECR astrophysics has been revealed.

  15. Twisted mass finite volume effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

  16. Nanoscale mass conveyors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Brian C. (Oakland, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

    2008-03-11

    A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

  17. HIGEE Mass Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

    1986-01-01

    compared with other more conventional mass transfer equipment, will show up to advantage at reasonably large capacity but compare poorly for low capacity duties. (3) Capacity and separation capability (i.e. number of stages) in a HIGEE... are not independent variables, because diameter features in both. If the casing dimensions, OD and axial length, are arbitrarily fixed; then for a duty requiring a large number of stages the packing thickness will be greater and the ID correspondingly smaller...

  18. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  19. Radiative Gaugino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar; Antonio Masiero

    1995-01-12

    We investigate the possibility that gauginos are massless at tree level and that the U(1) R-invariance is broken spontaneously by Higgs vevs, like the chiral symmetry of quarks in the standard model, or else explicitly by dimension 2 or 3 SUSY-breaking terms in the low energy effective Lagrangian. Gluino and lightest neutralino masses then depend on only a few parameters. For a SUSY-breaking scale <~ 400 GeV, the gluino and lightest neutralino have masses typically in the range 1/10 ~ 2 1/2 GeV. On the other hand, for a SUSY-breaking scale several TeV or larger, radiative contributions can yield gluino and lightest neutralino masses of O(50-300) GeV and O(10-30) GeV, respectively. As long as the Higgs vev is the only source of R-invariance breaking, or if SUSY breaking only appears in dimension 2 terms in the effective Lagrangian, the gluino is generically the lightest SUSY particle, modifying the usual phenomenology in interesting ways.

  20. Solution mass measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, W.; Marshall, R.S.; Osborn, L.C.; Picard, R.; Thomas, C.C. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    This report describes the efforts to develop and demonstrate a solution mass measurement system for use at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. Because of inaccuracy of load cell measurements, our major effort was directed towards the pneumatic bubbler tube. The differential pressure between the air inlet to the bubbler tube and the glovebox interior is measured and is proportional to the solution mass in the tank. An inexpensive, reliable pressure transducer system for measuring solution mass in vertical, cylindrical tanks was developed, tested, and evaluated in a laboratory test bed. The system can withstand the over- and underpressures resulting from solution transfer operations and can prevent solution backup into the measurement pressure transducer during transfers. Drifts, noise, quantization error, and other effects limit the accuracy to 30 g. A transportable calibration system using a precision machined tank, pneumatic bubbler tubes, and a Ruska DDR 6000 electromanometer was designed, fabricated, tested, and evaluated. Resolution of the system is +-3.5 g out of 50 kg. The calibration error is 5 g, using room-temperature water as the calibrating fluid. Future efforts will be directed towards in-plant test and evaluation of the tank measurement systems. 16 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Top Mass and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen-Chu Chen

    2008-05-15

    The top quark was discovered in 1995. The top quark mass is now well measured at the Tevatron, with uncertainty getting below 1% of the top mass. The world average from last year was 170.9 $\\pm$ 1.8 GeV/$c^2$. The new CDF measurement is 172 $\\pm$ 1.2 (stat) $\\pm$ 1.5 (sys) GeV/$c^2$, and D0 will soon present a new measurement. The top quark mass is an important parameter in the Standard Model, and should be measured as precisely as possible. To learn more about the top quark observed and study possible new physics, other properties also should be measured. At the Tevatron, the charge of the top quark can be measured directly. Examples of other properties studied and reported in this presentation are W helicity, top decay branching ratio to b ($R_b$), searches for $t \\to H b$ and for flavor changing neutral current (FCNC). The results are all consistent with the Standard Model within current statistics. With significantly more data being collected at the Tevatron, precision measurements of the top properties are just starting.

  2. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

    2011-06-28

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  3. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

    2007-09-18

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  4. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Cerrito

    2004-07-16

    Preliminary results on the measurement of the top quark mass at the Tevatron Collider are presented. In the dilepton decay channel, the CDF Collaboration measures m{sub t} = 175.0{sub -16.9}{sup +17.4}(stat.){+-}8.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 126 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (Run II). In the lepton plus jets channel, the CDF Collaboration measures 177.5{sub -9.4}{sup +12.7}(stat.) {+-} 7.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, using a sample of {approx} 102 pb{sup -1} at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The D0 Collaboration has newly applied a likelihood technique to improve the analysis of {approx} 125 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV (Run I), with the result: m{sub t} = 180.1 {+-} 3.6(stat.) {+-}3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The latter is combined with all the measurements based on the data collected in Run I to yield the most recent and comprehensive experimental determination of the top quark mass: m{sub t} = 178.0 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 3.3(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  5. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

  6. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    In this proceedings I review the physics that future experiments will use to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  7. Peak mass and dynamical friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo; M. Gambera

    1995-06-09

    We show how the results given by several authors relatively to the mass of a density peak are changed when small scale substructure induced by dynamical friction are taken into account. The peak mass obtained is compared to the result of Peacock \\& Heavens (1990) and to the peak mass when dynamical friction is absent to show how these effects conspire to reduce the mass accreted by the peak.

  8. Energy Grasses for the Masses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1-D: The Pitch Energy Grasses for the Masses Jason Force, Chief Executive Officer, Iron Goat Technology, Inc.

  9. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  10. WMAPping out Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron Pierce; Hitoshi Murayama

    2003-10-28

    Recent data from from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) place important bounds on the neutrino sector. The precise determination of the baryon number in the universe puts a strong constraint on the number of relativistic species during Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis. WMAP data, when combined with the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), also directly constrain the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. These results impinge upon a neutrino oscillation interpretation of the result from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND). We also note that the Heidelberg--Moscow evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay is only consistent with the WMAP+2dFGRS data for the largest values of the nuclear matrix element.

  11. The Subatomic Particle Mass Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Oldershaw

    2010-09-20

    Representative members of the subatomic particle mass spectrum in the 100 MeV to 7,000 MeV range are retrodicted to a first approximation using the Kerr solution of General Relativity. The particle masses appear to form a restricted set of quantized values of a Kerr-based angular momentum-mass relation: m = (sqrt n)(M), where values of n are a set of discrete integers and M is a revised Planck mass. A fractal paradigm manifesting global discrete self-similarity is critical to a proper determination of M, which differs from the conventional Planck mass by roughly 19 orders of magnitude. This exceedingly simple and generic mass equation retrodicts the masses of a representative set of 27 well-known particles with an average relative error of 1.6%. A more rigorous mass formula, which includes the total spin angular momentum rule of Quantum Mechanics, the canonical spin values of the particles, and the dimensionless rotational parameter of the Kerr angular momentum-mass relation, is able to retrodict the masses of the 8 dominant baryons in the 900 MeV to 1700 MeV range at the 99.7% level, on average.

  12. MASS STORAGE SYSTEMS AND LARGE RESEARCH LIBRARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Symposium on Mass Storage Systems, Denver, CO, April15-17, 1980 MASS STORAGE SYSTEMS AND LARGE RESEARCHSymposium on Mass Storage Systems, Denver, Colorado, April

  13. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  14. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  15. Electron Effective Mass in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Ariel; Amir Natan

    2012-08-12

    The particle effective mass in graphene is a challenging concept because the commonly used theoretical expression is mathematically divergent. In this paper, we use basic principles to present a simple theoretical expression for the effective mass that is suitable for both parabolic and non-parabolic isotropic materials. We demonstrate that this definition is consistent with the definition of the cyclotron effective mass, which is one of the common methods for effective mass measurement in solid state materials. We apply the proposed theoretical definition to graphene and demonstrate linear dependence of the effective mass on momentum, as confirmed by experimental cyclotron resonance measurements. Therefore, the proposed definition of the effective mass can be used for non-parabolic materials such as graphene.

  16. Quarkonia and the Pole Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. H. Hoang; M. C. Smith; T. Stelzer; S. Willenbrock

    1999-04-07

    The pole mass of a heavy quark is ambiguous by an amount of order $\\Lambda_{QCD}$. We show that the heavy-quark potential, $V(r)$, is similarly ambiguous, but that the total static energy, $2M_{pole}+V(r)$, is unambiguous when expressed in terms of a short-distance mass. This implies that the extraction of a short-distance mass from the quarkonium spectrum is free of an ambiguity of order $\\Lambda_{QCD}$, in contrast with the pole mass.

  17. Relativistic mass and modern physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. K. Silagadze

    2014-12-15

    At first sight, arguments for and against the notion of relativistic mass look like a notorious intra-Lilliputian quarrel between Big-Endians (those who broke their eggs at the larger end) and Little-Endians. However, upon closer inspection we discover that the relativistic mass notion is alien to the spirit of modern physics to a much greater extent than it seems. To demonstrate an abyss between the modern approach and archaic notions, in this paper we explore how the concept of mass is introduced in modern physics. This modern approach reveals a deep cohomological origin of mass.

  18. Static-light meson masses from twisted mass lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ETM Collaboration; Karl Jansen; Chris Michael; Andrea Shindler; Marc Wagner

    2008-08-15

    We compute the static-light meson spectrum using two-flavor Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. We have considered five different values for the light quark mass corresponding to 300 MeV < m_PS < 600 MeV. We have extrapolated our results, to make predictions regarding the spectrum of B and B_s mesons.

  19. Gravity and the Fermion Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth Dalton

    2010-06-11

    It is shown that gravity generates mass for the fermion. It does so by coupling directly with the spinor field. The coupling term is invariant with respect to the electroweak gauge group $ U(1) \\otimes SU(2)_L. $ It replaces the fermion mass term $ m\\bar{\\psi} \\psi $.

  20. Fermion Masses without Yukawa Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Borzumati; Glennys Farrar; Nir Polonsky; Scott Thomas

    1998-05-13

    Radiatively generated fermion masses without tree level Yukawa couplings are re-analyzed within supersymmetric models. Special emphasis is given to the possible appearance of color and charge breaking vacua. Several scenarios in which the radiative mechanism can be accomodated for the first, second, and third generation fermion masses are presented. Some of these require a low scale of supersymmetry breaking.

  1. Mass Exchange Processes with Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. L. Krapivsky

    2015-03-07

    We investigate a system of interacting clusters evolving through mass exchange and supplemented by input of small clusters. Three possibilities depending on the rate of exchange generically occur when input is homogeneous: continuous growth, gelation, and instantaneous gelation. We mostly study the growth regime using scaling methods. An exchange process with reaction rates equal to the product of reactant masses admits an exact solution which allows us to justify the validity of scaling approaches in this special case. We also investigate exchange processes with a localized input. We show that if the diffusion coefficients are mass-independent, the cluster mass distribution becomes stationary and develops an algebraic tail far away from the source.

  2. The neutron star mass distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiziltan, B; Kottas, A; De Yoreo, M; Thorsett, SE

    2013-01-01

    Science Library, Vol. 326, Neutron Stars 1 : Equation ofBlack holes, white dwarfs, and neutron stars: The physics ofPhys. Rev. , 55, 364 The Neutron Star Mass Distribution van

  3. Quark Masses and Chiral Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Creutz

    1995-05-18

    I discuss the global structure of the strongly interacting gauge theory of quarks and gluons as a function of the quark masses and the CP violating parameter $\\theta$. I concentrate on whether a first order phase transition occurs at $\\theta=\\pi.$ I show why this is expected when multiple flavors have a small degenerate mass. This transition can be removed by sufficient flavor-breaking. I speculate on the implications of this structure for Wilson's lattice fermions.

  4. Energy or Mass and Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo R Gonzalez-Martin

    2010-07-19

    A review. Problems: 1-Many empirical parameters and large dimension number; 2-Gravitation and Electrodynamics are challenged by dark matter and energy. Energy and nonlinear electrodynamics are fundamental in a unified nonlinear interaction. Nuclear energy appears as nonlinear SU(2) magnetic energy. Gravitation and electromagnetism are unified giving Einstein's equation and a geometric energy momentum tensor. A solution energy in the newtonian limit gives the gravitational constant G. Outside of this limit G is variable. May be interpreted as dark matter or energy. In vacuum, known gravitational solutions are obtained. Electromagnetism is an SU(2) subgroup. A U(1) limit gives Maxwell's equations. Geometric fields determine a generalized Dirac equation and are the germ of quantum physics. Planck's h and of Einstein's c are given by the potential and the metric. Excitations have quanta of charge, flux and spin determining the FQHE. There are only three stable 1/2 spin fermions. Mass is a form of energy. The rest energies of the fermions give the proton/electron mass ratio. Potential excitations have energies equal to the weak boson masses allowing a geometric interpretation of Weinberg's angle. SU(2) gives the anomalous magnetic moments of proton, electron, neutron and generates nuclear range attractive potentials strong enough to produce the binding energies of the deuteron and other nuclides. Lepton and meson masses are due to topological excitations. The geometric mass spectrum is satisfactory. The proton has a triple structure. The alpha constant is a geometric number.

  5. Neutrino Mass and Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David O. Caldwell

    1998-12-01

    Despite direct observations favoring a low mass density, a critical density universe with a neutrino component of dark matter provides the best existing model to explain the observed structure of the universe over more than three orders of magnitude in distance scale. In principle this hot dark matter could consist of one, two, or three species of active neutrinos. If all present indications for neutrino mass are correct, however, only the two-species (muon neutrino and tau neutrino) possibility works. This requires the existence of at least one light sterile neutrino to explain the solar electron neutrino deficit via nu(e)->nu(s), leaving nu(mu)->nu(tau) as the explanation for the anomalous nu(mu)/nu(e) ratio produced by atmospheric neutrinos, and having the LSND experiment demonstrating via anti-nu(mu)-> anti-nu(e) the mass difference between the light nu(e)-nu(s) pair and the heavier nu(mu)-nu(tau) pair required for dark matter. Other experiments do not conflict with the LSND results when all the experiments are analyzed in the same way, and when analyzed conservatively the LSND data is quite compatible with the mass difference needed for dark matter. Further support for this mass pattern is provided by the need for a sterile neutrino to rescue heavy-element nucleosynthesis in supernovae, and it could even aid the concordance in light element abundances from the early universe.

  6. Big Mysteries: The Higgs Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-04-28

    With the discovery of what looks to be the Higgs boson, LHC researchers are turning their attention to the next big question, which is the predicted mass of the newly discovered particles. When the effects of quantum mechanics is taken into account, the mass of the Higgs boson should be incredibly high...perhaps upwards of a quadrillion times higher than what was observed. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains how it is that the theory predicts that the mass is so large and gives at least one possible theoretical idea that might solve the problem. Whether the proposed idea is the answer or not, this question must be answered by experiments at the LHC or today's entire theoretical paradigm could be in jeopardy.

  7. Big Mysteries: The Higgs Mass

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-06-03

    With the discovery of what looks to be the Higgs boson, LHC researchers are turning their attention to the next big question, which is the predicted mass of the newly discovered particles. When the effects of quantum mechanics is taken into account, the mass of the Higgs boson should be incredibly high...perhaps upwards of a quadrillion times higher than what was observed. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln explains how it is that the theory predicts that the mass is so large and gives at least one possible theoretical idea that might solve the problem. Whether the proposed idea is the answer or not, this question must be answered by experiments at the LHC or today's entire theoretical paradigm could be in jeopardy.

  8. Press Pass - Press Release - Higgs mass constraints

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -mass-constraints-20100726-images.html Fermilab experiments narrow allowed mass range for Higgs boson Batavia, Ill.New constraints on the elusive Higgs particle are more...

  9. Weak scale radiative lepton mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, G.; Hou, W. (Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10764 (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1994-09-01

    We construct a [ital Z][sub 8] model for leptons where all Yukawa couplings are of order unity, but known lepton masses are generated radiatively, [ital order] [ital by] [ital order]. The seed is provided by fourth generation leptons [ital E] and [ital N], and two additional Higgs doublets are introduced to give nearest-neighbor Yukawa couplings. Loop masses are generated when [ital Z][sub 8] is [ital softly] broken down to [ital Z][sub 2], while [ital m][sub [ital e

  10. A relativistically invariant mass operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm I. Fushchych

    2002-06-10

    In Ukrain. J. Phys., 1967, V.12, N 5, p.741-746 it was shown how, for a given (discrete) mass spectrum of elementary or hypothetical particles, it was possible to construct a non-trivial algebra G containing a Poincare algebra P as a subalgebra so that the mass operator, defined throughout the space where one of the irreducible representations G is given, is self-conjugate and its spectrum coincides with the given mass spectrum. Such an algebra was constructed in explicit form for the nonrelativistic case, i.e., the generators were written for the algebra. However, the problem of how to assign the algebra G constructively and determine an explicit form of the mass operator in the relativistic case has remained unsolved. In the present work we present a solution of this problem, construct continuum analogs of the classical algebras U(N) and Sp(2N), and show that the problem of including the Poincare algebra can be formulated in the language of wave function equations.

  11. Black Holes of Negative Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1997-05-06

    I demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, regions of negative energy density can undergo gravitational collapse into a black hole. The resultant exterior black hole spacetimes necessarily have negative mass and non-trivial topology. A full theory of quantum gravity, in which topology-changing processes take place, could give rise to such spacetimes.

  12. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

    1984-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  13. Mass Generation and Noncommutative Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2009-02-23

    In this paper we show how it is possible to obtain mass generation in the context of non Abelian gauge field theory, using a non commutative spacetime. This is further confirmed by the modified dispersion relation that results from such a geometry.

  14. Charmonium mass in nuclear matter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, S. H.; Ko, Che Ming.

    2003-01-01

    The mass shift of charmonium states in nuclear matter is studied in the perturbative QCD approach. The leading-order effect due to the change of gluon condensate in nuclear matter is evaluated using the leading-order QCD formula, while the higher...

  15. MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    or heat exchange surfaces ­ Improved mass transfer, especially for immiscible liquids, G/L and L; for example L/L, L/S, S/S, G/L, G/L/Sexample L/L, L/S, S/S, G/L, G/L/S ­ Improved heat transfer to walls directions. Most important types, i i diff t t fgiving different types of flow patterns: ­ a Flat

  16. 1 Files and Databases mass storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Outline 1 Files and Databases mass storage hash functions 2 Dictionaries logical key values nested Jan Verschelde, 28 January 2015 Intro to Computer Science (MCS 260) mass storage and dictionaries L-7 28 January 2015 1 / 32 #12;mass storage dictionaries in Python 1 Files and Databases mass storage

  17. The generalized parton distribution functions and the nucleon spin sum rules in the chiral quark soliton model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Wakamatsu; H. Tsujimoto

    2005-03-29

    The theoretical predictions are given for the forward limit of the unpolarized spin-flip isovector generalized parton distribution function $(E^u - E^d)(x, \\xi, t)$ within the framework of the chiral quark soliton model, with full inclusion of the polarization of Dirac sea quarks. We observe that $[(H^u - H^d) + (E^u - E^d)](x,0,0)$ has a sharp peak around $x=0$, which we interpret as a signal of the importance of the pionic $q \\bar{q}$ excitation with large spatial extension in the transverse direction. Another interesting indication given by the predicted distribution in combination with Ji's angular momentum sum rule is that the $\\bar{d}$-quark carries more angular momentum than the $\\bar{u}$-quark in the proton, which may have some relation with the physics of the violation of the Gottfried sum rule.

  18. Generalized parton distribution functions and the nucleon spin sum rules in the chiral quark soliton model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakamatsu, M.; Tsujimoto, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    The theoretical predictions are given for the forward limit of the unpolarized spin-flip isovector generalized parton distribution function (E{sup u}-E{sup d})(x,{xi},t) within the framework of the chiral quark soliton model, with full inclusion of the polarization of Dirac sea quarks. We observe that [(H{sup u}-H{sup d})+(E{sup u}-E{sup d})](x,0,0) has a sharp peak around x=0, which we interpret as a signal of the importance of the pionic qq excitation with large spatial extension in the transverse direction. Another interesting indication given by the predicted distribution in combination with Ji's angular momentum sum rule is that the d quark carries more angular momentum than the u quark in the proton, which may have some relation with the physics of the violation of the Gottfried sum rule.

  19. Graphene, neutrino mass and oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Y. Wang

    2011-03-28

    A resolution of the Abraham-Minkowski dilemma is presented that other constant velocities can play the role of c in the theory of relativity. For example, in 2005 electrons of graphene were discovered to behave as if the coefficient is a Fermi velocity. Then we propose a conjecture for neutrinos to avoid the contradiction among two-component theory, negative rest mass-square and oscillation.

  20. Semi-inclusive charged-pion electroproduction off protons and deuterons: Cross sections, ratios, and access to the quark-parton model at low energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asaturyan, R.; Ent, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Adams, G. S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Angelescu, T.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, A.; Baker, O. K.; Benmouna, N.; Bertoncini, C.; Blok, H. P.; Boeglin, W. U.; Bosted, P. E.; Breuer, H.; Christy, M. E.; Connell, S. H.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M. M.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Dunne, J. A.; Dutta, D.; El Khayari, N.; Fenker, H. C.; Frolov, V. V.; Gan, L.; Gaskell, D.; Hafidi, K.; Hinton, W.; Holt, R. J.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; Hungerford, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.; Kalantarians, N.; Kelly, J. J.; Keppel, C. E.; Kubarovsky, V.; Li, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mack, D.; Malace, S. P.; Markowitz, P.; McGrath, E.; McKee, P.; Meekins, D. G.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Moziak, B.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Opper, A. K.; Ostapenko, T.; Reimer, P. E.; Reinhold, J.; Roche, J.; Rock, S. E.; Schulte, E.; Segbefia, E.; Smith, C.; Smith, G. R.; Stoler, P.; Tang, L.; Ungaro, M.; Uzzle, A.; Vidakovic, S.; Villano, A.; Vulcan, W. F.; Wang, M.; Warren, G.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S. A.; Xu, C.; Yuan, L.; Zheng, X.

    2012-01-01

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (?±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2 > 4 GeV2 and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2 < Q2 < 4 (GeV/c)2, and cover a range in the Bjorken scaling variable 0.2 < x < 0.6. The fractional energy of the pions spans a range 0.3 < z < 1, with small transverse momenta with respect to the virtual-photon direction, Pt2 < 0.2 (GeV/c)2. The invariant mass that goes undetected, Mx or W', is in the nucleon resonance region, W' < 2 GeV. The new data conclusively show the onset of quark-hadron duality in this process, and the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark ? pion production mechanisms. The x, z and Pt2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for ?+ and ?-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.

  1. March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure Chapter 12 #12;March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 2 Objectives Describe the physical structure of secondary and tertiary storage of mass-storage devices Discuss operating-system services provided for mass storage, including RAID

  2. Energy Band Model Based on Effective Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Ariel

    2012-09-06

    In this work, we demonstrate an alternative method of deriving an isotropic energy band model using a one-dimensional definition of the effective mass and experimentally observed dependence of mass on energy. We extend the effective mass definition to anti-particles and particles with zero rest mass. We assume an often observed linear dependence of mass on energy and derive a generalized non-parabolic energy-momentum relation. The resulting non-parabolicity leads to velocity saturation at high particle energies. We apply the energy band model to free relativistic particles and carriers in solid state materials and obtain commonly used dispersion relations and experimentally confirmed effective masses. We apply the model to zero rest mass particles in graphene and propose using the effective mass for photons. Therefore, it appears that the new energy band model based on the effective mass can be applied to relativistic particles and carriers in solid state materials.

  3. Origin of Mass. Mass and Mass-Energy Equation from Classical-Mechanics Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson; P-I. Johansson

    2006-01-23

    We establish the classical wave equation for a particle formed of a massless oscillatory elementary charge generally also traveling, and the resulting electromagnetic waves, of a generally Doppler-effected angular frequency $\\w$, in the vacuum in three dimensions. We obtain from the solutions the total energy of the particle wave to be $\\eng=\\hbarc\\w$, $2\\pi \\hbarc$ being a function expressed in wave-medium parameters and identifiable as the Planck constant. In respect to the train of the waves as a whole traveling at the finite velocity of light $c$, $\\eng=mc^2$ represents thereby the translational kinetic energy of the wavetrain, $m=\\hbarc\\w/c^2$ being its inertial mass and thereby the inertial mass of the particle. Based on the solutions we also write down a set of semi-empirical equations for the particle's de Broglie wave parameters. From the standpoint of overall modern experimental indications we comment on the origin of mass implied by the solution.

  4. New textures for the lepton mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Ferreira; L. Lavoura

    2014-12-02

    We study predictive textures for the lepton mass matrices in which the charged-lepton mass matrix has either four or five zero matrix elements while the neutrino Majorana mass matrix has, respectively, either four or three zero matrix elements. We find that all the viable textures of these two kinds share many predictions: the neutrino mass spectrum is inverted, the sum of the light-neutrino masses is close to 0.1 eV, the Dirac phase $\\delta$ in the lepton mixing matrix is close to either $0$ or $\\pi$, and the mass term responsible for neutrinoless double-beta decay lies in between 12 and 22 meV.

  5. New textures for the lepton mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, P M

    2014-01-01

    We study predictive textures for the lepton mass matrices in which the charged-lepton mass matrix has either four or five zero matrix elements while the neutrino Majorana mass matrix has, respectively, either four or three zero matrix elements. We find that all the viable textures of these two kinds share many predictions: the neutrino mass spectrum is inverted, the sum of the light-neutrino masses is close to 0.1 eV, the Dirac phase $\\delta$ in the lepton mixing matrix is close to either $0$ or $\\pi$, and the mass term responsible for neutrinoless double-beta decay lies in between 12 and 22 meV.

  6. High-performance MEMS square electrode quadrupole mass filters for chip-scale mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Kerry

    We report exciting experimental data from a low-cost, high-performance square electrode quadrupole mass filter with integrated ion optics intended for chips-cale mass spectrometry. The device showed a mass range of 650 amu ...

  7. Low floor mass transit vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmons, J. Bruce (Beverly Hills, MI); Blessing, Leonard J. (Rochester, MI)

    2004-02-03

    A mass transit vehicle includes a frame structure that provides an efficient and economical approach to providing a low floor bus. The inventive frame includes a stiff roof panel and a stiff floor panel. A plurality of generally vertical pillars extend between the roof and floor panels. A unique bracket arrangement is disclosed for connecting the pillars to the panels. Side panels are secured to the pillars and carry the shear stresses on the frame. A unique seating assembly that can be advantageously incorporated into the vehicle taking advantage of the load distributing features of the inventive frame is also disclosed.

  8. Sandia Energy - Photoionization Mass Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &WaterNewPhotoionization Mass Spectroscopy Home

  9. Quark masses: An environmental impact statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimchi, Itamar

    We investigate worlds that lie on a slice through the parameter space of the standard model over which quark masses vary. We allow as many as three quarks to participate in nuclei, while fixing the mass of the electron and ...

  10. Nonuniversal gaugino masses and muong-2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Nasir, Fariha; Shafi, Qaisar; Ün, Cem Salih

    2014-08-01

    We consider two classes of supersymmetric models with nonuniversal gaugino masses at the grand unification scale MGUT in an attempt to resolve the apparent muon g-2 anomaly encountered in the Standard Model. We explore two distinct scenarios, one in which all gaugino masses have the same sign at MGUT, and a second case with opposite sign gaugino masses. The sfermion masses in both cases are assumed to be universal at MGUT. We exploit the nonuniversality among gaugino masses to realize large mass splitting between the colored and noncolored sfermions. Thus, the sleptons can have masses in the few hundred GeVmore »range, whereas the colored sparticles turn out to be an order of magnitude or so heavier. In both models the resolution of the muon g-2 anomaly is compatible, among other things, with a 125–126 GeV Higgs boson mass and the WMAP dark matter bounds.« less

  11. W Boson Mass Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgore, W.; Kilgore, W.

    2010-06-14

    The W boson mass working group discussed the current status of the W boson mass measurement and the prospects for improving on LEP and Tevatron measurements at the LHC.

  12. Body Mass Index - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Education & Wellness > Health Calculators & Logs > Body Mass Index Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs...

  13. THE MESON MASS SYSTEM PAOLO PALAZZI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    relationship of spin versus mass squared in particles of the same family (Regge trajectories), and the GMO

  14. Advances in Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry & Lab Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    #12;Advances in Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry & Lab Automation 2 Publisher's Note Kevin Davies&EN Media Group 4 Top Ten Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry, and Lab Automation Papers APPLICATION NOTES 10&EN Supplement of 2015: "Advances in Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry, and Lab Automation." This supplement

  15. College of Arts & Sciences Mass Communication, BA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    College of Arts & Sciences Mass Communication, BA Broad Learning Goals A. Students should have core values associated with the practice of journalism and mass communication. B. Students should have concrete skills in order to be effective practitioners of journalism and mass communication. Student

  16. Mass Was&ng Introduc&on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    Mass Was&ng #12;Introduc&on · Material on a slope is unstable and tends to move down slope under the influence of gravity. Mass was&ng is the large. · In the United States, mass was&ng causes $1.5 billion dollars of damage a year

  17. Bioheat and Mass Transfer Educational Initiatives for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    warm-blooded organisims, freezing, unique systems CCNY Weinbaum Ugrad cell and tissue transport notes fluid and molecular transport Cornell Datta Ugrad heat and mass fundamentals Datta fluid mech Duke Fan Ugrad biofluid and mass transport Illinois Chato bioheat and mass transfer Chato chapter

  18. Mass measurements of rare isotopes with SHIPTRAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dworschak, M.

    2010-06-01

    The Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP was set up with the aim to perform high-precision mass measurements. Since autumn 2005, the masses of 63 neutron-deficient nuclides in the mass range from A = 80 to A = 254 have been determined with relative uncertainties of down to 10{sup -8}. Nuclides with half-lives down to 580 ms and production rates of less than one atom per minute were investigated. The results are valuable for nuclear structure investigations and nuclear astrophysics. The most remarkable successes were the first direct mass measurements beyond the proton drip line and in the region above Z = 100.

  19. Tau-neutrino mass limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1987-05-01

    was supported in part by the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy under Contracts Nos. W-31-109-Eng-38, DE-AC02-76ER011 12, DE-AC03-76S F000998, DE- AC02-76ER01428, and DE-AC02-84ER40125. This ex- periment was made possible by the support provided by the SLAC PEP staff... articles is followed, and page proofs are sent to authors. Tau-neutrino mass limit S. Abachi, P. Baringer, B. G. Bylsma, R. De Bonte, D. Koltick, F. J. Loeffler, E. H. Low, R. L. McIlwain, D. H. Miller, C. R. Ng, L. K. Rangan, and E. I. Shibata Purdue...

  20. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Witten, William B. (Lancing, TN); Kornienko, Oleg (Lansdale, PA)

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  1. Particle mass generation from physical vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Quimbay; J. Morales

    2012-06-14

    We present an approach for particle mass generation in which the physical vacuum is assumed as a medium at zero temperature and where the dynamics of the vacuum is described by the Standard Model without the Higgs sector. In this approach fermions acquire masses from interactions with vacuum and gauge bosons from charge fluctuations of vacuum. The obtained results are consistent with the physical mass spectrum, in such a manner that left-handed neutrinos are massive. Masses of electroweak gauge bosons are properly predicted in terms of experimental fermion masses and running coupling constants of strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions. An existing empirical relation between the top quark mass and the electroweak gauge boson masses is explained by means of this approach.

  2. Microelectromechanical dual-mass resonator structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyck, Christopher W. (Cedar Crest, NM); Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Huber, Robert J. (Bountiful, UT)

    2002-01-01

    A dual-mass microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator structure is disclosed in which a first mass is suspended above a substrate and driven to move along a linear or curved path by a parallel-plate electrostatic actuator. A second mass, which is also suspended and coupled to the first mass by a plurality of springs is driven by motion of the first mass. Various modes of operation of the MEM structure are possible, including resonant and antiresonant modes, and a contacting mode. In each mode of operation, the motion induced in the second mass can be in the range of several microns up to more than 50 .mu.m while the first mass has a much smaller displacement on the order of one micron or less. The MEM structure has applications for forming microsensors that detect strain, acceleration, rotation or movement.

  3. Mass Substructure in Abell 3128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCleary, Jacqueline; Huwe, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We perform a detailed 2-dimensional weak gravitational lensing analysis of the nearby (z = 0.058) galaxy cluster Abell 3128 using deep ugrz imaging from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We have designed a pipeline to remove instrumental artifacts from DECam images and stack multiple dithered observations without inducing a spurious ellipticity signal. We develop a new technique to characterize the spatial variation of the PSF which enables us to circularize the field to better than 0.5% and thereby extract the intrinsic galaxy ellipticities. By fitting photometric redshifts to sources in the observation, we are able to select a sample of background galaxies for weak lensing analysis free from low-redshift contaminants. Photometric redshifts are also used to select a high-redshift galaxy subsample with which we successfully isolate the signal from an interloping z = 0.44 cluster. We estimate the total mass of Abell 3128 by fitting the tangential ellipticity of background galaxies with the weak lensing shear pro...

  4. Gravitational `Convergence' and Cluster Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-12-01

    Two colour photometry of the cluster A1689 reveals a `relative magnification-bias' between lensed blue and red background galaxies, arising from a dependence of the faint galaxy count-slope on colour. The colour distribution is skewed blueward of the far field, allowing us to measure the cluster magnification and to understand the notorious blueness of large arcs. We show that the magnification information can be combined with the usual image distortion measurements to isolate the local `convergence' component of lensing and hence derive the projected mass. This is achieved through a simple local relation between the convergence and the observables, which can be applied generally over the surface a cluster. In the weak lensing limit, the convergence reduces to a dependence on the magnification alone, so that in the outskirts of clusters the surface-density of matter is obtained directly from the surface-density of background galaxies. Hence, useful lensing work requires colour information but not necessarily good seeing. Interestingly, convergence varies slowly at high redshift, saturating at a level depending on the Horizon distance, allowing a useful model-independent measurement of the Global Geometry.

  5. Otolith elemental signatures reflect residency in coastal water masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishimoto, Mary M.; Washburn, Libe; Warner, Robert R.; Love, Milton S.; Paradis, Georges L.

    2010-01-01

    residency in coastal water masses Mary M. Nishimoto & LibeSebastes jordani) resid- ing in water masses with distinctthat resided in different water masses that were associated

  6. Quantifying mass balance processes on the Southern Patagonia Icefield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    distributed glacier mass balance for the Swiss Alps from re-al. : Quantifying mass balance processes on the SPI Glaciarand future surface mass balance of the Northern Patagonian

  7. Mass and the creation of spatial volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Herzenberg

    2011-05-13

    The distortion of space by the presence of mass in general relativity appears to be capable of increasing three dimensional spatial volume. We examine excess volume effects associated with an isolated mass described by the Schwarzschild solution to the field equations. Fractional differential excess spatial volume in the vicinity of a mass is shown to be a direct measure of gravitational potential which can be easily visualized. The total amount of excess spatial volume associated with an isolated mass is evaluated and shown to be appreciable. Summing over the excess spatial volume contributions from individual masses present throughout the universe leads to an overall excess spatial volume comparable in magnitude to the volume of the observable universe. Interpretations of these results are discussed, including the possibility that this excess volume might contribute to clarifying the issue of missing matter in the contemporary universe. Alternatively, it is proposed speculatively that mass, rather than simply distorting preexisting space, might actually create it.

  8. Quark Masses: An Environmental Impact Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert L. Jaffe; Alejandro Jenkins; Itamar Kimchi

    2009-04-03

    We investigate worlds that lie on a slice through the parameter space of the Standard Model over which quark masses vary. We allow as many as three quarks to participate in nuclei, while fixing the mass of the electron and the average mass of the lightest baryon flavor multiplet. We classify as "congenial" worlds that satisfy the environmental constraint that the quark masses allow for stable nuclei with charges one, six, and eight, making organic chemistry possible. Whether a congenial world actually produces observers depends on a multitude of historical contingencies, beginning with primordial nucleosynthesis, which we do not explore. Such constraints may be independently superimposed on our results. Environmental constraints such as the ones we study may be combined with information about the a priori distribution of quark masses over the landscape of possible universes to determine whether the measured values of the quark masses are determined environmentally, but our analysis is independent of such an anthropic approach. We estimate baryon masses as functions of quark masses and nuclear masses as functions of baryon masses. We check for the stability of nuclei against fission, strong particle emission, and weak nucleon emission. For two light quarks with charges 2/3 and -1/3, we find a band of congeniality roughly 29 MeV wide in their mass difference. We also find another, less robust region of congeniality with one light, charge -1/3 quark, and two heavier, approximately degenerate charge -1/3 and 2/3 quarks. No other assignment of light quark charges yields congenial worlds with two baryons participating in nuclei. We identify and discuss the region in quark-mass space where nuclei would be made from three or more baryon species.

  9. Correlation energy contribution to nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Baroni; M. Armati; F. Barranco; R. A. Broglia; G. Colo'; G. Gori; E. Vigezzi

    2004-04-07

    The ground state correlation energies associated with collective surface and pairing vibrations are calculated for Pb- and Ca-isotopes. It is shown that this contribution, when added to those predicted by one of the most accurate modern nuclear mass formula (HFBCS MSk7 mass formula), reduces the associated rms error by an important factor, making mean field theory, once its time dependence is taken into account, a quantitative predictive tool for nuclear masses.

  10. An alternative heavy Higgs mass limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Castorina; M. Consoli; D. Zappalá

    2008-05-20

    After commenting on the present value of the Higgs particle mass from radiative corrections, we explore the phenomenological implications of an alternative, non-perturbative renormalization of the scalar sector where the mass of the Higgs particle does not represent a measure of observable interactions at the Higgs mass scale. In this approach the Higgs particle could be very heavy, even heavier than 1 TeV, and remain nevertheless a relatively narrow resonance.

  11. Higher-Order Mass Defect Analysis for Mass Spectra of Complex Organic Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2011-06-15

    Higher-order mass defect analysis is introduced as a unique formula assignment and visualization method for the analysis of complex mass spectra. This approach is an extension of the concepts of Kendrick mass transformation widely used for identification of homologous compounds differing only by a number of base units (e.g., CH2, H2, O, CH2O, etc.) in complex mixtures. We present an iterative renormalization routine for defining higher order homologous series and multidimensional clustering of mass spectral features. This approach greatly simplifies visualization of complex mass spectra and increases the number of chemical formulae that can be confidently assigned for given mass accuracy. The potential for using higher-order mass defects for data reduction and visualization is shown. Higher-order mass defect analysis is described and demonstrated through third-order analysis of a de-isotoped high-resolution mass spectrum of crude oil containing nearly 13,000 peaks.

  12. Quantum chaos and nuclear mass systematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge G. Hirsch; Victor Velazquez; Alejandro Frank

    2004-07-15

    The presence of quantum chaos in nuclear mass systematics is analyzed by considering the differences between measured and calculated nuclear masses as a time series described by the power law 1/ f^alpha. While for the liquid droplet model plus shell corrections a quantum chaotic behavior alpha approx 1 is found, errors in the microscopic mass formula have alpha approx 0.5, closer to white noise. The chaotic behavior seems to arise from many body effects not included in the mass formula.

  13. On the concept of relativistic mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter M. Brown

    2007-09-06

    Within the past fifteen years the use of the concept of "relativistic mass" has been on the decline and has been replaced by the concept of "proper mass" (aka "rest mass") - ?simply referred to as "mass" and labeled "m" by its proponents. This decline in usage appears to be due to arguments presented in several journal articles over the last thirty-five years, as well as to standard practices in the field of particle physics. The aforementioned debate consists of arguments as to how the term "mass" should be defined to maximize logic as well as to be less confusing to the layman and people just starting to learn relativity. Lacking in the debate is a clear definition of all types of mass and all its usages in a wide variety of cases. The purpose in this article is to bring a unifying perspective to the subject. In doing so I will explore those things omitted from previous articles on this subject including the importance of point particles vs. extended objects; open vs. closed systems and gravitational mass. Although I argue for the usage of relativistic mass I do "not" argue that proper mass is not an important tool in relativistic dynamics.

  14. MassSAVE (Gas)- Residential Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    MassSAVE, through Gas Networks, organizes residential conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These utilities...

  15. Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhenyu Ye; for CDF; D0 collaborations

    2011-07-22

    We report the latest results on the top-quark mass and on the top-antitop mass difference from the CDF and D0 collaborations using data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collider at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. We discuss general issues in top-quark mass measurements and present new results from direct measurements and from top-pair production cross-section. We also report new results on the top-antitop mass difference.

  16. Non-Oscillation Probes of Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster Institut fuer Kernphysik, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 9, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2010-03-30

    The absolute scale of neutrino masses is very important for understanding the evolution and the structure formation of the universe as well as for nuclear and particle physics beyond the present Standard Model. Complementary to deducing statements on the neutrino mass from cosmological observations, two different methods to determine the neutrino mass scale in the laboratory are pursued: the search for neutrinoless double beta decay and the direct neutrino mass search. For both methods currently experiments with a sensitivity of O(100) meV are being set up or commissioned.

  17. Lawrence D. Bobo and Victor Racialized Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napadow, Vitaly

    322 Lawrence D. Bobo and Victor Thompson · 12 Racialized Mass Incarceration Poverty, Prejudice to the simultaneous pro- cesses of urban socioeconomic restructuring that produced intensified ghetto poverty

  18. Electrospray Mass Spectrometry | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have come up with a technology that should speed DOE's remediation work while cutting costs. The technology is electrospray mass spectrometry (EMS), which creates gas phase...

  19. Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-08-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

  20. Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-10-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

  1. Small entries of neutrino mass matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kh. Akhmedov

    1999-09-15

    We consider phenomenologically allowed structures of the neutrino mass matrix in the case of three light neutrino species. Constraints from the solar, atmospheric and reactor neutrino experiments as well as those from the neutrinoless double beta decay are taken into account. Both hierarchical and quasi-degenerate neutrino mass cases are studied. Assuming maximal $\

  2. Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. L. S. Wang

    2009-04-02

    We present the latest measurements of the top quark mass from the Tevatron. The different top decay channels and measurement techniques used for these results are also described. The world average of the top quark mass based on some of these new results combined with previous results is mtop=172.6+-1.4 GeV.

  3. Mass Email Guidelines University of Western Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Mass Email Guidelines University of Western Ontario ITS Email Working Group Updated June 6, 2012 email communications. The University of Western Ontario provides electronic mail services for use use of mass email at The University of Western Ontario. These guidelines attempt to strike a balance

  4. Conservation of Mass The Continuity Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    Conservation of Mass The Continuity Equation The equations of motion describe the "conservation. Holton derives the continuity equation in two ways: Eulerian and Lagrangian. We will consider to the sum of all the net mass flows coming from all 3 directions (equations 4,5, and 6): ( ) ( ) ( ) tzyx z

  5. Emergence String and Mass Formulas of Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2011-07-19

    Assume that hadrons are formed from the emergence string. Usual string should possess two moving states: oscillation and rotation, so we propose corresponding potential and the equation of the emergence string, whose energy spectrum is namely the GMO mass formula and its modified accurate mass formula. These are some relations between the string and observable experimental data.

  6. Quantization of a string with attached mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2011-08-02

    A simple model of a relativistic open string with a point mass attached at one end is quantized. The normal modes are derived and used to construct expressions for the operator commutators. Light cone gauge is used to find the mass squared operator. The singular part of the operator product expansion is derived.

  7. Pion form factor with twisted mass QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou M. Abdel-Rehim; Randy Lewis

    2004-09-10

    The pion form factor is calculated using quenched twisted mass QCD with beta=6.0 and maximal twisting angle omega=pi/2. Two pion masses and several values of momentum transfer are considered. The momentum averaging procedure of Frezzotti and Rossi is used to reduce lattice spacing errors, and numerical results are consistent with the expected O(a) improvement.

  8. Aalborg Universitet Mass threshold for 'harmless' drones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    Aalborg Universitet Mass threshold for 'harmless' drones La Cour-Harbo, Anders Published in: Risk for 'harmless' drones. Risk Analysis. General rights Copyright and moral rights for the publications made from vbn.aau.dk on: november 29, 2015 #12;Mass threshold for 'harmless' drones Anders la Cour

  9. High-speed multiple-mode mass-sensing resolves dynamic nanoscale mass distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olcum, Selim

    Simultaneously measuring multiple eigenmode frequencies of nanomechanical resonators can determine the position and mass of surface-adsorbed proteins, and could ultimately reveal the mass tomography of nanoscale analytes. ...

  10. Educational Developmentalism In Nigeria: Education For The Masses Or Just Mass -Education?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobern, William W.

    Educational Developmentalism In Nigeria: Education For The Masses Or Just Mass -Education? William of education in general is not lost oil the leaders of Nigeria and the rest of the developing world

  11. The Maximum Mass of a Neutron Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliki Kalogera; Gordon Baym

    1996-08-11

    Observational identification of black holes as members of binary systems requires the knowledge of the upper limit on the gravitational mass of a neutron star. We use modern equations of state for neutron star matter, fitted to experimental nucleon-nucleon scattering data and the properties of light nuclei, to calculate, within the framework of Rhoades & Ruffini (1974), the minimum upper limit on a neutron star mass. Regarding the equation of state as valid up to twice nuclear matter saturation density, rho_{nm}, we obtain a secure upper bound on the neutron star mass equal to 2.9 solar masses. We also find that in order to reach the lowest possible upper bound of 2.2 solar masses, we need understand the physical properties of neutron matter up to a density of about 4 times rho_{nm}.

  12. Democratic neutrino mass matrix from generalized Fridberg-Lee model with the perturbative solar mass splitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Razzaghi

    2015-05-17

    We propose a phenomenological model of the Dirac neutrino mass matrix based on the Fridberg-Lee neutrino mass model at a special point. In this case, the Fridberg-Lee model reduces to the Democratic mass matrix with the $S_3$ permutation family symmetry. The Democratic mass matrix has an experimentally unfavored degenerate mass spectrum on the base of tribimaximal mixing matrix. We rescue the model to find a nondegenerate mass spectrum by adding the breaking mass term as preserving the twisted Fridberg-Lee symmetry. The tribimaximal mixing matrix can be also realized. Exact tribimaximal mixing leads to $\\theta_{13}=0$. However, the results from Daya Bay and RENO experiments have established a nonzero value for $\\theta_{13}$. Keeping the leading behavior of $U$ as tribimaximal, we use Broken Democratic neutrino mass model. We characterize a perturbation mass matrix which is responsible for a nonzero $\\theta_{13}$ along with CP violation, besides the solar neutrino mass splitting has been resulted from it. We consider this work in two stages: In the first stage, we obtain the perturbation mass matrix with real components which breaks softly the $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetry and this leads to a nonzero value for $\\theta_{13}$. In the second stage, we extend the perturbation mass matrix to a complex symmetric matrix which leads to CP violation. Therefore obtain a realistic neutrino mixing matrix with $\\theta_{23}=45^\\circ$. We obtain the solar mass splitting, the ordering of the neutrino masses is inverted. Using only two sets of the experimental data, we can fix all of the parameters of mass matrix and predict the masses of neutrinos and phases. These predictions include the following: $m_{1}\\approx(4.82-4.93)10^{-2}eV $, $|m_2|\\approx(4.90-5.01)10^{-2} eV$, $m_3\\approx0$ and, $\\phi\\approx(0.687^\\circ-10.31^\\circ)$ as the origin of the Majorana phases.

  13. High precision mass measurements of odd-odd T=1 nuclides for the study of the Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCormick, M; Atanasov, D; Blaum, K; Boehm, Ch; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; Cocolios, T E; Eliseev, S; Eronen, T; George, S; Herfurth, F; Herlert, A; Kisler, D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Litvinov, Yu A; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Minaya Ramirez, E; Naimi, S; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; de Roubin, A; Schweikhard, L; Welker, A; Wienholtz, F; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K; Jokinen, A; Moore, I D; CERN. Geneva. ISOLDE and neutron Time-of-Flight Experiments Committee; INTC

    2014-01-01

    High precision mass measurements of odd-odd T=1 nuclides for the study of the Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation

  14. Contribution of White Dwarfs to Cluster Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ted von Hippel

    1998-02-14

    I present a literature search through 31 July 1997 of white dwarfs (WDs) in open and globular clusters. There are 36 single WDs and 5 WDs in binaries known among 13 open clusters, and 340 single WDs and 11 WDs in binaries known among 11 globular clusters. From these data I have calculated WD mass fractions for four open clusters (the Pleiades, NGC 2168, NGC 3532, and the Hyades) and one globular cluster (NGC 6121). I develop a simple model of cluster evolution that incorporates stellar evolution but not dynamical evolution to interpret the WD mass fractions. I augment the results of my simple model with N-body simulations incorporating stellar evolution (Terlevich 1987; de la Feunte Marcos 1996; Vesperini & Heggie 1997). I find that even though these clusters undergo moderate to strong kinematical evolution the WD mass fraction is relatively insensitive to kinematical evolution. By comparing the cluster mass functions to that of the Galactic disk, and incorporating plausibility arguments for the mass function of the Galactic halo, I estimate the WD mass fraction in these two populations. I assume the Galactic disk is ~10 Gyrs old (Winget et al. 1987; Liebert, Dahn, & Monet 1988; Oswalt et al. 1996) and that the Galactic halo is ~12 Gyrs old (Reid 1997b; Gratton et al. 1997; Chaboyer et al. 1998), although the WD mass fraction is insensitive to age in this range. I find that the Galactic halo should contain 8 to 9% (alpha = -2.35) or perhaps as much as 15 to 17% (alpha = -2.0) of its stellar mass in the form of WDs. The Galactic disk WD mass fraction should be 6 to 7% (alpha = -2.35), consistent with the empirical estimates of 3 to 7% (Liebert, Dahn, & Monet 1988; Oswalt et al. 1996). (abridged)

  15. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  16. Mass Evaluation for Proton Rich Nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.; Kondev, F. G.

    2011-11-30

    The Atomic mass evaluation (AME) provides the reliable resource for the values related to atomic masses. Since the publication of the latest version of AME in 2003, many developments for atomic mass determination have been done and important results changed significantly our knowledge. A preliminary version of AME was released in April 2011, and an official version is foreseen to be published in early 2013. The general status of AME is presented and some specific features of AME for proton-rich nuclides are discussed.

  17. Mass Distributions of Clusters Using Gravitational Magnification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-05-03

    Lensing in the context of rich clusters is normally quantified from small image distortions, yielding a relative mass distribution in the limit of weak lensing. Here we show the magnification effect of lensing can also be mapped over a cluster, resulting in absolute mass determinations for the weak limit. Furthermore, given both magnification and distortion measurements, the mass distribution may be constrained in the strong regime. Methods for obtaining the magnification using spectroscopic and/or photometric information are discussed, for object detection within a fixed isophote or to a given flux limit. A map of the magnification around A1689 is constructed from the observed depletion of background red galaxy counts.

  18. Masses of Fe-61 and Fe-62 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cossairt, J. D.; Tribble, Robert E.; Kenefick, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    been measured using the Ni(a, Be) 'Fe and Ni("B,"N) Fe reactions. The mass excesses obtained are M( 'Fe) = ?58.92 ~ 0.02 MeV and M("Fe) = ?58.85 + 0.07 MeV. The results are consistent with recent predictions from two different mass relations. NUCLEAR... represents a differential cross section of about 24 pb/sr at 9?,?=10 . The mass excess is found to be -58.85+0.07 MeV. Our result is not in good agreement with the P-decay measurement that determined the mass excess to be -58.5 + 0.2 MeV (Ref. 7). We...

  19. Precision Electroweak Parameters and the Higgs Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William J. Marciano

    2000-03-17

    The status of various precisely measured electroweak parameters is reviewed. Natural relations among them are shown to constrain the Higgs mass, m_H, via quantum loop effects to relatively low values. A comparison with direct Higgs searches is made.

  20. Solar mass-varying neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marfatia, Danny; Huber, P.; Barger, V.

    2005-11-18

    We propose that the solar neutrino deficit may be due to oscillations of mass-varying neutrinos (MaVaNs). This scenario elucidates solar neutrino data beautifully while remaining comfortably compatible with atmospheric ...

  1. Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1996-01-01

    The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

  2. Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-05-26

    Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

  3. Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-05-25

    Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

  4. Thermal transition temperature from twisted mass QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Burger; Ernst-Michael Ilgenfritz; Malik Kirchner; Maria Paola Lombardo; Michael Müller-Preussker; Owe Philipsen; Carsten Urbach; Lars Zeidlewicz

    2010-09-20

    We present the current status of lattice simulations with N_f=2 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions at finite temperature. In particular, the determination of the thermal transition temperature is discussed.

  5. NEREUS Nemertes : embedded mass spectrometer control system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champy, Adam Samuel

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, I present Nemertes System, a software suite to control an embedded autonomous mass spectrometer. I first evaluate previous control systems for the hard- ware and evaluate a set of software design goals. The ...

  6. Direct neutrino mass measurements after PLANCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    The absolute mass scale of neutrinos remains an open question subject to experimental investigation from both particle physics and cosmology. Over the next decade, a number of experiments from both disciplines will attempt ...

  7. Experiments for the absolute neutrino mass measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Steidl

    2009-06-02

    Experimental results and perspectives of different methods to measure the absolute mass scale of neutrinos are briefly reviewed. The mass sensitivities from cosmological observations, double beta decay searches and single beta decay spectroscopy differ in sensitivity and model dependance. Next generation experiments in the three fields reach the sensitivity for the lightest mass eigenstate of $m_1<0.2eV$, which will finally answer the question if neutrino mass eigenstates are degenerate. This sensitivity is also reached by the only model-independent approach of single beta decay (KATRIN experiment). For higher sensitivities on cost of model-dependance the neutrinoless double beta decay search and cosmological observation have to be applied. Here, in the next decade sensitivities are approached with the potential to test inverted hierarchy models.

  8. Double beta decay and neutrino mass models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helo, J C; Ota, T; Santos, F A Pereira dos

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay allows to constrain lepton number violating extensions of the standard model. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, the mass mechanism will always contribute to the decay rate, however, it is not a priori guaranteed to be the dominant contribution in all models. Here, we discuss whether the mass mechanism dominates or not from the theory point of view. We classify all possible (scalar-mediated) short-range contributions to the decay rate according to the loop level, at which the corresponding models will generate Majorana neutrino masses, and discuss the expected relative size of the different contributions to the decay rate in each class. We also work out the phenomenology of one concrete 2-loop model in which both, mass mechanism and short-range diagram, might lead to competitive contributions, in some detail.

  9. Mass Wasting in the Western Galapagos Islands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Hillary

    2012-10-19

    Oceanic island volcanoes such as those in the Hawaiian, Canary and Galapagos Islands are known to become unstable, causing failures of the subaerial and submarine slopes of the volcanic edifices. These mass wasting events appear to be the primary...

  10. The connection between mass loss and nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacco Th. van Loon

    2008-01-03

    I discuss the relationship between mass loss and nucleosynthesis on the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB). Because of thermal pulses and possibly other mixing processes, products of nucleosynthesis can be brought to the surface of AGB stars, increasingly so as the star becomes more luminous, cooler, and unstable against pulsation of its tenuous mantle. As a result, mass loss is at its most extreme when dredge-up is too. As the high rate of mass loss truncates AGB evolution, it determines the enrichment of interstellar space with the AGB nucleosynthesis products. The changing composition of the stellar atmosphere also affects the mass-loss process, most obviously in the formation of dust grains - which play an important role in driving the wind of AGB stars.

  11. Mass Chain Evaluation for A=95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, S.K.; Sonzogni, A.; Basu, Swapan Kr.; Mukherjee, Gopal; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2011-08-01

    A full evaluation of the mass chain A = 95 has been done in the ENSDF format taking into account all the available data until June 2009. Excited states populated by in-beam nuclear reactions and by radioactive decay have been considered. The 'evp' editor, developed at the NNDC, has been used for the evaluation. This mass chain was last evaluated in 1993. Many new and improved data were reported since then. A total of 13 nuclei have been evaluated.

  12. Mass determination in sequential particle decay chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Webber

    2009-09-12

    A simple method is proposed for determining the masses of new particles in collider events containing a pair of decay chains (not necessarily identical) of the form Z -> Y+1, Y -> X+2, X -> N+3, where 1,2 and 3 are visible but N is not. Initial study of a possible supersymmetric case suggests that the method can determine the four unknown masses in effectively identical chains with good accuracy from samples of a few tens of events.

  13. ELECTRONICS UPGRADE OF HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcintosh, J; Joe Cordaro, J

    2008-03-10

    High resolution mass spectrometers are specialized systems that allow researchers to determine the exact mass of samples to four significant digits by using magnetic and electronic sector mass analyzers. Many of the systems in use today at research laboratories and universities were designed and built more than two decades ago. The manufacturers of these systems have abandoned the support for some of the mass spectrometers and parts to power and control them have become scarce or obsolete. The Savannah River National Laboratory has been involved in the upgrade of the electronics and software for these legacy machines. The Electronics Upgrade of High Resolution Mass Spectrometers consists of assembling high-end commercial instrumentation from reputable manufacturers with a minimal amount of customization to replace the electronics for the older systems. By taking advantage of advances in instrumentation, precise magnet control can be achieved using high resolution current sources and continuous feedback from a high resolution hall-effect probe. The custom equipment include a precision voltage divider/summing amplifier chassis, high voltage power supply chassis and a chassis for controlling the voltage emission for the mass spectrometer source tube. The upgrade package is versatile enough to interface with valve control, vacuum and other instrumentation. Instrument communication is via a combination of Ethernet and traditional IEEE-488 GPIB protocols. The system software upgrades include precision control, feedback and spectral waveform analysis tools.

  14. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RBC,; Blum, T; Boyle, P A; Christ, N H; Frison, J; Garron, N; Hudspith, R J; Izubuchi, T; Janowski, T; Jung, C; Juettner, A; Kelly, C; Kenway, R D; Lehner, C; Marinkovic, M; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, G; Murphy, D J; Ohta, S; Portelli, A; Sachrajda, C T; Soni, A

    2014-01-01

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities ($f_\\pi$, $f_K$, $B_K$, $m_{ud}$, $m_s$, $t_0^{1/2}$, $w_0$) obtained from simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly-physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O(3)%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum `global fit' with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of $m_\\pi$, $m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ to determine the two quark masses and the scale - all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with sub-percent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including: $f_\\pi$ = 130.2(9) MeV; $f_K$ = 155.5(8) MeV; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the $\\overline {\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, ...

  15. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RBC; UKQCD collaborations; :; T. Blum; P. A. Boyle; N. H. Christ; J. Frison; N. Garron; R. J. Hudspith; T. Izubuchi; T. Janowski; C. Jung; A. Juettner; C. Kelly; R. D. Kenway; C. Lehner; M. Marinkovic; R. D. Mawhinney; G. McGlynn; D. J. Murphy; S. Ohta; A. Portelli; C. T. Sachrajda; A. Soni

    2014-11-25

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities ($f_\\pi$, $f_K$, $B_K$, $m_{ud}$, $m_s$, $t_0^{1/2}$, $w_0$) obtained from simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly-physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O(3)%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum `global fit' with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of $m_\\pi$, $m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ to determine the two quark masses and the scale - all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with sub-percent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including: $f_\\pi$ = 130.2(9) MeV; $f_K$ = 155.5(8) MeV; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the $\\overline {\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, $B_K$, in the RGI scheme, 0.750(15) and the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 0.530(11).

  16. The HI mass function as a probe of photoionisation feedback on low mass galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Han-Seek; Power, C; Park, Jaehong; Lagos, C d P; Baugh, C M

    2015-01-01

    We explore the galaxy formation physics governing the low mass end of the HI mass function in the local Universe. Specifically, we predict the effects on the HI mass function of varying i) the strength of photoionisation feedback and the redshift of the end of the epoch of reionization, ii) the cosmology, iii) the supernovae feedback prescription, and iv) the efficiency of star formation. We find that the shape of the low-mass end of the HI mass function is most affected by the critical halo mass below which galaxy formation is suppressed by photoionisation heating of the intergalactic medium. We model the redshift dependence of this critical dark matter halo mass by requiring a match to the low-mass end of the HI mass function. The best fitting critical dark matter halo mass decreases as redshift increases in this model, corresponding to a circular velocity of $\\sim 50 \\, {\\rm km \\,s}^{-1}$ at $z=0$, $\\sim 30 \\, {\\rm km\\, s}^{-1}$ at $z \\sim 1$ and $\\sim 12 \\, {\\rm km \\, s}^{-1}$ at $z=6$. We find that an ev...

  17. Finding the Lower Stellar Mass Limit Observationally Justin Cantrell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiita, Paul J.

    saying: "1. Objects with true masses below the limiting mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium masses above the limiting mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium are "brown dwarfs", no matter how below the limiting mass for thermonuclear fusion of deuterium are not "planets", but are "sub

  18. Can Neutrinos be Degenerate in Mass?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis; Smaragda Lola

    1999-04-13

    We reconsider the possibility that the masses of the three light neutrinos of the Standard Model might be almost degenerate and close to the present upper limits from Tritium beta decay and cosmology. In such a scenario, the cancellations required by the latest upper limit on neutrinoless double-beta decay enforce near-maximal mixing that may be compatible only with the vacuum-oscillation scenario for solar neutrinos. We argue that the mixing angles yielded by degenerate neutrino mass-matrix textures are not in general stable under small perturbations. We evaluate within the MSSM the generation-dependent one-loop renormalization of neutrino mass-matrix textures that yielded degenerate masses and large mixing at the tree level. We find that m_{nu_e} > m_{nu_mu} > m_{nu_tau} after renormalization, excluding MSW effects on solar neutrinos. We verify that bimaximal mixing is not stable, and show that the renormalized masses and mixing angles are not compatible with all the experimental constraints, even for tanbeta as low as unity. These results hold whether the neutrino masses are generated by a see-saw mechanism with heavy neutrinos weighing approx. 10^{13} GeV or by non-renormalizable interactions at a scale approx. 10^5 GeV. We also comment on the corresponding renormalization effects in the minimal Standard Model, in which m_{nu_e} < m_{nu_mu} < m_{nu_tau}. Although a solar MSW effect is now possible, the perturbed neutrino masses and mixings are still not compatible with atmospheric- and solar-neutrino data.

  19. Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, Ronald W [U.S. DOE; Li, Tingwen [URS; Nicoletti, Phillip [URS

    2013-01-01

    In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

  20. Orbital masses of nearby luminous galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kudrya, Yuri N. E-mail: yukudrya@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    We use observational properties of galaxies accumulated in the Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog to derive a dark matter mass of luminous galaxies via motions of their companions. The data on orbital-to-stellar mass ratio are presented for 15 luminous galaxies situated within 11 Mpc from us: the Milky Way, M31, M81, NGC 5128, IC342, NGC 253, NGC 4736, NGC 5236, NGC 6946, M101, NGC 4258, NGC 4594, NGC 3115, NGC 3627, and NGC 3368, as well as for a composite suite around other nearby galaxies of moderate and low luminosity. The typical ratio for these galaxies is M {sub orb}/M {sub *} = 31, corresponding to the mean local density of matter ? {sub m} = 0.09, i.e., one-third of the global cosmic density. This quantity seems to be rather an upper limit of dark matter density, since the peripheric population of the suites may suffer from the presence of fictitious unbound members. We note that the Milky Way and M31 halos have lower dimensions and lower stellar masses than those of the other 13 nearby luminous galaxies. However, the dark-to-stellar mass ratio for both the Milky Way and M31 is typical for other neighboring luminous galaxies. The distortion in the Hubble flow, observed around the Local Group and five other neighboring groups, yields their total masses within the radius of a zero velocity surface, R {sub 0}; these masses are slightly lower than the orbital and virial values. This difference may be due to the effect of dark energy producing a kind of 'mass defect' within R {sub 0}.

  1. Mass Formulas Derived by Symmetry Breaking and Prediction of Masses on Heavy Flavor Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2008-03-02

    The base is the Lagrangian of symmetry and its dynamical breaking or Higgs breaking. When the soliton-like solutions of the scalar field equations are substituted into the spinor field equations, in the approximation of non-relativity we derive the Morse-type potential, whose energy spectrum is the GMO mass formula and its modified accurate mass formula. According to the symmetry of s-c quarks, the heavy flavor hadrons which made of u,d and c quarks may be classified by SU(3) octet and decuplet. Then some simple mass formulas are obtained, from this we predict some masses of unknown hadrons.

  2. Critical Masses for Unreflected Metal Spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westfall, Robert Michael; Wright, Richard Q

    2009-01-01

    Calculated critical masses of bare metal spheres for 28 actinide isotopes, using the SCALE/XSDRNPM one-dimensional, discrete-ordinates system, are presented. ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-VII, and JENDL-3.3 cross sections were used in the calculations. Results are given for isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, californium, and for one isotope of einsteinium. Calculated k values for these same nuclides are also given. We show that, for non-threshold or low-threshold fission nuclides, a good approximation for the nuclide k is the value of nubar at 1 MeV. A plot of the critical mass versus k values is given for 19 nuclides with A-numbers between 232 and 250. The peaks in the critical mass curve (for seven nuclides) correspond to dips in the k curve. For the seven cases with the largest critical mass, six are even-even nuclides. Neptunium-237, with a critical mass of about 62.7 kg (ENDF/B-VI calculation), has an odd number of protons and an even number of neutrons. However, two cases with quite small critical masses, 232U and 236Pu, are also even-even. These two nuclides do not exhibit threshold fission behavior like most other even-even nuclides. The largest critical mass is 208.8 kg for 243Am and the smallest is 2.44 kg for 251Cf. The calculated k values vary from 1.5022 for 234U to 4.4767 for 251Cf. A correlation between the calculated critical mass (kg) and the fission spectrum averaged value of is given for the elements U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Cf. For each of the five elements, a fit to the data for that element is provided. In each case the fit employs a negative exponential of the form mass = exp(A + B ~ ln( ) The values of A and B are element dependent and vary slightly for each of the five elements. The method described here is mainly applicable for non-threshold fission nuclides (15 of the 28 nuclides considered in this paper). There are three exceptions, 238Pu, 244Cm, and 250Cf, which all exhibit threshold fission behavior.

  3. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-06-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

  4. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-07-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

  5. Probing the Absolute Mass Scale of Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Joseph A. Formaggio

    2011-10-12

    The experimental efforts of the Neutrino Physics Group at MIT center primarily around the exploration of neutrino mass and its significance within the context of nuclear physics, particle physics, and cosmology. The group has played a prominent role in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, a neutrino experiment dedicated to measure neutrino oscillations from 8B neutrinos created in the sun. The group is now focusing its efforts in the measurement of the neutrino mass directly via the use of tritium beta decay. The MIT group has primary responsibilities in the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino mass experiment, expected to begin data taking by 2013. Specifically, the MIT group is responsible for the design and development of the global Monte Carlo framework to be used by the KATRIN collaboration, as well as responsibilities directly associated with the construction of the focal plane detector. In addition, the MIT group is sponsoring a new research endeavor for neutrino mass measurements, known as Project 8, to push beyond the limitations of current neutrino mass experiments.

  6. The Average Mass Profile of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; H. K. C. Yee; E. Ellingson; S. L. Morris; R. Abraham; P. Gravel; C. J. Pritchet; T. Smecker-Hane; F. D. A. Hartwick; J. E. Hesser; J. B. Hutchings; J. B. Oke

    1997-05-23

    The average mass density profile measured in the CNOC cluster survey is well described with the analytic form rho(r)=A/[r(r+a_rho)^2], as advocated on the basis on n-body simulations by Navarro, Frenk & White. The predicted core radii are a_rho=0.20 (in units of the radius where the mean interior density is 200 times the critical density) for an Omega=0.2 open CDM model, or a_rho=0.26 for a flat Omega=0.2 model, with little dependence on other cosmological parameters for simulations normalized to the observed cluster abundance. The dynamically derived local mass-to-light ratio, which has little radial variation, converts the observed light profile to a mass profile. We find that the scale radius of the mass distribution, 0.20<= a_rho <= 0.30 (depending on modeling details, with a 95% confidence range of 0.12-0.50), is completely consistent with the predicted values. Moreover, the profiles and total masses of the clusters as individuals can be acceptably predicted from the cluster RMS line-of-sight velocity dispersion alone. This is strong support of the hierarchical clustering theory for the formation of galaxy clusters in a cool, collisionless, dark matter dominated universe.

  7. Development and performance of a miniature, low cost mass spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemond, Brian D. (Brian David Thomson)

    2011-01-01

    A miniature, low cost mass spectrometer has been developed that is capable of unit resolution over a mass range of 10 to 50 AMU. The design of the mass spectrometer incorporates several new features that enhance the ...

  8. A reconciled estimate of ice-sheet mass balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Estimate of Ice-Sheet Mass Balance Andrew Shepherd, 1 * Erikand models of surface mass balance and glacial isostaticThis Ice Sheet Mass Balance Exercise (IMBIE) was facilitated

  9. Electromagnetic mass difference on the lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuke Namekawa; Yoshio Kikukawa

    2005-09-24

    We calculate electromagnetic mass difference of mesons using a method proposed by Duncan {\\it et al}. The RG-improved gauge action and the non-compact Abelian gauge action are employed to generate configurations. Quark propagators in the range of $m_{PS}/m_{V}=0.76-0.51$ are obtained with the meanfield-improved clover quark action. Chiral and continuum extrapolations are performed and the results are compared with experiments. Finite size effects are also examined. Quark masses are extracted from the measured spectrum. Our preliminary values for light quark masses are $m_{u}^{\\bar{MS}}(\\mu =2 {GeV}) = 3.03(19)$ MeV, $m_{d}^{\\bar{MS}}(\\mu = 2 {GeV}) = 4.44(28)$ MeV, $m_{s}^{\\bar{MS}}(\\mu = 2 {GeV}) = 99.2(52)$ MeV.

  10. Neutrino Majorana Mass from Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosuke Uehara

    2002-05-25

    We propose a new mechanism to generate the neutrino Majorana mass in TeV-scale gravity models. The black hole violates all non-gauged symmetries and can become the origin of lepton number violating processes. The fluctuation of higher-dimensional spacetime can result in the production of a black hole, which emits 2 neutrinos. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, this process is equivalent to the free propagation of a neutrino with the insertion of the black hole. From this fact, we derive the neutrino Majorana mass. The result is completely consistent with the recently observed evidence of neutrinoless double beta decay. And the obtained neutrino Majorana mass satisfies the constraint from the density of the neutrino dark matter, which affects the cosmic structure formation. Furthermore, we can explain the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays by the Z-burst scenario with it.

  11. Matching Hagedorn mass spectrum with Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Pok Man; Redlich, Krzysztof; Sasaki, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    Based on recent Lattice QCD (LQCD) results obtained at finite temperature, we discuss modeling of the hadronic phase of QCD in the framework of Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) with discrete and continuous mass spectra. We focus on fluctuations of conserved charges, and show how a common limiting temperature can be used to constrain the Hagedorn exponential mass spectrum in different sectors of quantum number, through a matching of HRG and LQCD. For strange baryons, the extracted spectra are found to be consistent with all known and expected states listed by the Particle Data Group (PDG). The strange-mesonic sector, however, requires additional states in the intermediate mass range beyond that embodied in the database.

  12. Matching Hagedorn mass spectrum with Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pok Man Lo; Micha? Marczenko; Krzysztof Redlich; Chihiro Sasaki

    2015-07-23

    Based on recent Lattice QCD (LQCD) results obtained at finite temperature, we discuss modeling of the hadronic phase of QCD in the framework of Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) with discrete and continuous mass spectra. We focus on fluctuations of conserved charges, and show how a common limiting temperature can be used to constrain the Hagedorn exponential mass spectrum in different sectors of quantum number, through a matching of HRG and LQCD. For strange baryons, the extracted spectra are found to be consistent with all known and expected states listed by the Particle Data Group (PDG). The strange-mesonic sector, however, requires additional states in the intermediate mass range beyond that embodied in the database.

  13. Top quark mass measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, Erik; /Chicago U., EFI

    2006-05-01

    The mass of the top quark M{sub top} is interesting both as a fundamental parameter of the standard model and as an important input to precision electroweak tests. The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has a robust program of top quark mass analyses, including the most precise single measurement, M{sub top} = 173.4 {+-} 2.8 GeV/c{sup 2}, using 680 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. A combination of current results from CDF gives M{sub top} = 172.0 {+-} 2.7 GeV/c{sup 2}, surpassing the stated goal of 3 GeV/c{sup 2} precision using 2 fb{sup -1} of data. Finally, a combination with current D0 results gives a world average top quark mass of 172.5 {+-} 2.3 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  14. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA); Eckels, Joel D. (Livermore, CA); Kimmons, James F. (Manteca, CA); Myers, David W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  15. Light quark masses using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Amarjit Soni; Matthew Wingate

    1998-09-10

    We compute the one-loop self-energy correction to the massive domain wall quark propagator. Combining this calculation with simulations at several gauge couplings, we estimate the strange quark mass in the continuum limit. The perturbative one-loop mass renormalization is comparable to that for Wilson quarks and considerably smaller than that for Kogut-Susskind quarks. Also, scaling violations appear mild in comparison to other errors at present. Given their good chiral behavior and these features, domain wall quarks are attractive for evaluating the light quark masses. Our preliminary quenched result is m_s(2 GeV) = 82(15) MeV in the ${\\bar{MS}}$ scheme.

  16. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  17. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, Brian D. (Pleasanton, CA); Fought, Eric R. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  18. Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

  19. Global Electroweak Fits and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Renton

    2008-09-26

    The current electroweak data and the constraints on the Higgs mass are discussed. Within the context of the Standard Model the data prefer a relatively light Higgs mass.

  20. Improvements to Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry for Quantitative Analysis using Short Pulse UV Laser DESCRIPTION: Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass...

  1. Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quark mass variation constraints from Big Bang nucleosynthesis We study...

  2. Advanced Heat/Mass Exchanger Technology for Geothermal and solar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HeatMass Exchanger Technology for Geothermal and solar Renewable Energy Systems Advanced HeatMass Exchanger Technology for Geothermal and solar Renewable Energy Systems Advanced...

  3. Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass...

  4. Proton Mass Shift in Muonic Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiichi Iwazaki

    2014-08-11

    We show that the value of the proton mass depends on each bound state of muonic or electronic hydrogen atom. The charged particle bound to the proton produces magnetic field inside the proton. This makes a change to the amount of chiral condensate inside the proton. The change gives rise to the shift in the value of the proton mass. Numerically, the shift in the $2S$ state of the muonic hydrogen atom can be of the order of $0.1$ meV. The effect may solve the puzzle of the proton radius.

  5. Solids mass flow indication with radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Macko, Joseph E. (Irwin, PA); Estriplet, Isnard (Irwin, PA)

    1985-06-04

    Method and apparatus for indicating mass flow of a solid particulate material through a rotary feeder. A radiation source and detector are positioned in a manner whereby radiation flux is directed through, and attenuated by, particulate material contained in rotating pockets. A Cesium-137 gamma source can be mounted within the shaft of the feeder, and one or more detectors can be mounted outside of the feeder housing. The detected signal is indicative of the mass of particulate material contained within a given pocket rotating within the feeder.

  6. Mass and Angular Momentum of Sgr A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2004-10-13

    For very fast spinning black holes with a>0.9953 the orbital velocity of a test particle unexpectly shows a positive radial gradient for low orbits, an effect of GR which has been overlooked so far. For a=0.99616 the maximum radial change of the orbital velocity equals the radial epicyclic frequency, which in turn is in a 1:3 resonance with the vertical epicyclic frequency. Application to Sgr A* using the quasi-periodic oscillations recently measured suggest that the mass of Sgr A* is 3.28 +/- 0.13 million solar masses.

  7. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Duerr

    2012-06-04

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular, we will discuss the relation between neutrinoless double beta decay and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter--Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore, we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate neutrinoless double beta decay from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope, i.e., within one experiment.

  8. Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerr, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-07-27

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular, we will discuss the relation between 0{nu}{beta}{beta} and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter-Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore, we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate 0{nu}{beta}{beta} from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope, i.e., within one experiment.

  9. On Count/Mass Distinction in Slovene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitrovi?, Moreno

    2011-01-01

    there is rabbit in this stew ? there is rabbit meat in this stew #10 A (predominately) mass noun can be made count we store three bloods ? we store three blood types Section 3 overviews these properties with regards to their application to Slovene. We... we store three bloods ? we store three blood types I regard and convert Chiercia’s ten properties for count/mass distinction into tests: I apply test #1 in §3.2.1, test #2 in §3.2.2, tests #4-7 in §3.2.3, test #8 in §3.2.4, and tests #9 and #10...

  10. Neutrino mass in cosmology: status and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yvonne Y. Y. Wong

    2011-11-06

    I give an overview of the effects of neutrino masses in cosmology, focussing on the role they play in the evolution of cosmological perturbations. I discuss how recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the large-scale matter distribution can probe neutrino masses with greater precision than current laboratory experiments. I describe several new techniques that will be used to probe cosmology in the future, as well as recent advances in the computation of the nonlinear matter power spectrum and related observables.

  11. Dynamical gluon mass and linear confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala, Cesar; Vento, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    We define a non-perturbative running coupling in terms of a gluon mass function, similar to that used in some Dyson-Schwinger approaches. From this coupling, which satisfies asymptotic freedom and describes correctly the singularity structure of confinement, a static quark-antiquark potential is constructed. We calculate the bottomonium and charmonium spectra below the first open flavor meson-meson thresholds and show that for a small range of values of the free parameter determining the gluon mass function a good agreement with data is attained.

  12. Nucleosynthesis in intermediate mass AGB stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Lattanzio; Corinne Charbonnel; Manuel Forestini

    1999-12-15

    We present a summary of the main sites for nucleosynthesis in intermediate mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. We then discuss some detailed evolutionary models and how these have been used to create a synthetic evolution code which calculates the nucleosynthesis very rapidly, enabling us to investigate changes in some uncertain parameters in AGB evolution, such as mass-loss and dredge-up. We then present results for C, C/O, Mg and Al. We also discuss the changes due to the recent NACRE compilation of reaction rates.

  13. Mass Spectrometer Laboratory | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyAprilMartinFeet)perMassMass

  14. Intracellular Water Exchange for Measuring the Dry Mass, Water Mass and Changes in Chemical Composition of Living Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cermak, Nathan

    We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell’s buoyant ...

  15. The History of Nuclidic Masses and of their Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Audi

    2006-02-08

    This paper is centered on some historical aspects of nuclear masses, and their relations to major discoveries. Besides nuclear reactions and decays, the heart of mass measurements lies in mass spectrometry, the early history of which will be reviewed first. I shall then give a short history of the mass unit which has not always been defined as one twelfth of the carbon-12 mass. When combining inertial masses from mass spectrometry with energy differences obtained in reactions and decays, the conversion factor between the two is essential. The history of the evaluation of the nuclear masses (actually atomic masses) is only slightly younger than that of the mass measurements themselves. In their modern form, mass evaluations can be traced back to 1955. Prior to 1955, several tables were established, the oldest one in 1935.

  16. Brachistochrone of a Spherical Uniform Mass Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David R. Mitchell

    2008-08-23

    We solve the brachistochrone problem for a particle travelling through a spherical mass distribution of uniform density. We examine the connection between this problem and the popular "gravity elevator" result. The solution is compared to the well known brachistochrone problem of a particle in a uniform gravitational field.

  17. Building Data Integration Systems via Mass Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doan, AnHai

    Building Data Integration Systems via Mass Collaboration Robert McCann, AnHai Doan, Vanitha 61801, USA {rlmccann, anhai, varadara, kramnik}@cs.uiuc.edu ABSTRACT Building data integration systems on the Web and at enterprises has generated much interest in building data integration systems. Figure 1

  18. The mean molecular mass of Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    , Mars, Mars #12;Science Questions · Mean molecular mass (µ) -> Chemical composition · How did Titan form? · Current reservoirs of volatiles · Ethane/methane puddles/ocean · Thermal structure of atmosphere #12, delicate, etc ­ T/p sensors are simple, cheap, reliable · Is it possible to know µ based on simple

  19. Anisotropic mass ejection in binary mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Morris; Ph. Podsiadlowski

    2006-01-10

    We investigate the mass loss from a rotationally distorted envelope following the early, rapid in-spiral of a companion star inside a common envelope. For initially wide, massive binaries (M_1+M_2=20M_{\\odot}, P\\sim 10 yr), the primary has a convective envelope at the onset of mass transfer and is able to store much of the available orbital angular momentum in its expanded envelope. Three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics calculations show that mass loss is enhanced at mid-latitudes due to shock reflection from a torus-shaped outer envelope. Mass ejection in the equatorial plane is completely suppressed if the shock wave is too weak to penetrate the outer envelope in the equatorial direction (typically when the energy deposited in the star is less than about one-third of the binding energy of the envelope). We present a parameter study to show how the geometry of the ejecta depends on the angular momentum and the energy deposited in the envelope during a merging event. Applications to the nearly axisymmetric, but very non-spherical nebulae around SN1987A and Sheridan 25 are discussed, as well as possible links to RY Scuti and the Small Magellanic Cloud object R4.

  20. Electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Portelli; S. Dürr; Z. Fodor; J. Frison; C. Hoelbling; S. D. Katz; S. Krieg; T. Kurth; L. Lellouch; T. Lippert; K. K. Szabó; A. Ramos

    2011-01-12

    At the precision reached in current lattice QCD calculations, electromagnetic effects are becoming numerically relevant. We will present preliminary results for electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses, based on simulations in which a $\\mathrm{U}(1)$ degree of freedom is superimposed on $N_f=2+1$ QCD configurations from the BMW collaboration.

  1. Mass Transfer of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    ). Many PAHs are only sparingly soluble, and large volumes of water can therefore be contaminated by smallMass Transfer of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Complex DNAPL Mixtures S U P A R N A M U K . * , Environmental and Water Resources Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University

  2. INFLUENCE OF MASS ON DISPLACEMENT THRESHOLD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, A.; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-12-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effect of mass on displacement threshold energy in Cr, Mo, Fe and W. For each interatomic potential, the mass of the atoms is varied among those metals for a total of 16 combinations. The average threshold energy over all crystal directions is calculated within the irreducible crystal directions using appropriate weighting factors. The weighting factors account for the different number of equivalent directions among the grid points and the different solid angle coverage of each grid point. The grid points are constructed with a Miller index increment of 1/24 for a total of 325 points. For each direction, 10 simulations each with a different primary-knock-on atom are performed. The results show that for each interatomic potential, the average threshold energy is insensitive to the mass; i.e., the values are the same within the standard error. In the future, the effect of mass on high-energy cascades for a given interatomic potential will be investigated.

  3. Improved D0 W boson mass determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. M. Abazov et al.

    2001-10-03

    We present a measurement of the W boson mass in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV based on a data sample of 82 pb{sup -1} integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We utilize e{nu} events in which the electron shower is close to the phi edge of one of the 32 modules in the D0 central calorimeter. The electromagnetic calorimenter response and resolution in this region differs from that in the rest of the module and electrons in this region were not previously utilized. We determine the calorimeter response and resolution in this region using Z {yields} ee events. We extract the W boson mass by fitting to the transverse mass and to the electron and neutrino transverse momentum distributions. The result is combined with previous D0 results to obtain an improved measurement of the W boson mass: m{sub W} = 80.483 {+-} 0.084 GeV.

  4. Thermodynamics and Mass Transport in Multicomponent,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Thermodynamics and Mass Transport in Multicomponent, Multiphase H2O Systems of Planetary Interest, cryogenic systems, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, clathrates, Mars, Enceladus, sound speed Abstract Heat of the noncondensible components can greatly alter the thermodynamic properties of the phases and their flow properties

  5. Low Mass Exotic Baryons: Myth or Reality ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff

    2002-07-08

    Using mainly $\\vec{p}$ p $\\to$ p ${\\pi^+}X$ and $\\vec{p}$ p $\\to$ p$_{f}$~p$_{s}$ X reactions, narrow baryonic structures were observed in the mass range 950$\\le$ M $\\le$ 1800 MeV.

  6. ACCOUNT AND PERSPECTIVE Macromolecule Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karypis, George

    ACCOUNT AND PERSPECTIVE Macromolecule Mass Spectrometry: Citation Mining of User Documents Ronald N. Kostoff and Clifford D. Bedford Office of Naval Research, Arlington, Virginia, USA J. Antonio del Ri impacted research, technology development, and applications. Citation Mining, an integration of citation

  7. Galaxy Cluster Virial Masses and Omega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlberg; Yee; Ellingson; Abraham; Gravel; Morris; Pritchet

    1995-09-06

    To re-examine the rich cluster $\\Omega$ value the CNOC Cluster Survey has observed 16 high X-ray luminosity clusters in the redshift range 0.17 to 0.55, obtaining approximately 2600 velocities in their fields. Directly adding all the K and evolution corrected $r$ band light to $M_r(0)=-18.5$, about $0.2L_\\ast$, and correcting for the light below the limit, the average mass-to-light ratio of the clusters is $283\\pm27h\\msun/\\lsun$ and the average mass per galaxy is $3.5\\pm0.4\\times10^{12}h^{-1}\\msun$. The clusters are consistent with having a universal $M_v/L$ value (within the errors of about 20\\%) independent of their velocity dispersion, mean color of their galaxies, blue galaxy content, redshift, or mean interior density. Using field galaxies within the same data set, with the same corrections, we find that the closure mass-to-light, $\\rho_c/j$, is $1160\\pm130h\\msun/\\lsun$ and the closure mass per galaxy, $\\rho_c/\\phi(>0.2L_\\ast)$, is $13.2\\pm1.9\\times10^{12}h^{-1}\\msun$. Under the assumptions that the galaxies are distributed like the mass and that the galaxy luminosities and numbers are statistically conserved, which these data indirectly support, $\\Omega_0=0.20\\pm0.04\\pm0.09$ where the errors are, respectively, the $1\\sigma$ internal and an estimate of the $1\\sigma$ systematic error resulting from the luminosity normalization.

  8. Higgs boson mass and new physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedor Bezrukov; Mikhail Yu. Kalmykov; Bernd A. Kniehl; Mikhail Shaposhnikov

    2012-09-27

    We discuss the lower Higgs boson mass bounds which come from the absolute stability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum and from the Higgs inflation, as well as the prediction of the Higgs boson mass coming from asymptotic safety of the SM. We account for the 3-loop renormalization group evolution of the couplings of the Standard Model and for a part of two-loop corrections that involve the QCD coupling alpha_s to initial conditions for their running. This is one step above the current state of the art procedure ("one-loop matching--two-loop running"). This results in reduction of the theoretical uncertainties in the Higgs boson mass bounds and predictions, associated with the Standard Model physics, to 1-2 GeV. We find that with the account of existing experimental uncertainties in the mass of the top quark and alpha_s (taken at 2sigma level) the bound reads M_H>=M_min (equality corresponds to the asymptotic safety prediction), where M_min=129+-6 GeV. We argue that the discovery of the SM Higgs boson in this range would be in agreement with the hypothesis of the absence of new energy scales between the Fermi and Planck scales, whereas the coincidence of M_H with M_min would suggest that the electroweak scale is determined by Planck physics. In order to clarify the relation between the Fermi and Planck scale a construction of an electron-positron or muon collider with a center of mass energy ~200+200 GeV (Higgs and t-quark factory) would be needed.

  9. L Dwarfs and the Substellar Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. N. Reid; J. D. Kirkpatrick; J. Liebert; A. Burrows; J. E. Gizis; A. Burgasser; C. C. Dahn; D. Monet; R. Cutri; C. A. Beichman; M. Skrutskie

    1999-05-13

    Analysis of initial observations from near-infrared sky surveys has shown that the resulting photometric catalogues, combined with far-red optical data, provide an extremely effective method of finding isolated, very low-temperature objects in the general field. Follow-up observations have already identified more than 25 sources with temperatures cooler than the latest M dwarfs. A comparison with detailed model predictions (Burrows & Sharp) indicates that these L dwarfs have effective temperatures between ~2000\\pm100 K and 1500\\pm100 K, while the available trigonometric parallax data place their luminosities at between 10^{-3.5} and 10^{-4.3} L_solar. Those properties, together with the detection of lithium in one-third of the objects, are consistent with the majority having substellar masses. The mass function cannot be derived directly, since only near-infrared photometry and spectral types are available for most sources, but we can incorporate VLM/brown dwarf models in simulations of the Solar Neighbourhood population and constrain Psi(M) by comparing the predicted L-dwarf surface densities and temperature distributions against observations from the DENIS and 2MASS surveys. The data, although sparse, can be represented by a power-law mass function, Psi(M) ~ M^{-alpha}, with 1 M/M_solar > 0.01 brown dwarfs is 0.10 systems pc^{-3}. In that case brown dwarfs are twice as common as main-sequence stars, but contribute no more than ~15% of the total mass of the disk.

  10. Multifragmentation at the balance energy of mass asymmetric colliding nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supriya Goyal

    2011-06-20

    Using the quantum molecular dynamics model, we study the role of mass asymmetry of colliding nuclei on the fragmentation at the balance energy and on its mass dependence. The study is done by keeping the total mass of the system fixed as 40, 80, 160, and 240 and by varying the mass asymmetry of the ($\\eta$ = $\\frac{A_{T}-A_{P}}{A_{T}+A_{P}}$; where $A_{T}$ and $A_{P}$ are the masses of the target and projectile, respectively) reaction from 0.1 to 0.7. Our results clearly indicate a sizeable effect of the mass asymmetry on the multiplicity of various fragments. The mass asymmetry dependence of various fragments is found to increase with increase in total system mass (except for heavy mass fragments). Similar to symmetric reactions, a power law system mass dependence of various fragment multiplicities is also found to exit for large asymmetries.

  11. Neutrino mass matrices with one texture zero and a vanishing neutrino mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radha Raman Gautam; Madan Singh; Manmohan Gupta

    2015-06-16

    Assuming Majorana nature of neutrinos, we investigate the singular one texture zero neutrino mass matrices in the flavor basis. We find that for the normal mass ordering with $m_1=0$, all the six one texture zero classes are now ruled out at 3$\\sigma$ confidence level, whereas for inverted mass ordering with $m_3=0$ only four classes out of total six can accommodate the latest neutrino oscillation data at 3$\\sigma$ confidence level. Moreover, only two classes can accommodate the present data at 1$\\sigma$ confidence level. We examine the phenomenological implications of the allowed classes for the effective Majorana mass, Dirac and Majorana CP-violating phases. Working within the framework of type-I seesaw mechanism, we present simple discrete Abelian symmetry models leading to all the phenomenologically allowed classes.

  12. Neutrino mass matrices with one texture zero and a vanishing neutrino mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautam, Radha Raman; Gupta, Manmohan

    2015-01-01

    Assuming Majorana nature of neutrinos, we investigate the singular one texture zero neutrino mass matrices in the flavor basis. We find that for the normal mass ordering with $m_1=0$, all the six one texture zero classes are now ruled out at 3$\\sigma$ confidence level, whereas for inverted mass ordering with $m_3=0$ only four classes out of total six can accommodate the latest neutrino oscillation data at 3$\\sigma$ confidence level. Moreover, only two classes can accommodate the present data at 1$\\sigma$ confidence level. We examine the phenomenological implications of the allowed classes for the effective Majorana mass, Dirac and Majorana CP-violating phases. Working within the framework of type-I seesaw mechanism, we present simple discrete Abelian symmetry models leading to all the phenomenologically allowed classes.

  13. Particle analysis using laser ablation mass spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Eric P.; Rosenthal, Stephen E.; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    2003-09-09

    The present invention provides a method of quickly identifying bioaerosols by class, even if the subject bioaerosol has not been previously encountered. The method begins by collecting laser ablation mass spectra from known particles. The spectra are correlated with the known particles, including the species of particle and the classification (e.g., bacteria). The spectra can then be used to train a neural network, for example using genetic algorithm-based training, to recognize each spectra and to recognize characteristics of the classifications. The spectra can also be used in a multivariate patch algorithm. Laser ablation mass specta from unknown particles can be presented as inputs to the trained neural net for identification as to classification. The description below first describes suitable intelligent algorithms and multivariate patch algorithms, then presents an example of the present invention including results.

  14. Mass freezing in growing neutrino quintessence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson J. Nunes; Lily Schrempp; Christof Wetterich

    2011-05-31

    Growing neutrino quintessence solves the coincidence problem for dark energy by a growing cosmological value of the neutrino mass which emerges from a cosmon-neutrino interaction stronger than gravity. The cosmon-mediated attraction between neutrinos induces the formation of large scale neutrino lumps in a recent cosmological epoch. We argue that the non-linearities in the cosmon field equations stop the further increase of the neutrino mass within sufficiently dense and large lumps. As a result, we find the neutrino induced gravitational potential to be substantially reduced when compared to linear extrapolations. We furthermore demonstrate that inside a lump the possible time variation of fundamental constants is much smaller than their cosmological evolution. This feature may reconcile current geophysical bounds with claimed cosmological variations of the fine structure constant.

  15. Lattice QCD Thermodynamics with Physical Quark Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Soltz; C. DeTar; F. Karsch; Swagato Mukherjee; P. Vranas

    2015-02-08

    Over the past few years new physics methods and algorithms as well as the latest supercomputers have enabled the study of the QCD thermodynamic phase transition using lattice gauge theory numerical simulations with unprecedented control over systematic errors. This is largely a consequence of the ability to perform continuum extrapolations with physical quark masses. Here we review recent progress in lattice QCD thermodynamics, focussing mainly on results that benefit from the use of physical quark masses: the crossover temperature, the equation of state, and fluctuations of the quark number susceptibilities. In addition, we place a special emphasis on calculations that are directly relevant to the study of relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC.

  16. Universality of Quark-Lepton Mass Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeshi Fukuyama; Hiroyuki Nishiura

    2013-01-22

    The recently observed lepton mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ of the MNS mixing matrix is well incorporated in a universal mixing hypothesis between quark and lepton sectors. This hypothesis asserts that, in the charged lepton diagonal base, all other mass matrices for up- and down-type quarks and light neutrinos are diagonalized by the same unitary matrix except for the phase elements. It is expressed as $V_{CKM}= U_{MNS}(\\delta^\\prime)^\\dagger P U_{MNS}(\\delta)$ for quark mixing matrix $V_{CKM}$ and lepton mixing matrix $U_{MNS}(\\delta)$ in the phenomenological level. Here $P$ is a diagonal phase mass matrix. $\\delta^\\prime$ is a slightly different phase parameter from the Dirac CP violating phase $\\delta=1.1\\pi$ (best fit) in the MNS lepton mixing matrix.

  17. Dry-Mass Sensing for Microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, T; Knowles, T P J

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach for interfacing an electromechanical sensor with a microfluidic device for the accurate quantification of the dry mass of analytes within microchannels. We show that depositing solutes onto the active surface of a quartz crystal microbalance by means of an on-chip microfluidic spray nozzle and subsequent solvent removal provides the basis for the real-time determination of dry solute mass. Moreover, this detection scheme does not suffer from the decrease in the sensor quality factor and the viscous drag present if the measurement is performed in a liquid environment, yet allows solutions to be analysed. We demonstrate the sensitivity and reliability of our approach by controlled deposition of nanogram levels of salt and protein from a micrometer-sized channel.

  18. Laser Mass Spectrometry in Planetary Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurz, P.; Whitby, J. A.; Managadze, G. G.

    2009-06-16

    Knowing the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary objects allows the study of their origin and evolution within the context of our solar system. Exploration plans in planetary research of several space agencies consider landing spacecraft for future missions. Although there have been successful landers in the past, more landers are foreseen for Mars and its moons, Venus, the jovian moons, and asteroids. Furthermore, a mass spectrometer on a landed spacecraft can assist in the sample selection in a sample-return mission and provide mineralogical context, or identify possible toxic soils on Mars for manned Mars exploration. Given the resources available on landed spacecraft mass spectrometers, as well as any other instrument, have to be highly miniaturised.

  19. Confining potential and mass of elementary particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. I. Buravov

    2014-11-21

    In this paper we consider a model in which the masses of elementary particles are formed and stabilized thanks to confining potential, which is caused by recoil momentum at emission of specific virtual bosons by particle itself. The calculation of this confining potential is carried out. It is shown that $\\Phi$(R) may be in the form const $R^3$ or const $R^2$ depending on continuous or discrete nature of the spectrum of emitted bosons.

  20. Mass in Quantum Yang-Mills Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. D. Faddeev

    2009-11-05

    Among seven problems, proposed for XXI century by Clay Mathematical Institute, there are two stemming from physics. One of them is called "Yang-Mills Existence and Mass Gap". The detailed statement of the problem, written by A. Jaffe and E. Witten, gives both motivation and exposition of related mathematical results, known until now. Having some experience in the matter, I decided to completement their text by my own personal comments aimed mostly to mathematical audience.

  1. On the cosmological mass function theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo

    2006-09-06

    This paper provides, from one side, a review of the theory of the cosmological mass function from a theoretical point of view, starting from the seminal paper of Press & Shechter (1974) to the last developments (Del Popolo & Gambera (1998, 1999), Sheth & Tormen 1999 (ST), Sheth, Mo & Tormen 2001 (ST1), Jenkins et al. 2001 (J01), Shet & Tormen 2002 (ST2), Del Popolo 2002a, Yagi et al. 2004 (YNY)), and from another side some improvements on the multiplicity function models in literature. ...

  2. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Daojing (Daly City, CA); Yang, Peidong (Kensington, CA); Kim, Woong (Seoul, KR); Fan, Rong (Pasadena, CA)

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  3. MassverfringochSeparationsteknik Mass transfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    MassöverföringochSeparationsteknik mars 2015 12.1 General considerations Åbo Akademi - kemiteknik Värme- och and equilibrium: absorption yi = Kxi L xin L xout V yout V yinxoutxin yout yin i yi+1 yi xi xi-1 LV mass balance: V·yi+L·xi= Vyi+1 + Lxi-1 working line: yi+1 ­ yi = (L/V)·(xi-1 ­ xi) slope L/V 6/92 #12;RoNz 424302

  4. Superintegrable systems with position dependent mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Nikitin; T. M. Zasadko

    2015-03-27

    First order integrals of motion for Schr\\"odinger equations with position dependent masses are classified. Seventeen classes of such equations with non-equivalent symmetries are specified. They include integrable, superintegrable and maximally superintegrable systems. Among them is a system invariant with respect to the Lie algebra of Lorentz group and a system whose integrals of motion form algebra so(4). Three of the obtained systems are solved exactly.

  5. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  6. Maximal CP Violation in Flavor Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitabayashi, Teruyuki

    2015-01-01

    Since flavor neutrino masses $M_{\\mu\\mu,\\tau\\tau,\\mu\\tau}$ can be expressed in terms of $M_{ee,e\\mu,e\\tau}$, mutual dependence among $M_{\\mu\\mu,\\tau\\tau,\\mu\\tau}$ is derived by imposing some constraints on $M_{ee,e\\mu,e\\tau}$. For appropriately imposed constraints on $M_{ee,e\\mu,e\\tau}$, we show a texture of neutrino mass matrix giving rise to maximal CP violation. When the atmospheric neutrino mixing is also maximal, we discuss various specific textures of neutrino mass matrices including the texture with $M_{\\tau\\tau}=M^\\ast_{\\mu\\mu}$ derived as the simplest solution to the constraint of $M_{\\tau\\tau}-M_{\\mu\\mu}$=imaginary, which is required by the constraint of $M_{e\\mu}\\cos\\theta_{23}-M_{e\\tau}\\sin\\theta_{23}$=real for $\\cos 2\\theta_{23}=0$. It is found that Majorana CP violation depends on the phase of $M_{ee}$.

  7. Expert overseer for mass spectrometer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Filby, Evan E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

    1991-01-01

    An expert overseer for the operation and real-time management of a mass spectrometer and associated laboratory equipment. The overseer is a computer-based expert diagnostic system implemented on a computer separate from the dedicated computer used to control the mass spectrometer and produce the analysis results. An interface links the overseer to components of the mass spectrometer, components of the laboratory support system, and the dedicated control computer. Periodically, the overseer polls these devices and as well as itself. These data are fed into an expert portion of the system for real-time evaluation. A knowledge base used for the evaluation includes both heuristic rules and precise operation parameters. The overseer also compares current readings to a long-term database to detect any developing trends using a combination of statistical and heuristic rules to evaluate the results. The overseer has the capability to alert lab personnel whenever questionable readings or trends are observed and provide a background review of the problem and suggest root causes and potential solutions, or appropriate additional tests that could be performed. The overseer can change the sequence or frequency of the polling to respond to an observation in the current data.

  8. Masses of Flavor Singlet Hybrid Baryons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olaf Kittel; Glennys R. Farrar

    2000-10-17

    We study the possibility that four iso-singlet baryons $\\Lambda_s(1405)$ $J^P=1/2^{-}$, $\\Lambda_s(1520)$ $J^P=3/2^{-}$, $\\Lambda_c(2593)$ $J^P=1/2^{-}$ and $\\Lambda_c(2625)$ $J^P=3/2^{-}$ are hybrids: three quark one gluon states (udsg). We calculate the mass separations of the candidates, using a degeneracy-lifting hyperfine interaction from an effective single colored gluon exchange between the constituents. The correct ordering of masses is obtained (contrary to the case for the conventional interpretation as 3 quarks with L=1) and the splittings are plausible. The parity of these states is not measured, only assumed to be negative. In the hybrid picture, the lightest states are parity even and the parity odd counterparts lie about 300 MeV higher. Thus the hybrid ansatz predicts that either the parity of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ etc is positive, or that there are undiscovered positive parity states about 300 MeV lower. We also remark that in this picture, the H-dibaryon mass may be around 1.5 GeV.

  9. Spin Singularities: Clifford Kaleidoscopes and Particle Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus S. Cohen

    2009-06-25

    Are particles singularities- vortex lines, tubes, or sheets in some global ocean of dark energy? We visit the zoo of Lagrangian singularities, or caustics in a spin(4,C) phase flow over compactifed Minkowsky space, and find that their varieties and energies parallel the families and masses of the elementary particles. Singularities are classified by tensor products of J Coxeter groups s generated by reflections. The multiplicity, s, is the number reflections needed to close a cycle of null zigzags: nonlinear resonances of J chiral pairs of lightlike matter spinors with (4-J) Clifford mirrors: dyads in the remaining unperturbed vacuum pairs. Using singular perturbations to "peel" phase-space singularities by orders in the vacuum intensity, we find that singular varieties with quantized mass, charge, and spin parallel the families of leptons (J=1), mesons (J=2), and hadrons (J=3). Taking the symplectic 4 form - the volume element in the 8- spinor phase space- as a natural Lagrangian, these singularities turn out to have rest energies within a few percent of the observed particle masses.

  10. Confidence in the neutrino mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarah Evslin

    2013-11-14

    The number of sigma of confidence in a determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy may be obtained from the statistic Delta chi squared. However, as the hierarchy is a discrete variable, this number is not given by the usual square root formula. We review a simple Bayesian formula for the sensitivity to the hierarchy that can be obtained from the median experiment as a function of Delta chi squared. We compare this analytical formula to 6 years of simulated data from JUNO together with a 4% (1%) determination of the effective atmospheric mass splitting from the disappearance channel at MINOS (NOvA). We find a Delta chi squared of 11 (20) yielding 2.6 sigma (3.9 sigma). However when the unknown nonlinear energy response of the detector is included in our analysis this significance degrades considerably. This degradation can be eliminated by dividing the single detector into a near and far detector of the same total target mass. A further advantage of a second detector is that, even while the reactor neutrino experiment runs, the decay at rest of a single, high intensity, continuously running pion source close to one of the detectors, such as that described by the DAEdALUS project, may determine the leptonic CP-violating phase delta.

  11. Confidence in the neutrino mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evslin, Jarah

    2013-01-01

    The number of sigma of confidence in a determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy may be obtained from the statistic Delta chi squared. However, as the hierarchy is a discrete variable, this number is not given by the usual square root formula. We review a simple Bayesian formula for the confidence in the hierarchy determination that can be obtained from the median experiment as a function of Delta chi squared. We compare this analytical formula to 6 years of simulated data from JUNO together with a 4% (1%) determination of the effective atmospheric mass splitting from the disappearance channel at MINOS (NOvA). We find a Delta chi squared of 11 (20) yielding 2.6 sigma (3.9 sigma) of confidence. However when the unknown nonlinear energy response of the detector is included in our analysis this significance degrades considerably. This degradation can be eliminated by dividing the single detector into a near and far detector of the same total target mass. A further advantage of a second detector is that, even ...

  12. Critical Masses for Unreflected Metal Spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westfall, Robert Michael; Goluoglu, Sedat; Wright, Richard Q

    2009-01-01

    Critical masses of bare metal spheres for 33 actinide isotopes, using the SCALE/XSDRNPM one-dimensional, discrete-ordinates system, are presented. ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-VII, and JENDL-3.3 cross sections were used in the calculations. Results are given for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Cf and for one isotope of Es. Calculated k-infinity values for 41 actinides are also given. For the nonthreshold or low-threshold fission nuclides, a good approximation for the nuclide k-infinity is the value of nubar at 1 MeV. A correlation between the calculated critical mass (kg) and the fission spectrum averaged value of F is given for the elements U, Np, Pu, Cm, and Cf as CM (kg) = exp (A + B ln( F)).(1) The values of A and B are element dependent and vary slightly for each of the five elements. The method described here is mainly applicable for nonthreshold fission nuclides (15 of the 31 nuclides considered in this paper). We conclude that equation (1) is useful for predicting the critical mass for nonthreshold fission nuclides if we have accurate values of the fission spectrum averaged F.

  13. Ultra-high-mass mass spectrometry with charge discrimination using cryogenic detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Matthias (Berkeley, CA); Mears, Carl A. (Oakland, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA); Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An ultra-high-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer using a cryogenic particle detector as an ion detector with charge discriminating capabilities. Cryogenic detectors have the potential for significantly improving the performance and sensitivity of time-of-flight mass spectrometers, and compared to ion multipliers they exhibit superior sensitivity for high-mass, slow-moving macromolecular ions and can be used as "stop" detectors in time-of-flight applications. In addition, their energy resolving capability can be used to measure the charge state of the ions. Charge discrimination is very valuable in all time-of-flight mass spectrometers. Using a cryogenically-cooled Nb-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -Nb superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction (STJ) detector operating at 1.3 K as an ion detector in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for large biomolecules it was found that the STJ detector has charge discrimination capabilities. Since the cryogenic STJ detector responds to ion energy and does not rely on secondary electron production, as in the conventionally used microchannel plate (MCP) detectors, the cryogenic detector therefore detects large molecular ions with a velocity-independent efficiency approaching 100%.

  14. Mass of astrophysically relevant $^{31}$Cl and the breakdown of the isobaric multiplet mass equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kankainen, A; Eronen, T; Hakala, J; Jokinen, A; Koponen, J; Moore, I D; Nesterenko, D; Reinikainen, J; Rinta-Antila, S; Voss, A; Äystö, J

    2015-01-01

    The mass of $^{31}$Cl has been measured with the JYFLTRAP double Penning trap mass spectrometer at the Ion-Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. The determined mass-excess value, -7034.7(34) keV, is 15 times more precise than in the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2012. The quadratic form of the isobaric multiplet mass equation for the T=3/2 quartet at A=31 fails ($\\chi^2_n$=11.6) and a non-zero cubic term, d=-3.49(44) keV, is obtained when the new mass value is adopted. $^{31}$Cl has been found to be less proton-bound with a proton separation energy of $S_p$=265(4) keV. Energies for the excited states in $^{31}$Cl and the photodisintegration rate on $^{31}$Cl have been determined with significantly improved precision using the new $S_p$ value. The improved photodisintegration rate helps to constrain astrophysical conditions where $^{30}$S can act as a waiting point in the rapid proton capture process in type I x-ray bursts.

  15. Mass of astrophysically relevant $^{31}$Cl and the breakdown of the isobaric multiplet mass equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kankainen; L. Canete; T. Eronen; J. Hakala; A. Jokinen; J. Koponen; I. D. Moore; D. Nesterenko; J. Reinikainen; S. Rinta-Antila; A. Voss; J. Äystö

    2015-11-25

    The mass of $^{31}$Cl has been measured with the JYFLTRAP double Penning trap mass spectrometer at the Ion-Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. The determined mass-excess value, -7034.7(34) keV, is 15 times more precise than in the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2012. The quadratic form of the isobaric multiplet mass equation for the T=3/2 quartet at A=31 fails ($\\chi^2_n$=11.6) and a non-zero cubic term, d=-3.49(44) keV, is obtained when the new mass value is adopted. $^{31}$Cl has been found to be less proton-bound with a proton separation energy of $S_p$=265(4) keV. Energies for the excited states in $^{31}$Cl and the photodisintegration rate on $^{31}$Cl have been determined with significantly improved precision using the new $S_p$ value. The improved photodisintegration rate helps to constrain astrophysical conditions where $^{30}$S can act as a waiting point in the rapid proton capture process in type I x-ray bursts.

  16. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms. Analysis of low concentration ions, at the ppm level, required a separate analysis using ion ejection techniques. Chemical ionization due to the formation of the MH{sup +} ion or MD{sup +} increased the complexity of the spectra compared to magnetic sector mass spectra and formation of the protonated or deuterated complex was a dynamic function of the trap ion concentration. This made quantitative measurement more of a challenge. However, the resolution of the instrument was far superior to any other mass spectrometry technique that has been applied to the analysis of the hydrogen isotopes. The piezo-electric picoliter injection device offers a new way of submitting small quantities of atmospheric pressure sample gas for analysis. The new software had many improvements over the previous version but significant flaws in the beta codes remain that make the prototype units less than ideal. The instrument is a promising new technology that experience will likely improve. Unfortunately, Siemens has concluded that the technology will not be a commercial success and has decided to stop producing this product.

  17. The Mass-Function of Low Mass Halo Stars: Limits on Baryonic Halo Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David S. Graff; Katherine Freese

    1996-06-18

    We derive mass functions (MF) for halo red dwarfs (the faintest hydrogen burning stars) and then extrapolate to place limits on the total mass of halo brown dwarfs (stars not quite massive enough to burn hydrogen). The mass functions are obtained from the luminosity function of a sample of 114 local halo stars in the USNO parallax survey (Dahn \\etal 1995). We use stellar models of Alexander \\etal (1996) and make varying assumptions about metallicity and about possible unresolved binaries in the sample. We find that the MF for halo red dwarfs cannot rise more quickly than $1/m^2$ as one approaches the hydrogen burning limit. Using recent results from star formation theory, we extrapolate the MF into the brown-dwarf regime. We see that likely extrapolations imply that the total mass of brown dwarfs in the halo is less than $\\sim 3\\%$ of the local mass density of the halo ($\\sim 0.3\\%$ for the more realistic models we consider). Our limits apply to brown dwarfs in the halo that come from the same stellar population as the red dwarfs.

  18. Coolant mass flow equalizer for nuclear fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Betten, Paul R. (Windsor, CT)

    1978-01-01

    The coolant mass flow distribution in a liquid metal cooled reactor is enhanced by restricting flow in sub-channels defined in part by the peripheral fuel elements of a fuel assembly. This flow restriction, which results in more coolant flow in interior sub-channels, is achieved through the use of a corrugated liner positioned between the bundle of fuel elements and the inner wall of the fuel assembly coolant duct. The corrugated liner is expandable to accommodate irradiation induced growth of fuel assembly components.

  19. Fermion mass generation without a condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkitesh Ayyar

    2014-12-05

    We study a lattice field theory model containing two flavors of massless staggered fermions with an onsite four-fermion interaction. The symmetry of the model forbids non-zero fermion bilinear order parameters that can generate a fermion mass. At weak couplings, we expect a massless fermion phase. At strong couplings, we can argue for the existence of massive fermions without the formation of any fermion bilinear condensate. Using Monte Carlo calculations in three space-time dimensions, we find evidence for a direct second order phase transition between the two phases.

  20. Quark mass thresholds in QCD thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Laine; Y. Schroder

    2006-05-05

    We discuss radiative corrections to how quark mass thresholds are crossed, as a function of the temperature, in basic thermodynamic observables such as the pressure, the energy and entropy densities, and the heat capacity of high temperature QCD. The indication from leading order that the charm quark plays a visible role at surprisingly low temperatures, is confirmed. We also sketch a way to obtain phenomenological estimates relevant for generic expansion rate computations at temperatures between the QCD and electroweak scales, pointing out where improvements over the current knowledge are particularly welcome.

  1. A More Precise Higgs Boson Mass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-05-14

    To learn what distinguishes electromagnetism from the weak interactions was an early goal of experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A big part of the answer was given in mid-2012, when the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the LHC announced the discovery of the Higgs boson in the study of proton–proton collisions. Now the discovery teams have pooled their data analyses to produce a measurement of the Higgs boson mass with 0.2% precision. The new value they discovered enables physicists to make more stringent tests of the electroweak theory and of the Higgs boson’s properties.

  2. Gravitational mass of relativistic matter and antimatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan

    2015-07-09

    The universality of free fall, the weak equivalence principle (WEP), is a cornerstone of the general theory of relativity, the most precise theory of gravity confirmed in all experiments up to date. The WEP states the equivalence of the inertial, $m$, and gravitational, $m_g$, masses and was tested in numerous occasions with normal matter at relatively low energies. However, there is no proof for the matter and antimatter at high energies. For the antimatter the situation is even less clear -- current direct observations of trapped antihydrogen suggest the limits $-65 International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider (CLIC).

  3. Environmental Dependence of Masses and Coupling Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith A. Olive; Maxim Pospelov

    2008-01-04

    We construct a class of scalar field models coupled to matter that lead to the dependence of masses and coupling constants on the ambient matter density. Such models predict a deviation of couplings measured on the Earth from values determined in low-density astrophysical environments, but do not necessarily require the evolution of coupling constants with the redshift in the recent cosmological past. Additional laboratory and astrophysical tests of \\Delta \\alpha and \\Delta(m_p/m_e) as functions of the ambient matter density are warranted.

  4. Miniaturized Mass Spectrometer - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetectionBenchmarkResults andVehicles and Fuels Vehicles

  5. Mass Spectrometer Facility | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyAprilMartinFeet)perMass

  6. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): growing up in a bad neighbourhood - how do low-mass galaxies become passive?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, L J M; Driver, S P; Alpaslan, M; Baldry, I K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Brough, S; Brown, M J I; Cluver, M E; Holwerda, B W; Hopkins, A M; Lara-Lopez, M A; Mahajan, S; Moffett, A J; Owers, M S; Phillipps, S

    2015-01-01

    Both theoretical predictions and observations of the very nearby Universe suggest that low-mass galaxies (log$_{10}$[M$_{*}$/M$_{\\odot}$]passive and star-forming galaxies as a function of stellar mass, using the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey. We find that passive fractions are higher in both interacting pair and group galaxies than the field at all stellar masses, and that this effect is most apparent in the lowest mass galaxies. We also find that essentially all passive log$_{10}$[M$_{*}$/M$_{\\odot}$]passive systems increases with decreasing stellar mass, and highlight that this is poten...

  7. A new detector for mass spectrometry: Direct detection of low...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A new detector for mass spectrometry: Direct detection of low energy ions using a multi-pixel photon counter Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A new detector for mass...

  8. Press Pass - Press Release - W mass precisions measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uncertainty of the W boson mass will lead to stricter bounds on the mass of the elusive Higgs boson. The W boson is a carrier of the weak nuclear force and a key element of the...

  9. Quantifying Particle Coatings Using High-Precision Mass Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knudsen, Scott Michael

    We present a general method to quantify coatings on microparticle surfaces based on the additional mass. Particle buoyant mass is determined in a solution with a density that is nearly equivalent to that of the core particle, ...

  10. Using buoyant mass to measure the growth of single cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godin, Michel

    We used a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) combined with picoliter-scale microfluidic control to measure buoyant mass and determine the 'instantaneous' growth rates of individual cells. The SMR measures mass with ...

  11. Scalability of mass transfer in liquid-liquid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woitalka, A.

    We address liquid–liquid mass transfer between immiscible liquids using the system 1-butanol and water, with succinic acid as the mass transfer component. Using this system we evaluate the influence of two-phase flow ...

  12. Digital microfluidic sample preparation for biological mass spectrometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Adam A.

    2011-06-27

    The use of mass spectrometry in the biosciences has undergone huge growth in re- cent years due to sustained effort in the development of new ionisation techniques, more powerful mass analysers and better bioinformatic ...

  13. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding (Book) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Book: Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding In fusion welding, parts...

  14. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses implied by the Seesaw Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, H

    2005-01-01

    It is found that the seesaw mechanism not only explain the smallness of neutrino masses but also account for the large mixing angles simultaneously, once the unification of the neutrino Dirac mass matrix with that of up-quark sector is realized. We show that provided the Majorana masses have hierarchical structure as is seen in the up-quark sector, we can reduce the information about the absolute values of neutrino masses through the data set of neutrino experiments. The results for the light neutrino masses are $m_1:m_2:m_3\\approx 1:3:17$ $(m_1\\simeq m_2:m_3\\approx 1.2:1)$ in the case of normal mass spectrum (inverted mass spectrum), and the heaviest Majorana mass turns out to be $m_3^R=1\\times 10^{15}$ GeV which just corresponds to the GUT scale.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Helicopter Weight and Mass Center Estimation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Bradley Whitten

    2013-04-09

    Real-time estimates of weight and mass center location for helicopters are desirable for flight control and condition-based maintenance purposes. While methods to estimate mass parameters of helicopters have been developed, they often assume near...

  16. Energetics of solar coronal mass ejections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad Subramanian; Angelos Vourlidas

    2007-02-26

    Aims: We investigate whether solar coronal mass ejections are driven mainly by coupling to the ambient solar wind or through the release of internal magnetic energy. Methods: We examine the energetics of 39 flux-rope like coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun using data in the distance range $\\sim$ 2--20 $R_{\\odot}$ from the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronograph (LASCO) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). This comprises a complete sample of the best examples of flux-rope CMEs observed by LASCO in 1996-2001. Results: We find that 69% of the CMEs in our sample experience a clearly identifiable driving power in the LASCO field of view. For the CMEs that are driven, we examine if they might be deriving most of their driving power by coupling to the solar wind. We do not find conclusive evidence in favor of this hypothesis. On the other hand, we find that their internal magnetic energy is a viable source of the required driving power. We have estimated upper and lower limits on the power that can possibly be provided by the internal magnetic field of a CME. We find that, on average, the lower limit to the available magnetic power is around 74% of what is required to drive the CMEs, while the upper limit can be as much as an order of magnitude larger.

  17. Methanol emission from low mass protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Maret; C. Ceccarelli; A. G. G. M. Tielens; E. Caux; B. Lefloch; A. Faure; A. Castets; D. R. Flower

    2005-07-15

    We present observations of methanol lines in a sample of Class 0 low mass protostars. Using a 1-D radiative transfer model, we derive the abundances in the envelopes. In two sources of the sample, the observations can only be reproduced by the model if the methanol abundance is enhanced by about two order of magnitude in the inner hot region of the envelope. Two other sources show similar jumps, although at a lower confidence level. The observations for the other three sources are well reproduced with a constant abundance, but the presence of a jump cannot be ruled out. The observed methanol abundances in the warm gas around low mass protostars are orders of magnitude higher than gas phase chemistry models predict. Hence, in agreement with other evidences, this suggest that the high methanol abundance reflects recent evaporation of ices due to the heating by the newly formed star. The observed abundance ratios of CH3 OH, H2 CO, and CO are in good agreement with grain surface chemistry models. However, the absolute abundances are more difficult to reproduce and may point towards the presence of multiple ice components in these regions.

  18. Mass Mixing, the Fourth Generation, and the Kinematic Higgs Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander N. Jourjine

    2010-08-25

    We describe how to construct chiral fermion mass terms using Dirac-Kahler (DK) spinors. Classical massive DK spinors are shown to be equivalent to four generations of Dirac spinors with equal mass coupled to a background U(2,2) gauge field. Quantization breaks U(2,2) to U(2)xU(2), lifts mass spectrum degeneracy, and generates a non-trivial mass mixing matrix.

  19. LCPHSM2001054 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LC­PHSM­2001­054 Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass and Cross Section with a Linear e + e \\Gamma for the measurement of the Higgs boson mass and produc­ tion cross section. An integrated luminosity of 500 fb \\Gamma1 is assumed. For Higgs boson masses of 120, 150 and 180 GeV the uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass

  20. Mass conservation in finite element groundwater DANIEL R LYNCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the volumetric water content, q ~s the volumetric fired flux. o is the mtrmsm mass sink due to pumping

  1. A reconciled estimate of ice-sheet mass balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    acceler- ation is, however, neither uniform nor progres-dynamical mass loss (15, 77), but neither signal is large in

  2. Nuclear Mass Datasets and Models at nuclearmasses.org

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This online repository for nuclear mass information allows nuclear researchers to upload their own mass values, store then, share them with colleagues, and, in turn, visualize and analyze the work of others. The Resources link provides access to published information or tools on other websites. The Contributions page is where users will find software, documents, experimental mass data sets, and theoretical mass models that have been uploaded for sharing with the scientific community.

  3. BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D­22607#erential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement possible impact of the beam related systematic errors on the Higgs boson mass measurement is discussed

  4. BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEAM RELATED SYSTEMATICS IN HIGGS BOSON MASS MEASUREMENT A.RASPEREZA DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 and differential luminosity spectrum measurements and beam energy spread on the precision of the Higgs boson mass such as Higgs boson mass, decay branching fractions and production rate. However, most of these studies did

  5. PROOF-MASS INERTIAL VIBRATION CONTROL USING A SHUNTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    PROOF-MASS INERTIAL VIBRATION CONTROL USING A SHUNTED ELECTROMAGNETIC TRANSDUCER Andrew J. Fleming-mass dampers utilize a suspended mass to reduce the vibration experienced by a host structure. Active vibration vibration absorbtion. An electrical impedance is designed and connected to an electromagnetic coil

  6. Transport de masse sur la Terre Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Transport de masse sur la Terre Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Universitaire de France Colloquium de l'Institut de Math´ematiques de Jussieu Ludovic Rifford Transport de masse des courbes trac´ees sur M qui relient x `a y. Ludovic Rifford Transport de masse sur la Terre #12

  7. Top Mass Measurements with the D0 Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Boline

    2015-01-18

    I present recent results related to the measurement of the top quark mass, using $p\\bar{p}$ collisions recorded with the D{\\O}Detector at the Tevatron. The results are: A direct measurement of the mass difference between top and anti-top quarks, Measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets channel and in the dilepton channel.

  8. Mass balance of Vatnajokull outlet glaciers reconstructed back to 1958

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, L.A.

    Mass balance of Vatnaj¨okull outlet glaciers reconstructed back to 1958 L. A. Rasmussen Department seasonal components of mass balance of five Vatnaj¨okull outlet glaciers. Over the period of observations of mass balance between 1991 and 2001, it had percentage r2 rang- ing from 41 to 93 for winter balance bw

  9. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2004; 18: 27062712

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    a tryptophanyl residue Joo Yeon Oh, Jeong Hee Moon and Myung Soo Kim* National Creative Research Initiative mass spectrometry.7,8 The internal energy that ions acquire in the MALDI process or via colli- sional has been attempted also.11­13 Compared with CAD, PD may be considered a clean technique without

  10. A PRECISE MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BINARY PULSAR PSR J1802 - 2124

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferdman, R. D.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Theureau, G. [Station de Radioastronomie de Nancay, Observatoire de Paris, 18330 Nancay (France); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121, Bonn (Germany); McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Nice, D. J. [Physics Department, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010 (United States); Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Lyne, A. G.; Faulkner, A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Possenti, A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, 09012 Capoterra (Italy); Demorest, P. B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Backer, D. C., E-mail: robert.ferdman@obs-nancay.f [Department of Astronomy and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-03-10

    PSR J1802 - 2124 is a 12.6 ms pulsar in a 16.8 hr binary orbit with a relatively massive white dwarf (WD) companion. These properties make it a member of the intermediate-mass class of binary pulsar (IMBP) systems. We have been timing this pulsar since its discovery in 2002. Concentrated observations at the Green Bank Telescope, augmented with data from the Parkes and Nancay observatories, have allowed us to determine the general relativistic Shapiro delay. This has yielded pulsar and WD mass measurements of 1.24 +- 0.11 M{sub sun} and 0.78 +- 0.04 M{sub sun} (68% confidence), respectively. The low mass of the pulsar, the high mass of the WD companion, the short orbital period, and the pulsar spin period may be explained by the system having gone through a common-envelope phase in its evolution. We argue that selection effects may contribute to the relatively small number of known IMBPs.

  11. Charge dependent relation between the masses of different generations and Neutrino masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branislav Sazdovic

    2015-01-29

    Despite the enormous achievements, the Standard model of Particle physics can not be consider as complete theory of fundamental interactions. Among other things, it can not describe the gravitational interaction and it depends on 19 parameters. The Standard model includes 12 fermions (matter elementary particles with spin $\\frac{1}{2}$) which are divided in three generations, groups with same interactions but different masses. Each generation can be classified into two leptons (with electric charges $Q=-1$, electron-like and $Q=0$, neutrino) and two quarks (with electric charges $Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$, down-type and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$, up-type). However, the understanding of the relationship between generations and ratio of masses of different generations are unknown. Here we show that there exists the simple relation between masses of different generations which depend only on the electric charges for $Q=-1,\\, \\, Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$ and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$. It is in pretty good agreement with experimental data. Assuming that the same relation valid for $Q=0$, we are able to calculate neutrino masses. Therefore, our results could pave the way for further investigations beyond Standard model.

  12. THE MASS OF KOI-94d AND A RELATION FOR PLANET RADIUS, MASS, AND INCIDENT FLUX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Lauren M.

    We measure the mass of a modestly irradiated giant planet, KOI-94d. We wish to determine whether this planet, which is in a 22 day orbit and receives 2700 times as much incident flux as Jupiter, is as dense as Jupiter or ...

  13. Effect of mass asymmetry on the mass dependence of balance energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supriya Goyal

    2011-02-19

    We demonstrate the role of the mass asymmetry on the balance energy (Ebal) by studying asymmetric reactions throughout the periodic table and over entire colliding geometry. Our results, which are almost independent of the system size and as well as of the colliding geometries indicate a sizeable effect of the asymmetry of the reaction on the balance energy.

  14. Exotic low mass narrow baryons extracted from charge exchange reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2010-02-12

    This paper aims to give further evidence for the existence of low mass exotic baryons. Narrow structures in baryonic missing mass or baryonic invariant mass were observed during the last twelve years. Since their evidence is still under debate, various data, measured with incident hadrons, by different collaborations, are reanalyzed to bring evidence on these narrow exotic baryonic resonances excited in charge-exchange reactions. These structures are clearly exotic as there is no room for them in the $qqq$ configurations: their width is smaller than the widths of "classical" baryonic resonances, moreover some of the masses lie below the pion threshold mass.

  15. Gerotor and bearing system for whirling mass orbital vibrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brett, James Ford; Westermark, Robert Victor; Turner, Jr., Joey Earl; Lovin, Samuel Scott; Cole, Jack Howard; Myers, Will

    2007-02-27

    A gerotor and bearing apparatus for a whirling mass orbital vibrator which generates vibration in a borehole. The apparatus includes a gerotor with an inner gear rotated by a shaft having one less lobe than an outer gear. A whirling mass is attached to the shaft. At least one bearing is attached to the shaft so that the bearing engages at least one sleeve. A mechanism is provided to rotate the inner gear, the mass and the bearing in a selected rotational direction in order to cause the mass, the inner gear, and the bearing to backwards whirl in an opposite rotational direction. The backwards whirling mass creates seismic vibrations.

  16. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coutts, Gerald W. (Livermore, CA); Bushman, John F. (Oakley, CA); Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A vacuum housing and pumping system for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof.

  17. Dynamic effective mass of granular media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaur-Jian Hsu; David L. Johnson; Rohit A. Ingale; John J. Valenza; Nicolas Gland; Hernan A. Makse

    2008-08-15

    We develop the concept of frequency dependent effective mass, M(omega), of jammed granular materials which occupy a rigid cavity to a filling fraction of 48%, the remaining volume being air of normal room condition or controlled humidity. The dominant features of M(omega) provide signatures of the dissipation of acoustic modes, elasticity and aging effects in the granular medium. We perform humidity controlled experiments and interpret the data in terms of a continuum model and a "trap" model of thermally activated capillary bridges at the contact points. The results suggest that attenuation in the granular materials is influenced significantly by the kinetics of capillary condensation between the asperities at the contacts.

  18. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coutts, G.W.; Bushman, J.F.; Alger, T.W.

    1996-07-23

    A vacuum housing and pumping system is described for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof. 7 figs.

  19. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  20. Chemistry of Low Mass Substellar Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katharina Lodders; Bruce Fegley, Jr

    2006-01-17

    "Brown dwarfs" is the collective name for objects more massive than giant planets such as Jupiter but less massive than M dwarf stars. This review gives a brief description of the classification and chemistry of low mass dwarfs. The current spectral classification of stars includes L and T dwarfs that encompass the coolest known stars and substellar objects. The relatively low atmospheric temperatures and high total pressures in substellar dwarfs lead to molecular gas and condensate chemistry. The chemistry of elements such as C, N, O, Ti, V, Fe, Cr, and the alkali elements play a dominant role in shaping the optical and infrared spectra of the "failed" stars. Chemical diagnostics for the subclassifications are described.

  1. Masses of Kr-76 and K-74 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moltz, D. M.; Toth, K. S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Neese, R. E.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    .77 ?64.04 ?70.22 ?71.35 ?62.05 ?66.54 ?59.67 ?62.20 ?68.91 ?69.80 ?59.21 ?64.12 ?56.21 ?62.45 ?69.16 ?70.19 ?59.94 ?64.91 ?57.53 ?62.66 ?68.89 ?70.26 ?60.66 ?65.25 ?58.14 '4Kr "Kr Kr Rb Rb 77Sr ?): 0.25 0.52 ?0.14 ?1.... TOF spectra. This experimental setup has been shown' to reject spurious background events at a level below 200 pb/(srMeV) for medium mass tar- gets. Additional experimental details may be found elsewhere. ' %hile the experiment consisted of two...

  2. Gravitational mass of relativistic matter and antimatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan

    2015-10-07

    The universality of free fall, the weak equivalence principle (WEP), is a cornerstone of the general theory of relativity, the most precise theory of gravity confirmed in all experiments up to date. The WEP states the equivalence of the inertial, $m$, and gravitational, $m_g$, masses and was tested in numerous occasions with normal matter at relatively low energies. However, there is no proof for the matter and antimatter at high energies. For the antimatter the situation is even less clear -- current direct observations of trapped antihydrogen suggest the limits $-65 solar gravitational potential. Our result clearly rules out the speculated antigravity. By considering the absolute potential of the Local Supercluster (LS), we also predict the bounds $1 - 4\\times 10^{-7} < m_g/m < 1 + 2\\times 10^{-7}$ for an electron and positron. Finally, we comment on a possibility of performing complementary tests at the future International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider (CLIC).

  3. Dynamic effective mass of granular media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Valenza; Chaur-Jian Hsu; Rohit Ingale; Nicolas Gland; Hernán A. Makse; David Linton Johnson

    2009-05-08

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of the frequency-dependent effective mass, $\\tilde{M}(\\omega)$, of loose granular particles which occupy a rigid cavity to a given filling fraction, the remaining volume being air of differing humidities. This allow us to study the mechanisms of elastic response and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media. We demonstrate that this is a sensitive and direct way to measure those properties of the granular medium that are the cause of the changes in acoustic properties of structures containing grain-filled cavities. Specifically, we apply this understanding to the case of the flexural resonances of a rectangular bar with a grain-filled cavity within it. The dominant features of $\\tilde{M}(\\omega)$ are a sharp resonance and a broad background, which we analyze within the context of simple models. We find that: a) These systems may be understood in terms of a height-dependent and diameter-dependent effective sound speed ($\\sim 100-300$ m/s) and an effective viscosity ($\\sim 5\\times 10^4$ Poise). b) There is a dynamic Janssen effect in the sense that, at any frequency, and depending on the method of sample preparation, approximately one-half of the effective mass is borne by the side walls of the cavity and one-half by the bottom. c) By performing experiments under varying humidity conditions we conclude that, on a fundamental level, damping of acoustic modes is dominated by adsorbed films of water at grain-grain contacts in our experiments, not by global viscous dampening. d) There is a monotonically increasing effect of humidity on the dampening of the fundamental resonance within the granular medium which translates to a non-monotonic, but predictable, variation of dampening within the grain-loaded bar.

  4. IMPLICATIONS OF MASS AND ENERGY LOSS DUE TO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS ON MAGNETICALLY ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2013-02-20

    Analysis of a database of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated flares over the period 1996-2007 finds well-behaved power-law relationships between the 1-8 A flare X-ray fluence and CME mass and kinetic energy. We extrapolate these relationships to lower and higher flare energies to estimate the mass and energy loss due to CMEs from stellar coronae, assuming that the observed X-ray emission of the latter is dominated by flares with a frequency as a function of energy dn/dE = kE {sup -{alpha}}. For solar-like stars at saturated levels of X-ray activity, the implied losses depend fairly weakly on the assumed value of {alpha} and are very large: M-dot {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and E-dot {approx}0.1 L{sub sun}. In order to avoid such large energy requirements, either the relationships between CME mass and speed and flare energy must flatten for X-ray fluence {approx}> 10{sup 31} erg, or the flare-CME association must drop significantly below 1 for more energetic events. If active coronae are dominated by flares, then the total coronal energy budget is likely to be up to an order of magnitude larger than the canonical 10{sup -3} L {sub bol} X-ray saturation threshold. This raises the question of what is the maximum energy a magnetic dynamo can extract from a star? For an energy budget of 1% of L {sub bol}, the CME mass loss rate is about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  5. Method for increasing the dynamic range of mass spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail; Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.

    2004-09-07

    A method for enhancing the dynamic range of a mass spectrometer by first passing a sample of ions through the mass spectrometer having a quadrupole ion filter, whereupon the intensities of the mass spectrum of the sample are measured. From the mass spectrum, ions within this sample are then identified for subsequent ejection. As further sampling introduces more ions into the mass spectrometer, the appropriate rf voltages are applied to a quadrupole ion filter, thereby selectively ejecting the undesired ions previously identified. In this manner, the desired ions may be collected for longer periods of time in an ion trap, thus allowing better collection and subsequent analysis of the desired ions. The ion trap used for accumulation may be the same ion trap used for mass analysis, in which case the mass analysis is performed directly, or it may be an intermediate trap. In the case where collection is an intermediate trap, the desired ions are accumulated in the intermediate trap, and then transferred to a separate mass analyzer. The present invention finds particular utility where the mass analysis is performed in an ion trap mass spectrometer or a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

  6. Quark masses, the Dashen phase, and gauge field topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creutz, Michael

    2013-12-15

    The CP violating Dashen phase in QCD is predicted by chiral perturbation theory to occur when the up–down quark mass difference becomes sufficiently large at fixed down-quark mass. Before reaching this phase, all physical hadronic masses and scattering amplitudes are expected to behave smoothly with the up-quark mass, even as this mass passes through zero. In Euclidean space, the topological susceptibility of the gauge fields is positive at positive quark masses but diverges to negative infinity as the Dashen phase is approached. A zero in this susceptibility provides a tentative signal for the point where the mass of the up quark vanishes. I discuss potential ambiguities with this determination. -- Highlights: •The CP violating Dashen phase in QCD occurs when the up quark mass becomes sufficiently negative. •Before reaching this phase, all physical hadronic masses and scattering amplitudes behave smoothly with the up-quark mass. •The topological susceptibility of the gauge fields diverges to negative infinity as the Dashen phase is approached. •A zero in the topological susceptibility provides a tentative signal for the point where the mass of the up quark vanishes. •The universality of this definition remains unproven. Potential ambiguities are discussed.

  7. Ten Low Mass Companions from the Keck Precision Velocity Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven S. Vogt; R. Paul Butler; Geoffrey W. Marcy; Debra A. Fischer; Dimitri Pourbaix; Kevin Apps; Gregory Laughlin

    2001-10-16

    Ten new low mass companions have emerged from the Keck precision Doppler velocity survey, with minimum (msini) masses ranging from 0.8 mjup to 0.34 msun. Five of these are planet candidates with msini < 12 mjup, two are brown dwarf candidates with msini ~30 mjup, and three are low mass stellar companions. Hipparcos astrometry reveals the orbital inclinations and masses for three of the (more massive) companions, and it provides upper limits to the masses for the rest. A new class of extrasolar planet is emerging, characterized by nearly circular orbits and orbital radii greater than 1 AU. The planet HD 4208b appears to be a member of this new class. The mass distribution of extrasolar planets continues to exhibit a rapid rise from 10 mjup toward the lowest detectable masses near 1 msat.

  8. Ten Low Mass Companions from the Keck Precision Velocity Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogt, S S; Marcy, G W; Fischer, D A; Pourbaix, D; Apps, K; Laughlin, G; Vogt, Steven S.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Pourbaix, Dimitri; Apps, Kevin; Laughlin, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    Ten new low mass companions have emerged from the Keck precision Doppler velocity survey, with minimum (msini) masses ranging from 0.8 mjup to 0.34 msun. Five of these are planet candidates with msini < 12 mjup, two are brown dwarf candidates with msini ~30 mjup, and three are low mass stellar companions. Hipparcos astrometry reveals the orbital inclinations and masses for three of the (more massive) companions, and it provides upper limits to the masses for the rest. A new class of extrasolar planet is emerging, characterized by nearly circular orbits and orbital radii greater than 1 AU. The planet HD 4208b appears to be a member of this new class. The mass distribution of extrasolar planets continues to exhibit a rapid rise from 10 mjup toward the lowest detectable masses near 1 msat.

  9. Galaxy Mergers and Dark Matter Halo Mergers in LCDM: Mass, Redshift, and Mass-Ratio Dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    We employ a high-resolution LCDM N-body simulation to present merger rate predictions for dark matter halos and investigate how common merger-related observables for galaxies - such as close pair counts, starburst counts, and the morphologically disturbed fraction - likely scale with luminosity, stellar mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift from z = 0 to z = 4. We provide a simple 'universal' fitting formula that describes our derived merger rates for dark matter halos a function of dark halo mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift, and go on to predict galaxy merger rates using number density-matching to associate halos with galaxies. For example, we find that the instantaneous merger rate of m/M > 0.3 mass ratio events into typical L {approx}> fL{sub *} galaxies follows the simple relation dN/dt {approx_equal} 0.03(1+f)Gyr{sup -1} (1+z){sup 2.1}. Despite the rapid increase in merger rate with redshift, only a small fraction of > 0.4L{sub *} high-redshift galaxies ({approx} 3% at z = 2) should have experienced a major merger (m/M > 0.3) in the very recent past (t < 100 Myr). This suggests that short-lived, merger-induced bursts of star formation should not contribute significantly to the global star formation rate at early times, in agreement with observational indications. In contrast, a fairly high fraction ({approx} 20%) of those z = 2 galaxies should have experienced a morphologically transformative merger within a virial dynamical time. We compare our results to observational merger rate estimates from both morphological indicators and pair-fraction based determinations between z = 0-2 and show that they are consistent with our predictions. However, we emphasize that great care must be made in these comparisons because the predicted observables depend very sensitively on galaxy luminosity, redshift, overall mass ratio, and uncertain relaxation timescales for merger remnants. We show that the majority of bright galaxies at z = 3 should have undergone a major merger (> 0.3) in the last 700 Myr and conclude that mergers almost certainly play an important role in delivering baryons and influencing the kinematic properties of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs).

  10. AGN Jet Mass Loading and Truncation by Stellar Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Hubbard; Eric G. Blackman

    2006-04-28

    Active Galactic Nuclei can produce extremely powerful jets. While tightly collimated, the scale of these jets and the stellar density at galactic centers implies that there will be many jet/star interactions, which can mass-load the jet through stellar winds. Previous work employed modest wind mass outflow rates, but this does not apply when mass loading is provided by a small number of high mass-loss stars. We construct a framework for jet mass-loading by stellar winds for a broader spectrum of wind mass-loss rates than has been previously considered. Given the observed stellar mass distributions in galactic centers, we find that even highly efficient (0.1 Eddington luminosity) jets from supermassive black holes of masses $M_{BH} \\la 10^4M_{\\odot}$ are rapidly mass loaded and quenched by stellar winds. For $10^4 M_{\\odot}jets is independent of the jet's mechanical luminosity. Stellar wind mass-loading is unable to quench efficient jets from more massive engines, but can account for the observed truncation of the inefficient M87 jet, and implies a baryon dominated composition on scales $\\ga 2$ kpc therein even if the jet is initially pair plasma dominated.

  11. Universality of the subsolar mass distribution from critical gravitational collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser; Nicolas Yunes

    2004-04-21

    Self-similarity induced by critical gravitational collapse is used as a paradigm to probe the mass distribution of subsolar objects. At large mass (solar mass and above) there is widespread agreement as to both the form and parameter values arising in the mass distribution of stellar objects. At subsolar mass there is still considerable disagreement as to the qualitative form of the mass distribution, let alone the specific parameter values characterizing that distribution. For the first time, the paradigm of critical gravitational collapse is applied to several concrete astrophysical scenarios to derive robust qualitative features of the subsolar mass distribution. We further contrast these theoretically derived ideas with the observational situation. In particular, we demonstrate that at very low mass the distribution is given by a power law, with an exponent opposite in sign to that observed in the high-mass regime. The value of this low-mass exponent is in principle calculable via dynamical systems theory applied to gravitational collapse. Qualitative agreement between theory, numerical experiments, and observational data is good, though quantitative issues remain troublesome.

  12. Charge dependent relation between the masses of different generations and Neutrino masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sazdovic, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enormous achievements, the Standard model of Particle physics can not be consider as complete theory of fundamental interactions. Among other things, it can not describe the gravitational interaction and it depends on 19 parameters. The Standard model includes 12 fermions (matter elementary particles with spin $\\frac{1}{2}$) which are divided in three generations, groups with same interactions but different masses. Each generation can be classified into two leptons (with electric charges $Q=-1$, electron-like and $Q=0$, neutrino) and two quarks (with electric charges $Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$, down-type and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$, up-type). However, the understanding of the relationship between generations and ratio of masses of different generations are unknown. Here we show that there exists the simple relation between masses of different generations which depend only on the electric charges for $Q=-1,\\, \\, Q=-\\frac{1}{3}$ and $Q=\\frac{2}{3}$. It is in pretty good agreement with experimental data. Assuming that...

  13. Open-split interface for mass spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diehl, John W. (Grand Forks, ND)

    1991-01-01

    An open-split interface includes a connector body having four leg members projecting therefrom within a single plane, the first and third legs being coaxial and the second and fourth legs being coaxial. A tubular aperture extends through the first and third legs and a second tubular aperture extends through the second and fourth legs, connecting at a juncture within the center of the connector body. A fifth leg projects from the connector body and has a third tubular aperture extending therethrough to the juncture of the first and second tubular apertures. A capillary column extends from a gas chromatograph into the third leg with its end adjacent the juncture. A flow restrictor tube extends from a mass spectrometer through the first tubular aperture in the first and third legs and into the capillary columnm end, so as to project beyond the end of the third leg within the capillary column. An annular gap between the tube and column allows excess effluent to pass to the juncture. A pair of short capillary columns extend from separate detectors into the second tubular aperture in the second and fourth legs, and are oriented with their ends spaced slightly from the first capillary column end. A sweep flow tube is mounted in the fifth leg so as to supply a helium sweep flow to the juncture.

  14. Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1993-02-23

    Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

  15. The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, Robert E

    2003-10-15

    The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

  16. The FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glikman, E; Helfand, D J; White, R L; Becker, R H; Gregg, M D; Lacy, M

    2007-06-28

    Combining radio observations with optical and infrared color selection--demonstrated in our pilot study to be an efficient selection algorithm for finding red quasars--we have obtained optical and infrared spectroscopy for 120 objects in a complete sample of 156 candidates from a sky area of 2716 square degrees. Consistent with our initial results, we find our selection criteria--J-K > 1.7,R-K > 4.0--yield a {approx} 50% success rate for discovering quasars substantially redder than those found in optical surveys. Comparison with UVX- and optical color-selected samples shows that {approx}> 10% of the quasars are missed in a magnitude-limited survey. Simultaneous two-frequency radio observations for part of the sample indicate that a synchrotron continuum component is ruled out as a significant contributor to reddening the quasars spectra. We go on to estimate extinctions for our objects assuming their red colors are caused by dust. Continuum fits and Balmer decrements suggest E(B-V) values ranging from near zero to 2.5 magnitudes. Correcting the K-band magnitudes for these extinctions, we find that for K {le} 14.0, red quasars make up between 25% and 60% of the underlying quasar population; owing to the incompleteness of the 2MASS survey at fainter K-band magnitudes, we can only set a lower limit to the radio-detected red quasar population of > 20-30%.

  17. Electron Ionization Mass Spectrum of Tellurium Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Richard A.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Peterson, James M.; Govind, Niranjan; Andersen, Amity; Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2015-05-18

    The first electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride (TeF6) is reported. The starting material was produced by direct fluorination of Te metal or TeO2 with nitrogen trifluoride. Formation of TeF6 was confirmed through cryogenic capture of the tellurium fluorination product and analysis through Raman spectroscopy. The eight natural abundance isotopes were observed for each of the set of fragment ions: TeF5+, TeF4+ TeF3+, TeF2+, TeF1+, and Te+, Te2+. A trend in increasing abundance was observed for the even fluoride bearing ions: TeF1+ < TeF3+ < TeF5+, and a decreasing abundance was observed for the even fragment series: Te(0)+ > TeF2+ > TeF4+ > TeF6+, with the molecular ion TeF6+ not observed at all. Density functional theory based electronic structure calculations were used to calculate optimized ground state geometries of these gas phase species and their relative stabilities explain the trends in the data and the lack of observed signal for TeF6+.

  18. Coronal Structure of Low-Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Pauline; Donati, Jean-Francois; Morin, Julien; Vidotto, Aline

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the change in stellar magnetic topology across the fully-convective boundary and its effects on coronal properties. We consider both the magnitude of the open flux that influences angular momentum loss in the stellar wind and X-ray emission measure. We use reconstructed maps of the radial magnetic field at the stellar surface and the potential-field source surface method to extrapolate a 3D coronal magnetic field for a sample of early-to-mid M dwarfs. During the magnetic reconstruction process it is possible to force a solution towards field geometries that are symmetric or antisymmetric about the equator but we demonstrate that this has only a modest impact on the coronal tracers mentioned above. We find that the dipole component of the field, which governs the large-scale structure, becomes increasingly strong as the stellar mass decreases, while the magnitude of the open (wind-bearing) magnetic flux is proportional to the magnitude of the reconstructed magnetic flux. By assuming a hydrostati...

  19. Giant comets and mass extinctions of life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, W M

    2015-01-01

    I find evidence for clustering in age of well-dated impact craters over the last 500 Myr. At least nine impact episodes are identified, with durations whose upper limits are set by the dating accuracy of the craters. Their amplitudes and frequency are inconsistent with an origin in asteroid breakups or Oort cloud disturbances, but are consistent with the arrival and disintegration in near-Earth orbits of rare, giant comets, mainly in transit from the Centaur population into the Jupiter family and Encke regions. About 1 in 10 Centaurs in Chiron-like orbits enter Earth-crossing epochs, usually repeatedly, each such epoch being generally of a few thousand years duration. On time-scales of geological interest, debris from their breakup may increase the mass of the near-Earth interplanetary environment by two or three orders of magnitude, yielding repeated episodes of bombardment and stratospheric dusting. I find a strong correlation between these bombardment episodes and major biostratigraphic and geological boun...

  20. Mass and Isospin Effects in Multifragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sfienti; the ALADiN2000 Collaboration

    2004-10-29

    A systematic study of isospin effects in the breakup of projectile spectators at relativistic energies has been performed with the ALADiN spectrometer at the GSI laboratory (Darmstadt). Four different projectiles 197Au, 124La, 124Sn and 107Sn, all with an incident energy of 600 AMeV, have been used, thus allowing a study of various combinations of masses and N/Z ratios in the entrance channel. The measurement of the momentum vector and of the charge of all projectile fragments with Z>1 entering the acceptance of the ALADiN magnet has been performed with the high efficiency and resolution achieved with the TP-MUSIC IV detector. The Rise and Fall behavior of the mean multiplicity of IMFs as a function of Zbound and its dependence on the isotopic composition has been determined for the studied systems. Other observables investigated so far include mean N/Z values of the emitted light fragments and neutron multiplicities. Qualitative agreement has been obtained between the observed gross properties and the predictions of the Statistical Multifragmentation Model.

  1. Quantification of colloidal and aqueous element transfer in soils: The dual-phase mass balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, CR; Thompson, A; Chadwick, OA

    2015-01-01

    1987) Constitutive mass balance relations between chemicalprocesses using mass balance princi- ples. Econ. Geol. 80,and Chorover J. (2011) A mass-balance model to separate and

  2. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krolak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  3. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska

    2012-04-25

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  4. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  5. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  6. Effective Majorana Mass and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Benato

    2015-10-05

    The probability distribution for the effective Majorana mass as a function of the lightest neutrino mass in the standard three neutrino scheme is computed via a random sampling from the distributions of the involved mixing angles and squared mass diffences. A flat distribution in the [0,2pi] range for the Majorana phases is assumed, and the dependence of small values of the effective mass on the Majorana phases is highlighted. The study is then extended with the addition of the cosmological bound on the sum of the neutrino masses. Finally, the prospects for neutrinoless double beta decay search with 76Ge, 130Te and 136Xe are discussed, as well as those for the measurement of the electron neutrino mass.

  7. Effective Majorana Mass and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benato, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The probability distribution for the effective Majorana mass as a function of the lightest neutrino mass in the standard three neutrino scheme is computed via a random sampling from the distributions of the involved mixing angles and squared mass diffences. A flat distribution in the [0,2pi] range for the Majorana phases is assumed, and the dependence of small values of the effective mass on the Majorana phases is highlighted. The study is then extended with the addition of the cosmological bound on the sum of the neutrino masses. Finally, the prospects for neutrinoless double beta decay search with 76Ge, 130Te and 136Xe are discussed, as well as those for the measurement of the electron neutrino mass.

  8. 2n-Dimensional Models with Topological Mass Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinichi Deguchi; Satoshi Hayakawa

    2008-02-06

    The 4-dimensional model with topological mass generation that has recently been presented by Dvali, Jackiw and Pi [G. Dvali, R. Jackiw, and S.-Y. Pi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 081602 (2006), hep-th/0610228] is generalized to any even number of dimensions. As in the 4-dimensional model, the 2n-dimensional model describes a mass-generation phenomenon due to the presence of the chiral anomaly. In addition to this model, new 2n-dimensional models with topological mass generation are proposed, in which a Stueckelberg-type mass term plays a crucial role in the mass generation. The mass generation of a pseudoscalar field such as the eta-prime meson is discussed within this framework.

  9. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuszewski, Michel G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

  10. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuszewski, M.G.

    1997-07-22

    A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

  11. Inference on gravitational waves from coalescences of stellar-mass compact objects and intermediate-mass black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haster, Carl-Johan; Berry, Christopher P L; Stevenson, Simon; Veitch, John; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescences of neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes into intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) of $\\gtrsim 100$ solar masses represent one of the exciting possible sources for advanced gravitational-wave detectors. These sources can provide definitive evidence for the existence of IMBHs, probe globular-cluster dynamics, and potentially serve as tests of general relativity. We analyse the accuracy with which we can measure the masses and spins of the IMBH and its companion in intermediate-mass ratio coalescences. We find that we can identify an IMBH with a mass above $100 ~ M_\\odot$ with $95\\%$ confidence provided the massive body exceeds $130 ~ M_\\odot$. For source masses above $\\sim200 ~ M_\\odot$, the best measured parameter is the frequency of the quasi-normal ringdown. Consequently, the total mass is measured better than the chirp mass for massive binaries, but the total mass is still partly degenerate with spin, which cannot be accurately measured. Low-frequency detector sen...

  12. Apparatus and methods for continuous beam fourier transform mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, Scott A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goeringer, Douglas E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A continuous beam Fourier transform mass spectrometer in which a sample of ions to be analyzed is trapped in a trapping field, and the ions in the range of the mass-to-charge ratios to be analyzed are excited at their characteristic frequencies of motion by a continuous excitation signal. The excited ions in resonant motions generate real or image currents continuously which can be detected and processed to provide a mass spectrum.

  13. Relativistic electromagnetic mass models in spherically symmetric spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Maurya; Y. K. Gupta; Saibal Ray; Vikram Chatterjee

    2015-07-04

    Under the static spherically symmetric Einstein-Maxwell spacetime of embedding class one we explore possibility of electromagnetic mass model where mass and other physical parameters have purely electromagnetic origin (Tiwari 1984, Gautreau 1985, Gron 1985). This work is in continuation of our earlier investigation (Maurya 2015a) where we developed an algorithm and found out three new solutions of electromagnetic mass models. In the present letter we consider different metric potentials $\

  14. Top quark mass measurements at the D0 experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Grohsjean

    2009-05-30

    The most recent measurements of the top quark mass at the D0 experiment are summarized. Different techniques and final states are used and the top quark mass is determined to be mtop=172.8+-1.6(stat+syst)GeV/c^2. In addition, a new, indirect measurement comparing the measured cross section to theoretical calculations is discussed. Both, the direct and the indirect measurement of the top quark mass are in good agreement.

  15. Scattering in abrupt heterostructures using a position dependent mass Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koç, R; Sahinoglu, G; Koc, Ramazan; Koca, Mehmet; Sahinoglu, Gultekin

    2005-01-01

    Transmission probabilities of the scattering problem with a position dependent mass are studied. After sketching the basis of the theory, within the context of the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for spatially varying effective mass, the simplest problem, namely, tranmission through a square well potential with a position dependent mass barrier is studied and its novel properties are obtained. The solutions presented here may be adventageous in the design of semiconductor devices.

  16. Scattering in abrupt heterostructures using a position dependent mass Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramazan Koc; Mehmet Koca; Gultekin Sahinoglu

    2005-10-22

    Transmission probabilities of the scattering problem with a position dependent mass are studied. After sketching the basis of the theory, within the context of the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for spatially varying effective mass, the simplest problem, namely, tranmission through a square well potential with a position dependent mass barrier is studied and its novel properties are obtained. The solutions presented here may be adventageous in the design of semiconductor devices.

  17. A New Mass Formula for NG Bosons in QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T. Cahill; Susan M. Gunner

    1995-09-01

    An often used mass formula for Nambu-Goldstone (NG) bosons in QCD, such as the pions, involves the condensate $$, $f_{\\pi}$ and the quark current masses. We argue, within the context of the Global Colour Model to QCD, that this expression is wrong. Analysis of the interplay between the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the constituent quark effect and the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the NG boson results in a new mass formula.

  18. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with Negligible Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswajoy Brahmachari; Ernest Ma

    2002-02-27

    If the electron neutrino has an effective nonzero Majorana mass, then neutrinoless double beta decay will occur. However, the latter is possible also with a negligible neutrino mass. We show how this may happen in a simple model of scalar diquarks and dileptons. This possibility allows neutrino masses to be small and hierarchical, without conflicting with the possible experimental evidence of neutrinoless double beta decay.

  19. Phenomenological relations for neutrino masses and mixing parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khruschov, V. V.

    2013-11-15

    Phenomenological relations for masses, angles, and CP phases in the neutrino mixing matrix are proposed with allowance for available experimental data. For the case of CP violation in the lepton sector, an analysis of the possible structure of the neutrino mass matrix and a calculation of the neutrino mass features and the Dirac CP phase for the bimodal-neutrino model are performed. The values obtained in this way can be used to interpret and predict the results of various neutrino experiments.

  20. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-08-19

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  1. State Roles in Providing Affordable Mass Transport Services for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Roles in Providing Affordable Mass Transport Services for Low-Income Residents Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State Roles in Providing Affordable...

  2. Algorithms for tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Ari Michael

    2008-01-01

    ed sequest algorithm. Analytical Chemistry 74, 5593– [138]of peptide ions. Analytical Chemistry 77, 4870–4882. [143]Tandem Mass Spectra. Analytical Chemistry, 77:4626-4639,

  3. THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, STAR FORMATION RATE, AND GAS METALLICITY OF GALAXIES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION...

  4. Electric and Magnetic Screening Masses around the Deconfinement Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attilio Cucchieri; Tereza Mendes

    2012-01-29

    We report on the status of our study of gluon propagators and screening masses around the de- confining transition for pure SU(2) gauge theory in Landau gauge.

  5. The low and intermediate mass dilepton and photon results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruan, Lijuan

    2014-11-01

    I summarize and discuss some of the experimental results on the low and intermediate mass dileptons and direct photons presented at Quark Matter 2014.

  6. Opportunities for Mass Market Demand Response to Provide Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Rob; Najewicz, Dave

    2011-10-01

    Discusses what is meant by mass market demand response to provide ancillary services and outlines opportunities for adoption, and barriers to adoption.

  7. IN OTHER CATEGORIES; MACHINERY; MASS BALANCE; MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    world Bracher, B. 42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; MACHINERY; MASS BALANCE; MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS; MAINTENANCE; REPAIR Field balancing can achieve significant...

  8. Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies K. Ueno and R. Van Straaten Building Science Corporation (BSC) February 2012 ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of...

  9. The low and intermediate mass dilepton and photon results

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruan, Lijuan

    2014-10-18

    I summarize and discuss some of the experimental results on the low and intermediate mass dileptons and direct photons presented at Quark Matter 2014.

  10. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses implied by the Seesaw Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Tsujimoto

    2005-12-12

    It is found that the seesaw mechanism not only explain the smallness of neutrino masses but also account for the large mixing angles simultaneously, even if the unification of the neutrino Dirac mass matrix with that of up-type quark sector is realized. We show that provided the Majorana masses have hierarchical structure as is seen in the up-type quark sector and all mass matrices are real, we can reduce the information about the absolute values of neutrino masses through the data set of neutrino experiments. Especially for $\\theta_{13}=0$, we found that the neutrino masses are decided as $m_1:m_2:m_3\\approx 1:3:17$ or $1:50:250$ ($m_1\\simeq m_2:m_3\\approx 3:1$ or $12:1$) in the case of normal mass spectrum (inverted mass spectrum), and the greatest Majorana mass turns out to be $m_3^R=1\\times 10^{15}$ GeV which just corresponds to the GUT scale. Including the decoupling effects caused by three singlet neutrinos, we also perform a renormalization group analysis to fix the neutrino Yukawa coupling matrix at low energy.

  11. Isoperimetric Inequalities Related to Mass and Energy in General ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-05-17

    THE 3RD SYMPOSIUM ON ANALYSIS AND PDES. PURDUE UNIVERSITY, MAY 27–30, 2007. ISOPERIMETRIC INEQUALITIES RELATED TO MASS AND.

  12. Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  13. Calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Blum; Amarjit Soni; Matthew Wingate

    2000-09-18

    We present a first calculation of the strange quark mass using domain wall fermions. This paper contains an overview of the domain wall discretization and a pedagogical presentation of the perturbative calculation necessary for computing the mass renormalization. We combine the latter with numerical simulations to estimate the strange quark mass. Our final result in the quenched approximation is 95(26) MeV in the ${\\bar{MS}}$ scheme at a scale of 2 GeV. We find that domain wall fermions have a small perturbative mass renormalization, similar to Wilson quarks, and exhibit good scaling behavior.

  14. Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enthalpy and mass flowrate measurements for two-phase geothermal production by Tracer dilution techniques Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  15. Method for analyzing the mass of a sample using a cold cathode ionization source mass filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felter, Thomas E.

    2003-10-14

    An improved quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The improvement lies in the substitution of the conventional hot filament electron source with a cold cathode field emitter array which in turn allows operating a small QMS at much high internal pressures then are currently achievable. By eliminating of the hot filament such problems as thermally "cracking" delicate analyte molecules, outgassing a "hot" filament, high power requirements, filament contamination by outgas species, and spurious em fields are avoid all together. In addition, the ability of produce FEAs using well-known and well developed photolithographic techniques, permits building a QMS having multiple redundancies of the ionization source at very low additional cost.

  16. Micro mass spectrometer on a chip.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, Dolores Y.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Fleming, James Grant

    2005-11-01

    The design, simulation, fabrication, packaging, electrical characterization and testing analysis of a microfabricated a cylindrical ion trap ({mu}CIT) array is presented. Several versions of microfabricated cylindrical ion traps were designed and fabricated. The final design of the individual trap array element consisted of two end cap electrodes, one ring electrode, and a detector plate, fabricated in seven tungsten metal layers by molding tungsten around silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) features. Each layer of tungsten is then polished back in damascene fashion. The SiO{sub 2} was removed using a standard release processes to realize a free-hung structure. Five different sized traps were fabricated with inner radii of 1, 1.5, 2, 5 and 10 {micro}m and heights ranging from 3-24 {micro}m. Simulations examined the effects of ion and neutral temperature, the pressure and nature of cooling gas, ion mass, trap voltage and frequency, space-charge, fabrication defects, and other parameters on the ability of micrometer-sized traps to store ions. The electrical characteristics of the ion trap arrays were determined. The capacitance was 2-500 pF for the various sized traps and arrays. The resistance was in the order of 1-2 {Omega}. The inductance of the arrays was calculated to be 10-1500 pH, depending on the trap and array sizes. The ion traps' field emission characteristics were assessed. It was determined that the traps could be operated up to 125 V while maintaining field emission currents below 1 x 10{sup -15} A. The testing focused on using the 5-{micro}m CITs to trap toluene (C{sub 7}H{sub 8}). Ion ejection from the traps was induced by termination of the RF voltage applied to the ring electrode and current measured on the collector electrode suggested trapping of ions in 1-10% of the traps. Improvements to the to the design of the traps were defined to minimize voltage drop to the substrate, thereby increasing trapping voltage applied to the ring electrode, and to allow for electron injection into, ion ejection from, and optical access to the trapping region.

  17. Failed supernovae explain the compact remnant mass function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USAAND (United States); Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    One explanation for the absence of higher mass red supergiants (16.5 M {sub ?} ? M ? 25 M {sub ?}) as the progenitors of Type IIP supernovae (SNe) is that they die in failed SNe creating black holes. Simulations show that such failed SNe still eject their hydrogen envelopes in a weak transient, leaving a black hole with the mass of the star's helium core (5-8 M {sub ?}). Here we show that this naturally explains the typical masses of observed black holes and the gap between neutron star and black hole masses without any fine-tuning of stellar mass loss, binary mass transfer, or the SN mechanism, beyond having it fail in a mass range where many progenitor models have density structures that make the explosions more likely to fail. There is no difficulty including this ?20% population of failed SNe in any accounting of SN types over the progenitor mass function. And, other than patience, there is no observational barrier to either detecting these black hole formation events or limiting their rates to be well below this prediction.

  18. Transport de masse sur les surfaces Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Transport de masse sur les surfaces Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Colloquium Lorrain de Math´ematiques Institut Elie Cartan Nancy Ludovic Rifford Transport de masse sur les surfaces #12;Transport de Monge quadratique dans Rn Soit µ0 et µ1 deux mesures de probabilit´es `a support

  19. Transport de masse sur la Terre Ludovic Rifford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rifford, Ludovic

    Transport de masse sur la Terre Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Universitaire de France Colloque 2012 de la Soci´et´e Math´ematique de Tunisie Ludovic Rifford Transport de des courbes trac´ees sur M qui relient x `a y. Ludovic Rifford Transport de masse sur la Terre #12

  20. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry Qinghao Wu and Richard N. Zare* A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm

  1. Double Beta Decay and the Absolute Neutrino Mass Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti

    2003-08-20

    After a short review of the current status of three-neutrino mixing, the implications for the values of neutrino masses are discussed. The bounds on the absolute scale of neutrino masses from Tritium beta-decay and cosmological data are reviewed. Finally, we discuss the implications of three-neutrino mixing for neutrinoless double-beta decay.

  2. What we (would like to) know about the neutrino mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; A. Palazzo; A. M. Rotunno

    2008-09-17

    We present updated values for the mass-mixing parameters relevant to neutrino oscillations, with particular attention to emerging hints in favor of theta_13>0. We also discuss the status of absolute neutrino mass observables, and a possible approach to constrain theoretical uncertainties in neutrinoless double beta decay. Desiderata for all these issues are also briefly mentioned.

  3. Microdroplet fusion mass spectrometry for fast reaction kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Microdroplet fusion mass spectrometry for fast reaction kinetics Jae Kyoo Leea,b , Samuel Kima,b,1 investigated the fusion of high-speed liquid droplets as a way to record the kinetics of liquid-phase chemical between the mass spec- trometer inlet and the droplet fusion center. Fused droplet trajec- tories were

  4. Ion Sources and Mass Analyzers in Protein Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    . Get molecules into the gas phase & ionize them. 2. Give the ions a defined energy or velocity. 3 of analyzers may not always be adequate to distinguish individual peaks. In this case, average masses are used/z are lost. The mass range is scanned as the voltages are swept from min to max, but at constant DC/RF ratio

  5. Single Cell Analysis Using Microfluidics Coupled to Ultrasensitive Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Single Cell Analysis Using Microfluidics Coupled to Ultrasensitive Mass Spectrometry PI Ryan Kelly is to combine microfluidic sample preparation and separations with the ultrasensitive mass spectrometry (MS without the need for chemical labeling. We will combine our expertise in the fields of microfluidics

  6. On the semiclassical mass of ${\\mathbb S}^2$-kinks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Alonso Izquierdo; M. A. Gonzalez Leon; J. Mateos Guilarte; M. J. Senosiain

    2009-08-13

    One-loop mass shifts to the classical masses of stable kinks arising in a massive non-linear ${\\mathbb S}^2$-sigma model are computed. Ultraviolet divergences are controlled using the heat kernel/zeta function regularization method. A comparison between the results achieved from exact and high-temperature asymptotic heat traces is analyzed in depth.

  7. 2006 EAAM Photogrammetric Estimates of Size and Mass in Hawaiian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © 2006 EAAM Photogrammetric Estimates of Size and Mass in Hawaiian Monk Seals (Monachus-invasive photographic technique was devel- oped to estimate the body mass of Hawaiian monk seals (Monachus schauinslandi-kg weaned pups. Key Words: Hawaiian monk seals, Monachus schauinslandi, photogrammetry, morphometric

  8. Type II Migration: Varying Planet Mass and Disc Viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard G. Edgar

    2008-07-03

    This paper continues an earlier study of giant planet migration, examining the effect of planet mass and disc viscosity on the migration rate. We find that the migration rate of a gap-opening planet varies systematically with the planet's mass, as predicted in our earlier work. However, the variation with disc viscosity appears to be much weaker than expected.

  9. Mass loading estimates of the Eyjafjll ash plume using principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Mass loading estimates of the Eyjafjöll ash plume using principle component analysis applied;Tropospheric aerosol kernels #12;Volcanic ash refractive index El Chicón ash: 1.53 (PaNerson et Eyjafjöll volcanic ash mass concentrations were low over NL PCA and multi-wavelength data may help to find

  10. Mass Effects and Internal Space Geometry in Triatomic Reaction Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koon, Wang Sang

    Mass Effects and Internal Space Geometry in Triatomic Reaction Dynamics Tomohiro Yanao , Wang S reaction dynamics is analyzed using the geometry of the associated internal space. Atomic masses equations of motion, which act as velocity-dependent forces in a coordinate chart. By statistically averag

  11. Anomaly Mediated Gaugino Mass and Path-Integral Measure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keisuke Harigaya; Masahiro Ibe

    2014-09-16

    In recent years, there have been controversy concerning the anomaly mediated gaugino mass in the superspace formalism of supergravity. In this paper, we reexamine the gaugino mass term in this formalism by paying particular attention to symmetry which controls gaugino masses in supergravity. We first discuss super-Diffeomorphism invariance of path-integral measures of charged superfields. As we will show, the super-Diffeomorphism invariant measure is not invariant under a super-Weyl transformation, which is the origin of the anomaly mediated gaugino mass. We show how the anomaly mediated gaugino mass is expressed as a local operator in a Wilsonian effective action in a super-Diffeomorphism covariant way. We also obtain a gaugino mass term independent of the gauge choice of the fictitious super-Weyl symmetry in the super-Weyl compensator formalism, which reproduces the widely accepted result. Besides, we discuss how to reconcile the gaugino mass term in the local Wilsonian effective action and the gaugino mass term appearing in a non-local 1PI quantum effective action.

  12. The mass function of high redshift seed black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Lodato; Priyamvada Natarajan

    2007-02-13

    In this paper we derive the mass function of seed black holes that result from the central mass concentrated via disc accretion in collapsed haloes at redshift $z\\approx 15$. Using standard arguments including stability, we show that these pre-galactic discs can assemble a significant mass concentration in the inner regions, providing fuel for the formation and initial growth of super-massive black holes. Assuming that these mass concentrations do result in central seed black holes, we determine the mass distribution of these seeds as a function of key halo properties. The seed mass distribution determined here turns out to be asymmetric and skewed to higher masses. Starting with these initial seeds, building up to $10^9$ solar masses by $z = 6$ to power the bright quasars is not a problem in the standard LCDM cosmogony. These seed black holes in gas rich environments are likely to grow into the supermassive black holes at later times via mergers and accretion. Gas accretion onto these seeds at high redshift will produce miniquasars that likely play an important role in the reionization of the Universe. Some of these seed black holes on the other hand could be wandering in galaxy haloes as a consequence of frequent mergers, powering the off-nuclear ultra-luminous X-ray sources detected in nearby galaxies.

  13. The mass function of high redshift seed black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lodato, G; Lodato, Giuseppe; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we derive the mass function of seed black holes that result from the central mass concentrated via disc accretion in collapsed haloes at redshift $z\\approx 15$. Using standard arguments including stability, we show that these pre-galactic discs can assemble a significant mass concentration in the inner regions, providing fuel for the formation and initial growth of super-massive black holes. Assuming that these mass concentrations do result in central seed black holes, we determine the mass distribution of these seeds as a function of key halo properties. The seed mass distribution determined here turns out to be asymmetric and skewed to higher masses. Starting with these initial seeds, building up to $10^9$ solar masses by $z = 6$ to power the bright quasars is not a problem in the standard LCDM cosmogony. These seed black holes in gas rich environments are likely to grow into the supermassive black holes at later times via mergers and accretion. Gas accretion onto these seeds at high redshift ...

  14. Simple radiative neutrino mass matrix for solar and atmospheric oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, E

    1995-01-01

    A simple 3 X 3 neutrino Majorana mass matrix is proposed to accommodate both the solar and atmospheric neutrino deficits. This scenario can be realized naturally by a radiative mechanism for the generation of neutrino masses. It also goes together naturally with electroweak baryogenesis and cold dark matter in a specific model.

  15. Fermion mass hierarchy and nonhierarchical mass ratios in SU(5)xU(1){sub F}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duque, Luis F.; Gutierrez, Diego A.; Nardi, Enrico; Norena, Jorge

    2008-08-01

    We consider a SU(5)xU(1){sub F} grand unified theory (GUT)-flavor model in which the number of effects that determine the charged fermions Yukawa matrices is much larger than the number of observables, resulting in a hierarchical fermion spectrum with no particular regularities. The GUT-flavor symmetry is broken by flavons in the adjoint of SU(5), realizing a variant of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism that gives rise to a large number of effective operators. By assuming a common mass for the heavy fields and universality of the fundamental Yukawa couplings, we reduce the number of free parameters to one. The observed fermion mass spectrum is reproduced thanks to selection rules that discriminate among various contributions. Bottom-tau Yukawa unification is preserved at leading order, but there is no unification for the first two families. Interestingly, U(1){sub F} charges alone do not determine the hierarchy, and can only give upper bounds on the parametric suppression of the Yukawa operators.

  16. Impact of individual nuclear masses on r-process abundances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mumpower, M. R.; Surman, R.; Fang, D. -L.; Beard, M.; Möller, P.; Kawano, T.; Aprahamian, A.

    2015-09-15

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive study of the sensitivity of r-process nucleosynthesis to individual nuclear masses across the chart of nuclides. Using the latest version (2012) of the Finite-Range Droplet Model, we consider mass variations of ±0.5 MeV and propagate each mass change to all affected quantities, including Q values, reaction rates, and branching ratios. We find such mass variations can result in up to an order of magnitude local change in the final abundance pattern produced in an r-process simulation. As a result, we identify key nuclei whose masses have a substantial impact on abundancemore »predictions for hot, cold, and neutron star merger r-process scenarios and could be measured at future radioactive beam facilities.« less

  17. Neutrino Mass and Mixing in the Seesaw Playground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    We discuss neutrino mass and mixing in the framework of the classic seesaw mechanism, involving right-handed neutrinos with large Majorana masses, which provides an appealing way to understand the smallness of neutrino masses. However, with many input parameters, the seesaw mechanism is in general not predictive. We focus on natural implementations of the seesaw mechanism, in which large cancellations do not occur, where one of the right handed neutrinos is dominantly responsible for the atmospheric neutrino mass, while a second right-handed neutrino accounts for the solar neutrino mass, leading to an effective two right-handed neutrino model. We discuss recent attempts to predict lepton mixing and CP violation within such natural frameworks, focussing on the Littlest Seesaw and its distinctive predictions.

  18. One hundred first stars: Protostellar evolution and the final masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Shingo; Umeda, Hideyuki [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hosokawa, Takashi [Department of Physics and Research Center for the Early Universe, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yoshida, Naoki; Chiaki, Gen [Department of Physics, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Omukai, Kazuyuki [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Yorke, Harold W., E-mail: hirano@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We perform a large set of radiation hydrodynamic simulations of primordial star formation in a fully cosmological context. Our statistical sample of 100 First Stars shows that the first generation of stars has a wide mass distribution M {sub popIII} = 10 ? 1000 M {sub ?}. We first run cosmological simulations to generate a set of primordial star-forming gas clouds. We then follow protostar formation in each gas cloud and the subsequent protostellar evolution until the gas mass accretion onto the protostar is halted by stellar radiative feedback. The accretion rates differ significantly among the primordial gas clouds that largely determine the final stellar masses. For low accretion rates, the growth of a protostar is self-regulated by radiative feedback effects, and the final mass is limited to several tens of solar masses. At high accretion rates the protostar's outer envelope continues to expand, and the effective surface temperature remains low; such protostars do not exert strong radiative feedback and can grow in excess of 100 solar masses. The obtained wide mass range suggests that the first stars play a variety of roles in the early universe, by triggering both core-collapse supernovae and pair-instability supernovae as well as by leaving stellar mass black holes. We find certain correlations between the final stellar mass and the physical properties of the star-forming cloud. These correlations can be used to estimate the mass of the first star from the properties of the parent cloud or of the host halo without following the detailed protostellar evolution.

  19. A Low-Mass Planet with a Possible Sub-Stellar-Mass Host in Microlensing Event MOA-2007-BLG-192

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. P. Bennett; I. A. Bond; A. Udalski; T. Sumi; F. Abe; A. Fukui; K. Furusawa; J. B. Hearnshaw; S. Holderness; Y. Itow; K. Kamiya; A. V. Korpela; P. M. Kilmartin; W. Lin; C. H. Ling; K. Masuda; Y. Matsubara; N. Miyake; Y. Muraki; M. Nagaya; T. Okumura; K. Ohnishi; Y. C. Perrott; N. J. Rattenbury; T. Sako; To. Saito; S. Sato; L. Skuljan; D. J. Sullivan; W. L. Sweatman; P. J. Tristram; P. C. M. Yock; M. Kubiak; M. K. Szymanski; G. Pietrzynski; I. Soszynski; O. Szewczyk; L. Wyrzykowski; K. Ulaczyk; V. Batista; J. P. Beaulieu; S. Brillant; A. Cassan; P. Fouque; P. Kervella; D. Kubas; J. B. Marquette

    2008-05-30

    We report the detection of an extrasolar planet of mass ratio q ~ 2 x 10^(-4) in microlensing event MOA-2007-BLG-192. The best fit microlensing model shows both the microlensing parallax and finite source effects, and these can be combined to obtain the lens masses of M = 0.060 (+0.028 -0.021) M_sun for the primary and m = 3.3 (+4.9 -1.6) M_earth for the planet. However, the observational coverage of the planetary deviation is sparse and incomplete, and the radius of the source was estimated without the benefit of a source star color measurement. As a result, the 2-sigma limits on the mass ratio and finite source measurements are weak. Nevertheless, the microlensing parallax signal clearly favors a sub-stellar mass planetary host, and the measurement of finite source effects in the light curve supports this conclusion. Adaptive optics images taken with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) NACO instrument are consistent with a lens star that is either a brown dwarf or a star at the bottom of the main sequence. Follow-up VLT and/or Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations will either confirm that the primary is a brown dwarf or detect the low-mass lens star and enable a precise determination of its mass. In either case, the lens star, MOA-2007-BLG-192L, is the lowest mass primary known to have a companion with a planetary mass ratio, and the planet, MOA-2007-BLG-192Lb, is probably the lowest mass exoplanet found to date, aside from the lowest mass pulsar planet.

  20. Masses of Stellar Black Holes and Testing Theories of Gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Postnov; A. M. Cherepashchuk

    2004-01-22

    We analyze the mass distribution of stellar black holes derived from the light and radial velocity curves of optical stars in close binary systems using dynamical methods. The systematic errors inherent in this approach are discussed. These are associated primarily with uncertainties in models for the contribution from gaseous structures to the optical brightness of the systems under consideration. The mass distribution is nearly flat in the range 4-15M_sun. This is compared with the mass distribution for black holes in massive close binaries, which can be manifest as ultraluminous X-ray sources (L_x > 10^39 erg/s) observed in other galaxies. If the X-ray luminosities of these objects correspond to the Eddington limit, the black-hole mass distribution should be described by a power law, which is incompatible with the flat shape derived dynamically from observations of close binaries in our Galaxy. One possible explanation of this discrepancy is the rapid evaporation of stellar-mass black holes predicted in recent multi-dimensional models of gravity. This hypothesis can be verifed by measuring the stellar black-hole mass spectrum or finding isolated or binary black holes with masses below 3M_sun.

  1. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses: Status and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti; J. A. Grifols; E. Masso

    2003-03-27

    Compelling evidences in favor of neutrino masses and mixing obtained in the last years in Super-Kamiokande, SNO, KamLAND and other neutrino experiments made the physics of massive and mixed neutrinos a frontier field of research in particle physics and astrophysics. There are many open problems in this new field. In this review we consider the problem of the absolute values of neutrino masses, which apparently is the most difficult one from the experimental point of view. We discuss the present limits and the future prospects of beta-decay neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double-beta decay. We consider the important problem of the calculation of nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double-beta decay and discuss the possibility to check the results of different model calculations of the nuclear matrix elements through their comparison with the experimental data. We discuss the upper bound of the total mass of neutrinos that was obtained recently from the data of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey and other cosmological data and we discuss future prospects of the cosmological measurements of the total mass of neutrinos. We discuss also the possibility to obtain information on neutrino masses from the observation of the ultra high-energy cosmic rays (beyond the GZK cutoff). Finally, we review the main aspects of the physics of core-collapse supernovae, the limits on the absolute values of neutrino masses from the observation of SN1987A neutrinos and the future prospects of supernova neutrino detection.

  2. NIHAO III: The constant disc gas mass conspiracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stinson, G S; Wang, L; Macciò, A V; Herpich, J; Bradford, J D; Quinn, T R; Wadsley, J; Keller, B

    2015-01-01

    We show that the cool gas masses of galactic discs reach a steady state that lasts many Gyr after their last major merger in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The mass of disc gas, M$_{\\rm gas}$, depends upon a galaxy halo's spin and virial mass, but not upon stellar feedback. Halos with low spin have high star formation efficiency and lower disc gas mass. Similarly, lower stellar feedback leads to more star formation so the gas mass ends up nearly the same irregardless of stellar feedback strength. Even considering spin, the M$_{\\rm gas}$ relation with halo mass, M$_{200}$ only shows a factor of 3 scatter. The M$_{\\rm gas}$--M$_{200}$ relation show a break at M$_{200}$=$2\\times10^{11}$ M$_\\odot$ that corresponds to an observed break in the M$_{\\rm gas}$--M$_\\star$ relation. The constant disc mass stems from a shared halo gas density profile in all the simulated galaxies. In their outer regions, the profiles are isothermal. Where the profile rises above $n=10^{-3}$ cm$^{-3}$, the gas readily cools and th...

  3. Dynamical mass ejection from black hole-neutron star binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutarou Kyutoku; Kunihito Ioka; Hirotada Okawa; Masaru Shibata; Keisuke Taniguchi

    2015-08-19

    We investigate properties of material ejected dynamically in the merger of black hole-neutron star binaries by numerical-relativity simulations. We systematically study the dependence of ejecta properties on the mass ratio of the binary, spin of the black hole, and equation of state of the neutron-star matter. Dynamical mass ejection is driven primarily by tidal torque, and the ejecta is much more anisotropic than that from binary neutron star mergers. In particular, the dynamical ejecta is concentrated around the orbital plane with a half opening angle of 10--20deg and often sweeps out only a half of the plane. The ejecta mass can be as large as ~0.1M_sun, and the velocity is subrelativistic with ~0.2--0.3c for typical cases. The ratio of the ejecta mass to the bound mass (disk and fallback components) is larger, and the ejecta velocity is larger, for larger values of the binary mass ratio, i.e., for larger values of the black-hole mass. The remnant black hole-disk system receives a kick velocity of O(100)km/s due to the ejecta linear momentum, and this easily dominates the kick velocity due to gravitational radiation. Structures of postmerger material, velocity distribution of the dynamical ejecta, fallback rates, and gravitational waves are also investigated. We also discuss the effect of ejecta anisotropy on electromagnetic counterparts, specifically a macronova/kilonova and synchrotron radio emission, developing analytic models.

  4. CALIBRATING C-IV-BASED BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Shin, Jaejin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Denney, Kelly D., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jjshin@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kelly@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-06-20

    We present the single-epoch black hole mass estimators based on the C IV {lambda}1549 broad emission line, using the updated sample of the reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei and high-quality UV spectra. By performing multi-component spectral fitting analysis, we measure the C IV line widths (FWHM{sub C{sub IV}} and line dispersion, {sigma}{sub C{sub IV}}) and the continuum luminosity at 1350 A (L{sub 1350}) to calibrate the C-IV-based mass estimators. By comparing with the H{beta} reverberation-based masses, we provide new mass estimators with the best-fit relationships, i.e., M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.50{+-}0.07}{sigma}{sub C{sub IV}{sup 2}} and M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.52{+-}0.09} FWHM{sub C{sub IV}{sup 0.56{+-}0.48}}. The new C-IV-based mass estimators show significant mass-dependent systematic difference compared to the estimators commonly used in the literature. Using the published Sloan Digital Sky Survey QSO catalog, we show that the black hole mass of high-redshift QSOs decreases on average by {approx}0.25 dex if our recipe is adopted.

  5. Massive Quiescent Cores in Orion. -- II. Core Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, D; Goldsmith, P F; Langer, W D

    2006-01-01

    We have surveyed submillimeter continuum emission from relatively quiescent regions in the Orion molecular cloud to determine how the core mass function in a high mass star forming region compares to the stellar initial mass function. Such studies are important for understanding the evolution of cores to stars, and for comparison to formation processes in high and low mass star forming regions. We used the SHARC II camera on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory telescope to obtain 350 \\micron data having angular resolution of about 9 arcsec, which corresponds to 0.02 pc at the distance of Orion. Our analysis combining dust continuum and spectral line data defines a sample of 51 Orion molecular cores with masses ranging from 0.1 \\Ms to 46 \\Ms and a mean mass of 9.8 \\Ms, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value found in typical low mass star forming regions, such as Taurus. The majority of these cores cannot be supported by thermal pressure or turbulence, and are probably supercritical.They are th...

  6. Optimizing weak lensing mass estimates for cluster profile uncertainty

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Lam, T. Y.; Seitz, S.

    2011-09-11

    Weak lensing measurements of cluster masses are necessary for calibrating mass-observable relations (MORs) to investigate the growth of structure and the properties of dark energy. However, the measured cluster shear signal varies at fixed mass M200m due to inherent ellipticity of background galaxies, intervening structures along the line of sight, and variations in the cluster structure due to scatter in concentrations, asphericity and substructure. We use N-body simulated halos to derive and evaluate a weak lensing circular aperture mass measurement Map that minimizes the mass estimate variance ap - M200m)2> in the presence of all these forms of variability. Dependingmore »on halo mass and observational conditions, the resulting mass estimator improves on Map filters optimized for circular NFW-profile clusters in the presence of uncorrelated large scale structure (LSS) about as much as the latter improve on an estimator that only minimizes the influence of shape noise. Optimizing for uncorrelated LSS while ignoring the variation of internal cluster structure puts too much weight on the profile near the cores of halos, and under some circumstances can even be worse than not accounting for LSS at all. As a result, we discuss the impact of variability in cluster structure and correlated structures on the design and performance of weak lensing surveys intended to calibrate cluster MORs.« less

  7. Geometric gravitational origin of neutrino oscillations and mass-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo R. Gonzalez-Martin

    2014-05-21

    A mass-energy scale for neutrinos was calculated from the null cone curvature using geometric concepts. The scale is variable depending on the gravitational potential and the trajectory inclination with respect to the field direction. The proposed neutrino covariant equation provides the adequate curvature. The mass-energy at the Earth surface varies from a horizontal value 0.402 eV to a vertical value 0.569 eV. Earth spinor waves with winding numbers n show squared energy differences within ranges from 2.05 x 10*(-3) to 4.10 x 10*(-3) eV*2 for n=0,1 neutrinos and from 3.89 x 10*(-5) to 7.79 x 10*(-5) eV*2 for n=1,2 neutrinos. These waves interfere and the different phase velocities produce neutrino-like oscillations. The experimental results for atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation mass parameters respectivelly fall within these theoretical ranges. Neutrinos in outer space, where interactions may be neglected, appear as particles travelling with zero mass on null geodesics. These gravitational curvature energies are consistent with neutrino oscillations, zero neutrino rest masses and Einstein's General Relativity and energy mass equivalence principle. When analyzing or averaging experimental neutrino mass-energy results of different experiments on the Earth it is of interest to consider the possible influence of the trajectory inclination angle.

  8. Phenomenology of Light Gauginos: I. Motivation, Masses, Lifetimes and Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    1995-08-14

    I explore an economical variant on supersymmetric standard models which may be indicated on cosmological grounds and is shown to have no SUSY-CP problem. Demanding radiative electroweak symmetry breaking suggests that the Higgs is light; other scalar masses may be ~ 100-200 GeV or less. In this case the gluino and photino, while massless at tree level, have 1-loop masses m(gluino) ~ 100 - 600 MeV and m(photino) ~ 100 - 1000 MeV. New hadrons with mass ~ 1 - 3 GeV are predicted and their lifetimes estimated. Existing experimental limits are discussed.

  9. Nucleon electromagnetic form factors from twisted mass lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou Abdel-Rehim; Constantia Alexandrou; Martha Constantinou; Kyriakos Hadjiyiannakou; Karl Jansen; Giannis Koutsou

    2015-01-07

    Results on the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon using twisted mass fermion configurations are presented. These include a gauge field ensemble simulated with two degenerate light quarks yielding a pion mass of around 130 MeV, as well as two ensembles that include strange and charm quarks in the sea yielding pion masses of 210 MeV and 373 MeV. Details of the methods used and systematic errors are discussed, such as noise reduction techniques and the effect of excited states contamination.

  10. Spherically symmetric electromagnetic mass models of embedding class one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Maurya; Y. K. Gupta; Saibal Ray; Sourav Roy Chowdhury

    2015-05-30

    In this article we consider the static spherically symmetric spacetime metric of embedding class one. Specifically three new electromagnetic mass models are derived where the solutions are entirely dependent on the electromagnetic field, such that the physical parameters, like density, pressure etc. do vanish for the vanishing charge. We have analyzed schematically all these three sets of solutions related to electromagnetic mass models by plotting graphs and shown that they can pass through all the physical tests performed by us. To validate these special type of solutions related to electromagnetic mass models a comparison has been done with that of compact stars and shown exclusively the feasibility of the models.

  11. Search for Low Mass Exotic leptonic or bosonic structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2007-07-09

    Recently, several papers discussed the existence of a low mass leptonic structure. It was suggested that the $\\Sigma^{+}$ disintegration: $\\Sigma^{+}\\to$pP$^{0}$, P$^{0}\\to\\mu^{-}\\mu^{+}$ proceeds through an intermediate particle P$^{0}$ having a mass close to M$\\approx$~214.3 MeV. The present work intends to look at other available data, in order to observe the eventual existence of a small peak or shoulder, at a mass close to M=214.3 MeV, which can strengthen the existence of a state produced by two leptons of opposite electric charge.

  12. CTEQ6 Parton Distributions with Heavy Quark Mass Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kretzer; H. L. Lai; F. I. Olness; W. -K. Tung

    2003-07-01

    Previously published CTEQ6 parton distributions adopt the conventional zero-mass parton scheme; these sets are most appropriate for use with massless hard-scattering matrix elements commonly found in most physics applications. For precision observables which are sensitive to charm and bottom quark mass effects, we provide in this paper an additional CTEQ6HQ parton distribution set determined in the more general variable flavor number scheme which incorporates heavy flavor mass effects. The results are obtained by combining these parton distributions with consistently matched DIS structure functions computed in the same scheme. We describe the analysis procedure, examine the predominant features of the new distributions, and compare with previous distributions.

  13. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.

    1999-07-14

    radiative corrections, the value of the top quark mass affects predic- tions of the standard model for many processes. For ex- ample, the prediction for the mass of the W boson varies by approximately 7 MeV1 for every 1 GeV change in the mass of the top... subdetectors that measure the trajectories of charged par- ticles: a vertex drift chamber, a transition radiation detector, a central drift chamber, and two forward drift chambers. These chambers also measure ionization to identify tracks from single charged...

  14. Gravitational centre of mass and localization of dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maluf, J W

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the expression for the centre of mass density of the gravitational field in the context of the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity. The purpose is to investigate the localization of dark energy in the three-dimensional space, induced by a cosmological constant in a simple Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time. We also investigate the gravitational centre of mass density in a particular model of dark matter, in the space-time of a point massive particle and in an arbitrary space-time with axial symmetry. The results are plausible, and lead to the notion of gravitational centre of mass distribution function.

  15. Lattice Gauge Theory and the Origin of Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    2013-08-01

    Most of the mass of everyday objects resides in atomic nuclei/ the total of the electrons' mass adds up to less than one part in a thousand. The nuclei are composed of nucleons---protons and neutrons---whose nuclear binding energy, though tremendous on a human scale, is small compared to their rest energy. The nucleons are, in turn, composites of massless gluons and nearly massless quarks. It is the energy of these confined objects, via $M=E/c^2$, that is responsible for everyday mass. This article discusses the physics of this mechanism and the role of lattice gauge theory in establishing its connection to quantum chromodynamics.

  16. Strange quark mass and Lambda parameter by the ALPHA collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinkovic, Marina; Sommer, Rainer; Virotta, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We determine f_K for lattice QCD in the two flavor approximation with non-perturbatively improved Wilson fermions. The result is used to set the scale for dimensionful quantities in CLS/ALPHA simulations. To control its dependence on the light quark mass, two different strategies for the chiral extrapolation are applied. Combining f_K and the bare strange quark mass with non-perturbative renormalization factors and step scaling functions computed in the Schroedinger Functional, we determine the RGI strange quark mass and the Lambda parameter in units of f_K.

  17. Strange quark mass and Lambda parameter by the ALPHA collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marina Marinkovic; Stefan Schaefer; Rainer Sommer; Francesco Virotta

    2011-12-18

    We determine f_K for lattice QCD in the two flavor approximation with non-perturbatively improved Wilson fermions. The result is used to set the scale for dimensionful quantities in CLS/ALPHA simulations. To control its dependence on the light quark mass, two different strategies for the chiral extrapolation are applied. Combining f_K and the bare strange quark mass with non-perturbative renormalization factors and step scaling functions computed in the Schroedinger Functional, we determine the RGI strange quark mass and the Lambda parameter in units of f_K.

  18. Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Plant Metabolites | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyAprilMartinFeet)perMassMassMass

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry program at the University of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farwell, G.W.; Leach, D.D.; Grootes, P.M.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1984-04-10

    The University uses an FN-Tandem for /sup 14/C and /sup 10/Be measurements. Three main problems for accelerator-mass-spectrometry are normalization, stability, and sample preparation. The approach to these problems is discussed. (GHT)

  20. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ntampaka, M; Sutherland, D J; Fromenteau, S; Poczos, B; Schneider, J

    2015-01-01

    We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create two mock catalogs from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation, one with perfect galaxy cluster membership information and the other where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. Assuming perfect membership knowledge, this unrealistic case produces a wide fractional mass error distribution, with width = 0.87. Interlopers introduce additional scatter, significantly widening the error distribution further (width = 2.13). We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to...

  1. Poincare-invariant equations with a rising mass spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm I. Fushchych

    2002-06-21

    In this note we shall construct, in the framework of relativistic quantum mechanics, the Poincare-invariant motion equations with realistic mass spectra. These equations describe a system with mass spectra of the form $m^2=a^2+b^2 s(s+1)$, where a and b are arbitrary parameters. Such equations are obtained by a reduction of the motion equation for two particles to a one-particle equation which describes the particle in various mass and spin states. It we impose a certain condition on the wave function of the derived equation, such an equation describes the free motion of a fixed-mass particle with arbitrary (but fixed) spin s.

  2. 4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Caroline

    This class provides an introduction to modern art and theories of modernism and postmodernism. It focuses on the way artists use the tension between fine art and mass culture to mobilize a critique of both. We will examine ...

  3. Managing storage en masse with a shared server

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platz, R.L.; Blackledge, R.C.; Hughes, J.H.

    1983-05-01

    Incorporating parallel processing, bit-slice technology, and queued instructions into mass storage control has a dramatic result. A single server can attend to several host processors while overseeing scores of storage peripherals.

  4. Moving Mass Control for Underwater Vehicles C. A. Woolsey1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    into stabil- ity and control design. For example, Abzug mod- eled fuel sloshing in an aircraft, and they are impervious to corrosion and biological fouling [14]. An intriguing application for moving mass control

  5. Applications of Ionic Clusters in High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leib, Ryan David

    2010-01-01

    16, 208-224. Belyayev, M. A. ; Cournoyer, J. J. ; Lin, C. ;Soc. 2003, 125, Li, X. J. ; Cournoyer, J. J. ; Lin, C. ;C. ; O'Connor, P. B. ; Cournoyer, J. J. J. Am. Soc. Mass

  6. Reconstructing particle masses from pairs of decay chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihoko M. Nojiri; Kazuki Sakurai; Bryan R. Webber

    2010-06-01

    A method is proposed for determining the masses of the new particles N,X,Y,Z in collider events containing a pair of effectively identical decay chains Z to Y+jet, Y to X+l_1, X to N+l_2, where l_1, l_2 are opposite-sign same-flavour charged leptons and N is invisible. By first determining the upper edge of the dilepton invariant mass spectrum, we reduce the problem to a curve for each event in the 3-dimensional space of mass-squared differences. The region through which most curves pass then determines the unknown masses. A statistical approach is applied to take account of mismeasurement of jet and missing momenta. The method is easily visualized and rather robust against combinatorial ambiguities and finite detector resolution. It can be successful even for small event samples, since it makes full use of the kinematical information from every event.

  7. Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. NREL has six MBMS systems that researchers and industry partners can use to understand thermochemical biomass conversion and biomass composition recalcitrance.

  8. Electromagnetic Mass Models in General Theory of Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumana Bhadra

    2007-10-30

    "Electromagnetic mass" where gravitational mass and other physical quantities originate from the electromagnetic field alone has a century long distinguished history. In the introductory chapter we have divided this history into three broad categories -- classical, quantum mechanical and general relativistic. Each of the categories has been described at a length to get the detailed picture of the physical background. Recent developments on Repulsive Electromagnetic Mass Models are of special interest in this introductory part of the thesis. In this context we have also stated motivation of our work. In the subsequent chapters we have presented our results and their physical significances. It is concluded that the electromagnetic mass models which are the sources of purely electromagnetic origin ``have not only heuristic flavor associated with the conjecture of Lorentz but even a physics having unconventional yet novel features characterizing their own contributions independent of the rest of the physics".

  9. Energy effectiveness of simultaneous heat and mass exchange devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, G. Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous heat and mass exchange devices such as cooling towers, humidifiers and dehumidifiers are widely used in the power generation, desalination, air conditioning, and refrigeration industries. For design and rating ...

  10. Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurement at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron ?s=1.96??TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ...

  11. Dipole Excitation With A Paul Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacAskill, J. A.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Chutjian, A. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Group, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the use of an auxiliary radiofrequency (rf) excitation voltage in combination with a high purity, high voltage rf generator to perform dipole excitation within a high precision Paul ion trap. These results show the effects of the excitation frequency over a continuous frequency range on the resultant mass spectra from the Paul trap with particular emphasis on ion ejection times, ion signal intensity, and peak shapes. Ion ejection times are found to decrease continuously with variations in dipole frequency about several resonant values and show remarkable symmetries. Signal intensities vary in a complex fashion with numerous resonant features and are driven to zero at specific frequency values. Observed intensity variations depict dipole excitations that target ions of all masses as well as individual masses. Substantial increases in mass resolution are obtained with resolving powers for nitrogen increasing from 114 to 325.

  12. Revamping luxury : mass customization applied to the luxury goods market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edouard, Mélissa Susan Caroline Coleman

    2009-01-01

    This thesis seeks to understand how the crisis has impacted the definition of luxury goods in the mind of consumers and the implications this has for luxury goods companies. It also aims to present Mass Customization as ...

  13. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruppa, Gary (San Francisco, CA); Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Young, Malin M. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  14. Top quark mass and properties at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -F. Arguin; for the CDF; D0 Collaborations

    2005-07-29

    We present recent analyses of top quark properties performed at Run II of the Tevatron. Measurements of the top quark mass, branching ratios and W boson helicity inside top quark decays are covered.

  15. The mass-metallicity relation of interacting galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Michel-Dansac; D. G. Lambas; M. S. Alonso; P. Tissera

    2008-02-26

    We study the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies in pairs and in isolation taken from the SDSS-DR4 using the stellar masses and oxygen abundances derived by Tremonti et al. (2004). Close galaxy pairs, defined by projected separation r_p ~ 10^10 Msun/h) galaxies have a systematically lower metallicity, although with a smaller difference (-0.05 dex). Similar trends are obtained if g-band magnitudes are used instead of stellar masses. In minor interactions, we find that the less massive member is systematically enriched, while a galaxy in interaction with a comparable stellar mass companion shows a metallicity decrement with respect to galaxies in isolation. We argue that metal-rich starbursts triggered by a more massive component, and inflows of low metallicity gas induced by comparable or less massive companion galaxies, provide a natural scenario to explain our findings.

  16. Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectrum at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN19.6 and 200 GeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  17. Top-quark mass measurements: Alternative techniques (LHC + Tevatron)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanie Adomeit

    2014-11-28

    Measurements of the top-quark mass employing alternative techniques are presented, performed by the D0 and CDF collaborations at the Tevatron as well as the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. The alternative methods presented include measurements using the lifetime of $B$-hadrons, the transverse momentum of charged leptons and the endpoints of kinematic distributions in top quark anti-quark pair ($t\\bar{t}$) final states. The extraction of the top-quark pole mass from the $t\\bar{t}$ production cross-section and the normalized differential $t\\bar{t}$ + 1-jet cross-section are discussed as well as the top-quark mass extraction using fixed-order QCD predictions at detector level. Finally, a measurement of the top-quark mass using events enhanced in single top t-channel production is presented.

  18. Evolutionary Patterns of Trilobites Across the End Ordovician Mass Extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Congreve, Curtis Raymond

    2013-05-31

    The end Ordovician mass extinction is the second largest extinction event in the history or life and it is classically interpreted as being caused by a sudden and unstable icehouse during otherwise greenhouse conditions. ...

  19. Mass balance of four East Antarctic outlet glaciers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Leigh

    2011-12-01

    Mountains, the balance characteristics of which are largely unknown. Here the mass balance is estimated for four glaciers draining ice from the EAIS through the Transantarctic Mountains into the Ross Sea embayment: David, Mulock, Byrd and Nimrod glaciers...

  20. 2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer, Fall 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lienhard, John H., 1961-

    Analysis, modeling, and design of heat and mass transfer processes with application to common technologies. Unsteady heat conduction in one or more dimensions, steady conduction in multidimensional configurations, numerical ...

  1. Loop-induced Neutrino Masses: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Tsai, Lu-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    We study the cocktail model in which the Majorana neutrino masses are generated by the so-called "cocktail" three-loop diagrams with the dark matter particle running in the loops. In particular, we give the correct analytic expressions of the neutrino masses in the model by the detailed calculation of the cocktail diagrams. Based on the reliable numerical calculation of the loop integrals, we explore the parameter space which can give the correct orders of neutrino masses while satisfying other experimental constraints, such as those from the neutrinoless double beta decay, low-energy lepton flavor violation processes, electroweak precision tests, and collider searches. As a result, the large couplings and the large mass difference between the two singly-charged (neutral) scalars are required.

  2. Renormalization of a two-loop neutrino mass model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babu, K. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States); Julio, J. [Fisika LIPI, Kompleks Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15310, Indonesia and Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova Cesta 39, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the renormalization group structure of a radiative neutrino mass model consisting of a singly charged and a doubly charged scalar fields. Small Majorana neutrino masses are generated by the exchange of these scalars via two-loop diagrams. We derive boundedness conditions for the Higgs potential and show how they can be satisfied to energies up to the Planck scale. Combining boundedness and perturbativity constraints with neutrino oscillation phenomenology, new limits on the masses and couplings of the charged scalars are derived. These in turn lead to lower limits on the branching ratios for certain lepton flavor violating (LFV) processes such as ??e?, ??3e and ? – e conversion in nuclei. Improved LFV measurements could test the model, especially in the case of inverted neutrino mass hierarchy where these are more prominent.

  3. MACHO Mass Determination Based on Space Telescope Observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mareki Honma

    1999-03-24

    We investigate the possibility of lens mass determination for a caustic crossing microlensing event based on a space telescope observation. We demonstrate that the parallax due to the orbital motion of a space telescope causes a periodic fluctuation of the light curve, from which the lens distance can be derived. Since the proper motion of the lens relative to the source is also measurable for a caustic crossing event, one can find a full solution for microlensing properties of the event, including the lens mass. To determine the lens mass with sufficient accuracy, the light curve near the caustic crossing should be observed within uncertainty of $\\sim$ 1%. We argue that the Hubble Space Telescope observation of the caustic crossing supplied with ground-based observations of the full light curve will enable us to determine the mass of MACHOs, which is crucial for understanding the nature of MACHOs.

  4. Orbits, masses, and evolution of main belt triple (87) Sylvia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, J; Margot, JL; Margot, JL; Rojo, P

    2012-01-01

    D. 2008, Binaries in the Kuiper Belt, ed. Barucci, M. A. ,Brozovic et al. 2009), main belt triples Kleopatra (DescampsMASSES, AND EVOLUTION OF MAIN BELT TRIPLE (87) SYLVIA J ULIA

  5. Orbits, Masses, and Evolution of Main Belt Triple (87) Sylvia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc; Rojo, Patricio

    2012-01-01

    D. 2008, Binaries in the Kuiper Belt, ed. Barucci, M. A. ,Brozovic et al. 2009), main belt triples Kleopatra (DescampsMASSES, AND EVOLUTION OF MAIN BELT TRIPLE (87) SYLVIA J ULIA

  6. Further evidence for narrow exotic low mass baryons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff

    2004-04-29

    Although narrow low mass baryonic structures, observed mainly in SPES3 (Saturne) data, were not confirmed in recent experiments using lepton probes, their existence is confirmed in other data, where hadronic probes were used.

  7. Finite volume effects for nucleon and heavy meson masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Fuhrer, Andreas; Lanz, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    We apply the resummed version of the Luescher formula to analyze finite volume corrections to the mass of the nucleon and of heavy mesons. We show that by applying the subthreshold expansion of the scattering amplitudes one can express the finite volume corrections in terms of only a few physical observables and the size of the box. In the case of the nucleon, the available information about the quark mass dependence of these physical quantities is discussed and used to assess the finite volume corrections to the nucleon mass as a function of the quark mass including a detailed analysis of the remaining uncertainties. For heavy mesons, the Luescher formula is derived both fully relativistically and in a nonrelativistic approximation and a first attempt at a numerical analysis is made.

  8. Mass spectrometer having a derivatized sample presentation apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randall W. (Phoenix, AZ)

    2000-07-25

    A mass spectrometer having a derivatized sample presentation apparatus is provided. The sample presentation apparatus has a complex bound to the surface of the sample presentation apparatus. This complex includes a molecule which may chemically modify a biomolecule.

  9. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

  10. Hadron Collider Tests of Neutrino Mass-Generating Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics (SM) is presently the best description of nature at small distances and high energies. However, with tiny but nonzero neutrino masses, a Higgs boson mass unstable under radiative corrections, and little guidance on understanding the hierarchy of fermion masses, the SM remains an unsatisfactory description of nature. Well-motivated scenarios that resolve these issues exist but also predict extended gauge (e.g., Left-Right Symmetric Models), scalar (e.g., Supersymmetry), and/or fermion sectors (e.g., Seesaw Models). Hence, discovering such new states would have far-reaching implications. After reviewing basic tenets of the SM and collider physics, several beyond the SM (BSM) scenarios that alleviate these shortcomings are investigated. Emphasis is placed on the production of a heavy Majorana neutrinos at hadron colliders in the context of low-energy, effective theories that simultaneously explain the origin of neutrino masses and their smallness compared to other elementar...

  11. Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  12. AN INITIAL MASS FUNCTION FOR INDIVIDUAL STARS IN GALACTIC DISKS. I. CONSTRAINING THE SHAPE OF THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parravano, Antonio [Universidad de Los Andes, Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Merida 5101a (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); McKee, Christopher F. [Physics Department and Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hollenbach, David J. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    We derive a semi-empirical galactic initial mass function (IMF) from observational constraints. We assume that the IMF, {psi}(m), is a smooth function of the stellar mass m. The mass dependence of the proposed IMF is determined by five parameters: the low-mass slope {gamma}, the high-mass slope -{Gamma} (taken to be -1.35), the characteristic mass m{sub ch} ({approx} the peak mass of the IMF), and the lower and upper limits on the mass, m{sub l} and m{sub u} (taken to be 0.004 and 120 M{sub sun}, respectively): {psi}(m)dln m {proportional_to} m{sup -}{Gamma}{l_brace}1 - exp [- (m/m{sub ch}){sup {gamma}}+{Gamma}]{r_brace}dln m. The values of {gamma} and m{sub ch} are derived from two integral constraints: (1) the ratio of the number density of stars in the range m = 0.1-0.6 M{sub sun} to that in the range m = 0.6-0.8 M{sub sun} as inferred from the mass distribution of field stars in the local neighborhood and (2) the ratio of the number of stars in the range m = 0.08-1 M{sub sun} to the number of brown dwarfs in the range m = 0.03-0.08 M{sub sun} in young clusters. The IMF satisfying the above constraints is characterized by the parameters {gamma} = 0.51 and m{sub ch} = 0.35 M{sub sun} (which corresponds to a peak mass of 0.27 M{sub sun} ). This IMF agrees quite well with the Chabrier IMF for the entire mass range over which we have compared with data, but predicts significantly more stars with masses <0.03 M{sub sun}; we also compare with other IMFs in current use and give a number of important parameters implied by the IMFs.

  13. On a possible approach to the variable-mass problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm I. Fushchych; Ivan Yu. Krivsky

    2002-06-11

    The mass operator M is introduced as an independent dynamical variable which is taken as the translation generator P_4 of the inhomogenous De Sitter group. The classification of representations of the algebra P(1,4) of this group is performed and the corresponding P(1,4) invariant equations for variable-mass particles are written out. In this way we have succeeded, in particular, in uniting the ``external'' and ``internal'' (SU_2) symmetries in a non-trivial fashion.

  14. Low-mass dilepton production in $pp$ and $AA$ collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong-Bo Kang; Jian-Wei Qiu; Werner Vogelsang

    2009-09-23

    We adopt a factorized QCD formalism to describe the transverse momentum distribution of low-mass lepton pairs produced in $pp$ collisions, when the pair transverse momentum $Q_T \\gg Q$, with the pair's invariant mass $Q$ as low as $Q \\sim \\Lambda_{\\mathrm{QCD}}$. We extend this formalism to dilepton production in $AA$ collisions by including the nuclear-dependent power correction due to parton multiple scattering.

  15. SUSY SO(10) GUT with Higgs mass prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogoladze, Ilia

    2014-06-24

    We identify a class of supersymmetric SO(10) model in which imposing essentially perfect t-b-? Yukawa coupling unification at the grand unification scale yields lightest CP-even (SM-like) Higgs boson mass around 125 GeV. The squark and gluino masses in these models exceed 3 TeV. The model predicts only neutralino-stau coannihilation scenario in order to obtain the desired relic dark matter density.

  16. Hybrid meson masses and the correlated Gaussian basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Mathieu

    2009-07-06

    We revisited a model for charmonium hybrid meson with a magnetic gluon [Yu. S. Kalashnikova and A. V. Nefediev, Phys. Rev. D {\\bf 77}, 054025 (2008)] and improved the numerical calculations. These improvements support the hybrid meson interpretation of X(4260). Within the same model, we computed the hybrid meson mass with an electric gluon which is resolved to be lighter. Relativistic effects and coupling channels decreased also the mass.

  17. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  18. Neutrinoless double beta decay and direct searches for neutrino mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig Aalseth; Henning Back; Loretta Dauwe; David Dean; Guido Drexlin; Yuri Efremenko; Hiro Ejiri; Steven Elliott; Jon Engel; Brian Fujikawa; Reyco Henning; G. W. Hoffmann; Karol Lang; Kevin Lesko; Tadafumi Kishimoto; Harry Miley; Rick Norman; Silvia Pascoli; Serguey Petcov; Andreas Piepke; Werner Rodejohann; David Saltzberg; Sean Sutton; Petr Vogel; Ray Warner; John Wilkerson; Lincoln Wolfenstein

    2004-12-21

    Study of the neutrinoless double beta decay and searches for the manifestation of the neutrino mass in ordinary beta decay are the main sources of information about the absolute neutrino mass scale, and the only practical source of information about the charge conjugation properties of the neutrinos. Thus, these studies have a unique role in the plans for better understanding of the whole fast expanding field of neutrino physics.

  19. QCD Thermodynamics with an almost realistic quark mass spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Schmidt

    2006-01-25

    We will report on the status of a new large scale calculation of thermodynamic quantities in QCD with light up and down quarks corresponding to an almost physical light quark mass value and a heavier strange quark mass. These calculations are currently being performed on the QCDOC Teraflops computers at BNL. We will present new lattice calculations of the transition temperature and various susceptibilities reflecting properties of the chiral transition. All these quantities are of immediate interest for heavy ion phenomenology.

  20. Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

    2011-10-19

    We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

  1. The Origin of Mass and the Feebleness of Gravity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wilczek, Frank

    2010-09-01

    BSA Distinguished Lecture presented by Frank Wilczek, co-winner of the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics. Einstein's famous equation E=mc^2 asserts that energy and mass are different aspects of the same reality. The general public usually associates the equation with the idea that small amounts of mass can be converted into large amounts of energy, as in nuclear reactors and bombs. For physicists who study the basic nature of matter, however, the more important idea is just the opposite.

  2. Vacuum Expectation Values of Twisted Mass Fermion Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou Abdel-Rehim; Randy Lewis; Walter Wilcox

    2007-10-23

    Using noise methods on a quenched $20^3 \\times 32$ lattice at $\\beta=6.0$, we have investigated vacuum expectation values and relative linear correlations among the various Wilson and twisted mass scalar and pseudoscalar disconnected loop operators. We show results near the maximal twist lines in $\\kappa$, $\\mu$ parameter space, either defined as the absence of parity mixing or the vanishing of the PCAC quark mass.

  3. Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Fengshou Zhang

    2010-11-17

    The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

  4. Direct Search for Low Mass Dark Matter Particles with CCDs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barreto, J.; Cease, H.; Diehl, H. T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Harrison, N.; Jones, J.; Kilminster, B.; Molina, J.; Smith, J.; et al

    2012-05-15

    A direct dark matter search is performed using fully-depleted high-resistivity CCD detectors. Due to their low electronic readout noise (RMS ~7 eV) these devices operate with a very low detection threshold of 40 eV, making the search for dark matter particles with low masses (~5 GeV) possible. The results of an engineering run performed in a shallow underground site are presented, demonstrating the potential of this technology in the low mass region.

  5. Top quark mass measurement using the template method at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T

    2011-06-03

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels of t$\\bar{t}$ decays using the template method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at Tevatron with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector. The measurement is performed by constructing templates of three kinematic variables in the lepton+jets and two kinematic variables in the dilepton channel. The variables are two reconstructed top quark masses from different jets-to-quarks combinations and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and amore »reconstructed top quark mass and mT2, a variable related to the transverse mass in events with two missing particles, in the dilepton channel. The simultaneous fit of the templates from signal and background events in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels to the data yields a measured top quark mass of Mtop = 172.1±1.1 (stat)±0.9 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  6. Local Mass and Heat Transfer on a Turbine Blade Tip

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jin, P.; Goldstein, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Local mass and heat transfer measurements on a simulated high-pressure turbine blade-tip surface are conducted in a linear cascade with a nonmoving tip endwall, using a naphthalene sublimation technique. The effects of tip clearance (0.86–6.90% of chord) are investigated at various exit Reynolds numbers (4–7 × 10 5 ) and turbulence intensities (0.2 and 12.0%). The mass transfer on the tip surface is significant along its pressure edge at the smallest tip clearance. At the two largest tip clearances, the separation bubble on the tip surface can cover the wholemore »width of the tip on the second half of the tip surface. The average mass-transfer rate is highest at a tip clearance of 1.72% of chord. The average mass-transfer rate on the tip surface is four and six times as high as on the suction and the pressure surface, respectively. A high mainstream turbulence level of 12.0% reduces average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface, while the higher mainstream Reynolds number generates higher local and average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface.« less

  7. Methane Planets and their Mass-Radius Relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helled, Ravit; Vos, Eran

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of both the mass and radius of an exoplanet allows us to estimate its mean density, and therefore, its composition. Exoplanets seem to fill a very large parameter space in terms of mass and composition, and unlike the solar-system's planets, exoplanets also have intermediate masses (~5-50 M_Earth) with various densities. In this letter, we investigate the behavior of the Mass-Radius relation for methane (CH_4) planets and show that when methane planets are massive enough (M_planet > ~15 M_Earth) the methane can dissociate and lead to a differentiated planet with a carbon core, a methane envelope, and a hydrogen atmosphere. The contribution of a rocky core to the behavior of CH_4 planet is considered as well. We also develop interior models for several detected intermediate-mass planets that could, in principle, be methane/methane-rich planets. The example of methane planets emphasizes the complexity of the Mass-Radius relation and the challenge in inferring the planetary composition uniquely.

  8. The mass dependence of dwarf satellite galaxy quenching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F. E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu

    2014-09-10

    We combine observations of the Local Group with data from the NASA-Sloan Atlas to show the variation in the quenched fraction of satellite galaxies from low-mass dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars to more massive dwarfs similar to the Magellanic Clouds. While almost all of the low-mass (M {sub *} ? 10{sup 7} M {sub ?}) dwarfs are quenched, at higher masses the quenched fraction decreases to approximately 40%-50%. This change in the quenched fraction is large and suggests a sudden change in the effectiveness of quenching that correlates with satellite mass. We combine this observation with models of satellite infall and ram pressure stripping to show that the low-mass satellites must quench within 1-2 Gyr of pericenter passage to maintain a high quenched fraction, but that many more massive dwarfs must continue to form stars today even though they likely fell into their host >5 Gyr ago. We also characterize how the susceptibility of dwarfs to ram pressure must vary as a function of mass if it is to account for the change in quenched fractions. Though neither model predicts the quenching effectiveness a priori, this modeling illustrates the physical requirements that the observed quenched fractions place on possible quenching mechanisms.

  9. Top quark mass measurement using the template method at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-06-03

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels of tt? decays using the template method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb-1 of pp? collisions at Tevatron with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector. The measurement is performed by constructing templates of three kinematic variables in the lepton+jets and two kinematic variables in the dilepton channel. The variables are two reconstructed top quark masses from different jets-to-quarks combinations and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and a reconstructed top quark mass and mT2, a variable related to the transverse mass in events with two missing particles, in the dilepton channel. The simultaneous fit of the templates from signal and background events in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels to the data yields a measured top quark mass of Mtop = 172.1±1.1 (stat)±0.9 (syst) GeV/c2.

  10. Atmospheres of low-mass planets: the "boil-off"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, James E

    2015-01-01

    We show that, for a low-mass planet that orbits its host star within several tenths of an AU (like the majority of the Kepler planets), the atmosphere it was able to accumulate while embedded in the proto-planetary disk may not survive unscathed after the disk disperses. This gas envelope, if more massive than a few percent of the core (with a mass below $10 M_\\oplus$), has a cooling time that is much longer than the time-scale on which the planet exits the disk. As such, it could not have contracted significantly from its original size, of order the Bondi radius. So a newly exposed proto-planet would be losing mass via a Parker wind that is energized by the stellar continuum radiation. The surface mass-loss induces a mass movement within the envelope that advects internal heat outward. As a result, the planet atmosphere rapidly cools down and contracts, until it has reached a radius of order $0.1$ Bondi radius, at which time the mass-loss effectively shuts down. Within a million years after the disk disperse...

  11. The Higgs mass derived from the U(3) Lie group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ole L. Trinhammer; Henrik G. Bohr; Mogens Stibius Jensen

    2015-07-07

    The Higgs mass value is derived from a Hamiltonian on the Lie group U(3) where we relate strong and electroweak energy scales. The baryon states of nucleon and delta resonances originate in specific Bloch wave degrees of freedom coupled to a Higgs mechanism which also gives rise to the usual gauge boson masses. The derived Higgs mass is around 125 GeV. From the same Hamiltonian we derive the relative neutron to proton mass ratio and the N and Delta mass spectra. All compare rather well with the experimental values. We predict scarce neutral flavor baryon singlets that should be visible in scattering cross sections for negative pions on protons, in photoproduction on neutrons, in neutron diffraction dissociation experiments and in invariant mass spectra of protons and negative pions in B-decays. The fundamental predictions are based on just one length scale and the fine structure constant. More particular predictions rely also on the weak mixing angle and the up-down quark flavor mixing matrix element. With differential forms on the measure-scaled wavefunction, we could generate approximate parton distribution functions for the u and d valence quarks of the proton that compare well with established experimental analysis.

  12. Neutrino masses and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay: Status and expectations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliviero Cremonesi

    2010-02-07

    Two most outstanding questions are puzzling the world of neutrino Physics: the possible Majorana nature of neutrinos and their absolute mass scale. Direct neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double beta decay (0nuDBD) are the present strategy to solve the puzzle. Neutrinoless double beta decay violates lepton number by two units and can occurr only if neutrinos are massive Majorana particles. A positive observation would therefore necessarily imply a new regime of physics beyond the standard model, providing fundamental information on the nature of the neutrinos and on their absolute mass scale. After the observation of neutrino oscillations and given the present knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing parameters, a possibility to observe 0nuDBDD at a neutrino mass scale in the range 10-50 meV could actually exist. This is a real challenge faced by a number of new proposed projects. Present status and future perpectives of neutrinoless double-beta decay experimental searches is reviewed. The most important parameters contributing to the experimental sensitivity are outlined. A short discussion on nuclear matrix element calculations is also given. Complementary measurements to assess the absolute neutrino mass scale (cosmology and single beta decays) are also discussed.

  13. Top quark mass measurement using the template method at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U.; Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U.; Dubna, JINR

    2011-06-03

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels of tt? decays using the template method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb-1 of pp? collisions at Tevatron with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector. The measurement is performed by constructing templates of three kinematic variables in the lepton+jets and two kinematic variables in the dilepton channel. The variables are two reconstructed top quark masses from different jets-to-quarks combinations and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton+jets channel, and a reconstructed top quark mass and mT2, a variable related to the transverse mass in events with two missing particles, in the dilepton channel. The simultaneous fit of the templates from signal and background events in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels to the data yields a measured top quark mass of Mtop = 172.1±1.1 (stat)±0.9 (syst) GeV/c2.

  14. GIANT PLANET FORMATION BY DISK INSTABILITY IN LOW MASS DISKS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2010-12-20

    Forming giant planets by disk instability requires a gaseous disk that is massive enough to become gravitationally unstable and able to cool fast enough for self-gravitating clumps to form and survive. Models with simplified disk cooling have shown the critical importance of the ratio of the cooling to the orbital timescales. Uncertainties about the proper value of this ratio can be sidestepped by including radiative transfer. Three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics models of a disk with a mass of 0.043 M{sub sun} from 4 to 20 AU in orbit around a 1 M{sub sun} protostar show that disk instabilities are considerably less successful in producing self-gravitating clumps than in a disk with twice this mass. The results are sensitive to the assumed initial outer disk (T{sub o}) temperatures. Models with T{sub o} = 20 K are able to form a single self-gravitating clump, whereas models with T{sub o} = 25 K form clumps that are not quite self-gravitating. These models imply that disk instability requires a disk with a mass of at least {approx}0.043 M{sub sun} inside 20 AU in order to form giant planets around solar-mass protostars with realistic disk cooling rates and outer-disk temperatures. Lower mass disks around solar-mass protostars must rely upon core accretion to form inner giant planets.

  15. A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linacre, Jacob Thomas; /Oxford U.

    2010-02-01

    A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t{bar t}) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p{bar p} collision data at centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t{bar t}) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be m{sub t} = 172.4 {+-} 1.4 (stat+{Delta}{sub JES}) {+-} 1.3 (syst) GeV=c{sup 2}, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

  16. Mass Segregation in Young LMC Clusters I. NGC 2157

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Fischer; Carlton Pryor; Stephen Murray; Mario Mateo; Tom Richtler

    1997-10-31

    We have carried out WFPC2 V- and I-band imaging of the young LMC cluster NGC 2157. Construction of a color-magnitude diagram and isochrone fitting yields an age of tau = 100 000 000 yrs, a reddening E(B-V) = 0.1 and a distance modulus of 18.4 mag. Our data covers the mass range 0.75 < m < 5.1 solar masses. We find that the cluster mass function changes significantly from the inner regions to the outer regions, becoming steeper (larger number of low mass stars relative to high mass stars) at larger radii. The age of NGC 2157 is comparable to its two-body relaxation timescale only in the cluster core. The observed steepening of the mass function at larger radii is therefore most likely an initial condition of the cluster stars. Such initial conditions are predicted in models of cluster star formation in which dissipative processes act more strongly upon more massive stars.

  17. Inferring Planet Mass from Spiral Structures in Protoplanetary Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fung, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of protoplanetary disk have reported spiral structures that are potential signatures of embedded planets, and modeling efforts have shown that a single planet can excite multiple spiral arms, in contrast to conventional disk-planet interaction theory. Using two and three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations to perform a systematic parameter survey, we confirm the existence of multiple spiral arms in disks with a single planet, and discover a scaling relation between the azimuthal separation of the primary and secondary arm, $\\phi_{\\rm sep}$, and the planet-to-star mass ratio $q$: $\\phi_{\\rm sep} = 102^{\\circ} (q/0.001)^{0.2}$ for companions between Neptune mass and 16 Jupiter masses around a 1 solar mass star, and $\\phi_{\\rm sep} = 180^{\\circ}$ for brown dwarf mass companions. This relation is independent of the disk's temperature, and can be used to infer a planet's mass to within an accuracy of about 30% given only the morphology of a face-on disk. Combining hydrodynamics and Monte-Carl...

  18. A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis Nathan K. Kaiser, John P. Quinn, Greg T. Blakney organic mixtures. However, analysis of petroleum crude oil as well as upcoming biofuels requires continued-ion atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrum of a Middle Eastern light crude oil, acquired with the new

  19. Measurement of the top quark mass using the invariant mass of lepton pairs in soft muon b-tagged events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present the first measurement of the mass of the top quark in a sample of tt? ???? bb? qq? events (where ?=e,?) selected by identifying jets containing a muon candidate from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor hadrons ...

  20. Prospects to Measure the Higgs Boson Mass and Cross Section in ee-->ZH Using the Recoil Mass Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Lohmann; M. Ohlerich; A. Raspereza; A. Schälicke

    2007-10-13

    The process ee-->ZH allows to measure the Higgs boson in the recoil mass spectrum against the Z boson without any assumptions on the Higgs boson decay. We performed a full simulation and reconstruction of ee-->ZH using the MOKKA and MARLIN packages describing the LDC detector. The Z is reconstructed from its decays into electrons and muons. The mass of the Higgs boson is set to 120 GeV. Assuming a centre-of-mass energy of 250 GeV and an integrated luminosity of 50/fb the Higgs boson mass and the Higgs-strahlung cross section can be measured with a precision of 120 MeV and 9%, respectively.

  1. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. STATISTICS AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SOURCE REGION CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Muhr, N.; Kienreich, I.; Utz, D.

    2011-09-10

    We use high time cadence images acquired by the STEREO EUVI and COR instruments to study the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from their initiation through impulsive acceleration to the propagation phase. For a set of 95 CMEs we derived detailed height, velocity, and acceleration profiles and statistically analyzed characteristic CME parameters: peak acceleration, peak velocity, acceleration duration, initiation height, height at peak velocity, height at peak acceleration, and size of the CME source region. The CME peak accelerations we derived range from 20 to 6800 m s{sup -2} and are inversely correlated with the acceleration duration and the height at peak acceleration. Seventy-four percent of the events reach their peak acceleration at heights below 0.5 R{sub sun}. CMEs that originate from compact sources low in the corona are more impulsive and reach higher peak accelerations at smaller heights. These findings can be explained by the Lorentz force, which drives the CME accelerations and decreases with height and CME size.

  2. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy C.; Haggerty, Roy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John W.

    2014-11-25

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

  3. POLYTOPES WITH MASS LINEAR FUNCTIONS, PART I DUSA MCDUFF AND SUSAN TOLMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Scott

    POLYTOPES WITH MASS LINEAR FUNCTIONS, PART I DUSA MCDUFF AND SUSAN TOLMAN Abstract. We analyze mass linear functions on simple polytopes , where a mass linear function is an affine function on whose value that certain types of symmetries of give rise to nonconstant mass linear functions on . We call mass linear

  4. Optical Spectroscopy of 2MASS Color-Selected Ultracool Subdwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam J. Burgasser; Kelle L. Cruz; J. Davy Kirkpatrick

    2006-10-03

    We present Gemini GMOS and Magellan LDSS-3 optical spectroscopy for seven ultracool subdwarf candidates color-selected from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Five are identified as late-type subdwarfs, including the previously reported sdM9.5 SSSPM 1013-1356 and L subdwarf 2MASS 1626+3925, and a new sdM8.5 2MASS 0142+0523. 2MASS 1640+1231 exhibits spectral features intermediate between a late-type M dwarf and subdwarf, similar to the previously identified high proper motion star SSSPM 1444-2019, and we classify both sources as mild subdwarfs, d/sdM9. 2MASS 1227-0447 is a new ultracool extreme subdwarf, spectral type esdM7.5. Spectral model fits yield metallicities that are consistent with these metallicity classifications. Effective temperatures track with numerical subtype within a metallicity class, although they are not equivalent across metallicity classes. As a first attempt to delineate subtypes in the L subdwarf regime we classify 2MASS 1626+3925 and the previously identified 2MASS 0532+8246 as sdL4 and sdL7, respectively, to reflect their similarity to equivalently classified, solar metallicity L-type field dwarfs over the 7300-9000 A region. We also detail preliminary criteria for distinguishing L subdwarf optical spectra as a roadmap for defining this new spectral class. The strong TiO bands and Ca I and Ti I lines in the spectrum of 2MASS 1626+3925 provide further evidence that condensate formation may be inhibited in metal-deficient L subdwarfs. We conclude with a compendium of currently known, optically classified ultracool subdwarfs.

  5. Theoretical mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Holzwarth; M. Jardine

    2006-11-14

    We develop a model for the wind properties of cool main-sequence stars, which comprises their wind ram pressures, mass fluxes, and terminal wind velocities. The wind properties are determined through a polytropic magnetised wind model, assuming power laws for the dependence of the thermal and magnetic wind parameters on the stellar rotation rate. We use empirical data to constrain theoretical wind scenarios, which are characterised by different rates of increase of the wind temperature, wind density, and magnetic field strength. Scenarios based on moderate rates of increase yield wind ram pressures in agreement with most empirical constraints, but cannot account for some moderately rotating targets, whose high apparent mass loss rates are inconsistent with observed coronal X-ray and magnetic properties. For fast magnetic rotators, the magneto-centrifugal driving of the outflow can produce terminal wind velocities far in excess of the surface escape velocity. Disregarding this aspect in the analyses of wind ram pressures leads to overestimations of stellar mass loss rates. The predicted mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars do not exceed about ten times the solar value. Our results are in contrast with previous investigations, which found a strong increase of the stellar mass loss rates with the coronal X-ray flux. Owing to the weaker dependence, we expect the impact of stellar winds on planetary atmospheres to be less severe and the detectability of magnetospheric radio emission to be lower then previously suggested. Considering the rotational evolution of a one solar-mass star, the mass loss rates and the wind ram pressures are highest during the pre-main sequence phase.

  6. Masses of a Fourth Generation with Two Higgs Doublets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab; Erler, Jens; /UNAM, Mexico; Heckman, Jonathan J.; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Ramirez-Homs, Enrique; /Texas U., El Paso

    2012-05-01

    We use sampling techniques to find robust constraints on the masses of a possible fourth sequential fermion generation from electroweak oblique variables. We find that in the case of a light (115 GeV) Higgs from a single electroweak symmetry breaking doublet, inverted mass hierarchies are possible for both quarks and leptons, but a mass splitting more than MW in the quark sector is unlikely. We also find constraints in the case of a heavy (600 GeV) Higgs in a single doublet model. As recent data from the Large Hadron Collider hints at the existence of a resonance at 124.5 GeV and a single Higgs doublet at that mass is inconsistent with a fourth fermion generation, we examine a Type II two Higgs doublet model. In this model, there are ranges of parameter space where the Higgs sector can potentially counteract the effects of the fourth generation. Even so, we find that such scenarios produce qualitatively similar fermion mass distributions.

  7. Masses of a Fourth Generation with Two Higgs Doublets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leo Bellantoni; Jens Erler; Jonathan J. Heckman; Enrique Ramirez-Homs

    2012-06-22

    We use sampling techniques to find robust constraints on the masses of a possible fourth sequential fermion generation from electroweak oblique variables. We find that in the case of a light (115 GeV) Higgs from a single electroweak symmetry breaking doublet, inverted mass hierarchies are possible for both quarks and leptons, but a mass splitting more than M(W) in the quark sector is unlikely. We also find constraints in the case of a heavy (600 GeV) Higgs in a single doublet model. As recent data from the Large Hadron Collider hints at the existence of a resonance at 124.5 GeV and a single Higgs doublet at that mass is inconsistent with a fourth fermion generation, we examine a type II two Higgs doublet model. In this model, there are ranges of parameter space where the Higgs sector can potentially counteract the effects of the fourth generation. Even so, we find that such scenarios produce qualitatively similar fermion mass distributions.

  8. Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurements at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-07-01

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1}. Using a sample of t{bar t} candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, mtop = 172.85 {+-} 0.71 (stat) {+-} 0.85 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  9. Mesolensing Explorations of Nearby Masses: From Planets to Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Di Stefano

    2007-12-20

    Nearby masses can have a high probability of lensing stars in a distant background field. High-probability lensing, or mesolensing, can therefore be used to dramatically increase our knowledge of dark and dim objects in the solar neighborhood, where it can discover and study members of the local dark population (free-floating planets, low-mass dwarfs, white dwarfs, neutron stars, and stellar mass black holes). We can measure the mass and transverse velocity of those objects discovered (or already known), and determine whether or not they are in binaries with dim companions. We explore these and other applications of mesolensing, including the study of forms of matter that have been hypothesized but not discovered, such as intermediate-mass black holes, dark matter objects free-streaming through the Galactic disk, and planets in the outermost regions of the solar system. In each case we discuss the feasibility of deriving results based on present-day monitoring systems, and also consider the vistas that will open with the advent of all-sky monitoring in the era of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

  10. EXTENDING THE USEFUL LIFE OF OLDER MASS SPECTROMETERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S.; Cordaro, J.; Holland, M.; Jones, V.

    2010-06-17

    Thermal ionization and gas mass spectrometers are widely used across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and contractor laboratories. These instruments support critical missions, where high reliability and low measurement uncertainty are essential. A growing number of these mass spectrometers are significantly older than their original design life. The reality is that manufacturers have declared many of the instrument models obsolete, with direct replacement parts and service no longer available. Some of these obsolete models do not have a next generation, commercially available replacement. Today's budget conscious economy demands for the use of creative funds management. Therefore, the ability to refurbish (or upgrade) these valuable analytical tools and extending their useful life is a cost effective option. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has the proven expertise to breathe new life into older mass spectrometers, at a significant cost savings compared to the purchase and installation of new instruments. A twenty-seven year old Finnigan MAT-261{trademark} Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS), located at the SRS F/H Area Production Support Laboratory, has been successfully refurbished. Engineers from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) fabricated and installed the new electronics. These engineers also provide continued instrument maintenance services. With electronic component drawings being DOE Property, other DOE Complex laboratories have the option to extend the life of their aged Mass Spectrometers.

  11. Renormalisation Group Corrections to Neutrino Mass Sum Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehrlein, Julia; Spinrath, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino mass sum rules are an important class of predictions in flavour models relating the Majorana phases to the neutrino masses. This leads, for instance, to enormous restrictions on the effective mass as probed in experiments on neutrinoless double beta decay. While up to now these sum rules have in practically all cases been taken to hold exactly, we will go here beyond that. After a discussion of the types of corrections that could possibly appear and elucidating on the theory behind neutrino mass sum rules, we estimate and explicitly compute the impact of radiative corrections, as these appear in general and thus hold for whole groups of models. We discuss all neutrino mass sum rules currently present in the literature, which together have realisations in more than 50 explicit neutrino flavour models. We find that, while the effect of the renormalisation group running can be visible, the qualitative features do not change. This finding strongly backs up the solidity of the predictions derived in the l...

  12. ORIGIN OF THE DENSE CORE MASS FUNCTION IN CONTRACTING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2013-02-20

    Mass functions of starless dense cores (CMFs) may arise from contraction and dispersal of core-forming filaments. In an illustrative model, a filament contracts radially by self-gravity, increasing the mass of its cores. During this contraction, FUV photoevaporation and ablation by shocks and winds disperse filament gas and limit core growth. The stopping times of core growth are described by a waiting-time distribution. The initial filament column density profile and the resulting CMF each match recent Herschel observations in detail. Then low-mass cores have short growth ages and arise from the innermost filament gas, while massive cores have long growth ages and draw from more extended filament gas. The model fits the initial density profile and CMF best for mean core density 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3} and filament dispersal timescale 0.5 Myr. Then the typical core mass, radius, mean column density, and contraction speed are respectively 0.8 solar masses, 0.06 pc, 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, and 0.07 km s{sup -1}, also in accord with observed values.

  13. Cool and Luminous Transients from Mass-Losing Binary Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pejcha, Ondrej; Tomida, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    We study transients produced by equatorial disk-like outflows from catastrophically mass-losing binary stars with an asymptotic velocity and energy deposition rate near the inner edge which are proportional to the binary escape velocity v_esc. As a test case, we present the first smoothed-particle radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the mass loss from the outer Lagrange point with realistic equation of state and opacities. The resulting spiral stream becomes unbound for binary mass ratios 0.06 < q < 0.8. For synchronous binaries with non-degenerate components, the spiral-stream arms merge at a radius of ~10a, where a is the binary semi-major axis, and the accompanying shock thermalizes 10-20% of the kinetic power of the outflow. The mass-losing binary outflows produce luminosities proportional to the mass loss rate and v_esc, reaching up to ~10^6 L_Sun. The effective temperatures depend primarily on v_esc and span 500 < T_eff < 6000 K. Dust readily forms in the outflow, potentially in a catast...

  14. Review of technical literature and trends related to automobile mass-reduction technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2010-01-01

    optimization including integration, parts consolidation, advanced materialoptimization designs that incorporate component-level mass reduction, a diverse mix of materials,materials, processes, and components for mass reduction. Existing mass-optimization

  15. Z' Bosons, the NuTeV Anomaly, and the Higgs Boson Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanowitz, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    NuTeV Anomaly, and the Higgs Boson Mass Michael S. Chanowitzpredicted value of the Higgs boson mass, from ? 60 to ? 120from an increase in the Higgs boson mass. There is a vast

  16. Mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet from 1958 to 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rignot, E; Rignot, E; Box, JE; Burgess, E; Hanna, E

    2008-01-01

    ice sheet surface mass balance varia- bility (1988 – 2004)5 L20502 RIGNOT ET AL. : MASS BALANCE GREENLAND 1958 – 20072005), Runoff and mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet:

  17. The supernova progenitor mass distributions of M31 and M33: further evidence for an upper mass limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Weisz, Daniel R. [University of California Observatories, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan [Box 351580, The University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Murphy, Jeremiah W. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: zgjennin@ucsc.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry to measure star formation histories, we age-date the stellar populations surrounding supernova remnants (SNRs) in M31 and M33. We then apply stellar evolution models to the ages to infer the corresponding masses for their supernova progenitor stars. We analyze 33 M33 SNR progenitors and 29 M31 SNR progenitors in this work. We then combine these measurements with 53 previously published M31 SNR progenitor measurements to bring our total number of progenitor mass estimates to 115. To quantify the mass distributions, we fit power laws of the form dN/dM?M {sup –?}. Our new larger sample of M31 progenitors follows a distribution with ?=4.4{sub ?0.4}{sup +0.4}, and the M33 sample follows a distribution with ?=3.8{sub ?0.5}{sup +0.4}. Thus both samples are consistent within the uncertainties, and the full sample across both galaxies gives ?=4.2{sub ?0.3}{sup +0.3}. Both the individual and full distributions display a paucity of massive stars when compared to a Salpeter initial mass function, which we would expect to observe if all massive stars exploded as SN that leave behind observable SNR. If we instead fix ? = 2.35 and treat the maximum mass as a free parameter, we find M {sub max} ? 35-45 M {sub ?}, indicative of a potential maximum cutoff mass for SN production. Our results suggest that either SNR surveys are biased against finding objects in the youngest (<10 Myr old) regions, or the highest mass stars do not produce SNe.

  18. Sensitivity analysis of GSI based mechanical characterization of rock mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ván, P

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the rock mechanical and rock engineering designs and calculations are frequently based on Geological Strength Index (GSI) method, because it is the only system that provides a complete set of mechanical properties for design purpose. Both the failure criteria and the deformation moduli of the rock mass can be calculated with GSI based equations, which consists of the disturbance factor, as well. The aim of this paper is the sensitivity analysis of GSI and disturbance factor dependent equations that characterize the mechanical properties of rock masses. The survey of the GSI system is not our purpose. The results show that the rock mass strength calculated by the Hoek-Brown failure criteria and both the Hoek-Diederichs and modified Hoek-Diederichs deformation moduli are highly sensitive to changes of both the GSI and the D factor, hence their exact determination is important for the rock engineering design.

  19. Debye mass at the QCD transition in the PNJL model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jankowski, J; Kaczmarek, O

    2015-01-01

    We consider colour-electric screening as expressed by the quark contribution to the Debye mass calculated in a PNJL model with emphasis on confining and chiral symmetry breaking effects. We observe that the screening mass is entirely determined by the nonperturbative quark distribution function and temperature dependent QCD running coupling. The role of the gluon background (Polyakov loop) is to provide strong suppression of the number of charge carriers below the transition temperature, as an effect of confinement, while the temperature dependent dynamical quark mass contributes additional suppression, as an effect of chiral symmetry breaking. An alternative derivation of this result from a modified kinetic theory is given, which allows for a slight generalization and explicit contact with perturbative QCD. This gives the possibility to gain insights into the colour screening mechanism in the region near the QCD pseudocritical temperature and to provide a guideline for the interpretation of lattice QCD data.

  20. Gravity Effects on Neutrino Masses in Split Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Aurelio Diaz; Benjamin Koch; Boris Panes

    2009-06-26

    The mass differences and mixing angles of neutrinos can neither be explained by R-Parity violating split supersymmetry nor by flavor blind quantum gravity alone. It is shown that combining both effects leads, within the allowed parameter range, to good agreement with the experimental results. The atmospheric mass is generated by supersymmetry through mixing between neutrinos and neutralinos, while the solar mass is generated by gravity through flavor blind dimension five operators. Maximal atmospheric mixing forces the tangent squared of the solar angle to be equal to 1/2. The scale of the quantum gravity operator is predicted within a 5% error, implying that the reduced Planck scale should lie around the GUT scale. In this way, the model is very predictive and can be tested at future experiments.

  1. Apparatus for preparing a sample for mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    1994-05-10

    An apparatus is described for preparing a sample for analysis by a mass spectrometer system. The apparatus has an entry chamber and an ionization chamber separated by a skimmer. A capacitor having two space-apart electrodes followed by one or more ion-imaging lenses is disposed in the ionization chamber. The chamber is evacuated and the capacitor is charged. A valve injects a sample gas in the form of sample pulses into the entry chamber. The pulse is collimated by the skimmer and enters the ionization chamber. When the sample pulse passes through the gap between the electrodes, it discharges the capacitor and is thereby ionized. The ions are focused by the imaging lenses and enter the mass analyzer, where their mass and charge are analyzed. 1 figures.

  2. Majorana equations and the rest mass of neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Borzeszkowski, H.; Treder, H.

    1985-02-01

    As is well known, the law of parity conservation does not hold in weak interactions. This type of asymmetry created a number of theoretical problems which were solved, first of all, by a new understanding of the features of neutrinos and their role in weak interactions. These solutions were based, however, essentially on the handedness (chirality) of neutrinos which is closely related to their vanishing rest mass. The thesis of neutrinos with nonvanishing rest mass, newly considered in the literature, therefore requires a rediscussion of the early arguments concerning the relation between the neutrino theory and some weak interaction essentials. When one does this, as in the present paper, it is noted that neutrinos with rest mass lead to some difficulties, in particular to a violation of T invariance.

  3. Fourth generation quark mass limits in CKM-element space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian J. Flacco; Daniel Whiteson; Matthew Kelly

    2011-01-25

    We present a reanalysis of CDF data to extend limits on individual fourth-generation quark masses from particular flavor-mixing rates to the entire space of possible mixing values. Measurements from CDF have set individual limits on masses, $m_{b'}$ and $m_{t'}$, at the level of $335$--$385$ GeV assuming specific and favorable flavor-mixing rates. We consider the space of possible values for the mixing rates and find that the CDF data imply limits of $290$ GeV and greater over a wide range of mixing scenarios. We also analyze the limits from the perspective of a four-generation CKM matrix. We find that present experimental constraints on CKM elements do not suggest further constraints on fourth-generation quark masses.

  4. Can Holographic dark energy increase the mass of the wormhole?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Davood Momeni; Aziza Altaibayeva; Ratbay Myrzakulov

    2014-11-26

    In this work, we have studied accretion of dark energy (DE) onto Morris- Thorne wormhole with three different forms, namely, holographic dark energy, holographic Ricci dark energy and modified holographic Ricci dark energy . Considering the scale factor in power-law form we have observed that as the holographic dark energy accretes onto wormhole, the mass of the wormhole is decreasing. In the next phase we considered three parameterization schemes that are able to get hold of quintessence as well as phantom phases. Without any choice of scale factor we reconstructed Hubble parameter from conservation equation and dark energy densities and subsequently got the mass of the wormhole separately for accretion of the three dark energy candidates. It was observed that if these dark energies accrete onto the wormhole, then for quintessence stage, wormhole mass decreases up to a certain finite value and then again increases to aggressively during phantom phase of the universe.

  5. The Neutrino Mass Hierarchy from Nuclear Reactor Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilio Ciuffoli; Jarah Evslin; Xinmin Zhang

    2013-08-14

    10 years from now reactor neutrino experiments will attempt to determine which neutrino mass eigenstate is the most massive. In this letter we present the results of more than seven million detailed simulations of such experiments, studying the dependence of the probability of successfully determining the mass hierarchy upon the analysis method, the neutrino mass matrix parameters, reactor flux models, geoneutrinos and, in particular, combinations of baselines. We show that a recently reported spurious dependence of the data analysis upon the high energy tail of the reactor spectrum can be removed by using a weighted Fourier transform. We determine the optimal baselines and corresponding detector locations. For most values of the CP-violating, leptonic Dirac phase delta, a degeneracy prevents NOvA and T2K from determining either delta or the hierarchy. We determine the confidence with which a reactor experiment can determine the hierarchy, breaking the degeneracy.

  6. Evidence for neutrino mass: A decade of discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2004-12-08

    Neutrino mass and mixing are amongst the major discoveries of recent years. From the observation of flavor change in solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments to the measurements of neutrino mixing with terrestrial neutrinos, recent experiments have provided consistent and compelling evidence for the mixing of massive neutrinos. The discoveries at Super-Kamiokande, SNO, and KamLAND have solved the long-standing solar neutrino problem and demand that we make the first significant revision of the Standard Model in decades. Searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay probe the particle nature of neutrinos and continue to place limits on the effective mass of the neutrino. Possible signs of neutrinoless double-beta decay will stimulate neutrino mass searches in the next decade and beyond. I review the recent discoveries in neutrino physics and the current evidence for massive neutrinos.

  7. An upper limit on electron antineutrino mass from Troitsk experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Aseev; A. I. Belesev; A. I. Berlev; E. V. Geraskin; A. A. Golubev; N. A. Likhovid; V. M. Lobashev; A. A. Nozik; V. S. Pantuev; V. I. Parfenov; A. K. Skasyrskaya; F. V. Tkachov; S. V. Zadorozhny

    2011-12-13

    An electron antineutrino mass has been measured in tritium beta-decay in the "Troitsk nu-mass" experiment. The setup consists of a windowless gaseous tritium source and an electrostatic electron spectrometer. The whole data set acquired from 1994 to 2004 was reanalysed. A thorough selection of data with the reliable experimental conditions has been performed. We checked every known systematic effect and got the following experimental estimate for neutrino mass squared m_{nu}^{2}=-0.67+/- 2.53 {eV}^{2}. This gives an experimental upper sensitivity limit of m_{nu}<2.2 eV and upper limit estimates m_{nu}<2.12 eV, 95% C.L. for Bayesian statistics and m_{nu}<2.05 eV, 95% C.L. for the Feldman and Cousins approach.

  8. Measurements of the top quark mass at the tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Brandt; for the CDF Collaboration; for the D0 Collaboration

    2012-04-04

    The mass of the top quark (\\mtop) is a fundamental parameter of the standard model (SM). Currently, its most precise measurements are performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar p$ collider at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt s=1.96 \\TeV$. We review the most recent of those measurements, performed on data samples of up to 8.7 \\fb\\ of integrated luminosity. The Tevatron combination using up to 5.8 fb$^{-1}$ of data results in a preliminary world average top quark mass of $m_{\\rm top} = 173.2 \\pm 0.9$ GeV. This corresponds to a relative precision of about 0.54%. We conclude with an outlook of anticipated precision the final measurement of \\mtop at the Tevatron.

  9. Magnetic and electric screening masses from Polyakov-loop correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Maezawa; S. Aoki; S. Ejiri; T. Hatsuda; N. Ishii; K. Kanaya; N. Ukita; T. Umeda

    2008-11-04

    Screening properties of the quark gluon plasma are studied from Polyakov-loop correlation in lattice QCD simulations with two flavors of improved Wilson quarks at temperatures $T/\\Tpc \\simeq 1$--4 where $\\Tpc$ is the pseudocritical temperature. Using the Euclidean-time reflection symmetry and the charge conjugation symmetry, we introduce various types of Polyakov-loop correlation functions and extract screening masses in magnetic and electric sectors. We find that the temperature dependence of the screening masses are well described by the weak coupling expansion. We also find that a ratio of the screening masses in the electric sector to the magnetic sector shows qualitative agreement with a prediction from the dimensionally-reduced effective field theory and the N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at $1.3 < T/\\Tpc < 3$.

  10. Neutrinoless double {beta}-decay and neutrino mass hierarchies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilenky, S. M. [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Simkovic, Fedor [Institute fuer Theoretische Physik der Universitaet Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    In the framework of the seesaw mechanism the normal hierarchy is favorable for the neutrino mass spectrum. For this spectrum we present a detailed calculation of the half-lives of neutrinoless double {beta}-decay for several nuclei of experimental interest. The half-lives are evaluated by considering the most comprehensive nuclear matrix elements, which were obtained within the renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation by the Bratislava-Caltech-Tuebingen group. The dependence of the half-lives on sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 13} and the lightest neutrino mass is studied. We present also the results of the calculations of the half-lives of neutrinoless double {beta}-decay in the case of the inverted hierarchy of neutrino masses.

  11. Neutrino Mixing and Masses from a Minimum Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Alonso; M. B. Gavela; G. Isidori; L. Maiani

    2013-10-24

    We analyze the structure of quark and lepton mass matrices under the hypothesis that they are determined from a minimum principle applied to a generic potential invariant under the $\\left[SU(3)\\right]^5\\otimes \\mathcal O(3)$ flavor symmetry, acting on Standard Model fermions and right-handed neutrinos. Unlike the quark case, we show that hierarchical masses for charged leptons are naturally accompanied by degenerate Majorana neutrinos with one mixing angle close to maximal, a second potentially large, a third one necessarily small, and one maximal relative Majorana phase. Adding small perturbations the predicted structure for the neutrino mass matrix is in excellent agreement with present observations and could be tested in the near future via neutrino-less double beta decay and cosmological measurements. The generalization of these results to arbitrary sew-saw models is also discussed.

  12. Measurements of the top quark mass at the tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    The mass of the top quark (\\mtop) is a fundamental parameter of the standard model (SM). Currently, its most precise measurements are performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar p$ collider at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt s=1.96 \\TeV$. We review the most recent of those measurements, performed on data samples of up to 8.7 \\fb\\ of integrated luminosity. The Tevatron combination using up to 5.8 fb$^{-1}$ of data results in a preliminary world average top quark mass of $m_{\\rm top} = 173.2 \\pm 0.9$ GeV. This corresponds to a relative precision of about 0.54%. We conclude with an outlook of anticipated precision the final measurement of \\mtop at the Tevatron.

  13. Influence of current mass on the spatially inhomogeneous chiral condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinji Maedan

    2009-12-18

    It is known that, in the chiral limit, spatially inhomogeneous chiral condensate occurs in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model at finite density within a mean-field approximation. We study here how an introduction of current quark mass affects the ground state with the spatially inhomogeneous chiral condensate. Numerical calculations show that, even if the current quark mass is introduced, the spatially inhomogeneous chiral condensate can take place. In order to obtain the ground state, the thermodynamic potential is calculated with a mean-field approximation. The influence of finite current mass on the thermodynamic potential consists of following two parts. One is a part coming from the field energy of the condensate, which favors inhomogeneous chiral condensate. The other is a part coming from the Dirac sea and the Fermi sea, which favors homogeneous chiral condensate. We also find that when the spatially inhomogeneous chiral condensate occurs, the baryon number density becomes spatially inhomogeneous.

  14. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  15. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  16. Mass as a form of Energy in a simple example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dib, Claudio O

    2015-01-01

    A major consequence of special relativity, expressed in the relation $E_0 = m c^2$, is that the total energy content of an object at rest, including its thermal motion and binding energy among its constituents, is a measure of its inertia, i.e. its mass. This relation was first stated by Einstein. He showed that, in order to be consistent with the principles of special relativity, there must be a loss of inertia in a block that emits two pulses of electromagnetic radiation. A pedagogical difficulty with this example is that radiation is a purely relativistic phenomenon, and so the connection with the examples one learns in introductory Mechanics courses is not simple. Here we use a more familiar example of masses and springs, where the non-relativistic limit can be easily found and where the potential energy is clearly shown to be part of the mass of the bound system.

  17. Momentum dependent quark mass in two-point correlators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Holdom; Randy Lewis

    1995-04-26

    A momentum dependent quark mass may be incorporated into a quark model in a manner consistent with dynamically broken chiral symmetry. We use this to study the high $Q^2$ behavior of the vector, axialvector, scalar and pseudoscalar two-point correlation functions. Expanding the results to order $1/Q^6$, we show the correspondence between the dynamical quark mass and the vacuum condensates which appear in the operator product expansion of QCD. We recover the correct leading logarithmic $Q^2$ dependence of the various terms in the OPE, but we also find substantial subleading corrections which are numerically huge in a specific case. We conclude by using the vector minus axialvector correlator to estimate the $\\pi^+ - \\pi^0$ electromagnetic mass difference.

  18. The isobaric multiplet mass equation for A?71 revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Yi Hua; Blank, Bertram; Smirnova, Nadezda A.; Bueb, Jean Bernard; Antony, Maria Susai

    2013-11-15

    Accurate mass determination of short-lived nuclides by Penning-trap spectrometers and progress in the spectroscopy of proton-rich nuclei have triggered renewed interest in the isobaric multiplet mass equation (IMME). The energy levels of the members of T=1/2,1,3/2, and 2 multiplets and the coefficients of the IMME are tabulated for A?71. The new compilation is based on the most recent mass evaluation (AME2011) and it includes the experimental results on energies of the states evaluated up to end of 2011. Taking into account the error bars, a significant deviation from the quadratic form of the IMME for the A=9,35 quartets and the A=32 quintet is observed.

  19. Mass measurements near the Z = N line with JYFLTRAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kankainen, Anu; Collaboration: JYFLTRAP Collaboration

    2011-11-30

    Masses of nuclides involved in astrophysical rp and {nu}p processes have to be known precisely in order to model these processes reliably. Mass excesses for 90 ground state and 8 isomeric states of neutron-deficient nuclides have been determined with a precision of better than 10 keV with the JYFLTRAP double Penning trap mass spectrometer at the Ion-Guide Isotope Separator On-Line facility in Jyvaeskylae. Highlights of the measurements related to nuclear astrophysics are given. Some of the measured isomers, such as {sup 53}Co{sup m}, {sup 90}Tc{sup m}, and {sup 95}Pd{sup m}, and implications for the excitation energy of the 21{sup +} isomer in {sup 94}Ag are briefly discussed.

  20. Atmospheric pressure plasma analysis by modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aranda Gonzalvo, Y.; Whitmore, T.D.; Rees, J.A.; Seymour, D.L.; Stoffels, E.

    2006-05-15

    Fractional number density measurements for a rf plasma 'needle' operating at atmospheric pressure have been obtained using a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) system designed for diagnostics of atmospheric plasmas. The MBMS system comprises three differentially pumped stages and a mass/energy analyzer and includes an automated beam-to-background measurement facility in the form of a software-controlled chopper mechanism. The automation of the beam modulation allows the neutral components in the plasma to be rapidly and accurately measured using the mass spectrometer by threshold ionization techniques. Data are reported for plasma generated by a needle plasma source operated using a helium/air mixture. In particular, data for the conversion of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen into nitric oxide are discussed with reference to its significance for medical applications such as disinfecting wounds and dental cavities and for microsurgery.

  1. ASTROMETRIC MASSES OF 26 ASTEROIDS AND OBSERVATIONS ON ASTEROID POROSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, James [James Cook University, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Townsville, QLD 4811 (Australia); Chesley, Steven R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Matson, Robert D., E-mail: jimbaer1@earthlink.net, E-mail: steve.chesley@jpl.nasa.gov [Science Applications International Corporation, 3030 Old Ranch Pkwy., Ste. 250, Seal Beach, CA 90740 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    As an application of our recent observational error model, we present the astrometric masses of 26 main-belt asteroids. We also present an integrated ephemeris of 300 large asteroids, which was used in the mass determination algorithm to model significant perturbations from the rest of the main belt. After combining our mass estimates with those of other authors, we study the bulk porosities of over 50 main-belt asteroids and observe that asteroids as large as 300 km in diameter may be loose aggregates. This finding may place specific constraints on models of main-belt collisional evolution. Additionally, we observe that C-group asteroids tend to have significantly higher macroporosity than S-group asteroids.

  2. Seismic evolution of low/intermediate mass PMS stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. G. Pinheiro

    2007-12-05

    This article presents a study of the evolution of the internal structure and seismic properties expected for low/intermediate mass Pre-Main Sequence (PMS) stars. Seismic and non-seismic properties of PMS stars were analysed. This was done using 0.8 to 4.4M$_\\odot$ stellar models at stages ranging from the end of the Hayashi track up to the Zero-Age Main-Sequence (ZAMS). This research concludes that, for intermediate-mass stars (M$>$1.3M$_\\odot$), diagrams comparing the effective temperature ($T_{eff}$) against the small separation can provide an alternative to Christensen-Dalsgaard (C-D) diagrams. The impact of the metal abundance of intermediate mass stars (2.5-4.4M$_\\odot$) has over their seismic properties is also evaluated.

  3. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2013-12-03

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  4. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  5. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2014-05-13

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  6. Symmetry Energy as a Function of Density and Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawel Danielewicz; Jenny Lee

    2007-08-21

    Energy in nuclear matter is, in practice, completely characterized at different densities and asymmetries, when the density dependencies of symmetry energy and of energy of symmetric matter are specified. The density dependence of the symmetry energy at subnormal densities produces mass dependence of nuclear symmetry coefficient and, thus, can be constrained by that latter dependence. We deduce values of the mass dependent symmetry coefficients, by using excitation energies to isobaric analog states. The coefficient systematic, for intermediate and high masses, is well described in terms of the symmetry coefficient values of a_a^V=(31.5-33.5) MeV for the volume coefficient and a_a^S=(9-12) MeV for the surface coefficient. These two further correspond to the parameter values describing density dependence of symmetry energy, of L~95 MeV and K_{sym}~25 MeV.

  7. Evolution of Low-Mass Helium Stars in Semidetached Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. R. Yungelson

    2008-06-17

    We present results of a systematic investigation of the evolution of low-mass (0.35, 0.40, and 0.65 solar mass) helium donors in semidetached binaries with accretors - white dwarfs. In the initial models of evolutionary sequences abundance of helium in the center is between $\\simeq 0.1$ and 0.98. Results of computations may be applied to the study of the origin and evolutionary state of AM CVn stars. It is shown that the minimum orbital periods of the systems only weakly depend on the total mass of the system and evolutionary state of the donor at RLOF and are equal to 9-11 min. The scatter in the mass-exchange rates at a given orbital period in the range between period minimum and about 40 min. does not exceed $\\sim 2.5$. At orbital periods exceeding about 20 min. mass-losing stars are weakly degenerate homogeneous cooling objects and abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne in the matter lost by them depend on the extent of He-depletion at RLOF. For the systems which are currently considered as the most probable model candidates for AM CVn stars with helium donors these abundances are, approximately, Y$>$0.4, X_C$<$0.3, X_O$<$0.25, X_N$<$0.005. At orbital periods greater than about 40 min. the timescale of mass-loss begins to exceed thermal time-scale of the donors, the latter begin to contract, they become more degenerate and, apparently, "white-dwarf" and "helium-star" populations of AM CVn stars merge.

  8. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunka, Deborah E; Austin, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS)The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.3 AcronymsIMSion mobility spectrometryMAAMaterial Access AreaMSmass spectrometryoaTOForthogonal acceleration time-of-flightTOFtime-of-flight4

  9. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunka Deborah Elaine; Austin, Daniel E.

    2005-07-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.

  10. NUCLEOSYNTHETIC CONSTRAINTS ON THE MASS OF THE HEAVIEST SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Justin M.; Woosley, S. E., E-mail: jumbrown@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We explore the sensitivity of nucleosynthesis in massive stars to the truncation of supernova explosions above a certain mass. It is assumed that stars of all masses contribute to nucleosynthesis by their pre-explosive winds, but above a certain limiting main sequence mass, M{sub BH}, the presupernova star becomes a black hole and ejects nothing more. The solar abundances from oxygen to atomic mass 90 are fit quite well assuming no cutoff at all, i.e., by assuming all stars up to 120 M{sub Sun} make successful supernovae. Little degradation in the fit occurs if M{sub BH} is reduced to 25 M{sub Sun }. If this limit is reduced further however, the nucleosynthesis of the s-process declines precipitously and the production of species made in the winds, e.g., carbon, becomes unacceptably large compared with elements made in the explosion, e.g., silicon and oxygen. By varying uncertain physics, especially the mass loss rate for massive stars and the rate for the {sup 22}Ne({alpha}, n){sup 25}Mg reaction rate, acceptable nucleosynthesis might still be achieved with a cutoff as low as 18 M{sub Sun }. This would require, however, a supernova frequency three times greater than the fiducial value obtained when all stars explode in order to produce the required {sup 16}O. The effects of varying M{sub BH} on the nucleosynthesis of {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al, the production of helium as measured by {Delta}Y/{Delta}Z, and the average masses of compact remnants are also examined.

  11. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01

    hydro facility or demand response aggregator to provide theOperator Demand Response Mass-Market Customers Aggregator ofDemand Response Resources Mass Market Customers Aggregator

  12. Identifying and tracking evolving water masses in optically complex aquatic environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palacios, Sherry Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Radiative Transfer in Natural Waters, Academic, New York.objective detection of water masses on continental shelves.objective detection of water masses on continental shelves,

  13. Mass-radius relations and core-envelope decompositions of super...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hsub 2-He envelope masses, and associated envelope entropies. For planets in the super-Earthsub-Neptune regime for which both radius and mass are measured, we estimate...

  14. The Low-mass Stellar Population in L1641: Evidence for Environmental Dependence of the Stellar Initial Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Allen, Lori; Hernandez, Jesus; Megeath, S T; Mosby, Gregory; Tobin, John J; Espaillat, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    We present results from an optical photometric and spectroscopic survey of the young stellar population in L1641, the low-density star-forming region of the Orion A cloud south of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). Our goal is to determine whether L1641 has a large enough low-mass population to make the known lack of high-mass stars a statistically-significant demonstration of environmental dependence of the upper mass stellar initial mass function (IMF). Our spectroscopic sample consists of IR-excess objects selected from the Spitzer/IRAC survey and non-excess objects selected from optical photometry. We have spectral confirmation of 864 members, with another 98 probable members; of the confirmed members, 406 have infrared excesses and 458 do not. Assuming the same ratio of stars with and without IR excesses in the highly-extincted regions, L1641 may contain as many as ~1600 stars down to ~0.1 solar mass, comparable within a factor of two to the the ONC. Compared to the standard models of the IMF, L1641 is defi...

  15. Unified spin gauge model and the top quark mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, J.S.R.; Farwell, R.S.

    1995-10-01

    Spin gauge models use a real Clifford algebraic structure R{sub p,q} associated with a real manifold of dimension p + q to describe the fundamental interactions of elementary particles. This review provides a comparison between those models and the standard model, indicating their similarities and differences. By contrast with the standard model, the spin gauge model based on R{sub 3,8} generates intermediate boson mass terms without the need to use the Higgs-Kibble mechanism and produces a precise prediction for the mass of the top quark. The potential of this model to account for exactly three families of fermions is considered.

  16. Light Gluino Mass and Condensate from Properties of $?$ and $?'$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar; G. T. Gabadadze

    1997-02-07

    We investigate whether known properties of the $\\eta'$ meson are consistent with its being the Goldstone boson of the spontaneously broken anomaly-free R symmetry required in the light gluino scenario. We fit the masses and $2\\gamma$ decays of the $\\eta$ and $\\eta'$ mesons, and also their production in radiative $J/\\psi$ decays. We find that the $\\eta-\\eta'$ system is well-described in the light gluino scenario, if $m_\\lambda\\simeq (84-144) MeV$ and $ \\simeq -(0.15-0.36) GeV^3$. These values are in the range expected when the gluino gets its mass entirely from radiative corrections.

  17. Energy bursts from deconfinement in high-mass twin stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Castillo, D E; Blaschke, D; Haensel, P; Zdunik, L

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the energy reservoir available in the deconfinement phase transition induced collapse of a neutron star to its hybrid star mass twin on the "third family" branch, using a recent equation of state of dense matter. The available energy corresponding to the mass-energy difference between configurations is comparable with energies of the most violent astrophysical burst processes. An observational outcome of such a dynamical transition might be fast radio bursts, specifically a recent example of a FRB with a double-peak structure in its light curve.

  18. Site-specific analysis of glycosylated proteins using mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irungu, Janet W.

    2008-01-16

    in Telsa, m in kilograms, r in meters, q in Coulombs, and v in meters per second. 25, 28, 30 As shown from equation 2, the cyclotron frequency is inversely proportional to the mass-to-charge ratio (m/q or m/z). All ions of the same m/q rotate... in Telsa, m in kilograms, r in meters, q in Coulombs, and v in meters per second. 25, 28, 30 As shown from equation 2, the cyclotron frequency is inversely proportional to the mass-to-charge ratio (m/q or m/z). All ions of the same m/q rotate...

  19. Dynamics of a global string with large Higgs boson mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Charmousis; B. Boisseau; B. Linet

    1998-01-12

    We consider a self-gravitating string generated by a global vortex solution in general relativity. We investigate the Einstein and field equations of a global vortex in the region of its central line and at a distance from the centre of the order of the inverse of its Higgs boson mass. By combining the two we establish by a limiting process of large Higgs mass the dynamics of a self-gravitating global string. Under our assumptions the presence of gravitation restricts the world sheet of the global string to be totally geodesic.

  20. Low-mass dielectrons from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Kozlov

    2006-11-14

    The production of the low-mass dielectrons is considered to be a powerful tool to study the properties of the hot and dense matter created in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We present the preliminary results on the first measurements of the low-mass dielectron continuum in Au+Au collisions and the phi meson production measured in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 200 GeV performed by the PHENIX experiment.