National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for u-098 isc bind

  1. V-172: ISC BIND RUNTIME_CHECK Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ISC BIND RUNTIMECHECK Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service Against Recursive Resolvers V-172: ISC BIND RUNTIMECHECK Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service Against Recursive...

  2. U-039: ISC Update: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote server can cause the target connected client to crash. Organizations across the Internet are reporting crashes interrupting service on BIND 9 nameservers performing recursive queries. Affected servers crash after logging an error in query.c with the following message: "INSIST(! dns_rdataset_isassociated(sigrdataset))" Multiple versions are reported as being affected, including all currently supported release versions of ISC BIND 9. ISC is actively investigating the root cause and working to produce patches which avoid the crash.

  3. U-183: ISC BIND DNS Resource Records Handling Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This problem was uncovered while testing with experimental DNS record types. It is possible to add records to BIND with null (zero length) rdata fields.

  4. V-172: ISC BIND RUNTIME_CHECK Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service Against Recursive Resolvers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A defect exists which allows an attacker to crash a BIND 9 recursive resolver with a RUNTIME_CHECK error in resolver.c

  5. T-662: ISC BIND Packet Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Deny Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A defect in the affected BIND 9 versions allows an attacker to remotely cause the "named" process to exit using a specially crafted packet. This defect affects both recursive and authoritative servers. The code location of the defect makes it impossible to protect BIND using ACLs configured within named.conf or by disabling any features at compile-time or run-time. A remote attacker would need to be able to send a specially crafted packet directly to a server running a vulnerable version of BIND. There is also the potential for an indirect attack via malware that is inadvertently installed and run, where infected machines have direct access to an organization's nameservers.

  6. NERSC at ISC16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at ISC16 NERSC at ISC16 June 13, 2016 by Rebecca Hartman-Baker Please join NERSC for the following events at ISC: NERSC has fielded its first-ever Student Cluster Competition team. The team, sponsored by Cray and Intel, consists of six former or current NERSC interns. Please visit the team on the showroom floor at Booth #1450, and after the competition starts, show your support by voting for them for the fan favorite at:

  7. IXPUG ISC15 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training » IXPUG ISC15 Documents IXPUG ISC15 Documents Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Source | Category BoF: IXPUG ISC15 BoF Introduction July 15, 2015 | Author(s): Thomas Steinke, ZIB | Download File: 1Welcome.pdf | pdf | 98 KB BoF: How Effective is SIMD in Case of Divergent Code Execution? Author(s): Florian Wende | Download File: ISC15-IXPUG-BoF-ZIB-Wende.pdf | pdf | 744 KB Workshop: Language Impact on Vectorization: Vector Programming in Fortran Author(s):

  8. IXPUG ISC15 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Effective is SIMD in Case of Divergent Code Execution? Author(s): Florian Wende | Download File: ISC15-IXPUG-BoF-ZIB-Wende.pdf | pdf | 744 KB BoF: IXPUG ISC15 BoF Introduction July 15, 2015 | Author(s): Thomas Steinke, ZIB | Download File: 1Welcome.pdf | pdf | 98 KB BoF: Performance Optimization of OpenFOAM on Xeon/Xeon Phi July 15, 2015 | Author(s): Nishant Agrawal | Download File: 2aBoF-ISC2015-OpenFOAM.pdf | pdf | 2.1 MB BoF: Preconditioning for Data Locality July 15, 2015 | Author(s):

  9. IXPUG ISC15 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IXPUG ISC15 BoF Introduction July 15, 2015 | Author(s): Thomas Steinke, ZIB | Download File: 1Welcome.pdf | pdf | 98 KB BoF: Performance Optimization of OpenFOAM on Xeon/Xeon Phi July 15, 2015 | Author(s): Nishant Agrawal | Download File: 2aBoF-ISC2015-OpenFOAM.pdf | pdf | 2.1 MB BoF: Preconditioning for Data Locality July 15, 2015 | Author(s): Luigi Iapichino | Download File: 2bISC15-BoF-Preconditioning.pdf | pdf | 1.2 MB Workshop: Language Impact on Vectorization: Vector Programming in C/C++

  10. IXPUG ISC15 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 15, 2015 | Author(s): Luigi Iapichino | Download File: 2bISC15-BoF-Preconditioning.pdf | pdf | 1.2 MB Workshop: Language Impact on Vectorization: Vector Programming in CC++ ...

  11. IXPUG ISC15 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Luigi Iapichino | Download File: 2bISC15-BoF-Preconditioning.pdf | pdf | 1.2 MB Workshop: Language Impact on Vectorization: Vector Programming in CC++ July 16, 2015 | Author(s):...

  12. IXPUG ISC15 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processor | Download File: KNL-ISC-2015-Workshop-Keynote.pdf | pdf | 1 MB Workshop: Language Impact on Vectorization: Vector Programming in CC++ July 16, 2015 | Author(s):...

  13. IXPUG ISC15 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intel® Xeon Phi(tm) Processor "Knights Landing" Architectural Overview Author(s): Avinash Sodani, Senior Principal Engineer, Intel Corporation Chief Architect, Knights Landing Processor | Download File: KNL-ISC-2015-Workshop-Keynote.pdf | pdf | 1 MB BoF: How Effective is SIMD in Case of Divergent Code Execution? Author(s): Florian Wende | Download File: ISC15-IXPUG-BoF-ZIB-Wende.pdf | pdf | 744 KB Workshop: Language Impact on Vectorization: Vector Programming in Fortran Author(s):

  14. ISC16 IXPUG Performance Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ISC16 IXPUG Performance Workshop ISC16 IXPUG Performance Workshop Materials from NERSC presentations at the ISC Workshop "Application Performance on Intel Xeon Phi - Being Prepared for KNL and Beyond" presented by the Intel Xeon Phi Users Group. Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Source | Category Applying the Roofline Performance Model to the Intel Xeon Phi Knights Landing Processor June 23, 2016 | Author(s): Douglas Doerfler, Jack Deslippe, Samuel Williams,

  15. IXPUG ISC15 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Language Impact on Vectorization: Vector Programming in C/C++ July 16, 2015 | Author(s): Guilherme Amadio | Download File: Language-Impact-on-Vectorization-Vector-Programming-in-C++.pdf | pdf | 924 KB Workshop: Coding for the Future:Knights Landing and beyond July 16, 2015 | Author(s): CJ Newburn, Intel SW/HW HPC Architect, .Community Builder | Download File: Preparing-Software-for-KNL-ISC15-IXPUG-Keynote.pdf | pdf | 1.1 MB Workshop: Performance Optimization of OpenFOAM on Xeon/Xeon Phi July 16,

  16. ISC2005v2.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputing: The Top Three Breakthroughs of the Last 20 Years and the Top Three Challenges for the Next 20 Years Horst Simon Associate Laboratory Director Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ISC 2005 Heidelberg June 22, 2005 Signpost System 1985 Cray-2 * 244 MHz (4.1 nsec) * 4 processors * 1.95 Gflop/s peak * 2 GB memory (256 MW) * 1.2 Gflop/s LINPACK R_max * 1.6 m 2 floor space * 0.2 MW power Signpost System in 2005 IBM BG/L @ LLNL * 700 MHz (x 2.86) * 65,536 nodes (x 16,384) * 180 (360)

  17. ISC-Chicago Office Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statements (EIS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Office Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act NEPA Documents ISC-Chicago Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Oak Ridge Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Chicago Office Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements ISC-Oak Ridge Office Environmental Assessments and

  18. ISC-Oak Ridge Office Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statements (EIS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) / Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act NEPA Documents ISC-Chicago Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Oak Ridge Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Chicago Office Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements ISC-Oak Ridge Office Environmental Assessments and

  19. Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainable Communities (ISC) Address: 535 Stone Cutters Way Montpelier, Vermont 05602 USA Place: Montpelier, Vermont Zip: 05602 Website: www.iscvt.org References: http:...

  20. ISC-Chicago Office Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations | U.S. DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Science (SC) Office Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act NEPA Documents ISC-Chicago Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Oak Ridge Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Chicago Office Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements ISC-Oak Ridge Office Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information

  1. ISC-Oak Ridge Office Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations | U.S. DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Science (SC) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act NEPA Documents ISC-Chicago Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Oak Ridge Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations ISC-Chicago Office Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements ISC-Oak Ridge Office Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Contact Information Integrated

  2. Jackie Chen to give keynote address at ISC High performance conference...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at ISC High performance conference in Germany - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia ... Jackie Chen to give keynote address at ISC High performance conference in Germany Home...

  3. Integrated Support Center (ISC) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Home Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act NEPA Documents Contact Information Integrated Support Center Roxanne ...

  4. ISC Conventional Reading Rooms | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ISC Conventional Reading Rooms Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act Advisory Exemptions How to Submit a FOIA Request Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Electronic Reading Room ISC Conventional Reading Rooms Reference Links Privacy Act NEPA Documents Contact Information Integrated Support Center Roxanne Purucker U.S. Department of Energy 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-2110 Kenneth Tarcza U.S. Department of Energy

  5. Quantifying and Reducing Curve-Fitting Uncertainty in Isc: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campanelli, Mark; Duck, Benjamin; Emery, Keith

    2015-09-28

    Current-voltage (I-V) curve measurements of photovoltaic (PV) devices are used to determine performance parameters and to establish traceable calibration chains. Measurement standards specify localized curve fitting methods, e.g., straight-line interpolation/extrapolation of the I-V curve points near short-circuit current, Isc. By considering such fits as statistical linear regressions, uncertainties in the performance parameters are readily quantified. However, the legitimacy of such a computed uncertainty requires that the model be a valid (local) representation of the I-V curve and that the noise be sufficiently well characterized. Using more data points often has the advantage of lowering the uncertainty. However, more data points can make the uncertainty in the fit arbitrarily small, and this fit uncertainty misses the dominant residual uncertainty due to so-called model discrepancy. Using objective Bayesian linear regression for straight-line fits for Isc, we investigate an evidence-based method to automatically choose data windows of I-V points with reduced model discrepancy. We also investigate noise effects. Uncertainties, aligned with the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM), are quantified throughout.

  6. U-038: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote server can cause the target connected client to crash. Organizations across the Internet are reporting crashes interrupting service on BIND 9 nameservers performing recursive queries. Affected servers crash after logging an error in query.c with the following message: "INSIST(! dns_rdataset_isassociated(sigrdataset))" Multiple versions are reported as being affected, including all currently supported release versions of ISC BIND 9. ISC is actively investigating the root cause and working to produce patches which avoid the crash.

  7. V-007: McAfee Firewall Enterprise ISC BIND Record Handling Lockup Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    McAfee has acknowledged a vulnerability in McAfee Firewall Enterprise, which can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

  8. Jackie Chen to give keynote address at ISC High performance conference in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Germany to give keynote address at ISC High performance conference in Germany - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing

  9. A review of the new ISC-PRIME model and implications for power plant licensing in Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, S.; Garrison, M.; Sherwell, J.

    1999-07-01

    The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) manages the consolidated review of environmental, engineering, socioeconomic, cost, and need issues that new and modified power plants in Maryland must address as part of the power plant licensing process. Power plant licensing cases in Maryland have included the addition or replacement of small diesel or combustion turbine electrical generation units, or the addition of new, larger simple-cycle combustion turbine units. Air quality modeling, including an assessment of the effects of building downwash, is often a part of the licensing process. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has sponsored the development of an improved building downwash model through its PRIME (Plume Rise Model Enhancements) project, involving the design and development of algorithms intended to address deficiencies in the widely used ISCST3. EPA recently provided a version of ISC that incorporates the PRIME model (ISC-PRIME) for review and comment by the public prior to deciding on the suitability and regulatory status of ISC-PRIME. The present paper focuses on a systematic evaluation of ISC-PRIME as it relates to short stacks with exhaust characteristics similar to diesel generators and combustion turbines, using both routine hourly meteorology and synthesized meteorological data covering a wide variety of stability and wind speed combinations. The goals of the paper are two-fold: first, to understand and explain the implications of this new model for power plant licensing decisions in the State of Maryland; and second, to broaden the experience base of the potential ISC-PRIME user community with information on model performance details that are not otherwise readily available.

  10. REVIEW OF FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) FUEL EXPERIMENTS FOR STORAGE IN INTERIM STORAGE CASKS (ISC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHASTAIN, S.A.

    2005-10-24

    Appendix H, Section H.3.3.10.11 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), provides the limits to be observed for fueled components authorized for storage in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) spent fuel storage system. Currently, the authorization basis allows standard driver fuel assemblies (DFA), as described in the FSAR Chapter 17, Section 17.5.3.1, to be stored provided decay power per assembly is {le} 250 watts, post-irradiation time is four years minimum, average assembly burn-up is 150,000 MWD/MTHM maximum and the pre-irradiation enrichment is 29.3% maximum (per H.3.3.10.11). In addition, driver evaluation (DE), core characterizer assemblies (CCA), and run-to-cladding-breach (RTCB) assemblies are included based on their similarities to a standard DFA. Ident-69 pin containers with fuel pins from these DFAs can also be stored. Section H.3.3.10.11 states that fuel types outside the specification criteria above will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. There are many different types of fuel and blanket experiments that were irradiated in the FFTF which now require offload to the spent fuel storage system. Two reviews were completed for a portion of these special type fuel components to determine if placement into the Core Component Container (CCC)/Interim Storage Cask (ISC) would require any special considerations or changes to the authorization basis. Project mission priorities coupled with availability of resources and analysts prevented these evaluations from being completed as a single effort. Areas of review have included radiological accident release consequences, radiological shielding adequacy, criticality safety, thermal limits, confinement, and stress. The results of these reviews are available in WHC-SD-FF-RPT-005, Rev. 0 and 1, ''Review of FFTF Fuel Experiments for Storage at ISA'', (Reference I), which subsequently allowed a large portion of these components to be included in the authorization basis (Table H.3.3-21). The report also identified

  11. Intrinsic Radiation Source Generation with the ISC Package: Data Comparisons and Benchmarking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, Clell J. Jr.

    2012-04-26

    The characterization of radioactive emissions from unstable isotopes (intrinsic radiation) is necessary for shielding and radiological-dose calculations from radioactive materials. While most radiation transport codes, e.g., MCNP [X-5 Monte Carlo Team, 2003], provide the capability to input user prescribed source definitions, such as radioactive emissions, they do not provide the capability to calculate the correct radioactive-source definition given the material compositions. Special modifications to MCNP have been developed in the past to allow the user to specify an intrinsic source, but these modification have not been implemented into the primary source base [Estes et al., 1988]. To facilitate the description of the intrinsic radiation source from a material with a specific composition, the Intrinsic Source Constructor library (LIBISC) and MCNP Intrinsic Source Constructor (MISC) utility have been written. The combination of LIBISC and MISC will be herein referred to as the ISC package. LIBISC is a statically linkable C++ library that provides the necessary functionality to construct the intrinsic-radiation source generated by a material. Furthermore, LIBISC provides the ability use different particle-emission databases, radioactive-decay databases, and natural-abundance databases allowing the user flexibility in the specification of the source, if one database is preferred over others. LIBISC also provides functionality for aging materials and producing a thick-target bremsstrahlung photon source approximation from the electron emissions. The MISC utility links to LIBISC and facilitates the description of intrinsic-radiation sources into a format directly usable with the MCNP transport code. Through a series of input keywords and arguments the MISC user can specify the material, age the material if desired, and produce a source description of the radioactive emissions from the material in an MCNP readable format. Further details of using the MISC utility can

  12. IXPUG ISC15 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop: Language Impact on Vectorization: Vector Programming in CC++ July 16, 2015 | Author(s): Guilherme Amadio | Download File: Language-Impact-on-Vectorization-Vector-Program...

  13. IXPUG ISC15 Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Language Impact on Vectorization: Vector Programming in CC++ July 16, 2015 | Author(s): Guilherme Amadio | Download File: Language-Impact-on-Vectorization-Vector-Programming-in-C+...

  14. ISC16 IXPUG Performance Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Porting the MIMD Lattice Computation (MILC) Code to the Intel Xeon Phi Knights Landing Processor Author(s): Ruizi Li, Dhiraj Kalamkar, Ashish Jha, Steven Gottlieb, Carleton DeTar, Doug Toussaint, Balint Joo, and Douglas Doerfler | Download File: 14-NERSC-Doerfler-MILC.pdf | pdf | 395 KB Applying the Roofline Performance Model to the Intel Xeon Phi Knights Landing Processor June 23, 2016 | Author(s): Douglas Doerfler, Jack Deslippe, Samuel Williams, Leonid Oliker, Brandon Cook, Thorsten Kurth,

  15. ISC16 IXPUG Performance Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applying the Roofline Performance Model to the Intel Xeon Phi Knights Landing Processor June 23, 2016 | Author(s): Douglas Doerfler, Jack Deslippe, Samuel Williams, Leonid Oliker, Brandon Cook, Thorsten Kurth, Mathieu Lobet, Tareq Malas, Jean---Luc Vay, and Henri VincenL | Download File: 03-NERSC-Doerfler-Roofline.pdf | pdf | 597 KB High performance optimizations for nuclear physics code MFDn on KNL June 23, 2016 | Author(s): Brandon Cook, Pieter Maris, Meiyue Shao, Nathan Wichmann, Marcus

  16. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  17. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  18. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  19. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  20. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  1. How Dynein Binds to Microtubules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Dynein Binds to Microtubules How Dynein Binds to Microtubules Print Wednesday, 29 April 2009 00:00 Cytoplasmic dynein is a protein complex responsible for the transport of a large variety of cargoes, from specific RNAs and proteins to whole organelles, in a directional fashion along microtubules that serve as cellular conveyor belts. Consistent with this central role, cytoplasmic dynein is associated with a number of disease-related processes, including the transport of viruses,

  2. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  3. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  4. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  5. How Dynein Binds to Microtubules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Dynein Binds to Microtubules Print Cytoplasmic dynein is a protein complex responsible for the transport of a large variety of cargoes, from specific RNAs and proteins to whole organelles, in a directional fashion along microtubules that serve as cellular conveyor belts. Consistent with this central role, cytoplasmic dynein is associated with a number of disease-related processes, including the transport of viruses, neurodegeneration, and the mitotic checkpoint malfunctions that lead to

  6. How Dynein Binds to Microtubules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Dynein Binds to Microtubules Print Cytoplasmic dynein is a protein complex responsible for the transport of a large variety of cargoes, from specific RNAs and proteins to whole organelles, in a directional fashion along microtubules that serve as cellular conveyor belts. Consistent with this central role, cytoplasmic dynein is associated with a number of disease-related processes, including the transport of viruses, neurodegeneration, and the mitotic checkpoint malfunctions that lead to

  7. How Dynein Binds to Microtubules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Dynein Binds to Microtubules Print Cytoplasmic dynein is a protein complex responsible for the transport of a large variety of cargoes, from specific RNAs and proteins to whole organelles, in a directional fashion along microtubules that serve as cellular conveyor belts. Consistent with this central role, cytoplasmic dynein is associated with a number of disease-related processes, including the transport of viruses, neurodegeneration, and the mitotic checkpoint malfunctions that lead to

  8. How Dynein Binds to Microtubules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Dynein Binds to Microtubules Print Cytoplasmic dynein is a protein complex responsible for the transport of a large variety of cargoes, from specific RNAs and proteins to whole organelles, in a directional fashion along microtubules that serve as cellular conveyor belts. Consistent with this central role, cytoplasmic dynein is associated with a number of disease-related processes, including the transport of viruses, neurodegeneration, and the mitotic checkpoint malfunctions that lead to

  9. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  10. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  11. PRESENTED BY: IXPUG-ISC16 Workshop OpenMP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy PRESENTATION: OVERVIEW OF DOE OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) PRESENTATION: OVERVIEW OF DOE OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) A briefing to the SEAB Task Force on Technology Development for Environmental Management on the DOE Ofiice of Environmental Management. Overview of the Office of Environmental Management (2.12 MB) Overview of the Office of Environmental Management's Technology Development Program (658.68 KB) More Documents & Publications OREM

  12. ISC-Reducing Congestion through Smart Parking Management | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Case studiesexamples, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.iscvt.orgresourcesdocuments...

  13. ISC15 Workshop for Intel® Xeon Phi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop for Intel® Xeon Phi TM Processors Guilherme Amadio São Paulo State University (UNESP) Language Impact on Vectorization: Vector Programming in C/C++ Vector Programming in C/C++ - Compiler Intrinsics ● C and C++ have fundamental types such as __m128, __m256d, etc ○ These types can be used with compiler intrinsics functions ○ C++ allows one to create abstractions on top of these intrinsics to make syntax more palatable ● Example: vector cross product (source) 2 void cross(const

  14. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  15. Binding Organic Liquids - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More Like This Return to Search Binding Organic Liquids Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contact PNNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Researchers at...

  16. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saunders, G.C.

    1984-05-30

    The invention relates to a method of measuring binding assays carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also a known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The binding reactant is the same as the binding reactant present in the sample. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number and strength of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating. (LEW)

  17. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  18. Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl Complexes with Glutarimidedioxime Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl ...

  19. Coupled ion Binding and Structural Transitions Along the Transport...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    binding primes the transport domain to accept its substrate and triggers extracellular gate opening, which prevents inward domain translocation until substrate binding takes place. ...

  20. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  1. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  2. Exciton binding energy in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokutnii, S. I.

    2010-04-15

    In the adiabatic approximation in the context of the modified effective mass approach, in which the reduced exciton effective mass {mu} = {mu}(a) is a function of the radius a of the semiconductor quantum dot, an expression for the exciton binding energy E{sub ex}(a) in the quantum dot is derived. It is found that, in the CdSe and CdS quantum dots with the radii a comparable to the Bohr exciton radii a{sub ex}, the exciton binding energy E{sub ex}(a) is substantially (respectively, 7.4 and 4.5 times) higher than the exciton binding energy in the CdSe and CdS single crystals.

  3. Flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saunders, George C.

    1987-01-01

    A method of measuring the result of a binding assay that does not require separation of fluorescent smaller particles is disclosed. In a competitive binding assay the smaller fluorescent particles coated with antigen compete with antigen in the sample being analyzed for available binding sites on larger particles. In a sandwich assay, the smaller, fluorescent spheres coated with antibody attach themselves to molecules containing antigen that are attached to larger spheres coated with the same antibody. The separation of unattached, fluorescent smaller particles is made unnecessary by only counting the fluorescent events triggered by the laser of a flow cytometer when the event is caused by a particle with a light scatter measurement within a certain range corresponding to the presence of larger particles.

  4. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  5. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  6. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  7. BPA FINAL Binding Arbitration policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    BPA FINAL Binding Arbitration policy BPA FINAL Binding Arbitration policy Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) encompasses a variety of methods that parties may use to resolve disputes without litigation. Arbitration is a private, less formal process in which parties agree to submit a dispute to one or more impartial arbitrators who then render a decision or award. In non-binding arbitration a party is not required to accept the arbitrator's decision. In contrast, a decision or award in binding

  8. Coenzyme A Binding to the Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb Increases Conformational Sampling of Antibiotic Binding Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Xiaohu; Norris, Adrianne; Baudry, Jerome Y; Serpersu, Engin H

    2011-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to describe the dynamic properties of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb (AAC) in its apo and coenzyme A (CoASH) bound forms. The {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H HSQC spectra indicate a partial structural change and coupling of the CoASH binding site with another region in the protein upon the CoASH titration into the apo enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate a significant structural and dynamic variation of the long loop in the antibiotic binding domain in the form of a relatively slow (250 ns), concerted opening motion in the CoASH enzyme complex and that binding of the CoASH increases the structural flexibility of the loop, leading to an interchange between several similar equally populated conformations.

  9. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  10. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  11. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  12. Polynucleotides encoding TRF1 binding proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a novel telomere associated protein (Trf1-interacting nuclear protein 2 "Tin2") that hinders the binding of Trf1 to its specific telomere repeat sequence and mediates the formation of a Tin2-Trf1-telomeric DNA complex that limits telomerase access to the telomere. Also included are the corresponding nucleic acids that encode the Tin2 of the present invention, as well as mutants of Tin2. Methods of making, purifying and using Tin2 of the present invention are described. In addition, drug screening assays to identify drugs that mimic and/or complement the effect of Tin2 are presented.

  13. Specific albumin binding to microvascular endothelium in culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnitzer, J.E.; Carley, W.W.; Palade, G.E. )

    1988-03-01

    The specific binding of rat serum albumin (RSA) to confluent microvascular endothelial cells in culture derived from the vasculature of the rat epididymal fat pad was studied at 4{degree}C by radioassay and immunocytochemistry. Radioiodinated RSA ({sup 125}I-RSA) binding to the cells reached equilibrium at {approximately} 20 min incubation. Albumin binding was a slowly saturating function over concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 50 mg/ml. Specific RSA binding with a moderate apparent affinity constant of 1.0 mg/ml and with a maximum binding concentration of 90 ng/cm{sup 2} was immunolocalized with anti-RSA antibody to the outer (free) side of the enothelium. Scatchard analysis of the binding yielded a nonlinear binding curve with a concave-upward shape. Dissociation rate analysis supports negative cooperativity of albumin binding, but multiple binding sites may also be present. Albumin binding fulfilled many requirements for ligand specificity including saturability, reversibility, competibility, and dependence on both cell type and cell number. The results are discussed in terms of past in situ investigations on the localization of albumin binding to vascular endothelium and its effect on transendothelial molecular transport.

  14. Reflection-Based Python-C++ Bindings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Generowicz, Jacek; Lavrijsen, Wim T.L.P.; Marino, Massimo; Mato, Pere

    2004-10-14

    Python is a flexible, powerful, high-level language with excellent interactive and introspective capabilities and a very clean syntax. As such, it can be a very effective tool for driving physics analysis. Python is designed to be extensible in low-level C-like languages, and its use as a scientific steering language has become quite widespread. To this end, existing and custom-written C or C++ libraries are bound to the Python environment as so-called extension modules. A number of tools for easing the process of creating such bindings exist, such as SWIG and Boost. Python. Yet, the process still requires a considerable amount of effort and expertise. The C++ language has few built-in introspective capabilities, but tools such as LCGDict and CINT add this by providing so-called dictionaries: libraries that contain information about the names, entry points, argument types, etc. of other libraries. The reflection information from these dictionaries can be used for the creation of bindings and so the process can be fully automated, as dictionaries are already provided for many end-user libraries for other purposes, such as object persistency. PyLCGDict is a Python extension module that uses LCG dictionaries, as PyROOT uses CINT reflection information, to allow /cwPython users to access C++ libraries with essentially no preparation on the users' behalf. In addition, and in a similar way, PyROOT gives ROOT users access to Python libraries.

  15. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  16. Method And Apparatus For Detecting Chemical Binding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2005-02-22

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  17. Method and apparatus for detecting chemical binding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2007-07-10

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  18. Hardware device to physical structure binding and authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Stein, David J.; Bauer, Todd M.

    2013-08-20

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a binding of the hardware device and a physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generate an internal PUF value. Binding logic is coupled to receive the internal PUF value, as well as an external PUF value associated with the physical structure, and generates a binding PUF value, which represents the binding of the hardware device and the physical structure. The cryptographic fingerprint unit also includes a cryptographic unit that uses the binding PUF value to allow a challenger to authenticate the binding.

  19. Paul D. Boyer, Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), and the Binding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Paul D. Boyer, Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), and the Binding Change Mechanism Resources with Additional Information Paul D. Boyer Courtesy of UCLA 'For Paul Boyer, the Nobel Prize ...

  20. X-ray crystallographic analysis of adipocyte fatty acid binding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray crystallographic analysis of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2) modified ... LIFE SCIENCES; ALDEHYDES; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; IN VIVO; INFLAMMATION; ...

  1. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein ...

  2. Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Print Wednesday, 09 December 2015 00:00 ...

  3. The Effects of Somatic Hypermutation on Neutralization and Binding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hypermutation on Neutralization and Binding in the PGT121 Family of Broadly Neutralizing HIV Antibodies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effects of Somatic...

  4. Fragment-Based Exploration of Binding Site Flexibility in Mycobacteriu...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Mycobacterium tuberculosis BioA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fragment-Based Exploration of Binding Site Flexibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis BioA Authors: ...

  5. Babel Fortran 2003 Binding for Structured Data Types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muszala, S; Epperly, T; Wang, N

    2008-05-02

    Babel is a tool aimed at the high-performance computing community that addresses the need for mixing programming languages (Java, Python, C, C++, Fortran 90, FORTRAN 77) in order to leverage the specific benefits of those languages. Scientific codes often rely on structured data types (structs, derived data types) to encapsulate data, and Babel has been lacking in this type of support until recently. We present a new language binding that focuses on their interoperability of C/C++ with Fortran 2003. The new binding builds on the existing Fortran 90 infrastructure by using the iso-c-binding module defined in the Fortran 2003 standard as the basis for C/C++ interoperability. We present the technical approach for the new binding and discuss our initial experiences in applying the binding in FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) to integrate C++ with legacy Fortran codes.

  6. Increased serum cortisol binding in chronic active hepatitis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orbach, O.; Schussler, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    A high serum cortisol concentration, apparently due to increased cortisol-binding globulin (CBG), was found in a patient (index case) with chronic active hepatitis (CAH). We therefore performed further studies to determine whether increased cortisol binding is generally associated with CAH. Serum samples were obtained from 15 hospitalized patients with long-term liver function test elevations but no evidence of cirrhosis, 15 normal subjects without a history of hepatitis, four healthy pregnant women, and 10 alcoholic patients with stigmata of cirrhosis. Serum cortisol binding was measured by an adaptation of a previously described charcoal uptake method. Thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) and sex hormone-binding globulin were determined by radioimmunoassays. Charcoal uptake of 125I cortisol from sera of normal subjects and additional patients with CAH revealed that increased serum cortisol binding by a saturable site, presumably CBG, was associated with CAH. Cortisol binding was significantly correlated with immunoassayable TBG, suggesting that in CAH, similar mechanisms may be responsible for increasing the serum concentrations of CBG and TBG.

  7. Product Binding Varies Dramatically between Processive and Nonprocessive Cellulase Enzymes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bu, L.; Nimlos, M. R.; Shirts, M. R.; Stahlberg, J.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-07-13

    Cellulases hydrolyze {beta}-1,4 glycosidic linkages in cellulose, which are among the most prevalent and stable bonds in Nature. Cellulases comprise many glycoside hydrolase families and exist as processive or nonprocessive enzymes. Product inhibition negatively impacts cellulase action, but experimental measurements of product-binding constants vary significantly, and there is little consensus on the importance of this phenomenon. To provide molecular level insights into cellulase product inhibition, we examine the impact of product binding on processive and nonprocessive cellulases by calculating the binding free energy of cellobiose to the product sites of catalytic domains of processive and nonprocessive enzymes from glycoside hydrolase families 6 and 7. The results suggest that cellobiose binds to processive cellulases much more strongly than nonprocessive cellulases. We also predict that the presence of a cellodextrin bound in the reactant site of the catalytic domain, which is present during enzymatic catalysis, has no effect on product binding in nonprocessive cellulases, whereas it significantly increases product binding to processive cellulases. This difference in product binding correlates with hydrogen bonding between the substrate-side ligand and the cellobiose product in processive cellulase tunnels and the additional stabilization from the longer tunnel-forming loops. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate- and product-side ligands are disrupted by water in nonprocessive cellulase clefts, and the lack of long tunnel-forming loops results in lower affinity of the product ligand. These findings provide new insights into the large discrepancies reported for binding constants for cellulases and suggest that product inhibition will vary significantly based on the amount of productive binding for processive cellulases on cellulose.

  8. Modeling of Carbohydrate Binding Modules Complexed to Cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Bomble, Y. J.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling results are presented for the interaction of two carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) with cellulose. The family 1 CBM from Trichoderma reesei's Cel7A cellulase was modeled using molecular dynamics to confirm that this protein selectively binds to the hydrophobic (100) surface of cellulose fibrils and to determine the energetics and mechanisms for locating this surface. Modeling was also conducted of binding of the family 4 CBM from the CbhA complex from Clostridium thermocellum. There is a cleft in this protein, which may accommodate a cellulose chain that is detached from crystalline cellulose. This possibility is explored using molecular dynamics.

  9. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  10. Linear Scaling of the Exciton Binding Energy versus the Band...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Linear Scaling of the Exciton Binding Energy versus the Band Gap of Two-Dimensional Materials This content will become publicly available on August 6, 2016 Prev Next Title:...

  11. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  12. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  13. Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactions in the Brain Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Print Wednesday, 09 December 2015 00:00 Most people have heard of adrenaline, the chemical that causes the "fight or flight" reaction in humans. Most people have also heard of the chemical substances cocaine and methamphetamine, which also elicit a particular (perhaps

  14. DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation Print Wednesday, 29 March 2006 00:00 The faithful inheritance of genetic information, essential for all organisms, requires accurate movement and positioning of replicated DNA to daughter cells during cell division. In cells without distinct nuclei (prokaryotes), this process, called partition or segregation, is mediated by par systems. The prototype system of

  15. Computational Biology: A Recipe for Ligand-Binding Proteins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Biology: A Recipe for Ligand-Binding Proteins Authors: Ghirlanda, G. Title: Computational Biology: A Recipe for Ligand-Binding Proteins Source: Nature Year: 2013 Volume: 501 Pages: 177-178 ABSTRACT: Cellular cross-talk, enzymatic catalysis and regulation of gene expression all depend on molecular recognition. A method that allows the design of proteins with desired recognition sites could thus be revolutionary Date of online publication: Thu, 2013-09-12 Link online:

  16. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print Wednesday, 24 September 2008 00:00 During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of

  17. MCM ring hexamerization is a prerequisite for DNA-binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Froelich, Clifford A.; Nourse, Amanda; Enemark, Eric J.

    2015-09-13

    The hexameric Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) protein complex forms a ring that unwinds DNA at the replication fork in eukaryotes and archaea. Our recent crystal structure of an archaeal MCM N-terminal domain bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) revealed ssDNA associating across tight subunit interfaces but not at the loose interfaces, indicating that DNA-binding is governed not only by the DNA-binding residues of the subunits (MCM ssDNA-binding motif, MSSB) but also by the relative orientation of the subunits. We now extend these findings to show that DNA-binding by the MCM N-terminal domain of the archaeal organism Pyrococcus furiosus occurs specifically in the hexameric oligomeric form. We show that mutants defective for hexamerization are defective in binding ssDNA despite retaining all the residues observed to interact with ssDNA in the crystal structure. One mutation that exhibits severely defective hexamerization and ssDNA-binding is at a conserved phenylalanine that aligns with the mouse Mcm4(Chaos3) mutation associated with chromosomal instability, cancer, and decreased intersubunit association.

  18. MCM ring hexamerization is a prerequisite for DNA-binding

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Froelich, Clifford A.; Nourse, Amanda; Enemark, Eric J.

    2015-09-13

    The hexameric Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) protein complex forms a ring that unwinds DNA at the replication fork in eukaryotes and archaea. Our recent crystal structure of an archaeal MCM N-terminal domain bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) revealed ssDNA associating across tight subunit interfaces but not at the loose interfaces, indicating that DNA-binding is governed not only by the DNA-binding residues of the subunits (MCM ssDNA-binding motif, MSSB) but also by the relative orientation of the subunits. We now extend these findings to show that DNA-binding by the MCM N-terminal domain of the archaeal organism Pyrococcus furiosus occurs specifically in themore » hexameric oligomeric form. We show that mutants defective for hexamerization are defective in binding ssDNA despite retaining all the residues observed to interact with ssDNA in the crystal structure. One mutation that exhibits severely defective hexamerization and ssDNA-binding is at a conserved phenylalanine that aligns with the mouse Mcm4(Chaos3) mutation associated with chromosomal instability, cancer, and decreased intersubunit association.« less

  19. The same pocket in menin binds both MLL and JUND but has opposite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Menin binds the JUN family transcription factor JUND and inhibits its transcriptional ... A recent report on the tethering of MLL1 to chromatin binding factor lens ...

  20. ISC15 The Road to Application Performance on Intel Xeon Phi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Road to Application Performance on Intel Xeon Phi July 16, 2015 SIMD: CilkPlus and OpenMP Kent Milfeld, Georg Zitzlsberger, Michael Klemm, Carlos Rosales 1 SIMD 2 Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) Data Registers Intel Cilk Plus SIMD Directive Declaration Examples OpenMP SIMD Directive Declaration SIMD loop SIMD CilkPlus OpenMP SIMD mapping Alignment & Elemental Functions Alignment Beyond Present Directives SIMD 3 Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) Data Registers Playground

  1. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of themore » substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  2. Molecular dynamics investigation of the substrate binding mechanism in carboxylesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-he

    2015-01-01

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of the substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, we further predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase rPPEs, which will help guide

  3. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of the substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  4. Orientation-dependent binding energy of graphene on palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kappes, Branden B.; Ebnonnasir, Abbas; Ciobanu, Cristian V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Program, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Program, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Kodambaka, Suneel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2013-02-04

    Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the binding strength of a graphene monolayer on Pd(111) can vary between physisorption and chemisorption depending on its orientation. By studying the interfacial charge transfer, we have identified a specific four-atom carbon cluster that is responsible for the local bonding of graphene to Pd(111). The areal density of such clusters varies with the in-plane orientation of graphene, causing the binding energy to change accordingly. Similar investigations can also apply to other metal substrates and suggests that physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of graphene may be controlled by changing its orientation.

  5. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  6. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  7. Modeling silver binding to gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janes, N.; Playle, R.C.

    1995-11-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 1--3 g) were exposed to {approximately} 1.0 {micro}M silver (Ag) ({approximately} 11 {micro}g {center_dot} L{sup {minus}1} Ag) for 2 to 3 h in synthetic soft water (Ca, Na {approximately} 300 {micro}M, pH 6.5--7.5) to which was added Ca, Na, H{sup +}, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Cl, or thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Gills were extracted and gill Ag concentrations were measured using graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The concentration of cations (Ca, Na, H{sup +}) and complexing agents (DOC, Cl, S{sub 2}O{sub 3}) needed to keep Ag off the gills were used to calculate conditional equilibrium binding constants (K) at the gills. Log K for Ag-gill binding was 10.0, with approximately 1.3 nmol Ag binding sites per fish. All experimentally determined log K values were entered into an aquatic chemistry equilibrium model, MINEQL{sup +}, to predict Ag binding at trout gills. For a series of natural waters, model-predicted gill Ag concentrations correlated well with observed gill Ag concentrations, with one exception, very hard city of Waterloo tapwater. This exception may indicate a kinetic constraint on the thermodynamic basis of the model.

  8. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  9. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  10. Inhibition Of Call-Cell Binding By Kipid Assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagy, Jon O. , Bargatze, Robert F.

    2003-12-16

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  11. Inhibition of cell-cell binding by lipid assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagy, Jon O.; Bargatze, Robert F.

    2001-05-22

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  12. Structural basis for DNA binding by replication initiator Mcm10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Eric M.; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Haworth, Justin; Greer, Briana; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin; Chazin, Walter J.; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2009-06-30

    Mcm10 is an essential eukaryotic DNA replication protein required for assembly and progression of the replication fork. The highly conserved internal domain (Mcm10-ID) has been shown to physically interact with single-stranded (ss) DNA, DNA polymerase alpha, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The crystal structure of Xenopus laevis Mcm10-ID presented here reveals a DNA binding architecture composed of an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-fold followed in tandem by a variant and highly basic zinc finger. NMR chemical shift perturbation and mutational studies of DNA binding activity in vitro reveal how Mcm10 uses this unique surface to engage ssDNA. Corresponding mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae result in increased sensitivity to replication stress, demonstrating the functional importance of DNA binding by this region of Mcm10 to replication. In addition, mapping Mcm10 mutations known to disrupt PCNA, polymerase alpha, and DNA interactions onto the crystal structure provides insight into how Mcm10 might coordinate protein and DNA binding within the replisome.

  13. A probabilistic approach to microRNA-target binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogul, Hasan; Umu, Sinan U.; Bioinformatics Program, Informatics Institute, Middle East Technical University, Cankaya TR-06800, Ankara ; Tuncel, Y. Yener; Akkaya, Mahinur S.

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} A new probabilistic model is introduced for microRNA-target binding. {yields} The new model significantly outperforms RNAHybrid and miRTif. {yields} The experiments can unveil the effects of the type and directions of distinct base pairings. -- Abstract: Elucidation of microRNA activity is a crucial step in understanding gene regulation. One key problem in this effort is how to model the pairwise interactions of microRNAs with their targets. As this interaction is strongly mediated by their sequences, it is desired to set-up a probabilistic model to explain the binding preferences between a microRNA sequence and the sequence of a putative target. To this end, we introduce a new model of microRNA-target binding, which transforms an aligned duplex to a new sequence and defines the likelihood of this sequence using a Variable Length Markov Chain. It offers a complementary representation of microRNA-mRNA pairs for microRNA target prediction tools or other probabilistic frameworks of integrative gene regulation analysis. The performance of present model is evaluated by its ability to predict microRNA-target mRNA interaction given a mature microRNA sequence and a putative mRNA binding site. In regard to classification accuracy, it outperforms two recent methods based on thermodynamic stability and sequence complementarity. The experiments can also unveil the effects of base pairing types and non-seed region in duplex formation.

  14. Workshop on gate valve pressure locking and thermal binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.J.

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of the Workshop on Gate Valve Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding was to discuss pressure locking and thermal binding issues that could lead to inoperable gate valves in both boiling water and pressurized water reactors. The goal was to foster exchange of information to develop the technical bases to understand the phenomena, identify the components that are susceptible, discuss actual events, discuss the safety significance, and illustrate known corrective actions that can prevent or limit the occurrence of pressure locking or thermal binding. The presentations were structured to cover U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff evaluation of operating experience and planned regulatory activity; industry discussions of specific events, including foreign experience, and efforts to determine causes and alleviate the affects; and valve vendor experience and recommended corrective action. The discussions indicated that identifying valves susceptible to pressure locking and thermal binding was a complex process involving knowledge of components, systems, and plant operations. The corrective action options are varied and straightforward.

  15. Photochemically enhanced binding of small molecules to the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 inhibits the binding of TNF-[alpha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Percy H.; Scherle, Peggy A.; Muckelbauer, Jodi K.; Voss, Matthew E.; Liu, Rui-qin; Thompson III, Lorin A.; Xu, Meizhong; Lo, Yvonne C.; Li, Zhong; Strzemienski, Paul; Yang, Gengjie; Falahatpishen, Nikoo; Farrow, Neil A.; Tebben, Andrew J.; Underwood, Denis; Trzaskos, James M.; Friedman, Steven M.; Newton, Robert C.; Decicco, Carl P.

    2010-03-05

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) to the type-1 TNF receptor (TNFRc1) plays an important role in inflammation. Despite the clinical success of biologics (antibodies, soluble receptors) for treating TNF-based autoimmune conditions, no potent small molecule antagonists have been developed. Our screening of chemical libraries revealed that N-alkyl 5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. After chemical optimization, we discovered IW927, which potently disrupted the binding of TNF-{alpha} to TNFRc1 (IC{sub 50} = 50 nM) and also blocked TNF-stimulated phosphorylation of I{kappa}-B in Ramos cells (IC{sub 50} = 600 nM). This compound did not bind detectably to the related cytokine receptors TNFRc2 or CD40, and did not display any cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 100 {micro}M. Detailed evaluation of this and related molecules revealed that compounds in this class are 'photochemically enhanced' inhibitors, in that they bind reversibly to the TNFRc1 with weak affinity (ca. 40-100 mM) and then covalently modify the receptor via a photochemical reaction. We obtained a crystal structure of IV703 (a close analog of IW927) bound to the TNFRc1. This structure clearly revealed that one of the aromatic rings of the inhibitor was covalently linked to the receptor through the main-chain nitrogen of Ala-62, a residue that has already been implicated in the binding of TNF-{alpha} to the TNFRc1. When combined with the fact that our inhibitors are reversible binders in light-excluded conditions, the results of the crystallography provide the basis for the rational design of nonphotoreactive inhibitors of the TNF-{alpha}-TNFRc1 interaction.

  16. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Carlsson, Boris; Forssen, Christian; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shellmore » nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.« less

  17. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Carlsson, Boris; Forssen, Christian; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3− states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shell nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.

  18. Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactions in the Brain Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Print Most people have heard of adrenaline, the chemical that causes the "fight or flight" reaction in humans. Most people have also heard of the chemical substances cocaine and methamphetamine, which also elicit a particular (perhaps desired) human response. What most people do not know is that the same receptors in the human brain recognize the natural, or

  19. Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactions in the Brain Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Print Most people have heard of adrenaline, the chemical that causes the "fight or flight" reaction in humans. Most people have also heard of the chemical substances cocaine and methamphetamine, which also elicit a particular (perhaps desired) human response. What most people do not know is that the same receptors in the human brain recognize the natural, or

  20. Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactions in the Brain Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Print Most people have heard of adrenaline, the chemical that causes the "fight or flight" reaction in humans. Most people have also heard of the chemical substances cocaine and methamphetamine, which also elicit a particular (perhaps desired) human response. What most people do not know is that the same receptors in the human brain recognize the natural, or

  1. Paul D. Boyer, Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), and the Binding Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mechanism Paul D. Boyer, Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), and the Binding Change Mechanism Resources with Additional Information Paul D. Boyer Courtesy of UCLA 'For Paul Boyer, the Nobel Prize was "an unexpected pleasure." It had been 20 years since he formulated a hypothesis to describe what he calls "the most prominent chemical reaction in the whole world." It is the process by which molecules produce ATP (adenosine triphosphate), thereby transmuting light, air, water and

  2. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions

  3. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions

  4. DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA-Binding Mechanism in Prokaryotic Partition Complex Formation Print The faithful inheritance of genetic information, essential for all organisms, requires accurate movement and positioning of replicated DNA to daughter cells during cell division. In cells without distinct nuclei (prokaryotes), this process, called partition or segregation, is mediated by par systems. The prototype system of prokaryotic partition is the Escherichia coli P1 plasmid par system, which consists of a centromere

  5. Thermodynamics of Binding Biomass to Cellulases for Renewable Fuel |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Thermodynamics of Binding Biomass to Cellulases for Renewable Fuel PI Name: Michael Crowley PI Email: michael.crowley@nrel.gov Institution: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 70 Million Year: 2013 Research Domain: Energy Technologies The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has stipulated that 30% of the gasoline demand be displaced by renewable transportation fuels from non-food feedstock by 2030. The

  6. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Konowalchuk, Thomas W

    2014-01-14

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods on inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  7. Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactions in the Brain Binding Behavior of Dopamine Transporter Key to Understanding Chemical Reactions in the Brain Print Most people have heard of adrenaline, the chemical that causes the "fight or flight" reaction in humans. Most people have also heard of the chemical substances cocaine and methamphetamine, which also elicit a particular (perhaps desired) human response. What most people do not know is that the same receptors in the human brain recognize the natural, or

  8. Reversible Acid Gas Capture Using CO2-Binding Organic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Yonker, Clement R.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

    2010-08-31

    Acid gas scrubbing technology is predominantly aqueous alkanolamine based. Of the acid gases, CO2, H2S and SO2 have been shown to be reversible, however there are serious disadvantages with corrosion and high regeneration costs. The primary scrubbing system composed of monoethanolamine is limited to 30% by weight because of the highly corrosive solution. This gravimetric limitation limits the CO2 volumetric (?108 g/L) and gravimetric capacity (?7 wt%) of the system. Furthermore the scrubbing system has a large energy penalty from pumping and heating the excess water required to dissolve the MEA bicarbonate salt. Considering the high specific heat of water (4 j/g-1K-1), low capacities and the high corrosion we set out to design a fully organic solvent that can chemically bind all acid gases i.e. CO2 as reversible alkylcarbonate ionic liquids or analogues thereof. Having a liquid acid gas carrier improves process economics because there is no need for excess solvent to pump and to heat. We have demonstrated illustrated in Figure 1, that CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) have a high CO2 solubility paired with a much lower specific heat (<1.5 J/g-1K-1) than aqueous systems. CO2BOLs are a subsection of a larger class of materials known as Binding Organic Liquids (BOLs). Our BOLs have been shown to reversibly bind and release COS, CS2, and SO2, which we denote COSBOLS, CS2BOLs and SO2BOLs. Our BOLs are highly tunable and can be designed for post or pre-combustion gas capture. The design and testing of the next generation zwitterionic CO2BOLs and SO2BOLs are presented.

  9. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions

  10. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions

  11. Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Selective Binding of Alkali Cations with Carboxylate Print During its lifetime, a cell spends a considerable fraction of its energy pumping sodium and calcium out and potassium in. This balancing process is similar to that found in the coils of the DNA double helix, where specific ions nestle and help stabilize this macromolecule. These are only two examples of selective ion interactions in biology; there are many others also vital to life. The existence of these interactions

  12. Gold Binding by Native and Chemically Modified Hops Biomasses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    López, M. Laura; Gardea-Torresdey, J. L.; Peralta-Videa, J. R.; de la Rosa, G.; Armendáriz, V.; Herrera, I.; Troiani, H.; Henning, J.

    2005-01-01

    Heavy metals from mining, smelting operations and other industrial processing facilities pollute wastewaters worldwide. Extraction of metals from industrial effluents has been widely studied due to the economic advantages and the relative ease of technical implementation. Consequently, the search for new and improved methodologies for the recovery of gold has increased. In this particular research, the use of cone hops biomass ( Humulus lupulus ) was investigated as a new option for gold recovery. The results showed that the gold binding to native hops biomass was pH dependent from pH 2 to pH 6, with a maximum percentage bindingmore » at pH 3. Time dependency studies demonstrated that Au(III) binding to native and modified cone hops biomasses was found to be time independent at pH 2 while at pH 5, it was time dependent. Capacity experiments demonstrated that at pH 2, esterified hops biomass bound 33.4 mg Au/g of biomass, while native and hydrolyzed hops biomasses bound 28.2 and 12.0 mg Au/g of biomass, respectively. However, at pH 5 the binding capacities were 38.9, 37.8 and 11.4 mg of Au per gram of native, esterified and hydrolyzed hops biomasses, respectively.« less

  13. Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline biosynthesis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic ...

  14. V-058: Microsoft Internet Explorer CDwnBindInfo Object Reuse...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Microsoft Internet Explorer CDwnBindInfo Object Reuse Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-058: Microsoft Internet Explorer CDwnBindInfo Object Reuse Flaw Lets Remote...

  15. Plasticity of the Quinone-binding Site of the Complex II Homolog...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plasticity of the Quinone-binding Site of the Complex II Homolog Quinol:Fumarate Reductase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plasticity of the Quinone-binding Site of the...

  16. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen

    2014-10-02

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  17. Computational Investigation of Glycosylation Effects on a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, C. B.; Talib, M. F.; McCabe, C.; Bu, L.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-27

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are ubiquitous components of glycoside hydrolases, which degrade polysaccharides in nature. CBMs target specific polysaccharides, and CBM binding affinity to cellulose is known to be proportional to cellulase activity, such that increasing binding affinity is an important component of performance improvement. To ascertain the impact of protein and glycan engineering on CBM binding, we use molecular simulation to quantify cellulose binding of a natively glycosylated Family 1 CBM. To validate our approach, we first examine aromatic-carbohydrate interactions on binding, and our predictions are consistent with previous experiments, showing that a tyrosine to tryptophan mutation yields a 2-fold improvement in binding affinity. We then demonstrate that enhanced binding of 3-6-fold over a nonglycosylated CBM is achieved by the addition of a single, native mannose or a mannose dimer, respectively, which has not been considered previously. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a single, artificial glycan on the anterior of the CBM, with the native, posterior glycans also present, can have a dramatic impact on binding affinity in our model, increasing it up to 140-fold relative to the nonglycosylated CBM. These results suggest new directions in protein engineering, in that modifying glycosylation patterns via heterologous expression, manipulation of culture conditions, or introduction of artificial glycosylation sites, can alter CBM binding affinity to carbohydrates and may thus be a general strategy to enhance cellulase performance. Our results also suggest that CBM binding studies should consider the effects of glycosylation on binding and function.

  18. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2014-08-21

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} for [CaCl{sub 2}] ranging from 10{sup −8} to 10{sup −2} M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation—that includes both steric and correlation effects—is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant.

  19. Functionalized polymers for binding to solutes in aqueous solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Barbara F.; Robison, Thomas W.

    2006-11-21

    A functionalized polymer for binding a dissolved molecule in an aqueous solution is presented. The polymer has a backbone polymer to which one or more functional groups are covalently linked. The backbone polymer can be such polymers as polyethylenimine, polyvinylamine, polyallylamine, and polypropylamine. These polymers are generally water-soluble, but can be insoluble when cross-linked. The functional group can be for example diol derivatives, polyol derivatives, thiol and dithiol derivatives, guest-host groups, affinity groups, beta-diphosphonic acids, and beta-diamides

  20. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  1. Climate change: Clinton affirms binding emissions reduction policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairley, P.

    1996-12-04

    In Australia last month President Clinton called for an international agreement to negotiate {open_quotes}legally binding commitments to fight climate change.{close_quotes} His comments affirmed the line the Administration adopted in July and lent prominence to the effort to bring about a treaty by December 1997. Environmentalists welcomed Clinton`s comments, but industry response is divided. The Global Climate Coalition (Washington), of which CMA is a member, has tried to slow negotiations by questioning the scientific consensus on climate change and suggesting {open_quotes}serious damage to the American economy{close_quotes} could result from emissions reduction.

  2. Development of Gamma-Emitting Receptor Binding Radiopharmace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reba, Richard

    2003-02-20

    The long-term objective is to develop blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeable m2-selective (relative to m1, m3, and m4) receptor-binding radiotracers and utilize these radiotracers for quantifying receptor concentrations obtained from PET or SPECT images of human brain. In initial studies, we concluded that the lipophilicity and high affinity prevented (R,S)-I-QNB from reaching a flow-independent and receptor-dependent state in a reasonable time. Thus, it was clear that (R,S)-I-QNB should be modified. Therefore, during the last portion of this funded research, we proposed that more polar heterocycles should help accomplish that. Since reports of others concluded that radiobromination and radiofluorination of the unactivated phenyl ring is not feasible (Newkome et al,,1982), we, therefore, explored during this grant period a series of analogues of (R)-QNB in which one or both of the six-membered phenyl rings is replaced by a five-membered thienyl (Boulay et al., 1995), or furyl ring. The chemistry specific aims were to synthesize novel compounds designed to be m2-selective mAChR ligands capable of penetrating into the CNS, and develop methods for efficient radiolabeling of promising m2-selective muscarinic ligands. The pharmacology specific aims were to determine the affinity and subtype-selectivity of the novel compounds using competition binding studies with membranes from cells that express each of the five muscarinic receptor subtypes, to determine the ability of the promising non-radioactive compounds and radiolabeled novel compounds to cross the BBB, to determine the biodistribution, in-vivo pharmacokinetics, and in-vitm kinetics of promising m2-selective radioligands and to determine the distribution of receptors for the novel m2-selective radioligands using quantitative autoradiography of rat brain, and compare this distribution to the distribution of known m2-selective compounds.

  3. Identification and characterization of riboflavin-binding proteins in human circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Innis-Whitehouse, W.S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Riboflavin binding by plasma proteins from healthy human subjects was examined by equilibrium dialysis and binding was observed to vary over a greater than 10-fold range. Upon fractionation of plasma by gel filtration, the major riboflavin-binding components eluted with albumin and gamma-globulins. Albumin was purified and found to bind riboflavin only very weakly, although FMN and photo-chemical degradation products were more tightly bound. Most of the binding occurred in the gamma-globulin fraction and was attributed to immunoglobulins because the binding proteins and immunoglobulins copurified using various methods, were removed by treatment of plasma with protein A-agarose, and were coincident upon immuno-electrophoresis followed by autoradiography to detect (2-{sup 14}C)-riboflavin. Binding differences among plasma samples were reflected in the binding recovered with the immunoglobulin fractions; however, there was not a direct relationship between the amount of immunoglobulin and the amount of (2-{sup 14}C)riboflavin bound. Hence, it appeared that the binding was due to a subfraction of immunoglobulins.

  4. Strong and Reversible Binding of Carbon Dioxide in a Green Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strong and Reversible Binding of Carbon Dioxide in a Green Metal-Organic Framework Previous Next List Jeremiah J. Gassensmith, Hiroyasu Furukawa, Ronald A. Smaldone, Ross S. ...

  5. New perspective on glycoside hydrolase binding to lignin from pretreated corn stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Taylor, II, Larry E.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Sammond, Deanne W.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Crowley, Michael F.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; et al

    2015-12-18

    In this study, non-specific binding of cellulases to lignin has been implicated as a major factor in the loss of cellulase activity during biomass conversion to sugars. It is believed that this binding may strongly impact process economics through loss of enzyme activities during hydrolysis and enzyme recycling scenarios. The current model suggests glycoside hydrolase activities are lost though non-specific/non-productive binding of carbohydrate-binding domains to lignin, limiting catalytic site access to the carbohydrate components of the cell wall.

  6. U-227: bind-dyndb-ldap DN Escaping Flaw Lets Remote Users Deny Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability has been reported in bind-dyndb-ldap, which can be exploited by malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

  7. Single-Molecule Dynamics Reveals Cooperative Binding-Folding in Protein Recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jin; Lu, Qiang N.; Lu, H PETER.

    2006-07-01

    The study of associations between two biomolecules is the key to understand molecular recognition and function. Molecular function is often thought to be determined by the underlying structures. Here, combining single molecule study of protein binding with an energy landscape inspired microscopic model, we found strong evidences that bio-molecular recognition is determined by flexibilities in addition to structures. Our model is based on coarse grained molecular dynamics performed on the residue level with the energy function biased towards the native binding structure (Go model). With our model, the underlying free energy landscape of the binding can be explored. Two distinct conformational states as free energy minimum, one with partially folding of CBD and significant binding of CBD to CDC42, and another with native folding of CBD and native binding of CBD to CDC42, are clearly seen. This shows the binding process proceeds with significant interface binding of CBD with CDC42 first without complete folding of CBD. Finally binding and folding are coupled with each other cooperatively to reach the native binding state. The single molecule experimental finding of the dynamic fluctuations between the loosely bound and closely bound conformational states can be identified with theoretically calculated free energy minimum and quantitatively explained in our model as a result of binding associated with large conformational changes. Theoretical predictions have identified certain key residues for binding which are consistent with mutational experiments. The combined study provides a test ground for fundamental mechanisms as well as insights into design and further explorations on biomolecular recognition with large conformational changes.

  8. Conformational Variability of Organophosphorus Hydrolase upon Soman and Paraoxon Binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomes, Diego Eb; Lins, Roberto D.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Lei, Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A.

    2011-12-31

    The bacterial enzyme organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) exhibits both catalytic and substrate promiscuity. It hydrolyzes bonds in a variety of phosphotriester (P-O), phosphonothioate (P-S), phosphofluoridate (P-F) and phosphonocyanate (F-CN) compounds. However, its catalytic efficiency varies markedly for different substrates, limiting the broad-range application of OPH as catalyst in the bioremediation of pesticides and chemical war agents. In the present study, pK{sub a} calculations and multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to characterize and contrast the structural dynamics of OPH bound to two substrates hydrolyzed with very distinct catalytic efficiencies: the nerve agent soman (O-pinacolyl-methyl-phosphonofluoridate) and the pesticide paraoxon (diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate). pK{sub a} calculations for the substrate-bound and unbound enzyme showed a significant pK{sub a} shift from standard values ({Delta}pK{sub a} = {+-} 3 units) for residues 254His and 275Arg. MD simulations of the doubly protonated 254His revealed a dynamic hydrogen bond network connecting the catalytic residue 301Asp via 254His to 232Asp, 233Asp, 275Arg and 235Asp, and is consistent with a previously postulated proton relay mechanism to ferry protons away from the active site with substrates that do not require activation of the leaving group. Hydrogen bonds between 301Asp and 254His were persistent in the OPH-paraoxon complex but not in the OPH-soman one, suggesting a potential role for such interaction in the more efficient hydrolysis of paraoxon over soman by OPH. These results are in line with previous mutational studies of residue 254His, which led to an increase of the catalytic efficiency of OPH over soman yet decreased its efficiency for paraoxon. In addition, comparative analysis of the molecular trajectories for OPH bound to soman and paraoxon suggests that binding of the latter facilitates the conformational transition of OPH from the

  9. Discriminating binding mechanisms of an intrinsically disordered protein via a multi-state coarse-grained model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott, Michael [Department of Chemistry, Cambridge University, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemistry, Cambridge University, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Best, Robert B., E-mail: robertbe@helix.nih.gov [Department of Chemistry, Cambridge University, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0520 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Many proteins undergo a conformational transition upon binding to their cognate binding partner, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) providing an extreme example in which a folding transition occurs. However, it is often not clear whether this occurs via an induced fit or conformational selection mechanism, or via some intermediate scenario. In the first case, transient encounters with the binding partner favour transitions to the bound structure before the two proteins dissociate, while in the second the bound structure must be selected from a subset of unbound structures which are in the correct state for binding, because transient encounters of the incorrect conformation with the binding partner are most likely to result in dissociation. A particularly interesting situation involves those intrinsically disordered proteins which can bind to different binding partners in different conformations. We have devised a multi-state coarse-grained simulation model which is able to capture the binding of IDPs in alternate conformations, and by applying it to the binding of nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) to either ACTR or IRF-3 we are able to determine the binding mechanism. By all measures, the binding of NCBD to either binding partner appears to occur via an induced fit mechanism. Nonetheless, we also show how a scenario closer to conformational selection could arise by choosing an alternative non-binding structure for NCBD.

  10. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  11. Single Molecule Kinetics of ENTH Binding to Lipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozovsky, Sharon; Forstner, Martin B.; Sondermann, Holger; Groves, Jay T.

    2012-04-03

    Transient recruitment of proteins to membranes is a fundamental mechanism by which the cell exerts spatial and temporal control over proteins’ localization and interactions. Thus, the specificity and the kinetics of peripheral proteins’ membrane residence are an attribute of their function. In this article, we describe the membrane interactions of the interfacial epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain with its target lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2). The direct visualization and quantification of interactions of single ENTH molecules with supported lipid bilayers is achieved using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) with a time resolution of 13 ms. This enables the recording of the kinetic behavior of ENTH interacting with membranes with physiologically relevant concentrations of PtdIns(4,5)P2 despite the low effective binding affinity. Subsequent single fluorophore tracking permits us to build up distributions of residence times and to measure ENTH dissociation rates as a function of membrane composition. In addition, due to the high time resolution, we are able to resolve details of the motion of ENTH associated with a simple, homogeneous membrane. In this case ENTH’s diffusive transport appears to be the result of at least three different diffusion processes.

  12. Superlattices assembled through shape-induced directional binding

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Fang; Yager, Kevin G.; Zhang, Yugang; Xin, Huolin; Gang, Oleg

    2015-04-23

    Organization of spherical particles into lattices is typically driven by packing considerations. Although the addition of directional binding can significantly broaden structural diversity, nanoscale implementation remains challenging. Here we investigate the assembly of clusters and lattices in which anisotropic polyhedral blocks coordinate isotropic spherical nanoparticles via shape-induced directional interactions facilitated by DNA recognition. We show that these polyhedral blocks—cubes and octahedrons—when mixed with spheres, promote the assembly of clusters with architecture determined by polyhedron symmetry. Moreover, three-dimensional binary superlattices are formed when DNA shells accommodate the shape disparity between nanoparticle interfaces. The crystallographic symmetry of assembled lattices is determined bymore » the spatial symmetry of the block’s facets, while structural order depends on DNA-tuned interactions and particle size ratio. Lastly, the presented lattice assembly strategy, exploiting shape for defining the global structure and DNA-mediation locally, opens novel possibilities for by-design fabrication of binary lattices.« less

  13. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  14. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, Eric; Tardie, Mark; Carty, Maynard; Brown Phillips, Tracy; Wang, Ing-Kae; Soeller, Walt; Qiu, Xiayang Karam, George

    2006-11-01

    The crystal structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) with a bound palmitate is reported at 1.5 resolution. Human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) belongs to a family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins involved in the transport and storage of lipids. Here, the crystal structure of human aP2 with a bound palmitate is described at 1.5 resolution. Unlike the known crystal structure of murine aP2 in complex with palmitate, this structure shows that the fatty acid is in a folded conformation and that the loop containing Phe57 acts as a lid to regulate ligand binding by excluding solvent exposure to the central binding cavity.

  15. Solution structure of telomere binding domain of AtTRB2 derived from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Won Kyung; Kim, Heeyoun; Kim, Eunhee; Cheong, Chaejoon; Cho, Myeon Haeng; Lee, Weontae

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • We have determined solution structure of Myb domain of AtTRB2. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 is located in the N-terminal region. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 binds to plant telomeric DNA without fourth helix. • Helix 2 and 3 of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 are involved in DNA recognition. • AtTRB2 is a novel protein distinguished from other known plant TBP. - Abstract: Telomere homeostasis is regulated by telomere-associated proteins, and the Myb domain is well conserved for telomere binding. AtTRB2 is a member of the SMH (Single-Myb-Histone)-like family in Arabidopsis thaliana, having an N-terminal Myb domain, which is responsible for DNA binding. The Myb domain of AtTRB2 contains three α-helices and loops for DNA binding, which is unusual given that other plant telomere-binding proteins have an additional fourth helix that is essential for DNA binding. To understand the structural role for telomeric DNA binding of AtTRB2, we determined the solution structure of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 (AtTRB2{sub 1–64}) using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In addition, the inter-molecular interaction between AtTRB2{sub 1–64} and telomeric DNA has been characterized by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and NMR titration analyses for both plant (TTTAGGG)n and human (TTAGGG)n telomere sequences. Data revealed that Trp28, Arg29, and Val47 residues located in Helix 2 and Helix 3 are crucial for DNA binding, which are well conserved among other plant telomere binding proteins. We concluded that although AtTRB2 is devoid of the additional fourth helix in the Myb-extension domain, it is able to bind to plant telomeric repeat sequences as well as human telomeric repeat sequences.

  16. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  17. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fagan, P A

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I{center_dot}C base pairs are functional analogs of A{center_dot}T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  18. Assessing Energetic Contributions to Binding from a Disordered Region in a Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Cho; C Swaminathan; D Bonsor; M Kerzic; R Guan; J Yang; C Kieke; P Anderson; D Kranz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Many functional proteins are at least partially disordered prior to binding. Although the structural transitions upon binding of disordered protein regions can influence the affinity and specificity of protein complexes, their precise energetic contributions to binding are unknown. Here, we use a model protein-protein interaction system in which a locally disordered region has been modified by directed evolution to quantitatively assess the thermodynamic and structural contributions to binding of disorder-to-order transitions. Through X-ray structure determination of the protein binding partners before and after complex formation and isothermal titration calorimetry of the interactions, we observe a correlation between protein ordering and binding affinity for complexes along this affinity maturation pathway. Additionally, we show that discrepancies between observed and calculated heat capacities based on buried surface area changes in the protein complexes can be explained largely by heat capacity changes that would result solely from folding the locally disordered region. Previously developed algorithms for predicting binding energies of protein-protein interactions, however, are unable to correctly model the energetic contributions of the structural transitions in our model system. While this highlights the shortcomings of current computational methods in modeling conformational flexibility, it suggests that the experimental methods used here could provide training sets of molecular interactions for improving these algorithms and further rationalizing molecular recognition in protein-protein interactions.

  19. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-11-21

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We reportmore » distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). In conclusion, our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.« less

  20. Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Mann, Grace

    2010-12-28

    Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Receptors are exposed to at least one potential binder and arrayed on a substrate support. Each member of the array is exposed to X-ray radiation. The magnitude of a detectable X-ray fluorescence signal for at least one element can be used to determine whether a binding event between a binder and a receptor has occurred, and can provide information related to the extent of binding between the binder and receptor.

  1. Secondary PDZ domain-binding site on class B plexins enhances...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Secondary PDZ domain-binding site on class B plexins enhances the affinity for PDZ-RhoGEF Authors: Pascoe, Heath G. ; Gutowski, Stephen ; Chen, Hua ; Brautigam, Chad A. ; ...

  2. New Insights into the RNA-Binding and E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: New Insights into the RNA-Binding and E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activities of Roquins Authors: Zhang, Qi ; Fan, Lixin ; Hou, Feng ; Dong, Aiping ; Wang, Yun-Xing ; Tong, Yufeng ...

  3. Selective Binding of O2 over N2 in a Redox-Active Metal-Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selective Binding of O2 over N2 in a Redox-Active Metal-Organic Framework with Open Iron(II) Coordination Sites Previous Next List E. D. Bloch, L. J. Murray, W. L. Queen, S. ...

  4. De novo Design of an Artificial bis-[4Fe4S] Binding Protein

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    De novo Design of an Artificial bis-4Fe4S Binding Protein Authors: Roy, A,, Sarrou, I., Vaughn, M.D., Astashkin, A.V., and Ghirlanda, G. Title: De novo Design of an Artificial ...

  5. Investigation of the mode of binding of a novel series ofN-benzyl...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the hepatitis C viral polymerase are described herein. These compounds bind to the hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 5B (NS5B), and co-crystal structures of select...

  6. Capture and release of acid-gasses with acid-gas binding organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heldebrant, David J; Yonker, Clement R; Koech, Phillip K

    2015-03-17

    A system and method for acid-gas capture wherein organic acid-gas capture materials form hetero-atom analogs of alkyl-carbonate when contacted with an acid gas. These organic-acid gas capture materials include combinations of a weak acid and a base, or zwitterionic liquids. This invention allows for reversible acid-gas binding to these organic binding materials thus allowing for the capture and release of one or more acid gases. These acid-gas binding organic compounds can be regenerated to release the captured acid gasses and enable these organic acid-gas binding materials to be reused. This enables transport of the liquid capture compounds and the release of the acid gases from the organic liquid with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems.

  7. Structure of Human Toll-like Receptor 3 (TLR3) Ligand-binding...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Toll-like Receptor 3 (TLR3) Ligand-binding Domain Jungwoo Choe1, Matthew S. Kelker1, ... Figure 1. Overall structure of human TLR3 ECD. The N-terminal region is colored blue, the ...

  8. Designing artificial metal binding peptides | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Production artificial metal binding peptides 24 Oct 2012 Dong Wang is a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Arizona State University. He is working in the lab of Professor James Allen, who is leading the Subtask 2 of the Bisfuel Center (Water oxidation catalysts). Dong's research project is focused on design and characterization of artificial peptides capable of binding divalent metals with the aim to construct an efficient water oxidation catalyst that

  9. Applying Kβ Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy to Cu(I) Binding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proteins with Relevance to Peptidylglycine Monooxygenase Reactivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Applying Kβ Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy to Cu(I) Binding Proteins with Relevance to Peptidylglycine Monooxygenase Reactivity Thursday, June 30, 2016 Copper serves as a redox center in metalloproteins, often cycling between the +1 and +2 oxidation states. Oxidases, such as petidylglycine monooxygenase (PHM), bind oxygen at Cu(I) sites giving rise to "oxo"

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo calculation of the binding energy of the beryllium dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deible, Michael J.; Kessler, Melody; Gasperich, Kevin E.; Jordan, Kenneth D.

    2015-08-28

    The accurate calculation of the binding energy of the beryllium dimer is a challenging theoretical problem. In this study, the binding energy of Be{sub 2} is calculated using the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method, using single Slater determinant and multiconfigurational trial functions. DMC calculations using single-determinant trial wave functions of orbitals obtained from density functional theory calculations overestimate the binding energy, while DMC calculations using Hartree-Fock or CAS(4,8), complete active space trial functions significantly underestimate the binding energy. In order to obtain an accurate value of the binding energy of Be{sub 2} from DMC calculations, it is necessary to employ trial functions that include excitations outside the valence space. Our best estimate DMC result for the binding energy of Be{sub 2}, obtained by using configuration interaction trial functions and extrapolating in the threshold for the configurations retained in the trial function, is 908 cm{sup −1}, only slightly below the 935 cm{sup −1} value derived from experiment.

  11. Elevated epidermal growth factor receptor binding in plutonium-induced lung tumors from dogs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, F.C.; Bohn, L.R.; Dagle, G.E. )

    1991-04-01

    The objective of this study is to examine and characterize epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) binding in inhaled plutonium-induced canine lung-tumor tissue and to compare it with that in normal canine lung tissue. Crude membrane preparations from normal and lung-tumor tissue from beagle dogs were examined in a radioreceptor assay, using {sup 125}I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a ligand. Specific EGF receptor binding was determined in the presence of excess unlabeled EGF. We have examined EGF receptor binding in eight lung-tumor samples obtained from six dogs. Epidermal growth factor receptor binding was significantly greater in lung-tumor samples (31.38%) compared with that in normal lung tissue (3.76%). Scatchard plot analysis from the displacement assay revealed that there was no statistical difference in the binding affinity but significantly higher concentration of EGF-R sites in the lung-tumor tissue (619 fmol/mg) than in normal lung tissue (53 fmol/mg). The increase in EGF-R number in plutonium-induced dog lung tumors does not seem to correlate with increase in the initial lung burden exposure to plutonium. Our results demonstrate that there is a significant increase in EGF-R binding in inhaled plutonium-induced dog lung tumors.

  12. In silico identification of anthropogenic chemicals as ligands of zebrafish sex hormone binding globulin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsteinson, Nels; Ban, Fuqiang; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo; Tabaei, Seyed M.H. [Prostate Centre at the Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, 2660 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Miguel-Queralt, Solange; Underhill, Caroline [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Child and Family Research Institute, 950 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4H4 (Canada); Cherkasov, Artem [Prostate Centre at the Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, 2660 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3Z6 (Canada)], E-mail: artc@interchange.ubc.ca; Hammond, Geoffrey L. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Child and Family Research Institute, 950 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4H4 (Canada)

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic compounds with the capacity to interact with the steroid-binding site of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) pose health risks to humans and other vertebrates including fish. Building on studies of human SHBG, we have applied in silico drug discovery methods to identify potential binders for SHBG in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model aquatic organism. Computational methods, including; homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening, and 3D QSAR analysis, successfully identified 6 non-steroidal substances from the ZINC chemical database that bind to zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) with low-micromolar to nanomolar affinities, as determined by a competitive ligand-binding assay. We also screened 80,000 commercial substances listed by the European Chemicals Bureau and Environment Canada, and 6 non-steroidal hits from this in silico screen were tested experimentally for zfSHBG binding. All 6 of these compounds displaced the [{sup 3}H]5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone used as labeled ligand in the zfSHBG screening assay when tested at a 33 {mu}M concentration, and 3 of them (hexestrol, 4-tert-octylcatechol, and dihydrobenzo(a)pyren-7(8H)-one) bind to zfSHBG in the micromolar range. The study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale in silico screening of anthropogenic compounds that may disrupt or highjack functionally important protein:ligand interactions. Such studies could increase the awareness of hazards posed by existing commercial chemicals at relatively low cost.

  13. Oligomycin frames a common drug-binding site in the ATP synthase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Symersky, Jindrich; Osowski, Daniel; Walters, D. Eric; Mueller, David M.

    2015-12-01

    We report the high-resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) crystal structure of oligomycin bound to the subunit c10 ring of the yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase. Oligomycin binds to the surface of the c10 ring making contact with two neighboring molecules at a position that explains the inhibitory effect on ATP synthesis. The carboxyl side chain of Glu59, which is essential for proton translocation, forms an H-bond with oligomycin via a bridging water molecule but is otherwise shielded from the aqueous environment. The remaining contacts between oligomycin and subunit c are primarily hydrophobic. The amino acid residues that form the oligomycin-binding site are 100% conserved between human and yeast but are widely different from those in bacterial homologs, thus explaining the differential sensitivity to oligomycin. Prior genetics studies suggest that the oligomycin-binding site overlaps with the binding site of other antibiotics, including those effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thereby frames a common 'drug-binding site.' We anticipate that this drug-binding site will serve as an effective target for new antibiotics developed by rational design.

  14. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This also represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.

  15. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This alsomore » represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.« less

  16. Multifunctional cellulase catalysis targeted by fusion to different carbohydrate-binding modules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walker, Johnnie A.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deng, Kai; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Udell, Hannah S.; Prom, Ben M.; Kim, Hyunkee; Adams, Paul D.; Northen, Trent R.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-12-21

    Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) bind polysaccharides and help target glycoside hydrolases catalytic domains to their appropriate carbohydrate substrates. To better understand how CBMs can improve cellulolytic enzyme reactivity, representatives from each of the 18 families of CBM found in Ruminoclostridium thermocellum were fused to the multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain of CelE (Cthe_0797, CelEcc), which can hydrolyze numerous types of polysaccharides including cellulose, mannan, and xylan. Since CelE is a cellulosomal enzyme, none of these fusions to a CBM previously existed. CelEcc_CBM fusions were assayed for their ability to hydrolyze cellulose, lichenan, xylan, and mannan. Several CelEcc_CBM fusions showed enhanced hydrolyticmore » activity with different substrates relative to the fusion to CBM3a from the cellulosome scaffoldin, which has high affinity for binding to crystalline cellulose. Additional binding studies and quantitative catalysis studies using nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) were carried out with the CBM3a, CBM6, CBM30, and CBM44 fusion enzymes. In general, and consistent with observations of others, enhanced enzyme reactivity was correlated with moderate binding affinity of the CBM. Numerical analysis of reaction time courses showed that CelEcc_CBM44, a combination of a multifunctional enzyme domain with a CBM having broad binding specificity, gave the fastest rates for hydrolysis of both the hexose and pentose fractions of ionic-liquid pretreated switchgrass. In conclusion, we have shown that fusions of different CBMs to a single multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain can increase its rate of reaction with different pure polysaccharides and with pretreated biomass. This fusion approach, incorporating domains with broad specificity for binding and catalysis, provides a new avenue to improve reactivity of simple combinations of enzymes within the complexity of plant biomass.« less

  17. Multifunctional cellulase catalysis targeted by fusion to different carbohydrate-binding modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Johnnie A.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deng, Kai; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Udell, Hannah S.; Prom, Ben M.; Kim, Hyunkee; Adams, Paul D.; Northen, Trent R.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-12-21

    Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) bind polysaccharides and help target glycoside hydrolases catalytic domains to their appropriate carbohydrate substrates. To better understand how CBMs can improve cellulolytic enzyme reactivity, representatives from each of the 18 families of CBM found in Ruminoclostridium thermocellum were fused to the multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain of CelE (Cthe_0797, CelEcc), which can hydrolyze numerous types of polysaccharides including cellulose, mannan, and xylan. Since CelE is a cellulosomal enzyme, none of these fusions to a CBM previously existed. CelEcc_CBM fusions were assayed for their ability to hydrolyze cellulose, lichenan, xylan, and mannan. Several CelEcc_CBM fusions showed enhanced hydrolytic activity with different substrates relative to the fusion to CBM3a from the cellulosome scaffoldin, which has high affinity for binding to crystalline cellulose. Additional binding studies and quantitative catalysis studies using nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) were carried out with the CBM3a, CBM6, CBM30, and CBM44 fusion enzymes. In general, and consistent with observations of others, enhanced enzyme reactivity was correlated with moderate binding affinity of the CBM. Numerical analysis of reaction time courses showed that CelEcc_CBM44, a combination of a multifunctional enzyme domain with a CBM having broad binding specificity, gave the fastest rates for hydrolysis of both the hexose and pentose fractions of ionic-liquid pretreated switchgrass. In conclusion, we have shown that fusions of different CBMs to a single multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain can increase its rate of reaction with different pure polysaccharides and with pretreated biomass. This fusion approach, incorporating domains with broad specificity for binding and catalysis, provides a new avenue to improve reactivity of simple combinations of enzymes within the complexity of plant biomass.

  18. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket that would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.

  19. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket thatmore » would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.« less

  20. Supramolecular binding and separation of hydrocarbons within a functionalized porous metal–organic framework

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Sihai; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Newby, Ruth; Garcia-Sakai, Victoria; Manuel, Pascal; Callear, Samantha K.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Tang, Chiu C.; Schröder, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Supramolecular interactions are fundamental to host–guest binding in many chemical and biological processes. Direct visualization of such supramolecular interactions within host–guest systems is extremely challenging, but crucial to understanding their function. Within this paper, we report a comprehensive study that combines neutron scattering, synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction, and computational modelling to define the detailed binding at a molecular level of acetylene, ethylene and ethane within the porous host NOTT-300. This study reveals simultaneous and cooperative hydrogen-bonding, π···π stacking interactions and intermolecular dipole interactions in the binding of acetylene and ethylene to give up to 12 individual weak supramolecular interactionsmore » aligned within the host to form an optimal geometry for the selective binding of hydrocarbons. In addition, we also report the cooperative binding of a mixture of acetylene and ethylene within the porous host, together with the corresponding breakthrough experiments and analysis of adsorption isotherms of gas mixtures.« less

  1. Beyond the detergent effect: a binding site for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in mammalian apoferritin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Renyu Bu, Weiming; Xi, Jin; Mortazavi, Shirin R.; Cheung-Lau, Jasmina C.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.; Loll, Patrick J.

    2012-05-01

    Using X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) binds specifically to a pre-formed internal cavity in horse-spleen apoferritin. Although sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is widely used as an anionic detergent, it can also exert specific pharmacological effects that are independent of the surfactant properties of the molecule. However, structural details of how proteins recognize SDS are scarce. Here, it is demonstrated that SDS binds specifically to a naturally occurring four-helix bundle protein: horse apoferritin. The X-ray crystal structure of the apoferritinSDS complex was determined at a resolution of 1.9 and revealed that the SDS binds in an internal cavity that has previously been shown to recognize various general anesthetics. A dissociation constant of 24 9 M at 293 K was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. SDS binds in this cavity by bending its alkyl tail into a horseshoe shape; the charged SDS head group lies in the opening of the cavity at the protein surface. This crystal structure provides insights into the proteinSDS interactions that give rise to binding and may prove useful in the design of novel SDS-like ligands for some proteins.

  2. Nucleotide-binding flexibility in ultrahigh-resolution structures of the SRP GTPase Ffh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, Ursula D.; Focia, Pamela J.; Freymann, Douglas M.

    2008-10-01

    Crystal structures of the Ffh NG GTPase domain at < 1.24 resolution reveal multiple overlapping nucleotide binding modes. Two structures of the nucleotide-bound NG domain of Ffh, the GTPase subunit of the bacterial signal recognition particle (SRP), have been determined at ultrahigh resolution in similar crystal forms. One is GDP-bound and one is GMPPCP-bound. The asymmetric unit of each structure contains two protein monomers, each of which exhibits differences in nucleotide-binding conformation and occupancy. The GDP-bound Ffh NG exhibits two binding conformations in one monomer but not the other and the GMPPCP-bound protein exhibits full occupancy of the nucleotide in one monomer but only partial occupancy in the other. Thus, under the same solution conditions, each crystal reveals multiple binding states that suggest that even when nucleotide is bound its position in the Ffh NG active site is dynamic. Some differences in the positioning of the bound nucleotide may arise from differences in the crystal-packing environment and specific factors that have been identified include the relative positions of the N and G domains, small conformational changes in the P-loop, the positions of waters buried within the active site and shifts in the closing loop that packs against the guanine base. However, loose binding may have biological significance in promoting facile nucleotide exchange and providing a mechanism for priming the SRP GTPase prior to its activation in its complex with the SRP receptor.

  3. Protein binding studies of technetium-99m-labeled phosphine and isocyanide cationic complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanelli, G.D.; Cook, N.; Lahiri, A.; Ellison, D.; Webbon, P.; Woolley, G.

    1988-01-01

    Most /sup 99m/Tc/phosphine/isocyanide complexes synthesized to date show preferential uptake by the myocardium of many animal species but not in man. A new complex has been synthesized, (/sup 99m/Tc(DEPE)2(CNR)2), +(DEPIC), where R = t - butyl isocyanide, which in three animal species images the myocardium very well, but in humans it remains primarily in the blood pool. One reason for the difference in the behavior of these complexes in different species could be the characteristics of their binding to plasma proteins. The protein binding characteristics of DEPIC and two other well-known complexes have therefore been studied. Whereas the other complexes bind nonspecifically to many proteins both in animal and human plasma, DEPIC binds almost exclusively to prealbumin in humans but nonspecifically to other proteins in the rabbit. The binding sites in human plasma appear to be those normally occupied by thyroxine on the prealbumin tetramer and these can be blocked by sodium salicylate.

  4. LINC Complexes Form by Binding of Three KASH Peptides to Domain Interfaces of Trimeric SUN Proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sosa, Brian A.; Rothballer, Andrea; Kutay, Ulrike; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-08-31

    Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the nuclear envelope and are composed of KASH and SUN proteins residing in the outer and inner nuclear membrane, respectively. LINC formation relies on direct binding of KASH and SUN in the perinuclear space. Thereby, molecular tethers are formed that can transmit forces for chromosome movements, nuclear migration, and anchorage. We present crystal structures of the human SUN2-KASH1/2 complex, the core of the LINC complex. The SUN2 domain is rigidly attached to a trimeric coiled coil that prepositions it to bind three KASH peptides. The peptides bind in three deep and expansive grooves formed between adjacent SUN domains, effectively acting as molecular glue. In addition, a disulfide between conserved cysteines on SUN and KASH covalently links both proteins. The structure provides the basis of LINC complex formation and suggests a model for how LINC complexes might arrange into higher-order clusters to enhance force-coupling.

  5. Beta-endorphin and alpha-n-acetyl beta-endorphin; synthesis, conformation and binding parameter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovegren, E.S.

    1986-01-01

    Beta-endorphin (EP) is a 31-residue opioid peptide found in many tissues, including the pituitary, brain and reproductive tract. Alpha-amino-acetyl beta-endorphin (AcEP) was characterized spectroscopically by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism in deuterated water and trifluoroethanol (TFE). Both EP and AcEP bind to neuroblastoma N2a cells. This binding was not mediated through opiate receptors, and both peptides seemed to bind at common sites. Ovarian immunoreactive-EP levels were determined for immature and mature rates. These levels were found to be responsive to exogenous gonadotropin treatment in immature animals. A large percentage of the immunoreactive-EP is present in follicular fluid, and most of the endorphin-like peptides were acetylated, as measured by radioimmunoassay. Chromatogaphic analysis suggested at least three EP-like species: EP, a carboxy-terminally cleaved and an amino-terminally acetylated EP.

  6. Crystal Structure of the HP1-EMSY Complex Reveals an Unusual Mode of HP1 Binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang,Y.; Myers, M.; Xu, R.

    2006-01-01

    Heterochromatin protein-1 (HP1) plays an essential role in both the assembly of higher-order chromatin structure and epigenetic inheritance. The C-terminal chromo shadow domain (CSD) of HP1 is responsible for homodimerization and interaction with a number of chromatin-associated nonhistone proteins, including EMSY, which is a BRCA2-interacting protein that has been implicated in the development of breast and ovarian cancer. We have determined the crystal structure of the HP1{beta} CSD in complex with the N-terminal domain of EMSY at 1.8 Angstroms resolution. Surprisingly, the structure reveals that EMSY is bound by two HP1 CSD homodimers, and the binding sequences differ from the consensus HP1 binding motif PXVXL. This structural information expands our understanding of HP1 binding specificity and provides insights into interactions between HP1 homodimers that are likely to be important for heterochromatin formation.

  7. Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1A polymers bind, but do not tubulate, liposomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backues, Steven K.; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.

    2010-03-19

    The Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1A (AtDRP1A) is involved in endocytosis and cell plate maturation in Arabidopsis. Unlike dynamin, AtDRP1A does not have any recognized membrane binding or protein-protein interaction domains. We report that GTPase active AtDRP1A purified from Escherichia coli as a fusion to maltose binding protein forms homopolymers visible by negative staining electron microscopy. These polymers interact with protein-free liposomes whose lipid composition mimics that of the inner leaflet of the Arabidopsis plasma membrane, suggesting that lipid-binding may play a role in AtDRP1A function. However, AtDRP1A polymers do not appear to assemble and disassemble in a dynamic fashion and do not have the ability to tubulate liposomes in vitro, suggesting that additional factors or modifications are necessary for AtDRP1A's in vivo function.

  8. Structures of Adnectin/Protein Complexes Reveal an Expanded Binding Footprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Krystek, Jr., Stanley R.; Bush, Alexander; Wei, Anzhi; Emanuel, Stuart L.; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Janjua, Ahsen; Cheng, Lin; Murdock, Melissa; Abramczyk, Bozena; Cohen, Daniel; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul; Davis, Jonathan H.; Dabritz, Michael; McLaughlin, Douglas C.; Russo, Katie A.; Chao, Ginger; Wright, Martin C.; Jenny, Victoria A.; Engle, Linda J.; Furfine, Eric; Sheriff, Steven

    2014-10-02

    Adnectins are targeted biologics derived from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin ({sup 10}Fn3), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Target-specific binders are selected from libraries generated by diversifying the three {sup 10}Fn3 loops that are analogous to the complementarity determining regions of antibodies. The crystal structures of two Adnectins were determined, each in complex with its therapeutic target, EGFR or IL-23. Both Adnectins bind different epitopes than those bound by known monoclonal antibodies. Molecular modeling suggests that some of these epitopes might not be accessible to antibodies because of the size and concave shape of the antibody combining site. In addition to interactions from the Adnectin diversified loops, residues from the N terminus and/or the {beta} strands interact with the target proteins in both complexes. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis confirmed the calculated binding energies of these {beta} strand interactions, indicating that these nonloop residues can expand the available binding footprint.

  9. Binding of formyl peptides to Walker 256 carcinosarcoma cells and the chemotactic response of these cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, D.C.; Orr, F.W.; Shiu, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    N-Formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP) induces chemotaxis in leukocytes, the response being mediated by peptide binding to a receptor on the plasma membrane. In tumor cells, this peptide has been reported to induce cellular swelling and chemotaxis in vitro and to enhance the localization of circulating tumor cells in vivo. In the Boyden chamber, the authors evaluated the migratory responses of Walker carcinosarcoma 256 cells to varying concentrations of fMLP. Sigmoidal dose-response curves were obtained with the dose of chemotactic factor that elicits a half-maximal chemotactic response of 5.0 +/- 2.5 X 10(-8) M. Checkerboard analysis indicated that these responses were dependent upon a concentration gradient of fMLP with increases in migration of circa 2 to 2.5 times that of random movement. To examine the binding of fMLP, the tumor cells were incubated with 5 X 10(-9) M fML-(/sup 3/H)P in Hanks balanced salt solution. Specific binding (0.5 to 1% of total radioligand, to whole cells inhibited by 5 X 10(-6) M fMLP) approached equilibrium after 4 to 6 h at 4 degrees C and after 6 to 10 h at 22 degrees C. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated heterogeneous binding of the peptide by tumor cells and also showed its intracellular localization. In homogenates of Walker cells prepared in 0.1 M Tris HCl, pH 7.4, with 10 mM MgCl2 and bovine serum albumin (1 mg/ml), specific binding of approximately 0.5% of total fML-(/sup 3/H)P reached equilibrium after 60 min at 4 degrees C. In whole cells and homogenates, binding was reversible by addition of unlabeled fMLP.

  10. Ligand-induced conformational changes in a thermophilic ribose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2009-05-21

    Members of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP) superfamily are involved in transport and signaling processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Biological responses are typically mediated by ligand-induced conformational changes in which the binding event is coupled to a hinge-bending motion that brings together two domains in a closed form. In all PBP-mediated biological processes, downstream partners recognize the closed form of the protein. This motion has also been exploited in protein engineering experiments to construct biosensors that transduce ligand binding to a variety of physical signals. Understanding the mechanistic details of PBP conformational changes, both global (hinge bending, twisting, shear movements) and local (rotamer changes, backbone motion), therefore is not only important for understanding their biological function but also for protein engineering experiments. Here we present biochemical characterization and crystal structure determination of the periplasmic ribose-binding protein (RBP) from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima in its ribose-bound and unliganded state. The T. maritima RBP (tmRBP) has 39% sequence identity and is considerably more resistant to thermal denaturation (appTm value is 108 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli homolog (ecRBP) (appTm value is 56 C). Polar ligand interactions and ligand-induced global conformational changes are conserved among ecRBP and tmRBP; however local structural rearrangements involving side-chain motions in the ligand-binding site are not conserved. Although the large-scale ligand-induced changes are mediated through similar regions, and are produced by similar backbone movements in tmRBP and ecRBP, the small-scale ligand-induced structural rearrangements differentiate the mesophile and thermophile. This suggests there are mechanistic differences in the manner by which these two proteins bind their ligands and are an example of how two structurally similar proteins utilize different

  11. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies of Anion-pi Interactions: Binding Strength and Anion Specificity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Sun, Zhenrong; Wang, Xue B.

    2015-01-01

    Proposed in theory and confirmed to exist, anion? interactions have been recognized as new and important non-covalent binding forces. Despite extensive theoretical studies, numerous crystal structural identifications, and a plethora of solution phase investigations, intrinsic anion? interaction strengths that are free from complications of condensed phases environments, have not been directly measured in the gas phase. Herein we present a joint photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical study on this subject, in which tetraoxacalix[2]arene[2]triazine 1, an electron-deficient and cavity self-tunable macrocyclic was used as a charge-neutral molecular host to probe its interactions with a series of anions with distinctly different shapes and charge states (spherical halides Cl?, Br?, I?, linear thiocyanate SCN?, trigonal planar nitrate NO??, pyramidic iodate IO??, and tetrahedral sulfate SO??). The binding energies of the resultant gaseous 1:1 complexes (1Cl?,1Br?, 1I?, 1SCN?, 1NO??, 1IO?? and 1SO??) were directly measured experimentally, exhibiting substantial non-covalent interactions with pronounced anion specific effects. The binding strengths of Cl?, NO??, IO?? with 1 are found to be strongest among all singly charged anions, amounting to ca. 30 kcal/mol, but only about 40% of that between 1 and SO??. Quantum chemical calculations reveal that all anions reside in the center of the cavity of 1 with anion? binding motif in the complexes optimized structures, where 1 is seen to be able to self-regulate its cavity structure to accommodate anions of different geometries and three-dimensional shapes. Electron density surface and natural bond orbital charge distribution analysis further support anion? binding formation. The calculated binding energies of the anions and 1 nicely reproduce the experimentally estimated electron binding energy increase. This work illustrates that size-selective photoelectron spectroscopy combined with theoretical

  12. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  13. Thermodynamics imprinting reveals differential binding of metals to {alpha}-synuclein: Relevance to parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathi; Rao, K.S.J. . E-mail: kjr5n@yahoo.co.in

    2007-07-20

    The aggregation of {alpha}-synuclein is a hallmark feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other synucleinopathies. Metals are the significant etiological factors in PD, and their interaction with {alpha}-synuclein affect dramatically the kinetics of fibrillation in vitro and are proposed to play an important and potential neurodegenerative role in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the stoichiometry of binding of copper [Cu (II)] and iron [Fe (III)] with {alpha}-synuclein (wild recombinant type and A30P, A53T, E46K mutant forms) using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). {alpha}-Synuclein monomer (wild and mutant forms) titrated by Cu (II), showed two binding sites, with an apparent K {sub B} of 10{sup 5} M and 10{sup 4} M, respectively. But, {alpha}-synuclein (wild type and mutant forms) titrated with Fe (III) revealed a K {sub B} of 10{sup 5} M with single binding site. The present investigation uncovers the detailed binding propensities between metals and {alpha}-synuclein and has biological implications in PD.

  14. Selection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-binding peptide using phage display technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soykut, Esra Acar; Dudak, Fahriye Ceyda; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2008-05-23

    In this study, peptides were selected to recognize staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) which cause food intoxication and can be used as a biological war agent. By using commercial M13 phage library, single plaque isolation of 38 phages was done and binding affinities were investigated with phage-ELISA. The specificities of the selected phage clones showing high affinity to SEB were checked by using different protein molecules which can be found in food samples. Furthermore, the affinities of three selected phage clones were determined by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. Sequence analysis was realized for three peptides showing high binding affinity to SEB and WWRPLTPESPPA, MNLHDYHRLFWY, and QHPQINQTLYRM amino acid sequences were obtained. The peptide sequence with highest affinity to SEB was synthesized with solid phase peptide synthesis technique and thermodynamic constants of the peptide-SEB interaction were determined by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and compared with those of antibody-SEB interaction. The binding constant of the peptide was determined as 4.2 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} which indicates a strong binding close to that of antibody.

  15. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Methanobactin: a copper binding compound having antibiotic and antioxidant activity isolated from methanotrophic bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DiSpirito, Alan A.; Zahn, James A.; Graham, David W.; Kim, Hyung J.; Alterman, Michail; Larive, Cynthia

    2007-04-03

    A means and method for treating bacterial infection, providing antioxidant activity, and chelating copper using a copper binding compound produced by methanotrophic bacteria is described. The compound, known as methanobactin, is the first of a new class of antibiotics having gram-positive activity. Methanobactin has been sequenced, and its structural formula determined.

  17. NRC staff review of licensee responses to pressure-locking and thermal-binding issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbun, H.J.

    1996-12-01

    Commercial nuclear power plant operating experience has indicated that pressure locking and thermal binding represent potential common mode failure mechanisms that can cause safety-related power-operated gate valves to fail in the closed position, thus rendering redundant safety-related systems incapable of performing their safety functions. In Generic Letter (GL) 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves,{close_quotes} the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff requested that nuclear power plant licensees take certain actions to ensure that valves susceptible to pressure locking or thermal binding are capable of performing their safety functions within the current licensing bases of the facility. The NRC staff has received summary information from licensees in response to GL 95-07 describing actions they have taken to prevent the occurrence of pressure locking and thermal binding. The NRC staff has developed a systematic process to help ensure uniform and consistent review of licensee submittals in response to GL 95-07.

  18. Structure of the Escherichia coli Phosphonate Binding Protein PhnD and Rationally Optimized Phosphonate Biosensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alicea, Ismael; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2012-09-17

    The phnD gene of Escherichia coli encodes the periplasmic binding protein of the phosphonate (Pn) uptake and utilization pathway. We have crystallized and determined structures of E. coli PhnD (EcPhnD) in the absence of ligand and in complex with the environmentally abundant 2-aminoethylphosphonate (2AEP). Similar to other bacterial periplasmic binding proteins, 2AEP binds near the center of mass of EcPhnD in a cleft formed between two lobes. Comparison of the open, unliganded structure with the closed 2AEP-bound structure shows that the two lobes pivot around a hinge by {approx}70{sup o} between the two states. Extensive hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions stabilize 2AEP, which binds to EcPhnD with low nanomolar affinity. These structures provide insight into Pn uptake by bacteria and facilitated the rational design of high signal-to-noise Pn biosensors based on both coupled small-molecule dyes and autocatalytic fluorescent proteins.

  19. Nucleotide-binding flexibility in ultrahigh-resolution structures of the SRP GTPase Ffh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, U.D.; Focia, P.J.; Freymann, D.M.

    2008-10-24

    Two structures of the nucleotide-bound NG domain of Ffh, the GTPase subunit of the bacterial signal recognition particle (SRP), have been determined at ultrahigh resolution in similar crystal forms. One is GDP-bound and one is GMPPCP-bound. The asymmetric unit of each structure contains two protein monomers, each of which exhibits differences in nucleotide-binding conformation and occupancy. The GDP-bound Ffh NG exhibits two binding conformations in one monomer but not the other and the GMPPCP-bound protein exhibits full occupancy of the nucleotide in one monomer but only partial occupancy in the other. Thus, under the same solution conditions, each crystal reveals multiple binding states that suggest that even when nucleotide is bound its position in the Ffh NG active site is dynamic. Some differences in the positioning of the bound nucleotide may arise from differences in the crystal-packing environment and specific factors that have been identified include the relative positions of the N and G domains, small conformational changes in the P-loop, the positions of waters buried within the active site and shifts in the closing loop that packs against the guanine base. However, 'loose' binding may have biological significance in promoting facile nucleotide exchange and providing a mechanism for priming the SRP GTPase prior to its activation in its complex with the SRP receptor.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor: specific binding and internalization in sensitive and resistant cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, M.; Yip, Y.K.; Vilcek, J.

    1985-11-01

    Highly purified, Escherichia coli-derived recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was labeled with /sup 125/I and employed to determine receptor binding, internalization, and intracellular degradation in murine L929 cells (highly sensitive to the cytotoxic action of TNF) and in diploid human FS-4 cells (resistant to TNF cytotoxicity). /sup 125/I-labeled TNF bound specifically to high-affinity receptors on both L929 and FS-4 cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated the presence of 2200 binding sites per L929 cell and 7500 binding sites per FS-4 cell. The calculated dissociation constants are 6.1 x 10/sup -10/ M and 3.2 x 10/sup -10/ M for L929 and FS-4 cells, respectively. In both L929 and FS-4 cells, incubation at 37/sup 0/C resulted in a rapid internalization of the bulk of the cell-bound TNF, followed by the appearance of trichloroacetic acid-soluble /sup 125/I radioactivity in the tissue culture medium, due to degradation of TNF. Degradation but not cellular uptake of TNF was inhibited in the presence of chloroquine (an inhibitor of lysosomal proteases) in both L929 and FS-4 cells, suggesting that degradation occurs intracellularly, probably within lysosomes. These results show that resistance of FS-4 cells to TNF cytotoxicity is not due to a lack of receptors or their inability to internalize and degrade TNF.

  1. MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2005-10-05

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA three-dimensional structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Nucleic Acid Database (NDB). Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements; in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure, and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering.

  2. Calculation of positron binding energies using the generalized any particle propagator theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, Jonathan; Charry, Jorge A.; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Varella, Mrcio T. do N.; Reyes, Andrs

    2014-09-21

    We recently extended the electron propagator theory to any type of quantum species based in the framework of the Any-Particle Molecular Orbital (APMO) approach [J. Romero, E. Posada, R. Flores-Moreno, and A. Reyes, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 074105 (2012)]. The generalized any particle molecular orbital propagator theory (APMO/PT) was implemented in its quasiparticle second order version in the LOWDIN code and was applied to calculate nuclear quantum effects in electron binding energies and proton binding energies in molecular systems [M. Daz-Tinoco, J. Romero, J. V. Ortiz, A. Reyes, and R. Flores-Moreno, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 194108 (2013)]. In this work, we present the derivation of third order quasiparticle APMO/PT methods and we apply them to calculate positron binding energies (PBEs) of atoms and molecules. We calculated the PBEs of anions and some diatomic molecules using the second order, third order, and renormalized third order quasiparticle APMO/PT approaches and compared our results with those previously calculated employing configuration interaction (CI), explicitly correlated and quantum Montecarlo methodologies. We found that renormalized APMO/PT methods can achieve accuracies of ?0.35 eV for anionic systems, compared to Full-CI results, and provide a quantitative description of positron binding to anionic and highly polar species. Third order APMO/PT approaches display considerable potential to study positron binding to large molecules because of the fifth power scaling with respect to the number of basis sets. In this regard, we present additional PBE calculations of some small polar organic molecules, amino acids and DNA nucleobases. We complement our numerical assessment with formal and numerical analyses of the treatment of electron-positron correlation within the quasiparticle propagator approach.

  3. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  4. Glycosylation Helps Cellulase Enzymes Bind to Plant Cell Walls (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    Computer simulations suggest a new strategy to design enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. Large-scale computer simulations predict that the addition of glycosylation on carbohydrate-binding modules can dramatically improve the binding affinity of these protein domains over amino acid mutations alone. These simulations suggest that glycosylation can be used as a protein engineering tool to enhance the activity of cellulase enzymes, which are a key component in the conversion of cellulose to soluble sugars in the production of biofuels. Glycosylation is the covalent attachment of carbohydrate molecules to protein side chains, and is present in many proteins across all kingdoms of life. Moreover, glycosylation is known to serve a wide variety of functions in biological recognition, cell signaling, and metabolism. Cellulase enzymes, which are responsible for deconstructing cellulose found in plant cell walls to glucose, contain glycosylation that when modified can affect enzymatic activity-often in an unpredictable manner. To gain insight into the role of glycosylation on cellulase activity, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used computer simulation to predict that adding glycosylation on the carbohydrate-binding module of a cellulase enzyme dramatically boosts the binding affinity to cellulose-more than standard protein engineering approaches in which amino acids are mutated. Because it is known that higher binding affinity in cellulases leads to higher activity, this work suggests a new route to designing enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. More generally, this work suggests that tuning glycosylation in cellulase enzymes is a key factor to consider when engineering biochemical conversion processes, and that more work is needed to understand how glycosylation affects cellulase activity at the molecular level.

  5. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2012-02-05

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites of AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.

  6. Identification of the heparin binding site on adeno-associated virus serotype 3B (AAV-3B)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerch, Thomas F.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2012-05-24

    Adeno-associated virus is a promising vector for gene therapy. In the current study, the binding site on AAV serotype 3B for the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptor has been characterized. X-ray diffraction identified a disaccharide binding site at the most positively charged region on the virus surface. The contributions of basic amino acids at this and other sites were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis. Both heparin and cell binding are correlated to positive charge at the disaccharide binding site, and transduction is significantly decreased in AAV-3B vectors mutated at this site to reduce heparin binding. While the receptor attachment sites of AAV-3B and AAV-2 are both in the general vicinity of the viral spikes, the exact amino acids that participate in electrostatic interactions are distinct. Diversity in the mechanisms of cell attachment by AAV serotypes will be an important consideration for the rational design of improved gene therapy vectors.

  7. High-Affinity and Cooperative Binding of Oxidized Calmodulin by Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Smallwood, Heather S.; Urbauer, Ramona J.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Williams, Todd D.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-12-12

    Methionines play an important role in modulating protein-protein interactions associated with intracellular signaling, and their reversible oxidation to form methionine sulfoxides [Met(O)] in calmodulin (CaM) and other signaling proteins has been suggested to couple cellular redox changes to protein function changes through the action of methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr). Prior measurements indicate the full recovery of target protein activation upon the stereospecific reduction of oxidized CaM by MsrA, where the formation of the S-stereoisomer of Met(O) selectively inhibits the CaM-dependent activation of the Ca-ATPase. However, the physiological substrates of MsrA remain unclear, as neither the binding specificities nor affinities of protein targets have been measured. To assess the specificity of binding and its possible importance in the maintenance of CaM function, we have measured the kinetics of repair and the binding affinity between oxidized CaM and MsrA. Reduction of Met(O) in fully oxidized CaM by MsrA is sensitive to protein folding, as repair of the intact protein is incomplete, with > 6 Met(O) remaining in each CaM following MsrA reduction. In contrast, following proteolytic digestion, MsrA is able to fully reduce one-half of the oxidized methionines, indicating that Met(O) within folded proteins are not substrates for MsrA repair. Further, in comparison to free Met(O), the turnover number and Km for oxidized CaM (CaMox) are substantially smaller, indicating that the binding interaction retards Msr recycling to reduce steady-state enzyme activity. Mutation of the active site (i.e., C72S) in MsrA permitted equilibrium-binding measurements using both ensemble and single-molecule measurements obtained by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Multiple MsrA bind tightly to CaMox (Kd = 70 +- 10 nM) with an affinity that is three orders of magnitude greater than the Michaelis constant (KM = 71 +- 8 micromolar). These results indicate that Msr

  8. Structural determinants of nuclear export signal orientation in binding to exportin CRM1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Fu, Szu -Chin; Brautigam, Chad A.; Chook, Yuh Min

    2015-09-08

    The Chromosome Region of Maintenance 1 (CRM1) protein mediates nuclear export of hundreds of proteins through recognition of their nuclear export signals (NESs), which are highly variable in sequence and structure. The plasticity of the CRM1-NES interaction is not well understood, as there are many NES sequences that seem incompatible with structures of the NES-bound CRM1 groove. Crystal structures of CRM1 bound to two different NESs with unusual sequences showed the NES peptides binding the CRM1 groove in the opposite orientation (minus) to that of previously studied NESs (plus). A comparison of minus and plus NESs identified structural and sequencemore » determinants for NES orientation. The binding of NESs to CRM1 in both orientations results in a large expansion in NES consensus patterns and therefore a corresponding expansion of potential NESs in the proteome.« less

  9. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materialsmore » science, chemistry, and biology.« less

  10. Quenching methods for background reduction in luminescence-based probe-target binding assays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Hong; Goodwin, Peter M; Keller, Richard A.; Nolan, Rhiannon L.

    2007-04-10

    Background luminescence is reduced from a solution containing unbound luminescent probes, each having a first molecule that attaches to a target molecule and having an attached luminescent moiety, and luminescent probe/target adducts. Quenching capture reagent molecules are formed that are capable of forming an adduct with the unbound luminescent probes and having an attached quencher material effective to quench luminescence of the luminescent moiety. The quencher material of the capture reagent molecules is added to a solution of the luminescent probe/target adducts and binds in a proximity to the luminescent moiety of the unbound luminescent probes to quench luminescence from the luminescent moiety when the luminescent moiety is exposed to exciting illumination. The quencher capture reagent does not bind to probe molecules that are bound to target molecules and the probe/target adduct emission is not quenched.

  11. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-06-26

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materials science, chemistry, and biology.

  12. Capture and release of mixed acid gasses with binding organic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heldebrant, David J. (Richland, WA); Yonker, Clement R. (Kennewick, WA)

    2010-09-21

    Reversible acid-gas binding organic liquid systems that permit separation and capture of one or more of several acid gases from a mixed gas stream, transport of the liquid, release of the acid gases from the ionic liquid and reuse of the liquid to bind more acid gas with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems. These systems utilize acid gas capture compounds made up of strong bases and weak acids that form salts when reacted with a selected acid gas, and which release these gases when a preselected triggering event occurs. The various new materials that make up this system can also be included in various other applications such as chemical sensors, chemical reactants, scrubbers, and separators that allow for the specific and separate removal of desired materials from a gas stream such as flue gas.

  13. Nucleic acids encoding phloem small RNA-binding proteins and transgenic plants comprising them

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, William J.; Yoo, Byung-Chun; Lough, Tony J.; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2007-03-13

    The present invention provides a polynucleotide sequence encoding a component of the protein machinery involved in small RNA trafficking, Cucurbita maxima phloem small RNA-binding protein (CmPSRB 1), and the corresponding polypeptide sequence. The invention also provides genetic constructs and transgenic plants comprising the polynucleotide sequence encoding a phloem small RNA-binding protein to alter (e.g., prevent, reduce or elevate) non-cell autonomous signaling events in the plants involving small RNA metabolism. These signaling events are involved in a broad spectrum of plant physiological and biochemical processes, including, for example, systemic resistance to pathogens, responses to environmental stresses, e.g., heat, drought, salinity, and systemic gene silencing (e.g., viral infections).

  14. Structural determinants of nuclear export signal orientation in binding to exportin CRM1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Fu, Szu -Chin; Brautigam, Chad A.; Chook, Yuh Min

    2015-09-08

    The Chromosome Region of Maintenance 1 (CRM1) protein mediates nuclear export of hundreds of proteins through recognition of their nuclear export signals (NESs), which are highly variable in sequence and structure. The plasticity of the CRM1-NES interaction is not well understood, as there are many NES sequences that seem incompatible with structures of the NES-bound CRM1 groove. Crystal structures of CRM1 bound to two different NESs with unusual sequences showed the NES peptides binding the CRM1 groove in the opposite orientation (minus) to that of previously studied NESs (plus). A comparison of minus and plus NESs identified structural and sequence determinants for NES orientation. The binding of NESs to CRM1 in both orientations results in a large expansion in NES consensus patterns and therefore a corresponding expansion of potential NESs in the proteome.

  15. Tight-binding calculation studies of vacancy and adatom defects in graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Ho, K. M.; Wang, C. Z.

    2016-02-19

    Computational studies of complex defects in graphene usually need to deal with a larger number of atoms than the current first-principles methods can handle. We show a recently developed three-center tight-binding potential for carbon is very efficient for large scale atomistic simulations and can accurately describe the structures and energies of various defects in graphene. Using the three-center tight-binding potential, we have systematically studied the stable structures and formation energies of vacancy and embedded-atom defects of various sizes up to 4 vacancies and 4 embedded atoms in graphene. In conclusion, our calculations reveal low-energy defect structures and provide a moremore » comprehensive understanding of the structures and stability of defects in graphene.« less

  16. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  17. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; et al

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobicmore » environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.« less

  18. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS{sup SV40}) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS{sup SV40} in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS{sup SV40} formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS{sup SV40} likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS{sup SV40} can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. - Highlights: • Nuclear localization signal-tagged GFP (GFP-NLS) showed clear nuclear localization. • The GFP-NLS dynamically localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus. • The nuclear localization of GFP-NLS results from transient oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. • Our NLS-tagging procedure is ideal for use in artificial sequestration of proteins in the nucleus.

  19. Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase Tuesday, March 31, 2015 All living organisms depend on the availability of nitrogen for incorporation into the basic biological building blocks such as amino acids and DNA. Globally the largest reservoir for nitrogen is the atmosphere, with an N2 content of roughly 78%. However, as a highly unreactive gas, most organisms are unable to directly utilize dinitrogen due to the severe energy barrier required

  20. Ritonavir binds to and downregulates estrogen receptors: Molecular mechanism of promoting early atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, Jin; Wang, Ying; Su, Ke; Liu, Min; Hu, Peng-Chao; Ma, Tian; Li, Jia-Xi; Wei, Lei; Zheng, Zhongliang; Yang, Fang

    2014-10-01

    Estrogenic actions are closely related to cardiovascular disease. Ritonavir (RTV), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor, induces atherosclerosis in an estrogen-related manner. However, how RTV induce pathological phenotypes through estrogen pathway remains unclear. In this study, we found that RTV increases thickness of coronary artery walls of Sprague Dawley rats and plasma free fatty acids (FFA) levels. In addition, RTV could induce foam cell formation, downregulate both estrogen receptor ? (ER?) and ER? expression, upregulate G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) expression, and all of them could be partially blocked by 17?-estradiol (E2), suggesting RTV acts as an antagonist for E2. Computational modeling shows a similar interaction with ER? between RTV and 2-aryl indoles, which are highly subtype-selective ligands for ER?. We also found that RTV directly bound to ER? and selectively inhibited the nuclear localization of ER?, and residue Leu536 in the hydrophobic core of ligand binding domain (LBD) was essential for the interaction with RTV. In addition, RTV did not change the secondary structure of ER?-LBD like E2, which explained how ER? lost the capacity of nuclear translocation under the treatment of RTV. All of the evidences suggest that ritonavir acts as an antagonist for 17?-estradiol in regulating ? subtype estrogen receptor function and early events of atherosclerosis. - Graphical abstract: RTV directly binds to ER? and Leu536 in the hydrophobic core of ligand binding domain is essential for the interaction. - Highlights: RTV increases the thickness of rat coronary artery wall and foam cell formation. RTV downregulates the expression of ER? and ER?. RTV inhibits ER? promoter activity. RTV directly binds to ER? and the key amino acid is Leu536. RTV inhibits the nuclear translocation of ER? and GPER.

  1. V-008: Debian Security Advisory | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    08: Debian Security Advisory V-008: Debian Security Advisory October 23, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Debian Security Advisory PLATFORM: Debian GNU/Linux 6.0 ABSTRACT: Debian update for bind9 REFERENCE LINKS: Debian Security Advisory DSA-2560-1 Debian bugtracking system: Bug 690118 ISC Reference Number: AA-00801 Secunia Advisory SA51054 CVE-2012-5166 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: was discovered that BIND, a DNS server, hangs while constructing the additional section of a DNS reply,

  2. VA-MD-DC Hydrogen Education for Decision Makers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Debian Security Advisory PLATFORM: Debian GNU/Linux 6.0 ABSTRACT: Debian update for bind9 REFERENCE LINKS: Debian Security Advisory DSA-2560-1 Debian bugtracking system: Bug 690118 ISC Reference Number: AA-00801 Secunia Advisory SA51054 CVE-2012-5166 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: was discovered that BIND, a DNS server, hangs while constructing the additional section of a DNS reply, when certain combinations of resource records are present. This vulnerability affects both recursive and

  3. Presence of specific growth hormone binding sites in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) tissues: characterization of the hepatic receptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, K.; Niu, P.D.; Le Gac, F.; Le Bail, P.Y. )

    1991-01-01

    The present work outlines the presence of specific binding for chinook salmon growth hormone (sGH) in different tissue preparations of rainbow trout. Optimal incubation conditions (pH, Tris, MgCl{sub 2}) were determined. Specific binding was very sensitive to salt concentration during incubation. The specific binding reached a plateau after 15 and 25 hr of incubation at 12 and 4 {degree}. At 20 {degree}, specific and nonspecific binding were not stable. Specific binding dissociation was slower than association and was only partial. The binding was saturable (Bmax = 187 +/- 167 pmol), of high affinity (Ka = 2.4 +/- 0.8 10(9) M-1), and very specific for GH, properties which are in agreement with the characteristics of hormonal receptors. Sea bream and mammalian GH appeared 2- and 30-fold, respectively, less potent than cold sGH2 for displacing {sup 125}I-sGH2. Tissue preparations from ovary, testis, fat, skin, cartilage, gill, blood pellet, brain, spleen, kidney, and muscle showed significant saturable binding.

  4. Structural and Energetic Analysis of Activiation by a Cyclic Nucleotide Binding Domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altieri,S.; Clayton, G.; Silverman, W.; Olivares, A.; De La Cruz, E.; Thomas, L.; Morais-Cabral, J.

    2008-01-01

    MlotiK1 is a prokaryotic homolog of cyclic-nucleotide-dependent ion channels that contains an intracellular C-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domain. X-ray structures of the CNB domain have been solved in the absence of ligand and bound to cAMP. Both the full-length channel and CNB domain fragment are easily expressed and purified, making MlotiK1 a useful model system for dissecting activation by ligand binding. We have used X-ray crystallography to determine three new MlotiK1 CNB domain structures: a second apo configuration, a cGMP-bound structure, and a second cAMP-bound structure. In combination, the five MlotiK1 CNB domain structures provide a unique opportunity for analyzing, within a single protein, the structural differences between the apo state and the bound state, and the structural variability within each state. With this analysis as a guide, we have probed the nucleotide selectivity and importance of specific residue side chains in ligand binding and channel activation. These data help to identify ligand-protein interactions that are important for ligand dependence in MlotiK1 and, more globally, in the class of nucleotide-dependent proteins.

  5. Subfamily-specific adaptations in the structures of two penicillin-binding proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prigozhin, Daniil M.; Krieger, Inna V.; Huizar, John P.; Mavrici, Daniela; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Hung, Li -Wei; Sacchettini, James C.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Alber, Tom; Mayer, Claudine

    2014-12-31

    Beta-lactam antibiotics target penicillin-binding proteins including several enzyme classes essential for bacterial cell-wall homeostasis. To better understand the functional and inhibitor-binding specificities of penicillin-binding proteins from the pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we carried out structural and phylogenetic analysis of two predicted D,D-carboxypeptidases, Rv2911 and Rv3330. Optimization of Rv2911 for crystallization using directed evolution and the GFP folding reporter method yielded a soluble quadruple mutant. Structures of optimized Rv2911 bound to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and Rv3330 bound to meropenem show that, in contrast to the nonspecific inhibitor, meropenem forms an extended interaction with the enzyme along a conserved surface. Phylogenetic analysis shows thatmore » Rv2911 and Rv3330 belong to different clades that emerged in Actinobacteria and are not represented in model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Clade-specific adaptations allow these enzymes to fulfill distinct physiological roles despite strict conservation of core catalytic residues. The characteristic differences include potential protein-protein interaction surfaces and specificity-determining residues surrounding the catalytic site. Overall, these structural insights lay the groundwork to develop improved beta-lactam therapeutics for tuberculosis.« less

  6. Identification of FAM96B as a novel prelamin A binding partner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Xing-Dong; Wang, Junwen; Zheng, Huiling; Jing, Xia; Liu, Zhenjie; Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524023; Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Diagnostics, Dongguan 523808 ; Zhou, Zhongjun; Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ; Liu, Xinguang; Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524023; Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Diagnostics, Dongguan 523808

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: We screen the binding protein of prelamin A by yeast two-hybrid screen. FAM96B colocalizes with prelamin A in HEK-293 cells. FAM96B physically interacts with prelamin A. -- Abstract: Prelamin A accumulation causes nuclear abnormalities, impairs nuclear functions, and eventually promotes cellular senescence. However, the underlying mechanism of how prelamin A promotes cellular senescence is still poorly understood. Here we carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen using a human skeletal muscle cDNA library to search for prelamin A binding partners, and identified FAM96B as a prelamin A binding partner. The interaction of FAM96B with prelamin A was confirmed by GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, co-localization experiments by fluorescent confocal microscopy revealed that FAM96B colocalized with prelamin A in HEK-293 cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated the physical interaction between FAM96B and prelamin A, which may provide some clues to the mechanisms of prelamin A in premature aging.

  7. Protein arginine deiminase 2 binds calcium in an ordered fashion: Implications for inhibitor design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slade, Daniel J.; Fang, Pengfei; Dreyton, Christina J.; Zhang, Ying; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Rempel, Don; Bax, Benjamin D.; Coonrod, Scott A.; Lewis, Huw D.; Guo, Min; Gross, Michael L.; Thompson, Paul R.

    2015-01-26

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ions that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs.

  8. A Novel, ;Double-Clamp; Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-08-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be {approx}15 times more potent (IC{sub 50} = 0.27{+-}0.07 {mu}M) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC{sub 50} = 4.0{+-}1.8 {mu}M). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This 'double-clamp' binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  9. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; et al

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes withmore » different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.« less

  10. Protein arginine deiminase 2 binds calcium in an ordered fashion: Implications for inhibitor design

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slade, Daniel J.; Fang, Pengfei; Dreyton, Christina J.; Zhang, Ying; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Rempel, Don; Bax, Benjamin D.; Coonrod, Scott A.; Lewis, Huw D.; Guo, Min; et al

    2015-01-26

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ionsmore » that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs.« less

  11. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-03-26

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoidsmore » that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. We find diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process.« less

  12. Membrane binding mode of intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor signaling subunits depends on lipid composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigalov, Alexander B., E-mail: Alexander.sigalov@umassmed.edu [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States); Hendricks, Gregory M. [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States)] [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States)

    2009-11-13

    Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling subunits including {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} all contain one or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), tyrosine residues of which are phosphorylated upon receptor triggering. Membrane binding-induced helical folding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} ITAMs is thought to control TCR activation. However, the question whether or not lipid binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} is necessarily accompanied by a folding transition of ITAMs remains open. In this study, we investigate whether the membrane binding mechanisms of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depend on the membrane model used. Circular dichroic and fluorescence data indicate that binding of {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} to detergent micelles and unstable vesicles is accompanied by a disorder-to-order transition, whereas upon binding to stable vesicles these proteins remain unfolded. Using electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we show that upon protein binding, unstable vesicles fuse and rupture. In contrast, stable vesicles remain intact under these conditions. This suggests different membrane binding modes for {zeta}{sub cyt} and CD3{epsilon}{sub cyt} depending on the bilayer stability: (1) coupled binding and folding, and (2) binding without folding. These findings explain the long-standing puzzle in the literature and highlight the importance of the choice of an appropriate membrane model for protein-lipid interactions studies.

  13. Kinetic and Crystallgraphic Studies of a Redesigned Manganese-Binding Site in Cytochrome c Peroxidase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfister,T.; Mirarefi, A.; Gengenbach, A.; Zhao, X.; Danstrom , C.; Conatser, N.; Gao, Y.; Robinson, H.; Zukoski, C.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium contains a manganese-binding site that plays a critical role in its function. Previously, a Mn{sup II}-binding site was designed into cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) based on sequence homology (Yeung et al. in Chem. Biol. 4:215-222, 1997; Gengenbach et al. in Biochemistry 38:11425-11432, 1999). Here, we report a redesign of this site based on X-ray structural comparison of MnP and CcP. The variant, CcP(D37E, V45E, H181E), displays 2.5-fold higher catalytic efficiency (k{sub cat}/k{sub M}) than the variant in the original design, mostly due to a stronger k{sub M} of 1.9 mM (vs. 4.1 mM). High-resolution X-ray crystal structures of a metal-free form and a form with Co{sup II} at the designed Mn{sup II} site were also obtained. The metal ion in the engineered metal-binding site overlays well with Mn{sup II} bound in MnP, suggesting that this variant is the closest structural model of the Mn{sup II}-binding site in MnP for which a crystal structure exists. A major difference arises in the distances of the ligands to the metal; the metal-ligand interactions in the CcP variant are much weaker than the corresponding interactions in MnP, probably owing to partial occupancy of metal ion at the designed site, difference in the identity of metal ions (Co{sup II} rather than Mn{sup II}) and other interactions in the second coordination sphere. These results indicate that the metal ion, the ligands, and the environment around the metal-binding site play important roles in tuning the structure and function of metalloenzymes.

  14. Particle trap to sheath non-binding contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, William H.

    1984-04-24

    A non-binding particle trap to outer sheath contact for use in gas insulated transmission lines having a corrugated outer conductor. The non-binding feature of the contact according to the teachings of the invention is accomplished by having a lever arm rotatably attached to a particle trap by a pivot support axis disposed parallel to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulator/particle trap assembly.

  15. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Haohao; He, Chuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  16. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, John

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  17. A novel cofactor-binding mode in bacterial IMP dehydrogenases explains inhibitor selectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Gu, Minyi; Zhang, Minjia; Mandapati, Kavitha; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-09

    The steadily rising frequency of emerging diseases and antibiotic resistance creates an urgent need for new drugs and targets. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMP dehydrogenase or IMPDH) is a promising target for the development of new antimicrobial agents. IMPDH catalyzes the oxidation of IMP to XMP with the concomitant reduction of NAD+, which is the pivotal step in the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Potent inhibitors of bacterial IMPDHs have been identified that bind in a structurally distinct pocket that is absent in eukaryotic IMPDHs. The physiological role of this pocket was not understood. Here, we report the structures of complexes with different classes of inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Clostridium perfringens IMPDHs. These structures in combination with inhibition studies provide important insights into the interactions that modulate selectivity and potency. We also present two structures of the Vibrio cholerae IMPDH in complex with IMP/NAD+ and XMP/NAD+. In both structures, the cofactor assumes a dramatically different conformation than reported previously for eukaryotic IMPDHs and other dehydrogenases, with the major change observed for the position of the NAD+ adenosine moiety. More importantly, this new NAD+-binding site involves the same pocket that is utilized by the inhibitors. Thus, the bacterial IMPDH-specific NAD+-binding mode helps to rationalize the conformation adopted by several classes of prokaryotic IMPDH inhibitors. As a result, these findings offer a potential strategy for further ligand optimization.

  18. Unusual dynamic properties of water near the ice-binding plane of hyperactive antifreeze protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuffel, Anna; Czapiewski, Dariusz; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2015-10-07

    The dynamical properties of solvation water of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana (CfAFP) are analyzed and discussed in context of its antifreeze activity. The protein comprises of three well-defined planes and one of them binds to the surface of ice. The dynamical properties of solvation water around each of these planes were analyzed separately; the results are compared with the dynamical properties of solvation water of ice around its two crystallographic planes: basal and prism. Three main conclusions are inferred from our investigations. The first one is that the solvation shell of CfAFP does not seem to be particularly far-ranged, at least not beyond what is usually observed for proteins that do not interact with ice. Therefore, it does not appear to us that the antifreeze activity is enhanced by a long-ranged retardation of water mobility. Also the correlation between the collective mobility of water and the collective mobility of protein atoms highly resembles the one measured for the protein that does not interact with ice. Our second conclusion is that the dynamical properties of solvation water of CfAFP are non-uniform. The dynamics of solvation water of ice-binding plane is, in some respects, different from the dynamics of solvation water of the two remaining planes. The feature that distinguishes the dynamics of solvation water of the three planes is the activation energy of diffusion process. The third conclusion is that—from the three analyzed solvation shells of CfAFP—the dynamical properties of solvation water of the ice-binding plane resemble the most the properties of solvation water of ice; note, however, that these properties still clearly differ from the dynamic properties of solvation water of ice.

  19. Conformational Melding Permits a Conserved Binding Geometry in TCR Recognition of Foreign and Self Molecular Mimics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-03-16

    Molecular mimicry between foreign and self Ags is a mechanism of TCR cross-reactivity and is thought to contribute to the development of autoimmunity. The {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 recognizes the foreign Ag Tax from the human T cell leukemia virus-1 when presented by the class I MHC HLA-A2. In a possible link with the autoimmune disease human T cell leukemia virus-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, A6 also recognizes a self peptide from the neuronal protein HuD in the context of HLA-A2. We found in our study that the complexes of the HuD and Tax epitopes with HLA-A2 are close but imperfect structural mimics and that in contrast with other recent structures of TCRs with self Ags, A6 engages the HuD Ag with the same traditional binding mode used to engage Tax. Although peptide and MHC conformational changes are needed for recognition of HuD but not Tax and the difference of a single hydroxyl triggers an altered TCR loop conformation, TCR affinity toward HuD is still within the range believed to result in negative selection. Probing further, we found that the HuD-HLA-A2 complex is only weakly stable. Overall, these findings help clarify how molecular mimicry can drive self/nonself cross-reactivity and illustrate how low peptide-MHC stability can permit the survival of T cells expressing self-reactive TCRs that nonetheless bind with a traditional binding mode.

  20. Fluorinated Calixpyrroles: Anion-Binding Extractants that Reduce the Hofmeister Bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Marquez, Manuel; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Shriver, James A.; Vercouter, Thomas; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2003-04-30

    b-Fluorinated calix[4]pyrrole 1 and calix[5]pyrrole 2, strong, neutral anion-binding agents, were found to transport small anions effectively while overcoming the classical solvation-based Hofmeister anion bias selectivity. These two receptors showed an ability to extract smaller anions (bromide and chloride for 1 and nitrate and fluoride for 2) as effectively as iodide anion into nitrobenzene (NB). The present results also represent a rare example of liquid-liquid extraction of inorganic salts effected using an anion receptor in the absence of a cation co-extractant.

  1. Determination of the Exciton Binding Energy in CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meulenberg, R; Lee, J; Wolcott, A; Zhang, J; Terminello, L; van Buuren, T

    2009-10-27

    The exciton binding energy (EBE) in CdSe quantum dots (QDs) has been determined using x-ray spectroscopy. Using x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy, the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB) edge shifts as a function of particle size have been determined and combined to obtain the true band gap of the QDs (i.e. without and exciton). These values can be compared to the excitonic gap obtained using optical spectroscopy to determine the EBE. The experimental EBE results are compared with theoretical calculations on the EBE and show excellent agreement.

  2. Ammonium Additives to Dissolve Li2S through Hydrogen Binding for High

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Li-S Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research July 1, 2016, Research Highlights Ammonium Additives to Dissolve Li2S through Hydrogen Binding for High Energy Li-S Batteries (a) Solubility of Li2S in DMSO solvent with different amounts of NH4NO3 as additive. (b) 1H chemical shifts as a function of Li2S concentration in DMSO-d6 with NH4NO3 additive. (c) DFT-derived structure of Li2S-NH4-NO3-8DMSO system shows the dissolution process of Li2S is enhanced through hydrogen

  3. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Loots, Gabriela G. [LLNL; Ovcharenko, I. [LLNL

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. This database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a comprehensive collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes generated using multiple sources of gene annotation. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in evolutionary conserved and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and fugu genomes. (taken from paper in Journal: Bioinformatics, November 7, 2006, pp. 122-124

  4. Binding Energies and Melting Temperatures of Heavy Hadrons in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narodetskii, I. M.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Veselov, A. I.

    2011-05-23

    We discuss the consequences of the suggestion that the non-perturbative quark-antiquark potential at T{>=}T{sub c}, where T{sub c} is a temperature of a deconfinement phase transition in QCD can be studied through the modification of the correlation functions, which define the quadratic field correlators of the nonperturbative vaccuum fields. We use the non-perturbative quark-antiquark potential derived within the Field Correlator Method and the screened Coulomb potential with T-dependent Debye mass to calculate J/{psi}, {Upsilon} and {Omega}{sub bbb} binding energies and melting temperatures in the deconfined phase of QCD.

  5. The quorum sensing transcriptional regulator TraR has separate binding sites for DNA and the anti-activator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zhida; Fuqua, Clay; Chen, Lingling

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quorum sensing transcription factor TraR is inhibited by forming TraR-TraM complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K213 is a key DNA binding residue, but not involved in interaction with TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraM-interacting TraR residues did not affect DNA-binding of TraR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraR residues reduced the TraR-TraM interaction more than those of TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR is driven by thermodynamics. -- Abstract: Quorum sensing represents a mechanism by which bacteria control their genetic behaviors via diffusible signals that reflect their population density. TraR, a quorum sensing transcriptional activator in the Rhizobiaceae family, is regulated negatively by the anti-activator TraM via formation of a TraR-TraM heterocomplex. Prior structural analysis suggests that TraM and DNA bind to TraR in distinct sites. Here we combined isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) to investigate roles of TraR residues from Rhizobium sp. NGR234 in binding of both TraM and DNA. We found that K213A mutation of TraR{sub NGR} abolished DNA binding, however, did not alter TraM binding. Mutations of TraM-interfacing TraR{sub NGR} residues decreased the TraR-TraM interaction, but did not affect the DNA-binding activity of TraR{sub NGR}. Thus, our biochemical studies support the independent binding sites on TraR for TraM and DNA. We also found that point mutations in TraR{sub NGR} appeared to decrease the TraR-TraM interaction more effectively than those in TraM{sub NGR}, consistent with structural observations that individual TraR{sub NGR} residues contact with more TraM{sub NGR} residues than each TraM{sub NGR} residues with TraR{sub NGR} residues. Finally, we showed that TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR was driven thermodynamically. We discussed subtle mechanistic differences in Tra

  6. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; et al

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, themore » high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.« less

  7. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.

  8. Tight binding prediction of the {alpha}-Gd{sub 2}S{sub 3} magnetic structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Lindsay E.; Hughbanks, Timothy

    2007-03-15

    Spin-dependent extended Hueckel tight binding (EHTB) calculations were carried out for the magnetic solid Gd{sub 2}S{sub 3} by considering 20 different variations in the ordering of the 4f {sup 7} moments. The tight-binding calculations are used to interpolate the band structure of a nonmagnetic congener (Y{sub 2}S{sub 3}) and the 4f/5d,6s exchange interactions are introduced as perturbations via the introduction of spin-dependent H{sub dd} and H{sub ss} parameters. The calculations predict that Gd{sub 2}S{sub 3} adopts an antiferromagnetic ordering of the 4f {sup 7} moments that is consistent with published neutron diffraction results. Our attempt to account for the calculated energies of the spin patterns using an Ising model was unsuccessful. - Graphical abstract: The spin-dependent EHTB method correctly predicts the magnetic structure of {alpha}-Gd{sub 2}S{sub 3} determined from neutron diffraction experiments.

  9. Structural Insights into the Cooperative Binding of SeqA to a Tandem GATC Repeat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Y.; Brendler, T; Austin, S; Guarne, A

    2009-01-01

    SeqA is a negative regulator of DNA replication in Escherichia coli and related bacteria that functions by sequestering the origin of replication and facilitating its resetting after every initiation event. Inactivation of the seqA gene leads to unsynchronized rounds of replication, abnormal localization of nucleoids and increased negative superhelicity. Excess SeqA also disrupts replication synchrony and affects cell division. SeqA exerts its functions by binding clusters of transiently hemimethylated GATC sequences generated during replication. However, the molecular mechanisms that trigger formation and disassembly of such complex are unclear. We present here the crystal structure of a dimeric mutant of SeqA [SeqA{Delta}(41-59)-A25R] bound to tandem hemimethylated GATC sites. The structure delineates how SeqA forms a high-affinity complex with DNA and it suggests why SeqA only recognizes GATC sites at certain spacings. The SeqA-DNA complex also unveils additional protein-protein interaction surfaces that mediate the formation of higher ordered complexes upon binding to newly replicated DNA. Based on this data, we propose a model describing how SeqA interacts with newly replicated DNA within the origin of replication and at the replication forks.

  10. Nuclear binding energy and symmetry energy of nuclear matter with modern nucleon-nucleon potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassaneen, Kh.S.A.; Abo-Elsebaa, H.M.; Sultan, E.A.; Mansour, H.M.M.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > The nuclear matter is studied within the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) approach employing the most recent accurate nucleon-nucleon potentials. > The results come out by approximating the single particle self-consistent potential with a parabolic form. > We discuss the current status of the Coester line, i.e., density and energy of the various saturation points being strongly linearly correlated. > The nuclear symmetry energy is calculated as the difference between the binding energy of pure neutron matter and that of symmetric nuclear matter. - Abstract: The binding energy of nuclear matter at zero temperature in the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation with modern nucleon-nucleon potentials is studied. Both the standard and continuous choices of single particle energies are used. These modern nucleon-nucleon potentials fit the deuteron properties and are phase shifts equivalent. Comparison with other calculations is made. In addition we present results for the symmetry energy obtained with different potentials, which is of great importance in astrophysical calculation.