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1

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1996 Table State Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama................................................................... 3.02 2.69 1.48 Alaska ...................................................................... 5.58 2.43 2.04 Arizona..................................................................... NA 0 0.55 Arkansas.................................................................. 0.88 1.12 1.23 California.................................................................. 1.25 1.45 8.23 Colorado .................................................................. 4.63 2.90 1.40 Connecticut.............................................................. 0 0 0.58 D.C...........................................................................

2

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers by State, 1996 Table State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Alabama..................................... 1.08 0.92 2.27 0.08 0.23 Alaska ........................................ 0.31 0.87 0.85 - 1.16 Arizona....................................... 0.53 0.92 0.30 3.91 0.70 Arkansas.................................... 0.88 0.98 1.59 0.11 1.24 California.................................... 9.03 7.44 7.82 43.11 11.64 Colorado .................................... 2.12 2.18 0.94 0.58 0.20 Connecticut................................ 0.84 1.26 0.37 1.08 0.38 D.C............................................. 0.33 0.52 - 0.21 - Delaware.................................... 0.19 0.21 0.16 0.04 0.86 Florida........................................

3

RSE Table 3.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

4

3.5 Nanowire Sensors 3.5.1 Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

117 3.5 Nanowire Sensors 3.5.1 Background Nanowires are solid, rod-like materials with diameters that similar commercial products will eventually be available. 3.5.2 Description Nanowire sensors have et al. 2003). A comprehensive review of current research activities on chemical sensors based

5

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" 0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $13.59",," W",," $63.63"," 21.4%"," 3,612"," W"," 100.0%"

6

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" 1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Delaware"," W"," $28.49",," W",," $131.87"," 21.6%", 59," W"," 100.0%"

7

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" 9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $14.43",," W",," $65.38"," 22.1%"," 4,509"," W"," 81.8%"

8

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" 2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Florida"," W"," $38.51",," W",," $140.84"," 27.3%", 134," W"," 100.0%"

9

Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Variable Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 1.0 42.6 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 35.2 18.6 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 34.7 19.7 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 6.2 66.5 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.0 59.6 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 13.3 67.0 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Constant $) (Table 7a) 30.7 26.1 Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Nominal $) (Table 7b) 30.0 27.1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (Table 8) 7.8 70.2 Natural Gas Production (Table 9) 7.1 66.0 Natural Gas Net Imports (Table 10) 29.3 69.7 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants (Constant $)** (Table 11a)

10

Percent Yield and Mass of Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Percent Yield and Mass of Water Percent Yield and Mass of Water Name: Lisa Status: educator Grade: 9-12 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: When doing a percent yield activity in lab, we use MgCl hexahydrate and CaSO4. How do we factor the mass of the water that is released during the reaction? Replies: Lisa, Based on your question, I am not quite sure what the experiment is. Are you heating the hydrates and looking at the percent-yield of water removed during the heating? If so, then you would calculate the theoretical yield (using stoichiometry and the balanced chemical equation: MgCl2.6H2O --> MgCl2 + 6H2O) of water released, and compare it to the actual yield of water released in the experiment to get percent yield. Greg (Roberto Gregorius) Canisius College

11

27. 5-percent silicon concentrator solar cells  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in silicon solar cells using the backside point-contact configuration have been extended resulting in 27.5-percent efficiencies at 10 W/sq cm (100 suns, 24 C), making these the most efficient solar cells reported to date. The one-sun efficiencies under an AM1.5 spectrum normalized to 100 mW/sq cm are 22 percent at 24 C based on the design area of the concentrator cell. The improvements reported here are largely due to the incorportation of optical light trapping to enhance the absorption of weakly absorbed near bandgap light. These results approach the projected efficiencies for a mature technology which are 23-24 percent at one sun and 29 percent in the 100-350-sun (10-35 W/sq cm) range. 10 references.

Sinton, R.A.; Kwark, Y.; Gan, J.Y.; Swanson, R.M.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

13

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

14

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

15

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

16

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

17

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

18

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

19

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

20

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

22

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

23

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

24

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

25

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

26

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

27

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

28

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

29

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

30

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

31

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

32

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

33

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

34

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

35

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

36

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

37

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

38

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

39

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

40

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

42

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

43

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

44

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

45

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

46

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

47

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

48

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

49

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

50

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

51

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

52

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

53

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

54

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

55

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

56

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

57

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

58

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

59

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

60

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

62

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

63

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

64

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

65

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

66

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

67

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

68

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

69

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

70

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

71

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

72

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

73

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

74

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

75

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

76

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

77

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

78

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

79

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

80

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

82

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

83

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

84

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

85

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

86

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

87

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

88

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

89

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

90

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

91

Biodegradation of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). While previous HMX biodegradation studies focused on the anaerobic degradation, these experiments demonstrated that HMX could be degraded in the presence of oxygen by a mixed consortia of acclimated...

Jankowski, Michael Dennis

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

93

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

94

3.5 Histogram Zoomable Window  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5.1 Summary States Up: 3. Graphical User Interface Previous: 3.4.4 5.1 Summary States Up: 3. Graphical User Interface Previous: 3.4.4 Row Adjustment Panel Contents 3.5 Histogram Zoomable Window Figure 3.23: Histogram window of the whole duration shown in Figure 3.10. Image histogram_state_all_cumu_excl The Histogram window is created by clicking the statistics button located in the middle of Duration Info Box, shown in Figure 3.19. In Figure 3.23, the Histogram window is created for the whole duration of the timeline canvas in Figure 3.10, that is, the same duration as the complete slog2 file. In general, the total duration of the histogram canvas is the same as the duration marked by the Duration Info Box, so that the Histogram window functions like a graphical display of statistical summary of the duration of interest. For instance, it is obvious from Figure 3.23 that the yellow

95

Bioavailability of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine (RDX) to the Praire Vole (Microtus ochrogaster).  

SciTech Connect

Estimating risk to wildlife requires that measures of exposure be equivalent to that of the laboratory studies from which toxic responses were observed. Exposure measures are often based on modeled estimates of uptake through the food web. These modeled estimates use largely untested assumptions that can lead to inaccurate, uncertain, and unreliable estimates of exposure. Recently, concerns have been raised over the potential bioavailability and biotransfer of munitions or energetics materials such as hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). RDX is more recalcitrant in the soil, may remain as the parent compound for extended periods of time, and is rapidly taken up by the roots of higher plants and partitioned predominantly into the above ground, herbivore-accessible tissues. This study assessed plant incorporated [14C]-RDX and plant derived [14C]-RDX-metabolites ingestion by a representative hindgut herbivore, the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). The animals were fed the labeled chow (?10 g/ day max) for five or seven days followed by a six or four day chase period with the control chow prior to final weighing and sacrifice. Animal excreta including feces, urine, and respired CO2 were collected and measured. Greater than 95% of all label presented to the voles was recovered in the summed excreta. Seventy-four percent of the label in the total excreta was found in the fecal non-absorbed bulk. This means that greater than 20% of the presented 14C-RDX and plant-derived 14C-RDX-metabolites were absorbed by the animal’s digestive tracts over the time course of the experiment and modified prior to release. These materials were either metabolized to 14CO2 (8 to 10% of the total label) or removed as nitrogenous waste through the kidneys (10 to 14%). The feeding regimes were followed by a rapid, 2 to 3 day, clearing of label from the bulk feces with the cessation of exposure. Both 14C-urine and 14CO2 excretion continued after the feces cleared indicating ongoing metabolism of the absorbed labeled material. Approximately 4% of the label presented in the chow over the exposure periods was retained within the animal’s tissues at time of sacrifice. Activity was found in the lung, heart, brain, spleen, testes, skeletal muscle, bone, and pancreatic tissues while the testes contained the highest tissue specific activity. The liver contained the highest activity of all the internal organs. All of these tissues which contain these [14C]-RDX derived materials are readily available to subsequent predators this may indicate a potential for this material to transfer to a higher trophic level.

Fellows, Robert J.; Driver, Crystal J.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Harvey, Scott D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

97

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

98

Ninety - Two Percent Minimum Heater Efficiency By 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology is now available to increase heater efficiencies to 92 percent and more. By 1980, this technology will be field proven and corrosion and reliability problems identified and resolved. Recent studies have shown that a minimum efficiency...

Mieth, H. C.; Hardie, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This and future measures at this precision are the key to determining the nature of dark energy. "One-percent accuracy in the scale of the universe is the most precise such...

100

NETL: News Release - President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 21, 2004 April 21, 2004 President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury Removal We Energies to Test TOXECON(tm) Process in Michigan Coal-fired Power Plant WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) and We Energies today initiated a joint venture to demonstrate technology that will remove an unprecedented 90 percent of mercury emissions from coal-based power plants. Presque Isle Power Plant - We Energies' Presque Isle Power Plant located on the shores of Lake Superior in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. As part of the President's Clean Coal Power Initiative of technology development and demonstration, the new project supports current proposals to reduce mercury emissions in the range of 70 percent through a proposed regulation pending before the Environmental Protection Agency or, in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08566108 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",77.22222222,"NA",79.16666667,82.9015544,75.38461538,85.09615385 " New England",88.37209302,"NA",81.81818182,82.9787234,82,88.52459016 " Middle Atlantic ",73.72262774,"NA",78.37837838,82.31292517,74.30555556,83.67346939 " Midwest ",85.51401869,"NA",90.66666667,90.17094017,92.30769231,91.47286822 " East North Central",82,"NA",88.81987578,89.88095238,91.51515152,90.55555556

102

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.5 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOWNLOAD June 16, 2011 CX-006343: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey-City-Hamilton, Township of CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B3.5, B5.1 Date: 06162011 Location(s):...

103

3-5-09_Final_Testimony_(Chu).pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steven Chu Steven Chu Secretary of Energy Before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources United States Senate Washington, D.C. March 5, 2009 Chairman Bingaman, Ranking Member Murkowski and Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to continue the conversation we began at my confirmation hearing. During that hearing, I touched on the enormous challenges and threats we face - to our economy, our security, and our climate. In the 20 th century, America's economic engine was powered by relatively inexpensive domestic fossil fuels. Today, we import roughly 60 percent of our oil, draining resources from our economy and leaving it vulnerable to volatility in oil prices. Additionally, the potentially adverse effects of global

104

Manipulating decision making of typical agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how the choice of decision makers can be varied under the presence of risk and uncertainty. Our analysis is based on the approach we have previously applied to individual decision makers, which we now generalize to the case of decision makers that are members of a society. The approach employs the mathematical techniques that are common in quantum theory, justifying our naming as Quantum Decision Theory. However, we do not assume that decision makers are quantum objects. The techniques of quantum theory are needed only for defining the prospect probabilities taking into account such hidden variables as behavioral biases and other subconscious feelings. The approach describes an agent's choice as a probabilistic event occurring with a probability that is the sum of a utility factor and of an attraction factor. The attraction factor embodies subjective and unconscious dimensions in the mind of the decision maker. We show that the typical aggregate amplitude of the attraction factor is $1/4$, and ...

Yukalov, V I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Hampshire Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.5 16.2 17.9 15.4 9.9 5.0 3.7 8.5 13.7 14.1 17.5 16.5 2002 16.4 11.2 14.6 9.0 8.3 9.0 5.2 10.1 7.7 29.4 32.3 17.4 2003 6.7 7.2 19.4 17.0 10.6 13.5 13.0 12.3 13.4 15.5 21.1 26.3 2004 30.3 9.1 10.7 10.4 7.1 5.5 3.9 4.3 5.6 8.7 9.7 17.0 2005 17.6 17.5 12.0 6.5 6.9 6.6 3.3 10.0 5.5 6.4 13.7 13.0 2006 16.3 24.3 18.2 18.2 17.7 12.9 4.8 9.1 8.0 12.8 8.8 15.6 2007 11.7 16.6 12.0 8.4 15.3 8.9 5.4 7.0 6.0 8.5 10.7 45.8 2008 23.0 22.9 22.0 15.0 16.4 16.2 14.6 12.3 11.2 13.6 16.1 20.0 2009 30.5 28.1 25.0 16.7 15.5 16.3 14.5 13.7 13.3 16.5 18.7 23.1 2010 18.0 16.4 15.4 12.2 10.3 8.8 8.6 10.9 8.0 10.7 13.6 14.1

106

Master's Thesis Performance Measurement over 3G and 3.5G Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master's Thesis 3 3.5 Performance Measurement over 3G and 3.5G Wireless Networks ( Han, Mongnam) Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Division of Computer Science and 3.5G Wireless Networks 2 #12;Performance Measurement over 3G and 3.5G Wireless Networks Major

Moon, Sue B.

107

Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings ................",4657,1097,1012,751,1796,67338,8864,16846,16966,24662 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,668,352,294,1034,6774,1895,1084,838,2957 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,282,292,188,348,8238,2026,2233,1435,2544

108

Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit","All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit" "All Buildings ................",4657,498,835,1228,2096,67338,3253,9187,20665,34233 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,323,351,517,1156,6774,915,1061,1499,3299 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,114,279,351,367,8238,818,2014,2614,2793

109

U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition Goal U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition Goal February 12, 2014 - 11:05am Addthis News Media...

110

Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings ................",4657,641,576,627,2813,67338,5736,7593,10745,43264 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,366,230,272,1479,6774,1091,707,750,4227 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,164,194,149,603,8238,1148,1504,1177,4409

111

Manipulating decision making of typical agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how the choice of decision makers can be varied under the presence of risk and uncertainty. Our analysis is based on the approach we have previously applied to individual decision makers, which we now generalize to the case of decision makers that are members of a society. The approach employs the mathematical techniques that are common in quantum theory, justifying our naming as Quantum Decision Theory. However, we do not assume that decision makers are quantum objects. The techniques of quantum theory are needed only for defining the prospect probabilities taking into account such hidden variables as behavioral biases and other subconscious feelings. The approach describes an agent's choice as a probabilistic event occurring with a probability that is the sum of a utility factor and of an attraction factor. The attraction factor embodies subjective and unconscious dimensions in the mind of the decision maker. We show that the typical aggregate amplitude of the attraction factor is $1/4$, and it can be either positive or negative depending on the relative attraction of the competing choices. The most efficient way of varying the decision makers choice is realized by influencing the attraction factor. This can be done in two ways. One method is to arrange in a special manner the payoff weights, which induces the required changes of the values of attraction factors. We show that a slight variation of the payoff weights can invert the sign of the attraction factors and reverse the decision preferences, even when the prospect utilities remain unchanged. The second method of influencing the decision makers choice is by providing information to decision makers. The methods of influencing decision making are illustrated by several experiments, whose outcomes are compared quantitatively with the predictions of our approach.

V. I. Yukalov; D. Sornette

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

112

Determination of self-absorption corrections by computation in routine gamma-ray spectrometry for typical environmental samples  

SciTech Connect

A simple and practical method has been developed to quickly calculate self-absorption corrections and mass attenuation coefficients, {mu}/p, in common environmental samples being analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry. The method involves using a sample computer program and estimates of the elemental compositions of typical environmental samples. The use of this method eliminates the need for gamma-ray-transmission measurements of individual samples, as well as expensive and time consuming elemental analyses of routine samples. The calculated percent attenuation of the beam through various samples, as determined by this method, agrees very well with experimentally measured values of percent attenuation.

Oresegun, M.O. [Univ. of Ibadan (Nigeria); Decker, K.M.; Sanderson, C.G. [Environmental Measurements Lab., New York, NY (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - association york 3-5 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spheroids Jorg Peters and Leif Kobbelt Summary: . The Tetroid A representative cubic patch has the B'ezier coefficients 2 4 3 Gamma3 Gamma3 3 5 2 4 1 Gamma1... Gamma7 3 5 2...

114

AIN Melaha 2010, Session 5B, Cairo, Egypt 3-5 May 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIN Melaha 2010, Session 5B, Cairo, Egypt 3-5 May 2010 Use of GNSS for Vehicle, Cairo, Egypt 3-5 May 2010 Use of GNSS for Vehicle-Pedestrian and Vehicle-Cyclist Crash Avoidance/V2C scenarios, are only made #12;AIN Melaha 2010, Session 5B, Cairo, Egypt 3-5 May 2010 for vehicle

Calgary, University of

115

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: March 26, 0: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Digg

116

Comparison of the percent recoveries of activated charcoal and Spherocarb after storage utilizing thermal desorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the two adsorbents. The parameters of storage in- cluded various durations of time, temperatures, and concentrations. Rather than the present conventional solvent desorption methods, thermal desorption was used in the analysis of samples... Duncan's Multiple Range Test For Variable Percent. 32 6 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Type Of Adsorbent And Storage Time . 7 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Sample Concentration And Storage Time. 39 40 8...

Stidham, Paul Emery

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

117

EECBG 11-002 Clarification of Ten Percent Limitation on Use of...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG), ten percent limitation, administrative expenses, the Energy...

118

Policy ForumSeries "Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Energy Future,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy ForumSeries "Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Energy Future, From Near with the UC Davis Policy Institute is the UC Davis Energy Institute. Renewables Beyond 33 Percent October 17 as it transitions to a renewable energy future. Featuring panelists from government, industry and academia

California at Davis, University of

119

PRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy, Disputes Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy his support for a 12 percent increase in federal funding for nuclear energy research, but challenged of modern nuclear power plants. Domenici is chairman of the Energy and Water Development Appropriations

120

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

122

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monumental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters

123

Cardiovascular and Metabolic Effects of Adenosine 3?,5?-Monophosphate in vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Drs. Robert B. Franklin and Leon M. Dixon, Cardio logy Service, Fitzsimons General Hospital, for the cardiac catheterization investigations on humans. 3',5'-AMP was provided by ...

ROBERT A. LEVINE; JAMES A. VOGEL

1965-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

124

Coal deposit characterization by gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: pb = C + Va(pa) Equation 3 where C is a constant. Ash content can therefore be geophysically determined as variations In log-derived bulk density measurements are in direct response to variations in ash content. However, when any of the above... by applying the relationships between geophysi cally-derived gamma-gamma density and laboratory-derived percent dry ash. The linear gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationship is dependent upon a constant fuel ratio (percent fixed carbon...

Wright, David Scott

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well...

126

EECBG 11-002 Clarification of Ten Percent Limitation on Use of Funds for Administrative Expenses  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG), ten percent limitation, administrative expenses, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

127

Skills, education, and the rise of earnings inequality among the “other 99 percent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...disaster assistance, food assistance) that buffer...executives and financial professionals...evidence of rents in top 1 percent...macro-micro-minnesota/2012/02...attractive financial proposition on average...research assistance. Supported...

David H. Autor

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or More Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Household vehicle ownership has changed over the last six decades. In 1960, over twenty percent of households did not own a vehicle, but by 2010, that number fell to less than 10%. The number of...

129

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried ... 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL Posted By Office of Public Affairs

130

Effects of time constraint and percent defective on visual inspection performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS OF TIME CONSTRAINT AND PERCENT DEFECTIVE ON VISUAL INSPECTION PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WALTER EDGAR GILMORE II Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering EFFECTS OF TIME CONSTRAINT AND PERCENT DEFECTIVE ON VISUAL INSPECTION PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WALTER EDGAR GILMORE II Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Committ e) (Memb r...

Gilmore, Walter Edgar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Typical Oak Ridge cemesto houses and city bus | Y-12 National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Typical Oak Ridge cemesto ... Typical Oak Ridge cemesto houses and city bus Typical Oak Ridge cemesto houses and city bus...

132

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 November 9, 2011 - 10:00am Addthis This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography Maria Tikoff Vargas

133

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

134

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well understood. Some gets to find the fuel and sell it. The fuel and all associated activities factor into the economic equation of the nation and the wrold. What is the economics of generating 20 percent of my total capacity from say wind? And all of it replaces coal powered electricty ? What happended to GDP ? Is the economy a net gain or net loss ? The value of the electricity came into the system, but no coal is bought or sold. Submitted by Jamespr on 6 May, 2013 - 17:46 0 answers Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

135

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

136

Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone June 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO - One quarter of the uranium mill tailings pile located in Moab, Utah, has been relocated to the Crescent Junction, Utah, site for permanent disposal. Four million tons of the 16 million tons total has been relocated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). A little over 2 years ago, Remedial Action Contractor EnergySolutions began

137

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2, 2012 November 2, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monu- mental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. In 2009, EM identified a goal of 40 percent footprint reduction by September 2011 as its High Priority Performance Goal. EM achieved that goal in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule, and continues to achieve footprint reduction, primarily at Savannah River Site and Hanford. Once

138

26-percent efficient point-junction concentrator solar cells with a front metal grid  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on silicon concentrator cells with point diffusions and metal contacts on both the front and back sides. The design minimizes reflection losses by forming an inverted pyramid topography on the front surface and by shaping the metal grid lines in the form of a triangular ridge. A short-circuit current density of 39.6 mA/cm{sup 2} has been achieved even though the front grid covers 16 percent of the cell's active area of 1.56 cm{sup 2}. This, together with an open-circuit voltage of 700 mV, has led to an efficiency of 22 percent at one sun, AM1.5 global spectrum. Under direct-spectrum, 8.8-W/cm{sup 2}, concentrated light, the efficiency is 26 percent. This is the highest ever reported for a silicon cell having a front metal grid.

Cuevas, A.; Sinton, R.A.; Midkiff, N.E.; Swanson, R.M. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. MOAB, Utah - The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project had a productive year, despite continued budget constraints and a first-ever, three-month curtailment of shipping operations last winter. On June 18, the project reached a significant milestone of having shipped 6

140

Microsoft Word - g413.3-5Final9-12-08.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baseline approval at Critical Decision (CD) 2. POINT OF CONTACT Kin Chao Office of Science, Office of Project Assessment (kin.chao@science.doe.gov; 301-903-4116) DOE G 413.3-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Signatures of Heating and Cooling Energy Consumption for Typical AHUs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis is performed to investigate the signatures of different parameters on the heating and cooling energy consumption of typical air handling units (AHUs). The results are presented in graphic format. HVAC simulation engineers can use...

Wei, G.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Gearbox Typical Failure Modes, Detection, and Mitigation Methods (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation was given at the AWEA Operations & Maintenance and Safety Seminar and focused on what the typical gearbox failure modes are, how to detect them using detection techniques, and strategies that help mitigate these failures.

Sheng, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6.1 4.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 3.6 1.9 2.9 2.5 2.5 3.3 4.0 2002 4.1 4.5 4.1 3.6 3.5 4.2 3.2 3.5 3.9 3.4 3.8 4.4 2003 4.2 5.9 4.4 3.9 3.5 3.7 3.3 2.6 3.7 3.2 4.4 3.3 2004 4.6 3.8 4.2 3.3 3.3 3.7 2.9 3.2 4.4 3.3 4.1 3.6 2005 2.7 4.1 3.8 3.4 3.1 3.2 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.7 3.5 3.6 2006 3.0 2.8 3.0 2.8 2.3 2.4 5.3 2.9 3.0 2.4 4.2 3.1 2007 2.6 3.1 3.5 2.3 2.9 4.0 2.8 2.6 3.6 2.5 3.7 3.6 2008 2.9 3.3 3.4 2.5 2.9 2.4 2.8 2.5 3.2 3.0 3.3 3.3 2009 3.5 3.4 4.8 3.3 3.1 2.8 2.8 2.9 2.8 3.4 3.1 2.8 2010 2.6 3.4 2.9 2.7 3.6 2.3 2.5 5.1 3.0 2.8 2.8 2.6 2011 3.1 4.3 2.6 2.8 2.8 2.6 2.9 2.9 2.8 3.1 3.8 2.4

144

Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's environmental and economic goals are to ensure ... (e) greenhouse gas emissions will be at least ten per cent). The Nova Scotia Department of Energy also assumes this level of emissions by 2020 in its background paper of carbon dioxide. #12;Energy Research Group: Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction 2 shows NRCan

Hughes, Larry

145

What is the problem? Buildings account for 40 percent of U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is the problem? Buildings account for 40 percent of U.S. energy use and a similar percentage with buildings and appliances are projected to grow faster than those from any other sector. In order to ensure that building energy consumption be significantly reduced. One way this can be achieved is through

146

On the relation between rough set reducts and typical testors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper studies the relations between rough set reducts and typical testors from the so-called logical combinatorial approach to pattern recognition. Definitions, comments and observations are formally introduced and supported by illustrative examples. Furthermore, some theorems expressing theoretical relations between reducts and typical testors are enunciated and proved. We also discuss several practical applications of these relations that can mutually enrich the development of research and applications in both areas. Although we focus on the relation between the classical concepts of testor and reduct, our study can be expanded to include other types of testors and reducts.

Manuel S. Lazo-Cortés; José Fco. Martínez-Trinidad; Jesús A. Carrasco-Ochoa; Guillermo Sanchez-Diaz

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

EM Partnering Initiative: Journey to Excellence Metric No. 3.5 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnering Initiative: Journey to Excellence Metric No. 3.5 Partnering Initiative: Journey to Excellence Metric No. 3.5 EM Partnering Initiative: Journey to Excellence Metric No. 3.5 Partnering establishes a collaborative approach among the Government and Contractor to achieve results. Partnering is not a contract; it does not alter the contractual relationship of the two parties. This teaming approach is based upon open communication, collaboration, and commitment to joint success. Partnering refocuses the nature of the working relationship based upon mutual goals and objectives. This model emphasizes early detection of problems and issues and proactive resolution of issues sooner than would happen through the normal process of performance and reporting. Partnering, therefore, is a commitment to perform in a collaborative manner as members

148

Sensitivity of 2,6-Diamino-3, 5-Dinitropyrazine-1-Oxide  

SciTech Connect

The thermal and shock sensitivities of plastic bonded explosive formations based on 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (commonly called LLM-105 for Lawrence Livermore Molecule No.105) are reported. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) apparatus was used to generate times to thermal explosion at various initial temperatures. A four-reaction chemical decomposition model was developed to calculate the time to thermal explosion versus inverse temperature curve. Three embedded manganin pressure gauge experiments were fired at different initial pressures to measure the pressure buildup and the distance required for transition to detonation. An Ignition and Growth reactive model was calibrated to this shock initiation data. LLM-105 exhibited thermal and shock sensitivities intermediate between those of triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazine (HMX).

Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Tran, T D

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

149

A combined cycle designed to achieve greater than 60 percent efficiency  

SciTech Connect

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Westinghouse is working on Phase 2 of an 8-year Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technologies required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. In this paper, the technologies required to yield an energy conversion efficiency greater than the Advanced Turbine Systems Program target value of 60 percent are discussed. The goal of 60 percent efficiency is achievable through an improvement in operating process parameters for both the combustion turbine and steam turbine, raising the rotor inlet temperature to 2,600 F (1,427 C), incorporation of advanced cooling techniques in the combustion turbine expander, and utilization of other cycle enhancements obtainable through greater integration between the combustion turbine and steam turbine.

Briesch, M.S.; Bannister, R.L.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Finding typical high redshift galaxies with the NOT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from an ongoing search for galaxy counterparts of a subgroup of Quasar Absorption Line Systems called Damped Ly-alpha Absorbers (DLAs). DLAs have several characteristics that make them prime candidates for being the progenitors of typical present day galaxies.

J. U. Fynbo; P. Moller; B. Thomsen

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

151

Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios Marty Humphrey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios Marty Humphrey Computer Science. A broader goal of these scenarios are to increase the awareness of security issues in Grid Computing. 1 easy and secure ac- cess to the Grid's diverse resources. Infrastructure software such as Legion [6

Thompson, Mary R.

152

Robust Neuroimaging-Based Classification Techniques of Autistic vs. Typically  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

abnormalities in several brain regions. Increased head size was the first observed characteristic in children1 Robust Neuroimaging-Based Classification Techniques of Autistic vs. Typically Developing Brain with autism. According to the published studies, different anatomical structures of the brain have been

Farag, Aly A.

153

Ultrasonic methods for measuring liquid viscosity and volume percent of solids  

SciTech Connect

This report describes two ultrasonic techniques under development at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the tank-waste transport effort undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy in treating low-level nuclear waste. The techniques are intended to provide continuous on-line measurements of waste viscosity and volume percent of solids in a waste transport line. The ultrasonic technique being developed for waste-viscosity measurement is based on the patented ANL viscometer. Focus of the viscometer development in this project is on improving measurement accuracy, stability, and range, particularly in the low-viscosity range (<30 cP). A prototype instrument has been designed and tested in the laboratory. Better than 1% accuracy in liquid density measurement can be obtained by using either a polyetherimide or polystyrene wedge. To measure low viscosities, a thin-wedge design has been developed and shows good sensitivity down to 5 cP. The technique for measuring volume percent of solids is based on ultrasonic wave scattering and phase velocity variation. This report covers a survey of multiple scattering theories and other phenomenological approaches. A theoretical model leading to development of an ultrasonic instrument for measuring volume percent of solids is proposed, and preliminary measurement data are presented.

Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Histological Analysis of the Antimetastatic Effect of (±)-1,2-Bis(3,5-dioxopiperazin-1-yl)propane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2-Bis(3,5-dioxopiperazin-1-yl)propane A. J. Salsbury Karen Burrage K. Hellmann...2-bis(3,5-dioxopiperazine-1-yl)propane (ICRF 159) on the Lewis lung carcinoma...2-bis(3,5-dioxopiperazin-1-yl)propane. | Comparative Study Journal Article...

A. J. Salsbury; Karen Burrage; K. Hellmann

1974-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Center For Brain Science 3/5/12 Center for Brain Science Neuroimaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center For Brain Science 3/5/12 1 Center for Brain Science Neuroimaging Training Levels are as follows: Level 1: Observer - Anyone and everyone wishing to observe research around the MRI magnet must first watch the safety video. Once you have done this you are permitted to be in the magnetic

Datta, Sandeep Robert

156

Stephanie Anderson, version: 17/03/2014 Semester 1 / 3 / 5 refer to the Winter Semester  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lecture hours Hours tutorials BAD-51 English legal terminology I 2 1 20 BAD-47 International Law I Philosophy (History of political ideas) 3 4 30 BAD-107 Droit civil VII 3 5 30 BAD-131 International Law II (Public International Law) 3 6 30 BAD-130 Philosophy of Law III (Sociology/Anthropology of Law) 3 6 30

van der Torre, Leon

157

Enaction and Enactive Interfaces: A Handbook of Terms 3 5+%7#'%$8!$-&+.$%&/9!6()+/!(.!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enaction and Enactive Interfaces: A Handbook of Terms 3 ! 5+%7#'%$8!$-&+.$%&/9!6()+/!(.! Armen it like the extension of the body, not like the object of the physics [Merleau-Ponty, 1945]. - Between does not care about what is going on in the computer, which becomes a transparent equipment. When

Boyer, Edmond

158

Two-dimensional 1,3,5-Tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene self-assembly at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-dimensional 1,3,5-Tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene self-assembly at the 1-phenyloctane and published work see http://pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/journalissues/tc. Two-dimensional (2D) self-assembly storage, selective ion exchange, high den- sity data storage, etc. Molecular self-assembly offers unique

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5 Course. This course provides an overview of wind turbine technology and energy concepts. The question of whether wind. Students will measure personal energy use and analyze wind turbine data from the Museum of Science's wind

160

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 15.1 14.0 7.1 7.1 4.2 3.7 5.2 1.0 5.5 8.3 6.6 10.2 2002 8.4 8.1 10.1 6.4 5.3 6.2 5.3 5.9 6.6 12.5 12.6 12.4 2003 14.2 12.9 8.9 7.2 7.0 5.9 6.2 5.7 9.3 6.2 11.3 9.3 2004 9.2 8.9 8.9 6.9 6.4 6.2 6.9 6.5 7.3 7.9 10.4 11.6 2005 9.8 7.7 9.6 5.8 6.3 5.5 5.5 6.7 8.2 8.2 10.6 8.9 2006 8.2 9.3 7.4 4.3 7.0 5.0 6.4 5.9 6.3 8.2 8.3 8.4 2007 9.3 9.4 5.8 7.6 6.1 5.5 6.0 5.0 6.9 6.8 9.5 9.1 2008 8.4 7.5 7.0 6.7 5.5 4.5 4.7 4.7 5.3 9.1 8.4 7.6 2009 8.6 8.5 5.3 6.3 7.1 6.2 6.8 5.0 6.2 7.8 6.8 8.1 2010 7.5 6.4 5.7 5.4 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.3 5.0 4.7 5.5 6.3 2011 4.5 4.8 4.8 3.5 3.4 3.2 3.5 2.2 2.5 2.4 3.1 4.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80 Percent and Increases Reliability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This case study outlines how General Motors (GM) developed a highly efficient pumping system for their Pontiac Operations Complex in Pontiac, Michigan. In short, GM was able to replace five original 60- to 100-hp pumps with three 15-hp pumps whose speed could be adjusted to meet plant requirements. As a result, the company reduced pumping system energy consumption by 80 percent (225,100 kWh per year), saving an annual $11,255 in pumping costs. With a capital investment of $44,966 in the energy efficiency portion of their new system, GM projected a simple payback of 4 years.

163

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maryland Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 15.4 11.4 9.7 7.2 6.7 4.5 9.7 6.3 6.3 7.0 6.6 10.3 2002 10.3 11.3 13.0 5.3 5.8 6.0 4.5 5.8 4.3 6.9 7.1 11.9 2003 10.5 13.2 11.4 9.1 7.8 6.6 6.3 6.2 7.1 12.1 11.9 12.9 2004 11.2 10.7 8.8 9.1 6.4 4.7 5.0 5.6 7.2 7.2 9.4 10.9 2005 11.3 11.5 11.3 9.8 5.5 5.1 4.9 5.3 5.2 6.2 9.4 10.7 2006 8.7 10.4 8.9 6.1 4.5 4.4 3.7 3.9 6.5 5.8 7.7 9.2 2007 13.1 13.7 11.0 9.9 6.1 3.7 4.5 3.8 6.9 3.5 8.4 10.4 2008 9.5 10.4 7.5 6.6 4.7 3.1 3.0 4.2 4.5 4.5 6.7 9.6 2009 12.8 10.9 8.0 4.2 1.7 2.2 2.0 2.0 3.6 2.8 3.4 7.6 2010 7.3 7.1 6.3 4.1 3.3 2.3 2.1 4.3 4.6 5.1 6.1 10.6 2011 11.3 10.0 8.0 7.2 4.2 3.5 2.2 3.6 3.9 3.9 4.9 5.0

164

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Ohio Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.1 9.8 10.4 6.2 3.9 3.4 1.5 4.8 1.2 2.9 5.6 6.4 2002 5.4 6.2 5.4 4.8 1.9 1.7 1.6 2.1 2.5 2.3 4.9 6.7 2003 6.3 7.0 5.4 4.0 1.8 2.4 2.0 1.7 1.7 2.4 3.3 4.6 2004 5.1 5.7 4.0 3.8 2.1 2.3 1.7 2.3 2.2 2.7 3.4 4.5 2005 5.7 6.6 4.5 2.6 2.0 1.6 2.1 2.0 1.9 2.6 3.3 4.8 2006 4.6 4.7 4.0 2.7 2.1 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.2 2.2 3.0 3.5 2007 3.9 4.8 3.5 2.6 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.4 1.5 1.2 2.2 3.7 2008 3.9 4.2 3.5 2.5 1.1 1.7 1.9 1.4 1.4 1.6 2.7 4.1 2009 4.8 4.7 3.8 2.2 2.1 2.6 1.7 1.4 1.1 1.6 2.0 3.2 2010 4.7 4.4 3.2 1.4 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.7 1.5 1.7 2.9 2011 4.0 3.5 3.0 1.5 1.0 0.7 0.5 0.7 1.0 0.8 1.9 2.8

165

Atmospheric chemistry of aniline, N,N-dimethylaniline, pyridine, 1,3,5-triazine, and nitrobenzene  

SciTech Connect

The atmospherically important reactions of aniline, N,N-dimethylaniline, pyridine, 1,3,5-triazine, and nitrobenzene, chosen as model compounds for a series of industrially and agriculturally important chemicals, have been studied with the OH radical, O/sub 3/, and gaseous HNO/sub 3/ by a variety of experimental techniques. At room temperature, the following rate constants (in cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/) were obtained for these gas-phase reactions: (OH radical reactions) aniline, (1.18 +/- 0.11) x 10/sup -10/; N,N-dimethylaniline, (1.48 +/- 0.11) x 10/sup -10/; pyridine, (4.9 +/- 0.4) x 10/sup -13/; 1,3,5-triazine, (1.5 +/- 0.3) x 10/sup -13/; nitrobenzene, <7 x 10/sup -13/; (O/sub 3/ reactions) aniline, (1.12 +/- 0.14) x 10/sup -18/; N,N-deimethylaniline, (9.1 +/- 1.0) x 10/sup -18/; pyridine, < 1.1 x 10/sup -20/; 1,3,5-triazine, < 4 x 10/sup -21/; nitrobenzene, < 7 x 10/sup -21/; (HNO/sub 3/ reactions) aniline, greater than or equal to 1.5 x 10/sup -16/; N,N-dimethylaniline, greater than or equal to 2.0 x 10/sup -16/; pyridine, greater than or equal to 1.5 x 10/sup -16/; 1,3,5-triazine, less than or equal to 6 x 10/sup -19/. Under atmospheric conditions, the O/sub 3/ reactions are calculated to be of negligible importance. The implications of the OH radical and HNO/sub 3/ reactions for the atmospheric lifetimes of these nitrogen-containing organic compounds are discussed. 28 references, 7 figures, 9 tables.

Atkinson, R.; Tuazon, E.C.; Wallington, T.J.; Aschmann, S.M.; Arey, J.; Winer, A.M.; Pitts, J.N. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Spot test for 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene, TATB  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple, sensitive and specific spot test for 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene, TATB, is described. Upon the application of the composition of matter of the subject invention to samples containing in excess of 0.1 mg of this explosive, a bright orange color results. Interfering species such as TNT and Tetryl can be removed by first treating the sample with a solvent which does not dissolve the TATB, but readily dissolves these interfering explosives.

Harris, B.W.

1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy Department Awards $3.5 Million to Develop Cost-Competitive Algal Biofuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department announced today $3.5 million for an algae project aimed at accelerating the development of sustainable, affordable algal biofuels. This research project supports the Department’s goal of producing 2,500 gallons of algal biofuel feedstock per acre per year by 2018, an important milestone toward reducing the cost of algal biofuels to cost-competitive levels of 5,000 gallons per acre per year by 2022.

168

Is the Sun Embedded in a Typical Interstellar Cloud?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical properties and kinematics of the partially ionized interstellar material near the Sun are typical of warm diffuse clouds in the solar vicinity. The interstellar magnetic field at the heliosphere and the kinematics of nearby clouds are naturally explained in terms of the S1 superbubble shell. The interstellar radiation field at the Sun appears to be harder than the field ionizing ambient diffuse gas, which may be a consequence of the low opacity of the tiny cloud surrounding the heliosphere. The spatial context of the Local Bubble is consistent with our location in the Orion spur.

P. C. Frisch

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

169

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia from NREL Ethiopia from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions

170

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil from NREL Brazil from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

171

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal from NREL Nepal from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

172

Meteorology: typical meteorological data for selected stations in Ghana  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data for selected stations in Ghana data for selected stations in Ghana from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations> (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

173

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in Sri  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Sri Lanka from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

174

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya from NREL Kenya from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

175

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arkansas Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 6.8 10.0 9.1 4.6 6.6 4.9 5.5 3.8 4.0 5.6 5.3 5.4 2002 6.1 6.1 6.5 5.0 4.1 3.9 5.1 3.8 3.8 5.0 4.8 4.9 2003 5.4 5.9 5.8 4.6 4.0 3.8 4.5 5.2 5.9 6.5 6.2 6.1 2004 6.5 6.8 6.3 5.7 5.1 6.0 5.8 4.4 4.9 7.2 7.0 5.0 2005 5.5 6.2 5.6 5.3 4.7 4.6 4.3 3.8 4.6 6.8 5.5 5.1 2006 5.3 5.7 5.2 4.6 4.0 4.1 3.7 3.3 4.1 5.4 5.5 5.8 2007 4.5 5.6 4.4 4.2 3.8 3.8 3.3 3.4 3.7 4.5 4.5 3.7 2008 4.1 4.6 3.9 4.0 3.1 2.8 3.0 2.9 3.2 4.8 5.4 4.4 2009 4.5 4.6 3.9 3.9 2.7 2.9 2.9 2.4 3.1 3.8 4.5 3.9 2010 4.0 3.9 3.6 3.1 2.4 2.5 2.2 2.1 2.4 2.7 2.2 2.0 2011 2.7 3.0 2.1 1.9 1.4 1.3 2.1 1.4 1.7 1.8 2.3 2.5

176

Predicting aerodynamic characteristic of typical wind turbine airfoils using CFD  

SciTech Connect

An investigation was conducted into the capabilities and accuracy of a representative computational fluid dynamics code to predict the flow field and aerodynamic characteristics of typical wind-turbine airfoils. Comparisons of the computed pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data. This work highlights two areas in CFD that require further investigation and development in order to enable accurate numerical simulations of flow about current generation wind-turbine airfoils: transition prediction and turbulence modeling. The results show that the laminar-to turbulent transition point must be modeled correctly to get accurate simulations for attached flow. Calculations also show that the standard turbulence model used in most commercial CFD codes, the k-e model, is not appropriate at angles of attack with flow separation. 14 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs.

Wolfe, W.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ochs, S.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Aerospace Engineering Dept.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Sun. A typical star in the solar neighborhood?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sun is used as the fundamental standard in chemical abundance studies, thus it is important to know whether the solar abundance pattern is representative of the solar neighborhood. Albeit at low precision (0.05 - 0.10 dex) the Sun seems to be a typical solar-metallicity disk star, at high precision (0.01 dex) its abundance pattern seems abnormal when compared to solar twins. The Sun shows a deficiency of refractory elements that could be due to the formation of terrestrial planets. The formation of giant planets may also introduce a signature in the chemical composition of stars. We discuss both planet signatures and also the enhancement of neutron-capture elements in the solar twin 18 Sco.

Melendez, Jorge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for Present and Current AEO Forecast Evaluations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO82 to AEO82 to AEO99 AEO82 to AEO2000 AEO82 to AEO2001 AEO82 to AEO2002 AEO82 to AEO2003 AEO82 to AEO2004 Total Energy Consumption 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 Total Petroleum Consumption 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 7.3 7.1 7.1 6.7 6.4 6.5 Total Coal Consumption 3.1 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8

179

Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR). Version 3.5, Quick Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

This Reference Guide contains instructions on how to install and use Version 3.5 of the NRC-sponsored Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR). The NUCLARR data management system is contained in compressed files on the floppy diskettes that accompany this Reference Guide. NUCLARR is comprised of hardware component failure data (HCFD) and human error probability (HEP) data, both of which are available via a user-friendly, menu driven retrieval system. The data may be saved to a file in a format compatible with IRRAS 3.0 and commercially available statistical packages, or used to formulate log-plots and reports of data retrieval and aggregation findings.

Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.; Reece, W.J.; Gertman, D.I.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Asymmetrical Lamb Dip in a High-Gain 3.5 µm Xenon Laser. I. Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deep and pronounced asymmetrical Lamb dips were observed in a single-mode oscillation with a 3.5 µm 136Xe laser over wide ranges of gas pressure (4.3–19.6 Pa) and dc excitation current (0.6–7 mA). The peak on the high-frequency side of the dip has a larger output power than that on the low-frequency side over wide ranges of gas pressure and discharge current. The asymmetry and depth of the dip, and the output power in the tuning curve were investigated with emphasis on their dependence on the xenon pressure and dc discharge current.

Shigeo Asami; Hideya Gamo; Toshiharu Tako

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Determination of the structure of 2(benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid)·1.5(pyrene)·2(methanol) and comparison with that of 2(benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid)·pyrene·2(ethanol)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed comparison is made of the structures of 2(benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid)·1.5(pyrene)·2(methanol) (new determination) and of 2(benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid)·pyrene·2(ethanol) (data from the literature).

Herbstein, F.H.

2001-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

Intramolecular electron transfer in mixed-valence complexes [(NH3)5Ru-L-Ru(NH3)5]5+ (L = N2, pyz, pym, 4,4?-bipy, bpa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of the intramolecular electron transfer from Ru(II) to Ru(III) in binuclear mixedvalence complexes [(NH3)5Ru-L- Ru(NH3)5]5+ (L = N2,pyz, bipy, pym, bpa) is analyzed by the semiempirical CINDO +...

O. V. Sizova; V. I. Baranovskii; A. I. Panin…

183

Intramolecular electron transfer in mixed-valence complexes [(NH3)5Ru-L-Ru(NH3)5]5+ (L = N2, pyz, pym, 4,4’-bipy, bpa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of the intramolecular electron transfer from Ru(II) to Ru(III) in binuclear mixed-valence complexes [NH3)5Ru -L-Ru(NH3)5]5+ (L = N2, pyz, bipy, pym, bpa) is analyzed by the semiempiri...

O. V. Sizova; V. I. Baranovskii; A. I. Panin…

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Extraction of Plutonium into 30 Percent Tri-Butyl Phosphate from Nitric Acid Solution Containing Fluoride, Aluminum, and Boron  

SciTech Connect

This work consists of experimental batch extraction data for plutonium into 30 volume-percent tri-butyl phosphate at ambient temperature from such a solution matrix and a model of this data using complexation constants from the literature.

Kyser, E.A.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

185

"EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" "Areas",38353,38384,38412,38443,38473,38504,38534,38565,38596,38626,38657,38687,38718,38749,38777,"application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

186

A correlation of water solubility in jet fuels with API gravity: aniline point percent aromatics, and temperature.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A CORRELATION OF WATER SOLUBILITY IN JET FUELS WITH API GRAVITY, ANILINE POINT PERCENT AROMATICS, AND TEMPERATURE A Thesis By ALONZO B YINGTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1964 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A CORRELATION OF MATER SOLUBILITT IH JET FUELS WITS API GEAVITT, ANILINE POINT, PERCENT ARONATICS, AND TENPERATURE A Thesis By ALOHZO BYIHGTOH Approved...

Byington, Alonzo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

187

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Colorado Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.2 0.6 1.2 2.9 2.8 1.7 0.4 0.4 0.1 2002 0.1 0.1 1.4 1.1 1.9 1.7 2.1 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 2003 0.1 0.0 0.3 1.2 0.8 0.9 1.9 3.0 2.7 0.9 0.4 0.1 2004 0.1 0.1 0.3 1.1 0.8 1.5 1.5 2.3 2.0 0.3 0.2 0.0 2005 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.4 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.7 2006 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.6 1.1 1.5 1.6 2.0 1.0 0.3 0.1 0.1 2007 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.5 0.8 1.3 1.5 0.7 0.2 0.2 0.1 2008 0.7 0.8 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.5 2009 0.6 0.8 0.4 0.8 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.5 2010 8.3 5.3 6.0 5.7 5.3 3.9 2.6 2.9 2.9 5.0 5.5 6.3 2011 8.9 9.0 8.3 8.6 6.5 4.3 5.2 5.5 5.7 6.9 8.5 8.6

188

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Rhode Island Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 41.4 29.5 26.1 37.6 29.0 29.3 26.0 26.2 22.4 26.8 29.3 13.6 2002 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 27.3 2003 15.7 18.9 21.5 19.6 26.7 11.7 16.8 18.8 18.6 22.1 18.5 22.3 2004 13.9 16.7 14.5 16.8 21.1 11.7 16.7 15.3 16.0 19.4 10.5 23.0 2005 17.8 14.7 15.9 11.0 16.3 16.5 12.9 13.8 16.3 13.2 16.5 19.7 2006 18.6 18.7 16.4 15.0 12.5 13.3 8.8 10.5 11.4 12.8 10.5 15.7 2007 13.0 19.0 15.1 12.7 10.1 14.3 8.0 6.3 17.1 8.3 9.0 10.9 2008 19.9 14.2 16.6 7.2 8.2 9.5 10.7 7.0 13.2 8.2 15.2 23.1 2009 12.2 14.7 8.0 12.3 9.5 7.8 6.7 9.5 10.8 3.5 8.6 7.0 2010 7.3 6.2 5.2 3.8 3.8 6.3 5.5 4.2 5.7 9.3 7.7 10.4

189

TYPICAL HOT WATER DRAW PATTERNS BASED ON FIELD DATA  

SciTech Connect

There is significant variation in hot water use and draw patterns among households. This report describes typical hot water use patterns in single-family residences in North America. We found that daily hot water use is highly variable both among residences and within the same residence. We compared the results of our analysis of the field data to the conditions and draw patterns established in the current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test procedure for residential water heaters. The results show a higher number of smaller draws at lower flow rates than used in the test procedure. The data from which the draw patterns were developed were obtained from 12 separate field studies. This report describes the ways in which we managed, cleaned, and analyzed the data and the results of our data analysis. After preparing the data, we used the complete data set to analyze inlet and outlet water temperatures. Then we divided the data into three clusters reflecting house configurations that demonstrated small, medium, or large median daily hot water use. We developed the three clusters partly to reflect efforts of the ASHRAE standard project committee (SPC) 118.2 to revise the test procedure for residential water heaters to incorporate a range of draw patterns. ASHRAE SPC 118.2 has identified the need to separately evaluate at least three, and perhaps as many as five, different water heater capacities. We analyzed the daily hot water use data within each cluster in terms of volume and number of hot water draws. The daily draw patterns in each cluster were characterized using distributions for volume of draws, duration of draws, time since previous draw, and flow rates.

Lutz, Jim; Melody, Moya

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

190

Medium effects in proton-induced $K^{0}$ production at 3.5 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis of the inclusive $K^{0}$ production in p+p and p+Nb collisions measured with the HADES detector at a beam kinetic energy of 3.5 GeV. Data are compared to the GiBUU transport model. The data suggest the presence of a repulsive momentum-dependent kaon potential as predicted by the Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT). For the kaon at rest and at normal nuclear density, the ChPT potential amounts to $\\approx 35$ MeV. A detailed tuning of the kaon production cross sections implemented in the model has been carried out to reproduce the experimental data measured in p+p collisions. The uncertainties in the parameters of the model were examined with respect to the sensitivity of the experimental results from p+Nb collisions to the in-medium kaon potential.

G. Agakishiev; O. Arnold; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; K. Göbel; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; G. Korcyl; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krása; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; T. Kunz; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; J. Michel; C. Müntz; R. Münzer; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky; . T. Gaitanos; J. Weil

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

191

"Table 1. Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated" "Gross Domestic Product" "Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2)",0.9772689079,42.55319149 "Petroleum" "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a)",35.19047501,18.61702128 "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b)",34.68652106,19.68085106 "Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4)",6.150682783,66.4893617 "Crude Oil Production (Table 5)",5.99969572,59.57446809 "Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6)",13.27260615,67.0212766 "Natural Gas"

192

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kansas Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3.0 2.9 3.2 2.9 7.8 9.4 18.1 21.2 16.4 7.7 7.9 4.4 2002 5.0 5.1 6.6 13.0 12.4 16.1 22.4 18.5 11.6 5.7 4.3 4.3 2003 2.4 3.4 3.2 8.2 11.0 6.9 14.8 21.1 9.1 5.3 5.0 3.1 2004 2.7 2.8 4.6 10.3 9.4 14.0 13.4 11.0 9.2 2.6 2.4 2.3 2005 1.7 1.4 1.4 3.2 6.6 8.2 16.3 19.2 9.0 3.8 2.5 1.7 2006 1.7 2.0 3.2 5.7 9.4 12.9 16.2 16.9 9.4 3.6 2.1 2.1 2007 1.3 1.5 1.5 1.4 4.9 9.8 16.2 17.3 9.6 4.0 2.8 1.7 2008 1.6 1.5 2.7 7.5 10.4 13.4 18.9 17.9 10.9 4.1 1.7 1.6 2009 1.5 2.0 4.4 4.6 6.3 9.2 16.6 17.0 11.0 3.3 1.5 1.1 2010 1.2 1.2 1.2 2.5 6.5 10.6 17.3 18.2 12.5 5.8 3.7 1.9 2011 1.5 1.7 5.6 10.4 11.0 17.0 20.8 19.9 12.8 4.9 3.6 1.6

193

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Jersey Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 29.3 31.1 27.6 21.9 21.2 19.6 18.6 15.6 18.5 16.8 15.6 21.1 2002 23.5 22.2 23.5 21.5 18.7 18.3 17.4 16.9 18.0 18.5 22.1 26.0 2003 21.1 23.1 26.0 26.8 23.9 18.0 15.3 17.3 13.3 14.9 13.0 18.4 2004 19.5 22.5 18.1 16.6 15.0 13.7 11.6 15.1 13.6 13.6 15.4 18.5 2005 22.4 22.7 21.9 17.6 15.7 15.4 17.7 20.4 16.9 19.4 20.1 25.4 2006 23.6 22.4 21.6 19.0 17.0 16.3 18.5 19.1 15.6 16.6 19.9 21.8 2007 21.5 23.6 20.8 23.0 17.1 17.5 17.7 19.8 19.9 20.0 21.2 23.1 2008 16.5 15.9 16.1 9.9 11.1 8.6 4.0 5.6 4.6 7.7 9.7 13.7 2009 18.4 13.1 12.9 6.5 4.2 4.2 3.1 3.9 4.9 6.2 8.8 11.6 2010 14.6 17.7 9.8 7.1 4.9 3.6 3.0 3.5 3.0 4.2 6.8 12.3

194

FLOATING PRESSURE CONVERSION AND EQUIPMENT UPGRADES OF TWO 3.5KW, 20K, HELIUM REFRIGERATORS  

SciTech Connect

Two helium refrigerators, each rated for 3.5 KW at 20 K, are used at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Building No. 32 to provide cryogenic-pumping within two large thermal-vacuum chambers. These refrigerators were originally commissioned in 1996. New changes to the controls of these refrigerators were recently completed. This paper describes some of the control issues that necessitated the controls change-over. It will describe the modifications and the new process control which allows the refrigerators to take advantage of the Ganni Cycle “floating pressure” control technology. The controls philosophy change-over to the floating pressure control technology was the first application on a helium gas refrigeration system. Previous implementations of the floating pressure technology have been on 4 K liquefaction and refrigeration systems, which have stored liquid helium volumes that have level indications used for varying the pressure levels (charge) in the system for capacity modulation. The upgrades have greatly improved the performance, stability, and efficiency of these two refrigerators. The upgrades have also given the operators more information and details about the operational status of the main components (compressors, expanders etc.) of the refrigerators at all operating conditions (i.e. at various loads in the vacuum chambers). The performance data of the two systems, pre and post upgrading are presented.

J. Homan, V. Ganni, A. Sidi-Yekhlef, J. Creel, R. Norton, R. Linza, G. Vargas, J. Lauterbach, J. Urbin, D. Howe

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Subthreshold Xi- Production in Collisions of p(3.5 GeV)+Nb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results on the production of the double-strange cascade hyperon $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ are reported for collisions of p\\,(3.5~GeV)\\,+\\,Nb, studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at SIS18 at GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Heavy-Ion Research, Darmstadt. For the first time, subthreshold $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ production is observed in proton-nucleus interactions. Assuming a $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ phase-space distribution similar to that of $\\mathrm{\\Lambda}$ hyperons, the production probability amounts to $P_{\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}}=(2.0\\,\\pm0.4\\,\\mathrm{(stat)}\\,\\pm 0.3\\,\\mathrm{(norm)}\\,\\pm 0.6\\,\\mathrm{(syst)})\\times10^{-4}$ resulting in a $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-/(\\Lambda+\\Sigma^0)}$ ratio of $P_{\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}}/\\ P_{\\mathrm{\\Lambda+\\Sigma^0}}=(1.2\\pm 0.3\\,\\mathrm{(stat)}\\pm0.4\\,\\mathrm{(syst)})\\times10^{-2}$. Available model predictions are significantly lower than the estimated $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ yield.

Agakishiev, G; Balanda, A; Belver, D; Belyaev, A V; Berger-Chen, J C; Blanco, A; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Cabanelas, P; Chernenko, S; Dybczak, A; Epple, E; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O V; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzon, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Göbel, K; Golubeva, M; Gonzalez-Diaz, D; Guber, F; Gumberidze, M; Heinz, T; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Ierusalimov, A; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kornakov, G; Kotte, R; Krasa, A; Krizek, F; Krücken, R; Kuc, H; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Ladygin, V; Lalik, R; Lang, S; Lapidus, K; Lebedev, A; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Siebenson, J; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Vasiliev, T; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wendisch, C; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Subthreshold Xi- Production in Collisions of p(3.5 GeV)+Nb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results on the production of the double-strange cascade hyperon $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ are reported for collisions of p\\,(3.5~GeV)\\,+\\,Nb, studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at SIS18 at GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Heavy-Ion Research, Darmstadt. For the first time, subthreshold $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ production is observed in proton-nucleus interactions. Assuming a $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ phase-space distribution similar to that of $\\mathrm{\\Lambda}$ hyperons, the production probability amounts to $P_{\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}}=(2.0\\,\\pm0.4\\,\\mathrm{(stat)}\\,\\pm 0.3\\,\\mathrm{(norm)}\\,\\pm 0.6\\,\\mathrm{(syst)})\\times10^{-4}$ resulting in a $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-/(\\Lambda+\\Sigma^0)}$ ratio of $P_{\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}}/\\ P_{\\mathrm{\\Lambda+\\Sigma^0}}=(1.2\\pm 0.3\\,\\mathrm{(stat)}\\pm0.4\\,\\mathrm{(syst)})\\times10^{-2}$. Available model predictions are significantly lower than the estimated $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ yield.

G. Agakishiev; O. Arnold; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhäuser; K. Göbel; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Diaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

197

Lambda hyperon production and polarization in collisions of p(3.5 GeV) + Nb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results on $\\Lambda$ hyperon production are reported for collisions of p(3.5 GeV) + Nb, studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at SIS18 at GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Heavy-Ion Research, Darmstadt. The transverse mass distributions in rapidity bins are well described by Boltzmann shapes with a maximum inverse slope parameter of about $90\\,$MeV at a rapidity of $y=1.0$, i.e. slightly below the center-of-mass rapidity for nucleon-nucleon collisions, $y_{cm}=1.12$. The rapidity density decreases monotonically with increasing rapidity within a rapidity window ranging from 0.3 to 1.3. The $\\Lambda$ phase-space distribution is compared with results of other experiments and with predictions of two transport approaches which are available publicly. None of the present versions of the employed models is able to fully reproduce the experimental distributions, i.e. in absolute yield and in shape. Presumably, this finding results from an insufficient modelling in the transport models of the elementary processes being relevant for $\\Lambda$ production, rescattering and absorption. The present high-statistics data allow for a genuine two-dimensional investigation as a function of phase space of the self-analyzing $\\Lambda$ polarization in the weak decay $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p \\pi^-$. Finite negative values of the polarization in the order of $5-20\\,\\%$ are observed over the entire phase space studied. The absolute value of the polarization increases almost linearly with increasing transverse momentum for $p_t>300\\,$MeV/c and increases with decreasing rapidity for $y < 0.8$.

G. Agakishiev; O. Arnold; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhäuser; K. Göbel; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

198

ITER: Japan to assign 20 percent of construction work to EU firms; Proposal for EU official to assume chief executive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ITER: Japan to assign 20 percent of construction work to EU firms; Proposal for EU official to assume chief executive position MAINICHI (Top Play) (Lead para.) December 7, 2004 Japan and the European Experimental Reactor (ITER). Japan yesterday revealed the details of a proposal to host the project. Tokyo has

199

The SUN Action database : collecting and analyzing typical actions for visual scene types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent work in human and machine vision has increasingly focused on the problem of scene recognition. Scene types are largely defined by the actions one might typically do there: an office is a place someone would typically ...

Olsson, Catherine Anne White

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK CLEANING: CORROSION RATE FOR ONE VERSUS EIGHT PERCENT OXALIC ACID SOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from the testing, there would be a significant increase in the CR. Specifically, the CR for an agitated 1-wt% pure oxalic acid solution at 45 or 75 C was about 4 to 10 times greater than those for a 1-wt% solution with sludge. For 8-wt% at 50 C, the effect was even larger. The lower CRs suggest that the cathodic reactions were altered by the sludge. For both the 1-wt% and 8-wt% solution, increasing the temperature did not result in an increased CR. Although the CR for a 1-wt% acid with sludge was considered to be non-temperature dependent, a stagnant solution with sludge resulted in a CR that was greater at 45 C than at 75 C, suggesting that the oxalate film formed at a higher temperature was better in mitigating corrosion. For both a 1 and an 8-wt% solution, agitation typically resulted in a higher CR. Overall, the testing showed that the general CR to the SRS carbon steel tanks from 1-wt% oxalic acid solution will remain bounded by those from an 8-wt% oxalic acid solution.

Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Systematic Survey of Extended Lyman-alpha Sources over z~3-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spatially extended Ly-alpha sources which are faint and compact in coninuum are candidates for extremely young galaxies (age of ~intermediate-band imaging data taken with the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. Our survey covers a field of view of 33' * 25' and a redshift range of 3.24typical sizes of \\~10-15 kpc and luminosities of ~10^42 ergs/s. Follow-up spectroscopy made for 7 of the 41 objects showed that our sample suffers from little contamination. All 7 objects have large equivalent widths of Ly-alpha emission line, all but one exceeding 240A in the rest frame. The large equivalent widths suggest that their extended Ly-a...

Saitô, T; Okamura, S; Ouchi, M; Akiyama, M; Yoshida, M; Saito, Tomoki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Sadanori; Ouchi, Masami; Akiyama, Masayuki; Yoshida, Michitoshi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Nonabelian dark matter models for 3.5 keV X-rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent analysis of XXM-Newton data reveals the possible presence of an X-ray line at approximately 3.55 keV, which is not readily explained by known atomic transitions. Numerous models of eV-scale decaying dark matter have been proposed to explain this signal. Here we explore models of multicomponent nonabelian dark matter with typical mass ~ 1-10 GeV (higher values being allowed in some models) and eV-scale splittings that arise naturally from the breaking of the nonabelian gauge symmetry. Kinetic mixing between the photon and the hidden sector gauge bosons can occur through a dimension-5 or 6 operator. Radiative decays of the excited states proceed through transition magnetic moments that appear at one loop. The decaying excited states can either be primordial or else produced by upscattering of the lighter dark matter states. These models are significantly constrained by direct dark matter searches or cosmic microwave background distortions, and are potentially testable in fixed target experiments that s...

Cline, James M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The unknown unsubstituted tetrazines: 1,2,3,4-tetrazine and 1,2,3,5-tetrazine  

SciTech Connect

Ab initio theoretical methods have been used to determine the equilibrium geometry of the unsubstituted 1,2,3,4- and 1,2,3,5-tetrazines. Double zeta (DZ) and double zeta plus polarization (DZP) basis sets have been used at both the self-consistent field (SCF) and single and double excitation configuration interaction (CISD) levels of theory. Harmonic vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities have been evaluated at the SCF level of theory. Comparisons between these and previous results at the SCF level using smaller basis sets have been made. Comparisons between these and previous results at the SCF level using smaller basis sets have been made. The 1,2,3,5-tetrazine is predicted to lie 8 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} below the experimentally characterized s-tetrazine (i.e., 1,2,4,5-tetrazine). The work strongly suggests renewed experimental efforts toward the laboratory identification of 1,2,3,5-tetrazine.

Thomas, J.R.; Quelch, G.E.; Schaefer, H.F. III (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

1991-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

204

Hart AG, Bowtell RW, Kckenberger W, Wenseleers T, Ratnieks FLW. 2003. Magnetic resonance imaging in entomology: a critical review. 9pp. Journal of Insect Science, 3:5, Available online: insectscience.org/3.5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 Journal of Insect Science insectscience.org Magnetic resonance imaging in entomology: a critical reviewHart AG, Bowtell RW, Köckenberger W, Wenseleers T, Ratnieks FLW. 2003. Magnetic resonance imaging in entomology: a critical review. 9pp. Journal of Insect Science, 3:5, Available online: insectscience.org/3

Wenseleers, Tom

205

Inhibition of the R3327MAT-Lu Prostatic Tumor by Diethylstilbestrol and 1,2-Bis(3,5-dioxopiperazin-1-yl)propane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2-Bis(3,5-dioxopiperazin-1-yl)propane 1 1 This investigation was supported by...2-bis(3,5-dioxopiperazin-1-yl)propane. Inhibition of the R3327MAT-Lu prostatic...2-bis(3,5-dioxopiperazin-1-yl)propane. | We have previously described the inhibitory...

David W. Lazan; Warren D. W. Heston; Dov Kadmon; William R. Fair

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Worksheet 3.5 In an earlier worksheet we looked at annuities --saving money by making regular investments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Worksheet 3.5 Loans In an earlier worksheet we looked at annuities -- saving money by making regular investments into an account earning interest, and taking the money out at the end. With a small change, we can now analyze loans -- receiving money at the beginning, and paying it back with regular

Lee, Carl

207

(2/94)(3-5/96)(6-8/01)(1,2/02)(10/03) Neuman Chapter 8 Alkenes and Alkynes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(2/94)(3-5/96)(6-8/01)(1,2/02)(10/03) Neuman Chapter 8 0 Chapter 8 Alkenes and Alkynes from Organic Chemistry by Robert C. Neuman, Jr. Professor of Chemistry, emeritus University of California, Riverside orgchembyneuman@yahoo.com Chapter Outline of the Book

Reed, Christopher A.

208

Observational consistency and future predictions for a 3.5 keV ALP to photon line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the possibility of explaining the 3.5 keV line through dark matter decaying to axion-like particles that subsequently convert to photons, we study ALP-photon conversion for sightlines passing within 50 pc of the galactic centre. Conversion depends on the galactic centre magnetic field which is highly uncertain. For fields at low or mid-range of observational estimates (10--100 $\\mu$G), no observable signal is possible. For fields at the high range of observational estimates (a pervasive poloidal mG field over the central 150 pc) it is possible to generate sufficient signal to explain recent observations of a 3.5 keV line in the galactic centre. In this scenario, the galactic centre line signal comes predominantly from the region with $z > 20$ pc, reconciling the results from the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes. The dark matter to ALP to photon scenario also naturally predicts the non-observation of the 3.5 keV line in stacked galaxy spectra. We further explore predictions for the line flux in galaxies and suggest a set of galaxies that is optimised for observing the 3.5 keV line in this model.

Pedro D. Alvarez; Joseph P. Conlon; Francesca V. Day; M. C. David Marsh; Markus Rummel

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ab initio studies of 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine/1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone cocrystal under high pressure using dispersion corrected density functional theory  

SciTech Connect

A detailed study of structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)/1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) cocrystal under the hydrostatic pressure of 0–100?GPa was performed by using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) method. The calculated crystal structure is in reasonable agreement with the experimental data at the ambient pressure. Based on the analysis of lattice constants, bond lengths, bond angles, and dihedral angles under compression, it is found that HMX molecules in HMX/DMI cocrystal are seriously distorted. In addition, as the pressure increases, the band gap decreases gradually, which suggests that HMX/DMI cocrystal is becoming more metallic. Some important intermolecular interactions between HMX and DMI are also observed in the density of states spectrum. Finally, its thermodynamic properties were characterized, and the results show that HMX/DMI cocrystal is more easily formed in the low pressure.

Gu, Bang-Ming [Institute of Applied Physics, Zhejiang Wanli University, 8 Qianhu South Road, Ningbo 315101 (China); Lin, He; Zhu, Shun-Guan, E-mail: zhusguan@yahoo.com [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210094 (China)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Drought remedial measures through resistivity investigations in a typical crystalline region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic geoelectrical investigations were carried out in a typical drought ... of Andhra Pradesh, India, for evolving drought remedial strategies. Depth to basement maps, geoelectrical...

B. H. Briz-Kishore

211

Estimating solar access of typical residential rooftops: A case study in San Jose, CA  

SciTech Connect

Shadows cast by trees and buildings can limit the solar access of rooftop solar-energy systems, including photovoltaic panels and thermal collectors. This study characterizes rooftop shading in a residential neighborhood of San Jose, CA, one of four regions analyzed in a wider study of the solar access of California homes.High-resolution orthophotos and LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) measurements of surface height were used to create a digital elevation model of all trees and buildings in a 4 km2 residential neighborhood. Hourly shading of roofing planes (the flat elements of roofs) was computed geometrically from the digital elevation model. Parcel boundaries were used to determine the extent to which roofing planes were shaded by trees and buildings in neighboring parcels.In the year in which surface heights were measured (2005), shadows from all sources ("total shading") reduced the insolation received by S-, SW-, and W-facing residential roofing planes in the study area by 13 - 16percent. Shadows cast by trees and buildings in neighboring parcels reduced insolation by no more than 2percent. After 30 years of simulated maximal tree growth, annual total shading increased to 19 - 22percent, and annual extraparcel shading increased to 3 - 4percent.

Levinson, Ronnen M.; Gupta, Smita; Akbari, Hashem; Pomerantz, Melvin

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

Synthesis and Evaluation of 3',5'-Di-tert-butyl-4'-hydroxyflavones as Potential Inhibitors of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synthesis and Evaluation of 3',5'-Di-tert-butyl-4'-hydroxyflavones as Potential Inhibitors of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Oxidation ...

Guy Lewin; Yves Rolland; Sylvie Privat; Christine Breugnot; Albert Lenaers; Jean Paul Vilaine; Jean-Pierre Baltaze; Jacques Poisson

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Search for a $??N-??N$ dibaryon in p+p@3.5 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is dedicated to the search for a $\\pi\\Lambda N\\!-\\!\\pi\\Sigma N$ resonance $\\mathcal{Y}$ with the quantum numbers ($Y,I,J^P$) = (1,3/2,$2^+$). The double charged $\\Sigma(1385)N\\!-\\!\\Delta(1232)Y$ quasibound state was looked for in the reaction $pp\\rightarrow \\mathcal{Y}^{++}K^0$ with its unique decay into $\\Sigma^+$ and proton measured with the HADES setup at a kinetic beam energy of 3.5 GeV. The analysis including background determination and a description of the data with a $K^0_S$ Monte Carlo cocktail are presented.

J. C. Berger-Chen; L. Fabbietti

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

214

Sorption-desorption characteristics of uranium, cesium and strontium in typical podzol soils from Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cesium and strontium in typical podzol soils from Ukraine S. Mishra 1 H. Arae 1 P. V. Zamostyan 2 T. Ishikawa...Radiation Medicine of Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine Sorption-desorption behaviour of uranium (U......

S. Mishra; H. Arae; P. V. Zamostyan; T. Ishikawa; H. Yonehara; S. K. Sahoo

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Brain Bases of Reading Fluency in Typical Reading and Impaired Fluency in Dyslexia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the neural systems supporting single word reading are well studied, there are limited direct comparisons between typical and dyslexic readers of the neural correlates of reading fluency. Reading fluency deficits ...

Christodoulou, Joanna

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - andisol typic hapludand Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

considerable pressure difference (typically overcontent... :427-436. Sperry, J.S., V. Stiller, and U.G. Hacke. 2002b. Soil water uptake andisolated vascular bundles and whole...

217

Highly-Selective and Reversible O2 Binding in Cr3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants.3 Here, instead of separating CO2 from N2 include the greater partial pressure of O2 in air (0.21 bar) compared to CO2 in a typical flue gas (0 may form the basis for a new generation of O2 capture materials with good air permeability, a high

218

Determination of a peak benzene exposure to consumers at typical self-service gasoline stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF A PEAK BENZENE EXPOSURE TO CONSUMERS AT TYPICAL SELF-SERVICE GASOLINE STATIONS A Thesis by TED CARAPEZZA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene DETERMINATION OF A PEAK BENZENE EXPOSURE TO CONSUMERS AT TYPICAL SELF-SERVICE GASOLINE STATIONS A Thesis by TED CARAPEZZA Approved as to style and content by: (. (iL, &? Chairman...

Carapezza, Ted

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

219

The impact of sheared vs. sawn timber in the typical southern pine plywood mill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE IMPACT OF SHEARED VS' SAWN TIMBER IN THE TYPICAL SOUTHERN PINE PLYWOOD MILL A Thesis by RUSSELL GARRETT SWINNEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Forestry THE IMPACT OP SHEARED VS. SAWN T1MBER IN THE TYPICAL SOUTHERN PINE PLYWOOD MILI A Thesis by RUSSELL GARRETT SWINNEY Approved as to style and content by: Jease ( hair of mmi Jy...

Swinney, Russell Garrett

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Accelerators (3/5)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Created 2/16/2012 SLC; Updated 3/5/2012 slc; Updated 7/1/2014 slf TTU Directory of Consumer Information OFA Internal Reference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Created 2/16/2012 SLC; Updated 3/5/2012 slc; Updated 7/1/2014 slf TTU Directory of Consumer Financial Aid #12;Created 2/16/2012 SLC; Updated 3/5/2012 slc; Updated 7/1/2014 slf Disclosure Disclosure

Zhang, Yuanlin

222

Bloom, fruit development, and embryo development of peaches in a mild-winter region, and use of percent dry weight of ovule as a maturity index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

persica (L.) Batsch] were examined, and percent dry weight of ovule (PDO) was studied as an embryo maturity index for stratification-germination in the breeding program. Differences in bloom times of 5 bloom period (BP) reference cultisms resulted...

Bacon, Terry A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Quantitative analysis of damage in an octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazonic-based composite explosive subjected to a linear thermal gradient  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The microstructure within a slowly heated consolidated explosive will be influenced by both physical changes and chemical reactions prior to thermal ignition. Thermal expansion exothermic decomposition endothermic phase change and increased binder viscosity play significant roles in the cook-off to detonation. To further explore the details of this intricate cook-off process we have conducted a series of experiments in which a carefully controlled temperature gradient has been applied along a cylinder of PBX 9501 [94.9/2.5/2.5/0.1-wt % octahydro-1 3 5 7-tetranitro-1 3 5 7-tetrazocine (HMX)/Estane 5703/a eutectic mixture of bis(2 2 dinitropropyl) acetal and bis(2 2-dinitropropyl) formal [abbreviated BDNPA-F]/Irganox] and maintained for a specified amount of time. After heating and subsequent cooling of the PBX 9501 the sample morphology has been probed with polarized light microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering. Using these techniques we have quantitatively characterized the particle morphology porosity and chemical state of the explosive as a function of position and therefore thermal treatment. Results of the analyses clearly show that thermal damage in PBX 9501 can be classified into two separate temperature regimes—an initial low-temperature regime ( 155 – 174 ° C ) dominated by the endothermic ? - ? crystalline phase change thermal expansion and Ostwald ripening and a high-temperature regime ( 175 – 210 ° C ) dominated by exothermic chemical decomposition. The results further show the complex interplay between the evolving sample morphology and the chemical reactions leading to a potential thermal self-ignition in the explosive.

Paul D. Peterson; Joseph T. Mang; Blaine W. Asay

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Quantitative analysis of damage in an octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazonic-based composite explosive subjected to a linear thermal gradient  

SciTech Connect

The microstructure within a slowly heated, consolidated explosive will be influenced by both physical changes and chemical reactions prior to thermal ignition. Thermal expansion, exothermic decomposition, endothermic phase change, and increased binder viscosity play significant roles in the cook-off to detonation. To further explore the details of this intricate cook-off process, we have conducted a series of experiments in which a carefully controlled temperature gradient has been applied along a cylinder of PBX 9501 [94.9/2.5/2.5/0.1-wt % octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)/Estane 5703/a eutectic mixture of bis(2,2 dinitropropyl) acetal and bis(2,2-dinitropropyl) formal [abbreviated BDNPA-F]/Irganox] and maintained for a specified amount of time. After heating and subsequent cooling of the PBX 9501, the sample morphology has been probed with polarized light microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering. Using these techniques we have quantitatively characterized the particle morphology, porosity, and chemical state of the explosive as a function of position, and therefore thermal treatment. Results of the analyses clearly show that thermal damage in PBX 9501 can be classified into two separate temperature regimes--an initial low-temperature regime (155-174 deg. C) dominated by the endothermic {beta}-{delta} crystalline phase change, thermal expansion, and Ostwald ripening, and a high-temperature regime (175-210 deg. C) dominated by exothermic chemical decomposition. The results further show the complex interplay between the evolving sample morphology and the chemical reactions leading to a potential thermal self-ignition in the explosive.

Peterson, Paul D.; Mang, Joseph T.; Asay, Blaine W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

"Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,0.3,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,77.5,63.7,4.2,1.8,2.2,5.6

226

Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates, on the basis of several analyanalytical criteria, that the production and extracellular release of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is widespread among phytoplankton species. The production and release of CAMP varied markedly among different species grown under similar environmental conditions, and intraspecifically during the life cycle of a given algal species. This investigation marks the first time cAMP has been investigated in natural aquatic systems. An examination of epilimnetic lakewater samples from Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan, demonstrated that cAMP existed in both particulate-associated and dissolved forms in these systems.

Francko, D.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Photo of the Week: Not Your Typical Jet Engine | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Not Your Typical Jet Engine Not Your Typical Jet Engine Photo of the Week: Not Your Typical Jet Engine November 23, 2012 - 11:57am Addthis As part of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program, the U.S. conducted extensive research showing that nuclear fission could power an aircraft. The research involved a series of Heat Transfer Reactor Experiments (HTREs), which tested if different types of jet engines could be run by nuclear power. In 1955, however, the project was cancelled, and a safe, operational prototype aircraft was never developed. In this 1988 photo, the two HTRE reactors are shown in transport to Idaho National Laboratory's EBR-1 visitor center, where they remain today. | Photo courtesy of Idaho National Laboratory. As part of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program, the U.S. conducted

228

Fundamental Reaction Pathways and Free-Energy Barriers for Ester Hydrolysis of Intracellular Second-Messenger 3‘,5‘-Cyclic Nucleotide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have performed a series of first-principles electronic structure calculations to study competing reaction pathways and the corresponding free-energy barriers for the ester hydrolysis of intracellular second-messenger adenosine 3‘,5‘-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and related phosphodiesters including trimethylene phosphate (TMP). ... 3‘,5‘-Cyclic nucleotides, such as adenosine 3‘,5‘-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) found by Sutherland and Rall nearly a half-century ago,1 are intracellular second messengers that are essential to vision, muscle contraction, neurotransmission, exocytosis, cell growth, and differentiation. ...

Xi Chen; Chang-Guo Zhan

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Typical Radiation Doses to Patients from Some Common X Ray Examinations in Tanzania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Typical Radiation Doses to Patients from Some Common X Ray Examinations in Tanzania W.E. Muhogora A.M. Nyanda U.S. Lema J.E. Ngaile The results of entrance surface dose measurements on adult patients......

W.E. Muhogora; A.M. Nyanda; U.S. Lema; J.E. Ngaile

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Ex-plant consequence assessment for NUREG-1150: Models, typical results, uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

The assessment of ex-plant consequences for NUREG-1150 source terms was performed using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS). This paper will briefly discuss the following elements of MACCS consequence calculations: input data, phenomena modeled, computational framework, typical results, controlling phenomena, and uncertainties. Wherever possible, NUREG-1150 results will be used to illustrate the discussion. 28 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Sprung, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The discovery of [Ru(NH3)5N2]2+: A case of serendipity and the scientific method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the author provides a personal account of the events leading up to the realization [Ru9NH3)5N2]2+ is a real species.

Caesar V. Senoff

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities  

SciTech Connect

This study is an investigation into the occurrence and potential functions of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP), a potent and ubiquitous metabolic regulatory molecule in heterotrophic organisms, in phytoplankton and in natural aquatic communities. Laboratory-cultured phytoplankton were grown under both optimal and suboptimal nutrient regimes under constant temperature and illumination regimes. Cellular and extracellular cAMP production, characterized by a number of biochemical techniques, was correlated with growth rate dynamics, chlorophyll a synthesis, /sup 14/C-bicarbonate uptake, alkaline phosphatase activity, and heterocyst formation. The blue-green alga Anabaena flos-aquae was used as a model system in the examination of these metabolic variables. Additionally, this alga was used to test the effects of perturbation of cAMP levels on the aforementioned metabolic variables. Investigations on the occurrence and seasonal dynamics of cAMP in aquatic systems were conducted on Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and on Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan. Putative cAMP from both systems was characterized by several biochemical techniques. Weekly sampling of particulate and dissolved cAMP in the epilimnia of both lakes was correlated with data on the rates of primary productivity, alkaline phosphatase activity, chlorophyll a synthesis and changes in phytoplankton community structure.

Francko, D.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injector Cavities for the ELBE Linac  

SciTech Connect

As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning, the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test was carried out at TJNAF's production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (O-slash10mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects appeared in the least accessible cathode cell. This contribution reports about our experiences, initial results and the on-going diagnostic work to understand and fix the problems.

Arnold, A. [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Murcek, P. [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Teichert, J. [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Xiang, R. [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Eremeev, G. V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kneisel, P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Stirbet, M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Turlington, L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Baryon resonance production and dielectron decays in proton-proton collisions at 3.5 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on baryon resonance production and decay in proton-proton collisions at a kinetic energy of $3.5$ GeV based on data measured with HADES. The exclusive channels $pp \\rightarrow np\\pi^{+}$ and $pp \\rightarrow pp\\pi^{0}$ as well as $pp \\rightarrow ppe^{+}e^{-}$ are studied simultaneously for the first time. The invariant masses and angular distributions of the pion-nucleon systems were studied and compared to simulations based on a resonance model ansatz assuming saturation of the pion production by an incoherent sum of baryonic resonances (R) with masses $<2~$ GeV/$c^2$. A very good description of the one-pion production is achieved allowing for an estimate of individual baryon-resonance production-cross-sections which are used as input to calculate the dielectron yields from $R\\rightarrow pe^+e^-$ decays. Two models of the resonance decays into dielectrons are examined assuming a point-like $RN \\gamma^*$ coupling and the dominance of the $\\rho$ meson. The results of model calculations are compared to data from the exclusive $ppe^{+}e^{-}$ channel by means of the dielectron and $pe^+e^-$ invariant mass distributions.

G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; K. Göbel; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. König; W. König; B. W. Kolb; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krása; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Pa\\lka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

Carbonization of Coal Effects of Variation of Rate of Heating during the Carbonization of a Typical Coking Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbonization of Coal Effects of Variation of Rate of Heating during the Carbonization of a Typical Coking Coal ...

William B. Warren

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Particle Adventure | How do we interpret our data? | Typical detector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Typical detector components Typical detector components The reason that detectors are divided into many components is that each component tests for a special set of particle properties. These components are stacked so that all particles will go through the different layers sequentially. A particle will not be evident until it either interacts with the detector in a measurable fashion, or decays into detectable particles. The interaction of various particles with the different components of a detector: *Neutrinos are not shown on this chart because they rarely interact with matter, and can only be detected by missing matter and energy. Just so you know, the pion ( ) is a charged meson.* A few important things to note: Charged particles, like electrons and protons, are detected both in the tracking chamber and the electromagnetic calorimeter.

237

Thermosyphon Cooler Hybrid System Providing Water Resiliency in a typical Chemical Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1Thermosyphon Cooler Hybrid System Providing Water Resiliency in a Typical Chemical Plant Presentation to the: May 21, 2014 Thomas P. Carter, P.E. Sr. Program Manager, Heat Rejection Technology Johnson Controls, Building Efficiency thomas....p.carter@jci.com ESL-IE-14-05-20 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 2Johnson Controls is a globally diversified company in the building and automotive industries Automotive Experience...

Carter, T. P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

WIYN Open Cluster Study XI: WIYN 3.5m Deep Photometry of M35 (NGC 2168)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present deep BVI observations of the core of M35 and a nearby comparison field obtained at the WIYN 3.5m telescope under excellent seeing. These observations display the lower main sequence in BV and VI CMDs down to V = 23.3 and 24.6, respectively. At these faint magnitudes background field stars are far more numerous than the cluster stars, yet by using a smoothing technique and CMD density distribution subtraction we recover the cluster fiducial main sequence and luminosity function to V = 24.6. We find the location of the main sequence in these CMDs to be consistent with earlier work on other open clusters, specifically NGC 188, NGC 2420, and NGC 2477. We compare these open cluster fiducial sequences to stellar models by Baraffe et al. (1998), Siess et al. (2000), Girardi et al. (2000), and Yi et al. (2001) and find that the models are too blue in both B-V and V-I for stars below ~0.4 Mo. M35 contains stars to the limit of the extracted main sequence, at M ~ 0.10-0.15 Mo, suggesting that M35 may harbor a large number of brown dwarfs, which should be easy targets for near-IR instrumentation on 8-10m telescopes. We also identify a new candidate white dwarf in M35 at V = 21.36 +- 0.01. Depending on which WD models are used to interpret this cluster candidate, it is either a very high mass WD (1.05 +- 0.05 Mo) somewhat older (0.19-0.26 Gyr, 3-4 sigma) than our best isochrone age (150 Myr), or it is a modestly massive WD (0.67-0.78 Mo) much too old (0.42-0.83 Gyr) to belong to the cluster.

Ted von Hippel; Aaron Steinhauer; Ata Sarajedini; Constantine P. Deliyannis

2002-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

239

Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates human platelet inositol trisphosphate 5/sup +/-/-phosphomonoesterase (IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase) increasing phosphatase activity  

SciTech Connect

Phosphoinositide breakdown in response to thrombin stimulation of human platelets generates messenger molecules that activate PKC (diglyceride) and mobilize Ca/sup + +/ (inositol tris-phosphates). The water soluble products of phospholipase C-mediated metabolism of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate are inositol 1,4,5 P/sub 3/ (IP/sub 3/) and inositol 1:2-cyclic 4,5 P/sub 3/ (cIP/sub 3/). A specific phosphatase, IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase, cleaves the 5 phosphate from IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/ to form IP/sub 2/ or cIP/sub 2/ and P/sub i/, none of which mobilizes Ca/sup + +/. Thus, the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase may regulate cellular responses to IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/. The authors find that IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase isolated from human platelets is phosphorylated by rat brain PKC, resulting in a 4-fold increase in IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase activity. The authors phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase using ..gamma.. /sup 32/P-ATP and found that the labeled enzyme comigrated on SDS-PAGE with the previously described 40K protein phosphorylated in response to thrombin stimulation of platelets. The similarity of the PKC-phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase observed in vitro and the thrombin-stimulated phosphorylated 40K protein known to be phosphorylated by PKC in vivo, suggests that these proteins may be the same. These results suggest that platelet Ca/sup + +/ mobilization maybe regulated by PKC phosphorylation of the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase and can explain the observation that phorbol ester treatment of intact human platelets results in decreased production of IP/sub 3/ and decreased Ca/sup + +/ mobilization upon subsequent thrombin addition.

Connolly, T.M.; Majerus, P.W.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Organizations around the world lose an estimated five percent of their annual revenues to fraud, according to a survey of fraud experts conducted by the Association of Certified  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizations around the world lose an estimated five percent of their annual revenues to fraud, according to a survey of fraud experts conducted by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE, the University's total expense for scholarships and fellowships was $110,067,000. Fraud cost includes reported

Sanders, Seth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

www.global.unam.mx www.unam.mx UNAM is home to more than 45 research institutes, centers and university programs; 50 percent of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and university programs; 50 percent of the research carried out in Mexico is generated by our institution. Our researchers cover the spectrum of disciplines, including energy, engineering, environmental sciences, genomic sciences, medicine, nanotechnologies, sustainable development, and water. Nationwide, one out of every 3

Petriu, Emil M.

242

A typical Ztrack'' long-term tracking result for the SSC aperture study  

SciTech Connect

A large amount of supercomputer CPU time has been used for tracking particles in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) using a vectorized, multi-tasked post-Teapot tracking program called Ztrack.'' Typically, hundreds of particles with appropriate initial displacements (relative to the closed orbits) are tracked for a hundred thousand turns. One then simply makes a survival plot (turn at which particle is lost versus initial displacements) to determine the dynamic aperture. Occasionally, particles are tracked to a million turns for very selective cases. These numerical studies aid in determining the best aperture for the SSC. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Yan, Y.; Bourianoff, G. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA)); Schachinger, L. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: the submillimetre properties of Lyman break galaxies at z=3-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present statistically significant detections at 850um of the Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) population at z=3, 4, and 5 using data from the Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS) in the United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey Ultra Deep Survey (UKIDSS-UDS) field. We employ a stacking technique to probe beneath the survey limit to measure the average 850um flux density of LBGs at z=3, 4, and 5 with typical ultraviolet luminosities of L(1700A)~10^29 erg/s/Hz. We measure 850um flux densities of (0.25 +/- 0.03, (0.41 +/- 0.06), and (0.88 +/- 0.23) mJy respectively, and find that they contribute at most 20 per cent to the cosmic far-infrared background at 850um. Fitting an appropriate range of spectral energy distributions to the z=3, 4, and 5 LBG stacked 24-850um fluxes, we derive infrared (IR) luminosities of L(8-1000um)~3.2, 5.5, and 11.0x10^11 Lsun (corresponding to star formation rates of ~50-200 Msun/yr) respectively. We find that the evolution in the IR luminosity...

Coppin, K E K; Almaini, O; Arumugam, V; Dunlop, J S; Hartley, W G; Ivison, R J; Simpson, C J; Smith, D J B; Swinbank, A M; Blain, A W; Bourne, N; Bremer, M; Conselice, C; Harrison, C M; Mortlock, A; Chapman, S C; Davies, L J M; Farrah, D; Gibb, A; Jenness, T; Karim, A; Knudsen, K K; Ibar, E; Micha?owski, M J; Peacock, J A; Rigopoulou, D; Robson, E I; Scott, D; Stevens, J; van der Werf, P P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Typical Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and operatioal support Typical Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and operatioal support Vendor's Name Contact/Rep Address Work Phone 615 Music Productions, Inc. Steve Hayes or Laura Palmer 1030 16th Ave. South, Nashville, TN 37212 616-244-6515 Adams, James F. James Adams 1217 Brookshire Dr., Bedford, TX 76021 214-674-6868 Adobe Systems Inc. N/A 2750 Barrett Lakes Blvd., Kennesaw, GA 30144 800-833-6687 Atlantech Resellers Inc, DBA CablesAndKits.com Craig Haynie 4555 Atwater Ct Ste ! Buford, GA 21075 877-633-2629 Albuquerque Printing Co Albert Padilla 3838 Bogan Ave.NE, Albq. 87109 505-872-2200 AlphaTRAC, Inc. John Ciolek 8670 Wolff Ct Ste 120 Westminster, CO 80031 303-428-5670 Amazon.com CSR

245

Weather data analysis based on typical weather sequence analysis. Application: energy building simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In building studies dealing about energy efficiency and comfort, simulation software need relevant weather files with optimal time steps. Few tools generate extreme and mean values of simultaneous hourly data including correlation between the climatic parameters. This paper presents the C++ Runeole software based on typical weather sequences analysis. It runs an analysis process of a stochastic continuous multivariable phenomenon with frequencies properties applied to a climatic database. The database analysis associates basic statistics, PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and automatic classifications. Different ways of applying these methods will be presented. All the results are stored in the Runeole internal database that allows an easy selection of weather sequences. The extreme sequences are used for system and building sizing and the mean sequences are used for the determination of the annual cooling loads as proposed by Audrier-Cros (Audrier-Cros, 1984). This weather analysis was tested with the datab...

David, Mathieu; Garde, Francois; Boyer, Harry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Raman Spectroscopy of Aminated and Ultrafine 1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene and PBX 9502 as a Function of Pressing Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Raman spectra of emulsion aminated, wet aminated, dry aminated, and ultrafine 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and PBX 9502 explosive powders are measured in a pellet die at pressures from ambient to 180 MPa with a 632.8 nm helium?neon ...

John A. Holy

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Where do the 3.5 keV photons come from? A morphological study of the Galactic Center and of Perseus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We test the origin of the 3.5 keV line photons by analyzing the morphology of the emission at that energy from the Galactic Center and from the Perseus cluster of galaxies. We employ a variety of different templates to model the continuum emission and analyze the resulting radial and azimuthal distribution of the residual emission. We then perform a pixel-by-pixel binned likelihood analysis including line emission templates and dark matter templates and assess the correlation of the 3.5 keV emission with these templates. We conclude that the radial and azimuthal distribution of the residual emission is incompatible with a dark matter origin for both the Galactic center and Perseus; the Galactic center 3.5 keV line photons trace the morphology of lines at comparable energy, while the Perseus 3.5 keV photons are highly correlated with the cluster's cool core, and exhibit a morphology incompatible with either dark matter decay or with axion-like particle conversions in the cluster's magnetic fields. The template...

Carlson, Eric; Profumo, Stefano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Characterization of a new magnesium hydrogen orthophosphate salt, Mg3.5H2(PO4)3, synthesized in supercritical water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization of a new magnesium hydrogen orthophosphate salt, Mg3.5H2(PO4)3, synthesized 2007 Available online 31 March 2007 Abstract Beige crystals of a new magnesium hydrogen orthophosphate water; IR and Raman spectra; Magnesium; Orthophosphate; Nanomaterial 1. Introduction Inorganic

Ryan, Dominic

249

Typical, finite baths as a means of exact simulation of open quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is presently considerable interest in accurately simulating the evolution of open systems for which Markovian master equations fail. Examples are systems that are time-dependent and/or strongly damped. A number of elegant methods have now been devised to do this, but all use a bath consisting of a continuum of harmonic oscillators. While this bath is clearly appropriate for, e.g., systems coupled to the EM field, it is not so clear that it is a good model for generic many-body systems. Here we explore a different approach to exactly simulating open-systems: using a finite bath chosen to have certain key properties of thermalizing many-body systems. To explore the numerical resources required by this method to approximate an open system coupled to an infinite bath, we simulate a weakly damped system and compare to the evolution given by the relevant Markovian master equation. We obtain the Markovian evolution with reasonable accuracy by using an additional averaging procedure, and elucidate how the typicality of the bath generates the correct thermal steady-state via the process of "eigenstate thermalization".

Luciano Silvestri; Kurt Jacobs; Vanja Dunjko; Maxim Olshanii

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

Are typical human serum BPA concentrations measurable and sufficient to be estrogenic in the general population?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mammalian estrogen receptors modulate many physiological processes. Chemicals with structural features similar to estrogens can interact with estrogen receptors to produce biological effects similar to those caused by endogenous estrogens in the body. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a structural analogue of estrogen that binds to estrogen receptors. Exposure to BPA in humans is virtually ubiquitous in industrialized societies, but BPA is rapidly detoxified by metabolism and does not accumulate in the body. Whether or not serum concentrations of BPA in humans are sufficiently high to disrupt normal estrogen-related biology is the subject of intense political and scientific debate. Here we show a convergence of robust methods for measuring or calculating serum concentrations of BPA in humans from 93 published studies of more than 30,000 individuals in 19 countries across all life stages. Typical serum BPA concentrations are orders of magnitude lower than levels measurable by modern analytical methods and below concentrations required to occupy more than 0.0009% of Type II Estrogen Binding Sites, GPR30, ER? or ER? receptors. Occupancies would be higher, but ?0.04%, for the highest affinity receptor, ERR?. Our results show limited or no potential for estrogenicity in humans, and question reports of measurable BPA in human serum.

Justin Teeguarden; Sesha Hanson-Drury; Jeffrey W. Fisher; Daniel R. Doerge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Data:2e91ee3c-6156-4611-a5d3-5d7e01d223ab | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c-6156-4611-a5d3-5d7e01d223ab c-6156-4611-a5d3-5d7e01d223ab No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Pearl River Valley El Pwr Assn Effective date: 2012/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: 70 OL-8 1000 HPS, Flood Sector: Lighting Description: Available to all Consumer's subject to Association's established rules and regulations. Association's standard outdoor lighting facilities. Service includes Association furnishing, operating, and maintaining lighting fixture, control equipment and lamp. When Association is required to alter its normal facilities to furnish a special outdoor lighting service, there will be an additional monthly charge.

252

Data:81adf393-c59e-40d8-baa3-5f8282fd5165 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

adf393-c59e-40d8-baa3-5f8282fd5165 adf393-c59e-40d8-baa3-5f8282fd5165 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Wisconsin Rapids W W & L Comm Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Single Phase Sector: Residential Description: This rate will be applied to residential single-phase and three-phase customers for ordinary household purposes receiving service within an urban rate area. Single-phase motors may not exceed 5 horsepower individual-rated capacity without utility permission. This rate is subject to a Public Benefits Charge of 3% of the combined monthly electric charges, not to exceed $1.75.

253

Data:6c2bcefc-7c09-4618-89c3-5e5270bcec5d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bcefc-7c09-4618-89c3-5e5270bcec5d bcefc-7c09-4618-89c3-5e5270bcec5d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Minnesota Power Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: PILOT RIDER FOR LARGE LIGHT AND POWER TIME-OF-USE SERVICE Sector: Description: APPLICATION Applicable to any customer taking service under Large Light and Power Service Schedule 55 or 75 with total power requirements in excess of 10,000 kW. All provisions of the Large Light and Power Service Schedule shall apply to the Time-of-Use service under this Rider except as noted below. Participation by customer is voluntary.

254

Data:138654b3-5ac2-473a-ba46-91cfc17f25ec | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b3-5ac2-473a-ba46-91cfc17f25ec b3-5ac2-473a-ba46-91cfc17f25ec No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: South Carolina Pub Serv Auth Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting - The Hampton 150 Watt PMH Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: https://www.santeecooper.com/business/equipment-leases/outdoor-lighting.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

255

Data:D019150c-035a-4542-8dc3-5b49a27fe554 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9150c-035a-4542-8dc3-5b49a27fe554 9150c-035a-4542-8dc3-5b49a27fe554 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Stillwater Utilities Authority Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: ELECTRIC RATE OUTDOOR SECURITY LIGHTING MV 100 W Sector: Lighting Description: This lighting fixture is no longer available for new installations. The Fixed Monthly Charge applies to Existing Distribution on Wood Poles. Additional Charges: If an extension of SEU's secondary circuit and a pole was necessary for the area security light, the monthly rate below shall be increased for each security light as follows:

256

The effects of storage time, storage temperature, and concentration on percent recoveries of thermally desorbed diffusive dosimeter samples contaminated with chloroform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the Analabs Thermal Desorber. 4. The Programmed Thermal Desorber on the left and linear chart recorder on the far right. 5. Gas Chromatograph Peak, Integrator Counting, and GC Conditions for Chloroform. 10 17 19 21 24 6. Photograph Illustrating.... A 2 x 3 x 3 Factorial Treatment Design . 13. Analysis of Variance Table for the Experimental Data 14. Mean Percent Recovery vs. Storage Temperature for 7 Days and 14 Days Storage Time At Concentration I (5 ppm - 8 hours). 26 27 28 29 30 31...

Gallucci, Joseph Matthew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Crystal structures and hydrogen bonding in the proton-transfer salts of nicotine with 3,5-di­nitro­salicylic acid and 5-sulfosalicylic acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal structures of the 1:1 salts of nicotine with 3,5-di­nitro­salicylic acid and with 5-sulfosalicylic acid both show polymeric hydrogen-bonded and --bonded structures but these differ in that in the first example, cations and anions form separate cation chains or anion columns which are unassociated through formal hydrogen bonds while in the second, hydrogen-bonded cation-anion chains are found.

Smith, G.

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

Assessment of typical BWR (boiling water reactor) vessel configurations and examination coverage  

SciTech Connect

Even though boiling water reactors (BWRs) are not susceptible to the kind of incident known as pressurized thermal shock that must be considered in the design and operation of pressurized water reactors, BWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) have experienced higher than expected embrittlement caused by fast neutron irradiation. This has required the vessel to be at a higher temperature than originally projected before the plant can be taken to power operation. In addition, many BWR plants have received exemption from the 10-year volumetric nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the vessel as required by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B PV) Code Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components,'' because NDE access is severely restricted. Since many RPV welds have not been examined after being placed in service and the potential for service-induced flaws exists, regulatory authorities are looking closely at examination relief requests. BWR reactor vessel examination coverage is typically limited by plant design. Most BWR plants were designed when inservice examination codes were in the early stages of development, and very little consideration was give to designing for NDE access. Consequently, there is restricted access for many areas of the RPV. Since an increase in examination requirements has been placed in ASME B PV Code Section XI in these areas, efforts have begun on a thorough analysis of the vessel weld volumes examined during inservice examination and an evaluation of possibility expanding the RPV examination coverage. Because of these concerns, an investigation of the accessibility of the reactor vessel for NDE was performed to define the present status and to determine the improvements in coverage that can be accomplished in the near future. 7 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Walker, S.M. (EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation Center, Charlotte, NC (USA)); Feige, E.J.; Ingamells, J.R. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA)); Calhoun, G.L.; Davis, J.; Kapoor, A. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Thermoelectric Properties of P-type Skutterudites YbxFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12 (0.8 x 1)  

SciTech Connect

P-type skutterudites, with nominal compositions YbxFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12 (0.8 x 1), have been synthesized by induction melting with subsequent annealing, and their thermoelectric properties evaluated from 3.5 K to 745 K to assess their suitability for thermoelectric based waste heat recovery applications. We report results for the synthesis and measurements of Seebeck coefficient (S), electrical resistivity ( ), thermal conductivity ( ), Hall coefficient (RH), and effective mass (m*/m0) of YbxFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12 (0.8 x 1). Powder x-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) show that this system has a narrow filling fraction range of x ~ 0.84 to 0.86 for Yb in the crystallographic voids. All samples show positive RH for the entire temperature range studied with carrier concentrations ranging from 9.6 1020 to 2.8 1021 cm-3 at room temperature. Relatively high values of S result in high power factors up to 17 Wcm-1K-2 at room temperature. However, large values of and a sharp reduction in the S at high temperature due to bipolar conduction prevent the attainment of high thermoelectric figure of merit.

Cho, Jung Y [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Ye, Zuxin [GM Research and Development Center; Tessema, M. [GM Research and Development Center; Waldo, R.A. [GM Research and Development Center; Salvador, James R. [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Yang, Jihui [General Motors Corporation; Cai, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Electrical and thermoelectric properties of 90% Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-5% Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-5% Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} single crystals doped with SbI{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect

Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} alloys with Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} contents up to 10 mol%, e.g., the 90% Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-5% Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-5% Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} alloy, are among the best n-type thermoelectric materials for Peltier coolers used near room temperature. In this work, the electrical and thermoelectric properties of Sbl{sub 3}doped 90% Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-5% Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}-5% Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} alloys were characterized at temperatures ranging from 80K to 600K. The temperature dependencies of the Hall coefficient, carrier mobility, Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity were measured, and the scattering parameter and bandgap energy were determined.

Hyun, D.B.; Hwang, J.S.; Shim, J.D.; Kolomoets, N.V. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Metals] [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Metals; Oh, T.S. [Hong Ik Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science] [Hong Ik Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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261

New emission line at ~3.5 keV - observational status, connection with radiatively decaying dark matter and directions for future studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent works of [1402.2301,1402.4119], claiming the detection of extra emission line with energy ~3.5 keV in X-ray spectra of certain clusters of galaxies and nearby Andromeda galaxy, have raised considerable interest in astrophysics and particle physics communities. A number of new observational studies claim detection or non-detection of the extra line in X-ray spectra of various cosmic objects. In this review I summarize existing results of these studies, overview possible interpretations of the extra line, including intriguing connection with radiatively decaying dark matter, and show future directions achievable with existing and planned X-ray cosmic missions.

Iakubovskyi, Dmytro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A toxological study of 3,6-BIS(3,5-Dimethyl-1-1-Pyrazolyl)1,2-Dihydro-1,2,4,5-Tetrazine  

SciTech Connect

The acute oral LD[sub 30/50] values for 3,6-BIS(3,5-Dimethyl-1-Pyrazolyl)-1,2-Dihydro-1,2,4,5-Tetrazine BIS(DMP)DHT are greater than 5g/kg. According to classical guidelines, the material would be considered only slightly toxic or practically nontoxic in both rats and mice. The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show BIS(DMP)SHT to have potential sensitizing effects. Skin application studies on the rabbit demonstrated the material was cutaneously nonirritating. This material was also nonirritating in the rabbit eye application studies.

London, J.E.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A toxological study of 3,6-BIS(3,5-Dimethyl-1-1-Pyrazolyl)1,2-Dihydro-1,2,4,5-Tetrazine  

SciTech Connect

The acute oral LD{sub 30/50} values for 3,6-BIS(3,5-Dimethyl-1-Pyrazolyl)-1,2-Dihydro-1,2,4,5-Tetrazine BIS(DMP)DHT are greater than 5g/kg. According to classical guidelines, the material would be considered only slightly toxic or practically nontoxic in both rats and mice. The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show BIS(DMP)SHT to have potential sensitizing effects. Skin application studies on the rabbit demonstrated the material was cutaneously nonirritating. This material was also nonirritating in the rabbit eye application studies.

London, J.E.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)  

SciTech Connect

A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

table3.5_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002; 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.1 0.6 1.1 1.2 0.9 1.0 1.3 311 Food 6 0 3 0 0 2 1 5.3 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3 0 * 0 0 2 * 0.9 31131 Sugar * 0 * 0 0 0 0 0.9 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 1 0 * 0 0 0 * 0.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 2 0 1 0 0 1 * 1.9 3121 Beverages 2 0 1 0 0 1 * 1.9 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 313 Textile Mills * 0 0 0 0 * 0 0.0 314 Textile Product Mills Q 0 0 0 0 Q 0 0.0 315 Apparel 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 316 Leather and Allied Products 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 321 Wood Products 210 0 0 0 0 205 6 5.1 321113 Sawmills 85 0 0 0 0 83 2 10.6 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods

266

Data:588469d3-5d8a-442d-b11c-7dd07a9e8c05 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d3-5d8a-442d-b11c-7dd07a9e8c05 d3-5d8a-442d-b11c-7dd07a9e8c05 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Tacoma, Washington (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: RS - Schedule A-1 - City of Fircrest Sector: Residential Description: Available for domestic purposes in residences, apartments, duplex houses and multiple family dwellings. Source or reference: www.mytpu.org/customer-service/rates/power-rates/power-rates-schedules.htm Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

267

Data:Dc093d7c-4f89-43ee-98e3-5e2da2cdadbb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dc093d7c-4f89-43ee-98e3-5e2da2cdadbb Dc093d7c-4f89-43ee-98e3-5e2da2cdadbb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kerrville Public Utility Board Effective date: 2000/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: New service charge-During normal business hours Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to all retail customers served by KPUB. The charges listed herein are in addition to any other charges made under KPUB's Tariff for Electric Service, and will be applied for the appropriate condition described. Other services not covered by these standard conditions will be charged on the basis of an estimate for the job or the actual costs plus overhead adders.

268

Data:C7afa839-7987-4672-a2e3-5ddcfbdef50a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

afa839-7987-4672-a2e3-5ddcfbdef50a afa839-7987-4672-a2e3-5ddcfbdef50a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Entergy Louisiana Inc Effective date: 2006/01/31 End date if known: Rate name: Business Schedule GS - 1W (Small General Service)(primary voltage) Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to electric service for which no specific rate schedule is provided, when all such service required by Customer on the premises is supplied by Company, at one point of delivery, and is measured through one kilowatt-hour meter. Service hereunder is subject to any of the Company's rider schedules that may be applicable. Service under this schedule shall not be resold, sub-metered, used for standby, or shared with others.

269

Data:A46837f3-5d7e-4192-a205-8f4c7fc2f63e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

837f3-5d7e-4192-a205-8f4c7fc2f63e 837f3-5d7e-4192-a205-8f4c7fc2f63e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Cleveland, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Genaral Power Rate-- GSD Sector: Industrial Description: This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where a customer's currently effective onpeak or offpeak contract demand, whichever is higher, is greater than 25,000 kW but not more than 15,000 kW; provided that the other conditions of this conditions are met. Source or reference: http://www.clevelandutilities.com/PDF/2011JulyElectricRates.pdf

270

Data:5bcbf0e1-5666-40b4-97f3-5a311e479c3b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bcbf0e1-5666-40b4-97f3-5a311e479c3b bcbf0e1-5666-40b4-97f3-5a311e479c3b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Detroit Edison Co Effective date: 2011/12/21 End date if known: Rate name: INTERRUPTIBLE SUPPLY RATE D8 Subtransmission (24 to 41.6 kV)-Full Service Sector: Commercial Description: Voltage discount $0.0010 included Available to customers desiring separately metered service at primary voltage who contract for a specified quantity of demonstrated interruptible load of not less than 50 kilowatts at a single location. Contracted interruptible capacity on this rate is limited to 150 megawatts.

271

Data:9f8151e3-5c40-480c-bf5a-22d6a43ee513 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

151e3-5c40-480c-bf5a-22d6a43ee513 151e3-5c40-480c-bf5a-22d6a43ee513 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Joe Wheeler Elec Member Corp Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Manufacturing Service Rate--Schedule SMSC Sector: Industrial Description: This rate shall apply to the firm electric power requirements where (a) a customer's currently effective contract demand is greater than 15,000 kW but not more than 25,000 kW Source or reference: http://www.jwemc.org/rateforms.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

272

Non-abelian Dark Matter Solutions for Galactic Gamma-ray Excess and Perseus 3.5 keV X-ray Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We attempt to explain simultaneously the Galactic center gamma-ray excess and the 3.5 keV X-ray line from the Perseus cluster based on a class of non-abelian $SU(2)$ DM models, in which the dark matter and an excited state comprise a "dark" $SU(2)$ doublet. The non-abelian group kinetically mixes with the standard model gauge group via dimensions-5 operators. The dark matter particles annihilate into standard model fermions, followed by fragmentation and bremsstrahlung, and thus producing a continuous spectrum of gamma-rays. On the other hand, the dark matter particles can annihilate into a pair of excited states, each of which decays back into the dark matter particle and an X-ray photon, which has an energy equal to the mass difference between the dark matter and the excited state, which is set to be 3.5 keV. The large hierarchy between the required X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray annihilation cross-sections can be achieved by a very small kinetic mixing between the SM and dark sector, which effectively suppresses t...

Cheung, Kingman; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Research: A typical thermal barrier coating consists of two layers over the substrate: 1) a ceramic top coat to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research: A typical thermal barrier coating consists of two layers over the substrate: 1) a ceramic-level understanding of the metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic interfaces present in thermal barrier coatings. We have interfaces weaken as the ceramic thickens. This provides atomic-level insight as to why thermal barrier

Carter, Emily A.

274

General Project Sequence The following are typical steps on many projects. Actual required steps may vary from project to project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General Project Sequence The following are typical steps on many projects. Actual required steps may vary from project to project depending upon the scope, complexity, and specific features. Time periods indicated will vary depending on the nature of the project and needs of the user group

Mather, Patrick T.

275

Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical Intra-oceanic Arc1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical at Dallas, Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083-0688, USA A B S T R A C T Major element compositions of glass of these lavas reflects accumulation of plagioclase. Glass inclusions also show the common occurrence of felsic

Stern, Robert J.

276

Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) What's it for: measuring the size of particles typically in the sub micron region,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) · What's it for: measuring the size of particles typically weight of organic compounds. #12;·DLS Measurement: the speed at which the particles are diffusing due to Brownian motion is measured by recording the rate at which the intensity of the scattered light fluctuates

Subramanian, Venkat

277

REST-FRAME UV-OPTICALLY SELECTED GALAXIES AT 2.3 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.5: SEARCHING FOR DUSTY STAR-FORMING AND PASSIVELY EVOLVING GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

A new set of color selection criteria (VJL) analogous with the BzK method is designed to select both star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and passively evolving galaxies (PEGs) at 2.3 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.5 by using rest-frame UV-optical (V - J versus J - L) colors. The criteria are thoroughly tested with theoretical stellar population synthesis models and real galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts to evaluate their efficiency and contamination. We apply the well-tested VJL criteria to the HST/WFC3 Early Release Science field and study the physical properties of selected galaxies. The redshift distribution of selected SFGs peaks at z {approx} 2.7, slightly lower than that of Lyman break galaxies at z {approx} 3. Comparing the observed mid-infrared fluxes of selected galaxies with the prediction of pure stellar emission, we find that our VJL method is effective at selecting massive dusty SFGs that are missed by the Lyman break technique. About half of the star formation in massive (M{sub star} > 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }) galaxies at 2.3 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.5 is contributed by dusty (extinction E(B - V) > 0.4) SFGs, which, however, only account for {approx}20% of the number density of massive SFGs. We also use the mid-infrared fluxes to clean our PEG sample and find that galaxy size can be used as a secondary criterion to effectively eliminate the contamination of dusty SFGs. The redshift distribution of the cleaned PEG sample peaks at z {approx} 2.5. We find six PEG candidates at z > 3 and discuss possible methods to distinguish them from dusty contamination. We conclude that at least part of our candidates are real PEGs at z {approx} 3, implying that these types of galaxies began to form their stars at z {approx}> 5. We measure the integrated stellar mass density (ISMD) of PEGs at z {approx} 2.5 and set constraints on it at z > 3. We find that the ISMD grows by at least about a factor of 10 in 1 Gyr at 3 < z <5 and by another factor of 10 in the next 3.5 Gyr (1 < z < 3).

Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Cassata, Paolo; Williams, Christina C.; Salimbeni, Sara [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, 710 N. Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton; Grogin, Norman A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dickinson, Mark [NOAO-Tucson, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Chary, Ranga-Ram [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Messias, Hugo [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Observatorio Astronomico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa (Portugal); Tundo, Elena [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Lin Lihwai [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lee, Seong-Kook [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Hoegiro 87, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Fontana, Adriano; Grazian, Andrea [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Kocevski, Dale [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lee, Kyoung-Soo [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Villanueva, Edward [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101-1292 (United States); Van der Wel, Arjen, E-mail: yicheng@astro.umass.edu [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

Effect of microstructural modification on tensile and fatigue properties of Cu-35wt%Ni-3. 5wt%Cr alloy  

SciTech Connect

Tensile and fatigue properties of Cu-35wt%Ni-3.5wt%Cr in four different material conditions have been investigated. It is shown that reduced grain size and enhanced dislocation density lead to an increase in tensile as well as fatigue strength of solution treated specimens. In the presence of precipitates, tensile properties are less dependent on grain size. Similar to tensile strength, LCF strength is improved by precipitation hardening. However, for large-grained material, the effect of precipitation hardening in the HCF region is reduced due to pronounced intergranular cracking. On the other hand, the intergranular cracking can be reduced by grain refinement, so that an improvement of HCF properties is then possible while taking advantage of precipitation hardening. Results obtained by TEM-investigation of deformed specimens are also discussed in connection with deformation behaviors of the material conditions.

Wang, G.X. (GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hidden axion dark matter decaying through mixing with QCD axion and the 3.5 keV X-ray line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hidden axions may be coupled to the standard model particles through a kinetic or mass mixing with QCD axion. We study a scenario in which a hidden axion constitutes a part of or the whole of dark matter and decays into photons through the mixing, explaining the 3.5 keV X-ray line signal. Interestingly, the required long lifetime of the hidden axion dark matter can be realized for the QCD axion decay constant at an intermediate scale, if the mixing is sufficiently small. In such a two component dark matter scenario, the primordial density perturbations of the hidden axion can be highly non-Gaussian, leading to a possible dispersion in the X-ray line strength from various galaxy clusters and near-by galaxies. We also discuss how the parallel and orthogonal alignment of two axions affects their couplings to gauge fields.

Tetsutaro Higaki; Naoya Kitajima; Fuminobu Takahashi

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

280

The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]-: infrared spectrum and structure  

SciTech Connect

The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate v3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- compared to the mono-complex [UO2(NO3)3]-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (v3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the v3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The lowest energy structure predicted by density functional theory (B3LYP functional) calculations was one in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

Groenewold, G. S.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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281

Typical Response to Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oppen.2006. PRSLB. 273:2305 - 2312 http://www.science.uts.edu Thermal Tolerance Magnetic Davies Keppels Magnetic Davies Control 30 oC 31 oC escence(Fv/Fm) Which kept at 27.5C for 5 days? Berkelmans and van Oppen.2006. PRSLB. 273:2305 - 2312 Keppels Magnetic Davies

Mitchell, Randall J.

282

Data:1763c9f0-da69-4218-baf3-5ba21a5bb680 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c9f0-da69-4218-baf3-5ba21a5bb680 c9f0-da69-4218-baf3-5ba21a5bb680 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Black River Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/04/15 End date if known: Rate name: General Service Optional Time-of-Day Single Phase 8am-8pm with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Commercial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The current cost per kilowatt-hour of energy billed is equal to the cost of power purchased for the most recent month, divided by the kilowatt-hours of energy sold. The monthly adjustment (rounded to the nearest one one-hundredth of a cent) is equal to the current cost less the base cost. The base cost of power (U) is $0.0790 per kilowatt-hour. Application: This rate schedule is optional to all Gs-1, General Service customers. Customers that wish to be served on this rate schedule must apply to the utility for service. Once an optional customer begins service on this rate schedule, the customer shall remain on the rate for a minimum of one year. Any customer choosing to be served on this rate schedule waives all rights to billing adjustments arising from a claim that the bill for service would be less on another rate schedule than under this rate schedule. Commitment to Community rider: General Service Optional TOD 3.0% of the total electric bill not to exceed $1.66

283

Simulations of the LHC high luminosity monitors at beam energies from 3.5 TeV to 7.0 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We have constructed two pairs of fast ionization chambers (BRAN) for measurement and optimization of luminosity at IR1 and IR5 of the LHC. These devices are capable of monitoring the performance of the LHC at low luminosity 10{sup 28} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} during beam commissioning all the way up to the expected full luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 7.0 TeV. The ionization chambers measure the intensity of hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward neutral particles of LHC collisions. To predict and improve the understanding of the BRAN performance, we created a detailed FLUKA model of the detector and its surroundings. In this paper, we describe the model and the results of our simulations including the detector's estimated response to pp collisions at beam energies of 3.5, 5.0, and 7.0 TeV per beam. In addition, these simulations show the sensitivity of the BRAN to the crossing angle of the two LHC beams. It is shown that the BRAN sensitivity to the crossing angle is proportional to the measurement of crossing angle by the LHC beam position monitors.

Matis, H.S.; Miyamoto, R.; Humphreys, P.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W.C.; Stiller, J.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

284

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Loring Air Force Base, Operable Units 3, 5, 10, and 11, Limestone, ME, August 21, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Loring Air Force Base National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in Aroostook County, Maine. This decision document presents the selected remedial actions for the source areas at the following sites located within OUs 3, 5, 10, and 11 at the Site: OU3 - Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Range Outdoor Firing Range; OU5 -- Base Exchange Service Station (BXSS); OU10 -- Pumphouse (PH) 8210; PH 8270; Former Solvent Storage Building (FSSB); and OU11 -- Refueling Maintenance Shop Area (RMSA); Vehicle Maintenance Building (VMB); The USAF has evaluated the potential risks to human health and the environment at each of the these sites and developed the site-specific remediation goals for the source areas at each of these sites based on the future land use determinations made in the April 1996 Record of Decision (PB96-963703) for the Disposal of Loring Air Force Base, Maine. Therefore, the No Further CERCLA Action decisions for the source areas at each of these sites is based on the assumption that future land use at each site shall be in accordance with the Disposal ROD (i.e., that real property comprising the site shall be parceled, disposed of, and reused in accordance with the Disposal ROD).

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Effect of defect imbalance on void swelling distributions produced in pure iron irradiated with 3.5 MeV self-ions  

SciTech Connect

Ion irradiation has been widely used to simulate neutron-induced radiation damage. There are a number of features of ion-induced damage that differ from neutron-induced damage, however, and these differences require investigation before ion data can be confidently used to predict behavior arising from neutron bombardment. In this study 3.5 MeV self-ion irradiation of pure iron was used to study the influence on void swelling of the depth-dependent defect imbalance between vacancies and interstitials that arises from various surface effects, forward scattering of displaced atoms, and especially the injected interstitial effect. It was observed that the depth dependence of void swelling does not follow the behavior anticipated from the depth dependence of the damage rate. Void nucleation and growth develop first in the lower-dose, near-surface region, and then moves to progressively deeper and higher-damage depths during continued irradiation. This indicates a strong initial suppression of void nucleation in the peak damage region that is eventually overcome with continued irradiation. Using the Boltzmann transport equation method, this phenomenon is shown to be due to depth-dependent defect imbalances created under ion irradiation. These findings demonstrate that void swelling does not depend solely on the local dose level and that this sensitivity of swelling to depth must be considered in extraction and interpretation of ion-induced swelling data. 2014 El

Lin Shao; C.-C. Wei; J. Gigax; A. Aitkaliyeva; D. Chen; B.H. Sencer; F.A. Garner

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Associate K^0 production in p+p collisions at 3.5 GeV: The role of Delta(1232)++  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exclusive analysis of the 4-body final states $\\mathrm{\\Lambda + p + \\pi^{+} + K^{0}}$ and $\\mathrm{\\Sigma^{0} + p + \\pi^{+} + K^{0}}$ measured with HADES for p+p collisions at a beam kinetic energy of 3.5 GeV is presented. The analysis uses various phase space variables, such as missing mass and invariant mass distributions, in the four particle event selection (p, $\\pi^+$, $\\pi^+$, $\\pi^-$) to find cross sections of the different production channels, contributions of the intermediate resonances $\\mathrm{\\Delta^{++}}$ and $\\mathrm{\\Sigma(1385)^{+}}$ and corresponding angular distributions. A dominant resonant production is seen, where the reaction $\\mathrm{\\Lambda + \\Delta^{++} + K^{0}}$ has an about ten times higher cross section ($\\mathrm{29.45\\pm0.08^{+1.67}_{-1.46}\\pm2.06\\,\\mu b}$) than the analogous non-resonant reaction ($\\mathrm{2.57\\pm0.02^{+0.21}_{-1.98}\\pm0.18\\,\\mu b}$). A similar result is obtained in the corresponding $\\Sigma^{0}$ channels with $\\mathrm{9.26\\pm0.05^{+1.41}_{-0.31}\\pm0.65\\,\\ mu b}$ in the resonant and $\\mathrm{1.35\\pm0.02^{+0.10}_{-1.35}\\pm0.09\\,\\mu b}$ in the non-resonant reactions.

G. Agakishiev; O. Arnold; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; K. Göbel; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krása; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; T. Kunz; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; R. Münzer; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wustenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

287

The corrosion performance of die-cast magnesium alloy MRI230D in 3.5% NaCl solution saturated with Mg(OH){sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

The environmental behavior of die-cast magnesium alloy MRI230D designated for high-temperature applications was evaluated in comparison with regular AZ91D alloy. The microstructure examination was carried out using SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis; the corrosion performance in 3.5% NaCl solution was evaluated by immersion test, salt spray testing, potentiodynamic polarization analysis, and stress corrosion behavior by Slow Strain Rate Testing (SSRT). Although the general corrosion resistance of MRI230D was slightly improved compared to that of AZ91D alloy its stress corrosion resistance was relatively reduced. The variations in the environmental behavior of the two alloys were mainly due to the differences in their chemical composition and microstructure after die casting. In particular, the differences were related to the reduced Al content in MRI230D and the addition of Ca to this alloy, which consequently affected its relative microstructure and electrochemical characteristics. - Research Highlights: {yields}Corrosion and SCC resistance of a new Mg alloy MRI230D was evaluated vs. regular AZ91D. {yields}MRI230D has a minor advantage in corrosion performance compared with AZ91D. {yields}The SCC resistance of MRI230D by SSRT analysis was relatively reduced. {yields}The reduced SCC resistance of MRI230D was due to the detrimental effect of Ca on ductility.

Aghion, E., E-mail: egyon@bgu.ac.il; Lulu, N.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Partial Wave Analysis of the Reaction $p(3.5 GeV)+p \\to pK^+?$ to Search for the "$ppK^-$" Bound State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Employing the Bonn-Gatchina partial wave analysis framework (PWA), we have analyzed HADES data of the reaction $p(3.5GeV)+p\\to pK^{+}\\Lambda$. This reaction might contain information about the kaonic cluster "$ppK^-$" via its decay into $p\\Lambda$. Due to interference effects in our coherent description of the data, a hypothetical $\\overline{K}NN$ (or, specifically "$ppK^-$") cluster signal must not necessarily show up as a pronounced feature (e.g. a peak) in an invariant mass spectra like $p\\Lambda$. Our PWA analysis includes a variety of resonant and non-resonant intermediate states and delivers a good description of our data (various angular distributions and two-hadron invariant mass spectra) without a contribution of a $\\overline{K}NN$ cluster. At a confidence level of CL$_{s}$=95\\% such a cluster can not contribute more than 2-12\\% to the total cross section with a $pK^{+}\\Lambda$ final state, which translates into a production cross-section between 0.7 $\\mu b$ and 4.2 $\\mu b$, respectively. The range of the upper limit depends on the assumed cluster mass, width and production process.

G. Agakishiev; O. Arnold; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; K. Göbel; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; H. Kuc; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; T. Kunz; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; J. Michel; C. Müntz; R. Münzer; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky; A. V. Sarantsev

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

White matter microstructure correlates of narrative production in typically developing children and children with high functioning autism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigated the relationship between white matter microstructure and the development of morphosyntax in a spoken narrative in typically developing children (TD) and in children with high functioning autism (HFA). Autism is characterized by language and communication impairments, yet the relationship between morphosyntactic development in spontaneous discourse contexts and neural development is not well understood in either this population or typical development. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to assess multiple parameters of diffusivity as indicators of white matter tract integrity in language-related tracts in children between 6 and 13 years of age. Children were asked to spontaneously tell a story about at time when someone made them sad, mad, or angry. The story was evaluated for morphological accuracy and syntactic complexity. Analysis of the relationship between white matter microstructure and language performance in TD children showed that diffusivity correlated with morphosyntax production in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), a fiber tract traditionally associated with language. At the anatomical level, the HFA group showed abnormal diffusivity in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) relative to the TD group. Within the HFA group, children with greater white matter integrity in the right ILF displayed greater morphological accuracy during their spoken narrative. Overall, the current study shows an association between white matter structure in a traditional language pathway and narrative performance in TD children. In the autism group, associations were only found in the ILF, suggesting that during real world language use, children with HFA rely less on typical pathways and more on alternative ventral pathways that possibly mediate visual elements of language.

Brian D. Mills; Janie Lai; Timothy T. Brown; Matthew Erhart; Eric Halgren; Judy Reilly; Anders Dale; Mark Appelbaum; Pamela Moses

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A GASFLOW analysis of a steam explosion accident in a typical light-water reactor confinement building  

SciTech Connect

Steam over-pressurization resulting from ex-vessel steam explosion (fuel-coolant interaction) may pose a serious challenge to the integrity of a typical light-water reactor confinement building. If the steam generation rate exceeds the removal capacity of the Airborne Activity Confinement System, confinement over pressurization occurs. Thus, there is a large potential for an uncontrolled and unfiltered release of fission products from the confinement atmosphere to the environment at the time of the steam explosion. The GASFLOW computer code was used to analyze the effects of a hypothetical steam explosion and the transport of steam and hydrogen throughout a typical light-water reactor confinement building. The effects of rapid pressurization and the resulting forces on the internal structures and the heat exchanger service bay hatch covers were calculated. Pressurization of the ventilation system and the potential damage to the ventilation fans and high-efficiency particulate air filters were assessed. Because of buoyancy forces and the calculated confinement velocity field, the hydrogen diffuses and mixes in the confinement atmosphere but tends to be transported to its upper region.

Travis, J.R. [ESSI Inc. (United States); Wilson, T.L.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rao, D.V. [SEA Inc. (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Energy-Performance-Based Design-Build Process: Strategies for Procuring High-Performance Buildings on Typical Construction Budgets: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

NREL experienced a significant increase in employees and facilities on our 327-acre main campus in Golden, Colorado over the past five years. To support this growth, researchers developed and demonstrated a new building acquisition method that successfully integrates energy efficiency requirements into the design-build requests for proposals and contracts. We piloted this energy performance based design-build process with our first new construction project in 2008. We have since replicated and evolved the process for large office buildings, a smart grid research laboratory, a supercomputer, a parking structure, and a cafeteria. Each project incorporated aggressive efficiency strategies using contractual energy use requirements in the design-build contracts, all on typical construction budgets. We have found that when energy efficiency is a core project requirement as defined at the beginning of a project, innovative design-build teams can integrate the most cost effective and high performance efficiency strategies on typical construction budgets. When the design-build contract includes measurable energy requirements and is set up to incentivize design-build teams to focus on achieving high performance in actual operations, owners can now expect their facilities to perform. As NREL completed the new construction in 2013, we have documented our best practices in training materials and a how-to guide so that other owners and owner's representatives can replicate our successes and learn from our experiences in attaining market viable, world-class energy performance in the built environment.

Scheib, J.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Polyamide woven fabrics with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride or nitro blue tetrazolium chloride as 2D ionizing radiation dosimeters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of flat woven fabric-based ionizing radiation 2D dosimeters is reported in this work. Polyamide fabric was surface modified with radiation-sensitive 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) or nitro blue tetrazolium chloride (NBT). These samples responded to gamma radiation of 60Co through a colour change: red and blue for TTC and NBT, respectively. The tinge intensity was observed to depend on the absorbed dose, which allowed for the reflectance of light (R) measurements and calculation of the calibration parameters: dose range, quasi-linear range, threshold dose and sensitivity. Oxygen was shown to be an important factor determining the dose response of the samples. For this reason, a range of additional modifications to the TTC- and NBT-polyamide fabric was proposed which lead to a decrease in the threshold dose and increase in the sensitivity to irradiation of the samples. For instance, a dosimeter made of polyamide fabric modified with 10 g/dm3 TTC, 0.5 mol/dm3 tert-butyl alcohol, 7.5% gelatine hydrogel at pH 10 (vacuum packed) showed the lowest dose threshold (50 Gy), dose range up to 2.8 kGy and the highest sensitivity to irradiation (?0.0396%/Gy) among the compositions studied. In consequence, this dosimeter was examined in terms of response to inhomogeneous irradiation from a 192Ir brachytherapy radiation source. The relative dose distribution profiles across the source's longitudinal axis were calculated. This showed potential of the textile dosimeters for 2D dose distribution measurements; however, further modifications towards improvement of the dosimeter's low dose response can be considered.

M. Kozicki; E. S?siadek

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Effects of Walking Surface and Vibration on the Gait Pattern and Vibration Perception Threshold of Typically Developing Children and Children with Idiopathic Toe Walking.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The aim of the current study is to investigate novel therapeutic/treatment methods and outcome measurement for children with Idiopathic Toe Walking (ITW). Fifteen typically… (more)

Fanchiang, Hsin-chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has inventoried over 30000 major hazardous waste sites in the US of which about 80 percent present some threat to groundwater supplies. The remediation of each of these  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the US of which about 80 percent present some threat to groundwater supplies. The remediation of each new and innovative strategies are developed. Much of the problem and initial cost of subsurface remediation concerns site characterization. A three-dimensional picture of the heterogeneous subsurface

Rubin, Yoram

295

Metrics (and Methodologies) for Evaluating Energy and Water Impacts of Alternative Process Cooling Systems in a Typical Chemical Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, kWh/Unit = 0.0039 85.1% February 5 12PM to 1PM Annual Values 0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.10 0.12 0.14 0.16 0.18 0.20 10.0 20.0 30.0 40.0 50.0 60.0 70.0 80.0 90.0 100.0 110.0 841 865 889 913 937 961 985 G a l / U n i t P r o d u c e d D...1Metrics (and Methodologies) for Evaluating Energy and Water Impacts of Alternative Process Cooling Systems in a Typical Chemical Plant Presentation to the: May 21, 2014 Thomas P. Carter, P.E. Sr. Program Manager, Heat Rejection Technology...

Carter, T. P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Isosorbide-5-mononitrate treatment prevents cyclosporin A-induced platelet hyperactivation and the underlying nitric oxide–cyclic guanosine-3?,5?-monophosphate disturbances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introduction: The clinical use of cyclosporin A (CsA) is commonly associated with the development of hypertension and increased risk of thromboembolic events. Decreased endothelium-dependent relaxation and increased platelet activation seems to be involved on those side effects, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet elucidated. The present study aimed to evaluate the CsA effect on the platelet NO–cyclic guanosine-3?,5?-monophosphate (cGMP) pathway and the putative benefits of concomitant isosorbide-5-mononitrate (IS-5-MN) administration on CsA-induced hypertension and on platelet hyperactivation. Materials and Methods: Blood pressures, platelet NO synthase activity and cGMP content, intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and whole blood platelet aggregation were assessed in three rat groups orally treated, during 7 weeks, with the following diets: orange juice (control group), 5 mg/kg/day of CsA (CsA group) and 150 mg/kg/day, b.i.d., of IS-5-MN for 2 weeks and IS-5-MN plus 5 mg/kg/day of CsA for 7 weeks (IS-5-MN+CsA group). Results: IS-5-MN treatment has prevented hypertension development obtained in the solely CsA-treated rats. CsA treatment has inhibited NOS activity, which was reverted by the concomitant IS-5-MN and CsA administration. On the contrary, platelets from CsA-treated rats had cGMP content increased when compared with the control rats. The variation obtained when ISMN was present was less predominant. Therefore, the organic nitrate treatment has prevented platelet hyperactivation, namely, by decreasing thrombin-evoked [Ca2+]i and collagen-evoked platelet aggregation, when compared with the solely CsA-treated group. The preventive effect of IS-5-MN was reinforced by electron microscopy studies of platelet activation. Conclusions: By increasing [Ca2+]i and aggregation, CsA induces platelet hyperactivation and simultaneously increases cGMP content, which might represent a compensatory inhibitory mechanism. The concomitant IS-5-MN treatment prevents the above-mentioned platelet hyperreactivity and tends to normalize the NO–cGMP pathway as well as the development of hypertension.

Flávio Reis; Lu??s Almeida; Teresa Alcobia; José D Santos-Dias; Margarida Lourenço; Aida Palmeiro; Carlos A Ferrer-Antunes; José F Mesquita; Fausto Pontes; Frederico Teixeira

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Greenhouse gases emissions accounting for typical sewage sludge digestion with energy utilization and residue land application in China  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHGs emissions from sludge digestion + residue land use in China were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AD unit contributes more than 97% of total biogenic GHGs emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD with methane recovery is attractive for sludge GHGs emissions reduction. - Abstract: About 20 million tonnes of sludge (with 80% moisture content) is discharged by the sewage treatment plants per year in China, which, if not treated properly, can be a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. Anaerobic digestion is a conventional sewage sludge treatment method and will continue to be one of the main technologies in the following years. This research has taken into consideration GHGs emissions from typical processes of sludge thickening + anaerobic digestion + dewatering + residue land application in China. Fossil CO{sub 2}, biogenic CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4,} and avoided CO{sub 2} as the main objects is discussed respectively. The results show that the total CO{sub 2}-eq is about 1133 kg/t DM (including the biogenic CO{sub 2}), while the net CO{sub 2}-eq is about 372 kg/t DM (excluding the biogenic CO{sub 2}). An anaerobic digestion unit as the main GHGs emission source occupies more than 91% CO{sub 2}-eq of the whole process. The use of biogas is important for achieving carbon dioxide emission reductions, which could reach about 24% of the total CO{sub 2}-eq reduction.

Niu Dongjie, E-mail: niudongjie@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); UNEP-Tongji Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Hui [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dai Xiaohu [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Urban Pollution Control, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhao Youcai [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Bulletin of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic SocietyVol.25 page 27 During a very wet four days in Sydney (typical of this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. With stunning views of Sydney Harbour, the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Sydney Opera House, the Crystal four days in Sydney (typical of this year's summer weather in the city) 335 delegates gathered

Phipps, Steven J.

299

Structural impacts of the 1985 farm bill on typical farms in the Texas Southern High Plains and delta region of Mississippi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STRUCTURAL IMPACTS OF THK 1985 FARM BILL ON TYPICAL FARMS IN THK TEXAS SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS AND DELTA REGION OF MISSISSIPPI A Thesis by CHARLES FREDERICK MILLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics STRUCTURAL IMPACTS OF THE 1985 FARM BILL ON TYPICAL FARMS IN THE TEXAS SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS AND DELTA REGION OF MISSISSIPPI A Thesis by CHARLES FREDERICK...

Miller, Charles Frederick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

3/5/09 11:36 AMTech composes the music of fish | ajc.com Page 1 of 3http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2009/02/22/tech_music_fish.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3/5/09 11:36 AMTech composes the music of fish | ajc.com Page 1 of 3http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2009/02/22/tech_music_fish.html Enlarge this image CURTIS COMPTON / ccompton@ajc.com Dr. Bruce Walker (right), project lead, and researcher Carrie Bruce watch fish during work on a Center for Music

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301

ACHIEVING CALIFORNIA'S 33 PERCENT RENEWABLE PORTFOLIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. To remedy this limitation, the report presents a new feed-in tariff approach that is modelled on successful as the basis for feed-in tariff rates that do not achieve the renewable goal, or do so at a higher cost than and risks because of their diversification effects. KEYWORDS Feed-in tariffs, portfolio analysis, generation

302

Corrosion of reinforcing steel is typically one of the main problems causing deterioration of concrete structures. The Microcomposite Multistructural Formable (MMFX) steel, which is a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion of reinforcing steel is typically one of the main problems causing deterioration available steel, has proven to have high corrosion resistance in comparison with conventional steel without provides a high resistance to corrosion due to severe environmental exposure in comparison to the use

303

Figure 1. The dataset for the running example is excerpted at left, arranged in the typical manner for MVPA. The boxes at right introduce the dataset  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1. The dataset for the running example is excerpted at left, arranged in the typical manner for MVPA. The boxes at right introduce the dataset representation used in later figures. In these boxes the "dataset-wise" scheme, the examples are relabeled prior to conducting the cross- validation, while

304

PV modules, with a life measured in decades, will typically be in place longer than the outdoor unit of a HVAC system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unit of a HVAC system. When the performance of an HVAC system deteriorates, it is usually inspected remain installed on the roof even after the system is no longer being used. Although HVAC units have only jumpers and screws effectively bond all parts of the listed device together. HVAC components are typically

Johnson, Eric E.

305

Study on the hydrogen storage and electrochemical properties of Mm0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Co0.2Alx (x = 0.0–0.4) alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mm0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Co0.2Alx (x = 0.0–0.4) alloys were prepared by the magnetic induction melting method. The influence of Al content on the hydrogen storage and electrochemical properties of the alloy was investigated. The results show that the hydrogen storage capacity is gradually reduced as the Al content increases. The (La,Pr,Nd)Ni5 cell volume and the change of enthalpy also decrease as Al is added. Although the discharge capacity decreases with increasing Al content, the addition of Al can reduce the stability of Mm0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Co0.2Alx (x = 0.0–0.4) hydride and improve the performance of hydrogen desorption thermodynamics. For the alloy electrode without Al, the maximum discharge capacity (Cmax) and retention discharge capacity after 100 charge–discharge cycles (C100) is 385 mA h g?1 and 202 mA h g?1, respectively. For the alloy electrode with x = 0.4, while Cmax is only 323 mA h g?1, C100 is 273 mA h g?1, which is much higher than that of the alloy without Al. The addition of Al can improve the charge–discharge cycle lifetime effectively and can increase the limiting current IL. The kinetic performance of the Mm0.75Mg0.25Ni3.5Co0.2Alx (x = 0.0–0.4) alloy electrode can also be improved by increasing the Al content.

Lan Zhiqiang; Peng Wenqi; Fu Shuying; Wei Wenlou; Wei Ningyan; Guo Jin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

12-Ferminews3/5/99  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R R e c y c l e r B e a m 7 F o l l o w t h e P a r t i c l e s : H o w t o M a k e A n t i p r o t o n s 1 0 C o u n t i n g B i r d s 12 T h e Ta l k o f t h e L a b New Fermilab Director Appointed 2 F E R M I L A B A U. S. D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y L A B O R A T O R Y F N E E R W M S I Volume 22 Friday, March 5, 1999 Number 5 f Fermilab Photos Michael Witherell, a professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, with a distinguished career in experimental particle physics, has been named to succeed Fermilab Director John Peoples. Congratulating Witherell on his appointment, Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson noted that Witherell is a leader in his field and will be taking on the directorship of the Laboratory at a time of extraordinary opportunities for new discoveries in the fundamental nature of matter and its forces. Ã’We here at the Department of Energy look

307

TABLE OF CONTENTS UESP Syllabus............................................................................................................... 3 -5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Kincanon@oregonstate.edu TBA Coordinator of Career and Major Decision-Making Program Email@oregonstate.edu Jeff Malone Assistant Head Advisor/Coordinator of Cross-Campus Advisor Initiatives and Development Jeff.Malone@oregonstate.edu K. Michelle Williams UESP Graduate Assistant Michelle.Williams2@oregonstate.edu Tiffany Fritz

Escher, Christine

308

QCD for Postgraduates (3/5)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Modern QCD - Lecture 3 We will introduce processes with initial-state hadrons and discuss parton distributions, sum rules, as well as the need for a factorization scale once radiative corrections are taken into account. We will then discuss the DGLAP equation, the evolution of parton densities, as well as ways in which parton densities are extracted from data.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

309

Section 3.5: Additional Applied Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 4, 2014 ... Guidelines for solving optimization problems. (1) Decide what is to be optimized and label variables. (2) Express relationships between ...

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

310

Figure 3-5 Vicinity Photographs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Facility (SERF) located on the southeast slope of South Table Mountain. The High Flux Solar Furnace, a temporary dish system, can be seen above on the mesa top (telephoto). 2....

311

Data:Dd8f41e5-9c4b-4f9a-b4a3-5bc56c480449 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e5-9c4b-4f9a-b4a3-5bc56c480449 e5-9c4b-4f9a-b4a3-5bc56c480449 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northeast Nebraska P P D Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule L - 150W HPS Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.nnppd.com/billing/rates/ Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3

312

Data:7a21d474-f878-4a3b-b1a3-5ef1ae43e312 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d474-f878-4a3b-b1a3-5ef1ae43e312 d474-f878-4a3b-b1a3-5ef1ae43e312 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Coahoma Electric Power Assn Effective date: 2009/01/31 End date if known: Rate name: 16 - Fish Farming Service Sector: Description: Available for fish farming and associated equipment at locations adjacent to Association's single phase and three phase distribution lines provided Association has sufficient capacity available. Single phase, 120/240 volts anywhere on the system and three phase service where available. Where three phase service is available, motors up to and including 30 HP shall be supplied with three phase, 240 volt service; and motors larger than 30 HP shall be supplied with three phase, three wire, 480 volt service.

313

Data:0bdc796b-f0f8-4ed9-a9a3-5b8c9a71cf43 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bdc796b-f0f8-4ed9-a9a3-5b8c9a71cf43 bdc796b-f0f8-4ed9-a9a3-5b8c9a71cf43 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Southwest Rural Elec Assn Inc Effective date: 2010/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: 1000 Watt HPS or MH, Unmetered Sector: Lighting Description: * Subject to Power Cost Adjustment. All bills are adjusted by applicable taxes. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4(Illinios State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

314

Data:F72c850a-ac7c-4ca0-b4d3-5fe74e6ef5ad | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0a-ac7c-4ca0-b4d3-5fe74e6ef5ad 0a-ac7c-4ca0-b4d3-5fe74e6ef5ad No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 1997/06/04 End date if known: Rate name: Rate ETS - OFF-PEAK RETAIL MARKETING SERVICE Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

315

Investigation of Gas-Phase Reactions and Ignition Delay Occurring at Conditions Typical for Partial Oxidation of Methane to Synthesis Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Gas-Phase Reactions and Ignition Delay Occurring at Conditions Typical for Partial Oxidation of Methane to Synthesis Gas ... A detailed kinetic model based on a free-radical mechanism has been developed, which allows the adequate calculation of the feed conversions and product selectivities. ... The production of synthesis gas from natural gas by partial oxidation has been extensively investigated as an alternative for the steam-reforming process since it results directly in a H2/CO ratio of 2:1 which is required for methanol and Fischer?Tropsch synthesis. ...

R. J. Berger; G. B. Marin

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Suggestion of typical phases of in-vessel fuel-debris by thermodynamic calculation for decommissioning technology of Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station  

SciTech Connect

For the decommissioning of the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), the characterization of fuel-debris in cores of Units 1-3 is necessary. In this study, typical phases of the in-vessel fuel-debris were estimated using a thermodynamic equilibrium (TDE) calculation. The FactSage program and NUCLEA database were applied to estimate the phase equilibria of debris. It was confirmed that the TDE calculation using the database can reproduce the phase separation behavior of debris observed in the Three Mile Island accident. In the TDE calculation of 1F, the oxygen potential [G(O{sub 2})] was assumed to be a variable. At low G(O{sub 2}) where metallic zirconium remains, (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2} were found as oxides, and oxygen-dispersed Zr, Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U), and Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2} were found as metals. With an increase in zirconium oxidation, the mass of those metals, especially Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2}, decreased, but the other phases of metals hardly changed qualitatively. Consequently, (U,Zr)O{sub 2} is suggested as a typical phase of oxide, and Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U) is suggested as that of metal. However, a more detailed estimation is necessary to consider the distribution of Fe in the reactor pressure vessel through core-melt progression. (authors)

Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Yano, Kimihiko; Kaji, Naoya; Washiya, Tadahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Kondo, Yoshikazu; Noguchi, Yoshikazu [PESCO Co.Ltd. (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Investigation of materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials performances in high moisture materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines Gerald Meier, Frederick Pettit and Keeyoung Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jung University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA 15260 Peer review Workshop III UTSR Project 04 01 SR116 October 18-20, 2005 Project Approach Task I Selection and Preparation of Specimens Task II Selection of Test Conditions Specimens : GTD111+CoNiCrAlY and Pt Aluminides, N5+Pt Aluminides Deposit : No Deposit, CaO, CaSO 4 , Na 2 SO 4 1150℃ Dry 1150℃ Wet 950℃ Wet 750℃ SO 3 950℃ Dry Selection of Test Temperature, T 1 , Gas Environment and Deposit Composition, D

318

3.5.2 Technical and Administrative Staff 3.5.2.1 Administrative Staff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for under- graduate students, organizing conferences and special events. · Manages the budget of the department vis-à-vis the Faculty of Exact Sciences and the Research Authority. · In charge of hosting of Mathematics and the Department of Computer Science's graduate students' theses and dissertations from

Adin, Ron

319

Five new Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers constructed by 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid: Syntheses, crystal structures, network topologies and luminescent properties  

SciTech Connect

Five Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers, [Zn{sub 2}(BOABA)(bpp)(OH)]{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(bpp){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(2,2 Prime -bipy){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}5.5H{sub 2}O (3), [CdNa(BOABA)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (4) and [Cd{sub 2}(BOABA)(bimb)Cl(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (5) (H{sub 3}BOABA=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid, bpp=1,3-bi(4-pyridyl)propane, 2,2 Prime -bipy=2,2 Prime -bipyridine, bimb=1,4-bis(imidazol-1 Prime -yl)butane), have been solvothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, IR spectra and TG analyses. 1 is an uninodal 4-connected 2D square grid network based on binuclear zinc clusters. 2 is 2D wavelike layer structure and further linked by hydrogen bonds into the final 3D (5,6,6)-connected topology network. 3 is 3-connected 2D topology network and the 2,2 Prime -bipy ligands decorate in two different types. 4 is a (4,8)-connected 2D topology network with heterocaryotic {l_brace}Cd{sub 2}Na{sub 2}{r_brace} clusters and BOABA{sup 3-} ligands. 5 can be rationalized as a (3,10)-connected 3D topology network with tetranuclear {l_brace}Cd{sub 4}Cl{sub 2}{r_brace} clusters and BOABA{sup 3-} ligands. Meanwhile, photoluminescence studies revealed that these five coordination polymers display strong fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Five new d{sup 10} metal(II) coordination polymers based on H{sub 3}BOABA ligand were obtained and characterized. They display different topological structures and luminescent properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five d{sup 10} metal(II) polymers based on 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymers were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polymers 1-5 display different topological structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They show strong fluorescent emission bands in the solid state.

Jiang Xianrong; Yuan Hongyan [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Feng Yunlong, E-mail: sky37@zjnu.edu.cn [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Theory of low energy excitations in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for rare-earth systems: Yb compounds as typical examples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical predictions are given for low energy excitations, such as crystal field excitations and Kondo resonance excitations, to be detected by high-resolution measurements of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) of rare-earth materials with Yb compounds as typical examples. Crystal field excitations in the Yb 3d RIXS of a Yb3+ ion in the cubic crystal field are formulated, and the calculation of RIXS spectra for YbN is done. Kondo resonance excitations revealed in the Yb 3d RIXS spectra are calculated for mixed-valence Yb compounds, Yb1-xLuxAl3, in the leading term approximation of the 1/Nf expansion method with a single impurity Anderson model. It is emphasized that the high-resolution RIXS with polarization dependence is a powerful tool to study the crystal field levels together with their symmetry and also the Kondo bound state in rare-earth compounds. Some in-depth discussions are given on the polarization effects of RIXS, including 4d and 2p RIXS spectra, the coherence effect of the Kondo bound states, and the importance of the high-resolution RIXS spectra for condensed matter physics under extreme conditions.

A. Kotani

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy consumption comparison analysis of high energy efficiency office buildings in typical climate zones of China and U.S. based on correction model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Actual operation energy consumption of the high energy efficiency buildings built and operated in China and U.S. has been quite different than expected. This paper compares actual energy consumption to expect high energy efficiency office buildings in U.S. and China. Considering the different indoor design temperature, climate conditions and operated period between the compared cases in the two countries impact on the building energy consumption, correction model was built to eliminate the influence of the three factors on the comparison result and put the comparison analysis of high energy efficiency office buildings in the two countries into the same level. Regard to building general information and climate condition, four pairs of buildings in typical climate zones of China and U.S. were selected to compare the building energy conservation technology and building energy consumption based on a large scale of investigation and testing. After corrected, the energy consumption data are analyzed, including total energy consumption, and sub-metering energy consumption such as heating, cooling, lighting, office equipment, etc.. The energy saving technologies applied in these four pairs of buildings was also compared to explain energy consumption differences.

Long Liu; Jing Zhao; Xin Liu; Zhaoxia Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

An assessment of the core degradation frequency in a typical large LMFBR design for internal accident initiators-a comparison with PWR predictions  

SciTech Connect

A comparative assessment of the core degradation frequency due to internal accident initiators between a typical large liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) design and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) has been performed. For the PWR system, existing analyses have been utilized. For the reference LMFBR, an extensive analysis has been performed for two accident initiators, i.e., loss of off-site power and loss of main feedwater. Based on this analysis an estimate of about1 X 10/sup -6//reactor X yr has been obtained for the core degradation frequency of the reference LMFBR. This estimate is significantly smaller than the PWR core degradation frequency ( about 6 X 10/sup -5//yr). A sensitivity analysis shows that the parameters having the largest impact on the unavailability of decay heat removal are (a) for the ''loss of off-site power'' initiator: human error and failure to restore off-site power, and (b) for the ''loss of main feedwater'' initiator: the leakage rates of the passive decay heat removal system and the adoption of the policy to repair the Na-NaK heat exchanger only during normal shutdowns. The results indicate that the LMFBR system has the potential of higher resistance than the PWR system to the accident initiators considered. The lower core degradation frequency estimated for the LMFBR system is due to the presence of two redundant and diverse reactor shutdown systems, with a self-actuated feature included in one of them, the incorporation of a passive decay heat removal system, and the significantly lower sensitivity of the reference LMFBR to primary system pipe breaks.

Tzanos, C.P.; Adamantiades, A.G.; Hanan, N.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The distribution and biomagnification of higher brominated \\{BDEs\\} in terrestrial organisms affected by a typical e-waste burning site in South China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Soil, vegetation, and several terrestrial species including turtledove, chicken, goose, grasshopper, dragonfly, butterfly and ant, were collected from an area surrounding a typical e-waste burning site in South China. The samples were examined to investigate the levels, congener profiles, and biomagnification extent of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) that may be present in the environment as a result of the e-waste, which was processed in a crude recycling style. Elevated levels of ?21PBDEs were found in the biota (101–4725 ng g?1 lipid weight (lw)), vegetation leaf (82.9–319 ng g?1 dry weight (dw)) and soil samples (5.2–22 110 ng g?1 dw), indicating that PBDE contamination in the samples collected from the e-waste burning site may pose risks to the local terrestrial ecosystem and local populations. Higher BDE congeners, especially deca-BDE (BDE-209) were the dominant homologs in organisms and nonbiological matrices, followed by nona-BDE and octa-BDE. Biomagnification factors (BMFs) were calculated as the ratio of the lipid-normalized concentration in the predator to that in the prey. The highest BMF (3.4) was determined for BDE-153 in the grasshopper/turtledove food chain. Other higher brominated congeners, such as BDE-202, -203, -154, -183 and -209, were also biomagnified in the terrestrial food chain with \\{BMFs\\} of 1.7–3.3. BDE-47, -100, and -99 were not biomagnified in the examined food chains (BMFs < 1), which suggests that bioaccumulation and biotransformation of \\{PBDEs\\} in terrestrial ecosystems could be distinguished from those in aquatic ecosystems.

Zhiqiang Nie; Shulei Tian; Yajun Tian; Zhenwu Tang; Yi Tao; Qingqi Die; Yanyan Fang; Jie He; Qi Wang; Qifei Huang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Astronomy Freshman Prizes for Excellence (AFPE) typically range from $2,000 to $10,000 per student and will be awarded yearly to freshmen of outstanding promise admitted to the first year of the UT Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Astronomy Freshman Prizes for Excellence (AFPE) typically range from $2,000 to $10,000 per Astronomy program. The AFPE awards are funded jointly by the Astronomy Department excellence funds@astro.as.utexas.edu Mailing address: Char Burke - Student Coordinator Department of Astronomy The University of Texas

Jefferys, William

325

Biodegradable Products Institute is an organization that certifies that so-called "biodegradable" plastic products will safely break down in a typical commercial composting facility. www.bpiworld.org.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.green-e.org. Greenguard is a nonprofit organization that certifies products that impact indoor air quality. Find productsEco-Labels Biodegradable Products Institute is an organization that certifies that so-called "biodegradable" plastic products will safely break down in a typical commercial composting facility. www

Escher, Christine

326

District of Columbia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 76.0 76.2 75.3 73.4 81.1 82.2 72.9 80.3 74.6 72.2 72.3 71.0 2003 70.4 71.0 69.3 63.9 64.8 75.9 55.6 69.6 77.6 71.8 73.7 74.8 2004 76.1 74.9 74.1 72.9 71.1 70.5 74.3 74.9 74.5 72.5 77.7 78.4 2005 81.0 79.1 78.9 74.5 76.2 85.2 80.8 74.1 80.3 78.0 81.0 81.0 2006 78.2 77.9 77.1 70.3 69.8 67.8 70.1 76.8 73.8 78.1 78.2 78.7 2007 77.0 80.1 73.9 74.4 62.5 77.4 68.0 77.1 67.8 74.0 75.2 78.5 2008 78.0 78.1 78.2 67.8 69.9 70.3 72.2 71.4 73.2 68.0 79.2 78.9 2009 78.8 78.7 76.5 71.7 70.4 67.9 64.8 77.2 68.5 72.4 72.6 78.2 2010 77.6 78.6 75.3 64.5 61.1 68.0 66.9 66.1 72.7 69.1 77.7 77.3 2011 79.4 75.3 74.8 72.3 54.3 60.9 70.6 78.8 70.9 77.6 78.7 71.5

327

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

328

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 99.3 99.3 99.2 99.3 99.1 99.2 99.0 99.0 86.9 99.5 99.1 99.2 2003 100.0 98.7 98.7 98.4 98.2 98.4 98.2 98.0 97.6 97.9 98.2 98.5 2004 98.7 98.7 98.7 98.5 97.8 98.7 98.0 98.8 98.7 97.8 98.8 98.9 2005 99.0 99.0 98.9 98.7 98.6 98.5 98.5 98.5 98.5 98.3 98.3 98.6 2006 98.7 98.6 98.7 98.4 98.3 98.4 98.4 98.5 98.3 97.9 98.2 98.3 2007 98.4 98.6 98.6 98.3 98.3 97.3 98.4 97.6 95.5 97.9 97.5 98.2 2008 98.2 98.0 98.1 97.9 97.3 95.8 97.8 97.4 97.4 96.8 97.2 97.8 2009 97.8 98.0 97.9 97.4 97.3 97.2 97.3 97.4 97.1 96.5 96.9 97.3 2010 97.8 97.7 97.6 97.0 96.9 97.3 97.1 97.1 96.8 95.9 96.7 97.0 2011 97.0 97.4 97.0 96.3 96.6 96.5 96.4 96.6 97.0 95.6 96.3 96.5

329

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Massachusetts Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.7 99.7 1991 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.7 99.6 99.6 99.8 99.9 99.9 1992 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.7 99.8 99.7 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7 99.8 1993 98.9 98.7 98.5 97.7 96.5 97.7 96.8 89.2 97.5 96.7 96.9 97.8 1994 75.2 78.4 72.5 69.8 69.8 61.2 67.0 86.0 79.7 90.6 81.2 87.1 1995 87.9 89.4 92.0 88.3 88.0 82.7 74.6 77.3 77.5 81.0 81.6 79.5 1996 84.7 83.5 82.4 80.2 79.2 71.3 68.1 61.3 55.4 69.5 62.5 68.9 1997 68.0 69.0 72.9 74.1 69.9 48.5 46.0 41.3 43.8 48.7 62.9 68.6

330

Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.8 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 2007 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 2008 89.7 89.7 89.3 86.2 78.4 70.7 68.4 68.3 68.1 77.4 83.6 89.3 2009 90.8 93.1 87.5 86.3 84.5 64.9 72.9 66.1 67.2 78.4 83.0 87.7 2010 91.5 89.7 88.6 82.6 77.8 68.7 65.0 61.5 67.4 75.8 84.1 93.4

331

Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

332

Mississippi Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

333

Pennsylvania Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

334

Vermont Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

335

Maryland Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

336

Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

337

Louisiana Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

338

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wisconsin Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 94.1 94.2 94.5 94.0 92.6 87.7 86.1 84.2 84.2 84.3 91.1 95.0 1990 91.6 91.5 91.9 91.9 90.3 86.5 83.1 82.4 82.6 87.5 90.1 93.3 1991 93.8 92.3 92.9 91.2 88.8 83.8 80.7 84.7 83.6 86.7 91.5 92.1 1992 92.7 92.1 91.6 90.0 85.8 82.3 83.3 84.1 85.2 90.7 93.4 95.1 1993 95.2 96.0 95.3 93.5 92.1 90.8 89.2 88.5 90.0 92.6 95.2 96.0 1994 97.1 97.6 97.4 96.6 91.8 89.9 83.5 87.1 87.8 90.8 94.4 84.4 1995 93.5 94.0 93.2 92.4 90.0 81.8 82.3 84.8 87.3 88.9 93.4 93.6 1996 93.9 94.8 94.0 92.0 89.9 86.1 82.1 83.8 82.4 87.1 90.9 91.8 1997 89.7 88.2 88.5 83.3 77.4 60.6 67.8 55.4 62.9 69.3 85.9 83.2 1998 87.0 81.6 79.8 75.5 55.6 55.5 47.6 48.5 45.5 71.1 74.9 79.2

339

Arkansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

340

Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 92.9 92.8 93.1 92.8 91.4 93.2 94.3 94.4 95.3 91.9 93.4 94.2 2003 93.8 94.2 93.1 93.4 96.9 95.2 94.6 94.5 95.7 92.2 93.9 94.0 2004 94.0 93.9 92.9 92.7 96.0 94.9 95.0 95.3 95.6 93.7 93.7 95.1 2005 94.5 94.5 94.6 94.0 95.7 95.3 95.9 95.8 96.1 93.8 95.3 95.7 2006 96.2 95.5 95.8 98.0 95.5 97.7 96.8 97.3 97.2 95.6 96.4 96.2 2007 96.2 95.9 96.2 95.8 96.4 96.6 96.7 96.9 97.0 95.7 95.8 96.3 2008 96.4 95.9 96.1 96.1 96.0 96.8 97.0 96.5 96.4 95.4 95.7 95.8 2009 95.8 95.3 95.2 94.9 95.3 95.6 95.1 95.6 95.5 94.8 94.9 95.6 2010 95.4 95.7 95.9 95.7 96.0 96.7 96.5 96.3 96.1 94.8 95.3 95.8 2011 95.1 95.0 95.2 95.4 94.9 94.5 95.9 96.5 96.1 97.2 96.3 96.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

342

Indiana Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 98.9 98.5 98.7 99.1 92.8 99.4 98.8 98.8 99.1 99.0 98.8 97.8 2003 97.0 97.0 97.0 96.3 96.6 97.7 96.1 100.0 97.2 96.4 97.1 96.9 2004 97.0 96.7 96.7 96.3 97.3 96.3 97.8 96.5 96.0 96.1 96.7 96.7 2005 96.8 96.7 96.2 95.7 96.4 96.0 96.3 96.3 96.2 96.1 96.4 96.5 2006 96.2 96.3 96.2 96.3 95.8 96.4 95.5 96.1 96.5 97.0 96.2 96.3 2007 96.4 97.0 95.9 96.6 96.1 95.2 95.0 95.6 95.0 94.8 95.9 95.9 2008 95.9 95.8 95.8 94.2 94.1 94.1 93.9 93.9 93.4 93.1 94.4 94.3 2009 94.0 94.9 93.2 92.8 91.7 93.2 92.8 92.1 91.7 93.1 93.3 93.7 2010 94.1 94.5 94.2 93.1 94.1 92.8 93.0 92.9 92.6 93.1 94.0 94.8 2011 95.2 94.7 94.6 94.4 94.4 94.5 93.9 94.7 93.8 94.2 94.2 94.6

343

North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

344

West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

345

Utah Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

346

New Hampshire Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

347

Wisconsin Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

348

South Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

349

Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

350

Rhode Island Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

351

Nebraska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 71.4 90.5 87.4 84.8 95.4 86.8 82.7 90.4 81.3 75.5 79.7 78.6 2003 80.3 93.4 87.6 91.1 95.3 94.9 87.9 80.0 95.4 69.4 78.6 80.7 2004 81.5 91.9 86.8 94.5 88.7 84.8 89.1 89.1 88.2 83.7 83.7 88.7 2005 86.1 87.2 86.3 83.0 84.5 86.5 85.0 84.4 85.5 83.9 84.3 84.1 2006 87.1 85.9 86.7 85.8 85.0 86.2 87.0 86.2 85.9 83.3 84.2 85.1 2007 84.9 87.4 89.4 86.1 87.5 86.9 88.7 85.5 83.3 77.5 76.6 83.9 2008 86.6 89.0 90.3 89.6 90.1 89.0 87.7 87.3 85.6 75.2 77.2 85.0 2009 90.2 89.1 89.1 86.8 85.8 88.1 86.7 88.8 86.4 83.6 84.6 85.4 2010 87.0 88.8 89.5 86.2 82.5 87.3 86.5 87.8 87.6 87.1 84.0 86.8 2011 87.2 88.9 89.2 86.3 86.1 86.1 87.8 89.1 86.7 86.3 83.3 86.1

352

Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 88.0 91.4 90.8 89.2 91.0 91.3 88.4 91.6 88.4 88.0 89.0 89.1 2003 88.6 88.6 87.7 87.7 85.5 91.4 80.6 86.1 83.9 86.4 88.3 89.1 2004 88.5 88.5 88.0 87.2 84.7 86.1 87.7 85.7 87.7 88.3 88.4 89.3 2005 90.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 91.2 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

353

Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

354

Montana Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 2007 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.7 100.0 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 2008 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 2009 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 2010 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9

355

Ohio Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

356

Delaware Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

357

Oklahoma Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.2 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

358

Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.8 99.8

359

New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 98.0 97.8 97.7 97.9 92.7 97.0 98.1 97.2 97.2 95.4 96.1 95.6 2003 94.9 95.0 95.5 95.0 95.1 95.2 95.3 95.1 96.7 94.4 94.9 94.7 2004 94.5 95.4 95.0 95.4 95.8 95.2 95.2 94.4 95.0 94.2 94.4 94.7 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

360

Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

362

Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

363

Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 2005 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.2 99.5 99.5 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7 99.7 99.9 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

364

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Carolina Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.5 98.5 98.6 98.3 98.1 98.2 98.1 97.7 97.7 97.8 98.0 97.3 1990 98.6 98.4 98.3 98.1 92.2 97.6 97.6 97.5 97.9 97.3 98.0 98.6 1991 98.7 98.9 98.7 96.9 97.4 97.5 97.3 97.7 97.7 97.4 98.9 98.9 1992 99.1 99.1 98.9 98.6 98.5 95.8 95.5 95.8 97.0 99.7 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 95.1 94.6 100.0 95.3 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.7 97.8 98.3 97.0 95.7 95.2 95.6 96.2 99.9 1995 97.8 97.5 96.7 95.0 95.6 88.4 95.0 95.1 95.3 95.3 95.9 100.0 1996 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 97.5 96.9 100.0 97.3 97.3 96.4 97.4 100.0 1997 100.0 98.3 97.8 96.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 97.1 98.8 99.9 100.0 98.0

365

New York Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

366

Washington Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

367

Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 99.9 100.0 100.0 99.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 100.0 100.0 100.0

368

Georgia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

369

NNSA hits 21 percent of CFC goal | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

represent such diverse fields as medical research, education, environment, recreation and sports, civil rights and science and technology. By working collectively, the...

370

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 99.8 99.6 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0...

371

Number Percent Official Lawrence HC 26,934 100%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lawrence Free State 134 Blue Valley Northwest 117 Blue Valley North 109 Lawrence 94 Saint Thomas Aquinas 90 Olathe East 80 Shawnee Mission Northwest 78 Shawnee Mission South 75 Shawnee Mission West 71 Total 990

372

Sandia National Laboratories: Voltage Increases Up to 25 Percent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Exhibition (EU PVSC) EC Top Publications Reference Model 5 (RM5): Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating- Point...

373

Conditions for collection efficiencies greater than one hundred percent  

SciTech Connect

An account is given for the conditions under which the collection efficiency is hydrogenated amorphous silicon pin-diodes increases to values larger than 100%. By specific bias illumination through the p-side bias generated photocarriers are collected under certain probe beam conditions of the collection efficiency measurement, leading to apparent large collection efficiencies. By numerical modeling they investigated the influence of the diode thickness, bias photon flux and probe absorption coefficient as well as applied voltage for possible sensor applications which may utilize this optical amplifying principle. The alternative with bias light through the n-side and probe light through the p-side is also explored. Collection efficiency values determined by the photogating of bias generated holes become only slightly larger than 100% in contrast to the electron case where values in excess of 3,000% are presented.

Brueggemann, R.; Zollondz, J.H.; Main, C.; Gao, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

State and National Wind Resource Potential 30 Percent Capacity...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. 1) Exclude areas of slope > 20% Derived...

375

Transcending Portland Cement with 100 percent fly ash concrete  

SciTech Connect

The use of concrete, made with 100% fly ash and no Portland cement, in buildings at the Transportation Institute in Bozeman, MT, USA, is described. 3 refs., 7 figs.

Cross, D.; Akin, M.; Stephens, J.; Cuelh, E. [Montana State University, MT (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

PERCENT FEDERAL LAND FOR OIL/GAS FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Federalland as your second layer. Copy the code into a VBA module in ArcMap. Inputs: Data frame in ArcMap named "Task 2" Layer (0) is a reference layer of your choice Layer...

377

RESEARCH ARTICLE Forty percent revenue increase by combining organic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uganda. Cabbage was grown on eight replicate farms in close association with a farmer field school-Saharan Africa indicate the need for effective strategies to restore soils, while improving smallholder incomes an eco- nomic perspective and none have explored its potential in intensively managed, market vegetable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

378

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 66.4 55.8 55.8 2000's 47.3 54.0 48.9 45.3 44.0 46.4 48.5 50.0 47.3 37.5 2010's 31.1 31.0 32.3...

379

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 96.0 93.0 96.5 98.1 80.9 82.0 87.0 81.9 68.7 62.8 2000's 78.3 77.6 72.4 68.1 69.0 70.3 71.0 71.5...

380

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 98.4 90.0 81.6 76.5 74.5 80.4 74.8 85.5 90.8 99.5 1990 100.0 100.0 98.7 95.9 92.3 89.9 87.5 86.9 87.2 91.3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 99.0 99.0...

382

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 66.1 48.5 50.9 50.2 58.7 44.3 34.1 58.5 55.7 73.8 58.9 51.8 2002 45.0 47.4 53.0 41.3 52.5 50.1 38.1 49.3 53.9 52.2 49.1...

383

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

or More","NA","NA",93.75,96.42857143,91.27516779,97.46835443 "Race of Householder1" " White",88.61111111,"NA",91.54929577,91.68704156,90.27093596,92.77845777 " Black...

384

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important...

385

Minnesota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

386

Michigan Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 97.9 97.7 97.9 97.7 95.5 94.0 95.6 94.1 91.2 91.7 92.6 92.9 2003 93.8 93.4 92.3 96.3 95.8 95.0 95.8 95.5 94.0 93.6 95.9 94.7 2004 95.1 95.6 95.3 95.7 90.9 95.6 95.7 95.6 95.1 95.0 95.3 95.7 2005 95.9 96.1 96.0 95.9 95.9 95.6 95.1 95.1 94.4 93.3 94.2 95.1 2006 94.6 94.4 94.6 95.4 94.6 95.0 94.2 93.8 92.6 92.1 93.4 93.6 2007 94.6 95.1 95.5 95.3 95.5 95.5 94.8 94.5 93.8 92.7 92.1 93.5 2008 93.6 93.5 94.1 95.5 94.2 95.6 95.1 94.3 94.2 91.9 93.1 94.0 2009 93.9 94.6 94.4 94.5 94.3 94.5 93.2 93.8 92.3 91.6 92.7 92.2 2010 93.6 93.5 93.8 80.9 93.6 93.1 93.1 92.7 91.5 90.4 91.6 92.1 2011 92.3 92.7 92.1 93.0 93.1 92.7 91.9 91.5 90.2 89.8 91.0 91.7

387

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

388

SPECIAL ACQUISITION REQUIREMENTS ? TYPICAL ISSUES ASSOCIATED...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

--- --- Chapter 37.114 (December 2010) 1 FEDERAL AND CONTRACTOR EMPLOYEE ROLES IN THE FEDERAL WORKPLACE: CONTRACTOR AND CONTRACTOR WORK PRODUCT...

389

Sandia National Laboratories: composite fibers typically aligned...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Webinar Wednesday, Jan. 14 Sandian Presents on PV Failure Analysis at European PV Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition (EU PVSC) EC Top Publications Design and Analysis for...

390

Microsoft Word - Benefits Guidance 3-5-10Murray  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Options for Reservists Called to Active Duty Options for Reservists Called to Active Duty In Support of Contingency Operations (Updated 3-10) Benefit Options What Action HR Needs To Take Additional Guidance or Policy Employee on Military Furlough Employee Using Intermittent Leave Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Employee may retain coverage for up to 24 months; DOE pays for employee's share of the FEHB premium. Employee needs to notify HR of continued coverage or cancellation. If continued coverage, HR sends a memo to DFAS imaging to stop FEHB deductions giving effective date and stating the employee is on active duty in support of contingency operations. No CHRIS action required. HR will process a termination if employee reaches 24 months while on miltary furlogh (Absent-Uniformed Service;

391

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

392

3-5-09_Final_Testimony_(EIA)_(Gruenspecht).pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TESTIMONY OF TESTIMONY OF DR. HOWARD GRUENSPECHT ACTING ADMINISTRATOR ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND MINERAL RESOURCES COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U. S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES MARCH 5, 2009 2 Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee, I appreciate the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the U.S. energy outlook to 2030, focusing on the role of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in current and projected energy production. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy that produces objective, timely, and relevant data, projections, and analyses to assist policymakers, help markets function efficiently, and inform the public. We do not promote, formulate, or take positions on policy issues,

393

Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability (3/5/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42 42 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 44 / Friday, March 5, 2004 / Notices NPDES Permit and U.S. Army COE Section 404 Permit, Oakland County, MI. Summary: EPA has environmental concerns with the proposed project and recommends additional clarification regarding the two build alternatives (general purpose lane and high occupancy vehicle lane), indirect and cumulative impact analyses, and the use of native vegetation in the project area. ERP No. D-FHW-L40221-00 Rating EC2, WA-35 Columbia River Crossing, Existing Bridge Replacement across the Columbia River between Hood River, Hood River, OR and White Salmon, WA. Summary: EPA has environmental concerns with the proposed project related to air toxics, invasive species, rare plant surveys, and intersection

394

Microsoft Word - Chap3 5-16-05.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Three May 2005 Three May 2005 2004 Site Environmental Report 3-1 Results in Brief: 2004 Groundwater Pathway Groundwater Remedy - At the start of 2004, active restoration of the Great Miami Aquifer continued at the following five groundwater restoration modules: * South Plume Module, which became operational on August 27, 1993 * South Field Extraction (Phase I) Module, which became operational on July 13, 1998 * South Plume Optimization Module, which became operational on August 9, 1998 * Re-injection Module, which became operational on September 2, 1998 * Waste Storage Area Module, which became operational on May 8, 2002. The decision was made to convert the advanced wastewater treatment facility (AWWT) into a smaller facility that would remain after site closure in 2006. Construction to convert the facility began in the fall of 2004.

395

5.3.5 QUEST Checklist for Labs 0913  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For LABS For LABS ______________________________________________________ GENERAL SAFETY Are interlock test procedures posted or readily available? Are interlock systems tested at least twice yearly when equipment is active (posted record of test or notes of inactivity within the last 6 months)? _____________________________________________________________________________ Are current work authorizations (AHDs, RWAs, SSAs, Task-Based JHAs) posted or readily available for experiments that require them? Are lists of authorized personnel up-to-date? Are there experiments, clean-up/construction projects, or other non-routine operations with significant hazards that might need a Task-Based JHA to document hazard analysis and work authorization? _____________________________________________________________________________

396

NERSC Users Group meeting June 3-5, 2002 Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introducing Juan Meza - the new head of NERSC HPC Research Dept Introducing Juan Meza - the new head of NERSC HPC Research Dept June 3, 2002 | Author(s): Juan Meza | Download File: NUG.060302.ppt | ppt | 471 KB Update on security issues with FTP June 3, 2002 | Author(s): NERSC staff | Download File: NUGMeetingFTPUpdateJune2002.ppt | ppt | 62 KB Visualization Update (1 of 2) June 3, 2002 | Author(s): Ken Schwartz | Download File: NUG060302-ks.ppt | ppt | 3.4 MB (See Visualization update (2 of 2) for movies by Ken Schwartz) Visualization Update (2 of 2) June 3, 2002 | Author(s): NERSC Staff | Download File: y-py.mpg | mpg | 4.2 MB Download File: parvin.mpg | mpg | 914 KB Download File: surfx.mpg | mpg | 567 KB Includes movies associated with this presentation, created by Ken Schwartz ACTS Tools - Case Studies with User Codes

397

NERSC Users Group meeting June 3-5, 2002 Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tool for performance instrumentation and browsing. We will also look at the future roadmap for the PERC tools and at how the PERC tool suite will affect the the future of...

398

NERSC Users Group meeting June 3-5, 2002 Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2002 | Author(s): Jonathan Carter | Download File: convert.ppt | ppt | 152 KB After the decommissioning of the Crays, what will become of the all the data stored in Cray...

399

Influence of chromium on the biodegradation of hexahydro-1,3,5- trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related sites. The DOE facility in Amarillo, TX is contaminated with both high explosives and Cr (VI). The interaction of these co-contaminants is the focus of this research. Previous studies focussed on the degradation of RDX and HMX (Hallgarth, 1996...

Kodikanti, Madhu Mohan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

?- and ?-Bond Strengths in Main Group 3?5 Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Daniel J. Grant and David A. Dixon * ... 30-32 All of the calculations were done on a massively parallel HP Linux cluster with 1970 Itanium-2 processors in the Molecular Sciences Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory or on the 144 processor Cray XD-1 computer system at the Alabama Supercomputer Center. ... By combining our computed ?D0 (total atomization energies) values with the known heats of formation at 0 K for the elements ?Hf0(N) = 112.53 ...

Daniel J. Grant; David A. Dixon

2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

3.5 Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) 5 February 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as burning of fossil fuels, deforestation, cement production, etc. It is an urgent task to estimate drawing tube (PFA tubing connected to silicone rubber tubing) into a 300 ml borosilicate glass bottle

402

DOE SUNY Cobleskill Final Report 3/5  

SciTech Connect

This research evaluated a rotary kiln gasification system utilizing agricultural wastes to generate syn gas. The goal of the project was to develop an efficient methodology for harnessing energy from agricultural waste. Objectives included: installation and cold testing of the gasification system; hot testing the gasification system with two agricultural wastes; development of an operations plan, including a data procurement and analysis plan; development of a predictive model and validation of the model; developing process improvement recommendations; and construction of two deployment pathway models (e.g., institutional and farm).

None

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Physics Advisory Committee Meeting November 3-5, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) report to HEPAP--the Energy Frontier, the Intensity matter are producing first-rate science at the Intensity and Cosmic Frontiers. Plans for future importance of maintaining detector and accelerator R&D for future projects in difficult budget times

Quigg, Chris

404

CH3: VECTOR SPACES 3.5 Change of Basis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? There are three cases: (a) Given x = c1u1 + c2u2, find the coordinates with respect to the standard basis [e1, e2

Gera, Ralucca

405

Philip J. Mucci PAPI 3.5 Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Perfmon2 kernels · Broken for unpatched kernels, awaiting access to hardware. · Data address sampling working. ­ PAPI_s/profile on data space! #12;Retired Platforms · Linux/Alpha, Tru64/Alpha · AIX/ Power N PMU resource. #12;Perfmon2 Multiplexing · PAPI has had the ability to multiplex counters for a while

Tennessee, University of

406

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Blast Pulping Liquor NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Total United States 311 Food 11 0 7 0 0 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 5 0 2 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 0 1 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Products 1 0 1 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 4 0 4 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 3 0 2 0 0 1 3121 Beverages 3 0 2 0 0 1 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0 0 0 0 0 314 Textile Product Mills

407

< 1 2 < 1 2 1 0.3 5 1 5 5 0.1 0.3 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T (573 ) + p (191 ) D=0.8Rp (C3H8) D=0.7Rp (CF4) : · 50-90% (1-4 �) · - 10-7-10-8 · FWHM 1/CF4 · 10 /2 · 2D readout 100 PIC ( ) readout : · 30 x 30 (PCB .) · ~ 10 MSGC ­ charge division #12; () CASCADE (DETNI project) · FWHM~3.1 ( ..) () · FWHM~1 ( +1.5 . CF4) · 10

Titov, Anatoly

408

Microbially Mediated Biodegradation of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5- Triazine by Extracellular Electron Shuttling Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...AQDS-amended incubations were RDX depleted at a faster rate. Bioavailable...stimulated bioremediation of uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments...1991. Microbial reduction of uranium. Nature 350: 413-416...drinking water standards and health advisories. U.S. Environmental...

Man Jae Kwon; Kevin T. Finneran

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Microbially Mediated Biodegradation of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5- Triazine by Extracellular Electron Shuttling Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...through three nitroso metabolites; remediation strategies must attenuate these compounds...contaminants focus area. Department of Energy innovative technology summary report DOE/EM-0623...study describes a novel approach for the remediation of RDX-contaminated environments using...

Man Jae Kwon; Kevin T. Finneran

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and properties of a 3D-framework polyoxometalate assembly: [Ag(4,4'-bipy)](OH){l_brace}[Ag(4,4'-bipy)]{sub 2}[PAgW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{r_brace}.3.5H{sub 2}O  

SciTech Connect

A 3D framework assembly based on the Keggin tungstophosphate POM with silver (I) transition metal and N-ligand organic moiety and of formula [Ag(4,4'-bipy)](OH){l_brace}[Ag(4,4'-bipy)]{sub 2}[PAgW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{r_brace}.3.5H{sub 2}O (1) (bipy=bipyridine) has been synthesized by hydrothermal method and structurally characterized. The crystal of 1 belongs to triclinic, space group P-1, Mr=3857.27, a=10.2741(3)A, b=11.3723(4)A, c=14.0161(5)A, {alpha}=85.7249(5){sup o}, {beta}=72.8795(5){sup o}, {gamma}=79.9543(5){sup o}, V=1540.61(9)A{sup 3}, Z=1, D{sub calc}=4.158Mgm{sup -3}. The final statistics based on F{sup 2} are GOF=1.045, R{sub 1}=0.0326 and wR{sub 2}=0.0843 for I>2{sigma}(I). X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the molecular structure of 1 consists of a neutral fragment {l_brace}[Ag{sup I}(4,4'-bipy)]{sub 2}[PAg{sup I}W{sup VI}{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{r_brace}, [Ag{sup I}(4,4'-bipy)]{sup +} cation, hydroxide anion and lattice water molecules. The {l_brace}[Ag{sup I}(4,4'-bipy)]{sub 2}[PAg{sup I}W{sup VI}{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{r_brace} subunits are interconnected through Ag(I) with bipyridine ligands, both surface bridging and terminal oxygen atoms of polyoxoanions (POMs) to represent a novel three-dimensional (3D) polymer with 1D elliptic channels. Meanwhile, the [Ag{sup I}(4,4'-bipy)]{sup +} cations are also linked each other to form 1D chains, and embedded in 1D elliptic channels.

Chen Jianxin [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)]. E-mail: jxchen_1964@163.com; Lan Tingyan [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Huang Yuanbiao [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Wei Chunxia [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Li Zhongshui [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Zhang Zhichun [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fixation of atmospheric CO[sub 2] by a series of hydroxo complexes of divalent metal ions and the implication for the catalytic role of metal ion in carbonic anhydrase. Synthesis, characterization, and molecular structure of [LM(OH)][sub n] (n = 1 or 2) and LM([mu]-CO[sub 3])ML (M(II) = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn; L = HB(3,5-iPr[sub 2]pz)[sub 3])  

SciTech Connect

By using the hindered tris(pyrazoly)borate ligand HB(3,5-iPr[sub 2]pz)[sub 3], (hydrotris(3,5-diisopropyl-1-pyrazolyl)-borate), a series of hydroxo complexes of first-row divalent metal ions (Mn (1), Fe (2), Co (3), Ni (4), Cu (5), Zn (6)) was synthesized. X-ray crystallography was applied to 1-5, establishing that all these hydroxo complexes have a dinuclear structure solely bridged with a bis(hydroxo) unit. The structure of 6 was characterized by spectroscopy, which indicates that 6 is monomeric. All these hydroxo complexes were found to react with CO[sub 2], even atmospheric CO[sub 2], to afford [mu]-carbonato dinuclear complexes of Mn (7), Fe (8), Co (9), Ni (10), Cu (11), and Zn (12). The molecular structures of the complexes 8-12 were determined. A variety of coordination modes of the carbonate group was seen. In 10 and 11, the carbonate group is bound to both metal centers bidentately in a symmetric fashion, while in 8 and 9, the carbonate coordination modes are described as an unsymmetric bidentate. The carbonate group in 12 is coordinated to one zinc ion bidentately, but it is bound to the other zinc ion unidentately. From IR data, the coordination mode of the carbonate group in 7 was suggested to be similar to those found in 8 and 9. Thus, the order of the coordination distortions of the carbonate groups in this series of [mu]-carbonato dinuclear complexes is determined. 40 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Kitajima, Nobumasa; Hikichi, Shiro; Tanaka, Masako; Moro-oka, Yoshihiko (Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Yokohama (Japan))

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Scenario E3 Max Tech Wind Power Nuclear Power NG Fired CCcapacity of wind, solar, and biomass power grows from 2.3 GWcapacity of wind, solar, and biomass power grows from 2.3 GW

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of GDP)to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. Thecommitted to reduce its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduction in energy consumption per unit of GDP from 2006 toEnergy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO 2 per unit of GDP)

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Kapundaite, (Na,Ca)[subscript 2]Fe[subscript 4][superscript 3+](PO[subscript 4])[subscript 4](OH)[subscript 3]·5H[subscript 2]O, a new phosphate species from Toms quarry, South Australia: Description and structural relationship to mélonjosephite  

SciTech Connect

Kapundaite, ideally (Na,Ca){sub 2}Fe{sub 4}{sup 3+}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}(OH){sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O, is a new mineral (IMA2009-047) from Toms phosphate quarry, Kapunda, South Australia, Australia. The new mineral occurs as cavernous aggregates of fibers up to several centimeters across, associated with leucophosphite, natrodufrenite, and meurigite-Na crystals and amorphous brown, black, and/or greenish coatings. Individual kapundaite crystals are very thin flattened fibers up to a few millimeters in length, but typically no more than a few micrometers in thickness. The main form observed is {l_brace}100{r_brace}; other forms in the [010] zone are present, but cannot be measured. Crystals of kapundaite are pale to golden yellow, transparent to translucent, have a yellow streak and silky luster, and are non-fluorescent. Mohs hardness is estimated to be about 3; no twinning or cleavage was observed. Kapundaite is biaxial (+), with indices of refraction = 1.717(3), {beta} = 1.737(3), and {gamma} = 1.790(3). 2V could not be measured; 2V{sub calc} is 64.7{sup o}. The optical orientation is Z = b, Y {approx} c with weak pleochroism: X = nearly colorless, Y = light brown, Z = pale brown; absorption: Y > Z > X. No dispersion was observed. The empirical chemical formula (mean of seven electron microprobe analyses) calculated on the basis of 24 O is (Ca{sub 1.13}Na{sub 0.95}){sub {Sigma}2.08}(Fe{sub 3.83}{sup 3+}Mn{sub 0.03}Al{sub 0.02}Mg{sub 0.01}){sub {Sigma}3.89}P{sub 3.92}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2.11}O. Kapundaite is triclinic, space group P{sub {bar 1}}, a = 6.317(5), b = 7.698(6), c = 9.768(7) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 105.53(1){sup o}, {beta} = 99.24(2){sup o}, {gamma} = 90.09(2){sup o}, V = 451.2(6) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 1. The five strongest lines in the powder X-ray diffraction pattern are [d{sub obs} in {angstrom} (I) (hkl)]: 9.338 (100) (001), 2.753 (64) (2{sub {bar 1}}1), 5.173 (52) (011), 2.417 (48) ({sub {ovr 21}}3, 202, 0{sub {bar 1}}4), and 3.828 (45) (0{sub {bar 2}}1). The crystal structure was solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data using synchrotron radiation and refined to R{sub 1} = 0.1382 on the basis of 816 unique reflections with F{sub o} > 4{sub {sigma}}F. The structure of kapundaite is based on a unique corrugated octahedral-tetrahedral sheet, which is composed of two types of chains parallel to a. Kapundaite is structurally related to melonjosephite. The mineral is named for the nearest town to the quarry.

Mills, Stuart J.; Birch, William D.; Kampf, Anthony R.; Christy, Andrew G.; Pluth, Joseph J.; Pring, Allan; Raudsepp, Mati; Chen, Yu-Sheng (Museum Vic.); (SA Museum); (NHM-LA); (UC); (UBC); (ANU)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

416

Cyclic Adenosine 3?:5?-Monophosphate Phosphodiesterase Activity in Malignant and Cyclic Adenosine 3?:5?-Monophosphate-induced “Differentiated” Neuroblastoma Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...this study. In addition, the phosphodiesterase...activity to divalent ions change in cyclic...phosphodiesterase. The addition of snake venom...Reeve Angel SB-2 ion-exchange resin-loaded paper...Gilmer, K. N. Demonstration of Dopamine-Sensi...

S. Kumar; G. Becker; and K. N. Prasad

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Mineralization of the Cyclic Nitramine Explosive Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine by Gordonia and Williamsia spp.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fredrickson 1 1 U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center...Development Program and the Corps of Engineers Environmental Quality research program. REFERENCES...and genetics. | U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center...

Karen T. Thompson; Fiona H. Crocker; Herbert L. Fredrickson

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Role of Nitrogen Limitation in Transformation of RDX (Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine) by Gordonia sp. Strain KTR9  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...funded in part by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Quality Research Program, the Strategic Environmental...ERDC/EL TR-02-35. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center, Environmental...

Karl J. Indest; Dawn E. Hancock; Carina M. Jung; Jed O. Eberly; William W. Mohn; Lindsay D. Eltis; Fiona H. Crocker

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

419

Genomic and Transcriptomic Studies of an RDX (Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine)-Degrading Actinobacterium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...British Columbia, Canada b and U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Environmental...part through grants from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Quality Research Program (project 08-34, K.J.I...

Hao-Ping Chen; Song-Hua Zhu; Israël Casabon; Steven J. Hallam; Fiona H. Crocker; William W. Mohn; Karl J. Indest; Lindsay D. Eltis

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

420

Croton Oil- and Benzo(a)pyrene-induced Changes in Cyclic Adenosine 3?:5?-Monophosphate and Cyclic Guanosine 3?:5?-Monophosphate Phosphodiesterase Activities in Mouse Epidermis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...together with a peak catalyzing the hydrolysis...treatment with croton oil. The increase in...acetone- and croton oil-treated epider mis...extracts showed 2 major peaks of both cyclic AMP...treatment with croton oil, epidemmal extracts showed only 2 major peaks of phosphodiesterase...

Ajit K. Verma; Mario Froscio; and Andrew W. Murray

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central America from NREL Central America from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems.A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even

422

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh from NREL Bangladesh from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not

423

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in Cuba  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuba Cuba from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems.A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even

424

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China from NREL China from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even

425

Waste Energy Analysis Recovery for a Typical Food Processing Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An energy analysis made for the Joan of Arc Food Processing Plant in St. Francisville, Louisiana indicated that a significant quantity of waste heat energy was being released to the atmosphere in the forms of low quality steam and hot flue gases...

Miller, P. H.; Mann, L., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Sustainable urban forms for Chinese typical new towns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phenomena of exploding world urban population and sharply decreasing global arable lands are illustrated in contemporary China in a dramatically amplified form. Construction of many new towns in rural areas has been ...

Son, Sunhwa, 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

TYPICAL EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN TO EMF: EXPOSIMETRY AND DOSIMETRY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......simple but standardised information, which could be used for post-hoc data analysis. For ELF exposure, Enertech Emdex II (Enertech Consultants, Campbell, CA, USA) was used, which measures the 3D LF magnetic flux density in the frequency......

Blaž Vali?; Bor Kos; Peter Gajšek

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF SUBSONIC FLOW OVER A TYPICAL MISSILE FOREBODY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the panel codes may be a compu­ tationally efficient tool for aerodynamic missile design purposes at low. These missiles are aerodynamically stable and there­ fore ``weather­cock'' into the free­stream after launch from work in prediction of missile aerodynamics was devoted to simpler con­ figurations, especially

Tuncer, Ismail H.

429

Typical Clothing Ensemble Insulation Levels for Sixteen Body Parts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Comfort.1994 CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen Bodya mesh arm chair whose insulation level was measured. FigureExperimental Conditions. CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen

Lee, Juyoun; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fluctuating asymmetry and preferences for sex-typical bodily characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...heads were removed from the images, and bodies were colored gray and rendered into 360° video using 3ds Max software (Autodesk Media and Entertainment). Bodies were projected onto a 2-m screen, one at a time in random order, for viewing by 87 evaluators...

William M. Brown; Michael E. Price; Jinsheng Kang; Nicholas Pound; Yue Zhao; Hui Yu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Establishing typicality: A closer look at individual formants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research into the forensic performance of individual formants has offered considerable evidence to support the traditional acoustic-phonetic view that whilst F1 and F2 encode broad phonetic contrast higher formants may offer greater speaker-discriminatory potential (Peterson 1959 Ladefoged 2006 Clermont and Mokhtari 1998 Rose 2002). However the comparative performance of formants has largely been assessed using posterior assessments of speaker-specificity (McDougall 2004 2006; Clermont et al. 2008). Using quadratic polynomial fittings of F1 to F3 from spontaneous tokens of /ai/ extracted from all 100 speakers in the DyVis database (Nolan et al. 2009) this paper discusses issues relating to p(H|E)-based voice comparison analysis (particularly the use of discriminant analysis DA). Further DA performance is compared with an analysis based on likelihood ratios (LRs). LRs based on F3 are found to only marginally outperform F1 and F2 with regard to the magnitude of same-speaker and different-speaker strength of evidence as well system performance metrics (EER and Cllr). The poorer than expected F3 LRs are assessed with regard to the distributions of values within- and between-speakers for the best performing F3 coefficient: the constant. The data go some way to establishing F3 population statistics which may potentially be applied to voice comparison casework.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Establishing typicality: A closer look at individual formants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research into the forensic performance of individual formants has offered considerable evidence to support the traditional acoustic-phonetic view that whilst F1 and F2 encode broad phonetic contrast higher formants may offer greater speaker-discriminatory potential (Peterson 1959 Ladefoged 2006 Clermont and Mokhtari 1998 Rose 2002). However the comparative performance of formants has largely been assessed using posterior assessments of speaker-specificity (McDougall 2004 2006; Clermont et al 2008). Using quadratic polynomial fittings of F1 to F3 from spontaneous tokens of /ai/ extracted from all 100 speakers in the DyVis database (Nolan et al 2009) this paper discusses issues relating to p(H|E)-based voice comparison analysis (particularly the use of discriminant analysis DA). Further DA performance is compared with an analysis based on likelihood ratios (LRs). LRs based on F3 are found to only marginally outperform F1 and F2 with regard to the magnitude of same-speaker and different-speaker strength of evidence as well system performance metrics (EER and Cllr). The poorer than expected F3 LRs are assessed with regard to the distributions of values within- and between-speakers for the best performing F3 coefficient: the constant. The data go some way to establishing F3 population statistics which may potentially be applied to voice comparison casework.

Vincent Hughes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Can we explain non-typical solar flares?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used multi-wavelength high-resolution data from ARIES, THEMIS, and SDO instruments, to analyze a non-standard, C3.3 class flare produced within the active region NOAA 11589 on 2012 October 16. Magnetic flux emergence and cancellation were continuously detected within the active region, the latter leading to the formation of two filaments. Our aim is to identify the origins of the flare taking into account the complex dynamics of its close surroundings. We analyzed the magnetic topology of the active region using a linear force-free field extrapolation to derive its 3D magnetic configuration and the location of quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) which are preferential sites for flaring activity. Because the active region's magnetic field was nonlinear force-free, we completed a parametric study using different linear force-free field extrapolations to demonstrate the robustness of the derived QSLs. The topological analysis shows that the active region presented a complex magnetic configuration comprising severa...

Dalmasse, K; Schmieder, B; Aulanier, G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Grid Computing consists of a collection of heterogeneous ... many ways to access the resources of a Grid, each with unique security requirements and implications for both the resource ... the resource provider. A...

Marty Humphrey; Mary R. Thompson

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Gradient–Controlled, Typical–Distance Clustering for Global ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would be to design algorithms capable of recognizing if a point belongs to the .... the local procedure used, is an implementation of BFGS with a line search and ana- ... There is an overhead in the performance of GTC, that is due to the process.

436

Arctic Change 2009 Woodgate Wk 4 -Mon Typical Arctic profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a cold (halocline) layer, which insulates the ice from the warm Atlantic water beneath (Shimada et al -divided into 2 channels by the Diomede Islands - split by the US- Russian border -ice covered from in the Arctic Implicated in the seasonal melt-back of ice In summer, Pacific waters are a source of near

Washington at Seattle, University of

437

TYPICAL EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN TO EMF: EXPOSIMETRY AND DOSIMETRY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......EMF: EXPOSIMETRY AND DOSIMETRY Blaz Valic 1 Bor Kos 2 Peter Gajsek 2 * * Corresponding author: peter.gajsek@inis.si 1 INIS - Institute of Non-ionizing Radiation, Pohorskega bataljona 215, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia 2 Faculty of Electrical......

Blaž Vali?; Bor Kos; Peter Gajšek

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Base-Exchange Properties of Some Typical Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. .... Amarillo fine sandy loam. .. Yahola fine sandy loam. ... Willacy fine sandy loam.. .. Lomalto clay loam.. ...... Hidalgo clay loam. ........ Raymondville fine sandy loam.. ................. Victoria clay loam.. ...... Wilson clay... loam Milam ...... 0-7 Victoria ..... 0-7 Harris ...... 0-7 Victoria ..... 0-7 \\lTashington ....... Washington ....... Ellis ........ 0-12 Milam ...... 0-7 Navarro .... 0-7 Navarro .... 0-7 Rockwall .... 0-7 Ellis .............. Ellis...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Feb. 1, 01:32 EDT A typically Canadian story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, they are the sons of the late King Faisal (reigned 1964-75). He is remembered in the West for quadrupling oil prices students around the world working on Islamic culture, history and faith. Free of charge. It does so from

John, Sajeev

440

Development of white matter pathways in typically developing preadolescent children  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author Manuscript (CST, ATR, SLF) when comparing children toand frontal regions. The SLF is a major pathway betweenManuscript CST ATR IFO ILF SLF Cing. (CG) UNC Slope per

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Problem Conventional office lighting typically consists of bright fluo-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and undercabinet lights combined with incandescent or fluorescent task lights. This approach is not very energy ) of space; traditional system with incandescent task lamp. Table 1: Traditional versus integrated office

442

Analysis of a typical Midwestern structure subjected to seismic loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extent of damage and casualties in Midwest cities such as St. Louis during an earthquake caused by the New Madrid fault system will be due in part to the performance of buildings. Dynamic nonlinear analysis of a reinforced concrete building...

Hart, Jason Frazier

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

443

SECONDARY CLASSROOM VOCABULARY: DATA FROM TYPICALLY DEVELOPING STUDENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, natural speech does not fully meet their daily communication needs. This population poses a particular challenge to inclusion in academic classrooms. This challenge increases significantly when the students advance to higher grade levels (Kent... knowledge if the vocabulary she needs is not in her system, which may lead to a cascade of low expectations 2 based on the assumption that she does not possess knowledge that she is merely unable to demonstrate. Identifying the need...

McKim Thomas, Sarah Summer

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1990 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1991 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1992 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1993 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1994 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1995 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1996 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1997 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1998 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1999 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

445

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Florida Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 96.2 96.1 96.3 96.1 96.4 96.0 96.7 94.9 1991 96.5 97.0 97.5 98.1 97.8 97.8 97.9 97.8 98.2 97.8 96.8 96.8 1992 96.8 97.2 97.4 98.2 98.3 98.2 98.1 98.1 98.3 98.2 97.4 97.0 1993 97.2 97.2 97.2 98.3 98.4 98.4 98.3 98.3 98.3 98.2 97.3 97.0 1994 97.3 97.6 97.8 98.3 97.6 98.3 98.2 98.4 98.5 97.9 97.8 97.0 1995 96.7 97.3 97.5 97.9 97.9 98.1 98.2 97.8 98.1 97.8 97.4 96.7 1996 96.7 96.9 96.7 97.6 97.8 97.6 97.5 97.2 97.6 97.4 97.0 96.1 1997 97.1 97.4 97.7 98.3 98.3 98.2 97.7 97.9 97.8 97.5 96.4 96.1

446

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arizona Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 33.6 44.6 45.1 46.7 45.0 48.3 48.5 41.4 43.8 54.6 54.8 55.3 2002 55.5 54.5 47.0 46.9 41.4 41.7 36.1 34.9 36.7 33.1 32.9 33.0 2003 37.3 38.2 36.6 36.4 36.4 35.7 37.7 38.8 44.8 45.3 45.3 48.8 2004 58.9 65.1 52.4 51.8 51.2 55.8 50.6 52.0 51.7 53.3 55.4 57.8 2005 47.4 48.2 43.8 47.9 46.2 40.8 40.9 38.2 40.1 40.3 42.7 43.5 2006 37.1 41.1 37.8 37.6 36.4 37.6 38.3 35.9 37.9 39.7 37.1 37.6 2007 36.3 35.8 34.0 35.0 32.8 32.4 26.5 26.4 24.4 28.9 29.7 30.4 2008 32.5 30.5 30.2 27.5 28.3 30.7 25.9 25.0 28.6 30.6 31.5 31.3 2009 32.5 34.6 31.8 30.4 29.8 28.5 25.9 23.5 24.4 27.1 28.8 28.4 2010 28.6 28.5 25.4 26.7 21.9 22.5 21.3 21.4 22.8 24.5 29.0 27.8

447

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New York Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 90.4 90.1 89.3 85.0 85.4 81.3 78.6 78.2 73.6 74.8 82.4 89.7 1990 90.5 92.3 85.6 85.3 78.9 77.8 80.2 80.1 76.5 75.8 80.7 81.5 1991 86.2 85.4 84.4 81.0 75.8 72.8 76.8 75.1 73.1 75.0 79.5 81.1 1992 81.0 78.9 79.5 77.3 72.4 70.9 72.9 69.3 69.3 76.0 82.6 81.5 1993 81.4 81.5 82.3 77.8 71.3 66.2 69.1 72.1 72.8 74.1 77.9 77.2 1994 83.7 83.4 83.3 77.7 73.4 73.2 74.7 73.4 75.1 76.4 78.0 81.9 1995 80.8 82.8 79.3 76.3 71.7 66.5 66.5 64.1 68.1 72.3 77.2 79.9 1996 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997 74.3 72.1 69.3 67.7 59.1 53.5 53.3 54.6 56.2 59.3 65.6 68.3 1998 55.3 60.7 59.0 53.6 48.2 49.8 43.2 43.2 43.3 50.2 53.3 56.7

448

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nevada Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.0 98.1 96.9 95.0 94.2 94.3 92.7 91.7 91.2 96.2 97.2 98.8 1990 99.1 99.4 97.7 97.0 96.4 96.7 95.7 95.0 95.1 96.8 98.4 99.1 1991 99.4 99.4 94.3 92.2 90.6 87.2 84.0 85.2 79.5 84.3 82.2 89.0 1992 90.6 89.5 88.3 87.2 83.7 84.0 84.8 81.4 82.7 88.9 88.5 95.4 1993 97.0 96.0 94.3 91.0 92.5 90.6 89.7 86.7 89.6 89.7 90.9 93.5 1994 93.8 89.3 86.1 81.3 80.1 79.6 76.4 74.5 76.4 73.9 76.7 81.4 1995 81.5 83.2 77.4 78.9 77.1 76.5 72.8 70.0 71.3 67.8 70.8 75.2 1996 79.1 80.5 78.2 76.4 74.2 73.0 69.2 66.7 67.6 64.0 70.8 74.9 1997 77.2 79.7 78.0 69.2 64.7 60.9 73.2 63.1 62.9 65.9 67.9 73.3 1998 76.5 79.1 75.1 72.9 71.0 70.0 65.2 55.2 55.5 62.6 63.6 69.9

449

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1983 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1984 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1985 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1986 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1987 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1988 93.8 93.3 92.5 91.7 89.4 87.5 86.3 87.2 87.6 87.4 88.7 89.7 1989 91.0 91.2 90.8 89.2 88.2 86.1 85.1 85.1 84.6 85.2 87.7 90.7 1990 90.8 88.8 88.3 86.9 85.5 83.8 81.8 81.7 80.3 81.2 84.7 87.9 1991 89.4 88.5 87.8 84.0 83.2 80.0 79.3 81.6 78.1 78.7 85.1 86.1 1992 87.1 85.2 84.7 84.0 79.3 79.4 76.0 76.1 78.0 80.9 83.1 85.6 1993 86.6 86.3 86.4 84.9 82.2 79.0 79.2 78.0 78.3 79.9 83.0 85.1

450

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Colorado Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.0 98.1 98.3 97.8 97.3 97.3 95.0 91.8 95.8 95.6 96.9 97.2 1990 98.1 98.0 97.9 97.6 97.3 97.4 94.7 94.5 95.5 94.6 97.0 97.0 1991 96.8 97.1 96.1 96.2 96.9 97.2 93.7 93.9 93.6 92.3 94.7 96.3 1992 96.7 96.7 95.9 95.7 95.1 96.0 94.2 93.3 93.6 91.2 93.7 96.2 1993 96.6 96.4 96.5 95.8 95.2 95.5 93.0 93.1 95.2 90.6 94.1 95.9 1994 95.9 96.1 95.7 94.9 95.3 94.3 91.2 91.7 93.1 91.5 93.2 95.5 1995 95.9 96.0 95.1 94.3 95.1 95.5 92.3 89.7 89.3 89.8 93.5 93.8 1996 94.5 95.5 93.8 93.1 92.4 92.5 88.0 87.1 90.6 89.1 92.8 94.3 1997 94.6 95.4 94.4 93.9 93.7 92.9 86.2 83.1 90.2 86.9 89.8 93.0 1998 95.4 95.1 96.1 95.8 95.0 91.6 92.0 91.1 93.2 87.5 94.0 95.2

451

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Montana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.3 98.9 98.8 98.6 97.4 96.8 96.4 96.3 96.3 97.5 97.9 98.1 1990 97.9 97.8 97.6 98.6 96.9 98.4 96.3 95.8 93.3 96.9 97.6 99.6 1991 98.5 98.1 98.0 97.7 97.8 96.9 95.8 95.8 95.8 96.3 96.5 97.2 1992 97.1 98.0 96.7 96.5 96.6 94.9 95.4 96.8 90.6 92.0 92.8 94.6 1993 95.4 94.0 94.9 93.9 94.9 91.1 91.2 91.2 87.5 88.8 91.5 93.5 1994 92.7 93.0 92.7 91.8 91.9 89.6 88.7 87.8 87.5 89.0 91.2 93.1 1995 93.0 92.5 92.5 91.9 92.0 90.1 89.6 88.9 88.2 88.8 91.8 91.9 1996 92.2 93.7 91.9 92.6 90.8 90.8 87.8 87.2 86.1 87.5 91.6 92.7 1997 93.5 93.1 92.0 91.3 90.4 88.9 90.6 87.6 85.8 88.2 90.6 92.3 1998 86.4 80.5 80.5 76.4 72.1 66.7 67.7 68.6 64.2 70.5 74.9 77.0

452

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arizona Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 96.1 96.3 94.1 93.5 92.8 91.7 89.1 89.1 91.6 91.6 94.8 95.3 1990 97.6 97.4 96.3 94.9 95.6 92.8 92.0 90.9 94.6 96.4 96.7 97.0 1991 98.0 94.9 93.5 92.6 91.7 89.6 87.0 88.1 88.5 92.8 92.8 97.7 1992 97.2 97.0 96.3 92.7 89.9 88.9 86.3 86.0 90.5 91.2 89.1 92.9 1993 93.3 93.4 92.5 90.1 91.2 90.6 88.3 89.5 90.2 92.1 90.7 92.5 1994 94.2 92.5 91.9 89.9 90.5 88.3 87.2 86.4 89.3 90.4 89.9 91.5 1995 91.7 92.8 88.7 86.9 87.8 87.9 84.5 84.8 86.5 88.4 87.9 87.2 1996 89.6 90.2 86.9 83.7 84.8 83.6 82.1 78.5 83.5 83.2 84.1 84.1 1997 87.3 87.8 86.5 83.8 86.1 82.6 79.7 78.6 83.8 81.0 83.1 85.8 1998 87.1 87.4 86.9 85.2 83.6 86.4 84.4 83.0 83.7 79.9 82.9 84.0

453

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Delaware Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1995 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1996 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

454

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New York Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.3 14.8 13.4 11.3 10.4 10.0 9.2 10.2 4.2 4.8 15.5 9.7 2002 12.2 12.1 11.1 11.1 11.9 10.9 9.4 10.4 13.5 7.7 9.4 11.2 2003 11.5 11.6 12.1 10.9 10.9 12.3 10.5 12.0 8.0 5.8 10.5 10.1 2004 12.4 13.5 11.5 13.0 11.1 11.5 9.3 8.7 8.0 7.6 8.7 9.8 2005 17.0 16.9 17.4 14.3 10.2 11.1 15.9 16.5 14.3 11.9 12.4 14.8 2006 14.8 14.0 11.5 9.6 7.6 11.4 11.0 9.9 9.6 10.8 13.6 13.7 2007 13.5 18.5 12.7 13.3 10.1 7.8 10.2 9.0 11.0 9.7 11.2 15.1 2008 16.6 13.4 13.1 10.6 9.0 9.2 9.0 7.7 9.3 9.8 11.3 12.9 2009 14.7 15.7 13.5 12.0 10.0 9.4 7.5 8.5 8.0 8.2 9.6 15.0 2010 14.2 14.8 11.4 10.3 8.8 7.5 8.0 10.3 9.0 8.1 9.6 11.0

455

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Vermont Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 95.2 80.1 79.2 79.2 69.2 67.8 65.6 67.7 70.7 73.3 76.0 79.0 2002 77.7 78.3 78.6 78.2 72.6 66.8 66.7 65.1 66.8 72.6 76.2 85.5 2003 87.3 100.0 100.0 75.7 74.2 72.4 75.0 67.7 70.4 73.2 77.4 80.1 2004 79.9 84.7 80.7 82.2 78.6 73.8 70.0 68.3 69.2 76.4 82.1 83.7 2005 83.6 86.4 82.6 78.0 74.4 71.5 72.1 83.9 94.3 82.4 75.7 96.4 2006 93.0 87.6 82.4 77.2 73.3 72.9 71.7 69.7 71.5 76.3 75.1 79.5 2007 83.0 84.1 81.8 76.2 72.2 71.7 71.4 71.2 73.9 76.6 78.7 82.2 2008 81.0 84.1 83.3 78.8 76.0 76.0 76.9 76.1 74.1 77.7 80.2 83.2 2009 82.6 85.8 77.5 76.6 74.2 73.8 73.8 72.4 72.8 77.4 76.0 81.5 2010 81.6 78.8 78.4 75.2 73.0 74.0 74.2 73.8 73.0 76.3 77.3 82.7

456

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nebraska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 96.8 96.5 97.1 99.8 99.7 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.7 98.8 98.1 98.5 1990 95.6 95.3 94.1 93.2 92.3 89.6 96.9 94.2 93.0 90.2 89.9 93.5 1991 93.6 93.3 91.8 87.9 85.4 88.2 96.4 95.2 85.8 86.1 90.5 91.4 1992 91.7 91.6 89.9 90.9 88.7 81.7 85.6 83.6 80.5 84.5 87.1 90.9 1993 94.1 94.7 94.5 93.4 89.5 88.4 88.1 87.8 82.9 85.2 84.8 92.0 1994 88.2 88.9 85.8 82.3 79.2 72.9 75.9 77.8 65.1 62.2 73.5 80.7 1995 81.4 80.6 79.2 79.8 76.0 71.8 70.4 68.4 NA NA NA NA 1996 83.8 79.1 77.7 77.3 69.8 66.0 51.8 54.1 66.2 40.3 68.6 76.6 1997 82.4 91.9 74.2 77.5 67.0 68.6 67.6 69.2 63.2 50.0 72.4 77.2 1998 80.4 78.6 77.9 72.1 74.6 67.1 66.3 82.0 74.5 80.4 66.5 51.5

457

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nebraska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 25.7 29.6 30.3 21.0 19.7 16.7 8.3 12.9 13.3 18.6 12.0 18.7 2002 22.6 19.5 29.3 17.6 15.0 24.0 7.4 8.4 8.8 16.4 18.9 19.6 2003 20.3 22.7 24.9 19.3 17.1 24.1 8.7 9.7 10.9 15.7 17.7 19.4 2004 19.7 21.4 24.7 19.0 18.3 14.2 9.2 10.6 16.5 18.8 16.0 16.6 2005 24.4 20.0 24.6 18.5 19.0 18.2 10.0 8.6 12.9 15.1 14.2 18.3 2006 13.8 15.1 17.1 13.3 13.0 9.8 8.3 7.7 10.5 11.5 10.2 12.4 2007 12.1 13.0 14.5 11.6 9.7 8.9 7.1 6.4 6.9 9.8 8.5 10.5 2008 12.0 13.8 13.2 13.6 12.4 8.5 8.0 7.1 8.6 7.4 8.0 11.4 2009 11.8 12.1 10.5 10.2 8.8 7.6 6.6 6.1 7.3 7.8 9.0 8.7 2010 11.1 11.7 10.5 9.1 7.0 7.8 6.8 6.5 7.2 7.4 7.6 7.5

458

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Montana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 3.0 3.1 2.8 2.6 2.3 1.9 0.9 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.9 3.0 2002 3.0 2.9 3.6 2.3 2.0 1.2 0.9 0.7 0.8 1.1 2.1 3.4 2003 2.9 2.8 3.3 2.1 1.8 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.8 0.6 1.2 1.6 2004 1.8 2.4 1.9 1.0 1.5 1.4 1.1 0.7 0.8 1.1 1.8 2.4 2005 3.1 2.9 2.2 2.3 1.8 1.4 0.9 0.6 0.7 1.0 1.3 2.3 2006 1.3 1.0 1.1 0.9 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.6 1.0 2007 1.0 1.2 0.9 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.7 1.0 2008 1.3 1.4 1.8 1.1 0.9 0.5 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 2009 2.5 1.7 1.5 1.2 0.8 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.6 1.0 1.8 2010 2.3 2.4 2.3 1.8 1.4 0.5 0.7 0.6 0.6 1.5 1.0 2.0 2011 1.9 3.3 2.1 1.3 0.9 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.3

459

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Rhode Island Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 87.1 83.9 47.7 48.9 40.4 44.6 82.7 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 75.5 80.2 97.3 91.1 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1995 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1996 100.0 99.3 98.4 98.2 97.8 92.0 84.1 86.8 49.9 66.5 87.3 89.1 1997 89.6 91.7 82.2 88.5 80.8 72.4 71.1 67.9 68.7 71.1 80.7 64.1

460

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Hawaii Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2002 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2003 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2004 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2005 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2006 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2007 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2008 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2009 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2010 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 2011 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maine Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1995 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1996 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

462

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Nevada Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 32.2 25.0 16.8 19.7 13.2 12.9 38.9 31.5 31.7 41.7 48.4 68.2 2002 58.3 44.3 59.1 37.8 44.2 40.0 17.5 18.2 19.5 21.2 23.0 28.8 2003 25.6 28.9 20.3 22.8 14.8 13.2 13.6 11.9 12.5 15.8 23.9 21.7 2004 21.4 23.6 14.9 15.1 12.4 11.3 10.7 11.5 13.4 15.9 20.9 22.6 2005 24.3 25.3 17.8 18.4 14.8 14.1 9.6 12.3 13.6 15.9 18.3 19.5 2006 20.9 21.8 22.3 14.7 14.8 11.9 11.7 10.6 11.5 16.9 16.6 23.7 2007 22.1 26.8 17.9 16.6 14.8 11.6 11.3 10.2 10.6 13.6 20.4 25.3 2008 27.5 26.4 21.5 17.5 17.4 9.7 10.4 9.2 8.1 11.3 23.4 26.0 2009 21.4 23.7 19.2 19.9 13.9 11.5 8.7 9.4 11.2 16.2 20.4 26.7 2010 23.5 26.8 23.1 19.6 18.0 13.4 12.7 11.0 10.9 13.6 22.0 22.3

463

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kentucky Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 27.3 21.8 18.9 13.8 17.8 15.8 17.4 17.4 17.3 19.6 16.5 16.9 2002 16.8 18.2 18.9 17.2 15.5 16.5 18.0 19.1 16.3 18.0 18.8 18.4 2003 20.6 20.1 18.7 19.5 19.2 20.3 16.6 16.0 18.1 18.2 18.1 18.4 2004 18.8 18.3 16.3 16.0 14.6 16.6 16.2 15.2 15.5 15.6 17.5 20.3 2005 16.5 17.5 17.3 16.0 15.8 15.2 16.1 14.9 17.4 17.9 17.2 19.7 2006 15.6 16.9 17.6 14.8 14.9 14.2 16.0 15.7 14.6 15.7 15.5 17.6 2007 16.6 18.1 17.0 17.7 16.1 17.5 16.6 14.7 15.3 16.1 16.6 16.5 2008 19.1 20.3 18.1 17.7 17.7 16.4 16.4 15.9 16.1 17.0 15.8 18.1 2009 17.3 19.7 16.0 17.8 19.4 21.5 18.1 18.8 18.2 16.1 17.4 17.8 2010 18.0 18.5 19.6 19.1 18.5 16.8 15.8 16.9 16.1 18.0 17.6 18.6

464

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Michigan Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 75.8 74.5 76.0 71.7 64.9 47.6 51.7 50.8 57.5 64.4 69.5 73.5 1990 73.1 74.0 74.5 72.3 67.4 58.1 49.6 51.5 52.2 62.1 70.1 74.6 1991 73.0 72.2 72.4 67.3 62.1 51.2 44.3 41.2 47.5 60.1 87.2 70.0 1992 73.7 74.5 71.4 70.5 66.6 55.5 48.5 51.6 49.9 61.1 68.6 73.1 1993 74.5 72.3 72.6 68.0 63.7 51.6 50.5 54.4 50.9 63.1 68.1 73.1 1994 73.7 71.6 70.8 66.3 60.1 45.7 41.7 42.3 45.4 55.4 63.4 69.8 1995 72.5 72.2 71.2 68.0 61.5 45.8 41.6 39.0 46.9 57.1 68.0 72.5 1996 73.7 72.1 73.1 68.5 64.4 46.1 44.2 41.3 44.6 55.8 67.2 70.2 1997 70.0 70.2 67.3 66.2 58.6 45.7 55.7 40.7 39.7 54.2 64.8 65.7 1998 70.8 66.5 65.7 60.1 44.3 42.3 39.6 37.5 42.5 47.8 57.9 64.7

465

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maine Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7.1 9.5 8.2 5.5 7.6 14.7 17.1 12.4 4.5 8.9 4.5 3.6 2002 13.5 1.7 6.8 1.5 1.6 1.2 100.0 0.8 100.0 0.7 0.8 1.0 2003 10.9 12.0 11.3 10.5 11.9 9.1 7.6 10.1 9.0 7.3 9.2 16.5 2004 2.0 1.7 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.3 1.3 2.0 1.6 1.5 1.6 1.8 2005 3.8 4.1 3.6 3.0 2.8 2.5 3.2 2.0 1.4 3.4 3.2 3.8 2006 1.3 1.3 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 1.0 0.9 0.8 2007 0.9 1.0 4.3 0.9 0.4 0.3 0.6 0.4 0.5 0.7 0.6 1.3 2008 1.1 0.9 1.5 0.6 0.5 0.3 0.8 0.6 0.6 1.0 0.9 0.9 2009 1.8 2.2 1.5 0.8 0.5 1.3 1.0 0.5 2.1 0.8 0.8 1.2 2010 1.2 0.8 1.2 0.7 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.7 2011 0.7 0.9 0.7 1.0 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.6

466

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Ohio Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 87.4 88.1 87.1 86.0 81.2 74.4 75.5 75.0 78.9 85.1 87.8 90.3 1990 89.9 89.2 89.9 86.4 82.4 78.5 77.0 75.6 77.7 83.0 87.9 91.4 1991 91.6 90.0 87.2 83.6 78.6 74.7 75.5 73.7 75.6 82.6 87.8 89.8 1992 89.1 88.0 88.4 85.7 78.9 73.9 72.0 73.5 73.1 84.2 85.7 88.5 1993 89.4 87.0 86.9 83.8 76.1 73.9 74.6 69.4 72.6 82.8 84.5 86.3 1994 87.4 86.5 84.9 78.4 75.9 70.5 66.7 67.5 66.5 75.1 78.7 81.5 1995 81.0 80.0 78.6 76.8 67.8 61.4 62.9 59.0 58.3 69.9 77.9 79.2 1996 77.3 76.1 76.1 72.3 63.1 42.1 56.4 53.9 65.1 68.5 72.4 74.0 1997 73.2 69.3 70.0 65.6 58.9 50.2 47.4 49.3 50.4 55.0 67.3 67.4 1998 61.5 61.2 61.1 54.9 42.3 45.6 48.0 36.3 44.9 56.3 50.7 50.3

467

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Arkansas Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 95.3 95.6 95.9 94.3 91.3 91.5 87.2 86.2 88.2 87.5 90.7 93.4 1990 95.8 94.8 93.7 93.2 90.7 88.8 88.4 86.9 87.4 86.8 90.6 91.5 1991 93.8 94.7 96.1 91.0 87.7 85.1 84.8 85.5 85.9 86.5 90.5 92.3 1992 93.0 94.7 91.3 92.7 88.4 87.0 85.9 85.4 86.4 87.6 88.7 90.8 1993 92.5 93.0 92.8 91.8 87.6 84.2 85.9 84.7 85.7 87.8 92.7 98.7 1994 93.9 95.9 95.4 94.8 91.2 91.7 94.2 94.3 96.6 95.3 96.4 97.4 1995 97.2 98.0 96.3 95.1 93.3 93.1 91.5 93.4 92.3 91.8 92.6 100.0 1996 96.4 97.0 95.6 96.3 92.4 94.2 88.5 91.6 92.7 90.2 94.1 95.7 1997 96.3 96.8 95.2 93.8 91.8 91.1 90.3 91.8 91.3 92.6 90.4 95.9 1998 95.5 95.4 94.0 93.0 88.8 86.8 86.1 84.9 82.4 81.5 86.1 89.0

468

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Jersey Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 99.0 98.9 98.7 98.3 96.2 94.7 94.2 93.4 93.5 94.7 99.0 99.7 1990 99.6 99.3 96.6 94.4 94.3 93.2 89.3 86.4 87.1 86.2 91.7 96.5 1991 98.1 96.5 95.8 91.8 92.3 89.1 89.5 80.6 89.2 90.0 93.2 97.0 1992 96.9 95.7 92.1 87.7 94.1 91.3 88.6 80.7 80.7 86.4 94.8 96.9 1993 93.6 94.0 93.7 91.2 88.5 86.4 87.1 79.8 84.6 90.0 92.4 93.8 1994 94.9 96.2 96.3 89.8 87.4 85.1 81.4 82.2 83.6 88.0 89.6 92.1 1995 93.7 92.4 91.3 87.4 84.5 80.0 78.7 75.1 83.8 72.6 81.9 82.9 1996 81.3 80.5 78.9 73.5 68.8 66.3 62.0 60.0 61.8 67.2 69.4 70.2 1997 60.9 89.2 58.4 55.9 45.7 50.1 44.8 47.8 47.2 47.0 48.2 52.0 1998 63.8 64.1 66.9 60.1 51.7 59.2 55.7 57.9 54.8 53.3 60.2 59.7

469

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Iowa Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9.5 10.3 7.4 5.5 6.3 3.3 6.0 4.5 5.4 7.8 10.9 9.9 2002 8.5 5.3 8.3 6.1 4.9 5.4 5.4 5.2 5.6 10.4 12.8 10.2 2003 10.3 8.9 9.3 6.7 5.2 6.0 5.5 5.6 6.3 8.8 10.6 9.1 2004 10.4 8.9 8.8 5.7 4.9 5.3 4.0 4.8 5.1 8.4 16.2 12.9 2005 11.8 9.6 9.8 7.7 7.8 8.0 8.8 8.3 9.1 11.5 12.5 10.7 2006 10.3 9.5 9.6 6.1 7.4 6.4 5.7 6.7 7.1 9.4 11.9 10.2 2007 8.9 8.1 6.4 6.1 5.8 5.2 4.2 5.0 5.8 6.6 7.0 7.5 2008 7.9 6.5 5.8 5.0 6.0 5.0 4.6 5.0 5.1 7.2 9.1 10.2 2009 6.9 7.2 6.4 4.7 4.3 4.6 4.5 4.4 4.3 7.3 9.4 10.2 2010 9.3 7.6 5.7 4.9 4.2 4.3 4.4 5.5 5.6 5.0 5.5 6.5 2011 6.5 6.5 5.5 5.3 4.6 5.1 4.2 4.4 5.9 5.6 6.2 5.8

470

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Kentucky Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 97.1 96.6 96.4 94.9 91.0 89.2 89.5 88.2 89.8 90.7 94.4 97.0 1990 97.2 96.9 96.3 94.8 91.6 91.6 89.5 89.5 89.1 93.3 95.0 96.2 1991 97.1 95.7 94.7 89.8 86.4 85.5 87.5 88.0 91.1 91.5 95.7 95.5 1992 95.4 94.2 93.6 91.9 87.9 86.9 86.7 87.4 87.9 93.0 94.6 94.9 1993 91.6 91.6 95.3 93.5 92.4 93.5 89.9 81.6 88.1 88.5 94.5 95.4 1994 93.6 95.9 94.6 92.1 88.2 85.4 83.0 83.5 83.4 87.6 87.9 89.9 1995 90.8 91.2 89.9 86.3 87.4 80.6 76.5 81.5 81.7 85.7 91.0 92.7 1996 93.8 92.0 92.1 90.3 84.0 91.1 85.9 85.4 84.3 88.9 88.9 91.9 1997 92.5 91.5 90.3 89.0 86.3 88.6 84.0 80.3 84.9 89.9 89.9 91.3 1998 90.4 90.1 90.4 86.2 84.8 82.2 76.5 79.1 81.9 82.3 87.1 88.6

471

State and National Wind Resource Potential 30 Percent Capacity Factor at 80 Meters  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. 1) Exclude areas of slope > 20% Derived from 90 m national elevation dataset. 6) 100% exclude 3 km surrounding criteria 2-5 (except water) Merged datasets and buffer 3 km 5) 100% exclusion of airfields, urban, wetland and water areas. USGS North America Land Use Land Cover (LULC), version 2.0, 1993; ESRI airports and airfields (2006); U.S. Census Urbanized Areas (2000 and 2003) 10) 50% exclusion of non-ridgecrest forest Ridge-crest areas defined using a terrain definition script, overlaid with USGS LULC data screened for the forest categories. Other Criteria 8) 50% exclusion of remaining Dept. of Defense lands except

472

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Maryland Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 97.1 96.6 97.1 96.7 95.9 95.1 94.3 94.7 94.1 94.2 94.6 96.8 1990 97.6 97.1 96.0 95.7 94.3 94.5 93.6 93.1 92.6 93.3 94.7 95.6 1991 97.3 97.5 97.1 96.6 95.9 94.8 94.5 94.7 94.1 95.8 96.5 97.4 1992 97.2 97.2 96.3 95.6 94.1 92.8 93.1 92.7 94.1 95.0 97.0 97.4 1993 97.3 97.4 96.5 96.3 94.6 96.2 95.0 93.4 93.4 95.4 97.1 98.1 1994 98.1 98.3 98.2 95.8 95.8 95.4 95.2 94.1 95.2 96.2 96.5 97.8 1995 97.9 98.5 97.8 96.7 95.9 96.2 94.4 94.9 95.6 94.7 95.6 97.0 1996 94.9 96.5 93.7 92.4 86.2 86.8 81.4 85.0 87.0 87.3 92.2 93.2 1997 83.9 81.9 77.6 71.5 61.9 56.1 51.6 50.3 48.6 51.7 64.7 53.1 1998 47.0 49.3 45.6 32.1 26.8 24.3 22.2 22.7 23.0 25.2 38.3 37.7

473

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Indiana Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 94.1 93.9 94.3 92.6 92.6 97.2 96.7 96.8 89.1 91.9 97.7 98.9 1990 99.2 98.5 93.4 90.1 92.1 90.6 92.2 89.7 88.4 91.8 98.4 98.6 1991 94.2 93.3 93.2 93.2 92.6 89.2 89.9 89.6 92.6 98.5 97.9 95.4 1992 93.6 92.4 98.6 99.1 99.7 99.9 92.8 99.6 91.9 99.8 99.9 98.0 1993 94.5 94.1 99.6 99.5 100.0 91.9 90.4 91.1 92.9 90.7 92.2 96.1 1994 94.1 97.5 93.7 91.5 88.4 85.6 84.6 85.9 84.3 86.7 91.3 91.4 1995 89.7 89.9 89.5 87.0 83.4 76.1 73.5 72.7 77.9 80.9 90.7 93.4 1996 98.1 98.6 97.9 97.4 93.7 88.9 91.6 86.8 86.8 91.5 96.1 97.4 1997 97.1 96.7 93.4 91.1 58.0 59.4 85.4 86.8 87.2 93.9 96.0 94.0 1998 85.1 83.9 88.3 78.9 75.8 69.8 59.1 70.2 57.3 69.0 74.5 82.6

474

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Alaska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1995 100.0 83.9 83.2 83.8 81.9 76.4 72.0 71.3 72.1 69.2 72.9 77.9 1996 73.4 78.9 76.0 62.5 59.1 55.0 51.2 53.1 50.7 54.2 58.2 61.8 1997 60.3 59.0 57.7 57.1 54.8 50.5 49.9 45.0 49.9 52.2 51.9 54.3

475

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Utah Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1991 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1992 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1994 83.8 85.2 82.9 82.4 77.7 77.9 76.4 79.0 79.8 83.7 83.8 85.9 1995 85.5 85.5 82.5 83.1 80.0 79.3 73.9 71.3 75.2 79.4 80.2 82.8 1996 84.0 85.6 82.8 82.3 77.7 72.9 73.3 71.9 78.4 79.5 81.2 84.4 1997 86.2 87.1 82.9 83.7 78.8 76.9 72.7 71.6 74.7 80.1 83.0 86.4

476

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Georgia Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 96.6 93.6 89.7 88.2 85.3 81.7 80.7 80.2 83.0 86.4 89.4 96.8 1990 96.5 90.3 88.7 86.9 82.0 80.9 80.1 82.5 78.9 84.3 87.9 94.1 1991 92.1 90.7 88.8 84.7 81.6 79.7 79.6 80.3 78.8 82.8 90.7 92.5 1992 90.8 90.6 89.3 88.2 85.0 82.7 79.7 83.3 83.4 84.6 87.9 92.9 1993 91.5 92.9 94.6 90.9 86.5 83.0 85.4 84.9 85.6 86.0 91.2 93.0 1994 97.0 94.9 92.4 90.3 89.3 86.8 87.9 89.0 86.1 88.6 91.6 92.6 1995 96.1 97.1 93.3 90.7 89.7 88.4 87.4 88.4 87.9 91.1 94.8 97.2 1996 97.7 98.1 96.9 94.9 92.2 89.0 88.7 88.1 86.6 90.6 92.2 93.2 1997 94.3 93.5 90.0 88.5 85.4 84.3 81.0 81.9 82.9 85.6 88.6 91.6 1998 90.7 91.3 88.8 86.3 83.7 80.9 71.5 71.5 73.6 74.6 77.4 79.2

477

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Alaska Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7 97.1 92.7 90.5 89.6 94.4 94.9 99.3 99.3 2002 99.3 99.2 99.2 99.3 80.9 79.0 78.8 78.4 86.9 99.4 96.3 99.6 2003 97.3 98.3 81.5 78.0 62.0 62.8 61.5 54.7 55.2 70.5 100.0 95.4 2004 94.3 77.2 72.2 65.1 68.5 66.1 60.9 54.9 55.5 58.7 76.9 73.3 2005 76.0 75.0 71.9 66.3 71.4 64.0 61.8 63.1 67.6 76.6 70.9 69.0 2006 66.8 63.2 71.2 60.6 60.5 63.6 55.1 60.2 64.8 61.6 78.2 70.2 2007 77.8 76.7 78.2 73.6 78.3 72.5 59.1 59.3 73.8 63.5 71.8 68.8 2008 100.0 100.0 83.8 82.2 57.2 60.9 54.5 72.1 75.9 93.1 83.1 100.0 2009 77.2 77.4 82.7 70.6 44.2 54.8 55.5 78.9 84.3 79.0 82.4 83.1

478

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Oregon Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 99.1 99.2 98.7 98.3 97.6 97.6 97.0 97.2 97.4 96.7 97.3 98.0 1990 98.2 98.6 98.4 97.4 97.4 97.5 96.6 96.6 96.9 95.6 96.5 98.1 1991 98.7 98.3 97.8 97.7 97.5 98.0 97.3 97.2 97.2 95.9 97.6 98.0 1992 98.6 98.4 97.4 97.7 97.7 97.8 97.9 96.7 97.8 94.6 97.4 98.4 1993 98.6 99.0 98.5 98.0 97.6 97.8 97.6 97.5 97.3 93.6 96.5 98.2 1994 98.5 98.6 98.3 97.4 97.6 97.7 98.1 97.7 97.9 97.0 97.8 98.6 1995 98.5 98.5 98.2 98.2 97.9 97.8 98.1 97.9 98.1 96.7 97.9 98.4 1996 98.4 98.8 98.6 98.1 98.2 98.3 98.1 98.0 97.6 97.0 98.3 98.6 1997 98.8 98.9 98.8 98.5 98.5 98.1 98.3 98.3 98.0 97.5 98.4 98.4 1998 99.3 99.2 99.1 98.9 98.8 99.0 98.9 98.6 98.7 98.4 99.0 99.1

479

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 88.9 90.2 90.6 89.0 82.8 85.9 86.8 83.0 84.1 79.3 84.6 87.4 1990 91.5 90.4 89.7 87.7 85.8 88.1 86.1 85.2 85.0 79.3 86.3 86.4 1991 91.0 91.7 88.5 87.4 87.4 86.8 84.7 84.0 82.9 73.6 85.1 87.5 1992 89.4 89.0 87.1 85.2 83.1 80.2 81.0 82.4 80.2 77.9 82.2 88.3 1993 89.4 89.9 91.0 87.9 87.4 82.3 82.8 81.3 79.2 77.7 81.5 87.8 1994 87.8 88.6 88.1 85.9 83.2 82.7 84.2 80.1 80.6 79.4 84.1 87.6 1995 89.7 89.1 86.5 85.5 86.0 85.3 83.7 82.5 80.4 77.1 85.9 85.5 1996 88.8 90.1 88.2 87.2 85.7 86.0 82.4 81.9 80.0 77.3 84.9 87.6 1997 87.8 89.7 87.7 86.1 86.4 83.3 83.1 82.8 82.5 76.4 83.1 86.9 1998 90.2 88.9 88.3 86.7 85.7 85.6 84.2 83.3 80.6 75.3 83.9 86.1

480

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Vermont Represented by the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1990 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1991 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1992 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1993 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1994 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1995 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1996 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1997 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1998 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1999 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typically 3-5 percent" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the past 7 y, the price of crystalline silicon...by 86%, and the price of PV modules has...In the meantime, average commercial c-Si...furnish a solar-to-fuels device with an efficiency...avoid the deleterious effect of concentrated base...2008 ) The hydrogen fuel alternative . MRS Bull...

Casandra R. Cox; Jungwoo Z. Lee; Daniel G. Nocera; Tonio Buonassisi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Charles Smith (Utility Wind Integration Group) and Robertare the integration costs associated with wind power. The

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solar-to-fuels conversion. Distributed and grid-scale adoption of nondispatchable, intermittent...Energy (2013) Hydrogen, fuel cells, & infrastructure technologies program. Hydrogen production. Available...2003 ) Design considerations for a hybrid amorphous silicon/photoelectrochemical...

Casandra R. Cox; Jungwoo Z. Lee; Daniel G. Nocera; Tonio Buonassisi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Sixty Percent Conceptual Design Report: Enterprise Accountability System for Classified Removable Electronic Media  

SciTech Connect

Classified removable electronic media (CREM) are tracked in several different ways at the Laboratory. To ensure greater security for CREM, we are creating a single, Laboratory-wide system to track CREM. We are researching technology that can be used to electronically tag and detect CREM, designing a database to track the movement of CREM, and planning to test the system at several locations around the Laboratory. We focus on affixing ''smart tags'' to items we want to track and installing gates at pedestrian portals to detect the entry or exit of tagged items. By means of an enterprise database, the system will track the entry and exit of tagged items into and from CREM storage vaults, vault-type rooms, access corridors, or boundaries of secure areas, as well as the identity of the person carrying an item. We are considering several options for tracking items that can give greater security, but at greater expense.

B. Gardiner; L.Graton; J.Longo; T.Marks, Jr.; B.Martinez; R. Strittmatter; C.Woods; J. Joshua

2003-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

485

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2013) Hydrogen, fuel cells, & infrastructure technologies program. Hydrogen production. Available at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/mypp/. Accessed April 30, 2014 . 10 Walter MG ( 2010 ) Solar water splitting cells...

Casandra R. Cox; Jungwoo Z. Lee; Daniel G. Nocera; Tonio Buonassisi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Fact #763: January 21, 2013 Eighty-four Percent of Scrapped Tires Are Recycled  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There were 263 million tires scrapped in 2009 (latest available data) which amounts to more than 4.7 million tons of waste. Fortunately, 84% of that waste was recycled. Most of the recycled tires...

487

Graduates 6 2 1 5 5 1 4 2 2 2 3 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Placement Database As of 4/2/2013 #12;29 Number of Grads with Placement Info Art History, PhD Graduates is captured in the TGS PhD Placement Database using graduate responses from the Exit Survey and Survey of Earned Doctorates, and updated with the help of faculty and staff after each graduation. The database

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

488

Graduates 2 1 5 5 1 4 2 2 2 6 3 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Placement Database As of 7/15/2014 #12;30 Number of Grads with Placement Info Art History, PhD Graduates is captured in the TGS PhD Placement Database using graduate responses from the Exit Survey and Survey of Earned Doctorates, and updated with the help of faculty and staff after each graduation. The database

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

489

Graduates 6 6 2 1 5 5 1 4 2 2 3 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Placement Database #12;33 Number of Grads with Placement Info Art History, PhD Graduates First Placement is captured in the TGS PhD Placement Database using graduate responses from the Exit Survey and Survey of Earned Doctorates, and updated with the help of faculty and staff after each graduation. The database

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

490

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electronics. This approach allows for facile optimization en route to addressing lower-cost...Gasteiger HA , eds ( 2003 ) Handbook of Fuel Cells: Fundamentals, Technology and Applications...Department of Energy (2013) Hydrogen, fuel cells, & infrastructure technologies program...

Casandra R. Cox; Jungwoo Z. Lee; Daniel G. Nocera; Tonio Buonassisi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology...Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology...Cambridge, MA 02139 Direct solar-to-fuels conversion...Information for 10% solar-to-fuel conversion...University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. bMassachusetts...

Casandra R. Cox; Jungwoo Z. Lee; Daniel G. Nocera; Tonio Buonassisi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power system modeling, wind energy I. I NTRODUCTION Generating electricity from wind technology has several advantages

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Using image processing to measure tree crown diameters and estimate percent crown closure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 92 15739. 78 12458. 89 14827. 1D 34621. 61 29827. 54 31822. 85 2'l709. 21 17220. 59 16172. 18 16078. 61 15824. 26 28936. 74 26003. 63 26839. 35 24482. 40 16616. 60 15824. 26 26422. 72 zszee. es 14828. 65 14340. 70 23922. 95 22465. 35...

Gabriel, Darren Kyle

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

494

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nickel-borate thin film electrocatalyst . J Am Chem Soc 135 ( 9 ): 3662 – 3674...Accelerating materials development for photoelectrochemical hydrogen...Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Program ECCS-1150878 (to...a NiBi anode and NiMoZn cathode operating in 1 M KOH (pH...

Casandra R. Cox; Jungwoo Z. Lee; Daniel G. Nocera; Tonio Buonassisi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Ten-percent solar-to-fuel conversion with nonprecious materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...can effectively be harnessed to electricity by fuel cell devices (3, 4) or converted...solar cell describes both wired and wireless water splitting and constrains the currents and...technology pathways to reach baseload electricity costs . Energy Environ Sci 5...

Casandra R. Cox; Jungwoo Z. Lee; Daniel G. Nocera; Tonio Buonassisi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GIS-based supply curves for wind resources, along with projected costs and performance for other generation technologies such as pulverized coal

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Graduates 0 2 3 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 Percent of Graduates with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D Completions and Placement, Ten Year Trend 2002-2003 to 2011-2012 French and Italian Placement Category As of 4/2/2013 #12;12 Number of Grads with Placement Info French and Italian, PhD Graduates First First Placement Category by Broad Field Category 77% 14% 18% 60% 11% 68% 36% 18% 3% 13% 42% 11% 3% 4% 7

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

498

Record Alewife Harvest Hikes U.S. Great Lakes Commercial Fish Catch 16 Percent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School Set for Persian Gulf Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and Iran signed a draft agreement on 17 June 1975 in Kuwait to establish a Persian Gulf Regional Center to train captains, and mechanics. Training courses will be in English and Arabic. The Persian Gulf Regional

499

Direct Hydrogenation Magnesium Boride to Magnesium Borohydride: Demonstration of >11 Weight Percent Reversible Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect

We here for the first time demonstrate direct hydrogenation of magnesium boride, MgB2, to magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2 at 900 bar H2-pressures and 400°C. Upon 14.8wt% hydrogen release, the end-decomposition product of Mg(BH4)2 is MgB2, thus, this is a unique reversible path here obtaining >11wt% H2 which implies promise for a fully reversible hydrogen storage material.

Severa, Godwin; Ronnebro, Ewa; Jensen, Craig M.

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

500

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel price forecast Coal prices follow AEO 2007 referencecoal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z