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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

2

Long Wave Resonance in Tropical Oceans and Implications on Climate: the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A wavelet analysis is preferred to a complex EOF analysis to investigate the resonance of long waves in the tropical ocean. If the two methods are similar for ... typical frequency domain analyses, i.e. the power

Jean-Louis Pinault

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

On Rayleigh Waves Across the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles On Rayleigh Waves Across the Pacific Ocean K. E. Bullen University College, Auckland, N. Z. ON RAYLEIGH WAVES ACROSS THE PACIFIC OCEAN K. E. Bullen (Received 1939November 9) The Bering......

K. E. Bullen

1939-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Air Piston This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGreenOceanWaveEnergy&oldid769161...

5

Tabular icebergs in ocean waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in ocean waves. Two field seasons have been carried out by SPRI in cooperation with Norsk Polarinstitutt, and Foldvik et a/.11 have reported some measurements which took place during ... officers and the crew of the ship for their patience and help. We thank the Norsk Polarinstitutt (NP) and the Radio Echo Group at SPRI for loan of equipment, ...

Monica Kristensen; Vernon A. Squire; Stuart C. Moore

1982-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis is applied to a set of measured ocean wind waves data collected during the 1990 SWADE {Surface Wave Dynamics Experi- ment) program. The results reveal significantly new and previously unexplored Insights on wave

7

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and...

8

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms at station 139. Keywords: wave energy, survivability, breaking waves, joint distribution, OWEC INTRODUCTION

Haller, Merrick

9

Internal Waves in the Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Salinity temperature and pressure gradients all cause the density of sea water to vary with depth in the ocean and the density gradient affects the motion of the waters. A quantity N having the units radians per second can be defined using the density gradient the velocity of sound and the acceleration of gravity.

Carl Eckart

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ocean Wave Converters: State of the Art and Current Status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Wave Converters: State of the Art and Current Status M.S. Lagoun1,2 , A. Benalia2 and M in one of the following categories: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy of energy exists in oceans. Ocean energy exists in many forms. Among these forms, significant opportunities

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using...

12

Floating type ocean wave power station equipped with hydroelectric unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors have invented the unique ocean wave power station, which is composed of the floating ... wave pitch and the counter-rotating type wave power unit, its runners are submerged in the ... as requested, be...

Shun Okamoto; Toshiaki Kanemoto; Toshihiko Umekage

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Energy Absorption from Ocean Waves: A Free Ride for Cetaceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cetaceans are capable of absorbing energy from ocean waves for propulsion. The extent of...following seas. Consequences of wave-energy absorption for energetics of...following seas. Consequences of wave-energy absorption for energetics of...

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Dynamics of Rossby waves in an ocean with inhomogeneous currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model for a two-layer ocean is applied to consider, in terms of ... theoretically analysed, with the depth of the ocean's upper layer much smaller than that ... studied the wave packet's interaction with the current

I. I. Karpatovich; G. K. Korotaev

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Wave–wave interactions and deep ocean acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deep ocean acoustics in the absence of shipping and wildlife is driven by surface processes. Best understood is the signal generated by non-linear surface wave interactions the Longuet-Higgins mechanism which dominates from 0.1 to 10?Hz and may be significant for another octave. For this source the spectral matrix of pressure and vector velocity is derived for points near the bottom of a deep ocean resting on an elastic half-space. In the absence of a bottom the ratios of matrix elements are universal constants. Bottom effects vitiate the usual “standing wave approximation ” but a weaker form of the approximation is shown to hold and this is used for numerical calculations. In the weak standing wave approximation the ratios of matrix elements are independent of the surface wave spectrum but depend on frequency and the propagation environment. Data from the Hawaii-2 Observatory are in excellent accord with the theory for frequencies between 0.1 and 1?Hz less so at higher frequencies. Insensitivity of the spectral ratios to wind and presumably waves is indeed observed in the data.

Z. Guralnik; J. Bourdelais; X. Zabalgogeazcoa; W. E. Farrell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

On the use of computational models for wave climate assessment in support of the wave energy industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Effective, economic extraction of ocean wave energy requires an intimate under- standing of the ocean wave environment. Unfortunately, wave data is typically un- available in… (more)

Hiles, Clayton E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy flux is a fundamental quantity for understanding internal wave generation, propagation, and dissipation. In this paper, the estimation of internal wave energy fluxes ?u?p?? from ocean observations that may be sparse in either time or depth ...

Jonathan D. Nash; Matthew H. Alford; Eric Kunze

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Comparison and analysis of Envisat ASAR ocean wave spectra with buoy data in the northern Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The validation and assessment of Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) ocean wave spectra products are important to their application in ocean wave numerical predictions. Six-year ASAR wave ... co-loca...

Qifeng Ren ???; Jie Zhang ??…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Energy harvesting from transverse ocean waves by a piezoelectric plate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An ocean wave energy harvester from the transverse wave motion of water particles is developed by the piezoelectric effects. The harvester is made of two horizontal cantilever plates attached by piezoelectric patches and fixed on a vertical rectangular column. To describe the energy harvesting process, a mathematical model is developed to calculate the output charge and voltage from the piezoelectric patches according to the Airy linear wave theory and the elastic beam model. The influences on the root mean square (RMS) of the generated power from the piezoelectric patches, such as the ocean depth, the harvester location under the ocean surface, the length of the cantilevers, the wave height, and the ratio of wave length to ocean depth, are discussed. Results show that the RMS increases with the increase in the length of cantilevers and the wave height, and decrease in the distance of the ocean surface to the cantilevers and the ratio of the wave length to ocean depth. As a result, an optimum ocean depth is obtained to achieve a maximum RMS at different harvester locations under the ocean surface. A value of the power up to 30 W can be realized for a practical transverse wave with the values of the ocean depth, wave length, wave height and harvester location under the ocean surface to be 10.6 m, 21.2 m, 4 m, and ?2 m, respectively. This research develops a novel technique leading to efficient and practical energy harvesting from transverse waves by piezoelectric energy harvesters that could be easily fixed on an offshore platform.

X.D. Xie; Q. Wang; N. Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Scaled modeling and simulation of ocean wave linear generator buoy systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Accurate scaled modeling and simulation are critical to advancing ocean wave linear generator buoys. A 100th scaled model of ocean wave generator buoy systems is… (more)

Gore, Ganesh P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Karhunen–Loeve representation of stochastic ocean waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stochastic ocean wave elevations and wind speed profiles is finally addressed...and design of fixed and floating offshore wind turbines and for the forecasting...wind speeds and power output of wind farms. 2. Spectral decomposition of...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Transient Ocean Currents Induced by Wind and Growing Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical nonlinear model for wind- and wave-induced currents in a viscous, rotating ocean is developed. The analysis is based on a Lagrangian description of motion. The nonlinear drift problem is formulated such that the solution depends on ...

Jan Erik Weber; Arne Melsom

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Variability of Intraseasonal Kelvin Waves in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous observational work has demonstrated that the phase speed of oceanic equatorial Kelvin waves forced by the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) appears to vary substantially. Processes that are responsible for systematic changes in the phase ...

Toshiaki Shinoda; Paul E. Roundy; George N. Kiladis

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modelling the Effect of Ocean Waves on the Atmospheric and Ocean Boundary Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean waves, in addition to generating direct forces on fixed and floating offshore wind generator structures, also have significant indirect effects via their influence on the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers above and below the water surface. In the atmospheric boundary layer the waves act as roughness elements, influencing the turbulent flow and the vertical wind speed profile, and induce oscillatory motions in the airflow. Spray droplets from breaking wave crests enhance structure corrosion, and may lead to icing under low-temperature conditions. Below the water surface, the air-sea momentum flux and mechanical energy flux, mediated by the waves and wave-generated turbulence, affect the vertical profiles of ocean current, temperature, and salinity. Effects include modifying the structural forces and dynamics, and the movement and dispersion of marine organisms, pollutants, and air bubbles generated by breaking waves, with consequences for fouling, corrosion, and environmental impact. Measurement of relevant airflow and ocean dynamical variables is also challenging, as near the water surface it is often necessary to use instruments mounted on moving measurement platforms. Modelling such boundary-layer effects is a complex task, as a result of feedbacks between the airflow, wave field, current field, and turbulence in the atmosphere and the ocean. We present results from a coupled model study of the North Sea and Norwegian Sea area. We employ a mesoscale atmosphere model (WRF) and a spectral wave model (WAM), running simultaneously and coupled using the open-source coupler MCEL which can interpolate between different model grids and time steps. To investigate the ocean boundary layer, one-dimensional model experiments were performed for an idealized Ekman layer and for locations in the North Sea, Atlantic Ocean, and the northern Pacific, using a version of the GOTM turbulence model, modified to take wave dynamics into account. Results show how the wave field alters the ocean's aerodynamic roughness and the air–sea momentum flux, depending on the relation between the surface wind speed and the propagation speed of the wave crests (the wave age). These effects will feed back into the airflow, wind speed and turbulence profile in the boundary layer. The ocean dynamics experiments showed results which compare favourably with field observations from the LOTUS3 and PROVESS experiments in the north Atlantic and North Sea, and Ocean Weather Station Papa in the Pacific Ocean.

Alastair D. Jenkins; Mostafa Bakhoday Paskyabi; Ilker Fer; Alok Gupta; Muralidhar Adakudlu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Self-organized Criticality Model for Ocean Internal Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a simple spring-block model for ocean internal waves based on the self-organized criticality (SOC). The oscillations of the water blocks in the model display power-law behavior with an exponent of –2 in the frequency domain, which is similar to the current and sea water temperature spectra in the actual ocean and the universal Garrett and Munk deep ocean internal wave model [Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 2 (1972) 225; J. Geophys. Res. 80 (1975) 291]. The influence of the ratio of the driving force to the spring coefficient to SOC behaviors in the model is also discussed.

Wang Gang; Lin Min; Qiao Fang-Li; Hou Yi-Jun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Beauty waves: an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we present a method for computing an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves. Wave forms are loosely based on procedural wave models and are designed to emulate those found in both art and nature. The wave forms...

Faulkner, Jay Allen

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Estimating the potential of ocean wave power resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The realistic assessment of an ocean wave energy resource that can be converted to an electrical power at various offshore sites depends upon many factors, and these include estimating the resource recognizing the random nature of the site-specific wave field, and optimizing the power conversion from particular wave energy conversion devices. In order to better account for the uncertainty in wave power resource estimates, conditional probability distribution functions of wave power in a given sea-state are derived. Theoretical expressions for the deep and shallow water limits are derived and the role of spectral width is studied. The theoretical model estimates were compared with the statistics obtained from the wave-by-wave analysis of JONSWAP based ocean wave time-series. It was shown that the narrow-band approximation is appropriate when the variability due to wave period is negligible. The application of the short-term models in evaluating the long-term wave power resource at a site was illustrated using wave data measured off the California coast. The final example illustrates the procedure for incorporating the local wave data and the sea-state model together with a wave energy device to obtain an estimate of the potential wave energy that could be converted into a usable energy resource.

Amir H. Izadparast; John M. Niedzwecki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ocean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Project 6: Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the storm generates 30 min period motion through interactions in the mixed layer. What angle from. The upper layer density is 1028 kg/m3, and the density is 1029 kg/m3 in the lower layer. a) A wind event generates an upwelling internal wave at 30N with a positive deviation in interface height of size 30m. What

Thompson, LuAnne

29

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

30

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes the analysis and results of a rigorous assessment of the United States ocean wave energy resource.

31

Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System Mark, alternative energy system to convert the circular motion of ocean waves as they propagate through the sea and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave

Wood, Stephen L.

32

Oceanic Internal-Wave Field: Theory of Scale-Invariant Spectra YURI V. LVOV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a nearly universal internal-wave energy spectrum in the ocean, first described by Garrett and Munk (Garrett framework that allows a detailed analysis of power-law spectra of internal waves in the ocean. WeOceanic Internal-Wave Field: Theory of Scale-Invariant Spectra YURI V. LVOV Rensselaer Polytechnic

Tabak, Esteban G.

33

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Air Piston | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Piston Piston < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Wave Air Piston.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Ocean Wave Energy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The OWAP captures power by continually raising or lowering a float which in turn raises or lowers one side of a lever arm about a stationary pivot point This therby raises or lowers a piston which is attached to the opposite side of the lever arm through a cylinder which in turn causes large volumes of air to move This air is funneled through drive turbines to produce power Mooring Configuration Monopile or platfrom

34

Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean JONATHAN D. NASH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean JONATHAN D. NASH College of Oceanic FE u p cgE is a fundamental quan- tity in internal wave energetics to identify energy sources, wave propagation, and energy sinks. Internal wave radiation transports energy from the boundaries

Kurapov, Alexander

35

Open Ocean Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Open Ocean Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site Overseeing Organization University of New Hampshire Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Offshore Berth Depth(m) 52.0 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The Offshore Mooring System is placed in 52m water depth with a subsurface attachment grid at 20m. The entire mooring system covers 36 acres of bottom. There are four 'bays' into which devices can be attached. Each bay is approximately 130m on a side. There is a database with ~10 years of wave data and other environmental parameters available. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes

36

Ocean Wave Energy Company OWECO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Company OWECO Energy Company OWECO Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Wave Energy Company (OWECO) Place Bristol, Rhode Island Sector Ocean Product Wave energy device developer. The company has patented the OWEC Ocean Wave Energy Converter®., a device consisting of a submerged array, suspended at depths permitting full reciprocation of buoys and respective driveshafts. Coordinates 42.55678°, -88.050449° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.55678,"lon":-88.050449,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

A power analysis and data acquisition system for ocean wave energy device testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the testing of ocean wave energy devices, the demand for a portable and robust data acquisition and electrical loading system has become apparent. This paper investigates the development of a 30 kW inclusive system combining loading capabilities, real-time power analysis, and data acquisition for the testing of deployed ocean wave energy devices. Hardware results for ocean testing are included.

Ean Amon; Ted K.A. Brekken; Annette von Jouanne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain Paper number: 197  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain Paper number: 197 #12;Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain #12;Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth

Grilli, Stéphan T.

39

Improving the assessment of wave energy resources by means of coupled wave-ocean numerical modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sea waves energy represents a renewable and sustainable energy resource, that nevertheless needs to be further investigated to make it more cost-effective and economically appealing. A key step in the process of Wave Energy Converters (WEC) deployment is the energy resource assessment at a sea site either measured or obtained through numerical model analysis. In these kind of studies, some approximations are often introduced, especially in the early stages of the process, viz. waves are assumed propagating in deep waters without underneath ocean currents. These aspects are discussed and evaluated in the Adriatic Sea and its northern part (Gulf of Venice) using locally observed and modeled wave data. In particular, to account for a “state of the art” treatment of the Wave–Current Interaction (WCI) we have implemented the Simulating \\{WAves\\} Nearshore (SWAN) model and the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), fully coupled within the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) system. COAWST has been applied to a computational grid covering the whole Adriatic Sea and off-line nested to a high-resolution grid in the Gulf of Venice. A 15-year long wave data set collected at the oceanographic tower “Acqua Alta”, located approximately 15 km off the Venice coast, has also been analyzed with the dual purpose of providing a reference to the model estimates and to locally assess the wave energy resource. By using COAWST, we have quantified for the first time to our best knowledge the importance of the WCI effect on wave power estimation. This can vary up to 30% neglecting the current effect. Results also suggest the Gulf of Venice as a suitable testing site for WECs, since it is characterized by periods of calm (optimal for safe installation and maintenance) alternating with severe storms, whose wave energy potentials are comparable to those ordinarily encountered in the energy production sites.

Francesco Barbariol; Alvise Benetazzo; Sandro Carniel; Mauro Sclavo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

On the application of circular–cylindrical waves to ocean wave power absorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study derives mathematical forms for the waves radiated from a heaving, surging and swaying point source on the surface of a three dimensional ocean. The interactions between a monochromatic plane wave and monochromatic circular–cylindrical radiated waves are examined, and solutions to the time averaged power are calculated. These calculations confirm pre-existing theoretical maximum absorption lengths for both a heaving and surging point source. The derivations also lead to the definition of the amplitude, phase and form of the radiated waves required to achieve these maximums. Two experimental case studies match measured radiated wave with circular waves. These matches demonstrate a correlation between the body motions and the dominant form of radiated waves as well as higher frequency waves. The study develops three general guidelines for the design of efficient point absorber wave energy converters (PAWECs). Optimum power absorption occurs when the PAWEC radiates theoretical heave and surge waves of the appropriate amplitude and phase. Theoretical sway type waves should be minimized as these radiate energy and do not interact with the incident wave. Similarly, the radiation of higher harmonic waves should also be minimized for the same reasons.

Matthew Wypych; Lan Le-Ngoc; Keith Alexander; Alister Gardner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Compressional and shear wave anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere - the Ngendei seismic refraction experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Sereno T. J. , Orcutt J. A., 1985. The synthesis of realistic oceanic P n wave trains, J. geophys. Res., 90, 12755-12776. Shearer P. , Orcutt J., 1985. Anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere - theory and observations from the Ngendei seismic......

P. M. Shearer; J. A. Orcutt

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Numerical and observational estimates of Indian Ocean Kelvin wave intrusion into Lombok Strait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical and observational estimates of Indian Ocean Kelvin wave intrusion into Lombok Strait to investigate Indian Ocean Kelvin waves (IOKWs), specifically their propagation and energy intrusion into Lombok Lombok Strait. This suggests that Lombok Strait acts as a significant transition point for Kelvin wave

43

The effect of ocean waves on offshore wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Ocean has a varying surface roughness where the roughness length is determined by the characteristics of the waves. In this paper, a method is established where the roughness length of the ocean is calculated from the wind speed and the fetch length. The fetch length depends on the wind direction and a case study is performed for a wind turbine exposed to wind blowing in two opposite directions: from the shore and the sea. For each case, the vertical wind speed distribution is calculated in order to study the influence that the direction of the wind has on the annual energy production. The potential for using a site-specific offshore turbine design, dependent on the prevailing wind direction, is also explored.

T. Thorsen; H. Naeser

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

SAR Imaging of Ocean Waves in the Presence of Variable Currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review of the hydrodynamic and electromagnetic processes contributing to radar imaging of ocean waves in the presence of variable currents and nonlinear forcing (input from the wind...

Gaspar R. Valenzuela

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Deep Signatures of Southern Tropical Indian Ocean Annual Rossby Waves* GREGORY C. JOHNSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep Signatures of Southern Tropical Indian Ocean Annual Rossby Waves* GREGORY C. JOHNSON NOAA Environmental Laboratory Contribution Number 3671. Corresponding author address: Gregory C. Johnson, NOAA

Johnson, Gregory C.

46

Overturning circulation driven by breaking internal waves in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A global estimate of the water-mass transformation by internal wave-driven mixing in the deep ocean is presented. The estimate is based on the energy conversion from tidal and geostrophic motions into internal waves combined ...

Nikurashin, Maxim

47

Experimental Testing and Model Validation for Ocean Wave Energy Harvesting Buoys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for large scale grid power applications, but rather for relatively low-power ocean sensor and communicationsExperimental Testing and Model Validation for Ocean Wave Energy Harvesting Buoys Douglas A. Gemme1 Island Department of Ocean Engineering Narragansett, RI 02882, USA Abstract-- Methodology and results

Grilli, Stéphan T.

48

A Spar Buoy for High-Frequency Wave Measurements and Detection of Wave Breaking in the Open Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waves and wave breaking play a significant role in the air–sea exchanges of momentum, sea spray aerosols, and trace gases such as CO2, but few direct measurements of wave breaking have been obtained in the open ocean (far from the coast). This ...

Robin W. Pascal; Margaret J. Yelland; Meric A. Srokosz; Bengamin I. Moat; Edward M. Waugh; Daniel H. Comben; Alex G. Cansdale; Mark C. Hartman; David G. H. Coles; Ping Chang Hsueh; Timothy G. Leighton

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power

50

Study of directional ocean wavefield evolution and rogue wave occurrence using large-scale phase-resolved nonlinear simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is challenging to obtain accurate predictions of ocean surface wavefield evolutions due to several complex dynamic processes involved, including nonlinear wave interaction, wave breaking and wind forcing, and also wave ...

Xiao, Wenting, 1982-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Bispectral Analysis of Energy Transfer within the Two-Dimensional Oceanic Internal Wave Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bispectral analysis of the numerically reproduced spectral responses of the two-dimensional oceanic internal wave field to the incidence of the low-mode semidiurnal internal tide is performed. At latitudes just equatorward of 30°, the low-mode ...

Naoki Furuichi; Toshiyuki Hibiya; Yoshihiro Niwa

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Current-Induced Modulation of the Ocean Wave Spectrum and the Role of Nonlinear Energy Transfer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Numerical simulations were performed to investigate current-induced modulation of the spectral and statistical properties of ocean waves advected by idealized and realistic current fields. In particular, the role of nonlinear energy transfer ...

Hitoshi Tamura; Takuji Waseda; Yasumasa Miyazawa; Kosei Komatsu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Impact of Finite-Amplitude Bottom Topography on Internal Wave Generation in the Southern Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct observations in the Southern Ocean report enhanced internal wave activity and turbulence in a kilometer-thick layer above rough bottom topography collocated with the deep-reaching fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Linear theory, ...

Maxim Nikurashin; Raffaele Ferrari; Nicolas Grisouard; Kurt Polzin

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Global energy conversion rate from geostrophic flows into internal lee waves in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A global estimate of the energy conversion rate from geostrophic flows into internal lee waves in the ocean is presented. The estimate is based on a linear theory applied to bottom topography at O(1–10) km scales obtained ...

Nikurashin, Maxim

55

Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical Intra-oceanic Arc1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical at Dallas, Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083-0688, USA A B S T R A C T Major element compositions of glass of these lavas reflects accumulation of plagioclase. Glass inclusions also show the common occurrence of felsic

Stern, Robert J.

56

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

wave has traveled seven wavelengths, while the wave group as a whole and its associated energy content have advanced only half that distance. ......

57

Detection of microseismic compressional (P) body waves aided by numerical modeling of oceanic noise sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or where ocean waves propagating as swell meet another swell or wind sea. We then emphasize two particularly strong storms to describe how they generate noise sources in their wake. We also use these two by earthquakes), the sources of the microseismic wave field are more widely distributed in space and time

Stutzmann, Eléonore

58

Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion Ralf Starzmann Fluid the water wave motion into a bi-directional air flow, which in turn drives an air turbine. The Wells turbine the environmental impact of an in situ Wells turbine in more detail requires an in depth understanding

Frandsen, Jannette B.

59

Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans Naoki 9 July 2008; published 30 September 2008. [1] The distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy-scaled kinetic energy are all consistent with the available observations in the regions of significant wind

Miami, University of

60

Measuring ocean waves from space; Proceedings of the Symposium, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD, Apr. 15-17, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers are presented on ocean-wave prediction; the quasi-universal form of the spectra of wind-generated gravity waves at different stages of their development; the limitations of the spectral measurements and observations of the group structure of surface waves; the effect of swell on the growth of wind wave; operational wave forecasting; ocean-wave models, and seakeeping using directional wave spectra. Consideration is given to microwave measurements of the ocean-wave directional spectra; SIR research; estimating wave energy spectra from SAR imagery, with the radar ocean-wave spectrometer, and SIR-B; the wave-measurement capabilities of the surface contour radar and the airborne oceanographic lidar; and SIR-B ocean-wave enhancement with fast-Fourier transform techniques. Topics discussed include wave-current interaction; the design and applicability of Spectrasat; the need for a global wave monitoring system; the age and source of ocean swell observed in Hurricane Josephine; and the use of satellite technology for insulin treatment.

Beal, R.C.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modelling rogue waves through exact dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ocean rogue wave, one of the mysteries of nature, has not yet been understood or modelled satisfactorily, in spite of being in the intense lime-light in recent years and the concept spreadin fast to other disciplines. Rogue waves are extraordinarily high and steep surface waves. However, most of their theoretical models and experimental observations, excluding a few are one-dimensional, admitting limited high intensity and steepness. We propose here a novel two-dimensional integrable nonlinear Schroedinger equation allowing an exact lump-soliton with special asymmetry and directional preference. The soliton can appear on surface waves making a hole just before surging up high, with adjustable height and steepness and disappear again followed by the hole. The dynamics, speed and the duration of the soliton is controlled by ocean currents. These desirable properties make our exact model promising for describing deep sea large rogue waves.

Kundu, Anjan; Naskar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The wave/ice interaction can potentially lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice is explicitly modeled by a DEM method, where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite size. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile & compressive forces and moments. Fracturing can be naturally represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean wave, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and micro-fractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds,, increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size decreases with increasing amplitude.

Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

63

Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 January 27, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology Hoyt Battey Water Power Market Acceleration and Deployment Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program

64

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TECHNICAL REPORT TECHNICAL REPORT Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource EPRI Project Manager P. Jacobson 3420 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304-1338 USA PO Box 10412 Palo Alto, CA 94303-0813 USA 800.313.3774 650.855.2121 askepri@epri.com 1024637 www.epri.com Final Report, December 2011 Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS DOCUMENT WAS PREPARED BY THE ORGANIZATION(S) NAMED BELOW AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED OR COSPONSORED BY THE ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC. (EPRI).

65

Generation of internal waves in the deep ocean J. Nycander  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

topography. The geographical distribution of the energy flux from tides to internal waves is determined essential to determine the energy flux from tides to internal waves. [3] The total dissipation of the M2 tide, which accounts for about two thirds of the energy of all tidal components combined, is known

Nycander, Jonas

66

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

have recovered by 5 cm when DSPR 30, but only by 1-2 cm when DSPR 10. Source: Smith et al. (2007). ... 2-14 Figure 2-9 Wave height reduction for a 90%...

67

Acoustic-gravity waves in ocean and atmosphere generated by an underwater source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air-water interface becomes anomalously transparent and the power flux in the wave transmitted into the air increases dramatically when a compact sound source in water approaches the interface within a fraction of wavelength [O.A. Godin Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 164301 (2006)]. The anomalous transparency of the ocean-atmosphere interface has important implications for detection of underwater explosions and monitoring of compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. At wave frequencies below 0.1 Hz it becomes necessary to take gravity into account. Then fluid buoyancy and compressibility simultaneously serve as restoring forces and mechanical perturbations in the water and in the air propagate as acoustic-gravity waves (AGW). It was previously shown [I. Fuks and O.A. Godin Proc. OCEANS'11 MTS/IEEE Kona HI Sept. 2011] that in the case of a shallow source in an ocean of an infinite depth a sharp peak in the power flux into air appears at frequencies close to a cutoff frequency of about 4mHz of a surfaceacoustic-gravity wave. In this paper we extend these results to the ocean of a finite depth where the AGWs interact with an elastic bottom.

Iosif Fuks; Oleg A. Godin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Open Ocean Trial of Controlled Upwelling Using Wave Pump Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1976, John D. Isaacs proposed to use wave energy to invert the density structure of the ocean and pump deep, nutrient-rich water into the sunlit surface layers. The basic principle is simple: a length of tubing attached to a surface buoy at ...

Angelicque White; Karin Björkman; Eric Grabowski; Ricardo Letelier; Steve Poulos; Blake Watkins; David Karl

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Modification of the Physics and Numerics in a Third-Generation Ocean Wave Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ocean wave model WAM was recently upgraded to improve the coupling between the sea state and the air flow and, in particular, enhance the growth of young wind sea over that of old wind sea. Prior to this change, numerous validations of the ...

Leslie C. Bender

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Bubble entrainment by breaking waves and their influence on optical scattering in the upper ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bubble entrainment by breaking waves and their influence on optical scattering in the upper ocean's surface inject bubbles and turbulence into the water column. During periods of rough weather the scales and the turbulent transport of bubbles to depth. Depending on their concentrations and size distribution

Stramski, Dariusz

71

Overview of Ocean Wave and Tidal Energy Lingchuan Mei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources such as solar and wind energy, waves and tides have the advantages of having much higher power stronger energy conversion devices lower in capital cost than for other renewable technologies and creating more job opportunities. For these major benefits the marine energy can provide us with, a great

Lavaei, Javad

72

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Power Spar Buoy Engine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spar Buoy Engine Spar Buoy Engine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Wave Power Spar Buoy Engine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Functional Design Engineering Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description A long period spar buoy supports a subsurface flow augmentor The augmentor directs water from the wave s submarine flow field to a free prime mover piston The prime mover is decoupled from the machine s PTO during times in the wave s cycle when there is little power available for conversion Wave energy is stored in the device until the is enough flow magnetude that power take off can efficiently take place Power can be taken off as high pressure water crankshaft torque or directly as DC electricity

73

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

450 450 Varnish cache server Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices.

74

Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences in the bottom bound- ary layer. In the nonlinear internal waves that were observed, the kinetic energy. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear

Kurapov, Alexander

75

100-Year Return Value Estimates for Ocean Wind Speed and Significant Wave Height from the ERA-40 Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and time variability of significant wave height and wind speed on the prediction of their extreme values of this dataset makes it ideal for the study of extreme wind and wave phenomena over the whole globe. Initial100-Year Return Value Estimates for Ocean Wind Speed and Significant Wave Height from the ERA-40

Haak, Hein

76

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Energy Converter OWEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Converter OWEC Converter OWEC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Wave Energy Converter OWEC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Wave Energy Company Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description Neutrally suspended and positively buoyant modules are quick connected into open frame networks Submerged portions are stabilized by variable ballast buoyancy chambers and optional damper sheets situated at a relatively calm depth Frame members carry shaft components of linear rotary converters associated with large point absorber buoys Both directions of reciprocal wave motion i e vertical and horizontal motion directly drive components of counter rotating electrical generators Compared to standard generators wherein one is associated with upstroke and another of smaller proportion with downstroke this configuration increases relative speed with fewer parts Electromechanical loads are real time adjustable with respect to wave sensor web resulting in optimal energy conversion from near fully submerged wave following buoys Electrical conductors are series connected and further quick connected with those of other modules via upper frame members Through implementation of rep

77

Direct Simulations of Wind-Driven Breaking Ocean Waves with Data Assimilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A formulation is developed to assimilate ocean-wave data into the Numerical Flow Analysis (NFA) code. NFA is a Cartesian-based implicit Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) code with Volume of Fluid (VOF) interface capturing. The sequential assimilation of data into NFA permits detailed analysis of ocean-wave physics with higher bandwidths than is possible using either other formulations, such as High-Order Spectral (HOS) methods, or field measurements. A framework is provided for assimilating the wavy and vortical portions of the flow. Nudging is used to assimilate wave data at low wavenumbers, and the wave data at high wavenumbers form naturally through nonlinear interactions, wave breaking, and wind forcing. Similarly, the vertical profiles of the mean vortical flow in the wind and the wind drift are nudged, and the turbulent fluctuations are allowed to form naturally. As a demonstration, the results of a HOS of a JONSWAP wave spectrum are assimilated to study short-crested seas in equilibrium with the wind. Log pr...

Dommermuth, Douglas G; Tran, Vu H; Valenciano, Miguel A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

MHK Projects/Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4501,"lon":-71.4495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

79

Practical limits to the power that can be captured from ocean waves by oscillating bodies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The maximum average power that can be captured from ocean waves by an idealised and unconstrained oscillating body depends on two hydrodynamic properties: the wave radiation pattern and the radiation resistance (also called added damping or wave damping coefficient). These properties depend on the body geometry and the mode of oscillation. For such unconstrained motion the limits of absorbed power are well described. Power bounds due to physical restrictions like limited volume stroke or machinery stroke length has also received some attention, but has not been sufficiently explored. This paper looks at such physical bounds to the achievable absorbed power. It is done by physical reasoning leading to analytical expressions for the upper bounds, treating heave, surge and pitch motions separately. It is shown how size, oscillation mode and volume stroke of the oscillating body inherently influence the absorption ability. Furthermore, implications for the practical and economical design of wave energy are identified and discussed.

Jørgen Hals Todalshaug

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ocean Wave Energy Systems Design: Conceptual Design Methodology for the Operational Matching of the Wells Air Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper has set out a conceptual design methodology that was employed in the design of a Wells air turbine for OWC ocean wave energy plants. In particular, the ... sizing, given the range and frequency of power

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Roles of Equatorial Waves and Western Boundary Reflection in the Seasonal Circulation of the Equatorial Indian Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roles of Equatorial Waves and Western Boundary Reflection in the Seasonal Circulation of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado (Manuscript received 17 May 2005, in final form 26 October 2005) ABSTRACT An ocean general circulation model (OGCM) is used to study the roles of equatorial waves and western

Han, Weiqing

82

Barotropic Rossby Waves Radiating from Tropical Instability Waves in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropical instability waves are triggered by instabilities of the equatorial current systems, and their sea level signal, with peak amplitude near 5°N, is one of the most prominent features of the dynamic topography of the tropics. Cross-spectral ...

J. Thomas Farrar

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Analysis of ocean waves and wave forces by a filtering technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

l i b r a r y A &M COLLEGE OF TEXAS AH ALTS 2S CP XIAN WAVES AND WAVE FORCES BY A FILTERING TECHNIQUE A Dis0?rt*tlon li b r a a y j a t r t 6ooipy?? tj ?p j???? t?? ?p????? ?t?ii ??tairt? p? ?prra???? ??t? p? ??oti?r??? ?t? ???? LIBRARY... fulfillment of the requires*nta far the degree of ?????? ?? ?????????? May 1955 ?6??? ???????? ??????6? ????????????? ???6????6??? A&MCO LLEG a ?? ?? l F ?? 6?????????????? ??? tb??pi ?it???b??? t???p??????j ??? b?j???aj? ???o p? ?ip??jjpij ?? ?? ??a...

Blumberg, Randolph

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

Development of two-variable maximum power point tracking control for ocean wave energy converters utilizing a power analysis and data acquisition system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ocean wave energy shows great potential as a developing form of renewable energy. However, challenges arise in maturing this technology to achieve cost-effective energy conversion.… (more)

Amon, Ean A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents met - ocean data and wave energy characteristics at three U.S. wave energy converter (WEC) test and potential deployment sites . Its purpose is to enable the compari son of wave resource characteristics among sites as well as the select io n of test sites that are most suitable for a developer's device and that best meet their testing needs and objectives . It also provides essential inputs for the design of WEC test devices and planning WEC tests, including the planning of deployment and op eration s and maintenance. For each site, this report catalogues wave statistics recommended in the (draft) International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Specification (IEC 62600 - 101 TS) on Wave Energy Characterization, as well as the frequency of oc currence of weather windows and extreme sea states, and statistics on wind and ocean currents. It also provides useful information on test site infrastructure and services .

Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Modelling rogue waves through exact dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents Anjan Kundu Abhik Mukherjee Tapan...soliton under the influence of an ocean current appears and disappears preceded...include higher order dispersion or ocean currents, which are suspected to have...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Poster presented at the OCEANS'11 Conference, September, 2011 Seeking Optimal Geometry of a Heaving Body for Improved Wave Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Poster presented at the OCEANS'11 Conference, September, 2011 Seeking Optimal Geometry of a Heaving Body for Improved Wave Power Absorption Efficiency Rachael Hager, Nelson Fernandez and Michelle H power absorption efficiency with various shaped bodies. The goal is to optimize the geometry of a two

88

Performance bounds on matched-field methods for source localization and estimation of ocean environmental parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matched-field methods concern estimation of source location and/or ocean environmental parameters by exploiting full wave modeling of acoustic waveguide propagation. Typical estimation performance demonstrates two fundamental ...

Xu, Wen, 1967-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Shelf edge reflection of atmospherically generated long ocean waves along the central U.S. East Coast  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes an investigation of unusual large-amplitude high­frequency sea level events (?40–60 cm) observed during the period 2006–2012 along the central U.S. East Coast. These events occurred 2–3 h after offshore propagating atmospheric pressure disturbances crossed the coastline. The large amplitudes of the oscillations may be explained by Proudman resonance, as the average speed of the atmospheric pressure disturbances, estimated to be between 16 and 25 m/s, was similar to the shallow-water wave speed over the shelf, ?15–20 m/s. The observed lag of 2–3 h of the events can be explained by shoreward-propagating free waves generated as the atmospheric-forced waves crossed the shelf edge. The estimated pathways of the forced and reflected free ocean waves seem to have been coherent and in good agreement with the lag observed at tide gauge stations.

S. Pasquet; I. Vilibi?

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Wind and Wave Extremes over the World Oceans From Very Large Forecast Ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global return value estimates of significant wave height and 10-m neutral wind speed are estimated from very large aggregations of archived ECMWF ensemble forecasts at +240-h lead time from the period 2003-2012. The upper percentiles are found to match ENVISAT wind speed better than ERA-Interim (ERA-I), which tends to be biased low. The return estimates are significantly higher for both wind speed and wave height in the extratropics and the subtropics than what is found from ERA-I, but lower than what is reported by Caires and Sterl (2005) and Vinoth and Young (2011). The highest discrepancies between ERA-I and ENS240 are found in the hurricane-prone areas, suggesting that the ensemble comes closer than ERA-I in capturing the intensity of tropical cyclones. The width of the confidence intervals are typically reduced by 70% due to the size of the data sets. Finally, non-parametric estimates of return values were computed from the tail of the distribution. These direct return estimates compare very well with Ge...

Breivik, Øyvind; Abdalla, Saleh; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ocean Energy Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Solar Wind Homes & Buildings Industry Vehicles & Fuels...

92

On currents, internal and inertial waves in a stratified ocean due to variable winds. Part 1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of a continuously stratified viscous ocean to a variable wind air pressure field has been studied during recent years by means of analytical methods. This requires the assumption of constant eddy ...

Prof. Dr. W. Krauss

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

On currents, internal and inertial waves in a stratified ocean due to variable winds. Part 2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of a continuously stratified viscous ocean to a variable wind and air pressure field has been studied during recent years by means of analytical methods. This requires the assumption of consntant ...

Prof. Dr. W. Krauss

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Modeling the Interaction between the Atmospheric and Oceanic Boundary Layers, Including a Surface Wave Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction between the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers is simulated by solving a closed system of equations including equations of motion, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), turbulent exchange coefficient (TEC), expressions for air and ...

Le Ngoc Ly

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

96

Novel control of a permanent magnet linear generator for ocean wave energy applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Wave energy conversion devices are a rapidly growing interest worldwide for the potential to harness a sustainable and renewable energy source. Due to the oscillatory… (more)

VanderMeulen, Aaron H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Observed Variability of Ocean Wave Stokes Drift, and the Eulerian Response to Passing Groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­current interactions are also considered important in generating and maintaining Langmuir circulation (LC), a prominent 2005, in final form 13 September 2005) ABSTRACT Waves and currents interact via exchanges of mass with current theory. 1. Introduction Surface waves are of central importance in general to air­sea interactions

Smith, Jerome A.

98

Waves and the equilibrium range at Ocean Weather Station P J. Thomson,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy spectra. Observations are consistent with a local balance between wind input and breaking is extended to a wider range of conditions using observations of wave energy spectra and wind speed during a 2 friction velocity u� (and thus wind stress) directly controls wave energy spectra levels at high fre

99

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration�¢����s (NOAA�¢����s) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables wave diffraction to substantially reestablish wave power densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available wave energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge, based on accumulating unit circle wave power densities, is estimated to be 2,640 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 590 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 240 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 80 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 1570 TWh/yr for Alaska, 130 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 30 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico. The total recoverable wave energy resource, as constrained by an array capacity packing density of 15 megawatts per kilometer of coastline, with a 100-fold operating range between threshold and maximum operating conditions in terms of input wave power density available to such arrays, yields a total recoverable resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge of 1,170 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 250 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 160 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 60 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 620 TWh/yr for Alaska, 80 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 20 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico.

Paul T. Jacobson; George Hagerman; George Scott

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Challenges in Ocean Energy Utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean is a reservoir of energy. It is ... . Development of suitable cost effective technologies for power generation from different forms of ocean energy (like wave energy, tidal energy, Ocean Thermal Energy Conv...

S. Neelamani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Extreme wave height estimation for ocean engineering applications in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

updated estimates of the 100-year extreme wave conditions for the entire Gulf of Mexico using a more comprehensive approach. First, the applicability of standard parametric wind models was examined and appropriate adjustments to the Rankine vortex model...

Jeong, Chan Kwon

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

102

Chapter 16 - Ocean Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Ocean thermal energy converters (OTECs) took advantage of the ocean acting as an immense collector and storer of solar radiation, thus delivering a steady flow of low-grade thermal energy. The ocean plays a similar role in relation to the wind energy, which is transformed into waves far steadier than the air currents that created them. Nevertheless, waves are neither steady nor concentrated enough to constitute a highly attractive energy source notwithstanding their large total power. There is little net horizontal motion of water in a surface ocean wave. A floating object drifts in the direction of the wave with about 1% of the wave velocity. A given elementary cell of water will move in a vertical circle, surging forward near the crest of the wave but receding by an almost equal amount at the trough. Any system in which the wave velocity depends on wavelength is called dispersive; hence the deep ocean is dispersive.

Aldo Vieira da Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Earth's hum: the excitation of Earth normal modes by ocean waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......air to the density of water. I will assume (at...suggest the forcing of atmospheric microbaroms (the equivalent...waves follow the deep water dispersion curve. At...turbulence an inefficient generator of sound at low Mach...suggests low Mach number atmospheric turbulence on the Earth......

Spahr C. Webb

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Internal?wave effects on 1000?km oceanic acoustic pulse propagation: Simulation and comparison with experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recent 1000?km acoustic pulse transmission experiment in the Pacific revealed unexpected fluctuations on received wavefronts including a dominant rapid variation called the broadband fluctuation with time scales less than 10 minutes and spatial scales of less than 60 m; a distinct breakdown of the geometrical optics wavefront pattern and broadening of the wavefront near the transmission finalé; and a coherent wavefront motion with a timescale near the semi?diurnal tidal period. Parabolic?equation numerical simulations have been carried out which utilize environmental data and which take into account internal?wave?induced sound?speed perturbations obeying the Garrett–Munk (GM) spectral model. It is shown that the effects of internal waves can account for the broadband fluctuations the breakdown of the geometrical opticspattern and the wavefront broadening. The sensitivity of these fluctuations to internal?wave energy and modal content is examined. The spectral energy in the GM model at tidal periods proves insufficient to explain the tidal period coherent fluctuations strongly suggesting the influence of an internal tide during the experiment. The simulations allow the estimation of the average travel?time bias caused by internal waves. The simulation results for travel?time wander and bias are compared with analytic calculations based on the path?integral technique.

John A. Colosi; Stanley M. Flatté; Charles Bracher

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Wind and Wave Extremes over the World Oceans from Very Large Ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global return values of marine wind speed and significant wave height are estimated from very large aggregates of archived ensemble forecasts at +240-h lead time. Long lead time ensures that the forecasts represent independent draws from the model climate. Compared with ERA-Interim, a reanalysis, the ensemble yields higher return estimates for both wind speed and significant wave height. Confidence intervals are much tighter due to the large size of the dataset. The period (9 yrs) is short enough to be considered stationary even with climate change. Furthermore, the ensemble is large enough for non-parametric 100-yr return estimates to be made from order statistics. These direct return estimates compare well with extreme value estimates outside areas with tropical cyclones. Like any method employing modeled fields, it is sensitive to tail biases in the numerical model, but we find that the biases are moderate outside areas with tropical cyclones.

Breivik, Øyvind; Abdalla, Saleh; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Janssen, Peter A E M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The oceanic excitation hypothesis for the continuous oscillations of the Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15. Top: Integrated ocean-wave power (square of wave height)Bottom: The integrated ocean-wave power for the whole region

Tanimoto, T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Volume Scattering of Acoustic Waves in the N. E. Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two types of scattering strength measurements have been obtained in the N. E. Pacific Ocean in deep water approximately 100 NM west of the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The first type is obtained using surface venting explosive charges with the listening hydrophone suspended near the surface (i.e. depth <50 ft) to measure the backscattered acoustic energy. Levels of the intensity time curves so observed yield the scattering strength integrated to the depth corresponding to the time coordinate on the decay curve i.e. ? z?d z? O m r ?(z)?dz while the decay rates yield information on the scattering distribution in the medium. The second type of scattering measurement obtained is the scattering strength profile. Such profiles are obtained using near monostatic fired charge and receiver placed at various depths. Observation of the close?in scattered returns permits adequate resolution to plot scattering profiles through most layers [i.e. mv (z) z=0+d ]. Both sets of measurements show the diurnal migration of the scattering layers as well as the frequency characteristics. However the technique of measuring the scattering strength profile is the more direct and yields a better picture of layer distributions and the depth dependence of the scattering spectra.

J. A. Scrimger; R. G. Turner

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Kelvin Waves around Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Southern Ocean allows circumpolar structure and the Antarctic coastline plays a role as a waveguide for oceanic Kelvin waves. Under the cyclic conditions, the horizontal wavenumbers and frequencies for circumpolarly propagating waves are ...

Kazuya Kusahara; Kay I. Ohshima

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Text Version Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even though the sun affects all ocean activity, the gravitational pull of the moon primarily drives tides, and wind powers ocean waves. Learn more about: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Addthis Related Articles Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

110

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the first time, the global ocean 80 m wind power and tofirst time, wind power at 80 m (typical wind turbine hub height) above the global ocean

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Liu et aL.September 2012 373 Simulation of ocean ReSponSeS to an idealized  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, inundation, significant wave heights and ocean currents in shallow coastal areas as a result of wave, significant wave height and ocean currents. Only in a TC-wave- ocean three-way coupled system, air, inundation, currents and significant wave height. Keywords: coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system

Liu, Paul

112

JOURNAL OF WATERWAY, PORT, COASTAL, AND OCEAN ENGINEERING / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2000 / 39 BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF WAVE TRANSFORMATION,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF WATERWAY, PORT, COASTAL, AND OCEAN ENGINEERING / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2000 / 39 BOUSSINESQ and testing of two sets of Boussinesq-type equations to include surf zone phenomena. Part I is restricted to 1. The model uses two main extensions to the Boussinesq equations: a momentum-conserving eddy viscosity

Kirby, James T.

113

48 / JOURNAL OF WATERWAY, PORT, COASTAL, AND OCEAN ENGINEERING / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2000 BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF WAVE TRANSFORMATION,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 / JOURNAL OF WATERWAY, PORT, COASTAL, AND OCEAN ENGINEERING / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2000 BOUSSINESQ and verification of an extended Boussinesq model for surf zone hydrodynamics in two horizontal dimensions. The time-domain numerical model is based on the fully nonlinear Boussinesq equations. As described in Part I of this two

Kirby, James T.

114

Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The logger’s fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

115

Measuring surface ocean wave height and directional spectra using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler from an autonomous underwater vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) is a proven technology which is capable of measuring surface wave height and directional information, however it is generally limited to rigid, bottom mounted applications which ...

Haven, Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

LaCure, Mari Mae

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

Wave Height Characteristics in the North Atlantic Ocean: A new approach based on Statistical and Geometrical techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on satellite records and corresponding simulations obtained from the numerical WAve prediction Model (WAM). The two data sets are analyzed by means of a variety of statistical measures mainly focusing Weibull distribution fits the data in the study with parameters that vary spatially. This variation should

Dodson, C.T.J.

118

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22, 2013 - 1:14pm Addthis Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean

119

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22, 2013 - 1:14pm Addthis Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean

120

Ocean Sci., 4, 1529, 2008 www.ocean-sci.net/4/15/2008/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is everywhere perpendicular to the local direction of gravity. If there were no waves or currents in the oceanOcean Sci., 4, 15­29, 2008 www.ocean-sci.net/4/15/2008/ © Author(s) 2008. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science An Oceanographer's Guide to GOCE and the Geoid C. W

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Ocean Science, 1, 97112, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/97/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oceanic currents by reducing the shears between them (Hansen and Paul, 1984; Weisberg, 1984Ocean Science, 1, 97­112, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/97/ SRef-ID: 1812-0792/os/2005-1-97 European Geosciences Union Ocean Science Multi-year satellite observations of instability waves

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

122

Infrasonic ambient ocean noise: Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of ocean ambient noise were made at three widely separated deep?water bottom locations in the N. E. Pacific at eight frequencies in the range from 2.5–20.0 Hz for 40 consecutive days. Concurrent data on wind speed and wave height were collected. Analysis indicates that the spectrum level of infrasonicnoise is linearly related to the log of the wind speed above a threshold level. There is evidence that the noise can be directly associated with the wind rather than through the surface waves it produces. [Work supported by ONR.

Rudolph H. Nichols

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

OceanEnergyMMS.p65  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Teacher Guide .......................................................... 2 Related National Science Standards .......................... 3 Introduction to Ocean Energy .................................. 4 Petroleum & Natural Gas ......................................... 5 Natural Oil and Gas Seeps ........................................ 7 Methane Hydrates .................................................... 8 Solar Energy .............................................................. 9 Wind Energy ........................................................... 10 Wave Energy ........................................................... 11 OTEC: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion .............

124

On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry Effective, economic extraction of ocean wave energy requires an intimate under- standing of the ocean wave

Victoria, University of

125

Wave Power: Destroyer of Rocks; Creator of Clean Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

E E PG&E Wave Energy Wave Energy Federal Utility Partnership Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting Wave Energy Wave Energy Development Development Ontario, CA Ontario, CA November 18 November 18- -19, 200 19, 2009 9 Donald G. Price Donald G. Price Senior Consulting Scientist, PG&E Senior Consulting Scientist, PG&E Wave Power Overview Wave Power Overview * * What is Wave Power? What is Wave Power? o o Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean o o Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean Wave power or wave energy is the energy contained in ocean waves that is converted into electricity by various means. waves that is converted into electricity by various means. o o It is a clean, renewable energy resource capable of being utilized

126

Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(RD&D) projects to benefit the electricity and natural gas ratepayers in California. The Energy for natural gas RD&D. The PIER program strives to conduct the most promising public interest energy research End-Use Energy Efficiency · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy

127

Turbulent Vertical Kinetic Energy in the Ocean Mixed Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical velocities in the ocean boundary layer were measured for two weeks at an open ocean, wintertime site using neutrally buoyant floats. Simultaneous measurements of the surface meteorology and surface waves showed a large variability in ...

Eric A. D'Asaro

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Biomimetic Electrostatics for Submerged Oceanic Sensing, Communication, and Coordination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential) to inject power into the ocean as salinity isocean waters eliminates virtually all of the output power aspower losses expected for an electromagnetic wave propagat- ing in the ocean

Friedman, Jonathan Katzenstein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Om Ocean Energy Centre Vrt uppdrag r att frmja havsenergiindustrin i Sverige  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

test med uppankring av "slangen" i havet) Waves4Power Vigor WaveEnergy Ocean Harvester Deep Green simulation · Power from the ocean Ocean Mechanical system Electrical System · Power take-off · ElectricOm Ocean Energy Centre Vårt uppdrag är att främja havsenergiindustrin i Sverige och

Lemurell, Stefan

130

Determining the influence of wind-wave breaking on the dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy in the upper ocean and on the dependence of the turbulent kinetic energy on the stage of wind-wave development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New experimental data that make it possible to explain and predict the observed variability of turbulent-energy dissipation in the upper ocean are discussed. ... For this purpose, the dependence of the energy dis...

S. A. Kitaigorodskii

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Establishing a Testing Center for Ocean Energy Technologies in...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Marine Renewable Energy Centers. NNMREC offers a full range of capabilities to support wave and tidal energy development for the United States. Ocean energy, generated from...

132

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves Few things in nature are as dramatic, and potentially dangerous, as ocean waves. The impact they have on our daily lives extends from shipping to the role they play in driving the global climate. From a theoretical viewpoint water waves pose rich

133

Ocean Acidification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean Acidification ... The first assignment I give my students in Environmental Modeling class is to calculate the mass of the oceans versus the mass of the atmosphere and the “living” soil. ... As a young chemical engineer in the early 1970s, I remember discussing the horrors of sulfur and particulate pollution from steel mills, smelters, and power plants. ...

Jerald L. Schnoor

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

134

Water wave transmission by an array of floating discs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high-concentration arrays are attributed to wave overwash of the discs and collisions...wave-scattering theories. They are used to predict attenuation rates of ocean-surface...ice-covered ocean, noting alternative theories to model waves in the ice-covered ocean also...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Designed for: Ocean Observing Demo: A collaboration between  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

off of Fire Island, NY. The Wave Glider records data on the wind, water temperature and salinity pressure, temperature and sound velocity. The Wave Glider is an autonomous ocean observing platform

136

13.853 Computational Ocean Acoustics, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave equations for fluid and visco-elastic media. Wave-theory formulations of acoustic source radiation and seismo-acoustic propagation in stratified ocean waveguides. Wavenumber Integration and Normal Mode methods for ...

Schmidt, Henrik

137

Estimating Oceanic Turbulence Dissipation from Seismic Images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seismic images of oceanic thermohaline finestructure record vertical displacements from internal waves and turbulence over large sections at unprecedented horizontal resolution. Where reflections follow isopycnals, their displacements can be used ...

W. Steven Holbrook; Ilker Fer; Raymond W. Schmitt; Daniel Lizarralde; Jody M. Klymak; L. Cody Helfrich; Robert Kubichek

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

MHK Technologies/WaveMaster | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WaveMaster WaveMaster < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WaveMaster.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Wavemaster Ltd Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The WaveMaster device consists of two pressure chambers connected via a number of turbines The device is located under the waters surface so that it is covered at all times The upper surface of each chamber is an active surface covered with one way valves that control the flow of water through the device The valves on the high pressure chamber allow water to flow into the chamber provided the external pressure is higher than the internal pressure in the chamber This situation typically occurs under wave crests If the external pressure is less than the internal pressure the valves remain closed and water does not flow in Similarly the valves on the low pressure chamber will only allow water to flow out of the chamber if the internal pressure is higher than the external pressure This situation typically occurs under wave troughs If the internal pressure is less than the external pressure the valves remain closed and there is no flow of water

139

Ocean Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some of these technologies are taking off from very low power capacities, although with an intense activity....4, 5] including La Rance tidal power station calculate a capacity of ocean energy facilities worldwid...

Ricardo Guerrero-Lemus; José Manuel Martínez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Ocean Currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water is continually in motion at all depths, even when the sea appears perfectly calm and flat. In Chaps. 3–6 of this book, we discussed a specific type of water motion, namely periodic wave motion. Waves can...

Prof. Dr. Stanis?aw Ryszard Massel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

MHK Technologies/OceanStar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OceanStar OceanStar < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage OceanStar.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Bourne Energy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Overtopping Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The OceanStar device captures the underlying pressure wave through a series of small turbine generators The OceanStar relies upon a proprietary energy efficient process to smooth out the pulse characteristics common to wave energy in order to be electrical grid friendly The OceanStars high level of scalability is essential to reach the large surface areas required to reach utility scale ocean power generation Technology Dimensions

142

European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference (EWTEC) series are international, technical and scientific conferences, focussed on ocean renewable energy and widely respected for their commitment to...

143

Sandia National Laboratories: wave energy converters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is a partnered effort to develop marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team...

144

The Orange River, southern Africa: an extreme example of a wave-dominated sediment dispersal system in the South Atlantic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lower reaches cross a semi-arid and then an...although, as indicated by semi-submersible (JAGO) dives, the...submerged wave-cut rock platforms have been found at...Offshore mining and semi-submersible dives have shown that...

B.J. Bluck; J.D. Ward; J. Cartwright; Roger Swart

145

E ect of a Simple Storm on a Simple Ocean Je Moehlis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can excite near-inertial currents in the mixed layer of the ocean; recent observations include [8, 13E#11;ect of a Simple Storm on a Simple Ocean Je#11; Moehlis 1 Introduction: Near-frequency cuto#11; for internal waves in the ocean. An internal wave with frequency near f is called a near

Moehlis, Jeff

146

Table 1 Highest tides (tide ranges) of the global ocean Country Site Tide range (m)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Climate. Indian Ocean Equatorial Currents. Internal Waves. Island Wakes. Langmuir Circula- tion and Instability. Mesoscale Eddies. Open Ocean Convection. Paci\\c Ocean Equatorial Currents. TurbulenceTable 1 Highest tides (tide ranges) of the global ocean Country Site Tide range (m) Canada Bay

Gorban, Alexander N.

147

8.01 - Generating Electrical Power from Ocean Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ocean energy resources derived from wind, waves, tidal or marine currents can be utilized and converted to large scale sustainable electrical power. Conversion technologies are easily adaptable and can be integrated within the current utility infrastructure. However, ocean energy has many forms - tides, surface waves, ocean circulation, salinity, and thermal gradients. The focus of this chapter is dedicated to two of these, namely waves and tidal energy. The first are the result of wind-driven waves derived ultimately from solar energy and the latter represents those found in tidal or marine currents, driven by gravitational effects. This chapter also gives an analysis of the current state of art of generating electricity from wave and tidal currents (termed ocean energy). Section 8.01.1 provides an overview of ocean wave and marine current energy conversion with more emphasis on the latter; Sections 8.01.2, 8.01.3, 8.01.4, and 8.01.5 address respectively the history of wave energy, wave resource assessment, wave device development, and air turbines; and Section 8.01.6 gives a review of the economics of ocean energy as applied to wave and tidal energy conversion technologies.

A.S. Bahaj

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wind Wave Float | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(TRL 1 2 3 Component) Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility-Scale PowerBuoy Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project...

149

Wave Breaking Dissipation Observed with “SWIFT” Drifters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy dissipation rates during ocean wave breaking are estimated from high-resolution profiles of turbulent velocities collected within 1 m of the surface. The velocity profiles are obtained from a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler sonar on a wave-...

Jim Thomson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Wave Energy Conversion Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wave Energy Conversion Technology Wave Energy Conversion Technology Speaker(s): Mirko Previsic Date: August 2, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Scientists have been working on wave power conversion for the past twenty years, but recent advances in offshore and IT technologies have made it economically competitive. Sea Power & Associates is a Berkeley-based renewable energy technology company. We have developed patented technology to generate electricity from ocean wave energy using a system of concrete buoys and highly efficient hydraulic pumps. Our mission is to provide competitively priced, non-polluting, renewable energy for coastal regions worldwide. Mirko Previsic, founder and CEO, of Sea Power & Associates will discuss ocean wave power, existing technologies for its conversion into

151

Oceans '88  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings discuss the following papers: Solid waste disposal crisis; Plastics in Ocean; Continental shelf environmental research; Seafood technology advancements; Gulf of Mexico chemosynthetic petroleum seep communities; Water reuse on onshore mariculture and processing facilities; Oil and gas industry conflicts on the outer continental shelf; Cumulative environmental effects of the oil and gas leasing program; Oil and gas exploration; and Oil and gas resource management; Aids to navigation systems and equipment; and Surveillance experiments.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

WAVE-DRIVEN SURFACE FROM HF RADAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments using the University of Miami's Ocean Surface Current Radar (OSCR) (Shay et al., 1995, 1997 to the internal wave signals. Observations The HF radar system mapped the coastal ocean currents over a 30 Ã? 45 kmFEATURE INTERNAL CURRENTS WAVE-DRIVEN SURFACE FROM HF RADAR By Lynn K. Shay Observations from

Miami, University of

153

Generating electricity from the oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean energy has many forms, encompassing tides, surface waves, ocean circulation, salinity and thermal gradients. This paper will considers two of these, namely those found in the kinetic energy resource in tidal streams or marine currents, driven by gravitational effects, and the resources in wind-driven waves, derived ultimately from solar energy. There is growing interest around the world in the utilisation of wave energy and marine currents (tidal stream) for the generation of electrical power. Marine currents are predictable and could be utilised without the need for barrages and the impounding of water, whilst wave energy is inherently less predictable, being a consequence of wind energy. The conversion of these resources into sustainable electrical power offers immense opportunities to nations endowed with such resources and this work is partially aimed at addressing such prospects. The research presented conveys the current status of wave and marine current energy conversion technologies addressing issues related to their infancy (only a handful being at the commercial prototype stage) as compared to others such offshore wind. The work establishes a step-by-step approach that could be used in technology and project development, depicting results based on experimental and field observations on device fundamentals, modelling approaches, project development issues. It includes analysis of the various pathways and approaches needed for technology and device or converter deployment issues. As most technology developments are currently UK based, the paper also discusses the UK's financial mechanisms available to support this area of renewable energy, highlighting the needed economic approaches in technology development phases. Examination of future prospects for wave and marine current ocean energy technologies are also discussed.

AbuBakr S. Bahaj

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Internal Waves and Tidal Conversion from a Finite Submarine Ridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The ocean, due to the constantly varying density gradient, effectively has a long boundary gradient across waves. In a density stratified fluid, which in the ocean is caused by variations in salinity

Morrison, Philip J.,

155

Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state's Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan identified certain state waters that are eligible for offshore wind, wave and tidal energy development and other state waters where such development is

156

Ocean Motion International LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Motion International LLC Ocean Motion International LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Motion International LLC Place Saulsbury, Tennessee Zip 38067 Sector Ocean Product Marine energy technology firm developing ocean/ wave powered generators. Coordinates 35.052242°, -89.083299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.052242,"lon":-89.083299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

157

Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

technologiesinchart.ppt More Documents & Publications Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 7 8 System) - Reedsport PB150...

158

Wave power extraction from a bottom-mounted oscillating water column converter with a V-shaped channel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CW Finkl. 2009 Ocean energy. Berlin, Germany...ME . 1981 Ocean wave energy conversion. New York, NY: Wiley Interscience...Justino. 1999 OWC wave energy devices with air flow...mathematical tables. New York, NY: Dover. 23 Mavrakos...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

On the stability of long-range sound propagation through a structured ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several acoustic experiments show a surprising degree of stability in wave fronts propagating over multi-megameter ranges through the ocean's sound channel despite the presence of random-like, sound speed fluctuations. Previous works have pointed out the existence of chaos in simplified ray models incorporating structure inspired by the true ocean environment. A ``predictability horizon'' has been introduced beyond which stable wave fronts cease to exist and point-wise, detailed comparisons between even the most sophisticated models and experiment may be limited for fundamental reasons. We find, by applying one of the simplified models, that for finite ranges, the fluctuations of the ray stabilities are very broad and consistent with lognormal densities. A fraction of the rays retain a much more stable character than the typical ray. This may be one of several possible mechanisms leading to greater than anticipated sound field stability. The lognormal ray stability density may underlie the recent, experimentally determined, lognormal density of wave field intensities [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105 (1999) 3202--18].

M. A. Wolfson; S. Tomsovic

2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Related Links List of Ocean Thermal Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOcean&oldid273467" Categories: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks Sectors...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sound Waves in the Atmosphere at Infrasonic Frequencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various geophysical processes generate sound waves in the atmosphere. Some typical sources are auroral discharges in the upper atmosphere tornadoes and severe storms surface waves on the oceans volcanic explosions earthquakes and atmospheric oscillations arising from unstable wind flow at the tropopause. Man?made sources include powerful explosions and the shock waves from vehicles moving at supersonic speeds at altitudes below about 125 km. The components of sound?wave energy at infrasonic frequencies (oscillation periods >1.0 sec) are propagated for large distances (thousands of kilometers) over the earth's surface with very little loss of energy from absorption by viscosity and heat conduction. But the propagation depends strongly on (a) the horizontally stratified temperature structure of the atmosphere (b) the influence of gravity at oscillation periods greater than the atmospheric resonance period ?300 sec and (c) the nonuniform distribution of atmospheric winds. The microphones and electroacoustical apparatus at an infrasonics observation station e.g. the one at Washington D. C. measure (1) the amplitude and waveform of incident sound pressure (2) the direction of local propagation of the wave (3) the horizontal trace velocity and (4) the distribution of sound wave energy at various oscillation frequencies. Researches on propagation require observational data from a network of stations separated geographically by large distances coupled with theoretical analysis of sound propagation to arrive at useful results on the acoustics of the atmosphere.

Richard K. Cook

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Role of Internal Tides in Mixing the Deep Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Internal wave theory is used to examine the generation, radiation, and energy dissipation of internal tides in the deep ocean. Estimates of vertical energy flux based on a previously developed model are adjusted to account for the influence of ...

Louis St. Laurent; Chris Garrett

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Boussinesq-Green-Naghdi Rotational Water Wave Theory.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A coastal ocean hydrodynamics modelling system has been created, with potential for future improvement. The system consists of a wave generation-absorbing system which initiates the… (more)

Zhang, Yao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A remotely operated, autonomous wave energy converter system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The potential for electric energy generation from ocean waves is substantial and much research is being conducted on the conversion process as a renewable, grid-connected,… (more)

Lewis, Timothy M. (Timothy Michael)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A novel control design for a wave energy converter.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ocean wave energy is rapidly becoming a field of great interest in the world of renewable energy. Significant advancements in design and technology are being… (more)

Schacher, Alphonse A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Wave energy technology in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wave energy technology in China Yage...Energy and Gas Hydrate...wave energy technology, summarizing...of an air turbine rotating at...research, development and construction...variable-pitch air turbine for the Azores...Liu2000Research and development of Daguan...National Ocean Technology Center, Tianjin...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Pacific Ocean’s Acidification Laboratory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Pacific Ocean’s Acidification Laboratory ... Five years ago, at the quadrennial International Coral Reef Symposium in Okinawa, Japan, a poll of the scientists and resource managers present ranked ocean acidification 38th out of a list of 39 possible threats facing reefs, recalls Rusty Brainard, head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Coral Reef Ecosystem Division. ... As the oceans absorb CO2 from the atmosphere at the rate of one million tons per hour, the pH of the water is changing. ...

Christopher Pala

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

168

Coordinated formation pattern control of multiple marine surface vehicles with model uncertainty and time-varying ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers the coordinated formation pattern control of multiple marine surface vehicles in the presence of model uncertainty and time-varying ocean disturbances induced wind, waves and ocean currents. ...

Zhouhua Peng; Dan Wang; Hao Wang; Wei Wang

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Interannual ENSO variability forced through coupled atmosphere-ocean feedback loops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2000; Power and Colman, 2006]. In this paper, we explore the extent to which baroclinic ocean Rossby1 Interannual ENSO variability forced through coupled atmosphere-ocean feedback loops Amy Solomon 1 feedback to, and significantly impact, the Tropics through ocean Rossby waves. We use an atmospheric

Solomon, Amy

170

Seminario de Matemtica Aplicada "Renowable wave energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seminario de Matemática Aplicada "Renowable wave energy: potencial and technical challenges Abstract: Among the various renewable energy sources, ocean wave energy has been only recently investiga will be at first to introduce the potential of wave energy, as a significant, and often neglected, contributor

Tradacete, Pedro

171

Manipulating decision making of typical agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate how the choice of decision makers can be varied under the presence of risk and uncertainty. Our analysis is based on the approach we have previously applied to individual decision makers, which we now generalize to the case of decision makers that are members of a society. The approach employs the mathematical techniques that are common in quantum theory, justifying our naming as Quantum Decision Theory. However, we do not assume that decision makers are quantum objects. The techniques of quantum theory are needed only for defining the prospect probabilities taking into account such hidden variables as behavioral biases and other subconscious feelings. The approach describes an agent's choice as a probabilistic event occurring with a probability that is the sum of a utility factor and of an attraction factor. The attraction factor embodies subjective and unconscious dimensions in the mind of the decision maker. We show that the typical aggregate amplitude of the attraction factor is $1/4$, and ...

Yukalov, V I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

GFD-2 Spring 2004 Syllabus Text: a nearly complete set of text handouts, plus A.E.Gill, Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geography of potential vorticity -lateral circulation: wind-driven ocean gyres and boundary currents -circumpolar ocean currents and the atmospheric westerly winds: stationary Rossby waves with mountains; waveGFD-2 Spring 2004 Syllabus Text: a nearly complete set of text handouts, plus A.E.Gill, Atmosphere-Ocean

173

Manipulating decision making of typical agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate how the choice of decision makers can be varied under the presence of risk and uncertainty. Our analysis is based on the approach we have previously applied to individual decision makers, which we now generalize to the case of decision makers that are members of a society. The approach employs the mathematical techniques that are common in quantum theory, justifying our naming as Quantum Decision Theory. However, we do not assume that decision makers are quantum objects. The techniques of quantum theory are needed only for defining the prospect probabilities taking into account such hidden variables as behavioral biases and other subconscious feelings. The approach describes an agent's choice as a probabilistic event occurring with a probability that is the sum of a utility factor and of an attraction factor. The attraction factor embodies subjective and unconscious dimensions in the mind of the decision maker. We show that the typical aggregate amplitude of the attraction factor is $1/4$, and it can be either positive or negative depending on the relative attraction of the competing choices. The most efficient way of varying the decision makers choice is realized by influencing the attraction factor. This can be done in two ways. One method is to arrange in a special manner the payoff weights, which induces the required changes of the values of attraction factors. We show that a slight variation of the payoff weights can invert the sign of the attraction factors and reverse the decision preferences, even when the prospect utilities remain unchanged. The second method of influencing the decision makers choice is by providing information to decision makers. The methods of influencing decision making are illustrated by several experiments, whose outcomes are compared quantitatively with the predictions of our approach.

V. I. Yukalov; D. Sornette

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

Causes of ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the foregoing analysis of the ocean and the atmosphere as two interacting subsystems, we have identified two major energy inputs into the ocean. These are the wind stress over the sea surface and heat fluxe...

David Tolmazin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Deepwater Internal Wave Study and Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ocean currents. Although their effects on floating drilling platforms and their riser systems have not been extensively studied, in the past these waves have seriously disrupted offshore exploration and drilling operations. In particular, a drill pipe...

Jiang, Lei

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Ocean Sci., 3, 337344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-East Atlantic Ocean are all dominated by the semidiurnal lunar (M2) tide. It is shown that motions at M2 vary divergence and focusing of internal wave rays to the removal of the in- ternal tidal energy by non, 1972). Recent studies on tidal motions focus on the dissipation of lunar (M) gravitational energy

Boyer, Edmond

177

Creation of nonlinear density gradients for use in internal wave research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method was developed to create a nonlinear density gradient in a tank of water. Such gradients are useful for studying internal waves, an ocean phenomenon that plays an important role in climate and ocean circulation. ...

Harris, Victoria Siân

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Wave Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:30pm Addthis Photo of a large wave. Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity. (A terawatt is equal to a trillion watts.) However, wave energy cannot be harnessed everywhere. Wave power-rich areas of the world include the western coasts of Scotland, northern Canada, southern Africa, and Australia as well as the northeastern and northwestern coasts of the United States. In the Pacific Northwest alone, it is feasible that wave energy could produce 40-70 kilowatts (kW) per 3.3 feet (1 meter) of western coastline. Wave Energy Technologies

179

Ocean | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Ocean Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean Welcome to our COMMUNITY This is the National Ocean Council's portal for data, information, and decision tools to support people engaged in regional marine planning for the future use of the ocean, our coasts, and the Great Lakes. Our goal is to enhance discovery of and access to data and information for planners, stakeholders, and the public. Please visit our Feedback page to tell us what would make the site most useful to you as we expand our content. Start Here! Previous Pause Next PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager View More West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework View More Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal

180

Harvesting Broadband Kinetic Impact Energy from Mechanical Triggering/Vibration and Water Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(13) Although efforts in utilizing ocean wave energy could be dated back to 1890,(13) there has not been any commercial wave power farms up to now. ... This demonstrates that in addition to water wave energy harvesting our TENG also has the potential for hydrological analysis, which is a very important function for a wave energy farming system. ... Last but not least, the major component for ocean wave harvesting is the offshore wind power. ...

Xiaonan Wen; Weiqing Yang; Qingshen Jing; Zhong Lin Wang

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

MHK Technologies/Hybrid wave Wind Wave pumps and turbins | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Wave pumps and turbins Wind Wave pumps and turbins < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Hybrid wave Wind Wave pumps and turbins.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description 2Wave1Wind The hybrid wave power rig uses two wave converting technologies in addition to wind mills The main system is a pneumatic float in the category of overtopping as Wave Dragon In addition the pneumatic float can house point absorbers The hybrid wave power rig is based on the patented wave energy converter from 2005

182

AWS Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AWS Ocean Energy Ltd AWS Ocean Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name AWS Ocean Energy Ltd Place Inverness, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip IV17 1SN Product Inverness-based company established to commercialise the Archimedes Wave Swing. Coordinates 48.55324°, -110.689764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.55324,"lon":-110.689764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

183

ocean energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

184

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Author's personal copy Wave energy resources along the Hawaiian Island chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Wave energy resources along the Hawaiian Island chain Justin E. Stopa model Wave atlas Wave energy Wave power a b s t r a c t Hawaii's access to the ocean and remoteness from demand for sustainable energy. The wave resources include swells from distant storms and year-round seas

186

Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

187

Finavera Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Finavera Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd Address 595 Burrard Street Suite 3113 Three Bentall Centre PO Box 49071 Place Vancouver Zip V7X 1G4 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 604-288-9051 Website http://www.finavera.com Region Canada LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Coos County Offshore Wave Energy Power Plant Figueira da Foz Portugal Humboldt County Wave Project Makah Bay Offshore Wave Pilot Project South Africa Ucluelet BC Canada This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: AquaBuoy This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

188

MHK Technologies/Ocean Energy Rig | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rig Rig < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Energy Rig.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Ocean Energy Rig is a hybrid concept harnessing tidal stream with increased velocity from venturi system wave and wind power The rig also uses solar panels to power computers and warning lights Other unique features include a water ballasting system with automatic self levelling and wave ramps to maximize FreeFlow 69 s new wave power device It is envisaged that the Ocean Energy Rig would be assembled and maintained in dry docks and would be towed out into position before being semi submerged and anchored for operation Power output of the production model would be at least 10MW

189

Energy Department Announces $10 million for Wave Energy Demonstration at Navy’s Hawaii Test Site  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced $10 million to test prototypes designed to generate clean, renewable electricity from ocean waves and help diversify America’s energy portfolio.

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave theory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

shallow water internal waves on acoustic... - and strong-scattering theories for random media would ... Source: Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric...

191

NREL: Energy Analysis - Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Ocean Energy OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for ocean power technologies. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of wave and tidal range technologies. Credit: Lewis, A., S. Estefen, J. Huckerby, W. Musial, T. Pontes, J. Torres-Martinez, 2011: Ocean Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds)], Cambridge University Press. Figure 6.11 Enlarge image

192

How ocean currents are studied  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

How infinite and boundless the ocean must have seemed to the first man to set foot upon its shore. Kind or stern, shallow or steep, the ocean’s shores have always held a peculiar fascination for man. The moist...

David Tolmazin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

SIMPLIFIED MODEL OF THE AIR FLOW ABOVE WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMPLIFIED MODEL OF THE AIR FLOW ABOVE WAVES V.N. Kudryavtsev Marine Hydrophysical Institute influenced by the air flow dynamics over the water waves. The exchange of momentum, heat, moisture and gases between the atmosphere and the ocean is determined to a large extent by the wind-wave interaction

Haak, Hein

195

Experimental investigation of small-scale breaking waves : flow visualization across the air-water interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics of breaking waves significantly affect air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum, mass and energy across the ocean interface. Breaking waves also contribute considerable loading to offshore and coastal structures, and ...

McDonald, Angus Kai

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Navier-Stokes simulations of steep breaking water waves with a coupled air-water interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave breaking on the ocean surface significantly facilitates the transfer of mass, momentum, heat and energy across the air-sea interface. In the context of the near field flow about a surface ship, the breaking bow wave ...

Hendrickson, Kelli L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Indian Ocean tsunami of December 26, 2004: observations in Sri Lanka and Thailand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On December 26, 2004 a great earthquake (M W 9.3) occurred off the western coast of Sumatra triggering a series of tsunami waves that propagated across the Indian Ocean causing damage and life los...

T. Rossetto; N. Peiris; A. Pomonis; S. M. Wilkinson; D. Del Re; R. Koo…

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Simulation and detection of tsunami signatures in ocean surface currents measured by HF radar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-frequency (HF) surface wave radars provide the unique capability to continuously monitor the coastal environment far beyond the range of conventional microwave radars. Bragg-resonant backscattering by ocean ...

Klaus-Werner Gurgel; Anna Dzvonkovskaya; Thomas Pohlmann; Thomas Schlick…

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

An ocean kinetic energy converter for low-power applications using piezoelectric disk elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main problem facing long-term electronic system deployments in the sea, is to find a feasible way to supply them with the power they require. Harvesting mechanical energy from the ocean wave oscillations and ...

C. Viñolo; D. Toma; A. Mànuel; J. del Rio

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Group-velocity tomography of South America and the surrounding oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Group-velocity tomography of South America and the surrounding oceans Oleg Vdovin,1 Jose¨ A. Rial,2 propagating across South America and the surrounding oceans. Broad-band waveform data from about 765 events and show that the average resolution across South America is about 60^80 for Rayleigh waves and 70

Ritzwolle, Mike

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Lost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occur where physical factors such as extreme wind fields and strong currents cause waves to mergeLost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment 1 Unidata Policy Lost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment 2 Hurricane Force (HF

202

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Zender, Charles

203

Dances with waves Air-sea interaction The generation and growth of waves due to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the atmosphere fuels to a large extent the atmospheric and oceanic circulation. The release of water vapourDances with waves Air-sea interaction · The generation and growth of waves due to wind blowing over water, is a well-known example of air-sea interaction. Momentum transported downwards from the air

Haak, Hein

204

Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ocean wave power can be a significant source of large?scale, renewable energy for the US electrical grid. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) conservatively estimated that 20% of all US electricity could be generated by wave energy. Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT), with funding from private sources and the US Navy, developed the PowerBuoy? to generate renewable energy from the readily available power in ocean waves. OPT's PowerBuoy converts the energy in ocean waves to electricity using the rise and fall of waves to move the buoy up and down (mechanical stroking) which drives an electric generator. This electricity is then conditioned and transmitted ashore as high?voltage power via underwater cable. OPT's wave power generation system includes sophisticated techniques to automatically tune the system for efficient conversion of random wave energy into low cost green electricity, for disconnecting the system in large waves for hardware safety and protection, and for automatically restoring operation when wave conditions normalize. As the first utility scale wave power project in the US, the Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, OR, will consist of 10 PowerBuoys located 2.5 miles off the coast. This U.S. Department of Energy Grant funding along with funding from PNGC Power, an Oregon?based electric power cooperative, was utilized for the design completion, fabrication, assembly and factory testing of the first PowerBuoy for the Reedsport project. At this time, the design and fabrication of this first PowerBuoy and factory testing of the power take?off subsystem are complete; additionally the power take?off subsystem has been successfully integrated into the spar.

Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator] [Principal Investigator; Downie, Bruce [Project Manager] [Project Manager

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

205

Zones of T-wave excitation in the NE Indian ocean mapped using variations in backazimuth over time obtained from multi-channel correlation of IMS hydrophone triplet data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......detection is coded in grey shades (light grey 0 to black 1). The...bathymetric features such as Christmas Island more than 3 south of...wave is also observed from the Christmas Island area. The corresponding...reflections from Java, from Christmas Island and from a seamount......

Frank M. Graeber; Pierre-Franck Piserchia

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

MHK Technologies/Ocean Treader floating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Treader floating Treader floating < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Treader floating.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Ocean Energy Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Development of Ocean Treader Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The Ocean Treader is comprised of two sponsons at the fore and aft of the device and a spar buoy in the center. As a wave passes along the device, first the fore sponson lifts and falls, then the spar buoy, and then the aft sponson, respectively. The relative motion between these three floating bodies is harvested by hydraulic cylinders mounted between the tops of the arms and the spar buoy. The cylinders pressurize hydraulic fluid that spins hydraulic motors and an electric generator. The electricity is exported via a cable piggy-backed to the anchor cable. Ocean Treader is designed to passively weather-vane to face the wave direction; and in addition, the device has active onboard adjustment to allow for offset due to the effects of current.

207

Simple ocean carbon cycle models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pertinent question, however, is: what is the worldwide power resource that could be extracted with OTEC plants without affecting the thermohaline ocean circulation? The estimate is that the maximum steady-state...

Dr. Luis A. Vega Ph.D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pertinent question, however, is: what is the worldwide power resource that could be extracted with OTEC plants without affecting the thermohaline ocean circulation? The estimate is that the maximum steady-state...

Dr. Luis A. Vega Ph.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Use of Ocean Energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For converting the current of water for the production of electricity, there is a wide range of technological approaches. The Italian ocean current power plant named Kobold (Fig. 6.2) was the first commercial o...

Prof. Dr.-Ing Hermann-Josef Wagner…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Beyond the waves : economic and cultural effects of the global surf industry in El Tunco, El Salvador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

73. Booth, Douglas. “From Bikinis to Boardshorts: Wahinesto their boardshorts and bikinis. In the ocean, anythingposing demurely on a beach in a bikini as she assesses wave

Iatarola, Briana Marie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Analysis of Ocean Electromagnetic Data Using a Hilbert Spectrum Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We apply a newly developed time series analysis technique the Hilbert?Huang Transform (HHT) to naturally occurring ocean electromagnetic data obtained from bottom?mounted sensors. The HHT was originally developed as an alternative to the Fourier power spectral density for the analysis of nonlinear phenomena in water waves. The HHT is applied to the data in two steps. In the first step an empirical mode decomposition is used to extract individual oscillatory modes possessing different characteristic time scales. Unlike Fourier modes however these modes can vary in amplitude and frequency. In the second step the Hilbert transform is used to determine physically meaningful instantaneous frequencies from these modes. We present results showing that the HHT provides a more compact representation of the ocean electromagnetic environment than the Fourier spectrum. In particular the HHT is able to capture nonlinear wave phenomena associated with ocean swell in a single mode without the need for higher order harmonics.

Jeffrey Ridgway; Michael L. Larsen; Cye H. Waldman; Michael Gabbay; Rodney R. Buntzen; C. David Rees

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waves receive their energy from the wind by means of a ... whose yield is not yet clearly understood. Energy in the wave is more concentrated than in the wind ... density. For this reason a motor utilizing wave p...

Ferruccio Mosetti

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-multiple of the wavelength: n 2 L ,n 1,2,... . A vibrating string is an example of a transverse wave: its oscillation2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand

Glashausser, Charles

216

Typical Oak Ridge cemesto houses and city bus | Y-12 National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Typical Oak Ridge cemesto ... Typical Oak Ridge cemesto houses and city bus Typical Oak Ridge cemesto houses and city bus...

217

WAVES OC514 Spring 2012 P.B. Rhines Term project ideas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVES OC514 Spring 2012 P.B. Rhines Term project ideas 10 Apr 2012 1. Coastal trapped waves signals, seasonal cycles, wind-driven signals 2. ENSO (el Nino/Southern Oscillation) and equatorial waves events? Atmospheric Kelvin and Rossby waves bridging from one ocean to the next. Gill model

218

Infragravity waves over topography: generation, dissipation, and reflection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean surface infragravity waves (periods from 20 to 200 s) observed along the southern California coast are shown to be sensitive to the bottom topography of the shelf region, where propagation is linear, and of the ...

Thomson, James M. (James McArthur)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Signatures of Heating and Cooling Energy Consumption for Typical AHUs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis is performed to investigate the signatures of different parameters on the heating and cooling energy consumption of typical air handling units (AHUs). The results are presented in graphic format. HVAC simulation engineers can use...

Wei, G.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Gearbox Typical Failure Modes, Detection, and Mitigation Methods (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation was given at the AWEA Operations & Maintenance and Safety Seminar and focused on what the typical gearbox failure modes are, how to detect them using detection techniques, and strategies that help mitigate these failures.

Sheng, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power April 30, 2013 - 12:40pm Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FIND OUT MORE Read about the Energy Department's assessments of wave and tidal energy resources. You've probably seen water at work generating electricity at dams and other hydropower facilities in your region. But an emerging clean energy technology called marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy -- or ocean power -- uses water to generate electricity in a different way, and has yet to get

224

Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power April 30, 2013 - 12:40pm Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FIND OUT MORE Read about the Energy Department's assessments of wave and tidal energy resources. You've probably seen water at work generating electricity at dams and other hydropower facilities in your region. But an emerging clean energy technology called marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy -- or ocean power -- uses water to generate electricity in a different way, and has yet to get

225

Incursion of the Pacific Ocean Water into the Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the data collected during the International Indian Ocean Expedition, maps showing the distribution of depth ... became clear that low-salinity water from the Pacific intrudes into the western Indian Ocean t...

G S Sharma; A D Gouveia…

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Offshore wave power measurements—A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first wave power patent was filed in 1799. Since then, hundreds of ideas for extraction of energy from ocean waves have surfaced. In the process of developing a concept, it is important to learn from previous successes and failures, and this is not least important when moving into the ocean. In this paper, a review has been made with the purpose of finding wave power projects that have made ocean trials, and that also have reported what has been measured during the trials, and how it has been measured. In relation to how many projects have done work on wave power, surprisingly few have reported on such measurements. There can be many reasons for this, but one is likely the great difficulties in working with experiments in an ocean environment. Many of the projects have reported on sensor failures, unforeseen events, and other general problems in making measurements at sea. The most common site measurement found in this review was wave height. Such measurements was almost universal, although the technologies used differed somewhat. The most common device measurements were electric voltages and/or currents and system pressures (air and water). Device motion and mooring forces were also commonly measured. The motion measurements differed the most between the projects, and many varying methods were used, such as accelerometers, wire sensors, GPS systems, optical systems and echo sounders.

Simon Lindroth; Mats Leijon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development among the ocean energy options, and other relatively...paper focuses on ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). However, much of the paper's content has relevance to the use of the other ocean energy sources. Techniques of ocean...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Wave-climate assessment by satellite remote sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Satellite remote sensing based on radar altimetry and the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be used for accurate ocean-wave climatology globally. The altimeter provides significant wave height and wind speed whereas SAR in principle gives the full wave spectrum. Over the next few years, altimeter-derived wave heights will become the basic data sources for open-ocean statistics and SAR, in combination with results from global wave models, will provide the corresponding directional statistics. In addition, SAR may be used for studying wave conditions in near coastal areas. In the Norwegian Sea and elsewhere, real-time SAT and altimeter data are now being used operationally for forecasting and assimilation into numerical wave models.

Barstow, S.; Krogstad, H.E. [SINTEF, Trodheim (Norway)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

On the relation between rough set reducts and typical testors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper studies the relations between rough set reducts and typical testors from the so-called logical combinatorial approach to pattern recognition. Definitions, comments and observations are formally introduced and supported by illustrative examples. Furthermore, some theorems expressing theoretical relations between reducts and typical testors are enunciated and proved. We also discuss several practical applications of these relations that can mutually enrich the development of research and applications in both areas. Although we focus on the relation between the classical concepts of testor and reduct, our study can be expanded to include other types of testors and reducts.

Manuel S. Lazo-Cortés; José Fco. Martínez-Trinidad; Jesús A. Carrasco-Ochoa; Guillermo Sanchez-Diaz

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Ocean Circulation Lynne D Talley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the topography, with low pressure in the center. Ocean currents transport heat from the tropics to the poles have gone to sea. As knowledge about ocean currents and capabilities to observe it below the surfaceOcean Circulation Lynne D Talley Volume 1, The Earth system: physical and chemical dimensions

Talley, Lynne D.

231

Finding typical high redshift galaxies with the NOT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from an ongoing search for galaxy counterparts of a subgroup of Quasar Absorption Line Systems called Damped Ly-alpha Absorbers (DLAs). DLAs have several characteristics that make them prime candidates for being the progenitors of typical present day galaxies.

J. U. Fynbo; P. Moller; B. Thomsen

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

232

Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios Marty Humphrey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios Marty Humphrey Computer Science. A broader goal of these scenarios are to increase the awareness of security issues in Grid Computing. 1 easy and secure ac- cess to the Grid's diverse resources. Infrastructure software such as Legion [6

Thompson, Mary R.

233

Robust Neuroimaging-Based Classification Techniques of Autistic vs. Typically  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abnormalities in several brain regions. Increased head size was the first observed characteristic in children1 Robust Neuroimaging-Based Classification Techniques of Autistic vs. Typically Developing Brain with autism. According to the published studies, different anatomical structures of the brain have been

Farag, Aly A.

234

Global ocean modeling on the Connection Machine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed a version of the Bryan-Cox-Semtner ocean model (Bryan, 1969; Semtner, 1976; Cox, 1984) for massively parallel computers. Such models are three-dimensional, Eulerian models that use latitude and longitude as the horizontal spherical coordinates and fixed depth levels as the vertical coordinate. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, with a turbulent eddy viscosity, and mass continuity equation are solved, subject to the hydrostatic and Boussinesq approximations. The traditional model formulation uses a rigid-lid approximation (vertical velocity = 0 at the ocean surface) to eliminate fast surface waves. These waves would otherwise require that a very short time step be used in numerical simulations, which would greatly increase the computational cost. To solve the equations with the rigid-lid assumption, the equations of motion are split into two parts: a set of twodimensional ``barotropic`` equations describing the vertically-averaged flow, and a set of three-dimensional ``baroclinic`` equations describing temperature, salinity and deviations of the horizontal velocities from the vertically-averaged flow.

Smith, R.D.; Dukowicz, J.K.; Malone, R.C.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in Cable, Sound & Sea Technology (SST) Luis A. Vega, HNEI-University of Hawaii Energy Ocean International

236

THE FORCE OF A TSUNAMI ON A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER LAURA O'BRIEN, PAUL CHRISTODOULIDES, EMILIANO RENZI, DENYS DUTYKH,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE FORCE OF A TSUNAMI ON A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER LAURA O'BRIEN, PAUL CHRISTODOULIDES, EMILIANO in the open ocean but as the wave approaches the shore its energy is com­ pressed creating large destructive waves. The question posed here is whether a nearshore wave energy converter (WEC) could withstand

237

THE FORCE OF A TSUNAMI ON A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER LAURA O'BRIEN, PAUL CHRISTODOULIDES, EMILIANO RENZI, DENYS DUTYKH,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE FORCE OF A TSUNAMI ON A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER LAURA O'BRIEN, PAUL CHRISTODOULIDES, EMILIANO in the open ocean but as the wave approaches the shore its energy is com- pressed creating large destructive waves. The question posed here is whether a nearshore wave energy converter (WEC) could withstand

Boyer, Edmond

238

Why Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? The subarctic Pacific Ocean is one of the areas considered particularly vulnerable to acidification, which could affect the ocean's ability to act as a carbon sink. Global warming affects the food webs and biodiversity in marine ecosystems, especially in regions known as oxygen minimum zones where key components of the global carbon cycle take place. Oxygen minimum zones are found between 200 and 1,000 meters below sea level in the subarctic Pacific, the eastern South Pacific Ocean, the northern parts of the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea, and off southwestern Africa. As global warming continues, researchers believe the oxygen levels in the oceans will decrease, a change that will extend the boundaries of the oxygen minimum

239

Laboratory Investigations in Support of Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research under this Project has proven that liquid carbon dioxide can be emulsified in water by using very fine particles as emulsion stabilizers. Hydrophilic particles stabilize a CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O (C/W) emulsion; hydrophobic particles stabilize a H{sub 2}O-in-CO{sub 2} (W/C) emulsion. The C/W emulsion consists of tiny CO{sub 2} droplets coated with hydrophilic particles dispersed in water. The W/C emulsion consists of tiny H{sub 2}O droplets coated with hydrophobic particles dispersed in liquid carbon dioxide. The coated droplets are called globules. The emulsions could be used for deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Liquid CO{sub 2} is sparsely soluble in water, and is less dense than seawater. If neat, liquid CO{sub 2} were injected in the deep ocean, it is likely that the dispersed CO{sub 2} droplets would buoy upward and flash into vapor before the droplets dissolve in seawater. The resulting vapor bubbles would re-emerge into the atmosphere. On the other hand, the emulsion is denser than seawater, hence the emulsion plume would sink toward greater depth from the injection point. For ocean sequestration a C/W emulsion appears to be most practical using limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) particles of a few to ten ?m diameter as stabilizing agents. A mix of one volume of liquid CO{sub 2} with two volumes of H{sub 2}O, plus 0.5 weight of pulverized limestone per weight of liquid CO{sub 2} forms a stable emulsion with density 1087 kg m{sup -3}. Ambient seawater at 500 m depth has a density of approximately 1026 kg m{sup -3}, so the emulsion plume would sink by gravity while entraining ambient seawater till density equilibrium is reached. Limestone is abundant world-wide, and is relatively cheap. Furthermore, upon disintegration of the emulsion the CaCO{sub 3} particles would partially buffer the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in seawater, alleviating some of the concerns of discharging CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean. Laboratory experiments showed that the CaCO{sub 3} emulsion is slightly alkaline, not acidic. We tested the release of the CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O emulsion stabilized by pulverized limestone in the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory High Pressure Water Tunnel Facility (HPWTF). Digital photographs showed the sinking globules in the HPWTF, confirming the concept of releasing the emulsion in the deep ocean. We modeled the release of an emulsion from the CO{sub 2} output of a 1000 MW coal-fired power plant at 500 m depth. The emulsion would typically sink several hundred meters before density equilibration with ambient seawater. The CO{sub 2} globules would rain out from the equilibrated plume toward the ocean bottom where they would disintegrate due to wave action and bottom friction. Conceptual release systems are described both for an open ocean release and a sloping seabed release of the emulsion.

Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Stephen Pennell; Carl Lawton; Peter Swett; Devinder Arora; John Hannon; Michael Woods; Huishan Duan; Tom Lawlor

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Optical rogue waves D. R. Solli1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observations show that the probability of encountering an extremely large rogue wave in the open ocean is much that they arise infrequently from initially smoothpulses owing to power transfer seeded by a small noise for the first time by scientific measurements during an encounter at the Draupner oil platform in the North Sea3

Jalali. Bahram

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Navy Catching Waves in Hawaii | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Navy Catching Waves in Hawaii Navy Catching Waves in Hawaii Navy Catching Waves in Hawaii June 2, 2010 - 11:56am Addthis This experimental power-generating buoy installed off the coast of Oahu can produce enough energy to power 25 homes under optimal conditions. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. This experimental power-generating buoy installed off the coast of Oahu can produce enough energy to power 25 homes under optimal conditions. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. To a casual observer, the buoy off the shore of Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) might look like nothing more than a bright yellow spot in a blue ocean. But this isn't an ordinary buoy - it's a small electrical generator, creating renewable electricity as it bobs up and down on the waves. It's also a test project by the U.S. Navy to see whether a wider

243

Ocean Energy Technology: Overview, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

femp.energy.gov femp.energy.gov Ocean Energy Technology Overview Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy Management Program July 2009 DOE/GO-102009-2823 Ocean Energy Technology Overview i Contacts Principal Investigators: Kari Burman Phone: 303-384-7558 E-mail: kari.burman@nrel.gov Andy Walker, PhD PE Phone: 303-384-7531 E-mail: andy.walker@nrel.gov Energy Management and Federal Markets Group National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) MS 301 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program Acknowledgements This work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). Research regarding ocean energy resources, status of wave and tidal power technologies, and

244

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .currents in the tropical Pacific Ocean. J. Phys. Oceanogr. ,in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with the

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

MHK Technologies/bioWave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bioWave bioWave < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage BioWave.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization BioPower Systems Pty Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/bioWAVE Pilot Plant Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description TThe bioWAVE is based on the swaying motion of sea plants in the presence of ocean waves. The hydrodynamic interaction of the buoyant blades with the oscillating flow field is designed for maximum energy absorption. Mooring Configuration Gravity base Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions 30 to 50M depth 20kW m wave climate or greater

246

Internal waves across the Pacific M. H. Alford,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.7) are interpreted as the inertial waves resulting from PSI of the internal tide. Elevated near-inertial energy comprise most internal-wave energy in the ocean. Internal tides (internal waves of tidal frequency) are pri and below the surface by extracting energy from the internal tide through parametric subharmonic instability

MacKinnon, Jennifer

247

MHK Technologies/Ocean Powered Compressed Air Stations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powered Compressed Air Stations Powered Compressed Air Stations < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Powered Compressed Air Stations.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Power Plant Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Ocean Powered Compressed Air Station is a point absorber that uses an air pump to force air to a landbased generator The device only needs 4m water depth and electricity production fluctations through storing energy at a constant air pressure Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 13:16.5 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from

248

Nonlinear Energy Transfer in a Narrow Gravity-Wave Spectrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Nonlinear Energy Transfer in a Narrow Gravity-Wave Spectrum J. C...calculation of the rate of energy transfer due to...a narrow gravity wave spectrum according...typical narrow wind wave spectrum on the nonlinear energy transfer are very...

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variations in eastern Indian Ocean upper-ocean thermal properties are assessed for the period 1970–2004, with a particular focus on asymmetric features related to opposite phases of Indian Ocean dipole events, using high-resolution ocean model ...

Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Franziska U. Schwarzkopf; Gary Meyers; Erik Behrens; Arne Biastoch; Claus W. Böning

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Is the Sun Embedded in a Typical Interstellar Cloud?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physical properties and kinematics of the partially ionized interstellar material near the Sun are typical of warm diffuse clouds in the solar vicinity. The interstellar magnetic field at the heliosphere and the kinematics of nearby clouds are naturally explained in terms of the S1 superbubble shell. The interstellar radiation field at the Sun appears to be harder than the field ionizing ambient diffuse gas, which may be a consequence of the low opacity of the tiny cloud surrounding the heliosphere. The spatial context of the Local Bubble is consistent with our location in the Orion spur.

P. C. Frisch

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

Neutron Star Crustal Interface Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The eigenfrequencies of nonradial oscillations are a powerful probe of a star's interior structure. This is especially true when there exist discontinuities such as at the neutron star (NS) ocean/crust boundary, as first noted by McDermott, Van Horn, & Hansen. The interface mode associated with this boundary has subsequently been neglected in studies of stellar nonradial oscillations. We revisit this mode, investigating its properties both analytically and numerically for a simple NS envelope model. We find that it acts like a shallow surface ocean wave, but with a large radial displacement at the ocean/crust boundary due to flexing of the crust with shear modulus ? P, the pressure. This displacement lowers the mode's frequency by a factor of ~(?/P)1/2 ~ 0.1 in comparison to a shallow surface wave frequency on a hard surface. The interface mode may be excited on accreting or bursting NSs, and future work on nonradial oscillations should consider this mode. Our work also implies an additional mode on massive and/or cold white dwarfs with crystalline cores, which may have a frequency between the f-mode and g-modes, an otherwise empty part of the frequency domain.

Anthony L. Piro; Lars Bildsten

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Currents Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global...

253

wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

wave energy ? Wellenenergie f [Die einer Schwerewelle innewohnende potentielle und kinetische Energie. Sie ist etwa proportional dem Quadrat der Wellenhöhe. Zeichen: E we ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia from NREL Ethiopia from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions

255

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil from NREL Brazil from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

256

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal from NREL Nepal from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

257

Meteorology: typical meteorological data for selected stations in Ghana  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data for selected stations in Ghana data for selected stations in Ghana from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations> (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

258

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in Sri  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Sri Lanka from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

259

Meteorology: typical meteorological year data for selected stations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya from NREL Kenya from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Each TMY is a data set of hourly values of solar radiation and meteorological elements for a 1-year period. Solar radiation is modeled using the NREL METSTAT model, with surface observed cloud cover being the principal model input. The container file contains one TMY file for each selected station in the region, plus documentation files and a TMY data reader file for use with Microsoft Excel. (Purpose): Simulations (Supplemental Information): A TMY consists of months selected from individual years and concatenated to form a complete year. The intended use is for computer simulations of solar energy conversion systems and building systems. Because of the selection criteria, these TMYs are not appropriate for simulations of wind energy conversion systems. A TMY provides a standard for hourly data for solar radiation and other meteorological elements that permit performance comparisons of system types and configurations for one or more locations. A TMY is not necessarily a good indicator of conditions over the next year, or even the next 5 years. Rather, it represents conditions judged to be typical over a long period of time, such as 30 years. Because they represent typical rather than extreme conditions, they are not suited for designing systems and their components to meet the worst-case conditions occurring at a location.

260

Ocean acoustic noise budgets: Application to the environmental assessment of offshore wind power generation.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A noise budget is a listing of the various sources of acoustic noise and their associated ranking by importance. A number of different types of budgets can be conceived using various acoustic measures such as intensity energy or duration of maximum amplitude level. These budgets are typically parameterized by frequency and are usually computed over 1/3 octave bands. As part of the environmental assessment of the proposed offshore wind powergeneration project under the Rhode Island Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) noise measurements were made using the Passive Acoustic Listener (PAL) systems off the coast of Rhode Island prior to the installation of any wind power facilities. Two PALs were deployed within two miles of Block Island in water depths of 20 m from October 6 to November 11 2008. The data included noise spectra and source identification every 3 min. Short snapshots of unusual sounds were also recorded. From this data the ocean acoustic noise budget is computed with contributions from shipping wind/waves marine mammals and rain from 500 Hz to 50 kHz. The shipnoise data is correlated with ship traffic data from the Automatic Identification System (AIS). [Funding provided by the Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geoengineering Downwelling Ocean Currents: A Cost Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Downwelling ocean currents carry carbon into the deep ocean (the solubility pump), and play a ... weakening of the NADW is modification of downwelling ocean currents, by an increase in carbon concentration or ......

S. Zhou; P. C. Flynn

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ocean currents may prevent stagnation or accumulatioLegal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy #12;Introduction Ocean sequestration of CO2, a potentially significant technique to be used

263

Ocean currents help explain population genetic structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...original work is properly cited. Ocean currents help explain population genetic...larval dispersal estimates based on ocean current observations, we demonstrate...Data-assimilated models of ocean currents for the study region were produced...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Configuration of a Southern Ocean Storm Track  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diagnostics of ocean variability that reflect and influence local transport properties of heat and chemical species vary by an order of magnitude along the Southern Ocean’s Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Topographic “hotspots” are important ...

Tobias Bischoff; Andrew F. Thompson

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

Dales, K Phillips

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

ocean | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean ocean Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

267

Vacuum Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

Paul S. Wesson

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

268

Predicting aerodynamic characteristic of typical wind turbine airfoils using CFD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted into the capabilities and accuracy of a representative computational fluid dynamics code to predict the flow field and aerodynamic characteristics of typical wind-turbine airfoils. Comparisons of the computed pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data. This work highlights two areas in CFD that require further investigation and development in order to enable accurate numerical simulations of flow about current generation wind-turbine airfoils: transition prediction and turbulence modeling. The results show that the laminar-to turbulent transition point must be modeled correctly to get accurate simulations for attached flow. Calculations also show that the standard turbulence model used in most commercial CFD codes, the k-e model, is not appropriate at angles of attack with flow separation. 14 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs.

Wolfe, W.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ochs, S.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Aerospace Engineering Dept.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Sun. A typical star in the solar neighborhood?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sun is used as the fundamental standard in chemical abundance studies, thus it is important to know whether the solar abundance pattern is representative of the solar neighborhood. Albeit at low precision (0.05 - 0.10 dex) the Sun seems to be a typical solar-metallicity disk star, at high precision (0.01 dex) its abundance pattern seems abnormal when compared to solar twins. The Sun shows a deficiency of refractory elements that could be due to the formation of terrestrial planets. The formation of giant planets may also introduce a signature in the chemical composition of stars. We discuss both planet signatures and also the enhancement of neutron-capture elements in the solar twin 18 Sco.

Melendez, Jorge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

Boynton, Walter R.

271

MHK Technologies/Under Bottom Wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Bottom Wave Generator Under Bottom Wave Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Under Bottom Wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Glen Edward Cook Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description Water will flow up into the pipe from the down stroke and out of the pipe back into the ocean on the up stroke Waves rolling by will push water into the pipe This will mock the ocean swell A propellar is mounted inside the lower portion of the pipe the upward and downward flow of water will spin the propellar in both direcitons The propellar is connected to a generator

272

Ocean Navitas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navitas Navitas Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Navitas Address Nursery House Place United Kingdom Zip DN21 5BQ Sector Ocean Product Ocean Navitas was incorporated in May 2006 by experienced engineers, businessmen and sailing enthusiasts David Hunt, James McCague and Simon Condry. Website http://www.oceannavitas.com Region United Kingdom References Ocean NavitasUNIQ75db538f85b32404-ref-000014E2-QINU LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Ocean Navitas NaREC This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Aegir Dynamo This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

273

Ocean - FAQ | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FAQ FAQ Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Frequently Asked Questions Following are some Frequently Asked Questions, we hope to add to this list as we hear from you. Questions What is Ocean.data.gov? How can I use this resource? What data can I expect to find here? Where do these data come from? Can data from State and academic sources be included in this portal? Who can suggest data and information to be included in Ocean.data.gov? Who decides what data are included? How do I get involved? How does this differ from other data efforts such as regional data portals? Where do I find information about data standards, metadata standards, and formats? Can we provide feedback about a particular dataset?

274

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Aspects of modeling the North Pacific Ocean.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Three aspects of the problem of modeling North Pacific Ocean climate are investigated: the effect of viscosity on effective model resolution, the effect of ocean… (more)

Dawe, Jordan Tyler

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

T E C H N O L O G Y A V E N U E Wave EnergyMohammad-Reza Alam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Ocean wave energy has significant advantages over other renewable energy resources like wind and solar acceptable methods of generating power. The ocean is a large, relatively untapped renewable energy resource of energy in wind driven waves alone worldwide [1]. This may be compared to the 15 thousands gigawatts

Alam, Mohammad-Reza

278

The Signature of Inertial and Tidal Currents in Offshore Wave Records  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The roughness of the sea surface can be affected by strong currents. Here, long records of surface wave heights from buoy observations in the northeastern Pacific Ocean are examined. The data show the influence of tidal currents, but the first ...

Johannes Gemmrich; Chris Garrett

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Generation of solitary waves by transcritical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)). For instance, in the case of water waves, typically stationary lee waves are found downstream in subcritical) is the subcritical (supercritical) regime). The fKdV equation has been derived for water waves by Akylas (1984), Cole. In this paper we consider the analogous transcritical flow over a step, primarily in the context of water waves

280

Wave Energy Conversion Overview and it's Renewable Energy Potential for the Oil and Gas Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean energy conversion has been of interest for many years. Recent developments such as concern over global warming have renewed interest in the topic. Part II provides an overview of the energy density found in ocean waves and how it is calculated...

Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Estimating wave energy from a wave record  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This note is concerned with the calculation of wave energy from a time series record of wave heights. Various methods are used to estimate the wave energy. For wave records that contain a number of different ... ...

Sasithorn Aranuvachapun; John A. Johnson

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Coherence waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1955 Wolf noticed that the mutual coherence function ? obeys two wave equations [Proc. R. Soc. London230, 246 (1955)]. The physical optics of this finding is thoroughly presented in...

Lohmann, Adolf W; Mendlovic, David; Shabtay, Gal

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Comparison between third and second generation ocean wave models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This is accomplished by adjusting the CPSD to agree with linear theory. The 2-D buoy spectrum with 40 frequency bands and 72 direction bands is estimated using the Maximum Likelihood Method (MLM) (Capon 1969; Isobe et aL 1984; Brissette and Tsanis 1994) applied... to the CPSD. More accurate methods for estimating the 2-D spectra from pitch-roll- heave buoys exist, but the MLM method's computational efficiency and robust behavior make it a practical choice for processing large amounts of data. One important MLM...

Bratos, Steven Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Download Full Report Download Download Full Report URL: http:en.openei.orgdatasetsdataset6b40f428-2af0-40b3-8a53-0c32c7e35973resource9bfc4b34-78a1-4da9-8928-48a1f72ee8e8...

285

A REVIEW OF GLOBAL OCEAN TEMPERATURE OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by taking an inventory of changes in energy storage. The main storage is in the ocean, the latest values, Energy Sustainable Economic, Earth's energy imbalance, and thermosteric sea level rise. Up-to-date estimates are provided

286

composition of putative oceans on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Results: Oceanic water composition · Oceanic water is a NaCl-CaCl2 solution · Large Cl mass · Cl in a "soda ocean" Temperature, o C 100 200 300 400 500 Concentration,mole/kgH2O 0.01 0.1 1 Cl- CaCl2 CaCl+ Na calcite · Quartz · Na-K feldspars · Anhydrite · Pyrite · Hematite/magnetite · Evaporites: NaCl+CaCl2 350o

Treiman, Allan H.

287

TYPICAL HOT WATER DRAW PATTERNS BASED ON FIELD DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is significant variation in hot water use and draw patterns among households. This report describes typical hot water use patterns in single-family residences in North America. We found that daily hot water use is highly variable both among residences and within the same residence. We compared the results of our analysis of the field data to the conditions and draw patterns established in the current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test procedure for residential water heaters. The results show a higher number of smaller draws at lower flow rates than used in the test procedure. The data from which the draw patterns were developed were obtained from 12 separate field studies. This report describes the ways in which we managed, cleaned, and analyzed the data and the results of our data analysis. After preparing the data, we used the complete data set to analyze inlet and outlet water temperatures. Then we divided the data into three clusters reflecting house configurations that demonstrated small, medium, or large median daily hot water use. We developed the three clusters partly to reflect efforts of the ASHRAE standard project committee (SPC) 118.2 to revise the test procedure for residential water heaters to incorporate a range of draw patterns. ASHRAE SPC 118.2 has identified the need to separately evaluate at least three, and perhaps as many as five, different water heater capacities. We analyzed the daily hot water use data within each cluster in terms of volume and number of hot water draws. The daily draw patterns in each cluster were characterized using distributions for volume of draws, duration of draws, time since previous draw, and flow rates.

Lutz, Jim; Melody, Moya

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

288

Nonlinear analysis of an actuated seafloor-mounted carpet for a high-performance wave energy extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carpet for a high-performance wave energy extraction Mohammad-Reza Alam...seabed carpet in harvesting ocean wave energy is the subject of this article...performance of our proposed carpet of wave energy conversion (CWEC) against a spectrum...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

MHK Technologies/Oxygen Releasing and Carbon Absorbing Ocean Based  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Releasing and Carbon Absorbing Ocean Based Releasing and Carbon Absorbing Ocean Based Renewable Energy System < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Oxygen Releasing and Carbon Absorbing Ocean Based Renewable Energy System.jpg Technology Profile Technology Description The benefits of the system developed and patented by AEEA are 1 exploitation of the greater wave energy density in the more remote off shore locations 2 usage of existing industrial fuel storage and distribution infrastructure 3 provision for a gradual transition to widespread electric vehicle use 4 avoidance of environmental destruction and visual impairment with minimal impact on commercial fishing and recreation uses 5 fostering the development of a new maritime and energy industry 6 avoidance of the high capital investment in mooring and anchoring seabed electrical cable installation and seabed restoration 7 development of flexibility by deployment of fleets of these vessels to supply widely separated market locations using coastal and national waterways and 8 provision for the addition of fleets without depletion of primary feed stocks as in nuclear energy systems 2 Fig 1 In summary the system converts wave energy from the nearly unlimited world wide

290

Grays Harbor Ocean Energy Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Company Ocean Energy Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Grays Harbor Ocean Energy Company Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98105 Sector Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product Grays Harbor has started a demonstration project for offshore wind/wave renewable power generation in Washington State and has applied for up to 1GW in permits for wave projects around the US. Coordinates 47.60356°, -122.329439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.60356,"lon":-122.329439,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

291

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

Frandsen, Jannette B.

292

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

293

Ocean Sci., 3, 417427, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/417/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deacon Cell. When the ocean currents are averaged zon- ally to produce a meridional overturningOcean Sci., 3, 417­427, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/417/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science On the fast response of the Southern Ocean to changes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

294

Silicic acid leakage from the Southern Ocean: Opposing effects of nutrient uptake and oceanic circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the thermocline region of low latitudes. The power of Southern Ocean intermediate waters to affect phytoplanktonSilicic acid leakage from the Southern Ocean: Opposing effects of nutrient uptake and oceanic in formation rate of Southern Ocean intermediate waters. Comparison of d30 Si records from the Southern Ocean

Pahnke, Katharina

295

Toward Energetically Consistent Ocean Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Possibilities to construct a realistic quasi-global ocean model in Boussinesq approximation with a closed energy cycle are explored in this study. In such a model, the energy related to the mean variables would interact with all parameterized ...

Carsten Eden; Lars Czeschel; Dirk Olbers

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ocean Currents at Rocas Alijos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flow of oceanic water over and around an obstacle such as a seamount or island has the potential to profoundly affect the local biological community (Hamner and Hauri, 1986; Wolanski and Hamner, 1988). If ...

Shirley Vaughan; Ronald K. Skinner; Robert W. Schmieder; Brian McGuire

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Conference on oceans draws Clinton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Against the tranquil backdrop of Monterey Bay, Calif., President Bill Clinton earlier this month signed a measure extending the U.S. ban on offshore oil drilling, and he proposed several sweeping initiatives to protect, restore, and explore the oceans....

ELIZABETH WILSON

1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

298

Pacific Ocean Islands – Editorial Introduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Islands in the Pacific Ocean are of three kinds (Nunn 2005). ... Most of the islands lie in the SW Pacific, but the Galapagos, Clipperton, and Easter ... Island are volcanic islands rising from the East Pacific R...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Modelling ocean currents in the northern Adriatic Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ocean circulation in the northern Adriatic Sea is characterised by the interactions of tidal currents, bathymetric constraints, wind forcing and density gradients induced by river input and heat exchange. The MIKE 3/21 modelling system, together with measurements of wind, waves, currents and water levels at one location, has been used to investigate the currents dynamics of the northern Adriatic basin and to assess model sensitivity to the parameterisation of different processes and implementation strategies. An assessment has been carried out against available in-situ observations (waves, currents, surface elevation, and water temperature), and also in comparison with a high-resolution modelling system (COAWST) implemented in the same area during the corresponding period. The MIKE 3/21 system was implemented for a 1-year simulation period and validation of surface elevation, wind, and waves with data indicated a good model performance, statistically very similar to the COAWST implementation. Depth-averaged, surface and bottom currents were more difficult to reproduce by both models, with the observed high variability not being fully captured by the model systems. Some of the differences between the models results may be due to model configuration, spatial resolution and the way they treat atmosphere–ocean momentum and heat transfers, turbulence, and are therefore discussed in the paper. From the thorough analysis of MIKE 3/21 system, wind is found to be the main forcing factor inducing currents in the northern Adriatic; tides and baroclinic motions were of second order, although some specific events seems to be forced by these processes. Waves were found to be highly correlated with local wind, and a rather weak wave–current interaction was observed. Even if the inclusion of wave effects trough radiation stress did not seem to lead to significant improvements in the modelled currents with MIKE 3/21, the full wave–ocean coupling in COAWST was significant in explaining small scale features, especially in the Gulf of Venice. Spectral and SVD analysis showed energy around diurnal and semidiurnal frequencies and that about 50% of variance in the current profile was explained by the first mode, which was well captured by both modelling systems.

Rodolfo Bolaños; Jacob V. Tornfeldt Sørensen; Alvise Benetazzo; Sandro Carniel; Mauro Sclavo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

DSM Will Acquire Ocean Nutrition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DSM Will Acquire Ocean Nutrition ... Dutch chemical maker DSM will spend about $530 million to acquire Ocean Nutrition Canada, which calls itself the world’s largest supplier of omega-3 fatty acids to the dietary supplement and food manufacturing markets. ... DSM says the acquisition is the fifth purchase it has made in the nutrition field since September 2010, when it announced a corporate strategy to expand in the health, nutrition, and industrial materials markets. ...

MICHAEL MCCOY

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

wave power density | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power density power density Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. Source Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Date Released December 05th, 2011 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EPRI MHK NREL ocean Virginia Tech wave wave power density Data application/pdf icon Download Full Report (pdf, 8.8 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment

302

1. Department, Course Number, Title ORE 608, Probability and Statistics for Ocean Engineers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ocean engineering. 7. Topics Covered Random Variables Monte Carlo Methods Probability Density Functions and statistics Water wave mechanics 5. Textbooks and/or Other Reading Material Textbooks: None Reference books: 1. Data Analysis Methods in Physical Oceanography - Emery and Thomson 2. Extreme Value Theory

Frandsen, Jannette B.

303

WIND-DRIVEN NEAR INERTIAL OCEAN RESPONSE AND MIXING AT THE CRITICAL LATITUDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? latitude. Near 30? latitude, the maximum oceanic response to sea breeze moves offshore slowly because of the near-zero group speed of Poincare waves at this latitude. The lateral energy flux convergence plus the energy input from the wind is maximum near...

Zhang, Xiaoqian

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

Soft Capacitors for Wave Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave energy harvesting could be a substantial renewable energy source without impact on the global climate and ecology, yet practical attempts have struggle d with problems of wear and catastrophic failure. An innovative technology for ocean wave energy harvesting was recently proposed, based on the use of soft capacitors. This study presents a realistic theoretical and numerical model for the quantitative characterization of this harvesting method. Parameter regio ns with optimal behavior are found, and novel material descriptors are determined which simplify analysis dramatically. The characteristics of currently ava ilable material are evaluated, and found to merit a very conservative estimate of 10 years for raw material cost recovery.

Karsten Ahnert; Markus Abel; Matthias Kollosche; Per Jørgen Jørgensen; Guggi Kofod

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

305

Observations on waveforms of capillary and gravity-capillary waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to extreme conditions in the field, there has not been any observational report on three-dimensional waveforms of short ocean surface waves. Three-dimensional waveforms of short wind waves can be found from integrating surface gradient image data (Zhang 1996a). Ocean surface gradient images are captured by an optical surface gradient detector mounted on a raft operating in the water offshore California (Cox and Zhang 1997). Waveforms and spatial structures of short wind waves are compared with early laboratory wind wave data (Zhang 1994, 1995). Although the large-scale wind and wave conditions are quite different, the waveforms are resoundingly similar at the small scale. It is very common, among steep short wind waves, that waves in the capillary range feature sharp troughs and flat crests. The observations show that most short waves are far less steep than the limiting waveform under weak wind conditions. Waveforms that resemble capillary-gravity solitons are observed with a close match to the form theoretically predicted for potential flows (Longuet-Higgins 1989, Vanden-Broeck and Dias 1992). Capillaries are mainly found as parasitic capillaries on the forward face of short gravity waves. The maximum wavelength in a parasitic wave train is less than a centimeter. The profiles of parasitic wave trains and longitudinal variations are shown. The phenomenon of capillary blockage (Phillips 1981) on dispersive freely traveling short waves is observed in the tank but not at sea. The short waves seen at sea propagate in all directions while waves in the tank are much more unidirectional.

Xin Zhang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Long Wave/Short Wave Resonance in Equatorial Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that resonant coupling between ultra long equatorial Rossby waves and packets of either short Rossby or short westward-traveling gravity waves is possible. Simple analytic formulas give the discrete value of the packet wave number k, ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Incentives Thermal Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 96 Ocean Thermal Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 96) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Agricultural Commercial Industrial Utility Anaerobic Digestion Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Ocean Thermal Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Small Wind Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes CCEF - Project 150 Initiative (Connecticut) State Grant Program Connecticut Commercial Solar Thermal Electric

308

AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formerly Oceanergia formerly Oceanergia Jump to: navigation, search Name AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia Address Redshank House Alness Point Business Park Place Alness Ross shire Zip IV17 0UP Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 44 (0) 1349 88 44 22 Website http://www.awsocean.com Region United Kingdom LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: AWS II Portugal Pre Commercial Pilot Project This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Archimedes Wave Swing This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=AWS_Ocean_Energy_formerly_Oceanergia&oldid=678253

309

Upper-Ocean Processes under the Stratus Cloud Deck in the Southeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual mean heat budget of the upper ocean beneath the stratocumulus/stratus cloud deck in the southeast Pacific is estimated using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) and an eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Both are ...

Yangxing Zheng; George N. Kiladis; Toshiaki Shinoda; E. Joseph Metzger; Harley E. Hurlburt; Jialin Lin; Benjamin S. Giese

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves Hiu Ning Chan (1 waves; Long-short resonance PACS Classification: 02.30.Jr; 05.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg #12;2 ABSTRACT A resonance between long and short waves will occur if the phase velocity of the long wave matches the group velocity

312

Energy conversion of orbital motions in gravitational waves: Simulation and test of the Seaspoon wave energy converter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The conversion of ocean wave power into sustainable electrical power represents a major opportunity to Nations endowed with such a kind of resource. At the present time the most of the technological innovations aiming at converting such resources are at early stage of development, with only a handful of devices close to be at the commercial demonstration stage. The Seaspoon device, thought as a large energy harvester, catches the kinetic energy of ocean waves with promising conversion efficiency, and robust technology, according to specific “wave-motion climate”. University of Genoa aims to develop a prototype to be deployed in medium average energy content seas (i.e. Mediterranean or Eastern Asia seas). This paper presents the first simulation and experimental results carried out on a reduced scale proof-of-concept model tested in the laboratory wave flume.

L. Di Fresco; A. Traverso

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Wave energy attenuation and shoreline alteration characteristics of submerged breakwaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVE ENERGY ATTENUATION AND SHORELINE ALTERATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SUBMERGED BREAKWATERS A Thesis by KATHERINE MARGARET KRAFFT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering WAVE ENERGY ATTENUATION AND SHORELINE ALTERATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SUBMERGED BREAKWATERS A Thesis by KATHERINE MARGARET KRAFFT Approved as to style and content by: John...

Krafft, Katherine Margaret

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

On Deviations from Gaussian Statistics for Surface Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we discuss some issues concerning the statistical properties of ocean surface waves. We show that, using the approach of weak turbulence theory, deviations from Gaussian statistics can be naturally included. In particular we discuss the role of bound and free modes for the determination of the statistical properties of the surface elevation. General formulas for skewness and kurtosis as a function of the spectral wave action density are here derived.

M. Onorato; A. R. Osborne; M. Serio

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Vortices in Brain waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003). Vortices in Brain Waves 62. M. E. Raichle, ScienceVORTICES IN BRAIN WAVES WALTER J. FREEMAN Department ofthat is recorded in brain waves (electroencephalogram, EEG).

Freeman, Walter J III; Vitiello, Giuseppe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft ProgrammaticPlan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistantl OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary engineeringCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byFifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plant

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II: Radiation of Gravity Waves from a Gaussian Jet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II structures that dominate wave momentum and energy transport. When the interior of a typical midlatitude jet and energy at jet interior critical levels. Longer waves transport momentum and energy away from the jet

Farrell, Brian F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

MHK Technologies/Wave Treader fixed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies/Wave Treader fixed MHK Technologies/Wave Treader fixed < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Wave Treader fixed.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Ocean Energy Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Development of Ocean Treader Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The Wave Treader concept utilises the arms and sponsons from Ocean Treader and instead of reacting against a floating Spar Buoy, will react through an Interface Structure onto the Foundation of an Offshore Wind Turbine. Between the Arms and the Interface Structure hydraulic cylinders are mounted and as the wave passes the machine first the forward Sponson will lift and fall and then the aft Sponson will lift and fall each stroking their hydraulic cylinder in turn. This pressurises hydraulic fluid which is then smoothed by hydraulic accumulators before driving a hydraulic motor which in turn drives an electricity generator. The electricity is then exported through the cable shared with the Wind Turbine.

322

Global P, PP, and PKP wave microseisms observed from distant storms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and there is thus no coupling of ocean-wave energy at the primary frequency into seismic energy at the seafloor cannot generate primary microseisms in deep water, this energy is most likely generated by coastalGlobal P, PP, and PKP wave microseisms observed from distant storms Peter Gerstoft,1 Peter M

Buckingham, Michael

323

Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field Frank M. Lee,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in global ocean mixing, it is important to understand the power present in the internal wave fieldExperimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data Frank M. Lee to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux J and total radiated power P

Morrison, Philip J.,

324

EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION OF A COUPLED BEM-NAVIER-STOKES MODEL FOR SOLITARY WAVE SHOALING AND BREAKING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications are considered. The first one is the case of the breaking of a solitary wave over a step, which). INTRODUCTION Breaking waves on beaches and over ocean bottom discontinuities, constitute one of the most. In particular, due to the increasing power of mod- ern computers, direct Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD

Grilli, Stéphan T.

325

MHK Technologies/WavePlane | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WavePlane WavePlane < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WavePlane.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization WavePlane A S Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/WavePlane Prototype 1 Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Overtopping Device Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The WavePlane is a V-shaped design, which is anchored with the head up against the incoming waves. Below the waterline the device is fitted with an artificial beach, which is designed to improve the capture of wave energy. The WavePlane is symmetrical in its construction. Each side captures the water from the waves of various heights. The device splits the oncoming waves with a series of intakes, known as lamellas, which guide the captured water into a 'flywheel tube.' The fast moving vortex that is formed then forces the water across two turbines, which are located at the ends of the two 'V-shaped legs'. Finally the water is discharged back into the ocean.

326

Ultrasonic guided waves in eccentric annular pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper studies the feasibility of using ultrasonic guided waves to rapidly inspect tubes and pipes for possible eccentricity. While guided waves are well established in the long range inspection of structures such as pipes and plates, studies for more complex cross sections are limited and analytical solutions are often difficult to obtain. Recent developments have made the Semi Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method widely accessible for researchers to study guided wave properties in complex structures. Here the SAFE method is used to study the effect of eccentricity on the modal structures and velocities of lower order guided wave modes in thin pipes of diameters typically of interest to the industry. Results are validated using experiments. The paper demonstrates that even a small eccentricity in the pipe can strongly affect guided wave mode structures and velocities and hence shows potential for pipe eccentricity inspection.

Pattanayak, Roson Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu [Centre for NDE, Indian Institute of Technology - Madras Chennai 600036, T. N. (India)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

327

Ocean - Tools | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tools Tools Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Decision-Support Tools (DSTs): Science and information are fundamental to effective marine planning. Marine planning involves inclusive discussion and analyses of the status and potential uses of 3-dimensional areas of coastal, marine and Great Lakes ecosystems (including the water column) and their potential changes over time. Relevant spatial data and derived interpretive and analytical products (i.e. decision-support tools) help inform all phases of the marine planning process. To date, several decision-support tools have been develop to support marine planning efforts. Marine planners should carefully evaluate which tools best apply to their region or specific issue or project. Below is a list of

328

New Wave Power Project In Oregon | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wave Power Project In Oregon Wave Power Project In Oregon New Wave Power Project In Oregon June 17, 2011 - 3:12pm Addthis Mike Reed Water Power Program Manager, Water Power Program What does this project do? Promises to add tremendous value to the wave energy industry, reinforcing utility-scale viability, collecting ground-breaking environmental impact data and exploring avenues for cost reduction. Has issued localized manufacturing contracts for the PB150 to several Oregon companies. If you've ever been surfing, or gone swimming in choppy water, you've experienced first-hand the striking power of waves. In fact, further offshore, wave activity becomes even more powerful, making it an excellent resource for generating clean, renewable energy. That's exactly what the Department of Energy and its partner Ocean Power Technologies (OPT) are

329

Nonlinear waves in the solar atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the intended application to solar physics deserves great effort...waves and oscillations in the solar plasma. Figure 1 A typical...distance from the base of the solar atmosphere. The quantity is...The (a), (b) and (c) panels correspond to z=0, z=z...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Rogue wave impact on a tension leg platform: The effect of wave incidence angle and mooring line tension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An understanding of the interaction between extreme ocean conditions and floating offshore platforms is required for their design and safe operation. Rogue wave impacts cannot easily be handled by traditional analytic or computational techniques. Here we use Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate the fully non-linear dynamics of a large breaking wave on a semi-submersible tension leg platform. We consider the effect of wave impact angle and mooring line pre-tension on the subsequent motion of the platform, and predict the maximum tension in each mooring line. The primary effect of wave impact angle is to determine the peak mooring line tension and line “slackness” during wave impact. A 45° impact results in the maximum tension on the leading line. The maximum heave, surge and pitch vary only slightly with wave angle. As mooring line pre-tension is increased, the duration of heave and pitch excursions is reduced. Peak mooring tension increases only slightly, but the incidence of mooring line “slack” decreases significantly for higher pre-tension. Properly applied, SPH has a wide application in predicting non-linear wave–structure interactions. Genuine opportunity exists for using SPH in the design of structures and mooring systems exposed to extreme ocean events such as rogue wave impact.

Murray Rudman; Paul W. Cleary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ocean Color Web | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Color Web Ocean Color Web Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Ocean Color Web Dataset Summary Description A comprehensive image analysis package for the processing, display, analysis, and quality control of ocean color data. Tags {Ocean,"water color",spectrometer,"sea viewing",MODIS,"marine biology",NASA,GSFC,"Goddard Space Flight Center"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 15-Jan-2010 Publisher National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contact Name Contact Email Gene.C.Feldman@nasa.gov Unique Identifier NASA-1547

332

Ocean Data Impacts in Global HYCOM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of the assimilation of ocean observations on reducing global Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) 48-h forecast errors is presented. The assessment uses an adjoint-based data impact procedure that characterizes the forecast impact of ...

James A. Cummings; Ole Martin Smedstad

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1982 research-article Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion...Lennard J. H. Turner P. Wadhams Renewable ocean energy sources can eventually supply a large fraction of man's energy needs, starting in the 1990s...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The SUN Action database : collecting and analyzing typical actions for visual scene types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent work in human and machine vision has increasingly focused on the problem of scene recognition. Scene types are largely defined by the actions one might typically do there: an office is a place someone would typically ...

Olsson, Catherine Anne White

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of intense climate interest. A large fraction of the carbon fixed in the oceanic surface waters is recycledOceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean are estimated from selected hydrographic sections from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment spanning the world

Wunsch, Carl

336

Ocean Mixing and Climate ChangeOcean Mixing and Climate Change Factors inducing seawater mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the reverse current created when the fluid flows past an obstacle. Ocean Eddies range: cm-100 km. When two energy drives global winds ­ Latitudinal wind belts produce ocean currents · Determine circulation layer depth ~100 m · Heat transfer from equator to pole by ocean currents · Oceans redistribute about

Russell, Lynn

337

Ocean Sci., 3, 363377, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/363/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

currents and water mass properties intriguing texture. In the upper ocean observational evidenceOcean Sci., 3, 363­377, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/363/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Variability of Antarctic intermediate Water properties

Boyer, Edmond

338

Indian Ocean Surface Circulations and Their Connection To Indian Ocean Dipole, Identified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Surface Currents Analysis Realtime (OSCAR) Data Advisor : Peter C Chu Second Reader : Charles Sun Aldisrupting Al--QaidaQaida''s networks network IraqIraq''s Instabilitys Instability #12;Ocean Surface Currents Analysis ­ Realtime (OSCAR) Data Base Ocean Surface currents data available for whole world' oceans at www

Chu, Peter C.

339

Ocean Sci., 3, 223228, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/223/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and regional sea level changes associated with changing currents and mass distribution in the ocean. The studyOcean Sci., 3, 223­228, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/223/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Towards measuring the meridional overturning circulation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

340

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

342

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. We receive many benefits from the oceans from seafood, recreation and transportation industriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our ocean impacts our own health and well- being, and in turn how

343

Oceans and ClimateOceans and Climate PeterPeter RhinesRhines 11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

say, the ocean is a great thermometer/thermometer/halometerhalometer Levitus, Antonov, Boyer+ Stephens

344

Coupling Mineral Carbonation and Ocean Liming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

systems suggests that, unless air capture significantly outperforms these systems, it is likely to require more than 400 kJ of work per mol of CO2, requiring it to be powered by CO2-neutral power sources in order to be CO2 neg. ... by the oceans at an increased rate if ocean alky. ... Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is altering the seawater chem. of the world's oceans with consequences for marine biota. ...

P. Renforth; T. Kruger

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

Waves in Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quadratic corrections to the metaplectic formulation of mode conversions. In this work we showed how to systematically deal with quadratic corrections beyond the usual linearization of the dispersion matrix at a conversion. The linearization leads to parabolic cylinder functions as the local approximation to the full-wave behavior, but these do not include the variation in amplitude associated with ray refraction in the neighborhood of the conversion. Hence, the region over which they give a good fit to the incoming and outgoing WKB solutions is small. By including higher order corrections it is possible to provide a much more robust matching. We also showed that it was possible, in principle, to extend these methods to arbitrary order. A new normal form for mode conversion. This is based upon our earlier NSF-DOE-funded work on ray helicity. We have begun efforts to apply these new ideas in practical ray tracing algorithms. Group theoretical foundation of path integrals and phase space representations of wave problems. Using the symbol theory of N. Zobin, we developed a new understanding of path integrals on phase space. The initial goal was to find practical computational tools for dealing with non-standard mode conversions. Along the way we uncovered a new way to represent wave functions directly on phase space without the intermediary of a Wigner function. We are exploring the use of these ideas for numerical studies of conversion, with the goal of eventually incorporating kinetic effects. Wave packet studies of gyroresonance crossing. In earlier work, Huanchun Ye and Allan Kaufman -- building upon ideas due to Lazar Friedland -- had shown that gyroresonance crossings could be treated as a double conversion. This perspective is one we have used for many of our papers since then. We are now performing a detailed numerical comparison between full-wave and ray tracing approaches in the study of minority-ion gyroresonance crossing. In this study, a fast magnetosonic wave -- supported by a majority-ion species such as deuterium -- crosses the resonance layer associated with a minority species, such as hydrogen. By using wave packets instead of harmonic solutions, it becomes easy to see the evolution in k-space of the minority-ion disturbance, and the time delay for emission of the reflected fast-wave packet. Iterated conversion in a cavity. When mode conversion occurs in a cavity where rays are trapped, multiple conversions will occur and the resulting absorption profile will typically have a complicated spatial dependence due to overlapping interference patterns. The goal of this work is to develop fast and efficient ray-based methods for computing the cavity response to external driving, and to compute the spatial absorption profile. We have introduced a new approach that allows us to visualize in great detail the underlying iterated ray geometry, and should lead to simpler methods for identifying parameter values where global changes occur in the qualitative response (e.g. global bifurcations).

Tracy, Eugene R

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

Forcing of the Indian Ocean Dipole on the Interannual Variations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean: Roles of the Indonesian Throughflow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Controlled numerical experiments using ocean-only and ocean–atmosphere coupled general circulation models show that interannual sea level depression in the eastern Indian Ocean during the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) events forces enhanced Indonesian ...

Dongliang Yuan; Jing Wang; Tengfei Xu; Peng Xu; Zhou Hui; Xia Zhao; Yihua Luan; Weipeng Zheng; Yongqiang Yu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1 G. Danabasoglu,1 M. Holland,1 Y.-O. Kwon,1 and W. G. Large1] The impacts of parameterized lateral ocean viscosity on climate are explored using three 120-year integrations of a fully coupled climate model. Reducing viscosity leads to a generally improved ocean circulation

Jochum, Markus

348

ACR 891 (?) Ocean Policy: Current Issues seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACR 891 (?) Ocean Policy: Current Issues seminar Fall, 2013 (2 cr, + 1 cr optional) Professor of a common pool resource than the world's oceans it can only be the atmosphere. The latter is currently neglected. This seminar is intended to introduce students to some of the current issues in ocean policy

349

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

Pierce, Stephen

350

Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST -We are implementing and evaluating a feature tracking approach to estimate ocean surface currents. - This approach allows us to estimate://cioss.coas.oregonstate.edu/ Ocean surface currents (vectors) derived from SST (background) modeled fields along the west coast of U

Kurapov, Alexander

351

Ocean indicators Current knowledge and future directions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean indicators Current knowledge and future directions Brian Burke, NOAA Fisheries Brian.Burke@noaa.gov #12;· Review of ocean indicator work · Forecasting · Indicator gaps and the importance of mechanistic understanding · Plugging in to management #12;Haeseker et al. 2012 Ocean survival is low and variable #12;-10 -5

352

Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Forcing: currents Figure: Velocity (m/s) at ocean surface, average of an OPA climatology Marco van Hulten: Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model 5 #12;Forcing: currents Figure: Atlantic OverturningAluminium in an ocean general circulation model Marco van Hulten November 15, 2011 This research

Haak, Hein

353

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

Barth, Jack

354

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, School of Ocean depths of 20 m (surface water) and 1,000 m. OTEC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, the process Energy Conversion. At first, OTEC plantships providing electricity, via submarine power cables, to shore

355

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions Chris Brierley, Alan Thorpe, Mat Collins's to perform the integrations Currently uses a `slab' ocean #12;An Ocean Model Required to accurately model transient behaviour Will have its own uncertainties Requires even more computing power Create new models

Jones, Peter JS

356

Gravimetric geoid in the Northwest Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Gravimetric geoid in the Northwest Pacific Ocean A. B. Watts A. R. Leeds...gravimetric geoid of the Northwest Pacific Ocean. The 1 1 averages are based on...observations of gravity in the northwest Pacific Ocean, Tr. Intern. Okeanol., AN......

A. B. Watts; A. R. Leeds

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Anthropogenic modification of the oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...calcification in the coralline alga Hydrolithon decreased following...concentration. Epiphytic coralline algae are much less abundant in low-pH...that, like corals, coralline algae will be highly susceptible to...currently very little fossil fuel CO2 in the deep ocean. However...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

ScienceMatters Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the ocean. The growth of marine algae is highest at the ice edge during the brief summer period when the ice of the marine food web, providing the main source of nourishment for fish and marine mammals. Algae also remove at molecular-level manufacturing as attempts to assemble LEGO pieces while wearing boxing gloves

Pedersen, Tom

359

Turning Ocean Water Into Rain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...an alternative method of desalination for mainland communities...Although thermally driven desalination may be a good option for...a good attempt, but the economics will have to be proved.” Kathiroli...are just starting out.” Desalination. Turning ocean water into...

Yudhijit Bhattacharjee

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

360

PACIFIC OCEAN SOUTH BAY HARBOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PACIFIC OCEAN LONG BEACH SOUTH BAY HARBOR GATEWAY NORWALK PASADENA EAST LA DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES W illow P Pacific CoastHw y Anaheim 5th St 1stSt P©$ P©$ Transit Mall P©$ Pacific Long Beach P Lakew

Weinreb, Sander

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. Carl Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA #12;PUBLISHER'S NOTES Material in this publication may be copied

362

Ocean Energy: Forms and Prospects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...disabled yacht or fish-ing boat out of...indicates that wind waves are regenerated...For example, if wind is forced to move...envisaged are huge offshore floating or near-surface...suggested that kelp farms be developed for...flux of energy from winds into waves would...

John D. Isaacs; Walter R. Schmitt

1980-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

363

Wind dependence of deep ocean ambient noise at low frequencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of experiments has been carried out using a vertical line array to measure low?frequency ambient noise at deep ocean sites in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Data in the band from 13 to 300 Hz were processed to obtain the array response directed vertically upward in order to study the noise due to local winds. The results indicate that there are two regimes of behavior depending on the wind speed v with the transition occurring at the onset of wave breaking v?10 kn. The noise level (NL) for a specific wind noise process was related to a power n of the wind speed according to the relationship NL=B+20n?log?v and the model parameters were obtained by fitting the data. The average value over the band was n=0.3 for wind speeds wind?generated noise was determined over the low?frequency band for wind speeds from 10–30 kn. The values are consistent with those of a recent analysis of available noise data [Kewley e t a l. ‘‘Low?frequency wind?generated ambient noise source levels ’’ J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 8 8 1894–1902 (1990)] and the model provides good agreement with wind noise measurements obtained with omni hydrophones in the southern oceans.

N. R. Chapman; J. W. Cornish

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Chapter 2 - The History of Measuring Ocean Currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins with a brief mention of the contributions made by the ancient mariners in the “discovery” of oceanic currents. Subsequent efforts made by several investigators in this direction, toward development of various devices for measurements of oceanic currents, are then addressed. These include technologies for measurement of surface currents, subsurface and abyssal currents, seafloor boundary layer currents, and vertical profiling of horizontal currents. Surface current measurement technologies include the application of drifting surface bodies; imaging of surface water motion trajectories and patterns with the support of aerial photography, radiometry, and active microwave radar systems; and vector mapping based on current-driven sea-surface wave transport. This is followed by discussion of technologies developed for subsurface and abyssal current measurements. These include spatially integrated measurements based on earth’s magnetism and oceanic sound speed, Lagrangian measurements based on motion of drifting subsurface floats, and Eulerian measurements with the support of a multitude of devices such as suspended drag, propeller revolution registration by mechanical counters, unidirectional impeller current meters, Savonius rotor current meters, ultrasonic acoustic methods, thermal sensors for measurements of turbulent motions, laser Doppler sensors, and acoustic Doppler current meters. This chapter further addresses an important topic of seafloor boundary layer current measurements using mechanical devices and nonmechanical devices such as BASS and MAVS. The chapter concludes with a discussion of technologies developed for vertical profiling of horizontal currents.

Antony Joseph

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Acoustic monitoring of severe weather in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind and rainfall are the principal physical processes responsible for the production of high?frequency (1–50 kHz) ambient sound in the ocean. The primary source of the sound is the resonant ringing of individual bubbles created during wave breaking and raindrop splashes. Larger bubbles (>300 ?m diameter) quickly return to the surface while smaller bubbles can be mixed downward at several meters. During severe weather a layer of smaller ambient bubble forms and effectively absorbs higher?frequency (>10 kHz) sound. These processes are revealed in a two?year record of ambient sound recorded from a subsurface mooring at 50N 145W in the NE Pacific Ocean as part of the Canadian SOLAS program. The passive acoustic signal of wind rain and ambient bubbleclouds are compared to the subsurface mooring data including data from an upward looking 200 kHz active sonar and a 300 kHz ADCP. The acoustic signatures of light moderate and heavy rainfall are superimposed on the signature of high wind demonstrating rainfall detection even in the presence of high wind. [Work supported by ONR Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Canadian CFCAS NSERC.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Wave-particle interaction and Hamiltonian dynamics investigated in a traveling wave tube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For wave-particle interaction studies, the one-dimensional (1-D) beam-plasma system can be advantageously replaced by a Traveling Wave Tube (TWT). This led us to a detailed experimental analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and a small either cold or warm beam. More recently, a test electron beam has been used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s). The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is investigated with a trochoidal energy analyzer that records the beam energy distribution at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave responsible for Landau damping is observed. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is also observed, as well as the transition to large-scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap leading to a typical 'devil's staircase' behavior. A new strategy for the control of chaos is tested.

Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro [Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moleculaires, Unite 6633 CNRS-Universite de Provence, Equipe Turbulence Plasma, Case 321, Centre de Saint-Jerome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Ocean Wavemaster Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wavemaster Ltd Wavemaster Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Wavemaster Ltd Address CAPCIS House 1 Echo Street Place Manchester, United Kingdom Zip M1 2DP Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product String representation "WaveMaster expl ... water surface." is too long. Phone number 0161 933 4000 Website http://http://www.tnei.co.uk/p Coordinates 53.479605°, -2.248818° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.479605,"lon":-2.248818,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

368

Ocean noise in the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean ambient noise is well studied in the North Pacific and North Atlantic but is poorly described for most of the worlds' oceans. Calibrated passive acoustic recordings were collected during 2009–2010 at seven locations in the central and western tropical and subtropical Pacific. Monthly and hourly mean power spectra (15–1000?Hz) were calculated in addition to their skewness kurtosis and percentile distributions. Overall ambient noise at these seven sites was 10–20?dB lower than reported recently for most other locations in the North Pacific. At frequencies 200?Hz with higher levels recorded in the winter than in the summer. Several species of baleen whales humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae) blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales also contributed seasonally to ambient noise in characteristic frequency bands.

Ana Širovi?; Sean M. Wiggins; Erin M. Oleson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Excitation of Banded Whistler Waves in the Magnetosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Banded whistler waves can be generated by the whistler anisotropy instability driven by two bi-Maxwellian electron components with T{sub {perpendicular}}/T{sub {parallel}} > 1 at different T{sub {parallel}} For typical magnetospheric condition of 1 < {omega}{sub e}/{Omega}{sub e} < 5 in regions associated with strong chorus, upper-band waves can be excited by anisotropic electrons below {approx} 1 keV, while lower-band waves are excited by anisotropic electrons above {approx} 10 keV. Lower-band waves are generally field-aligned and substantially electromagnetic, while upper-band waves propagate obliquely and have quasi-electrostatic fluctuating electric fields. The quasi-electrostatic feature of upper-band waves suggests that they may be more easily identified in electric field observations than in magnetic field observations. Upper-band waves are liable to Landau damping and the saturation level of upperband waves is lower than lower-band waves, consistent with observations that lower-band waves are stronger than upper-band waves on average. The oblique propagation, the lower saturation level, and the more severe Landau damping together would make upper-band waves more tightly confined to the geomagnetic equator (|{lambda}{sub m}| < {approx}10{sup o}) than lower-band waves.

Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Kaijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

370

Plane waves Lumped systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems S x y z Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · open tube #12;2 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · closed tube Impedance · Cylindrical waves z x y r #12;3 Impedance · Cylindrical waves ­ Circumferential part n=0 n=1 n=2 n=3 Impedance · Cylindrical

Berlin,Technische Universität

371

Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

372

MHK Technologies/Wave Energy Propulsion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

< MHK Technologies < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Wave Energy Propulsion.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Kneider Innovations Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Description The device concept is a converter of the vertical potential energy moving wave to push the boat on horizontal kinetic motion Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions The device is compliant for boat navigating on sea and oceans or lakes when water levels are changing cyclicly waves Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 18:32.0 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Wave_Energy_Propulsion&oldid=681483"

373

MHK Technologies/hyWave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hyWave hyWave < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage HyWave.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Wavegen subsidiary of Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Mutriku *MHK Projects/Wavegen Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The hyWave device rests directly on the seabed and is designed to operate in the near-shore environment in a nominal mean water depth of 15m. Optimum performance will be achieved when driven by a long ocean swell. The pneumatic power of the oscillating water column (OWC) is converted to electricity by a Wells generator and specially designed induction generators.

374

MHK Technologies/Wave Rider | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rider Rider < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Wave Rider.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Seavolt Technologies Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The company s Wave Rider system uses buoys and hydraulic pumps to convert the movement of ocean waves into electricity Electricity is generated via small turbines powered by hydraulic circuits which captures the energy of the wave and converts it into high pressure hydraulic fluid flow spinning the turbines to generate electricity Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 19:42.1 << Return to the MHK database homepage

375

Semi-Compressible Ocean Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The equations of motion are reexamined with the objective of improving upon the Boussinesq approximation. We derive new equations that conserve energy, filter out sound waves, are more accurate than the Boussinesq set and are computationally ...

WK Dewar; J Schoonover; TJ McDougall; WR Young

376

The noise spectral parameters and the energy of breaking waves experimental study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The process of wave breaking and whitecap creation is one of the most important and least understood phenomena associated with the evolution of the surface gravity waves in the open sea. This process is the main way of energy and momentum transfer between ocean and atmosphere. However it is very difficult to estimate under real sea conditions the frequency of breaking wave events or the fraction of sea surface covered by whitecaps and the amount of dissipated energy produced by wave breaking. A controlled experiment was carried out in the Ocean Basin Laboratory at MARINTEK Trondheim (Norway). The simulation of random waves of the prescribed spectra provided a very realistic pattern of the sea surface. The number of breaking waves was estimated using photography method and wave staff recording. Acoustic measurements during the experiments were conducted in order to examine the relationship between the noise spectral parameters and both the whitecap coverage and dissipation energy of breaking waves for different types of waves. A comparison of simultaneous video observations wave staff records of the surface wave above the hydrophones with the spectral parameters of acoustical signals made it possible to find physical links between processes.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Deep-Sea Research I 50 (2003) 321 Generation of internal tides in an ocean of finite depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy for mixing, internal tides generated by the interaction of the barotropic tide with bottomDeep-Sea Research I 50 (2003) 3­21 Generation of internal tides in an ocean of finite depth energy is converted into the internal wave field are quite uncertain. Here, I present analytical

Khatiwala, Samar

378

Measuring Ocean Acidification: New Technology for a New Era of Ocean Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 system changes in the upper ocean (wind-mixed layer) at stations in the Pacific (HOT) and Atlantic (BATS) oceans: the carbonate:bicarbonate concentration ratio and pH. ... Ocean alkalinity buffers the effects of oceanic CO2 uptake, but slowing and eventually reversing the trend of increasing ocean acidity will require increased continental weathering and dissolution of ocean carbonate sediments. ... (80) Each platform imposes different constraints on instrument design and performance in terms of measurement frequency, accuracy, and precision, as well as sensor size, power requirements, and endurance. ...

Robert H. Byrne

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

MHK Technologies/WaveBlanket PolymerMembrane | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WaveBlanket PolymerMembrane WaveBlanket PolymerMembrane < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WaveBlanket PolymerMembrane.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wind Waves and Sun Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description WaveBlanket could be called the accordion of the sea Poetically speaking It is simply a bellows played upon by the swells of the ocean WaveBlanket is a flexible polymer membrane which uses air pressure rather than steel to achieve its lateral strength and as a result produces about 1000 times more energy per unit of mass than rigid green energy designs

380

Wave-Energy Company Looks to Test Prototypes in Maine Waters | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wave-Energy Company Looks to Test Prototypes in Maine Waters Wave-Energy Company Looks to Test Prototypes in Maine Waters Wave-Energy Company Looks to Test Prototypes in Maine Waters April 9, 2010 - 4:19pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell Resolute Marine Energy - a Boston-based, wave-energy technology company - hopes to test ocean wave energy conversion prototypes in Maine sometime in the summer of 2011. The company has already completed two of the three testing stages, the first using computer simulation and the second with reduced-scale prototypes in a controlled environment. Now, the company is ready to take the technology offshore to begin ocean testing. Its eyes are set on the waters of its Northern neighbor, Maine. Maine is an ideal location for Resolute Marine Energy to conduct testing for a few reasons, said CEO and President Bill Staby. Working in Maine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

Cheon, Woo Geunn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Drought remedial measures through resistivity investigations in a typical crystalline region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic geoelectrical investigations were carried out in a typical drought ... of Andhra Pradesh, India, for evolving drought remedial strategies. Depth to basement maps, geoelectrical...

B. H. Briz-Kishore

383

Energy flux into internal lee waves: sensitivity to future climate changes using linear theory and a climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Internal lee waves generated by geostrophic flows over rough topography are thought to be a significant energy sink for eddies and energy source for deep ocean mixing. The sensitivity of the energy flux into lee waves from pre-industrial, present ...

Angelique Melet; Robert Hallberg; Alistair Adcroft; Maxim Nikurashin; Sonya Legg

384

Harmonic generation by reflecting internal waves Bruce Rodenborn, D. Kiefer, H. P. Zhang, and Harry L. Swinney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harmonic generation by reflecting internal waves Bruce Rodenborn, D. Kiefer, H. P. Zhang, and Harry 2011 The generation of internal gravity waves by tidal flow over topography is an important oceanic­Stokes equations to determine the value of the topographic slope that gives the most intense generation of second

Texas at Austin. University of

385

Surface waves in multilayered elastic media. Part II. Higher mode spectra and spectral ratios from point sources in plane layered Earth models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...10- -0.~0~TTEr00 -0.18161E 0l SURFACE WAVES IN MULTILAYERED ELASTIC ~EDIA TABLE 18 OCEAN 1965 DISPLACEMENT AND STRESS RA1IOS AT A DEPTH OF 150 KN RAYLEIGH LOVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~oo...

David G. Harkrider

386

On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

Reid, Joseph L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Indian Ocean surface circulations and their connection to Indian Ocean dipole, identified from Ocean Surface Currents Analysis Real Time (OSCAR) data .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ocean surface circulation is an essential component of the world climate system. In this study, the Ocean Surface Currents Analysis - Real Time (OSCAR) data,… (more)

Rana, Haris Sarwar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Wave Pipe Generating Wave Pipe < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Generating Wave Pipe.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Able Technologies Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The EGWAP incorporates a specially designed environmentally sound hollow noncorroding pipe also known as a tube or container whose total height is from the ocean floor to above the highest wave peak The pipe is anchored securely beneath the ocean floor When the water level in the pipe rises due to wave action a float rises and a counterweight descends This action will empower a main drive gear and other gearings to turn a generator to produce electricity The mechanism also insures that either up or down movement of the float will turn the generator drive gear in the same direction Electrical output of the generator is fed into a transmission cable

389

Ocean - Regional Planning Efforts | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Efforts Regional Planning Efforts Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Marine planning is a science-based process that provides transparent information about ocean use and guarantees the public and stakeholders a voice early on in decisions affecting the uses of the marine environment. It is an inclusive, bottom-up approach that gives the Federal Government, States, and Tribes, with input from local communities, stakeholders, and the public, the ability to make informed decisions on how best to optimize the use of and protect the ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes. Under the National Ocean Policy, the United States is subdivided into nine regional planning areas. Within each region, Federal, State, and Tribal

390

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Earth, Space Sciences » Earth, Space Sciences » Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate change and projecting the impacts of high-latitude change on regions throughout the globe. Get Expertise Phil Jones COSIM Email Matthew Hecht COSIM Email Elizabeth Hunke COSIM Email Mat Maltrud COSIM Email Bill Lipscomb COSIM Email Scott Elliott COSIM Email Todd Ringler COSIM Email We are also developing a set of next-generation ocean and ice models with variable resolution horizontal grids to focus resolution on regions of interest or regions where specific processes (like eddies) need to be resolved. Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the

391

Magnetic Field Generation by Detonation Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple model is given for the spontaneous magnetic field generation by a detonation wave in condensed matter. The field is shown to arise from the noncollinearity of the thermal and electron density gradients near a medium boundary at the detonation shock front. The model allows calculation of approximate values for the field strength at the front and penetration ahead of the detonation wave. For typical explosive media interfaced by air the magnetic field is predicted to lie in the range 0.1 to 15 G.

Michael J. Frankel and Edward T. Toton

1979-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

Evaluation of OSCAR ocean surface current product in the tropical Indian Ocean using in situ data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The OSCAR (ocean surface current analysis real-time), which is a ... , has been evaluated in the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) in two different ways. First ... capture the variabilities of the well-known surface current

RAJESH SIKHAKOLLI; RASHMI SHARMA; SUJIT BASU; B S GOHIL…

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Effects of horizontal mixing on the upper ocean temperature in the equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of horizontal mixing on the thermal structure of the equatorial Pacific Ocean is examined based on a sigma coordinate ... on the upper thermal structure in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, while their ...

Chuanjiang Huang; Fangli Qiao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and currents at various resolutions. We briefly present the OFS, then describe three currently available oceanShort Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite L., and Soulat, F. 2008. Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite. ­ ICES

Ribes, Aurélien

395

Ocean Sci., 8, 227248, 2012 www.ocean-sci.net/8/227/2012/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the Arabian Sea, the surface oceanic currents form a cyclonic gyre in January, which weakens in March (KindleOcean Sci., 8, 227­248, 2012 www.ocean-sci.net/8/227/2012/ doi:10.5194/os-8-227-2012 © Author(s) 2012. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science Mesoscale variability of water masses in the Arabian

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

396

Ocean Science, 1, 145157, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/145/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. On the other hand, the thermal forcing has a neg- ligible effect on the ocean currents. For sea ice, both of heat by the ocean current and advect also warmer air in the Weddell Sea and colder air in the Ross SeaOcean Science, 1, 145­157, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/145/ SRef-ID: 1812-0792/os/2005

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

397

Inherent optical properties of the ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and Monterey Bay, and includes Gulf Stream, Loop Current, slope, shelf, and ... The solar-induced fluorescence of CDOM ...

1999-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

398

Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 September 1933 research-article Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve...

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

On Ocean Currents Produced by Winds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 January 1935 research-article On Ocean Currents Produced by Winds G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access...

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Intermediate Waters of the Pacific Ocean.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

BOOK REVIEWS. 313. REID, J. L., JR. 1965. Intermediate. Waters of the Pacific Ocean. Johns Hopkins Oceano- graphic. Studies,. No. 2. Johns Hopkins. Press ...

1999-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector.

402

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll...

403

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited OCEAN THERMAL EXTRACTABLE ENERGY VISUALIZATION Award DE-EE0002664 October 28, 2012 Final Technical Report Prepared by...

404

Analysis of variations in ocean color  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aug 9, 1976 ... mote sensing values of the color of the ocean .... its spectral variations, we must first study ... tering can be expressed in terms of a power.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

405

Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

406

MHK Technologies/CETO Wave Energy Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Energy Technology Wave Energy Technology < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage CETO Wave Energy Technology.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Carnegie Wave Energy Limited Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/CETO La Reunion *MHK Projects/CETO3 Garden Island *MHK Projects/Perth Wave Energy Project PWEP Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7/8: Open Water System Testing & Demonstration & Operation Technology Description The CETO system distinguishes itself from other wave energy devices by operating out of sight and being anchored to the ocean floor. Each CETO unit consists of a pump unit moored to the ocean floor and connected to a submerged Buoyant Actuator via a tether. The Buoyant Actuator moves in an orbital motion, in harmony with the wave, capturing the power of the passing waves. The Buoyant Actuator is connected to a tether (marine rope) that creates a vertical upward force which actuates the seabed mounted piston pump. This force pressurises fluid in the CETO system. The high pressure fluid is then sent ashore via a subsea pipeline. Onshore the fluid passes through a standard hydroelectric turbine to generate zero-emission electricity and/or through a reverse osmosis plant to directly create zero-emission desalinated water (replacing greenhouse gas emitting electrically driven pumps usually required for such plants). The fluid is then re-circulated at low-pressure to the CETO units offshore creating a closed-loop system. The generation capacity of CETO projects is scalable. To increase the project capacity additional units can be added offshore and connected back to a larger power house onshore.

407

Variability, interaction and change in the atmosphere–ocean–ecology system of the Western Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...all. In a symposium on the Indian Ocean over 30 years ago, David...sea level? Why do most modern Indian Ocean reefs only thinly veneer...survival over long time-scales) point to the importance of long-term...regeneration. In the Western Indian Ocean, studies are in place...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Atmosphere–ocean dynamics in the Western Indian Ocean recorded in corals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Atmosphere-ocean-ecology dynamics in the Western Indian Ocean organized by Tom Spencer...18 O (dashed line) and 11-point moving average (solid line...Parker et al. 1995) and 11-point moving average (solid line...to the wind- driven southern Indian Ocean gyre (Allan et al. 1995...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

Meyers, Steven D.

410

Persistent Ocean Monitoring with Underwater Gliders: Towards Accurate Reconstruction of Dynamic Ocean Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to ocean currents. The speed control algorithm then optimizes the speed along the planned path so waters of large magnitude ocean currents, and is length constrained. Secondly, we develop a velocityPersistent Ocean Monitoring with Underwater Gliders: Towards Accurate Reconstruction of Dynamic

Smith, Ryan N.

411

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

Boss, Emmanuel S.

412

TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC-scale interactions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, especially, processes associated with the EI Nino phenomena. He has of ocean temperatures. He suggests that an anomalously high heat supply in the equatorial Pacific

413

Ocean Sci., 3, 299310, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/299/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and industrial fisheries, are experiencing a constant increase, significantly affecting the marine ecosystemOcean Sci., 3, 299­310, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/299/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Observing the Mediterranean Sea from space: 21 years

Boyer, Edmond

414

Forces due to waves in the presence of currents on a submerged model structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering FORCES DUE TO WAVES IN THE PRESENCE OF CURRENTS ON A SUBMERGED MODEL STRUCTURE A Thesis by DAVID RAY SHIELDS Approved as to style and content by: Jo n . Her &c (Chairman of Committee) K...-induced and nonwave-induced (ZO). Nonwave-induced loads are the result of nonwave-induced currents and fluid-entrained spray acting upon the structure which may extend above the water's free surface. The wave-induced hydrodynamic loads are the result of ocean...

Shields, David Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

415

Reflectivity in shock wave fronts of xenon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New results for the reflection coefficient of shock-compressed dense xenon plasmas at pressures of 1.6–20 GPa and temperatures around 30?000 K are interpreted. Reflectivities typical of metallic systems are found at high densities. A consistent description of the measured reflectivities is achieved if a finite width of the shock wave front is considered. Several mechanisms to give a microscopic explanation for a finite extension of the shock front are discussed.

T Raitza; H Reinholz; G Röpke; V Mintsev; A Wierling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.cold deep-ocean waters to produce electric power via eitherOffice of Solar Power Applications. Division of Ocean Energy

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an open cycle ocean thermal difference power plant. M.S.screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.1958. Ocean cooling water system for 800 MW power station.

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer1 May 2009. [ 1 ] Global ocean wind power has recently beenincreases mean global ocean wind power by +58% and À4%,

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

screens for ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.cold deep-ocean waters to produce electric power via eitherpower from the temperature differential between warm surface and cold deep-ocean

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Tidal triggering of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean William S. D. Wilcock School...of earthquakes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, a region of high-amplitude...interaction|forecasting|prediction|Pacific Ocean| Introduction For more than a......

William S. D. Wilcock

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

MHK Technologies/Indian Wave Energy Device IWAVE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Energy Device IWAVE Wave Energy Device IWAVE < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Indian Wave Energy Device IWAVE.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Nualgi Nanobiotech Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description It is a floating device tethered with chains to piles driven to ocean bottom The wave action raises the heavy partially buoyant piston that drives the overhead crankshaft by half turn The receding wave drops the piston completing the balance half turn One revolution is obtained for every wave Using gear box and generator the current is produced continuously

422

MHK Technologies/Oceanlinx Mark 3 Wave Energy Converter | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oceanlinx Mark 3 Wave Energy Converter Oceanlinx Mark 3 Wave Energy Converter < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Oceanlinx Mark 3 Wave Energy Converter.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Oceanlinx Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/GPP Namibia *MHK Projects/Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project *MHK Projects/Hawaii *MHK Projects/Oceanlinx Maui *MHK Projects/Port Kembla *MHK Projects/Portland Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Oceanlinx Mark 3 Wave Energy Converter is a floating multi Oscilating Water Chamber Wave Energy Converter. The airflow generated by the OWC passes through a patented Denniss Auld turbine which converts the bidirectional airflow of the OWC to a unidirectional rotation of the axial flow turbine which in turn drives a generator.

423

Reduced order prediction of rare events in unidirectional nonlinear water waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the problem of short-term prediction of rare, extreme water waves in unidirectional fields, a critical topic for ocean structures and naval operations. One possible mechanism for the occurrence of such rare, unusually-intense waves is nonlinear wave focusing. Recent results have demonstrated that random localizations of energy, induced by the dispersive mixing of different harmonics, can grow significantly due to localized nonlinear focusing. Here we show how the interplay between i) statistical properties captured through linear information such as the waves power spectrum and ii) nonlinear dynamical properties of focusing localized wave groups defines a critical length scale associated with the formation of extreme events. The energy that is locally concentrated over this length scale acts as the "trigger" of nonlinear focusing for wave groups and the formation of subsequent rare events. We use this property to develop inexpensive, short-term predictors of large water waves. Specifically, we sho...

Cousins, Will

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

ocean energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

425

ALIEN MAPS OF AN OCEAN-BEARING WORLD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When Earth-mass extrasolar planets first become detectable, one challenge will be to determine which of these worlds harbor liquid water, a widely used criterion for habitability. Some of the first observations of these planets will consist of disc-averaged, time-resolved broadband photometry. To simulate such data, the Deep Impact spacecraft obtained light curves of Earth at seven wavebands spanning 300-1000 nm as part of the EPOXI mission of opportunity. In this paper, we analyze disc-integrated light curves, treating Earth as if it were an exoplanet, to determine if we can detect the presence of oceans and continents. We present two observations each spanning 1 day, taken at gibbous phases of 57 deg. and 77 deg., respectively. As expected, the time-averaged spectrum of Earth is blue at short wavelengths due to Rayleigh scattering, and gray redward of 600 nm due to reflective clouds. The rotation of the planet leads to diurnal albedo variations of 15%-30%, with the largest relative changes occurring at the reddest wavelengths. To characterize these variations in an unbiased manner, we carry out a principal component analysis of the multi-band light curves; this analysis reveals that 98% of the diurnal color changes of Earth are due to only two dominant eigencolors. We use the time variations of these two eigencolors to construct longitudinal maps of the Earth, treating it as a non-uniform Lambert sphere. We find that the spectral and spatial distributions of the eigencolors correspond to cloud-free continents and oceans despite the fact that our observations were taken on days with typical cloud cover. We also find that the near-infrared wavebands are particularly useful in distinguishing between land and water. Based on this experiment, we conclude that it should be possible to infer the existence of water oceans on exoplanets with time-resolved broadband observations taken by a large space-based coronagraphic telescope.

Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Meadows, Victoria S.; Robinson, Tyler [Astronomy Department and Astrobiology Program, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Livengood, Timothy A.; Deming, Drake [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lisse, Carey M. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, SD/SRE, MP3-E167, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); A'Hearn, Michael F.; Wellnitz, Dennis D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Seager, Sara [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. 54-1626, MA 02139 (United States); Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: cowan@astro.washington.edu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alfvenic waves are thought to play an important role in coronal heating and acceleration of solar wind. Here we investigate the statistical properties of Alfvenic waves along spicules (jets that protrude into the corona) in a polar coronal hole using high-cadence observations of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We developed a technique for the automated detection of spicules and high-frequency waves. We detected 89 spicules and found (1) a mix of upward propagating, downward propagating, as well as standing waves (occurrence rates of 59%, 21%, and 20%, respectively); (2) the phase speed gradually increases with height; (3) upward waves dominant at lower altitudes, standing waves at higher altitudes; (4) standing waves dominant in the early and late phases of each spicule, while upward waves were dominant in the middle phase; (5) in some spicules, we find waves propagating upward (from the bottom) and downward (from the top) to form a standing wave in the middle of the spicule; and (6) the medians of the amplitude, period, and velocity amplitude were 55 km, 45 s, and 7.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We speculate that upward propagating waves are produced near the solar surface (below the spicule) and downward propagating waves are caused by reflection of (initially) upward propagating waves off the transition region at the spicule top. The mix of upward and downward propagating waves implies that exploiting these waves to perform seismology of the spicular environment requires careful analysis and may be problematic.

Okamoto, Takenori J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

Frandsen, Jannette B.

428

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste ... A raucous, hostile crowd of Philadelphia residents shouted down Environmental Protection Agency officials last week at a public hearing on the agency's tentative decision to issue a research permit for an ocean burn of chemical wastes. ...

1986-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

Dynamics of a Snowball Earth ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... a model that couples ice flow and ocean circulation, and is driven by a weak geothermal heat flux under a global ice cover about a kilometre thick. Compared with the ... studies accounted for the combined effects of thick ice cover and flow, and driving by geothermal heating, yet ref. 11 simulated an ocean under a 200-m-thick ice cover ...

Yosef Ashkenazy; Hezi Gildor; Martin Losch; Francis A. Macdonald; Daniel P. Schrag; Eli Tziperman

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

430

Automated Sensor Networks to Advance Ocean Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satellite telecom- munications. A regional cabled observa- tory will "wire" a single region in the north- eastern Pacific Ocean with a high-speed optical and power grid. The coastal com- ponent will expand ocean- observing network in the Mid-Atlantic Bight waters (MAB, spanning offshore regions from

431

www.hboi.fau.edu Ocean Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to drive turbines #12;At present, the focus is to establish a small-scale ocean current test sitewww.hboi.fau.edu Ocean Energy Collaboration: A Charge for Engineers BULLETIN Summer 2012 Beginning by Executive Director Sue Skemp, they are helping to investigate and develop power extraction from particularly

Fernandez, Eduardo

432

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP/KNMI/TEC/RP/147 Validation of ASCAT 12.5-km winds The Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) delivers an operational level 2 wind product produces a level 1 product with 12.5-km WVC spacing that has a resolution of approximately 25 km. Since

Stoffelen, Ad

433

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP2/KNMI/TEC/RP/194 Quality Control of Ku. The OSCAT level 2a data are available in near-real time and OWDP is used at KNMI to produce the Ocean and Sea Ice (OSI) SAF wind product which is made available to users. A beta version of OWDP is also

Stoffelen, Ad

434

The Curious Case of Indian Ocean Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent studies have pointed out an increased warming over the Indian Ocean warm pool (the central-eastern Indian Ocean characterized by sea surface temperatures greater than 28.0°C) during the past half-century, although the reasons behind this ...

Mathew Koll Roxy; Kapoor Ritika; Pascal Terray; Sébastien Masson

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

Fleming, Alex J.

2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

436

Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across the Tropical Pacific Ocean as a Component of the TOGA-TAO Buoy Array R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction The purpose of this document is to bring together pertinent information concerning the NOAA TOGA-TAO buoy array so that a decision can be made for the following questions: 1. Are the scientific gains from an array of short-wave radiation sensors in the equatorial Pacific Ocean sufficiently impelling that DOE/ARM should provide financial and material support to NOAA/PMEL to install and operate this array? 2. What scientists and/or scientific studies would directly benefit from such a data set? 3. What should that array look like? That is, what sub-set of buoys should be so implemented given the per-buoy

437

Temporal Coherence of Normal Modes in an Ocean Waveguide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coherence time of acoustic signals is derived using coupled mode equation to the first order of sound speed perturbation squared. It is found that mode coupling induced by internal waves in a waveguide changes the temporal coherence of the acoustic field. For a typical shallow water environment numerical results show that the coherence time of acoustic field decreases as ?3/2 power of frequency and ?1/2 power of range at high frequencies in accord with experimental data. Ignoring the mode coupling the coherence time of acoustic field decreases as ?1 power of frequency and ?1/2 power of range same as that predicted for acoustic rays.

T. C. Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Sperm whale coda repertoires in the western Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sperm whales are social cetaceans that live in matrilineal family units and inhabit all major ocean basins from the tropics to polar regions. They produce stereotyped patterns of 3 to 40 broadband clicks termed “codas ” that typically occur within a period of less than 3 s. Coda repertoires can be assigned to a “vocal clan ” a type of social group used to define sperm whale population structure. Extensive studies of vocal clans have been conducted in the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP); however little is known about sperm whale coda repertoires in the western Pacific. We reviewed codas recorded from independent sperm whale groups that were acoustically and visually encountered during two marine mammal surveys conducted in the Northern Mariana Islands (10 groups) and Palau region (3 groups) in 2007 and 2012 respectively. Three bioacousticians qualitatively classified codas to type which indicated the presence of the “+1” and “regular” vocal clan. These data are now being analyzed using multivariate methods described by Rendell and Whitehead (2003) to quantitatively classify codas from each group. The identification of vocal clans within this region has implications for understanding the culturally linked stock distribution of sperm whales across the Pacific Ocean.

Elizabeth L. Ferguson; Thomas F. Norris; Cory A. Hom-Weaver; Kerry J. Dunleavy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Searching for stochastic gravitational waves using data from the two colocated LIGO Hanford detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Searches for a stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) using terrestrial detectors typically involve cross-correlating data from pairs of detectors. The sensitivity of such cross-correlation analyses depends, among ...

Aasi, J.

440

Technical Sessions B. E. Manner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B. E. Manner B. E. Manner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Wave Propagation Laboratory 130ulder, CO 80303 The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) pirog ram goals are ambitious, and its schedule is demanding. Many of the instruments, proposed for operations at the first Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site as early alS 1992 represent emerging technology and exist only as :special research prototypes. Therefore, an important preparatory step for ARM was an intensive field project in Colorado in 1991 to assess the suitability of instruments an(j tech- niques for profiling the thermodynamic and kinematic structure of the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The field work was designed to provide ARM with a head start by gathering practical information for the desigln and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A predictive ocean oil spill model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Papodopoulos, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaudt, K. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Szabo, D. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Clean Cities: Ocean State Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Ocean State Clean Cities Coalition Ocean State Clean Cities Coalition The Ocean State Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Ocean State Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Wendy Lucht 401-874-2792 wlucht@uri.edu Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Wendy Lucht Photo of Wendy Lucht Wendy Lucht has worked as the Ocean State Clean Cities coordinator at the University of Rhode Island (URI) since 2008 but has worked at URI since 1999. Lucht is working to make Rhode Island the first state certified by Project Get Ready, an initiative preparing cities and states for the arrival of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). As part of this effort, Lucht is serving as chair of the fleet-acquisition committee working on

443

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report about the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization project, which focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy from the world’s ocean thermal resources.

444

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Report summarizing the results of...

445

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Several people are photographed standing on the barge. The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion project at Hawaii's Natural Energy Lab was one of the first successful thermal ocean...

446

Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable (TRL 4 System) - THOR's Power Method...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable (TRL 4 System) - THOR's Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable (TRL 4 System) - THOR's Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices...

447

Regime for Marine Scientific Research in the Indian Ocean Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structural leadership by power-based actors was seen as fundamental by ... IOGOOS members to the successful establishment of an Ocean Observing System in the Indian Ocean.

Manoj Gupta

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Tensile stiffness analysis on ocean dynamic power umbilical  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tensile stiffness of ocean dynamic power umbilical is an important design parameter for ... for the estimation of tensile stiffness of the ocean dynamic power umbilical.

Ming-gang Tang ???; Jun Yan ? ?; Ye Wang ? ?; Qian-jin Yue ???

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Respiration and ammonium excretion by open ocean gelatinous  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mar 26, 1976 ... divers in the western North Atlantic Ocean. In situ rates of ... open ocean regions, however, there is little ..... power functions of body protein (mg.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

450

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Indonesian archipelago links the tropical Indian and western Pacific Oceans, so transmission of oceanic and atmospheric energy across the archipelago has the potential to… (more)

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Oxygen-nutrient relationships in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aug 18, 1972 ... In the northeastern Pacific Ocean the oxygen-phosphate ... different stations in the Pacific and Indian Oceans to study their water masses.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

Wave induced forces on a partially exposed circular cylinder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine the wave forces on a pipeline rest. ing on the bottom partia'lly embeded in surrounding sediments was conducted. The forces were measured by strain gauge load cells and recorded on an electronic strip chart recorder. The resulting forces were... Associated with the Potential Function of Stokes' 3rd Order Wave Theory Fluid Density Circular Have Frequency (ML a) O'-. 'APTER I IN RJCUCTION Since the Tate nineteenth century, men have been constructing various types of pipelines in t"e ocean...

Parker, Michael Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

453

Prufer Transformations for the Normal Modes in Ocean Acoustics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1926 Prufer introduced a method of transforming the second order Sturm-Liouville (SL) equation into two nonlinear first order differential equations for the phase oe and ''magnitude'', |oe{sup 2}+oe{sup 2}| for a Poincare phase space representation, (oe,oe). The useful property is the phase equation decouples from the magnitude one which leads to a nonlinear, two point boundary value problem for the eigenvalues, or SL numbers. The transformation has been used both theoretically, e.g. Atkinson, [1960] to prove certain properties of SL equations as well as numerically e.g Bailey [1978]. This paper examines the utility of the Prufer transformation in the context of numerical solutions for modes of the ocean acoustic wave equation. (Its use is certainly not well known in the ocean acoustics community.) Equations for the phase, oe, and natural logarithm of the ''magnitude'', ln(|oe{sup 2}+oe{sup 2}|) lead to same decoupling and a fast and efficient numerical solution with the SL eigenvalues mapping to the horizontal wavenubers. The Prufer transformation has stabilty problems for low order modes at high frequecies, so a numerically stable method of integrating the phase equation is derived. This seems to be the first time the these stability issues have been highlighted to provide a robust algorthim for the modes.

Baggeroer, Arthur B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

454

MHK Technologies/Archimedes Wave Swing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Archimedes Wave Swing Archimedes Wave Swing < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Archimedes Wave Swing.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/AWS II *MHK Projects/Portugal Pre Commercial Pilot Project Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The AWS wave energy converter is a cylindrical chamber moored to the seabed. Passing waves move an air-filled upper casing against a lower fixed cylinder, with up and down movement being converted into electricity. As a wave crest approaches, the water pressure on the top of the cylinder increases, and the upper part or 'floater' compresses the gas within the cylinder to balance the pressures. The reverse happens as the wave trough passes and the cylinder expands. The relative movement between the floater and the lower part or silo is converted to electricity by means of a hydraulic system and motor-generator set.

455

Sorption-desorption characteristics of uranium, cesium and strontium in typical podzol soils from Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cesium and strontium in typical podzol soils from Ukraine S. Mishra 1 H. Arae 1 P. V. Zamostyan 2 T. Ishikawa...Radiation Medicine of Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine Sorption-desorption behaviour of uranium (U......

S. Mishra; H. Arae; P. V. Zamostyan; T. Ishikawa; H. Yonehara; S. K. Sahoo

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Brain Bases of Reading Fluency in Typical Reading and Impaired Fluency in Dyslexia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although the neural systems supporting single word reading are well studied, there are limited direct comparisons between typical and dyslexic readers of the neural correlates of reading fluency. Reading fluency deficits ...

Christodoulou, Joanna

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - andisol typic hapludand Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

considerable pressure difference (typically overcontent... :427-436. Sperry, J.S., V. Stiller, and U.G. Hacke. 2002b. Soil water uptake andisolated vascular bundles and whole...

458

Determination of a peak benzene exposure to consumers at typical self-service gasoline stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF A PEAK BENZENE EXPOSURE TO CONSUMERS AT TYPICAL SELF-SERVICE GASOLINE STATIONS A Thesis by TED CARAPEZZA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene DETERMINATION OF A PEAK BENZENE EXPOSURE TO CONSUMERS AT TYPICAL SELF-SERVICE GASOLINE STATIONS A Thesis by TED CARAPEZZA Approved as to style and content by: (. (iL, &? Chairman...

Carapezza, Ted

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

The impact of sheared vs. sawn timber in the typical southern pine plywood mill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE IMPACT OF SHEARED VS' SAWN TIMBER IN THE TYPICAL SOUTHERN PINE PLYWOOD MILL A Thesis by RUSSELL GARRETT SWINNEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Forestry THE IMPACT OP SHEARED VS. SAWN T1MBER IN THE TYPICAL SOUTHERN PINE PLYWOOD MILI A Thesis by RUSSELL GARRETT SWINNEY Approved as to style and content by: Jease ( hair of mmi Jy...

Swinney, Russell Garrett

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

Pasyanos, M E

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

463

North Pacific Mesoscale Coupled Air-Ocean Simulations Compared with Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive summary The main objective of the study was to investigate atmospheric and ocean interaction processes in the western Pacific and, in particular, effects of significant ocean heat loss in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions on the lower and upper atmosphere. It is yet to be determined how significant are these processes are on climate scales. The understanding of these processes led us also to development of the methodology of coupling the Weather and Research Forecasting model with the Parallel Ocean Program model for western Pacific regional weather and climate simulations. We tested NCAR-developed research software Coupler 7 for coupling of the WRF and POP models and assessed its usability for regional-scale applications. We completed test simulations using the Coupler 7 framework, but implemented a standard WRF model code with options for both one- and two-way mode coupling. This type of coupling will allow us to seamlessly incorporate new WRF updates and versions in the future. We also performed a long-term WRF simulation (15 years) covering the entire North Pacific as well as high-resolution simulations of a case study which included extreme ocean heat losses in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions. Since the extreme ocean heat loss occurs during winter cold air outbreaks (CAO), we simulated and analyzed a case study of a severe CAO event in January 2000 in detail. We found that the ocean heat loss induced by CAOs is amplified by additional advection from mesocyclones forming on the southern part of the Japan Sea. Large scale synoptic patterns with anomalously strong anticyclone over Siberia and Mongolia, deep Aleutian Low, and the Pacific subtropical ridge are a crucial setup for the CAO. It was found that the onset of the CAO is related to the breaking of atmospheric Rossby waves and vertical transport of vorticity that facilitates meridional advection. The study also indicates that intrinsic parameterization of the surface fluxes within the WRF model needs more evaluation and analysis.

Koracin, Darko; Cerovecki, Ivana; Vellore, Ramesh; Mejia, John; Hatchett, Benjamin; McCord, Travis; McLean, Julie; Dorman, Clive

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

464

Sound transmission through the internal?wave field: The inverse problem.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Buoyed by the early success of ocean acoustictomography for ocean mapping and of path integral theory combined with the Garrett–Munk internal?wave model for explaining acoustic fluctuations Flatte and others could not resist the temptation of using statistical moments of the acoustic field to learn something about the spatial and temporal distributions of oceaninternal waves. Indeed internal waves are of intense oceanographic interest because of their relation to tides eddies (which account for 99% of the ocean kinetic energy) and the mixing processes that maintain the thermocline. Because of the integrating property of acoustics and the sensitivity of certain acoustic observables to different parts of the internal?wave spectrum acoustical techniques like those described by Flatte offer a unique view into internal?wave behavior. Recent acoustic and oceanographic measurements made in the Philippine Sea using a large vertical aperture array and high temporal sampling may provide the first field demonstration of internal?wave tomography progress of which would be quite pleasing to Flatte.

John Colosi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Distributed three-dimensional finite-difference modeling of wave propagation in acoustic media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including earthquake and oil exploration seismology, laboratory ultrasonics, ocean acoustics, radar imaging, let us consider the requirements for a typical application in oil exploration geophysics: Perform, and show here benchmarks on two different distributed memory architectures, the IBM SP2 and a network

Scales, John

466

Seafloor topography and tectonic elements of the Western Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...northerly part of the Western Indian Ocean is characterized by the...world's oceans and in the Western Indian Ocean is represented by a shallow...ocean basins. At its shallowest point (66 9 5 7 E , 17 30 2 2 S...5600 m, on the Southwest Indian Ridge (Patriat et al. 1997...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography Naokazu Taniguchia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography Naokazu Taniguchia) Graduate School 29 April 2013) Ocean current profiling using ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was conducted proportional to temperature) and current in the ocean (Munk et al., 1995). Other than coastal sea studies (e

Frandsen, Jannette B.

468

Characterization of Prochlorococcus clades from iron-depleted oceanic regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trace metal values (22). Nitrate and phosphate were monthly averages derived from the World Ocean Atlas (

Rusch, D. B; Martiny, A. C; Dupont, C. L; Halpern, A. L; Venter, J. C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean WEALTH FROM OCEANS FLAGSHIP Jock of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY3 | Thunnus tonggol Thunnus obesus Thunnus albacares Thunnus of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY4 | Species SCA DR SIA SFA Thunnus alalunga + + + 0 Thunnus albacares + + + 0

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

470

Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean C. L. Sabine,1 R. A. Feely,2 R. M. Key,3 J] This work presents an estimate of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean based on measurements from the WOCE tracers; 9355 Information Related to Geographic Region: Pacific Ocean; KEYWORDS: Pacific Ocean

471

Gravity perturbed Crapper waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waves are known to have multi-valued height. Using...gravity-capillary waves with multi-valued height. The...of single-valued and multi-valued travelling waves...absence of gravity, a family of exact solutions is...elliptic functions. Building upon the work by Tanveer...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Photo of the Week: Not Your Typical Jet Engine | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Not Your Typical Jet Engine Not Your Typical Jet Engine Photo of the Week: Not Your Typical Jet Engine November 23, 2012 - 11:57am Addthis As part of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program, the U.S. conducted extensive research showing that nuclear fission could power an aircraft. The research involved a series of Heat Transfer Reactor Experiments (HTREs), which tested if different types of jet engines could be run by nuclear power. In 1955, however, the project was cancelled, and a safe, operational prototype aircraft was never developed. In this 1988 photo, the two HTRE reactors are shown in transport to Idaho National Laboratory's EBR-1 visitor center, where they remain today. | Photo courtesy of Idaho National Laboratory. As part of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program, the U.S. conducted

473

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

Hansen, René Rydhof

474

The Effect of Wave Breaking on the Wave Energy Spectrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of wave breaking on the wave energy spectral shape is examined. The Stokes wave-breaking criterion is first extended to random waves and a breaking wave model is established in which the elevation of breaking waves is expressed in ...

C. C. Tung; N. E. Huang

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

MHK Technologies/SyncWave Power Resonator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Resonator Power Resonator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage SyncWave Power Resonator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Marinus Power Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The SyncWave Power Resonator makes power by capturing the motion differential due to the phase lag between the two concentric float structures the Float and the Spar each having a very different resonance characteristic in waves The power generated from this phase lag is maximized under varying ocean wave conditions via a proprietary variable inertia tuning system SWELS located inside the central Spar Power is captured by an hydraulic power take off which drives a variable speed generator Power outputs conditioned by modern power electronics from several SyncWave Units in a wave farm will be collected and converted to in farm power in a sea bed mounted collector hub then transmitted ashore by subsea cable for interconnection to a shoreside load

476

Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydropower and Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products

477

Millimetre-Wave Aperture Synthesis Radiometry for Snow and Ice Mapping Andy R Harvey1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surface salinity, soil moisture content and wind velocity [2]. Mechanical, mm-wave pencil beam scanners application to (1) mapping of snow and ice cover and (2) determination of ocean wind vector. The most mature that is push-broom scanned to form a two-dimensional image. Other candidate techniques are the Mills Cross [5

Harvey, Andy

478

Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer James R. Munroe1, a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the surface or the barotropic tide acting on bottom topography, transport their energy to the ocean interiorInternal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer James R. Munroe1, a) and Bruce R in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy den- sity

Sutherland, Bruce

479

Influence of coastal vegetation on the 2004 tsunami wave impact in west Aceh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coastal vegetation . Science 310 : 643 . 3 Tanaka...Experience of the recent Indian Ocean tsunami...defense against the recent tsunami? Curr Biol 15 : R443...killer tsunamis . Science 326 : 1188 – 1189...thank the German Aerospace Center...uses to the wave advance. Applying a spatial...

Juan Carlos Laso Bayas; Carsten Marohn; Gerd Dercon; Sonya Dewi; Hans Peter Piepho; Laxman Joshi; Meine van Noordwijk; Georg Cadisch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Energy Department Announces $8 Million to Develop Advanced Components for Wave, Tidal, and Current Energy Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced $8 million in available funding to spur innovation in next-generation marine and hydrokinetic control and component technologies. In the United States, waves, tides, and ocean currents represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource that could provide clean, affordable energy to homes and businesses across the country's coastal regions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "typical ocean wave" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

An investigation of the vergence field of the wind and ocean currents of the Indian ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The vergence chart of the ocean currents (January) shows in the region of the equatorial counter current a distribution of the vergence that is...A. Defant.

W. van Dijk

482

Ocean heat transport in a Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA): structure, mechanisms, and impacts on climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that heat advection by ocean currents plays in the anthropogenic warming of the world?s oceans. From Barnet et al., 2005.???????????????????......... 14 2.1 Meridional heat transport in PW across 40N o in the Atlantic Ocean based on monthly... and (b) trend of oceanic heat transport in ! PW"decade #1 for the period 1958-2001 in SODA-1.4.2.... 29 3.2 Same as Fig. 3.1 except for SODA-1.4.0??????????????.. 31 3.3 Time-mean of zonal-averaged meridional currents in ! cm"s #1...

Zheng, Yangxing

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Acanthaster planci outbreaks in Vanuatu coincide with ocean productivity, furthering trends throughout the pacific ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study identifies linkages between regional ocean productivity and the emergence of large Acanthaster planci starfish populations in Vanuatu. Positive correlations were found between wind stress, chlorophyll-...

Peter Houk; Jason Raubani

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change John Ferguson1 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries're finding - adult forecasts and climate change) #12;1. Past (for context) · The coastal pelagic ecosystem

485

Climate Prediction: The Limits of Ocean Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We identify three major areas of ignorance which limit predictability in current ocean GCMs. One is the very crude representation of subgrid-scale mixing processes. These processes are parameterized with coefficients whose ...

Stone, Peter H.

486

Ocean Fertilization: Science, Policy, and Commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past 20 years there has been growing interest in the concept of fertilizing the ocean with iron to abate global warming. This interest was catalyzed by basic scientific experiments showing that iron limits primary ...

Strong, Aaron L.

487

Heat-Flow Below the Oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... oceans. His two values of 22 and 26 metres per degree Centigrade give an average geothermal gradient of about 42 C./km., which he says is unexpectedly high1.

A. E. BENFIELD

1950-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

488

Particulate matter in the south Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The particulate matter (PM) distribution in the south Atlantic Ocean and its relationship to water masses and currents were determined from optical and hydrographic data. Attenuation coefficients were obtained by interfacing a beam transmissometer...

Wood, Megan Maria

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

489

Ocean Currents and Circulation and Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Atlantic Ocean, in particular its Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC), is sensitive to the patterns of atmospheric forcing, in particular to that of the freshwater flux. Relatively small changes in at...

Henk A. Dijkstra

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Notes on global climate and ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problems related to the role of both natural and anthropogenic factors in global climate change are considered. The role of ocean circulation in the Earth’s global thermodynamic processes is qualitatively ...

R. I. Nigmatulin

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Sustaining observations in the polar oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...propelled by environmental energy. IEEE J. Oceanic...Sandven. 2011 Recent wind driven high sea ice...Understanding Earth's polar challenges: International Polar...initial science and implementation strategy. Cambridge...92 AON Design and Implementation Task Force 2012 Designing...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Oceanic mass transport by mesoscale eddies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...time-mean ocean circulation transports fluid as a conveyor belt, but fluid parcels can also be trapped and transported discretely...continuously, mesoscale eddies can trap fluid parcels within the eddy core and transport them discretely...

Zhengguang Zhang; Wei Wang; Bo Qiu

2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

493

Ocean acidification in a geoengineering context  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...R. Young 2009 From laboratory manipulations to Earth system models: scaling calcification impacts of ocean acidification...CO2-induced climate change?: Results from four Earth system models. Earth Syst. Dynam. Discuss. 3, 31-72. 10...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Thermodynamic Optimization in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As alternative energy sources to oil and uranium, we can consider well known alternative sources such as solar power, geothermal power and wind power. However when we consider the 21st century energy sources, ocean

Y. Ikegami; H. Uehara

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced ...

Schmitt, Raymond W.

496

Circulation of Tritium in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The input of bomb tritium into the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere waters has demonstrated the spread of a tracer in three dimensions in the North Pacific Ocean. Subsurface tritium maxima in middle and low latitudes clearly show the importance ...

Rana A. Fine; Joseph L. Reid; H. Göte Östlund

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Planctosphaera (Hemichordata: Enteropneusta) in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four specimens of the unusual hemichordate larva Planctosphaera...sp., previously known only from the North Atlantic Ocean were collected by midwater trawl from depths ... 1977 and 1982. The anatomy of the Pacific

M. G. Hadfield; R. E. Young

498

Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

Muralidharan, Shylesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Ocean Renewable Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Company Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Place Portland, Maine Zip 4101 Sector Ocean, Renewable Energy Product Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC was founded in 2004 for the purpose of generating reliable, competitive, emission-free electricity from the energy resources of the oceans. Coordinates 45.511795°, -122.675629° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.511795,"lon":-122.675629,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

500

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Address PO Box 1206 Place Kailua Zip 96734-1206 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 1973 Number of employees 28 Phone number 808.259.8871 Website http://www.makai.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Deep Water Pipelines This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.