National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for typical ocean wave

  1. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  2. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California, State and Federal Agencies and their expectations in respect to potential wave power deployments Jim a huge amount of wave measurement data from various data sources Asfaw Beyene of the Department

  3. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and...

  4. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  5. Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: Internal wave fine structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomsovic, Steve

    Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: Internal wave fine structure 2004 Acoustic wave fields propagating long ranges through the ocean are refracted As acoustic waves propagate long ranges through the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities

  6. Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves Walter Craig Department of Mathematics & Statistics AAAS Annual Meeting St. Louis Missouri February 19, 2006 Walter Craig McMaster University Tsunamis and ocean-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Introduction Tsunami waves are generated relatively often, from various

  7. CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    gradient technologies. This paper is focused on Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) and the needCHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms

  8. WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research a preliminary examination and analysis of a small suite of 4-D wave data to explore what new insight century. We feel it is timely to encourage further 4-D ocean wave measurement and thereby facilitate fresh

  9. Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Jun

    Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean Keji Liu Yongzhi Xu Jun Zou Abstract. We- penetrable inhomogeneous medium in a 3D finite depth ocean. The method is based on a scat- tering analysis extend the direct sampling method proposed in [13] to image a wave- penetrable inhomogeneous medium

  10. A DISCRETE WAVELET ANALYSIS OF FREAK WAVES IN THE OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measurement of landslide-generated impulse waves was presented in [2]. In fact, the measured results of continuous wave recordings made in the Sea of Japan during 1986­1990 by the Ship Research Institute of JapanA DISCRETE WAVELET ANALYSIS OF FREAK WAVES IN THE OCEAN EN-BING LIN AND PAUL C. LIU Received 25

  11. Beauty waves: an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, Jay Allen

    2007-04-25

    In this thesis, we present a method for computing an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves. Wave forms are loosely based on procedural wave models and are designed to emulate those found in both art and nature. The wave forms...

  12. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

  13. Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Aero-Acoustic Analysis of Wells Turbine for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion Ralf Starzmann Fluid of harnessing the energy from ocean waves is the oscillating water column (OWC) device. The OWC converts

  14. Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon:Corp Jump to:India Renewables(RedirectedOcean

  15. High-frequency P-wave seismic noise driven by ocean winds Jian Zhang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shearer, Peter

    with the offshore wind speed, demonstrating that these high-frequency P- waves are excited by distant ocean windsHigh-frequency P-wave seismic noise driven by ocean winds Jian Zhang,1 Peter Gerstoft,1 and Peter M, J., P. Gerstoft, and P. M. Shearer (2009), High-frequency P-wave seismic noise driven by ocean winds

  16. Non-Reflecting Internal Wave Beam Propagation in the Deep Ocean Roger Grimshaw1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Here we analyze theoretically the penetration of internal waves in an ocean with continuousNon-Reflecting Internal Wave Beam Propagation in the Deep Ocean Roger Grimshaw1) , Efim Pelinovsky1 2008 Using linear internal wave theory for an ocean stratified by both density and current, we identify

  17. An Open Ocean Trial of Controlled Upwelling Using Wave Pump Technology ANGELICQUE WHITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Angelicque

    An Open Ocean Trial of Controlled Upwelling Using Wave Pump Technology ANGELICQUE WHITE College) ABSTRACT In 1976, John D. Isaacs proposed to use wave energy to invert the density structure of the ocean of deep water to the surface ocean. Although Isaacs's wave-powered pump has taken many forms, from energy

  18. Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System Mark, alternative energy system to convert the circular motion of ocean waves as they propagate through the sea and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave

  19. Experimental Testing and Model Validation for Ocean Wave Energy Harvesting Buoys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Experimental Testing and Model Validation for Ocean Wave Energy Harvesting Buoys Douglas A. Gemme1 are presented for numerical simulations and field experiments using point absorption ocean wave energy and experimental data. Index Terms ­ energy conversion, wave energy harvesting, linear generator, ocean energy

  20. Stochastic analysis of ocean wave states with and without rogue waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadjihosseini, A; Hoffmann, N P

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of ocean wave data including rogue waves. A stochastic approach based on the theory of Markov processes is applied. With this analysis we achieve a characterization of the scale dependent complexity of ocean waves by means of a Fokker-Planck equation, providing stochastic information of multi-scale processes. In particular we show evidence of Markov properties for increment processes, which means that a three point closure for the complexity of the wave structures seems to be valid. Furthermore we estimate the parameters of the Fokker-Planck equation by parameter-free data analysis. The resulting Fokker-Planck equations are verified by numerical reconstruction. This work presents a new approach where the coherent structure of rogue waves seems to be integrated into the fundamental statistics of complex wave states.

  1. Soliton Turbulence in Shallow Water Ocean Surface Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Andrea; Resio, Donald T; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivì, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E

    2014-01-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of $soliton$ $turbulence$ in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a $dense$ $soliton$ $gas$, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation, a $completely$ $integrable$ $soliton$ $system$: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic/quasiperiodic boundary conditions the $ergodic$ $solutions$ of KdV are exactly solvable by $finite$ $gap$ $theory$ (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as $\\sim\\omega^{-1}$. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter $densely$ $packed$ $soliton$ $wave$ $trains$ from the data. We apply ...

  2. Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain Paper number: 197

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005 WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain #12;Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis, Fifth International Symposium WAVES 2005, 3rd-7th, July, 2005. Madrid, Spain #12;Ocean Waves Measurement and Analysis

  3. Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean JONATHAN D. NASH College of Oceanic FE u p cgE is a fundamental quan- tity in internal wave energetics to identify energy sources, wave propagation, and energy sinks. Internal wave radiation transports energy from the boundaries

  4. Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave energy, wave energy converter, WEC, electrical energy, alternative energy, hydrokinetic energy on the coasts of the United States the harvesting ocean wave energy is ideal. It is projected that wave energy

  5. Rapid generation of high-frequency internal waves beneath a wind and wave forced oceanic surface mixed layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    Rapid generation of high-frequency internal waves beneath a wind and wave forced oceanic surface the wind) generates high- frequency internal waves in the stratified fluid below. The internal waves evolveKinnon, and A. E. Tejada-Marti´nez (2008), Rapid generation of high-frequency internal waves beneath a wind

  6. AMP 576 Wave Propagation in the Ocean Environment, Prof. Roland Romeiser Fall Semester 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    AMP 576 ­ Wave Propagation in the Ocean Environment, Prof. Roland Romeiser Fall Semester 2012 Goals: This course is intended to present to students the fundamentals of processes that govern waves in the ocean environment. Material: Basic principles of fluid mechanics, equations of surface gravity waves, linear

  7. Are deep-ocean-generated surface-wave microseisms observed on land?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Are deep-ocean-generated surface-wave microseisms observed on land? Peter D. Bromirski,1 Ralph A generate a pressure excitation pulse at twice the ocean wave frequency that excites pseudo-Rayleigh (pRg) wave DF microseisms. pRg generated in shallow coastal waters have most of their energy in the solid

  8. Detection of microseismic compressional (P) body waves aided by numerical modeling of oceanic noise sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stutzmann, Eléonore

    Detection of microseismic compressional (P) body waves aided by numerical modeling of oceanic noise), Detection of microseismic compressional (P) body waves aided by numerical modeling of oceanic noise sources in seismic noise, body waves present appealing properties but are still challenging to extract. Here we first

  9. Observations of high-frequency internal waves in the Coastal Ocean Dynamics Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    1 Observations of high-frequency internal waves in the Coastal Ocean Dynamics Region James M. Introduction In the deep ocean, away from horizontal and vertical boundaries, the high-frequency internal wave to examine how the high-frequency internal wave spectrum changes across a continental shelf. This is done

  10. Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office What are the key documents? Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource pdf here Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...

  11. Direct simulation and deterministic prediction of large-scale nonlinear ocean wave-field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Guangyu, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    Despite its coarse approximation of physics, the phase-averaged wave spectrum model has been the only type of tool available for ocean wave prediction in the past 60 years. With the rapid advances in sensing technology, ...

  12. Does extreme internal-wave breaking matter for ocean mixing? J.A. MacKinnon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKinnon, Jennifer

    a substantial risk to offshore oil platforms [Cai et al., 2003]. However, internal waves are often perceived of the energy escapes to propagate up to thousands of km across ocean basins as low-mode waves [St. Lau- rent

  13. Long-range propagation of finite-amplitude acoustic waves in an ocean waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Wave Equation NPE 7 is used to propagate a finite-amplitude acoustic wave field. Second, this codeLong-range propagation of finite-amplitude acoustic waves in an ocean waveguide Kae¨lig Castor for T-wave formation. © 2004 Acoustical Society of America. DOI: 10.1121/1.1756613 PACS numbers: 43

  14. Anomalous surface waves associated with deep earthquakes, generated at an ocean ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furumura, Takashi

    Anomalous surface waves associated with deep earthquakes, generated at an ocean ridge M. Furumura earthquakes in laterally homogeneous structures do not generate such surface waves. Since the propagation these surface waves are generated. Many of the zones from which the surface waves appear to originate

  15. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms Joseph T. Maestasa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms Joseph T. Maestasa) Department wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long- range shock propagation using a wave waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line. VC 2014 Acoustical Society of America. [http

  16. Near-Inertial Wave Wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita over Mesoscale Oceanic Eddies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Near-Inertial Wave Wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita over Mesoscale Oceanic Eddies BENJAMIN; Jaimes and Shay 2009, hereafter JS09). These robust mesoscale oceanic features are present at any time (Jaimes 2009). This mesoscale ocean variability imposed important dynamical constraints on the OML

  17. SIMULATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF INTERNAL SOLITARY WAVES ON OCEANIC SHELVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SIMULATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF INTERNAL SOLITARY WAVES ON OCEANIC SHELVES Roger Grimshaw1 Version 1 October 6, 2003 Abstract Due to the horizontal variability of oceanic hydrology (density and current stratification) and the variable depth over the continental shelf, internal solitary waves

  18. Tsunami Wave Analysis and Possibility of Splay Fault Rupture During the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunami Wave Analysis and Possibility of Splay Fault Rupture During the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake NORA DEDONTNEY 1 and JAMES R. RICE 1,2 Abstract--The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was observed by two, but which observed different tsunami lead wave morphologies. The earlier satellite, Jason-1, recorded a lead

  19. Dispersive tsunami waves in the ocean: Model equations and sensitivity to dispersion and Coriolis effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Dispersive tsunami waves in the ocean: Model equations and sensitivity to dispersion and Coriolis online 19 December 2012 Keywords: Boussinesq wave model Tsunami Dispersive effect Coriolis effect a b­Kutta scheme in time. In the context of tsunami generation and propagation over trans-oceanic distances

  20. A review of hydrodynamic investigations into arrays of ocean wave energy converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Chowdhury, S; Sanchez, A Madrigal; Fleming, A; Winship, B; Illesinghe, S; Toffoli, A; Babanin, A; Penesis, I; Manasseh, R

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical, numerical and experimental studies on arrays of ocean wave energy converter are reviewed. The importance of extracting wave power via an array as opposed to individual wave-power machines has long been established. There is ongoing interest in implementing key technologies at commercial scale owing to the recent acceleration in demand for renewable energy. To date, several reviews have been published on the science and technology of harnessing ocean-wave power. However, there have been few reviews of the extensive literature on ocean wave-power arrays. Research into the hydrodynamic modelling of ocean wave-power arrays is analysed. Where ever possible, comparisons are drawn with physical scaled experiments. Some critical knowledge gaps have been found. Specific emphasis has been paid on understanding how the modelling and scaled experiments are likely to be complementary to each other.

  1. SEI 03 Microseisms interpreted as coastal reflections of ocean waves generated by storms based on Mexico Array data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    SEI 03 Microseisms interpreted as coastal reflections of ocean waves generated by storms based relative to the stations. Both theories describe microseisms generated in interfering ocean surface waves will call the HR theory, proposes that the microseisms are generated by the ocean waves from the storms

  2. Wave Energy Test Site Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Test Site (WETS). Design by Sound and Sea Technology for US Navy 30m 80m 60m Bunker #12;WaveWave Energy Test Site Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute | School of Ocean & Earth Science`i Wave Energy Test Site (WETS), the United States' first grid- connected test site of this kind

  3. Study of directional ocean wavefield evolution and rogue wave occurrence using large-scale phase-resolved nonlinear simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Wenting, 1982-

    2013-01-01

    It is challenging to obtain accurate predictions of ocean surface wavefield evolutions due to several complex dynamic processes involved, including nonlinear wave interaction, wave breaking and wind forcing, and also wave ...

  4. Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical Intra-oceanic Arc1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical at Dallas, Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083-0688, USA A B S T R A C T Major element compositions of glass of these lavas reflects accumulation of plagioclase. Glass inclusions also show the common occurrence of felsic

  5. Global energy conversion rate from geostrophic flows into internal lee waves in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikurashin, Maxim

    A global estimate of the energy conversion rate from geostrophic flows into internal lee waves in the ocean is presented. The estimate is based on a linear theory applied to bottom topography at O(1–10) km scales obtained ...

  6. A Novel Excitation Scheme for an Ocean Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orazov, Bayram

    2011-01-01

    1.2 Wave Energy Conversion Technology 1.3 Heavinglevelhow.html) 1.2 Wave Energy Conversion Technology The

  7. An idealised experimental model of ocean surface wave transmission by an ice floe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennetts, Luke; Meylan, Michael; Cavaliere, Claudio; Babanin, Alexander; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    An experimental model of transmission of ocean waves by an ice floe is presented. Thin plastic plates with different material properties and thicknesses are used to model the floe. Regular incident waves with different periods and steepnesses are used, ranging from gently-sloping to storm-like conditions. A wave gauge is used to measure the water surface elevation in the lee of the floe. The depth of wave overwash on the floe is measured by a gauge in the centre of the floe's upper surface. Results show transmitted waves are regular for gently-sloping incident waves but irregular for storm-like incident waves. The proportion of the incident wave transmitted is shown to decrease as incident wave steepness increases, and to be at its minimum for an incident wavelength equal to the floe length. Further, a trend is noted for transmission to decrease as the mean wave height in the overwash region increases.

  8. Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans Naoki 9 July 2008; published 30 September 2008. [1] The distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy-scaled kinetic energy are all consistent with the available observations in the regions of significant wind

  9. Reflection and transmission of ocean wave spectra by a band of randomly distributed ice floes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montiel, Fabien; Bennetts, Luke

    2014-01-01

    A new ocean wave/sea-ice interaction model is proposed that simulates how a directional wave spectrum evolves as it travels through an arbitrary finite array of circular ice floes, where wave/ice dynamics are entirely governed by wave scattering effects. The model is applied to characterise the wave reflection and transmission properties of a strip of ice floes, such as an ice edge band. A method is devised to extract the reflected and transmitted directional wave spectra produced by the array. The method builds upon an integral mapping from polar to Cartesian coordinates of the scattered wave components. Sensitivity tests are conducted for a row of floes randomly perturbed from a regular arrangement. Results for random arrays are generated using ensemble averaging. A realistic ice edge band is then reconstructed from field experiments data. Simulations show a good qualitative agreement with the data in terms of transmitted wave energy and directional spreading. In particular, it is observed that short waves ...

  10. Simulation of asteroid impact on ocean surfaces, subsequent wave generation and the effect on US shorelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezzedine, Souheil M.; Lomov, Ilya; Miller, Paul L.; Dennison, Deborah S.; Dearborn, David S.; Antoun, Tarabay H.

    2015-01-01

    As part of a larger effort involving members of several other organizations, we have conducted numerical simulations in support of emergency-response exercises of postulated asteroid ocean impacts. We have addressed the problem from source (asteroid entry) to ocean impact (splash) to wave generation, propagation and interaction with the U.S. shoreline. We simulated three impact sites. The first site is located off the east coast by Maryland's shoreline. The second site is located off of the West coast, the San Francisco bay. The third set of sites are situated in the Gulf of Mexico. Asteroid impacts on the ocean surface are conducted using LLNL's hydrocode GEODYN to create the impact wave source for the shallow water wave propagation code, SWWP, a shallow depth averaged water wave code.

  11. Simulation of asteroid impact on ocean surfaces, subsequent wave generation and the effect on US shorelines

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ezzedine, Souheil M.; Lomov, Ilya; Miller, Paul L.; Dennison, Deborah S.; Dearborn, David S.; Antoun, Tarabay H.

    2015-05-19

    As part of a larger effort involving members of several other organizations, we have conducted numerical simulations in support of emergency-response exercises of postulated asteroid ocean impacts. We have addressed the problem from source (asteroid entry) to ocean impact (splash) to wave generation, propagation and interaction with the U.S. shoreline. We simulated three impact sites. The first site is located off the east coast by Maryland's shoreline. The second site is located off of the West coast, the San Francisco bay. The third set of sites are situated in the Gulf of Mexico. Asteroid impacts on the ocean surface aremore »conducted using LLNL's hydrocode GEODYN to create the impact wave source for the shallow water wave propagation code, SWWP, a shallow depth averaged water wave code.« less

  12. A Novel Excitation Scheme for an Ocean Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orazov, Bayram

    2011-01-01

    1.2 Wave Energy Conversion Technology 1.3 Heavinglevelhow.html) 1.2 Wave Energy Conversion Technology Thewaves on the map as a viable energy source. Over the past 30 years, WEC technology

  13. Modelling rogue waves through exact dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Anjan; Naskar, Tapan

    2012-01-01

    The ocean rogue wave, one of the mysteries of nature, has not yet been understood or modelled satisfactorily, in spite of being in the intense lime-light in recent years and the concept spreadin fast to other disciplines. Rogue waves are extraordinarily high and steep surface waves. However, most of their theoretical models and experimental observations, excluding a few are one-dimensional, admitting limited high intensity and steepness. We propose here a novel two-dimensional integrable nonlinear Schroedinger equation allowing an exact lump-soliton with special asymmetry and directional preference. The soliton can appear on surface waves making a hole just before surging up high, with adjustable height and steepness and disappear again followed by the hole. The dynamics, speed and the duration of the soliton is controlled by ocean currents. These desirable properties make our exact model promising for describing deep sea large rogue waves.

  14. Discrete-element model for the interaction between ocean waves and sea ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Pan, Wenxiao

    2012-01-05

    We present a discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the mechanical behavior of sea ice in response to ocean waves. The wave/ice interaction can potentially lead to the fracture and fragmentation of sea ice depending on the wave amplitude and period. The fracture behavior of sea ice is explicitly modeled by a DEM method, where sea ice is modeled by densely packed spherical particles with finite size. These particles are bonded together at their contact points through mechanical bonds that can sustain both tensile & compressive forces and moments. Fracturing can be naturally represented by the sequential breaking of mechanical bonds. For a given amplitude and period of incident ocean wave, the model provides information for the spatial distribution and time evolution of stress and micro-fractures and the fragment size distribution. We demonstrate that the fraction of broken bonds,, increases with increasing wave amplitude. In contrast, the ice fragment size decreases with increasing amplitude.

  15. A Novel Excitation Scheme for an Ocean Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orazov, Bayram

    2011-01-01

    1.4 Tidal Energy . . . . . . .7th European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference. Porto (for such application. 1.4 Tidal Energy Often mistakenly

  16. Ocean waves, nearshore ecology, and natural selection Mark W. Denny*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    , Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA; *Author for correspondence (e-mail: mwdenny, Intertidal communities, Lift, Wave theory Abstract Although they are subjected to one of the most stressful

  17. Karhunen-Loeve representation of stochastic ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sclavounos, Paul D.

    A new stochastic representation of a seastate is developed based on the Karhunen–Loeve spectral decomposition of stochastic signals and the use of Slepian prolate spheroidal wave functions with a tunable bandwidth parameter. ...

  18. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    have recovered by 5 cm when DSPR 30, but only by 1-2 cm when DSPR 10. Source: Smith et al. (2007). ... 2-14 Figure 2-9 Wave height reduction for a 90%...

  19. Experimental Testing and Model Validation for Ocean Wave Energy Harvesting Buoys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    , convert wave motion into electricity, to allow operation under all weather conditions, while enabling harvesting buoy systems, using the heave motion of the buoys to produce useful electrical power. Two for large scale grid power applications, but rather for relatively low-power ocean sensor and communications

  20. FROM SINGLE POINT GAUGE TO SPATIO-TEMPORAL MEASUREMENT OF OCEAN WAVES PROSPECTS AND PERSPECTIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at present and also conceptually new, it's a new, unfamiliar, and unrelenting world to pursue. We need a paradigm shift away from our familiar single-point conceptualization in order to effective approach the new With the recent advancement of spatial measurements of ocean waves, we are clearly facing new challenges regarding

  1. On the kurtosis of ocean waves in deep water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedele, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit Janssen's (2003) formulation for the dynamic excess kurtosis of weakly nonlinear gravity waves in deep water. For narrowband directional spectra, the formulation is expressed as a sixfold integral that depends upon the Benjamin-Feir index and the parameter $R=\

  2. Oceanic El-Ni\\~{n}o wave dynamics and climate networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic Kelvin and Rossby waves play an important role in tropical climate and \\en dynamics. Here we develop and apply a climate network approach to quantify the characteristics of \\en related oceanic waves, based on sea surface height satellite data. We associate the majority of dominant long distance ($\\geq 500$ km) links of the network with (i) equatorial Kelvin waves, (ii) off-equatorial Rossby waves, and (iii) tropical instability waves. Notably, we find that the location of the hubs of out-going ($\\sim 180^{\\circ}\\rm{E}$) and in-coming ($\\sim 140^{\\circ}\\rm{W}$) links of the climate network coincide with the locations of the Kelvin wave initiation and dissipation, respectively. We also find that this dissipation at $\\sim 140^{\\circ}\\rm{W}$ is much weaker during \\en times. Moreover, the hubs of the off-equatorial network coincide with the locations of westerly wind burst activity and high wind vorticity, two mechanisms that were associated with Rossby waves activity. The quantitative methodology and meas...

  3. Reconstruction of stratified steady water waves from pressure readings on the ocean bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Robin Ming

    2015-01-01

    Consider a two-dimensional stratified solitary wave propagating through a body of water that is bounded below by an impermeable ocean bed. In this work, we study how such a wave can be reconstructed from data consisting of the wave speed, upstream and downstream density profile, and the trace of the pressure on the bed. First, we prove that this data uniquely determines the wave, both in the (real) analytic and Sobolev regimes. Second, for waves that consist of multiple layers of constant density immiscible fluids, we provide an exact formula describing each of the interfaces in terms of the data. Finally, for continuously stratified fluids, we detail a reconstruction scheme based on approximation by layer-wise constant density flows.

  4. Reconstruction of stratified steady water waves from pressure readings on the ocean bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robin Ming Chen; Samuel Walsh

    2015-02-26

    Consider a two-dimensional stratified solitary wave propagating through a body of water that is bounded below by an impermeable ocean bed. In this work, we study how such a wave can be reconstructed from data consisting of the wave speed, upstream and downstream density profile, and the trace of the pressure on the bed. First, we prove that this data uniquely determines the wave, both in the (real) analytic and Sobolev regimes. Second, for waves that consist of multiple layers of constant density immiscible fluids, we provide an exact formula describing each of the interfaces in terms of the data. Finally, for continuously stratified fluids, we detail a reconstruction scheme based on approximation by layer-wise constant density flows.

  5. Study Pelamis system to capture energy of ocean wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobato, Ricardo; Fedrigo, Desire Francine Gobato

    2015-01-01

    Over the years, energy has become vital for humans, enabling us to comfort, leisure, mobility and other factors. The quest for cheap energy sources, renewable and clean has grown in recent years, mainly for the reduction of effects that comes degrading nature, allowing scientists and engineers to search for new technologies. Many energy sources have been researched for proper funding where some stand out for their ease of obtaining, by other low cost and others by being renewable. The main objective of this work is to study one of these energy sources - wave energy, whose capture is still in development. This energy comes from the waves of the sea and is 100% renewable and with minimal environmental impact when compared to hydro, nuclear, coal, thermal, etc. The system studied here is the Pelamis system.

  6. Effects of wave-current interaction on rip currents Department of Ocean Engineering, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slinn, Donald

    Effects of wave-current interaction on rip currents Jie Yu1 Department of Ocean Engineering in the nearshore is studied by numerical experiments. The generation of rip currents is due to waves propagating and breaking over alongshore variable topography. Our main focus is to examine the significance of wave

  7. Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences in the bottom bound- ary layer. In the nonlinear internal waves that were observed, the kinetic energy. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear

  8. Direct Simulations of Wind-Driven Breaking Ocean Waves with Data Assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommermuth, Douglas G; Tran, Vu H; Valenciano, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    A formulation is developed to assimilate ocean-wave data into the Numerical Flow Analysis (NFA) code. NFA is a Cartesian-based implicit Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) code with Volume of Fluid (VOF) interface capturing. The sequential assimilation of data into NFA permits detailed analysis of ocean-wave physics with higher bandwidths than is possible using either other formulations, such as High-Order Spectral (HOS) methods, or field measurements. A framework is provided for assimilating the wavy and vortical portions of the flow. Nudging is used to assimilate wave data at low wavenumbers, and the wave data at high wavenumbers form naturally through nonlinear interactions, wave breaking, and wind forcing. Similarly, the vertical profiles of the mean vortical flow in the wind and the wind drift are nudged, and the turbulent fluctuations are allowed to form naturally. As a demonstration, the results of a HOS of a JONSWAP wave spectrum are assimilated to study short-crested seas in equilibrium with the wind. Log pr...

  9. MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Air Piston | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar <OMI Combined Energy SystemTreaderWave Air

  10. Satellite observations and numerical simulations of jet-front gravity waves over North America and North Atlantic Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Meng

    2008-10-10

    SIMULATIONS OF JET-FRONT GRAVITY WAVES OVER NORTH AMERICA AND NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN A Thesis by MENG ZHANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2008 Major Subject: Atmospheric Sciences SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS AND NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF JET-FRONT GRAVITY WAVES OVER NORTH AMERICA AND NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN A Thesis by MENG ZHANG Submitted to the Office...

  11. Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-10-01

    This report presents met - ocean data and wave energy characteristics at three U.S. wave energy converter (WEC) test and potential deployment sites . Its purpose is to enable the compari son of wave resource characteristics among sites as well as the select io n of test sites that are most suitable for a developer's device and that best meet their testing needs and objectives . It also provides essential inputs for the design of WEC test devices and planning WEC tests, including the planning of deployment and op eration s and maintenance. For each site, this report catalogues wave statistics recommended in the (draft) International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Specification (IEC 62600 - 101 TS) on Wave Energy Characterization, as well as the frequency of oc currence of weather windows and extreme sea states, and statistics on wind and ocean currents. It also provides useful information on test site infrastructure and services .

  12. Constraints on crustal and mantle structure of the oceanic plate south of Iceland from ocean bottom recorded Rayleigh waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilmann, Frederik

    Constraints on crustal and mantle structure of the oceanic plate south of Iceland from ocean bottom- drophones in the North Atlantic south of Iceland. During the deployment period we recorded clear Rayleigh curve is sensitive to the structure just south of Iceland (average plate age 33 Myr). Both dispersion

  13. Wind and Wave Extremes over the World Oceans From Very Large Forecast Ensembles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breivik, Øyvind; Abdalla, Saleh; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Global return value estimates of significant wave height and 10-m neutral wind speed are estimated from very large aggregations of archived ECMWF ensemble forecasts at +240-h lead time from the period 2003-2012. The upper percentiles are found to match ENVISAT wind speed better than ERA-Interim (ERA-I), which tends to be biased low. The return estimates are significantly higher for both wind speed and wave height in the extratropics and the subtropics than what is found from ERA-I, but lower than what is reported by Caires and Sterl (2005) and Vinoth and Young (2011). The highest discrepancies between ERA-I and ENS240 are found in the hurricane-prone areas, suggesting that the ensemble comes closer than ERA-I in capturing the intensity of tropical cyclones. The width of the confidence intervals are typically reduced by 70% due to the size of the data sets. Finally, non-parametric estimates of return values were computed from the tail of the distribution. These direct return estimates compare very well with Ge...

  14. Effects of internal waves on low frequency, long range, acoustic propagation in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jinshan

    2007-01-01

    This thesis covers a comprehensive analysis of long-range, deep-ocean, low-frequency, sound propagation experimental results obtained from the North Pacific Ocean. The statistics of acoustic fields after propagation through ...

  15. During their offshore migration, sea turtle hatchlings swim away from their natal beaches and into the open ocean. Early

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohmann, Kenneth J.

    a novel, nonvisual mechanism. Objects in a water column beneath the surface of the ocean describe by a vertebrate inner ear (Lewis et al. 1985). Given that the accelerations beneath typical waves explained. Objects in a water column beneath the surface of the ocean describe a circular movement as waves

  16. The impulsive effects of momentum transfer on the dynamics of a novel ocean wave energy converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, CA; O'Reilly, OM; Sava?, O

    2013-01-01

    7] J. Falnes, A review of wave-energy extraction, MarineOrazov, O. M. O’Reilly, O. wave energy converter, Journal ofsimple model for a novel wave energy converter: non-resonant

  17. Parametric Excitation of Internal Gravity Waves in Ocean and Atmosphere as Precursors of Strong Earthquakes and Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chefranov, Sergey G

    2013-01-01

    The condition of internal gravity waves (IGW) parametric excitation in the rotating fluid layer heated from above, with the layer vibration along the vertical axis or with periodic modulation in time of the vertical temperature distribution, is obtained. We show the dual role of the molecular dissipative effects that may lead not only to the wave oscillations damping, but also to emergence of hydrodynamic dissipative instability (DI) in some frequency band of IGW. This DI also may take place for the localized in horizontal plane tornado-like disturbances, horizontal scale of which does not exceed the character vertical scale for the fluid layer of the finite depth. Investigated parametric resonance mechanism of IGW generation in ocean and atmosphere during and before earthquakes allows monitoring of such waves (with double period with respect to the period of vibration or temperature gradient modulation) as precursors of these devastating phenomena.

  18. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagerman, G.; Scott, G.

    2011-12-01

    This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources.

  19. Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

  20. Response of the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica, to ocean gravity-wave forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromirski, Peter D.

    wind waves and swell, infragravity (IG) waves and tsunami waves. The vibration response of the RIS between the vertical and horizontal sensors in the 8­12 Hz band from February to April, combined in mass, energy and stress balances (e.g. Scambos and others, 2000, 2009). The sudden catastrophic break

  1. Issues and progress in the prediction of ocean submesoscale features and internal waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duda, Timothy F.

    Data-constrained dynamical ocean modeling for the purpose of detailed forecasting and prediction continues to evolve and improve in quality. Modeling methods and computational capabilities have each improved. The result ...

  2. SPATIAL PREDICTION OF NONLINEAR RANDOM OCEAN WAVES: IDENTIFICATION OF GAUSSIAN AND NONGAUSSIAN CONTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    , is shown to produce unstable spatial wave statistics, producing more nearly Gaussian behavior after spatial­sided) wave spectrum S(!) at the discrete frequencies ! k , while the mutually independent phases #18; k(t)---has a JONSWAP power spectrum, with significant w

  3. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul T. Jacobson; George Hagerman; George Scott

    2011-12-01

    This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration�¢����s (NOAA�¢����s) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables wave diffraction to substantially reestablish wave power densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available wave energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge, based on accumulating unit circle wave power densities, is estimated to be 2,640 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 590 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 240 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 80 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 1570 TWh/yr for Alaska, 130 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 30 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico. The total recoverable wave energy resource, as constrained by an array capacity packing density of 15 megawatts per kilometer of coastline, with a 100-fold operating range between threshold and maximum operating conditions in terms of input wave power density available to such arrays, yields a total recoverable resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge of 1,170 TWh/yr, broken down as follows: 250 TWh/yr for the West Coast, 160 TWh/yr for the East Coast, 60 TWh/yr for the Gulf of Mexico, 620 TWh/yr for Alaska, 80 TWh/yr for Hawaii, and 20 TWh/yr for Puerto Rico.

  4. Origin of deep ocean microseisms by using teleseismic body waves Matthieu Lands,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    analysis is accurate enough to confirm that significant amount of the microseism energy is generated far from the coast in deep oceans. Citation: Landès, M., F. Hubans, N. M. Shapiro, A. Paul, and M. Campillo networks pro- vides us with new approaches for seismic tomography [e.g., Shapiro and Campillo, 2004

  5. Extreme wave height estimation for ocean engineering applications in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Chan Kwon

    2012-07-16

    updated estimates of the 100-year extreme wave conditions for the entire Gulf of Mexico using a more comprehensive approach. First, the applicability of standard parametric wind models was examined and appropriate adjustments to the Rankine vortex model...

  6. Waves and the equilibrium range at Ocean Weather Station P J. Thomson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 2013; accepted 29 September 2013; published 8 November 2013. [1] Wave and wind measurements energy spectra. Observations are consistent with a local balance between wind input and breaking dissipation, as described by Philips (1985). The measurements include direct covariance wind stress estimates

  7. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    the ocean transfers energy to the sea surface, initially forming small ripples, which over time, if the wind typically see breaking at Mavericks or Steamer Lane, they are all generated by the wind. Wind blowing across persists, will begin to form discrete waves. The amount of energy transmitted to the ocean surface and

  8. MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Energy Converter OWEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar <OMI Combined Energy SystemTreaderWave

  9. Voltage Converter TYPICAL APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    1 LTC660 100mA CMOS Voltage Converter TYPICAL APPLICATION U s Simple Conversion of 5V to ­5V Supply s Output Drive: 100mA s ROUT: 6.5 (0.65V Loss at 100mA) s BOOST Pin (Pin 1) for Higher Switching Frequency-capacitor voltage converter. It performs supply voltage conversion from positive to negative from an input range

  10. Roles of Equatorial Waves and Western Boundary Reflection in the Seasonal Circulation of the Equatorial Indian Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Weiqing

    semiannual oscillations of surface zonal currents in the central equatorial Indian Ocean are investigated of the Equatorial Indian Ocean DONGLIANG YUAN Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao, China WEIQING HAN PAOS, University

  11. Ocean Power (4 Activities) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    our existing non-renewable resources. Ocean power is divided into three categories: wave energy, tidal energy, and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) Systems. It is...

  12. Ocean Engineering 34 (2007) 23742384 On the tuning of a wave-energy driven oscillating-water-column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godoy-Diana, Ramiro

    2007-01-01

    2006; accepted 15 May 2007 Available online 21 May 2007 Abstract Performance of wave-energy devices, 2003). An OWC wave energy device intended for seawater pumping, involving no generation of electricity

  13. 48 / JOURNAL OF WATERWAY, PORT, COASTAL, AND OCEAN ENGINEERING / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2000 BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF WAVE TRANSFORMATION,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    -part paper, the energy dissipation due to wave breaking is modeled by introducing an eddy viscosity term in both computer technology and dispersive, nonlinear long-wave theory (Madsen and Sørensen 1992; Nwogu MODELING OF WAVE TRANSFORMATION, BREAKING, AND RUNUP. II: 2D By Qin Chen,1 James T. Kirby,2 Robert A

  14. Wave Energy Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity.

  15. Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

    2014-06-23

    Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The logger’s fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

  16. Ocean Sci., 5, 313327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    . The role of the penetration length scale of short- wave radiation into the surface ocean and its impactOcean Sci., 5, 313­327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/ © Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science Regional impacts of ocean color

  17. 236 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 32, NO. 1, JANUARY 2007 Progress on Nonlinear-Wave-Forced Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    -Wave-Forced Sediment Transport Simulation Richard W. Gilbert, Emily A. Zedler, Stéphan T. Grilli, and Robert L. Street potential flow (FNPF) equa- tions, in driving simulations of flow and sediment transport around partially buried obstacles. The suspended sediment transport is modeled in the near-field in a Navier­Stokes (NS

  18. Typical Pure Nonequilibrium Steady States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takaaki Monnai; Kazuya Yuasa

    2014-08-12

    We show that typicality holds for a class of nonequilibrium systems, i.e., nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs): almost all the pure states properly sampled from a certain Hilbert space well represent a NESS and characterize its intrinsic thermal nature. We clarify the relevant Hilbert space from which the pure states are to be sampled, and construct practically all the typical pure NESSs. The scattering approach leads us to the natural extension of the typicality for equilibrium systems. Each pure NESS correctly yields the expectation values of observables given by the standard ensemble approach. It means that we can calculate the expectation values in a NESS with only a single pure NESS. We provide an explicit construction of the typical pure NESS for a model with two reservoirs, and see that it correctly reproduces the Landauer-type formula for the current flowing steadily between the reservoirs.

  19. Internal Wave Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Manikandan S.

    Internal waves are a ubiquitous and significant means of momentum and energy transport in the oceans, atmosphere, and astrophysical bodies. Here, we show that internal wave propagation in nonuniform density stratifications, ...

  20. Rogue Waves and Explorations of Coastal Wave Characteristics Primary Investigator: Paul C. Liu -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    assumption of ocean wave process to be a stationary, Gaussian random process. This assumption is inconsistent years of wind and wave measurement from South Indian Ocean from an offshore oil drilling platform near

  1. On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry Effective, economic extraction of ocean wave energy requires an intimate under- standing of the ocean wave

  2. Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleiss, Jessica M.

    2009-01-01

    E. M. Janssen, 1996: Wave energy dissipation by whitecaps.waves: Surface impulse and wave energy dissipation rates. J.to the ocean, dissipating wave energy that is then available

  3. Wave Energy Harvesting unmanned maritime vehicle, Concept and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Wave Energy Harvesting unmanned maritime vehicle, Concept and Applications Justin Manley Senior). By harvesting abundant natural energy Wave Gliders provide a persistent ocean presence to commercial scientific

  4. Experimental studies of irregular water wave component interactions with comparisons to the hybrid wave model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longridge, Jonathon Kent

    1993-01-01

    Waves in the oceans pose challenging problems to offshore structural design because they arc irregular and can be highly nonlinear. Although these irregular waves can be viewed as the summation of many linear wave components of different...

  5. Radiance in the ocean: effects of wave slope and raman scattering near the surface and at depths through the asymptotic region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slanker, Julie Marie

    2009-05-15

    in shallow and deep water. The nature of the radiance field is also gives an understanding of the living environment for ocean animals. Hydrolight 4.1, a simulation software developed by Curtis D. Mobley, was used to calculate the spectral radiance in clear...

  6. Temporary Pedestrian & Vehicular Traffic Flow Typical Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Temporary Pedestrian & Vehicular Traffic Flow Typical Conditions Winter 2014 Ann Arbor - Ross 900150 Feet Pedestrian Route Existing Building Construction Area Traffic Detour Temporary Transit Stop

  7. 13.853 Computational Ocean Acoustics, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Henrik

    Wave equations for fluid and visco-elastic media. Wave-theory formulations of acoustic source radiation and seismo-acoustic propagation in stratified ocean waveguides. Wavenumber Integration and Normal Mode methods for ...

  8. Vertical mixing and the ocean circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Changing sources of mixing Hurricanes Tidal dissipation 2 #12;Zonal Mean Ocean Temperature 3 #12;Sandström's Theorem A circulation cannot be driven unless heat is input at a lower depth than it is lost in the ocean? Wind-driven stirring Tidal generation of internal waves Biota Hurricanes Nasa 6 #12;Sources

  9. Temporary Pedestrian & Vehicular Traffic Flow Typical Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Temporary Pedestrian & Vehicular Traffic Flow Typical Conditions Winter 2014 Ann Arbor - Medical://www.umaec.umich.edu/closures.html Roadway Closure Existing Traffic Pattern I0 400 800 1,200200 Feet Pedestrian Route Existing Building

  10. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  11. A dynamical picture of the oceanic tides Eugene I. Butikova)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butikov, Eugene

    of the oceans, the actual system that responds with tides and tidal currents to the well-known tideA dynamical picture of the oceanic tides Eugene I. Butikova) Department of Physics, St. Petersburg waves. To clarify the underlying physics, we use a simple model of the ocean that consists of a water

  12. Mid-ocean microseisms Peter D. Bromirski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromirski, Peter D.

    , and the Hawaiian Islands appear to be a significant source of LPDF energy in the North Pacific when waves arrive peak, is caused by ocean wave energy couplin Sciences and Technology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA (fkd@hawaii.edu) Ralph A

  13. GECCO Ocean Energy System Luis Maristany, Nicole Waters, Billy W. Wells Jr., Mario Suarez, Richard Gestewitz, Alexej Wiest,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    types of materials, supplies, as well as energy; however the exploration of wave energy as a resource Operation) is a wave energy converter that extracts kinetic energy from ocean waves using a rugged, innovative mechanical multi-system. Index Terms--Ocean energy, wave energy, hydrokinetic energy, alternative

  14. Simulated Longwave Clearsky Irradiance over the Ocean: Spatial and Temporal Variability 19791993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    Simulated Long­wave Clear­sky Irradiance over the Ocean: Spatial and Temporal Variability 1979.: OA8038 First author: Allan 1 Simulated Long­wave Clear­sky Irradiance over the Ocean: Spatial­wave irradiances calculated by a wide­band radiation code applied to the ECMWF re­analysis are used to investigate

  15. Research and Technology in Wave Energy for Electric Mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Research and Technology in Wave Energy for Electric Mobility Reza Ghorbani Assistant Professor marine energy resources that are available for our utilization. These include wave energy, energy generated by ocean current and energy extraction through ocean thermal conversion (OTEC). For wave energy

  16. The Effects of Wave Energy Converters on a Monochromatic Wave Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    in wave energy converters as a possible means of providing renewable energy, the effects of a wave energy The interest in renewable energies is currently increasing due to the reported rise in global temperature and mean wave period of wave energy fields. There is tremendous energy potential in the ocean. Solar energy

  17. Energy conservation in typical Asian countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.; Rumsey, P.

    1997-06-01

    Various policies and programs have been created to promote energy conservation in Asia. Energy conservation centers, energy conservation standards and labeling, commercial building codes, industrial energy use regulations, and utility demand-side management (DSM) are but a few of them. This article attempts to analyze the roles of these different policies and programs in seven typical Asian countries: China, Indonesia, Japan, Pakistan, South Korea, the Philippines, and Thailand. The conclusions show that the two most important features behind the success policies and programs are (1) government policy support and (2) long-run self-sustainability of financial support to the programs.

  18. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    revealed that these giant waves often occur where ordinary wind waves encounter ocean currents. The strength of the current #12;seems to concentrate the wave energy, much like a lens will concentrate light

  19. Mathematical Theory of Water Waves John D. Carter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, John

    . Carter Mathematical Theory of Water Waves #12;Water Waves Surface waves in the deep ocean during a stormMathematical Theory of Water Waves John D. Carter October 11, 2010 John D. Carter Mathematical Theory of Water Waves #12;About Me B.S. in mathematics from UPS, 1994 M.S. in applied mathematics from CU

  20. Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK to waves and current, sediment transport, high pressure and temperature variations, and renewable energy methods, water wave mechanics, sediment transport. R. CENGIZ ERTEKIN Professor, PhD 1984, UC Berkeley

  1. Ocean Sci., 5, 4758, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/47/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Hartmut

    under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves mean shear. The model turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, K) balance, its first equation, incorporates a term for the energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. This energy source is in addition

  2. Geometric phases of water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Fedele

    2014-08-08

    Recently, Banner et al. (2014) highlighted a new fundamental property of open ocean wave groups, the so-called crest slowdown. For linear narrowband waves, this is related to the geometric and dynamical phase velocities $U_d$ and $U_g$ associated with the parallel transport through the principal fiber bundle of the wave motion with $\\mathit{U}(1)$ symmetry. The theoretical predictions are shown to be in fair agreement with ocean field observations, from which the average crest speed $c=U_d+U_g$ with $c/U_d\\approx0.8$ and $U_{g}/U_d\\approx-0.2$.

  3. Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technologiesinchart.ppt More Documents & Publications Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 7 8 System) - Reedsport PB150...

  4. Energy Department Announces $10 million for Wave Energy Demonstration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    million to test prototypes designed to generate clean, renewable electricity from ocean waves and help diversify America's energy portfolio. The Energy Department-supported...

  5. Multicomponent seismic data, combining P-wave and converted P-to-SV wave (C-wave) wavefields, provide inde-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Multicomponent seismic data, combining P-wave and converted P-to-SV wave (C-wave) wavefields (fast and slow) with differing polarization. The 4C, 3D ocean-bottom cable (OBC) multicomponent seismic objectives were to evaluate seismic attributes, such as VP/VS velocity ratios and Poisson's ratio derived

  6. Equatorial Magnetosonic Waves in the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Qianli

    2015-01-01

    magnetosonic waves and the ion differential energy flux areEnergy scattering rates due to typical magnetosonic waves . . . .the waves and are scattered in pitch angle and energy. The

  7. Wave Motion Unit code: MATH35012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    MATH35012 Wave Motion Unit code: MATH35012 Credit Rating: 10 Unit level: Level 3 Teaching period This course unit aims to elucidate some of the physical properties of important types of wave motion and their mathematical descriptions. Overview Wave motion occurs in the oceans, atmosphere and in the earth. Problems

  8. Seminario de Matemtica Aplicada "Renowable wave energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tradacete, Pedro

    Seminario de Matemática Aplicada "Renowable wave energy: potencial and technical challenges Abstract: Among the various renewable energy sources, ocean wave energy has been only recently investiga will be at first to introduce the potential of wave energy, as a significant, and often neglected, contributor

  9. On a class of self-similar 2D surface water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sijue Wu

    2012-06-11

    We construct a class of self-similar surface water waves and study its properties. This class of surface waves appears to be in very good agreement with a common type of wave crests in the ocean.

  10. Climate modulates internal wave activity in the Northern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decarlo, TM; Karnauskas, KB; Davis, KA; Wong, GTF

    2015-01-01

    of nonlinear internal wave generation and propagation in theof generation mechanisms of solitary internal waves in theWaves The background oceanic density ?eld has both spatial and temporal variability, which can affect IW generation

  11. Design and Control of a Floating Wave-Energy Converter Utilizing a Permanent Magnet Linear Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom, Nathan Michael

    2013-01-01

    electrical generator technology for wave energy converters,”wave energy point absorber,” Proceedings of the IFAC Conference on Control Methodologies and Technologyseen, clean technologies, such as ocean wave energy, present

  12. Mass-modulation schemes for a class of wave energy converters: Experiments, models, and efficacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, CA; Judge, CQ; Orazov, B; Sava?, Ö; O'Reilly, OM

    2015-01-01

    dynamics of a novel ocean wave energy converter. Journal of5565. Dick, W. , 2005. Wave energy converter. U.S. Patentof the IPS buoy wave energy converter including the effect

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of nonlinear internal gravity wave beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabaei Befrouei, Ali, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    Continuously stratified fluids, like the atmosphere and the oceans, support internal gravity waves due to the effect of buoyancy. This type of wave motion is anisotropic since gravity provides a preferred direction. As a ...

  14. Generation and analysis of multi-directional waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liagre, Pierre-Yves Francois Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Real sea states cannot be represented adequately by a single sine wave. Indeed, wind-generated waves in the ocean have obviously different amplitudes and frequencies, but also come from different directions. Consequently, the distribution of energy...

  15. Entropy and the Typicality of Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian Barbour; Tim Koslowski; Flavio Mercati

    2015-07-24

    The universal validity of the second law of thermodynamics is widely attributed to a finely tuned initial condition of the universe. This creates a problem: why is the universe atypical? We suggest that the problem is an artefact created by inappropriate transfer of the traditional concept of entropy to the whole universe. Use of what we call the relational $N$-body problem as a model indicates the need to employ two distinct entropy-type concepts to describe the universe. One, which we call entaxy, is novel. It is scale-invariant and decreases as the observable universe evolves. The other is the algebraic sum of the dimensionful entropies of branch systems (isolated subsystems of the universe). This conventional additive entropy increases. In our model, the decrease of entaxy is fundamental and makes possible the emergence of branch systems and their increasing entropy. We have previously shown that all solutions of our model divide into two halves at a unique `Janus point' of maximum disorder. This constitutes a common past for two futures each with its own gravitational arrow of time. We now show that these arrows are expressed through the formation of branch systems within which conventional entropy increases. On either side of the Janus point, this increase is in the same direction in every branch system. We also show that it is only possible to specify unbiased solution-determining data at the Janus point. Special properties of these `mid-point data' make it possible to develop a rational theory of the typicality of universes whose governing law, as in our model, dictates the presence of a Janus point in every solution. If our self-gravitating universe is governed by such a law, then the second law of thermodynamics is a necessary direct consequence of it and does not need any special initial condition.

  16. Accomplishments and future perspective of coastal ocean observing systems Coastal oceans are the most densely urbanized regions on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are the most densely urbanized regions on the planet with populations growing at rapid rate. In the near future as communities increasingly rely on the coastal ocean to provide additional sources of energy (wind, waves, oil, our ability to map and forecast the coastal ocean remains low. While certain areas are difficult

  17. Wave EnergyFocusing in aThree-dimensional Numerical WaveTank C. Fochesato*, F. Dias**, S. Grilli***

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Wave EnergyFocusing in aThree-dimensional Numerical WaveTank C. Fochesato*, F. Dias**, S. Grilli Department (University of Rhode Island), Narragansett, RI, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Directional wave energy focusing in space is one of the mechanisms that may contribute to the generation of a rogue wave in the ocean

  18. Deepwater Internal Wave Study and Application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Lei

    2013-12-10

    conforming to the physics of internal waves and to study the effects on offshore drilling semisubmersibles, different types of offshore hull forms and riser systems, including the large diameter cold water pipe of floating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion...

  19. Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry wave generation in a laboratory model of oscillating tidal flow on a continental margin. Waves waves in the oceans are generated by oscillatory tides flowing over ocean to- pography

  20. 2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand of waves. A #12;2011 Waves - 2 A standing wave is caused by superposing two similar (same frequency

  1. GFD-2 Spring 2004 Syllabus Text: a nearly complete set of text handouts, plus A.E.Gill, Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geography of potential vorticity -lateral circulation: wind-driven ocean gyres and boundary currents -circumpolar ocean currents and the atmospheric westerly winds: stationary Rossby waves with mountains; waveGFD-2 Spring 2004 Syllabus Text: a nearly complete set of text handouts, plus A.E.Gill, Atmosphere-Ocean

  2. Wind Speed Dependence of Single-Site Wave-Height Retrievals from High-Frequency Radars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    -order returns to the ocean surface wave energy spectra. Methods to invert the Barrick (1972) equations, Georgia Institute of Technology, Savannah, Georgia @ Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Marine

  3. Creation of nonlinear density gradients for use in internal wave research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Victoria Siân

    2007-01-01

    A method was developed to create a nonlinear density gradient in a tank of water. Such gradients are useful for studying internal waves, an ocean phenomenon that plays an important role in climate and ocean circulation. ...

  4. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha; Prudell, Joseph H.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe

    2013-07-29

    The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

  5. Numerical modeling of extreme rogue waves generated by directional energy focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Numerical modeling of extreme rogue waves generated by directional energy focusing Christophe that contributes to the generation of extreme waves, also known as rogue waves, in the ocean. To simulate and analyze this phenomenon, we generate extreme waves in a 3D numerical wave tank (NWT), by specifying

  6. Author's personal copy Wave energy resources along the Hawaiian Island chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Author's personal copy Wave energy resources along the Hawaiian Island chain Justin E. Stopa model Wave atlas Wave energy Wave power a b s t r a c t Hawaii's access to the ocean and remoteness from as nearshore wave energy resources in Hawaii. A global WAVEWATCH III (WW3) model forced by surface winds from

  7. Predicting Wave Glider Speed from Environmental Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ryan N.

    . This vehicle produces forward motion by harvesting abundant natural energy from ocean waves, and providesPredicting Wave Glider Speed from Environmental Measurements Ryan N. Smith, Jnaneshwar Das, Graham of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia Email: ryan.smith@qut.edu.au Robotic Embedded Systems Laboratory

  8. Structure of The Dixie Valley Geothermal System, a "Typical"...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal System, a "Typical" Basin and Range Geothermal System, From Thermal and Gravity Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  9. Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer scraps with enhanced mechanical properties based on solid-state mechanochemical milling Citation Details In-Document...

  10. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

  11. WAVE-SEDIMENT INTERACTION ON A MUDDY SHELF A. Sheremet1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheremet, Alexandru

    WAVE-SEDIMENT INTERACTION ON A MUDDY SHELF A. Sheremet1 , A. J. Mehta2 , and J. M. Kaihatu3-induced wave dissipation and 3- wave interactions on wave evolution over muddy environments. The model is used to simulate wave conditions typical for a muddy shallow shelf. Mud-induced long-wave dissipation introduces

  12. Microsoft Word - NNMREC-OSU-WaveTechEA_06252012_CLEAN.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    University is pro- posing to use funding from DOE to construct and operate a wave energy test facility, known as the "Mobile Ocean Test Berth". An Environmental Assessment...

  13. Sources and levels of ambient ocean sound near the antarctic peninsula

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dziak, Robert P.; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Matsumoto, Haruyoshi; Park, Minkyu; Lee, Won Sang; Fowler, Matt J.; Lau, Tai-Kwan; Haxel, Joseph H.; Mellinger, David K.; et al

    2015-04-14

    Arrays of hydrophones were deployed within the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea (Antarctic Peninsula region) from 2005 to 2009 to record ambient ocean sound at frequencies of up to 125 and 500 Hz. Icequakes, which are broadband, short duration signals derived from fracturing of large free-floating icebergs, are a prominent feature of the ocean soundscape. Icequake activity peaks during austral summer and is minimum during winter, likely following freeze-thaw cycles. Iceberg grounding and rapid disintegration also releases significant acoustic energy, equivalent to large-scale geophysical events. Overall ambient sound levels can be as much as ~10–20 dB higher in the open,more »deep ocean of the Scotia Sea compared to the relatively shallow Bransfield Strait. Noise levels become lowest during the austral winter, as sea-ice cover suppresses wind and wave noise. Ambient noise levels are highest during austral spring and summer, as surface noise, ice cracking and biological activity intensifies. Vocalizations of blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales also dominate the long-term spectra records in the 15–28 and 89 Hz bands. Blue whale call energy is a maximum during austral summer-fall in the Drake Passage and Bransfield Strait when ambient noise levels are a maximum and sea-ice cover is a minimum. Fin whale vocalizations were also most common during austral summer-early fall months in both the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea. The hydrophone data overall do not show sustained anthropogenic sources (ships and airguns), likely due to low coastal traffic and the typically rough weather and sea conditions of the Southern Ocean.« less

  14. Sources and levels of ambient ocean sound near the antarctic peninsula

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dziak, Robert P. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences.; Stafford, Kathleen M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Matsumoto, Haruyoshi [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Park, Minkyu [Korea Polar Research Inst., Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Polar Environmental Research Div.; Lee, Won Sang [Korea Polar Research Inst., Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Polar Environmental Research Div.; Fowler, Matt J. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Lau, Tai-Kwan [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Haxel, Joseph H. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Mellinger, David K. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Fine, Michael L [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Arrays of hydrophones were deployed within the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea (Antarctic Peninsula region) from 2005 to 2009 to record ambient ocean sound at frequencies of up to 125 and 500 Hz. Icequakes, which are broadband, short duration signals derived from fracturing of large free-floating icebergs, are a prominent feature of the ocean soundscape. Icequake activity peaks during austral summer and is minimum during winter, likely following freeze-thaw cycles. Iceberg grounding and rapid disintegration also releases significant acoustic energy, equivalent to large-scale geophysical events. Overall ambient sound levels can be as much as ~10–20 dB higher in the open, deep ocean of the Scotia Sea compared to the relatively shallow Bransfield Strait. Noise levels become lowest during the austral winter, as sea-ice cover suppresses wind and wave noise. Ambient noise levels are highest during austral spring and summer, as surface noise, ice cracking and biological activity intensifies. Vocalizations of blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales also dominate the long-term spectra records in the 15–28 and 89 Hz bands. Blue whale call energy is a maximum during austral summer-fall in the Drake Passage and Bransfield Strait when ambient noise levels are a maximum and sea-ice cover is a minimum. Fin whale vocalizations were also most common during austral summer-early fall months in both the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea. The hydrophone data overall do not show sustained anthropogenic sources (ships and airguns), likely due to low coastal traffic and the typically rough weather and sea conditions of the Southern Ocean.

  15. The Science of Hurricanes Typical eye diameter ~20 miles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    #12;The Science of Hurricanes #12;#12;Typical eye diameter ~20 miles Typical hurricane diameter-View of a Hurricane #12;Day 0, Disturbance Day 1, 35mph Depression Day 2, 46mph Tropical Storm Day 3, 63mph Tropical Storm Day 4, 92mph Hurricane Day 5, 127mph Hurricane Day 6, 150mph Hurricane Day 7, 144mph Hurricane Day

  16. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER ARNAUD ROUGIREL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER MODEL ARNAUD ROUGIREL Abstract. In a context where for buoy-type ocean wave energy converter. The simplest model for this scheme is a non autonomous piecewise and periodic solutions, and compare the energy performance of this novel WEC with respect to the one of wave

  17. Transport and generation of macroscopically modulated waves in diatomic chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Giannoulis

    2011-05-08

    We derive and justify analytically the dynamics of a small macroscopically modulated amplitude of a single plane wave in a nonlinear diatomic chain with stabilizing on-site potentials including the case where a wave generates another wave via self-interaction. More precisely, we show that in typical chains acoustical waves can generate optical but not acoustical waves, while optical waves are always closed with respect to self-interaction.

  18. Low-frequency variability of the North Pacific Ocean: The roles of boundary-and wind-driven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Low-frequency variability of the North Pacific Ocean: The roles of boundary- and wind in determining the low-frequency large-scale variability of the ocean interior through Rossby waves generated. The variability in the ocean interior is primarily driven by wind with only a minor influence from the boundary

  19. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    the ocean--wave power, tidal or current power, offshore wind power, and ocean thermal energy conversion Sciences, UC Santa Cruz. #15 November 8, 2008 Energy and the oceans­part 2 The San Onofre Power plant is one of only two commercial nuclear power plants in California. Important questions about energy

  20. Design and Control of a Floating Wave-Energy Converter Utilizing a Permanent Magnet Linear Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom, Nathan Michael

    2013-01-01

    electrical generator technology for wave energy converters,”seen, clean technologies, such as ocean wave energy, presentwave energy point absorber,” Proceedings of the IFAC Conference on Control Methodologies and Technology

  1. Experimental investigation of small-scale breaking waves : flow visualization across the air-water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Angus Kai

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of breaking waves significantly affect air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum, mass and energy across the ocean interface. Breaking waves also contribute considerable loading to offshore and coastal structures, and ...

  2. Navier-Stokes simulations of steep breaking water waves with a coupled air-water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Kelli L

    2005-01-01

    Wave breaking on the ocean surface significantly facilitates the transfer of mass, momentum, heat and energy across the air-sea interface. In the context of the near field flow about a surface ship, the breaking bow wave ...

  3. Modeling wind forcing in phase resolving simulation of nonlinear wind waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalmikov, Alexander G

    2010-01-01

    Wind waves in the ocean are a product of complex interaction of turbulent air flow with gravity driven water surface. The coupling is strong and the waves are non-stationary, irregular and highly nonlinear, which restricts ...

  4. Wave Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Carcione, F. Cavallini, Simulation of waves in porn-viscoelastic rocks Saturated by immiscible ?uids. Numerical evidence ofa second slow wave,]. Comput.

  5. Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekhiche, Mike; Downie, Bruce

    2013-10-21

    Ocean wave power can be a significant source of large?scale, renewable energy for the US electrical grid. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) conservatively estimated that 20% of all US electricity could be generated by wave energy. Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT), with funding from private sources and the US Navy, developed the PowerBuoy? to generate renewable energy from the readily available power in ocean waves. OPT's PowerBuoy converts the energy in ocean waves to electricity using the rise and fall of waves to move the buoy up and down (mechanical stroking) which drives an electric generator. This electricity is then conditioned and transmitted ashore as high?voltage power via underwater cable. OPT's wave power generation system includes sophisticated techniques to automatically tune the system for efficient conversion of random wave energy into low cost green electricity, for disconnecting the system in large waves for hardware safety and protection, and for automatically restoring operation when wave conditions normalize. As the first utility scale wave power project in the US, the Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, OR, will consist of 10 PowerBuoys located 2.5 miles off the coast. This U.S. Department of Energy Grant funding along with funding from PNGC Power, an Oregon?based electric power cooperative, was utilized for the design completion, fabrication, assembly and factory testing of the first PowerBuoy for the Reedsport project. At this time, the design and fabrication of this first PowerBuoy and factory testing of the power take?off subsystem are complete; additionally the power take?off subsystem has been successfully integrated into the spar.

  6. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  7. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC · Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  8. Gearbox Typical Failure Modes, Detection, and Mitigation Methods (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation was given at the AWEA Operations & Maintenance and Safety Seminar and focused on what the typical gearbox failure modes are, how to detect them using detection techniques, and strategies that help mitigate these failures.

  9. Ocean Energy Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-05

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  10. Pelagic and coastal sources of P wave microseisms: Generation under tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Pelagic and coastal sources of P wave microseisms: Generation under tropical cyclones Jian Zhang,1 2010; published 6 August 2010. [1] Nonlinear wave wave interactions generate double frequency (DF it is unclear whether DF surface waves generated in deep oceans are observed on land, we show that beamforming

  11. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 1: Strategic summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-15

    The proposed COPS (Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems) program is concerned with combining numerical models with observations (through data assimilation) to improve our predictive knowledge of the coastal ocean. It is oriented toward applied research and development and depends upon the continued pursuit of basic research in programs like COOP (Coastal Ocean Processes); i.e., to a significant degree it is involved with ``technology transfer`` from basic knowledge to operational and management applications. This predictive knowledge is intended to address a variety of societal problems: (1) ship routing, (2) trajectories for search and rescue operations, (3) oil spill trajectory simulations, (4) pollution assessments, (5) fisheries management guidance, (6) simulation of the coastal ocean`s response to climate variability, (7) calculation of sediment transport, (8) calculation of forces on structures, and so forth. The initial concern is with physical models and observations in order to provide a capability for the estimation of physical forces and transports in the coastal ocean. For all these applications, there are common needs for physical field estimates: waves, tides, currents, temperature, and salinity, including mixed layers, thermoclines, fronts, jets, etc. However, the intent is to work with biologists, chemists, and geologists in developing integrated multidisciplinary prediction systems as it becomes feasible to do so. From another perspective, by combining observations with models through data assimilation, a modern approach to monitoring is provided through whole-field estimation.

  12. Mapping the Potential of U.S. Ocean Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    undertaken to date to accurately define the magnitude and location of U.S. and global wave, tidal, ocean thermal, and continental U.S. river hydrokinetic resources. With more...

  13. Note on the redistribution and dissipation of tidal energy over mid-ocean ridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Xinfeng

    The redistribution and dissipation of internal wave energy arising from the conversion at mid-ocean ridges of the barotropic tide is studied in a set of numerical experiments. A two-dimensional non-hydrostatic model with ...

  14. Toward the Understanding and Prediction of Optical Variability in the Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    , and organisms. 5. How do solar zenith angles, winds, surface waves and upper ocean optical properties affect, particles & organisms & exits sea Exiting light can be seen above water surface; sensed by airplanes

  15. Ocean and Climate Change Session Lin et al. EARSeL, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean and Climate Change Session Lin et al. EARSeL, 2012 Surface Clutter Suppression Techniques for achieving a required gain and penetration capability of the radar waves through ice sheets. Nevertheless

  16. Using Computer Simulations to Help Understand Flow Statistics and Structures at the Air-Ocean Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Lian

    The interaction among atmosphere, oceans, and surface waves is an important process with many oceanographic and environmental applications. It directly affects the motion and fate of pollutants such as oil spills. The ...

  17. Infragravity waves over topography: generation, dissipation, and reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, James M. (James McArthur)

    2006-01-01

    Ocean surface infragravity waves (periods from 20 to 200 s) observed along the southern California coast are shown to be sensitive to the bottom topography of the shelf region, where propagation is linear, and of the ...

  18. Acoustic-Gravity Waves Interacting with a Rectangular Trench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadri, Usama

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical solution of the two-dimensional linear problem of an acoustic-gravity wave interacting with a rectangular trench, in a compressible ocean, is presented. Expressions for the flow field on both sides of the ...

  19. The near-coastal microseism spectrum: Spatial and temporal wave climate relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromirski, Peter D.

    at near-coastal ocean bottom and inland seismic stations at the Oregon coast with both offshore [2] Wind-generated ocean gravity waves excite pressure fluctuations that couple energy into seismic seas nearby are calm, even when very energetic seas are present at buoys 500 km offshore. At wave

  20. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  1. Table 1. HARVESTING MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES Strategy Name Use Typical location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Table 1. HARVESTING MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES Strategy Name Use Typical location Harvesting strategies Unstable gullies with debris flow potential, unstable channels with high water transport, unstable fans by water flows Channels with high or moderate water transport potential Clean large woody debris /CLWD

  2. Figure 1. Typical Slow Sand Filter Schematic Supernatant Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure 1. Typical Slow Sand Filter Schematic Headspace Supernatant Water Schmutzdecke Raw water for support and also at the bottom an underdrain system collects the filtered water (Figure 1). As water of SSFs to marginal source waters, filter harrowing and faster methods of filter scraping have greatly

  3. B.S. in Biochemistry Typical Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    B.S. in Biochemistry Typical Program of Study: First Semester Second Semester 1st Year CHEM 1211K Biochemistry I Organic Chemistry Lab CHEM 4512 (3) CHEM 4581 (3) Biology Elective (3) Core Elective (3) Core Elective (3) Biochemistry II Biochemistry Lab I 4th Year CHEM 4582 (3) CHEM 4521 (3) Biology Elective (3

  4. Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios Marty Humphrey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mary R.

    Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios Marty Humphrey Computer Science. A broader goal of these scenarios are to increase the awareness of security issues in Grid Computing. 1 easy and secure ac- cess to the Grid's diverse resources. Infrastructure software such as Legion [6

  5. Feb. 1, 01:32 EDT A typically Canadian story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Sajeev

    process light the same way that the semiconductor processes electrical current. In plain English in Germany - is more celebrated abroad than at home is typically Canadian. As if in keeping, they are the sons of the late King Faisal (reigned 1964-75). He is remembered in the West for quadrupling oil prices

  6. Energy-Efficient Lighting The typical American family spends more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy-Efficient Lighting The typical American family spends more than $1,500 a year on household energy bills--and many households spend considerably more. Costs could climb even higher in the future, as electricity and natural gas prices continue to rise. Investing money in energy-saving products like compact

  7. Response of photosynthesis to ocean acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, KRM; Morris, JJ; Morris, JJ; Morel, FMM; Kranz, SA

    2015-01-01

    sub- tropical North Pacific Ocean. Aquatic Microbial Ecologytropical Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and contributes sub-

  8. EVOLUTION OF L HYBRID WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    . INTRODUCTIO In typical lower hybrid heating schemes, lower hybrid waves are launched at the wall sf tokamak. In this paper we study the C numerically, and determine the consequences of our results for lower hybrid heating hybrid heating of a tokamak. 11. THE CMKDV EQUAT The two-dimensional steady-state propagation of a single

  9. GECCO Ocean Energy System Luis Maristany, Nicole Waters, Billy W. Wells Jr., Mario Suarez, Richard Gestewitz, Alexej Wiest,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    types of materials, supplies, as well as energy; however the exploration of wave energy as a resource is still in its infancy. The Florida Institute of Technology has constructed an alternative energy system Operation) is a wave energy converter that extracts kinetic energy from ocean waves using a rugged

  10. Multi-Scale Coupling in Ocean and Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhengyu Liu, Leslie Smith

    2009-08-14

    We have made significant progress on several projects aimed at understanding multi-scale dynamics in geophysical flows. Large-scale flows in the atmosphere and ocean are influenced by stable density stratification and rotation. The presence of stratification and rotation has important consequences through (i) the conservation of potential vorticity q = {omega} {center_dot} {del} {rho}, where {omega} is the total vorticity and {rho} is the density, and (ii) the existence of waves that affect the redistribution of energy from a given disturbance to the flow. Our research is centered on quantifying the effects of potential vorticity conservation and of wave interactions for the coupling of disparate time and space scales in the oceans and the atmosphere. Ultimately we expect the work to help improve predictive capabilities of atmosphere, ocean and climate modelers. The main findings of our research projects are described.

  11. Although tropical cyclones are still not fully understood, Professor Nick Shay was responsible for uncovering the role of the deep ocean on their possible intensification. Here, he

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    of circulation and available upper ocean heat. The HF radar provides a means of mapping surface currents, winds and waves over the coastal ocean to as far as 200 km offshore. These measurements are useful to improve for uncovering the role of the deep ocean on their possible intensification. Here, he explains how his current

  12. Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

  13. Ocean Energy Resource Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource assessment for the United States.

  14. ENCYCLOPEDIA OCEAN SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENCYCLOPEDIA OF OCEAN SCIENCES Editor-in-Chief JOHN H. STEELE Editors STEVE A. THORPE KARL K in Marine Biology 26: 115-168. Rosland Rand Giske .I (1997) A dynamic model for tbe life history

  15. Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

  16. Emergence of typical entanglement in two-party random processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. C. O. Dahlsten; R. Oliveira; M. B. Plenio

    2007-01-17

    We investigate the entanglement within a system undergoing a random, local process. We find that there is initially a phase of very fast generation and spread of entanglement. At the end of this phase the entanglement is typically maximal. In previous work we proved that the maximal entanglement is reached to a fixed arbitrary accuracy within $O(N^3)$ steps, where $N$ is the total number of qubits. Here we provide a detailed and more pedagogical proof. We demonstrate that one can use the so-called stabilizer gates to simulate this process efficiently on a classical computer. Furthermore, we discuss three ways of identifying the transition from the phase of rapid spread of entanglement to the stationary phase: (i) the time when saturation of the maximal entanglement is achieved, (ii) the cut-off moment, when the entanglement probability distribution is practically stationary, and (iii) the moment block entanglement scales exhibits volume scaling. We furthermore investigate the mixed state and multipartite setting. Numerically we find that classical and quantum correlations appear to behave similarly and that there is a well-behaved phase-space flow of entanglement properties towards an equilibrium, We describe how the emergence of typical entanglement can be used to create a much simpler tripartite entanglement description. The results form a bridge between certain abstract results concerning typical (also known as generic) entanglement relative to an unbiased distribution on pure states and the more physical picture of distributions emerging from random local interactions.

  17. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  18. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio. The Sound Waves simulation becomes the source of an analogical mapping to Radio Waves. Concepts Radio Waves 1 - Sound Waves references water waves 2 - Water is analogy for Sound Waves 3 - Radio

  19. Semi-empirical Probability Distributions and Their Application in Wave-Structure Interaction Problems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izadparast, Amir Hossein

    2012-02-14

    energetic ocean waves may be converted to usable energy, utilizing Wave Energy Convertor (WEC) devices. The random characteristic of ocean environment requires engineers to consider the effects of random variability of the pertinent variables...-1 SEMI-EMPIRICAL PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS AND THEIR APPLICATION IN WAVE-STRUCTURE INTERACTION PROBLEMS A Dissertation by AMIR HOSSEIN IZADPARAST Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  20. Observations of the 2004 and 2006 Indian Ocean tsunamis from a pressure gauge array in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprintall, Janet

    Observations of the 2004 and 2006 Indian Ocean tsunamis from a pressure gauge array in Indonesia located in straits in the southern Indonesian islands were used to evaluate tsunami signals triggered. Tsunami waves reached the pressure gauges around 5 to 6 hours after the 2004 earthquake; the largest waves

  1. Wave-Particle Interactions in Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas F. Anderegg, C. F. Driscoll, D. H. E. Dubin, and T. M. O'Neil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Wave-Particle Interactions in Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas F. Anderegg, C. F waves (EAW) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma thermal velocity are observed on pure ion excitation the EAW is more frequency variable than typical Langmuir waves, and at large excitations resonance

  2. Harmonic generation by reflecting internal waves Bruce Rodenborn, D. Kiefer, H. P. Zhang, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmonic generation by reflecting internal waves Bruce Rodenborn, D. Kiefer, H. P. Zhang, and Harry 2011 The generation of internal gravity waves by tidal flow over topography is an important oceanic waves generated by tidal flow over topography. Near the generation region, the wave spectrum includes

  3. Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in Cable, Sound & Sea Technology (SST) Luis A. Vega, HNEI-University of Hawaii Energy Ocean International

  4. Typical Problems of AHU and Air Movement in Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    of AHU and Air Typical Problems of AHU and Air Movement in Buildings Movement in Buildings TsinghuaTsinghua UniversityUniversityOct. 2006Oct. 2006 22 ???????? Supply More Than NeededSupply More Than Needed ???????? TP1: Oversize of fresh air supplyTP1...: Oversize of fresh air supply ???????? TP2: CAV serving big spaceTP2: CAV serving big space ???????? TP3: Continuously running in partial time occupied zonesTP3: Continuously running in partial time occupied zones ???????? Wrong Air Handling Process...

  5. Is the Sun Embedded in a Typical Interstellar Cloud?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. Frisch

    2008-06-17

    The physical properties and kinematics of the partially ionized interstellar material near the Sun are typical of warm diffuse clouds in the solar vicinity. The interstellar magnetic field at the heliosphere and the kinematics of nearby clouds are naturally explained in terms of the S1 superbubble shell. The interstellar radiation field at the Sun appears to be harder than the field ionizing ambient diffuse gas, which may be a consequence of the low opacity of the tiny cloud surrounding the heliosphere. The spatial context of the Local Bubble is consistent with our location in the Orion spur.

  6. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  7. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  8. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  9. Vacuum Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson

    2012-12-11

    As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

  10. Wave-driven wind jets in the marine atmospheric boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    Wave-driven wind jets in the marine atmospheric boundary layer Kirsty E. Hanley Stephen E. Belcher;Abstract The interaction between ocean surface waves and the overlying wind leads to a transfer of momentum can also be transferred upwards when long wavelength waves, characteristic of re- motely generated

  11. Statistics of Met-Ocean Conditions Between West and Central Gulf of Mexico Based on Field Measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Lin

    2012-07-16

    Statistics of met-ocean conditions including wind, current and wave at the location between west and central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) are derived based on about three year of field measurements. Two-parameter Weibull distribution has been employed...

  12. Predicting aerodynamic characteristic of typical wind turbine airfoils using CFD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, W.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ochs, S.S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Aerospace Engineering Dept.

    1997-09-01

    An investigation was conducted into the capabilities and accuracy of a representative computational fluid dynamics code to predict the flow field and aerodynamic characteristics of typical wind-turbine airfoils. Comparisons of the computed pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data. This work highlights two areas in CFD that require further investigation and development in order to enable accurate numerical simulations of flow about current generation wind-turbine airfoils: transition prediction and turbulence modeling. The results show that the laminar-to turbulent transition point must be modeled correctly to get accurate simulations for attached flow. Calculations also show that the standard turbulence model used in most commercial CFD codes, the k-e model, is not appropriate at angles of attack with flow separation. 14 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Thermal evolution of an early magma ocean in interaction with the atmosphere: conditions for the condensation of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandeis, Geneviève

    for the condensation of a water ocean T. Lebrun1 , H. Massol1 , E. Chassefière1 , A. Davaille2 , E. Marcq3 , P. Sarda1-planet distance. Our results suggest that a steam atmosphere delays the end of the magma ocean phase by typically 1 Myr. Water vapor condenses to an ocean after 0.1 Myr, 1.5 Myr and 10 Myr for, respectively, Mars

  14. Typical atmospheric aerosol behavior at the Cherenkov Telescope Array candidate sites in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piacentini, Rubén D; Micheletti, María I; Salum, Graciela M; Maya, Javier; Mancilla, Alexis; García, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Aerosols from natural and antropogenic sources are one of the atmospheric components that have the largest spacial-temporal variability, depending on the type (land or ocean) surface, human activity and climatic conditions (mainly temperature and wind). Since Cherenkov photons generated by the incidence of a primary ultraenergetic cosmic gamma photon have a spectral intensity distribution concentrated in the UV and visible ranges [Hillas AM. Space Science Reviews, 75, 17-30, 1996], it is important to know the aerosol concentration and its contribution to atmospheric radiative transfer. We present results of this concentration measured in typical rather calm (not windy) days at San Antonio de los Cobres (SAC) and El Leoncito/CASLEO proposed Argentinean Andes range sites for the placement of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). In both places, the aerosol concentration has a peak in the 2.5-5.0$\\mu$m range of the mean aerosol diameter and a very low mean total concentration of 0.097$\\mu$g/m$^3$ (0.365$\\mu$g/m$^...

  15. Spatial localization of Langmuir waves generated from an electron beam propagating in an inhomogeneous plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Spatial localization of Langmuir waves generated from an electron beam propagating in the formation of these wave packets. In this article, we focus on the mechanism of generation of localized wave present simulation results of the generation of Langmuir wave packets in typical solar wind conditions

  16. Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

  17. Steroid estrogens in ocean sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braga, O.; Smythe, G.A.; Schäfer, Andrea; Feitz, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives results from a study measuring the abundance of steroid hormones in ocean sediments in the proximity of a deep ocean sewage outfall. The outfall is discharge point for an enhanced primary sewage treatment ...

  18. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    the same conditions). 3) To demonstrate a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, naval architecture: Design/Fluid Mechanics Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior Focus: Naval Architecture and High Speed Small vessel under a variety of foil configurations, sea conditions, propulsion states and loads. 2) To perform

  19. Ocean Circulation Lynne D Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    to the topography, with low pressure in the center. Ocean currents transport heat from the tropics to the poles have gone to sea. As knowledge about ocean currents and capabilities to observe it below the surfaceOcean Circulation Lynne D Talley Volume 1, The Earth system: physical and chemical dimensions

  20. 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W. Fairall et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Water-side turbulence enhancement of ozone deposition to the ocean C. W. Fairall1 , D. Helmig2 , L. Fairall (chris.fairall@noaa.gov) 5137 #12;ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W

  1. Strategic Plan National Ocean Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan of the National Ocean Service 2005-2010 U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic Strategic Plan for 2005 to 2010. This Plan heralds a new era for the ocean and coasts as NOS responds these challenges. The NOS Strategic Plan is synchronous with the NOAA Strategic Plan -- one NOAA, one workforce

  2. December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  3. February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Richter Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  4. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  5. Engineering by Design Ocean Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Engineering by Design Ocean Engineering Bachelor of Science Degree Virginia Tech For more engineering is a diverse field. At Virginia Tech, the major focus areas are ocean energy systems and ocean in the aerospace and related industries and in the shipbuilding, naval engineering, and ship design fields. Some

  6. Pressurized pyrolysis and gasification of Chinese typical coal samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanping Chen; Zhiwu Luo; Haiping Yang; Fudong Ju; Shihong Zhang [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion

    2008-03-15

    This paper aims to understand the pyrolysis and gasification behavior of different Chinese coal samples at different pressures. First, the pyrolysis of four typical Chinese coals samples (Xiaolongtan brown coal, Shenfu bituminous coal, Pingzhai anthracite coal, and Heshan lean coal) were carried out using a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer at ambient pressure and 3 MPa, respectively. The surface structure and elemental component of the resultant char were measured with an automated gas adsorption apparatus and element analyzer. It was observed that higher pressure suppressed the primary pyrolysis, while the secondary pyrolysis of coal particles was promoted. With respect to the resultant solid char, the carbon content increased while H content decreased; however, the pore structure varied greatly with increasing pressure for different coal samples. For Xiaolongtan brown coal (XLT) char, it decreased greatly, while it increased obviously for the other three char types. Then, the isothermal gasification behavior of solid char particles was investigated using an ambient thermal analyzer with CO{sub 2} as the gasifying agent at 1000{sup o}C. The gasification reactivity of solid char was decreased greatly with increasing pyrolysis pressure. However, the extent of change displayed a vital relation with the characteristics of the original coal sample. 26 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Wave Propagation in Multiferroic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Scott Macklin

    2013-01-01

    130 SAW Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . .QuasiStatic MEE Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General MEE Wave Solution . . . . . . . . . . . .

  8. Status of Wave and Tidal Power Technologies for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the status of marine applications for renewable energy as of 2008 from a U.S. perspective. Technologies examined include wave, tidal, and ocean current energy extraction devices.

  9. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions B. R. Sutherland fluid, vertically propagating internal gravity waves of moderately large amplitude can become unstable, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  10. Low-frequency western Pacific Ocean sea level and circulation changes due to the connectivity of the Philippine Archipelago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    of the Philippine Archipelago Wei Zhuang,1 Bo Qiu,2 and Yan Du1 Received 26 August 2013; revised 18 November 2013 changes associated with the oceanic connectivity around the Philippine Archipelago are studied using-driven baroclinic Rossby waves impinge on the eastern Philippine coast and excite coastal Kelvin waves, conveying

  11. Our Ocean Backyard Santa Cruz Sentinel columns by Gary Griggs, Director, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , Steamer Lane, or Mavericks, are generated by the wind. Wind blowing across the ocean transfers energy to the sea surface, initially forming small ripples, which over time, if the wind persists, will grow to form distinct waves. Ultimately, the size of the waves is a function of the amount of energy transmitted

  12. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hereman, Willy

    2013-01-01

    Encyclopedic article covering shallow water wave models used in oceanography and atmospheric science. Sections: Definition of the Subject; Introduction and Historical Perspective; Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations; Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics; Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions; Numerical Methods; Water Wave Experiments and Observations; Future Directions, and Bibliography.

  13. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  14. Nonlocal resonances in weak turbulence of gravity-capillary waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quentin Aubourg; Nicolas Mordant

    2015-03-13

    We report a laboratory investigation of weak turbulence of water surface waves in the gravity-capillary crossover. By using time-space resolved profilometry and a bicoherence analysis, we observe that the nonlinear processes involve 3-wave resonant interactions. By studying the solutions of the resonance conditions we show that the nonlinear interaction is dominantly 1D and involves collinear wave vectors. Furthermore taking into account the spectral widening due to weak nonlinearity explains that nonlocal interactions are possible between a gravity wave and high frequency capillary ones. We observe also that nonlinear 3-wave coupling is possible among gravity waves and we raise the question of the relevance of this mechanism for oceanic waves.

  15. Wave Energy Conversion Overview and it's Renewable Energy Potential for the Oil and Gas Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Ocean energy conversion has been of interest for many years. Recent developments such as concern over global warming have renewed interest in the topic. Part II provides an overview of the energy density found in ocean waves and how it is calculated...

  16. A Lagrangian finite element approach for the simulation of water-waves induced by landslides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frangi, Attilio

    due to landslides, of interest to ocean, coastal as well as to dam engineers. Validation is car- ried breaks [7,8]. In particular specific attention has always been devoted by ocean, coastal and dam rockslide penetrated into the Vajont reservoir at velocities of up to 30 m/s. Wave run-up reached a highest

  17. Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II: Radiation of Gravity Waves from a Gaussian Jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Brian F.

    Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II structures that dominate wave momentum and energy transport. When the interior of a typical midlatitude jet and energy at jet interior critical levels. Longer waves transport momentum and energy away from the jet

  18. Internal wave and boundary current generation by tidal flow over topography Amadeus Dettner, Harry L. Swinney, and M. S. Paoletti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Internal wave and boundary current generation by tidal flow over topography Amadeus Dettner, Harry turbulence and small-scale internal waves above deep-ocean topography Phys. Fluids 25, 106604 (2013); 10.1063/1.4826888 Topographically induced internal solitary waves in a pycnocline: Secondary generation and selection criteria Phys

  19. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    310, the Ocean the Ocean Energy Thermal Energy Conversionfor the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary

  20. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  1. ARM - Oceanic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSA Related Links AntarcticaNews fromOceanic

  2. Ocean | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE Energy Resources, IncIncOccidental,OceanLtd

  3. Ocean Wave Converters: State of the Art and Current Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to 8x106 TWh/year, which is about 100 times the total hydroelectricity generation of the whole planet

  4. Overview of Ocean Wave and Tidal Energy Lingchuan Mei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad

    ) Avoiding the damage that may be caused by other energy tecnology: explosion and lethal radiation of nuclear

  5. Comparison between third and second generation ocean wave models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bratos, Steven Martin

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the relative performance of a second generation (2G) model, WISWAVE (Hubertz 1992), and a third generation (3G) model, WAM (WAMDI 1988), in deep water. High-quality wind fields, with detailed spatial...

  6. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Download Full Report URL: http:en.openei.orgdatasetsdataset6b40f428-2af0-40b3-8a53-0c32c7e35973resource9bfc4b34-78a1-4da9-8928-48a1f72ee8e8downloadmappingandassessmentofth...

  7. On Dissipation Function of Ocean Waves due to Whitecapping.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    , The University of Arizona, Tucson; Department of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of New Mexico of the Hamiltonian in powers of "steepness" (here = 2 and ^k = -) H = 1 2 g2 + ^k d2 r+ + 1 2 ||2 - (^k)2 d2 r at small scales; Fr is a pumping term corresponding to external force (having in mind wind blow

  8. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Source http:my.epri.comportalserver.pt?Productid000000000001024637 Author EPRI Catalog OpenEI Origination Date 2011-12-05T00:00:00 Required Software Sectors Water...

  9. Ocean Wave Energy Company OWECO | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information AreaCountyEnergy Company OWECO

  10. Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information AreaCountyEnergy Company

  11. Open Ocean Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt.Information OlindaOnslow County,OpTIC Technium

  12. Pelamis Wave Power Ocean Power Delivery Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC Jump to:3 ofAltos delValley El PwrPeking

  13. Soft Capacitors for Wave Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsten Ahnert; Markus Abel; Matthias Kollosche; Per Jørgen Jørgensen; Guggi Kofod

    2011-10-14

    Wave energy harvesting could be a substantial renewable energy source without impact on the global climate and ecology, yet practical attempts have struggle d with problems of wear and catastrophic failure. An innovative technology for ocean wave energy harvesting was recently proposed, based on the use of soft capacitors. This study presents a realistic theoretical and numerical model for the quantitative characterization of this harvesting method. Parameter regio ns with optimal behavior are found, and novel material descriptors are determined which simplify analysis dramatically. The characteristics of currently ava ilable material are evaluated, and found to merit a very conservative estimate of 10 years for raw material cost recovery.

  14. Oceans and Ecosystems Research Changing levels of Oceanic Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the atmospheric, the remainder is taken up by land plants and oceans. · We study the uptake by the oceans both EPA qualified the increasing CO2 levels as a pollutant along with the other greenhouse gases Ch4, N2O & wind Algorithm development pCO2= f(SST, color) Co-located satellite data Regional satellite SST & color

  15. OCEAN PREDICTION WITH THE HYBRID COORDINATE OCEAN MODEL (HYCOM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . of South Florida, Fugro-GEOS, ROFFS, Orbimage, Shell, ExxonMobil #12;414 ERIC P. CHASSIGNET ET AL-resolving, real-time global and basin-scale ocean prediction system in the context of the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE). Keywords: HYCOM, GODAE, LAS, data assimilation, metrics. 1. Introduction

  16. Wave variability and wave spectra for wind generated gravity waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretschneider, Charles L.

    1959-01-01

    A series of experiments of forces on a fixed vertical truncated column due to Stokes 5th order like waves were done in a wave tank. An effort was made to generate the waves as close as possible to theoretical Stokes 5th order waves. A systematic...

  17. Tsunami recorded on the open ocean floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filloux, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    On March 14, 1979 a sizeable earth-quake (Ms-7.6 Richter scale) occurred on the continential shelf adjacent to S.W. Mexico, near Petatlan in the state of Guerrero. This earthquake generated a small tsunami that was recorded in deep water, 1000 km away, thus providing for the first time a glance at a tsunami traveling in the open ocean. The same sea floor pressure record displays conspicuous signals associated with vertical sea floor motions generated at the passage of the first Rayleight seismic wave, R1. Seismic and tsunami travel velocities are in agreement with our present understanding of the phenomena, and tsunami detectability in deep water is demonstrated to be well within present day state of the art in the design of sea floor pressure transducers. As calculations anticipate, the E.M. signals associated with the passage of the tsunami were too faint to be detected.

  18. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  19. The Force of a Tsunami on a Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Laura; Renzi, Emiliano; Dutykh, Denys; Dias, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing emphasis on renewable energy resources, wave power technology is fast becoming a realistic solution. However, the recent tsunami in Japan was a harsh reminder of the ferocity of the ocean. It is known that tsunamis are nearly undetectable in the open ocean but as the wave approaches the shore its energy is compressed creating large destructive waves. The question posed here is whether a nearshore wave energy converter (WEC) could withstand the force of an incoming tsunami. The analytical 3D model of Renzi & Dias (2012) developed within the framework of a linear theory and applied to an array of fixed plates is used. The time derivative of the velocity potential allows the hydrodynamic force to be calculated.

  20. Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Lewis M.

    The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

  1. Oceans and Human Health (and climate change)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    Oceans and Human Health (and climate change) Tracy K. Collier Science Dimensions and Ocean Health in a Changing Climate, USC March 12, 2013 1 #12 use Climate change Closes the loop in understanding connections between ocean health and human health

  2. Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dales, K Phillips

    1957-01-01

    Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

  3. Marine Ecosystems Ocean Environment Research Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been studying how CO2 emissions affect the ocean system for more than three decades and conQnue to monitor ocean acidificaQon in all the world's oceans from

  4. HOW TO COOK OCEAN PERCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is an excellent food fish with firm fle h. When cooked, the meat is white and flaky, with a delicate flavor. Ocean to the consumer until 1935. At that time, the indlu;try began experimenting with filleting and freezing ocean pel

  5. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

  6. January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  7. Ocean Systems Lecture 16 & 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    to thrive in oceans and lakes they need sunlight and nutrients. But thermal stratification tends to separateOcean Systems Lecture 16 & 17 #12;Hydroclimate, heat budgets and stratification For plants the nature of stratification. Light, less dense, water floats on top of colder, less dense water. Plankton

  8. Wave energy attenuation and shoreline alteration characteristics of submerged breakwaters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krafft, Katherine Margaret

    1993-01-01

    WAVE ENERGY ATTENUATION AND SHORELINE ALTERATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SUBMERGED BREAKWATERS A Thesis by KATHERINE MARGARET KRAFFT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering WAVE ENERGY ATTENUATION AND SHORELINE ALTERATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SUBMERGED BREAKWATERS A Thesis by KATHERINE MARGARET KRAFFT Approved as to style and content by: John...

  9. The SUN Action database : collecting and analyzing typical actions for visual scene types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsson, Catherine Anne White

    2013-01-01

    Recent work in human and machine vision has increasingly focused on the problem of scene recognition. Scene types are largely defined by the actions one might typically do there: an office is a place someone would typically ...

  10. Ocean Surface Topography Mission/ Jason 2 Launch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Surface Topography Mission/ Jason 2 Launch PreSS KiT/JUNe 2008 #12;#12;Media Contacts Steve .............................................................................................................................. 7 Why Study Ocean Surface Topography

  11. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is...

  12. Localization of Classical Waves I: Acoustic Waves.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Localization of Classical Waves I: Acoustic Waves. Alexander Figotin \\Lambda Department, 1997 Abstract We consider classical acoustic waves in a medium described by a position dependent mass the existence of localized waves, i.e., finite energy solutions of the acoustic equations with the property

  13. Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry An interferometer is an instrument that is sensitive to the interference of two or more waves (optical or acoustic). For example, an optical interferometer uses two interfering light beams to measure small length changes. Coda wave interferometry

  14. Monsoon surges trigger oceanic eddy formation and propagation in the lee of the Philippine Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with eddies that form in the lee of the Cabo Verde and Canary Islands [Chavanne et al., 2002; Sangra et al., 2007]. The Hawaii, Cabo Verde and Canary Islands are located in the trades where winds have typicalMonsoon surges trigger oceanic eddy formation and propagation in the lee of the Philippine Islands

  15. Virtual Seafloor Reduces Internal Wave Generation by Tidal Flow Likun Zhang*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the applicability of linear theory to global predictions of the conversion of tidal energy into internal wave energy of the energy budget of the oceans requires a determination of the efficiency of conversion of tidal energyVirtual Seafloor Reduces Internal Wave Generation by Tidal Flow Likun Zhang* and Harry L. Swinney

  16. Journal of Oceanography, Vol. 66, pp. 709 to 717, 2010 Near-inertial wave,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    . Introduction The ultimate fate of wind-induced near-inertial waves (NIWs) after their generation at the ocean709 Journal of Oceanography, Vol. 66, pp. 709 to 717, 2010 Keywords: Near-inertial wave, Kuroshio. * Corresponding author. E-mail: jpark@gso.uri.edu Copyright©The Oceanographic Society of Japan

  17. A presentation of the U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    A presentation of the U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Patrick Cross Senior Project Specialist Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii Abstract The U.S. Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) in Hawaii is now fully operational

  18. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS ­ UAV ­ Ocean optics, Biological ­ Laser penetration New opportunity · Insitu Sensors ­ (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  19. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore »embedded functional traits.« less

  20. Excitation of Banded Whistler Waves in the Magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, S. Peter; Liu, Kaijun; Winske, Dan

    2012-07-13

    Banded whistler waves can be generated by the whistler anisotropy instability driven by two bi-Maxwellian electron components with T{sub {perpendicular}}/T{sub {parallel}} > 1 at different T{sub {parallel}} For typical magnetospheric condition of 1 < {omega}{sub e}/{Omega}{sub e} < 5 in regions associated with strong chorus, upper-band waves can be excited by anisotropic electrons below {approx} 1 keV, while lower-band waves are excited by anisotropic electrons above {approx} 10 keV. Lower-band waves are generally field-aligned and substantially electromagnetic, while upper-band waves propagate obliquely and have quasi-electrostatic fluctuating electric fields. The quasi-electrostatic feature of upper-band waves suggests that they may be more easily identified in electric field observations than in magnetic field observations. Upper-band waves are liable to Landau damping and the saturation level of upperband waves is lower than lower-band waves, consistent with observations that lower-band waves are stronger than upper-band waves on average. The oblique propagation, the lower saturation level, and the more severe Landau damping together would make upper-band waves more tightly confined to the geomagnetic equator (|{lambda}{sub m}| < {approx}10{sup o}) than lower-band waves.

  1. OCEANS`13 MTS/IEEE SAN DIEGO, SEPTEMBER 2013 1 Electromechanical Emulation of Hydrokinetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    interesting due to the high power density of river and tidal water currents as well as ocean waves that have Abstract--The pace of research and development efforts to integrate renewable power sources into modern paramount. In particular, hydrokinetic power is appealing due to its high energy density and superior

  2. WIND-DRIVEN NEAR INERTIAL OCEAN RESPONSE AND MIXING AT THE CRITICAL LATITUDE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoqian

    2010-07-14

    ? latitude. Near 30? latitude, the maximum oceanic response to sea breeze moves offshore slowly because of the near-zero group speed of Poincare waves at this latitude. The lateral energy flux convergence plus the energy input from the wind is maximum near...

  3. THE SPECTRUM OF OCEANIC VARIABILITY (Part 1) Stephen Riser, University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    , heating/cooling, tides, geothermal heating (generally large spatial scales, > 1000 km) Energy dissipation gradient yields ocean pressure force to the east. wind wind sea level wind 100° W140° E #12;ENSO Atmosphere;13 April 1993 31 July 1993 Rossby wave propagation is clearly evident near the Equator; at other latitudes

  4. Forcing of Ocean and Sea Ice Variability by the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    hemisphere ocean. 1 #12;1 The atmospheric jet stream and southern hemisphere geography If the earth's surface in solar forcing would also be zonally-symmetric. This would generate, in turn, a mid-latitude jet stream the well-known wavenumber 2 stationary wave pattern in the climatological mean state of the NH jet stream

  5. Forcing of Ocean and Sea Ice Variability by the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    hemisphere ocean. 1 #12; 1 The atmospheric jet stream and southern hemisphere geography If the earth in solar forcing would also be zonally­symmetric. This would generate, in turn, a mid­latitude jet stream the well­known wavenumber 2 stationary wave pattern in the climatological mean state of the NH jet stream

  6. The emergence of zonal ocean jets under large-scale stochastic wind forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCasce, Joseph H.

    . But we will show how such forcing can in fact generate zonal jet-like structures. [5] Wind forcingThe emergence of zonal ocean jets under large-scale stochastic wind forcing Christopher H. O stochastic wind forcing is investigated. As found in many previous studies, long Rossby waves are excited

  7. NUMERICAL MODELING OF LOW FREQUENCY HYDRO-ACOUSTIC WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    NUMERICAL MODELING OF LOW FREQUENCY HYDRO-ACOUSTIC WAVES GENERATED BY SUBMARINE TSUNAMIGENIC#al to increase the reliability of the system · Can we use precursors of tsunami? Hydro numerical models applicable on an oceanic scale #12;Index · Introduc#on on hydro

  8. TSUNAMI BENCHMARK RESULTS FOR FULLY NONLINEAR BOUSSINESQ WAVE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    TSUNAMI BENCHMARK RESULTS FOR FULLY NONLINEAR BOUSSINESQ WAVE MODEL FUNWAVE-TVD, VERSION 1 by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program CENTER FOR APPLIED COASTAL RESEARCH Ocean Engineering Laboratory University of Delaware Newark, Delaware 19716 #12;Abstract This report describes tsunami benchmark testing

  9. The Link Foundation Ocean Engineering and Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    and ocean instrumentation. Application Available online at www.linkoe.org or write to/email: Forms and DrThe Link Foundation Ocean Engineering and Instrumentation Ph.D. Fellowship Program Objectives: To foster ocean engineering and ocean instrumentation research; to enhance both the theoretical

  10. Response of photosynthesis to ocean acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, KRM; Morris, JJ; Morris, JJ; Morel, FMM; Kranz, SA

    2015-01-01

    primary productiv- ity, especially in the oligotrophic regions of the ocean. In addition to the energy

  11. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CARIBBEAN OCEAN HISTORY AND THE CRETACEOUS Scientist, Leg 165 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LESSER ANTILLES FOREARC J. Casey Moore Staff Science Representative, Leg 110 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Direct* Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean

  13. INSTRUCTIONS INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP) MANUSCRIPT AND PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas 77845, USA A signed copyright of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program or any other publications of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Author

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 109 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORWEGIAN SEA Olav Eldholm Co-Chief Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Pni±ip o Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  16. WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Product Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Product Documentation Ocean Climate Laboratory NODC / NESDIS / NOAA Silver: World Ocean Atlas 2013 Product Documentation. T. Boyer, Ed.; A. Mishonov, Technical Ed.; 14 pp such as mixed layer depth. Upon publishing Climatological Atlas of the World Ocean in 1982, he distributed

  17. Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

  18. Newsletter of Coastal Ocean Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science Workshop Executive Summary Draft OCEAN.US Airlie House Workshop Update Evolution of the Cross and the following working groups: 1.Trace elements in ecological and biogeochemical processes 2.Physical forcing

  19. Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamborg, Carl

    The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

  20. Ocean Renewable Energy Conference X

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 10th annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference provides attendees a forum to share new ideas and concepts, opportunity to learn from leading-edge practitioners and policy-makers, information...

  1. MPAS-Ocean Development Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Douglas W.; Ringler, Todd D.; Petersen, Mark R.; Jones, Philip W.; Maltrud, Mathew E.

    2012-06-13

    The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) is a modeling framework developed jointly between NCAR and LANL, built to allow core developers to: rapidly develop new dynamical cores, and leverage improvements made to shared codes. MPAS-Ocean (MPAS-O) is a functioning ocean model capable of high resolution, or highly vairable resolution simulations. The first MPAS-O publication is expected by the end of the year.

  2. Dept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Only Indian and Pacific Ocean GlobalEEZ100km from shorelineAtlantic OceanIndo-Pacific #12;OTEC MODELINGDept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology of deep layers, Increase in THC strength 1) Global 2) EEZ 3)100km from Shoreline 4) Only Atlantic Ocean 5

  3. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal; Siegel et al., 1995] have demonstrated that the penetration of EVIS in the upper layer of the ocean plays

  4. Wave Control Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    focussing: in crossing seas due to coastal or submarine convergences. Moreover, (rogue) wave energy devices maker to create the highest rogue wave? geometry and dynamo in a new rogue wave energy device? maximum

  5. Could we identify hot Ocean-Planets with CoRoT, Kepler and Doppler velocimetry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Selsis; B. Chazelas; P. Borde; M. Ollivier; F. Brachet; M. Decaudin; F. Bouchy; D. Ehrenreich; J. -M. Griessmeier; H. Lammer; C. Sotin; O. Grasset; C. Moutou; P. Barge; M. Deleuil; D. Mawet; D. Despois; J. F. Kasting; A. Leger

    2007-07-12

    Planets less massive than about 10 MEarth are expected to have no massive H-He atmosphere and a cometary composition (50% rocks, 50% water, by mass) provided they formed beyond the snowline of protoplanetary disks. Due to inward migration, such planets could be found at any distance between their formation site and the star. If migration stops within the habitable zone, this will produce a new kind of planets, called Ocean-Planets. Ocean-planets typically consist in a silicate core, surrounded by a thick ice mantle, itself covered by a 100 km deep ocean. The existence of ocean-planets raises important astrobiological questions: Can life originate on such body, in the absence of continent and ocean-silicate interfaces? What would be the nature of the atmosphere and the geochemical cycles ? In this work, we address the fate of Hot Ocean-Planets produced when migration ends at a closer distance. In this case the liquid/gas interface can disappear, and the hot H2O envelope is made of a supercritical fluid. Although we do not expect these bodies to harbor life, their detection and identification as water-rich planets would give us insight as to the abundance of hot and, by extrapolation, cool Ocean-Planets.

  6. Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

    2014-04-03

    Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

  7. Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2009-01-01

    over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

  8. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond Angélil; Prasenjit Saha

    2015-05-20

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics - rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches - we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  9. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wavemore »intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10?³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.« less

  10. Analysis of ocean waves and wave forces by a filtering technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumberg, Randolph

    1955-01-01

    The importance of clean air to the indoor air quality affecting the well-being of human occupants and rising energy consumption has highlighted the critical role of air filter performance. Actual performance of air filters installed in air handling...

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01

    M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  12. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  14. Big Flippin' Wave Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Verdes, Campus Point, Coal Oil Point (Sands) Waves propagate perpendicular to isobaths (lines of constant

  15. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves nonlinear waves. Throughout the theory is based on the traditional assumptions that water is inviscid

  16. Land-ocean contrasts under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Observations and climate models show a pronounced land-ocean contrast in the responses of surface temperature and the hydrological cycle to global warming: Land temperatures increase more than ocean temperatures, low-level ...

  17. PHYSICS OF OCEAN CIRCULATION Instructor: S. Riser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    Topography Tides Wind Geothermal heating Surface flows elsewhere #12;How deep is the ocean? The average ocean circulation #12;UNITS Horizontal distance: km (= 105 cm) Vertical distance: m Velocity: cm/sec Density: g/cm3

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT GAS HYDRATE SAMPLING ON THE BLAKE RIDGE of Tokyo (Japan) National Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program (Belgium, Denmark, Finland

  19. Mechanistic models of oceanic nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Fanny

    2009-01-01

    Oceanic nitrogen fixation and biogeochemical interactions between the nitrogen, phosphorus and iron cycles have important implications for the control of primary production and carbon storage in the ocean. The biological ...

  20. Oceanography | Vol.24, No.3114 OCEAN WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Helen

    out ows via these pathways return freshwaters to the North Atlantic that were evaporated from tropical oceans, transported by the atmosphere, and delivered to the Arctic Ocean via precipi- tation, terrestrial

  1. Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons PI: Meghan Cronin Co Lab Review 2 hClimate Sta-ons are moored buoys #12;Ocean Climate Sta1ons 2014 PMEL Lab Review 5 Contribu-ng to NOAA's Goals

  2. Price Philanthropies Ocean Science Education: Aquarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton, Randy

    ! ! ! ! ! Price Philanthropies Ocean Science Education: Aquarium Express Outreach Who: Students by The Price Philanthropies Ocean Science Fund and participate in our Aquarium Express Outreach Programs! What education, Price Philanthropies, led by Robert and Allison Price, joined supporters of Birch Aquarium

  3. Design Considerations for Monopile Founded Offshore Wind Turbines Subject to Breaking Waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Garrett Reese 1987-

    2012-11-26

    The majority of offshore wind farms utilize monopile substructures. As these wind farms are typically located in water depths less than 30 meters, the effect of breaking waves on these structures is of great concern to design engineers...

  4. the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

  5. Wave turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallet, Basile; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-01-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave Turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well-suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wavenumber, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bo...

  6. Deep Meridional Overturning Circulation in the Indian Ocean and Its Relation to Indian Ocean Dipole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep Meridional Overturning Circulation in the Indian Ocean and Its Relation to Indian Ocean Dipole of the Ocean (GECCO) syn- thesis data to analyze and examine the relationship of the Indian Ocean deep within the zonal band of 108 on both sides of the equator. Therefore, there exists a surface to deep

  7. AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program U ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;Integrated Ocean Drilling Program United States Implementing Organization JOI T his Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)-U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) Fiscal Year 2006

  8. A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Thomas W. N.

    of the oceanic31 carbon pool. It influences light penetration with consequences for primary productivity1 A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2 S. Dwivedi1 , T. W. N. Haine2 and C. E. Del Castillo3 3 1 Department of Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences, University

  9. Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

  10. Could we identify hot Ocean-Planets with CoRoT, Kepler and Doppler velocimetry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selsis, F; Borde, P; Ollivier, M; Brachet, F; Decaudin, M; Bouchy, F; Ehrenreich, D; Griessmeier, J M; Lammer, H; Sotin, C; Grasset, O; Moutou, C; Barge, P; Deleuil, M; Mawet, D; Despois, D; Kasting, J F; Léger, A

    2007-01-01

    Planets less massive than about 10 MEarth are expected to have no massive H-He atmosphere and a cometary composition (50% rocks, 50% water, by mass) provided they formed beyond the snowline of protoplanetary disks. Due to inward migration, such planets could be found at any distance between their formation site and the star. If migration stops within the habitable zone, this will produce a new kind of planets, called Ocean-Planets. Ocean-planets typically consist in a silicate core, surrounded by a thick ice mantle, itself covered by a 100 km deep ocean. The existence of ocean-planets raises important astrobiological questions: Can life originate on such body, in the absence of continent and ocean-silicate interfaces? What would be the nature of the atmosphere and the geochemical cycles ? In this work, we address the fate of Hot Ocean-Planets produced when migration ends at a closer distance. In this case the liquid/gas interface can disappear, and the hot H2O envelope is made of a supercritical fluid. Althou...

  11. Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST -We are implementing and evaluating a feature tracking approach to estimate ocean surface currents. - This approach allows us to estimate://cioss.coas.oregonstate.edu/ Ocean surface currents (vectors) derived from SST (background) modeled fields along the west coast of U

  12. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Jack

    WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

  13. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    .coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS THE COTE D'IVOIRE - GHANA TRANSFORM MARGIN, Leg 159 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park

  15. SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 HANDBOOK OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE 3 portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A & M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LABRADOR SEA - BAFFIN BAY Dr. Michael A. Bradford Clement Staff Science Representative, Leg 105 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469" Philip Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FLUID FLOW AND SUBDUCTION FLUXES ACROSS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO Philip D Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS IZU-MARIANA MARGIN Dr. Terry Plank Co France Dr. Carlota Escutia Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE H2O LONG-TERM SEAFLOOR Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SHAKEDOWN AND SEA TRIALS CRUISE Philip D. Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station

  3. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS PALEOGENE EQUATORIAL TRANSECT Dr. Mitchell __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS MARIANA CONVERGENT MARGIN/ WEST PHILIPPINE SEA Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT HOLE 504B Dr. Henry Dick Dr. Jörg Erzinger Co Giessen Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Laura Stokking Staff Scientist, Leg 140 Ocean Drilling Program Copies of this publication may be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

  7. Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 22092223 Technical Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    2006-01-01

    . Three quarter of our planet's surface is covered by water where a richer biodiversity than life on land exists--more major taxonomic groupings of animals can be found in the oceans than on land. The oceans food, energy, and mineral resources, oceans also play a critical role in regulating Earth's weather

  8. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    productive oceanic eastern boundary current, providing anCurrent System and the Kuroshio Extension uses OFES products for their oceanic

  9. APS DPP November 11 15 2002University of Washington Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory Typical plasma parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    to RMF FRC experiments at RPPL Theory: RMF fully penetrates plasma, Cosynchronous electron rotation plasma, Magnetic profiles flattened across null. Theory: Revised to encompass FRC condition. RMFAPS DPP November 11 ­ 15 2002University of Washington Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory Typical

  10. Determination of a peak benzene exposure to consumers at typical self-service gasoline stations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carapezza, Ted

    1977-01-01

    DETERMINATION OF A PEAK BENZENE EXPOSURE TO CONSUMERS AT TYPICAL SELF-SERVICE GASOLINE STATIONS A Thesis by TED CARAPEZZA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene DETERMINATION OF A PEAK BENZENE EXPOSURE TO CONSUMERS AT TYPICAL SELF-SERVICE GASOLINE STATIONS A Thesis by TED CARAPEZZA Approved as to style and content by: (. (iL, &? Chairman...

  11. Elastic wave-turbulence and intermittency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chibbaro, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Weak Wave Turbulence is a powerful theory to predict statistical observables of diverse relevant physical phenomena, such as ocean waves, magnetohydrodynamics and nonlinear optics. The theory is based upon an asymptotic closure permitted in the limit of small nonlinearity. Here, we explore the possible deviations from this mean-field framework, in terms of anomalous scaling, focusing on the case of elastic plates. We establish the picture of the possible behaviors at varying the extent of nonlinearity, and we show that the mean-field theory is appropriate when all excited scales remain dominated by linear dynamics. The other picture is non-trivial and our results suggest that, when large scales contain much energy, the cascade sustains extreme events at small scales and the system displays intermittency.

  12. Extended Abstract Ocean Optics XIV, 10.-13. November 1998 COMPARISON OF UNDERWATER LIGHT FIELD PARAMETERIZATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    °30'W) north of Gran Canaria, Canary Islands. It dis- cusses the typical winter and spring situation-Series in the Ocean Canary Islands (ESTOC) is located 60 nautical miles north of Gran Canaria and Tenerife (29°10'N are done as a part of the European CANIGO project (Canary Islands Azores Gibraltar Observation). The ex

  13. Modulational instability, wave breaking and formation of large scale dipoles in the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iafrati; A. Babanin; M. Onorato

    2012-08-27

    In the present Letter we use the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equation for a two-phase flow (water and air) to study the dynamics of the modulational instability of free surface waves and its contribution to the interaction between ocean and atmosphere. If the steepness of the initial wave is large enough, we observe a wave breaking and the formation of large scale dipole structures in the air. Because of the multiple steepening and breaking of the waves under unstable wave packets, a train of dipoles is released and propagate in the atmosphere at a height comparable with the wave length. The amount of energy dissipated by the breaker in water and air is considered and, contrary to expectations, we observe that the energy dissipation in air is larger than the one in the water. Possible consequences on the wave modelling and on the exchange of aerosols and gases between air and water are discussed.

  14. Relativistic Quaternionic Wave Equation II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II J. Math. Phys.Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II Charles Schwartzcomponent quaternionic wave equation recently introduced. A

  15. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

  16. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long WaveShort Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave­Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW 1Ã , Hiu Ning CHAN 1 online June 11, 2013) The long wave­short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution equations

  17. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. Significant interactions and energy transfer can1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase

  18. Model for the formation of longshore sand ridges on the Continental Shelf: The interaction of internal waves and the bottom topography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Restrepo, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bona, J.L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1994-01-05

    Longshore sand ridges are frequently observed to occur on the continental shelf where the overlying ocean is stratified. This study formulates a model for the formation and evolution of three-dimensional longshore sand ridges on the continental shelf. The model is based on the interaction of interfacial, weakly nonlinear waves in a stratified ocean with the sedimentary bottom topography.

  19. Geophys.J. Int. (1996) 125,385-396 Waveform analysis of Scholte modes in ocean sedimentlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolet, Guust

    1996-01-01

    of interface waves (Scholte 1958)from the THUMPER experiment off southern California. Waveform fitting is a very powerful tool to determine the S velocity in the top few metres of the sediment. Starting from of the ocean basins is detritus from the plants and animals living above. The volume of these biogenic

  20. SMALL-SCALE VARIABILITY IN SEA SURFACE HEIGHTS AND SURFACE WINDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR ERRORS IN OCEAN MODELS AND OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexey

    SMALL-SCALE VARIABILITY IN SEA SURFACE HEIGHTS AND SURFACE WINDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR ERRORS IN OCEAN on dispersion relationship of planetary waves 4. Small-scale variability in surface winds and sea surface of model and observational data sets. Imperfect parameterization of the small-scale variability (SSV

  1. LI, BINGHUI. The Economic Performance of Ocean Compressed Air Energy Storage. (Under the direction of Dr. Joseph DeCarolis).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barlaz, Morton A.

    associated with renewables such as wind, wave, and solar power. Ocean Compressed Air Energy Storage (OCAES, and can be installed close to major US coastal demand centers. A preliminary economic analysis in Chapter-generated electricity that exceeds the grid-tied, undersea cable capacity. A mixed integer programming (MIP

  2. 2 Ionospheric GPS total electron content (TEC) disturbances triggered 3 by the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    Indian Ocean tsunami 4 Jann-Yenq Liu,1,2 Yi-Ben Tsai,3 Kuo-Fong Ma,3 Yuh-Ing Chen,4 Ho-Fang Tsai,5 5 2005; accepted 17 January 2006; published XX Month 2006. 7 [1] Tsunami ionospheric disturbances (TIDs that the 10 tsunami waves triggered atmospheric disturbances near the sea surface, which then 11 traveled

  3. Gravitational waves from Affleck-Dine condensate fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2015-01-01

    We compute the stochastic gravitational wave production from Affleck-Dine condensate fragmentation in the early universe, focusing on an effective potential with a logarithmic mass correction that typically arises in gravity mediated supersymmetry breaking scenarios. We find that a significant gravitational wave background can be generated when Q-balls are being formed out of the condensate fragmentation. This gravitational wave background has a distinct multi-peak power spectrum where the trough is closely linked to the supersymmetry breaking scale and whose frequencies are peaked around kHz for TeV supersymmetry breaking.

  4. Gravitational waves from Affleck-Dine condensate fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuang-Yong Zhou

    2015-06-01

    We compute the stochastic gravitational wave production from Affleck-Dine condensate fragmentation in the early universe, focusing on an effective potential with a logarithmic mass correction that typically arises in gravity mediated supersymmetry breaking scenarios. We find that a significant gravitational wave background can be generated when Q-balls are being formed out of the condensate fragmentation. This gravitational wave background has a distinct multi-peak power spectrum where the trough is closely linked to the supersymmetry breaking scale and whose frequencies are peaked around kHz for TeV supersymmetry breaking.

  5. Global warming and changes in ocean circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, P.B.; Caldeira, K.C.

    1998-02-01

    This final report provides an overview of the goals and accomplishments of this project. Modeling and observational work has raised the possibility that global warming may cause changes in the circulation of the ocean. If such changes would occur they could have important climatic consequences. The first technical goal of this project was to investigate some of these possible changes in ocean circulation in a quantitative way, using a state-of -the-art numerical model of the ocean. Another goal was to develop our ocean model, a detailed three-dimensional numerical model of the ocean circulation and ocean carbon cycles. A major non-technical goal was to establish LLNL as a center of excellence in modelling the ocean circulation and carbon cycle.

  6. The International Workshop on Wave Hindcasting and Forecasting and the Coastal Hazards Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breivik, Øyvind; Babanin, Alexander; Horsburgh, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Following the 13th International Workshop on Wave Hindcasting and Forecasting and 4th Coastal Hazards Symposium in October 2013 in Banff, Canada, a topical collection has appeared in recent issues of Ocean Dynamics. Here we give a brief overview of the history of the conference since its inception in 1986 and of the progress made in the fields of wind-generated ocean waves and the modelling of coastal hazards before we summarize the main results of the papers that have appeared in the topical collection.

  7. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J.

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123–130). This ...

  8. X-ray Imaging of Shock Waves Generated by High-Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    , the fuel jets can exceed supersonic speeds and result in gaseous shock waves. High-pressure, high-speed monochromat- ic x-radiography to probe the high-speed fuel sprays and show the generation of shock waves. We studied a high-pressure common-rail diesel injection system typical of that in a passenger car

  9. Emission of Inertial Waves by Baroclinically Unstable Flows: Laboratory Experiments with Altimetric Imaging Velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the dispersion relation for the inertial waves. The energy of the waves is small compared to the energy, or the "gradient wind" velocity with very high spatial resolution (typically several million vectors) limited largely by the pixel resolution of the available imaging sensors. The technique is particularly suited

  10. Electromagnetic Surface Wave Propagation Applicable to UltraHigh Energy Neutrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic Surface Wave Propagation Applicable to UltraHigh Energy Neutrino Detection Peter ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR), which would typically interact very close to the surface. Since of electromagnetic surface waves and their propagation is presented. The charged particle shower is modelled

  11. Gravitational Waves on Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2004-03-12

    We consider a gravitational wave of arbitrary frequency incident on a normal or a super-conductor. The gravitationally induced fields inside the conductor are derived. The outward propagating EM waves are calculated for a low frequency wave on a small sphere and for a high frequency wave incident on a large disk. We estimate for both targets the GW to EM conversion efficiencies and also the magnitude of the superconductor's phase perturbation.

  12. composition of putative oceans on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    · CO2, ~0.3-0.9 (volume fraction) · H2O, ~0.01-0.6 · N2, ~0.02-0.15 · High temperature corresponds CO2 and N2 are degassed · S and Cl are from Earth's data · 1 km thick ocean, variable basalt layer and phyllosilicates · S is in sulfate and sulfide minerals Why? · ~ neutral pH, no trapping of atmospheric CO2

  13. Bragg grating rogue wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degasperis, Antonio; Aceves, Alejandro B

    2015-01-01

    We derive the rogue wave solution of the classical massive Thirring model, that describes nonlinear optical pulse propagation in Bragg gratings. Combining electromagnetically induced transparency with Bragg scattering four-wave mixing, may lead to extreme waves at extremely low powers.

  14. Wave Particles Cem Yuksel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    Wave Particles Cem Yuksel Computer Science Texas A&M University Donald H. House Visualization captured from our real-time simulation system (approximately 100,000 wave particles) Abstract We present a new method for the real-time simulation of fluid sur- face waves and their interactions with floating

  15. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    , known as parametric sub- harmonic instability, results generally when a disturbance of one frequency imparts energy to disturbances of half that frequency.13,14 Generally, a plane periodic internal wave, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  16. Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

  17. EVALUATION OF TROQUE VS CLOSURE BOLT PRELOAD FOR A TYPICAL CONTAINMENT VESSEL UNDER SERVICE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.

    2010-02-16

    Radioactive material package containment vessels typically employ bolted closures of various configurations. Closure bolts must retain the lid of a package and must maintain required seal loads, while subjected to internal pressure, impact loads and vibration. The need for insuring that the specified preload is achieved in closure bolts for radioactive materials packagings has been a continual subject of concern for both designers and regulatory reviewers. The extensive literature on threaded fasteners provides sound guidance on design and torque specification for closure bolts. The literature also shows the uncertainty associated with use of torque to establish preload is typically between 10 and 35%. These studies have been performed under controlled, laboratory conditions. The ability to insure required preload in normal service is, consequently, an important question. The study described here investigated the relationship between indicated torque and resulting bolt load for a typical radioactive materials package closure using methods available under normal service conditions.

  18. The Direct Wave-Drive Thruster Matthew S. Feldman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Magnetic Vector Potential T Thrust m Mass Flow Rate P Power Complex Frequency Dependent Plasma concepts have used various waves to heat a plasma and obtain thrust via expansion through a magnetic nozzle operating at 5kW with a mass flow rate of 1 mg/s and found that for typical plasma parameters, the maximum

  19. Wide bandwidth dual acoustic gravitational wave detectors M. Bonaldia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    instruments and methods to search for gravitational waves from the universe. Resonant mass "bar" detectors [1 of quanta of vibration at about 1 kHz. However it is commonly accepted in the community that, to enter be achieved. Traditional acoustic detectors are seriously lim- ited in terms of bandwidth (typically to about

  20. Wave–current interaction in the presence of a three-dimensional bathymetry: Deep water wave focusing in opposing current conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, V. Charland, J. Touboul, J.

    2014-09-15

    Large scale experiments were carried out in the Ocean Engineering Basin FIRST, France. A tri-dimensional bathymetry consisting of two symmetrical submerged mounds was displayed on the flat bed on both sides of the basin. Regular waves of frequency corresponding to deep water conditions above the bathymetry were generated in opposing current conditions. A strong tri-dimensional behaviour is observed for the wave amplitude, leading to a strong focusing (up to twice the incident amplitude) of the wave energy towards the central deeper zone. This amplification cannot be ascribed to the increase of the current intensity in the main wave direction, nor to a current gradient normally to the wave direction. A wave phase gradient, normal to its main direction, is observed up-wave (or downstream) the mounds. This phase lag depends on the wave amplitude, it is the higher for the moderate amplitude case. The experimental data are compared with calculations of a refraction-diffraction model assuming a depth-averaged current. If the model qualitatively predicts the wave amplification in the centerline of the basin, discrepancies are observed in the vicinity of the depth changes. The observed mean current vertical profile shape is then supposed to play a significant role in the wave focusing, especially near the steep slopes down-stream the mounds. In addition, the waves are found to modify substantially both horizontal and vertical current fields.

  1. Mechanism of destruction of transport barriers in geophysical jets with Rossby waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Yu. Uleysky; M. V. Budyansky; S. V. Prants

    2012-02-02

    The mechanism of destruction of a central transport barrier in a dynamical model of a geophysical zonal jet current in the ocean or the atmosphere with two propagating Rossby waves is studied. We develop a method for computing a central invariant curve which is an indicator of existence of the barrier. Breakdown of this curve under a variation of the Rossby wave amplitudes and onset of chaotic cross-jet transport happen due to specific resonances producing stochastic layers in the central jet. The main result is that there are resonances breaking the transport barrier at unexpectedly small values of the amplitudes that may have serious impact on mixing and transport in the ocean and the atmosphere. The effect can be found in laboratory experiments with azimuthal jets and Rossby waves in rotating tanks under specific values of the wave numbers that are predicted in the theory.

  2. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OBSERVED ABOVE A QUIET-SUN REGION IN A DARK CAVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jiajia; Zhou Zhenjun; Wang Yuming; Liu Rui; Liao Chijian; Shen Chenglong; Zheng Huinan; Miao Bin; Su Zhenpeng; Wang, S.; Wang Bin E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn

    2012-10-20

    Waves play a crucial role in diagnosing the plasma properties of various structures in the solar corona and coronal heating. Slow magnetoacoustic (MA) waves are one of the important types of magnetohydrodynamic waves. In past decades, numerous slow MA waves were detected above active regions and coronal holes, but were rarely found elsewhere. Here, we investigate a 'tornado'-like structure consisting of quasi-periodic streaks within a dark cavity at about 40-110 Mm above a quiet-Sun region on 2011 September 25. Our analysis reveals that these streaks are actually slow MA wave trains. The properties of these wave trains, including phase speed, compression ratio, and kinetic energy density, are similar to those of the reported slow MA waves, except that the period of these waves is about 50 s, much shorter than the typical reported values (3-5 minutes).

  3. Radiation dose estimates for typical piloted NTR lunar and Mars mission engine operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnitzler, B.G. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Borowski, S.K. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center)

    1991-01-01

    The natural and manmade radiation environments to be encountered during lunar and Mars missions are qualitatively summarized. The computational methods available to characterize the radiation environment produced by an operating nuclear propulsion system are discussed. Mission profiles and vehicle configurations are presented for a typical all-propulsive, fully reusable lunar mission and for a typical all-propulsive Mars mission. Estimates of crew location biological doses are developed for all propulsive maneuvers. Post-shutdown dose rates near the nuclear engine are estimated at selected mission times. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  5. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  6. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael

    2013-08-15

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  7. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

  8. INTRODUCTION Motor control of the feeding mechanism is typically regarded as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    3095 INTRODUCTION Motor control of the feeding mechanism is typically regarded as phylogenetically). In spite of this conservatism, most of these fishes are capable of modulating the kinematics of the feeding et al., 2006b; Nauwelaerts et al., 2007). Thus, the effect of kinematic modulation on the resulting

  9. Strain Storage Typically, mycobacteria can be stored as lyophilized stocks, agar slants, or frozen stocks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strain Storage Typically, mycobacteria can be stored as lyophilized stocks, agar slants, or frozen stocks. Since lyophilization is not a cost-effective product storage alternative for virulent M. tuberculosis and agar slants can take up considerable BSL3 storage space, the best alternative for strain

  10. Assessing Student Learning We typically assess student learning in terms of their grades on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champagne, Frances A.

    need to be student-focused rather than instructor-focused. Focus on the learning resulting fromAssessing Student Learning We typically assess student learning in terms of their grades on quizzes should be linked to our learning objectives. To properly assess student learning, you need to know what

  11. 1 Introduction Studies of facial attractiveness have typically investigated how physical cues, such as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Tony

    1 Introduction Studies of facial attractiveness have typically investigated how physical cues for a recent meta-analytic review). By contrast with this emphasis on the effects that physical cues have of these invariant physical cues and those of changeable social signals, such as gaze direction and expression, might

  12. OROGRAPHIC PRECIPITATION Precipitation that has been generated or modified by topography, typically through the forcing of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Gerard

    OROGRAPHIC PRECIPITATION Precipitation that has been generated or modified by topography, typically rainfall). Orographic effects on precipitation are also responsible for some of the planet's sharpest perpendicular to the prevailing winds, precipitation is greatly enhanced on the windward side and suppressed

  13. The ocean’s role in the transient response of climate to abrupt greenhouse gas forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffery R.

    We study the role of the ocean in setting the patterns and timescale of the transient response of the climate to anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing. A novel framework is set out which involves integration of an ocean-only ...

  14. Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean about 100 m). Because of correlations between errors, the export production becomes significant when cycling; 4863 Oceanography: Biological and Chemical: Sedimentation; KEYWORDS: export production, nutrient

  15. On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Joseph L

    2009-01-01

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

  16. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

  17. Ocean Viral Metagenomics (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rohwer, Forest

    2011-04-26

    Forest Rohwer from San Diego State University talks about "Ocean Viral Metagenomics" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  18. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll...

  19. Observations: Oceanic Climate Change and Sea Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Changes ............. 402 5.4 Ocean Biogeochemical Changes ................... 403 5.4.1 Introduction ......................................................... 403 5.4.2 Carbon................................................................. 403 5.4.3 Oxygen

  20. Ocean Navitas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information AreaCounty LandfillLtd JumpOcean

  1. ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimate inMakingMovingOcean

  2. On the so-called rogue waves in the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Y Charles

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of a rogue water wave is still unknown. One popular conjecture is that the Peregrine wave solution of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLS) provides a mechanism. A Peregrine wave solution can be obtained by taking the infinite spatial period limit to the homoclinic solutions. In this article, from the perspective of the phase space structure of these homoclinic orbits in the infinite dimensional phase space where the NLS defines a dynamical system, we exam the observability of these homoclinic orbits (and their approximations). Our conclusion is that these approximate homoclinic orbits are the most observable solutions,and they should correspond to the most common deep ocean waves rather than the rare rogue waves. We also discuss other possibilities for the mechanism of a rogue wave: rough dependence on initial data or finite time blow up.

  3. On the so-called rogue waves in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Charles Li

    2015-11-02

    The mechanism of a rogue water wave is still unknown. One popular conjecture is that the Peregrine wave solution of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLS) provides a mechanism. A Peregrine wave solution can be obtained by taking the infinite spatial period limit to the homoclinic solutions. In this article, from the perspective of the phase space structure of these homoclinic orbits in the infinite dimensional phase space where the NLS defines a dynamical system, we exam the observability of these homoclinic orbits (and their approximations). Our conclusion is that these approximate homoclinic orbits are the most observable solutions,and they should correspond to the most common deep ocean waves rather than the rare rogue waves. We also discuss other possibilities for the mechanism of a rogue wave: rough dependence on initial data or finite time blow up.

  4. Ocean Sci., 6, 775787, 2010 www.ocean-sci.net/6/775/2010/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Pacific Ocean F. M. Bingham1, G. R. Foltz2, and M. J. McPhaden3 1Center for Marine Science, Univ. of North salinity (SLS) is examined in the Pacific Ocean between 40 S and 60 N using a variety of data sourcesOcean Sci., 6, 775­787, 2010 www.ocean-sci.net/6/775/2010/ doi:10.5194/os-6-775-2010 © Author

  5. Compressive spectral method for the simulation of the water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cihan Bayindir

    2015-12-19

    In this paper an approach for decreasing the computational effort required for the spectral simulations of the water waves is introduced. Signals with majority of the components zero, are known as the sparse signals. Like majority of the signals in the nature it can be realized that water waves are sparse either in time or in the frequency domain. Using the sparsity property of the water waves in the time or in the frequency domain, the compressive sampling algorithm can be used as a tool for improving the performance of the spectral simulation of the water waves. The methodology offered in this paper depends on the idea of using a smaller number of spectral components compared to the classical spectral method with a high number of components. After performing the time integration with a smaller number of spectral components and using the compressive sampling technique, it is shown that the water wave field can be reconstructed with a significantly better efficiency compared to the classical spectral method with a high number of spectral components, especially for long time evolutions. For the sparse water wave model in the time domain the well-known solitary wave solutions of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation is considered. For the sparse water wave model in the frequency domain the well-known Airy (linear) ocean waves with Jonswap spectrum is considered. Utilizing a spectral method, it is shown that by using a smaller number of spectral components compared to the classical spectral method with a high number of components, it is possible to simulate the sparse water waves with negligible error in accuracy and a great efficiency especially for large time evolutions.

  6. 2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project- and Ocean Drilling Program Services on behalf of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program September 2007 #12;#12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which in February 2007 contained

  7. Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

  8. 2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which contained almost 22,000 citation records related to the Deep Sea Drilling Institute (AGI). The database has been on line since August 2002. Beginning in 2006, citation records

  9. Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color Laboratory, Ocean Optics Section, Code 7333, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 gould@nrlssc.navy.mil Abstract: Satellite-derived optical properties are compared to in situ mooring and ship-based measurements

  10. Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

  11. TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC-scale interactions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, especially, processes associated with the EI Nino phenomena. He has of ocean temperatures. He suggests that an anomalously high heat supply in the equatorial Pacific

  12. DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tandon, Amit

    DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL developed to automatically detect, locate and track mesoscale eddies spatially and temporally. Using an invaluable tool to assess mesoscale oceanic features. Key Words ­ Scientific Visualization, Eddy Detection

  13. Elastic-Plastic deformation studies in 4140 steel using the critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr)wave technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Wei

    1996-01-01

    The critically refracted longitudinal (LCR) wave ultrasonic technique has been used to investigate a typical turbine disk material in the elastic-plastic region. Both applied tensile stress and residual strain effects are ...

  14. MHD waves in sunspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sych, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The review addresses the spatial frequency morphology of sources of sunspot oscillations and waves, including their localization, size, oscillation periods, height localization with the mechanism of cut-off frequency that forms the observed emission variability. Dynamic of sunspot wave processes, provides the information about the structure of wave fronts and their time variations, investigates the oscillation frequency transformation depending on the wave energy is shown. The initializing solar flares caused by trigger agents like magnetoacoustic waves, accelerated particle beams, and shocks are discussed. Special attention is paid to the relation between the flare reconnection periodic initialization and the dynamics of sunspot slow magnetoacoustic waves. A short review of theoretical models of sunspot oscillations is provided.

  15. ALIEN MAPS OF AN OCEAN-BEARING WORLD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Meadows, Victoria S.; Robinson, Tyler [Astronomy Department and Astrobiology Program, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Livengood, Timothy A.; Deming, Drake [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lisse, Carey M. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, SD/SRE, MP3-E167, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); A'Hearn, Michael F.; Wellnitz, Dennis D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Seager, Sara [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave. 54-1626, MA 02139 (United States); Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: cowan@astro.washington.edu

    2009-08-01

    When Earth-mass extrasolar planets first become detectable, one challenge will be to determine which of these worlds harbor liquid water, a widely used criterion for habitability. Some of the first observations of these planets will consist of disc-averaged, time-resolved broadband photometry. To simulate such data, the Deep Impact spacecraft obtained light curves of Earth at seven wavebands spanning 300-1000 nm as part of the EPOXI mission of opportunity. In this paper, we analyze disc-integrated light curves, treating Earth as if it were an exoplanet, to determine if we can detect the presence of oceans and continents. We present two observations each spanning 1 day, taken at gibbous phases of 57 deg. and 77 deg., respectively. As expected, the time-averaged spectrum of Earth is blue at short wavelengths due to Rayleigh scattering, and gray redward of 600 nm due to reflective clouds. The rotation of the planet leads to diurnal albedo variations of 15%-30%, with the largest relative changes occurring at the reddest wavelengths. To characterize these variations in an unbiased manner, we carry out a principal component analysis of the multi-band light curves; this analysis reveals that 98% of the diurnal color changes of Earth are due to only two dominant eigencolors. We use the time variations of these two eigencolors to construct longitudinal maps of the Earth, treating it as a non-uniform Lambert sphere. We find that the spectral and spatial distributions of the eigencolors correspond to cloud-free continents and oceans despite the fact that our observations were taken on days with typical cloud cover. We also find that the near-infrared wavebands are particularly useful in distinguishing between land and water. Based on this experiment, we conclude that it should be possible to infer the existence of water oceans on exoplanets with time-resolved broadband observations taken by a large space-based coronagraphic telescope.

  16. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some findings and outstanding problems are also presented. Keywords: dusty plasmas, dust acoustic waves PACS: 52

  17. Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

  18. Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

  19. REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE PARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE PARTICLES A Dissertation by Cem Yuksel Submitted to the Office of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Computer Science #12;REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE, Valerie E. Taylor August 2010 Major Subject: Computer Science #12;iii ABSTRACT Real-time Water Waves

  20. GN Wave theory and TEBEM for Wave-Body Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GN Wave theory and TEBEM for Wave-Body Interaction Dr. BinBin Zhao and Professor Wenyang Duan of simulating irregular nonlinear water wave interaction with arbitrary floating bodies, the Green-Naghdi wave corners. The results show that the high-level GN theory can predict wave transformation over uneven seabed

  1. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lognonné, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing themore »vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.« less

  2. Typicality of thermal equilibrium and thermalization in isolated macroscopic quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hal Tasaki

    2015-08-01

    Based on the view that thermal equilibrium should be characterized through macroscopic observations, we develop a general theory about typicality of thermal equilibrium and the approach to thermal equilibrium in macroscopic quantum systems. We first formulate the notion that a pure state in an isolated quantum system represents thermal equilibrium. Then by assuming, or proving in certain classes of nontrivial models (including that of two bodies in thermal contact), large-deviation type bounds (which we call thermodynamic bounds) for the microcanonical ensemble, we prove that to represent thermal equilibrium is a typical property for pure states in the microcanonical energy shell. We also establish the approach to thermal equilibrium under two different assumptions; one is that the initial state has a moderate energy distribution, and the other is the energy eigenstate thermalization hypothesis. We also discuss three easily solvable models in which these assumptions can be verified.

  3. Trimodal steady water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnström; Erik Wahlén

    2013-10-31

    We construct three-dimensional families of small-amplitude gravity-driven rotational steady water waves on finite depth. The solutions contain counter-currents and multiple crests in each minimal period. Each such wave generically is a combination of three different Fourier modes, giving rise to a rich and complex variety of wave patterns. The bifurcation argument is based on a blow-up technique, taking advantage of three parameters associated with the vorticity distribution, the strength of the background stream, and the period of the wave.

  4. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  5. CALCULATION OF WAVE-ICE INTERACTION USING THE WIENER-HOPF TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Colin

    of long-standing interest to New Zealand researchers [18, 11, 13], particularly those processes in the South- ern Oceans around the coast of Antarctica. SigniÞcant features of the breakup process, as well-edged shore fast ice. The wave energy that is not reßected, i.e. that penetrates into the ice sheet, causes

  6. Thermosyphon Cooler Hybrid System Providing Water Resiliency in a typical Chemical Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, T. P.

    2014-01-01

    System Providing Water Resiliency in a Typical Chemical Plant Presentation to the: May 21, 2014 Thomas P. Carter, P.E. Sr. Program Manager, Heat Rejection Technology Johnson Controls, Building Efficiency thomas.p.carter@jci.com ESL-IE-14...-05-20 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 2Johnson Controls is a globally diversified company in the building and automotive industries Automotive ExperienceBuilding Efficiency Power Solutions...

  7. Unifying typical entanglement and coin tossing: on randomization in probabilistic theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus P. Müller; Oscar C. O. Dahlsten; Vlatko Vedral

    2012-11-12

    It is well-known that pure quantum states are typically almost maximally entangled, and thus have close to maximally mixed subsystems. We consider whether this is true for probabilistic theories more generally, and not just for quantum theory. We derive a formula for the expected purity of a subsystem in any probabilistic theory for which this quantity is well-defined. It applies to typical entanglement in pure quantum states, coin tossing in classical probability theory, and randomization in post-quantum theories; a simple generalization yields the typical entanglement in (anti)symmetric quantum subspaces. The formula is exact and simple, only containing the number of degrees of freedom and the information capacity of the respective systems. It allows us to generalize statistical physics arguments in a way which depends only on coarse properties of the underlying theory. The proof of the formula generalizes several randomization notions to general probabilistic theories. This includes a generalization of purity, contributing to the recent effort of finding appropriate generalized entropy measures.

  8. Physics Problems for the Future of Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    --graphics, movies! #12;Recent Worries of Ocean Modeling Mesoscale eddies and boundary currents-- resolving;Recent Worries of Ocean Modeling Mesoscale eddies and boundary currents-- resolving the deformation) #12;Recent Worries of Ocean Modeling Mesoscale eddies and boundary currents-- resolving

  9. Effects of variable wind stress on ocean heat content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klima, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Ocean heat content change (ocean heat uptake) has an important role in variability of the Earth's heat balance. The understanding of which methods and physical processes control ocean heat uptake needs improvement in order ...

  10. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large will unavoidably affect pelagic fish... ­ Noise and water pollution ­ FAD effects ­ Entrainment and Impingement

  11. ORE 630 Structural Analysis in Ocean Engineering Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    to Program Outcomes Program Outcome 2: Basic science, mathematics, & engineering Program Outcome 4: OceanORE 630 Structural Analysis in Ocean Engineering Designation Offshore Engineering Required Course. Design of Ocean Structures. Design process, project planning, materials selection, 6. economic analysis

  12. ORE 630 Structural Analysis in Ocean Engineering Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORE 630 Structural Analysis in Ocean Engineering Designation Offshore Engineering Required Course Catalog Description Structural and finite element analyses, and design of ocean structures to withstand analysis, finite element analysis, and their application in ocean structure design. Topics Covered 1

  13. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat...

  14. Biological and physical regulation of the oceanic fixed nitrogen reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Thomas Smith

    2013-01-01

    2 in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 412: 635-38in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Marine Chemistry 16:and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean. Global Biogeochemical

  15. Assessing uncertainty in models of the ocean carbon cycle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis I explore the effect of parameter uncertainty in ocean biogeochemical models on the calculation of carbon uptake by the ocean. The ocean currently absorbs around a quarter of the annual anthropogenic CO2 ...

  16. Remote Sensing the Ocean Sarah Gille

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    ×1021 J in 50 years = 50 TW) roughly quadru- ple current energy usage by people (13 TW). #12;Global ocean- ple current energy usage by people (13 TW). · Energy added to top 700 m of ocean equivalent to about 2 Radiation http://www.uwsp.edu/geo/faculty/ritter/geog101/textbook/energy/global patterns of heat transfer

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS, this source should be appropriately acknowledged. Ocean Drilling Program Scientific Prospectus No. 102 Publications homepage on the World Wide Web at: http://www-odp.tamu.edu/publications This publication

  18. Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy the deployment of CO2 storage technologies used in the marine environment. This paper will address some of the legal issues involved in ocean storage of carbon dioxide from a US perspective. The following paragraphs

  19. Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Alex J.

    2014-08-23

    The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT ENGINEERING II: WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU September 1990 #12;This informal

  1. LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ENGINEERING PRELIMINARY REPORT NO. 3 EAST PACIFIC RISE 1992 #12;OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT East Pacific Rise Dr. Rodey Batiza Co 96822 Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CENTRAL KERGUELEN PLATEAU Dr. Roland Schlich Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77841 Philip D.VRabinowitz Director ^^~-- ODP of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station

  3. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BASEMENT DRILLING OF THE ONTONG JAVA PLATEAU of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX 77845-9547 U.S.A. May 2000

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS HAMMER DRILLING and NERO Dr. Jack Casey Chief.S.A. Tom Pettigrew Chief Engineer, Leg 179 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST PACIFIC SEISMIC OBSERVATORY AND HAMMER DRILL ENGINEERING TESTS Dr. Toshihiko Kanazawa Co-Chief Scientist Earthquake Research Institute Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  6. Oceans and Climate Change Peter Rhines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , animals, atmosphere and ocean ... totally isolated except for an energy source: the sun #12;The value of the Atlantic circulation (kinetic energy density) from altimetry satellites #12;Oceans and the Global) Daphnia (water flea) Duckweed (floating water lens) #12;#12;#12;microcosm: a sealed flask with plants

  7. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01

    forecast models requires a thorough understanding of the upper ocean thermodynamic response to wind andforecasts of hurricane intensity A Supplementary Formulae A.l W i n d Stress Windforecast models. This thesis investigates several aspects of the ocean's response to strong wind

  8. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  9. What is the Ocean Like off Oregon?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    meters. The sampling grid was reminiscent of the more ambitious CalCOFI survey grid off California, begunWhat is the Ocean Like off Oregon? Exploring, Monitoring, and Understanding the Northern California g o 76 Introduction The dynamic, ever-changing ocean off Oregon is home to a rich, productive

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 122 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Suzanne O Connell Staff Scientist, Leg 122 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Francais de Recherche pour 1'Exploitation de la Mer (France) Ocean, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed

  11. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 158 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Jay Miller Staff Scientist, Leg 158 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A/Australia Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any

  12. Wave Energy challenges and possibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Wave Energy ­ challenges and possibilities By: Per Resen Steenstrup www.WaveStarEnergy.com Risø-R-1608(EN) 161 #12;© Wave energy is an old story.... The first wave energy patent is 200 years old. Over the last 100 years more than 200 new wave energy devices have been developped and more than 1.000 patents

  13. A predictive ocean oil spill model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D.; Papodopoulos, P.; Schaudt, K.; Szabo, D.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

  14. Optical tsunamis: shoaling of shallow water rogue waves in nonlinear fibers with normal dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In analogy with ocean waves running up towards the beach, shoaling of prechirped optical pulses may occur in the normal group-velocity dispersion regime of optical fibers. We present exact Riemann wave solutions of the optical shallow water equations and show that they agree remarkably well with the numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, at least up to the point where a vertical pulse front develops. We also reveal that extreme wave events or optical tsunamis may be generated in dispersion tapered fibers in the presence of higher-order dispersion.

  15. Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01

    In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

  16. Wave-Corpuscle Mechanics for Electric Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Anatoli; Figotin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    superposition in nonlinear wave dynamics. Rev. Math. Phys.6. Babin, A. , Figotin, A. : Wave-corpuscle mechanics forV. , Fortunato, D. : Solitary waves in the nonlinear wave

  17. Microstructural Design for Stress Wave Energy Management /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranian, Aref

    2013-01-01

    Nasser, S. , 2010. Stress-wave energy management throughNemat-Nasser, Stress-wave energy management through materialconstitute pressure wave energy and/or shear wave energy.

  18. Nonlinear propagation and control of acoustic waves in phononic superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiménez, Noé; Picó, Rubén; García-Raffi, Lluís M; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor J

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of intense acoustic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal is studied. The medium consists in a structured fluid, formed by a periodic array of fluid layers with alternating linear acoustic properties and quadratic nonlinearity coefficient. The spacing between layers is of the order of the wavelength, therefore Bragg effects such as band-gaps appear. We show that the interplay between strong dispersion and nonlinearity leads to new scenarios of wave propagation. The classical waveform distortion process typical of intense acoustic waves in homogeneous media can be strongly altered when nonlinearly generated harmonics lie inside or close to band gaps. This allows the possibility of engineer a medium in order to get a particular waveform. Examples of this include the design of media with effective (e.g. cubic) nonlinearities, or extremely linear media (where distortion can be cancelled). The presented ideas open a way towards the control of acoustic wave propagation in nonlinear regime.

  19. Gravitational waves from gamma-ray pulsar glitches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stopnitzky, Elan; Profumo, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    We use data from pulsar gamma-ray glitches recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope as input to theoretical models of gravitational wave signals the glitches might generate. We find that the typical peak amplitude of the gravity wave signal from gamma-ray pulsar glitches lies between 10{sup –23} and 10{sup –35} in dimensionless units, with peak frequencies in the range of 1 to 1000 Hz, depending on the model. We estimate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for all gamma-ray glitches, and discuss detectability with current gravity wave detectors. Our results indicate that the strongest predicted signals are potentially within reach of current detectors, and that pulsar gamma-ray glitches are promising targets for gravity wave searches by current and next-generation detectors.

  20. Wind-driven changes in Southern Ocean residual circulation, ocean carbon reservoirs and atmospheric CO[subscript 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.

    The effect of idealized wind-driven circulation changes in the Southern Ocean on atmospheric CO[subscript 2] and the ocean carbon inventory is investigated using a suite of coarse-resolution, global coupled ocean circulation ...

  1. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United...

  2. The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of...

  3. Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

    2007-01-01

    during production from the Class 3 oceanic hydrate depositProduction From Oceanic Class 3 Hydrate Accumulations GeorgeAccumulations Houston, Texas, Class 3 May 2007. presented,

  4. Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources Memorandum of Understanding On...

  5. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-01-01

    efficiency of biological pump in the global ocean. JournalOcean Biological Carbon Pump Carbon Flux Explorerocean’s “biological carbon pump” (Broecker and Peng, 1982;

  6. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Report summarizing the results of...

  7. Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

    2007-11-26

    Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

  8. Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Robin

    Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases Robin Kaiser and Mark D. Havey Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases #12;39 E xperimental developments permit in the transport proper- ties of electromagnetic radiation in strongly scattering random media. Even in weakly

  9. CATCHING THE FOURTH WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    CATCHING THE FOURTH WAVE YOU MAY HAVE RIDDEN THEM YOURSELF -- the swells that develop farther out beyond Toffler, the fourth wave -- biologi- cal intelligence and medical technology -- is on the horizon second and fourth nationally in terms of cities that receive the most research funds from the National

  10. Developing de Broglie Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

    2006-08-27

    The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

  11. Quantum Shock Waves - the case for non-linear effects in dynamics of electronic liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldad Bettelheim; Alexander G. Abanov; Paul Wiegmann

    2006-06-29

    Using the Calogero model as an example, we show that the transport in interacting non-dissipative electronic systems is essentially non-linear. Non-linear effects are due to the curvature of the electronic spectrum near the Fermi energy. As is typical for non-linear systems, propagating wave packets are unstable. At finite time shock wave singularities develop, the wave packet collapses, and oscillatory features arise. They evolve into regularly structured localized pulses carrying a fractionally quantized charge - {\\it soliton trains}. We briefly discuss perspectives of observation of Quantum Shock Waves in edge states of Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and a direct measurement of the fractional charge.

  12. Rayleigh WaveInternal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Rayleigh Wave­Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream B. R to the study of unstable jet flows and applications of this work for internal wave generation by dynamic remains poorly understood. Most investigations of shear­generation of inter­ nal waves in the atmosphere

  13. Rayleigh Wave-Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Rayleigh Wave-Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream B. R to the study of unstable jet flows and applications of this work for internal wave generation by dynamic remains poorly understood. Most investigations of shear-generation of inter- nal waves in the atmosphere

  14. An unsteady wave driver for narrowbanded waves: modeling nearshore circulation driven by wave groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    An unsteady wave driver for narrowbanded waves: modeling nearshore circulation driven by wave Abstract In this paper, we derive an unsteady refraction­diffraction model for narrowbanded water waves for use in computing coupled wave­current motion in the nearshore. The end result is a variable

  15. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brizard, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    model lies with the simple wave energy conservation law itthe recirculation of wave energy introduces interference e?particles, the tertiary-wave energy may be negative and thus

  16. Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil of CWP is on seismic modeling, imaging and inversion methods, as well as on improving the accuracy

  17. An Economic Study of a Typical Ranching Area on the Edwards Plateau of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngblood, B. (Bonney); Cox, Alonzo B. (Alonzo Bettis)

    1922-01-01

    .SCHOOL OF THE UNI- VERSITY OF WISCONSIN IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY ENTITLED AN ECONOMIC STUDY OF A TYPICAL RANCHING AREA EDWARDS PLATEAU OF TEXAS LI BHAH Y &)@S A&M I.JNIVERSi BONNY;' ~q...: in reported, this chapter is devoted to a discussion of thl ective domains of the farmer and the grazier and to esti 2s as to the area and extent of the lands occupied by each present and potential. Historically, ranching has been a frontier industry. I...

  18. An Agricultural Economic Survey of Rockwall County, Texas : A Typical Blackland Cotton Farming Area. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.)

    1925-01-01

    XPfRIMfNT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President BULLETIN NO. 327 February, 1925 DIVISION OF FARM AND RANCH ECONOMICS AN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC SURVEY OF ROCKWALL COUNTY, TEXAS A Typical Blackland Cotton Farming Area B..., Ph. D., Chief of Div ision ,J. M. SCHAEDEL, Executive Assistant FARM AND RANCH ECONOMICS VECTE~I~f~~El~~~N~Ehnical A ssistant L. P. GABBARD, M. S., Chief of Division *M. FRANCIS, D. V. M., Chief of Division B. a~~Vl:;;c~LJ12,~~.!_;t S., Ph. D...

  19. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glein, Christopher; Waite, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to obtain a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model indicates that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ~11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by clays and carbonates on the ocean floor. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecule...

  20. North Pacific Mesoscale Coupled Air-Ocean Simulations Compared with Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koracin, Darko; Cerovecki, Ivana; Vellore, Ramesh; Mejia, John; Hatchett, Benjamin; McCord, Travis; McLean, Julie; Dorman, Clive

    2013-04-11

    Executive summary The main objective of the study was to investigate atmospheric and ocean interaction processes in the western Pacific and, in particular, effects of significant ocean heat loss in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions on the lower and upper atmosphere. It is yet to be determined how significant are these processes are on climate scales. The understanding of these processes led us also to development of the methodology of coupling the Weather and Research Forecasting model with the Parallel Ocean Program model for western Pacific regional weather and climate simulations. We tested NCAR-developed research software Coupler 7 for coupling of the WRF and POP models and assessed its usability for regional-scale applications. We completed test simulations using the Coupler 7 framework, but implemented a standard WRF model code with options for both one- and two-way mode coupling. This type of coupling will allow us to seamlessly incorporate new WRF updates and versions in the future. We also performed a long-term WRF simulation (15 years) covering the entire North Pacific as well as high-resolution simulations of a case study which included extreme ocean heat losses in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions. Since the extreme ocean heat loss occurs during winter cold air outbreaks (CAO), we simulated and analyzed a case study of a severe CAO event in January 2000 in detail. We found that the ocean heat loss induced by CAOs is amplified by additional advection from mesocyclones forming on the southern part of the Japan Sea. Large scale synoptic patterns with anomalously strong anticyclone over Siberia and Mongolia, deep Aleutian Low, and the Pacific subtropical ridge are a crucial setup for the CAO. It was found that the onset of the CAO is related to the breaking of atmospheric Rossby waves and vertical transport of vorticity that facilitates meridional advection. The study also indicates that intrinsic parameterization of the surface fluxes within the WRF model needs more evaluation and analysis.

  1. Diagonalization of pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-05-21

    A coordinate transformation is found which diagonalizes the axisymmetric pp-waves. Its effect upon concrete solutions, including impulsive and shock waves, is discussed.

  2. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  3. Detection of electromagnetic waves using charged MEMS structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datskos, Panos G [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Tobin, Jacob D [ORNL; Bowland, Landon T [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We describe micromechanical structures that are capable of sensing both electrostatic fields and electromagnetic fields over a wide frequency range. Typically, sensing of electromagnetic waves is achieved with electrically conducting antennas, which despite the many advantages do not exhibit high sensitivity over a broad frequency range. An important aspect of our present work is that, in contrast to traditional antennas, the dimensions of micromechanical oscillators sensitive to electromagnetic waves can be much smaller than the wavelength. We characterized the micromechanical oscillators and measured responses to electric fields and estimated the performance limits by evaluating the signal-to-noise ratio theoretically and experimentally.

  4. Relations for a periodic array of flap-type wave energy converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renzi, Emiliano

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the interaction of plane incident waves with a wave farm in the open ocean. The farm consists of a periodic array of large flap-type wave energy converters. A linear inviscid potential-flow model, already developed by the authors for a single flap in a channel, is considered. Asymptotic analysis of the wave field allows to obtain new expressions of the reflection, transmission and radiation coefficients of the system. It is shown that, unlike a line of heaving buoys, an array of flap-type converters is able to exploit resonance of the system transverse modes in order to attain high capture factor levels. Relations between the hydrodynamic coefficients are derived and applied for optimising the power output of the wave farm.

  5. Environmental Effects for Gravitational-wave Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Barausse; Vitor Cardoso; Paolo Pani

    2015-01-07

    The upcoming detection of gravitational waves by terrestrial interferometers will usher in the era of gravitational-wave astronomy. This will be particularly true when space-based detectors will come of age and measure the mass and spin of massive black holes with exquisite precision and up to very high redshifts, thus allowing for better understanding of the symbiotic evolution of black holes with galaxies, and for high-precision tests of General Relativity in strong-field, highly dynamical regimes. Such ambitious goals require that astrophysical environmental pollution of gravitational-wave signals be constrained to negligible levels, so that neither detection nor estimation of the source parameters are significantly affected. Here, we consider the main sources for space-based detectors -- the inspiral, merger and ringdown of massive black-hole binaries and extreme mass-ratio inspirals -- and account for various effects on their gravitational waveforms, including electromagnetic fields, cosmological evolution, accretion disks, dark matter, "firewalls" and possible deviations from General Relativity. We discover that the black-hole quasinormal modes are sharply different in the presence of matter, but the ringdown signal observed by interferometers is typically unaffected. The effect of accretion disks and dark matter depends critically on their geometry and density profile, but is negligible for most sources, except for few special extreme mass-ratio inspirals. Electromagnetic fields and cosmological effects are always negligible. We finally explore the implications of our findings for proposed tests of General Relativity with gravitational waves, and conclude that environmental effects will not prevent the development of precision gravitational-wave astronomy.

  6. Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    and high temperature cooling_REHVA Guidebook, Federation ofEvaluation of cooling performance of thermally activatedsystem with evaporative cooling source for typical United

  7. Abstract--During medical procedures, such as surgery, a patient's vital signs are typically monitored using a web of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Hongshen

    Abstract--During medical procedures, such as surgery, a patient's vital signs are typically unit, patient vital signs are obtained through various wires and adhesive electrodes attached

  8. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hereman, Willy A.M.

    . Water Wave Experiments and Observations VII. Future Directions VIII. Bibliography Glossary Deep water A surface wave is said to be in deep water if its wavelength is much shorter than the local water depthShallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer

  9. Long wave expansions for water waves over random topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    Long wave expansions for water waves over random topography Anne de Bouard1 , Walter Craig2 interacting with the random bottom. We show that the resulting influence of the random topography is expressed numbers: 76B15, 35Q53, 76M50, 60F17 Keywords :Water waves, random topography, long wave asymptotics #12

  10. On Generating Gravity Waves with Matter and Electromagnetic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

    2008-04-05

    If a homogeneous plane light-like shell collides head-on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

  11. Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography Naokazu Taniguchia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography Naokazu Taniguchia) Graduate School 29 April 2013) Ocean current profiling using ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was conducted proportional to temperature) and current in the ocean (Munk et al., 1995). Other than coastal sea studies (e

  12. Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone Soup Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical Note No. 13 Compiled by Elizabeth A. Heise Ocean Drilling Program Texas A orpersonalresearchpurposes; however,republicationof any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling

  13. 2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2009 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  14. 2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2007 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  15. 2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2008 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  16. 2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2011 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  17. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION FISCAL YEAR 2008 ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM UNITED STATES IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION CONSORTIUM FOR OCEAN LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION CONTRACT OCE-0352500 1 OCTOBER 2007­30 SEPTEMBER 2008 #12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ii

  18. 2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2012 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  19. The Ocean Lithosphere: A Fundamental Component of the Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    between the solid Earth, oceans and biosphere, both full penetration across the Moho and shallow targeted1 The Ocean Lithosphere: A Fundamental Component of the Earth System Damon Teagle1 , Natsue Abe2 formation at mid-ocean ridges, to its recycling in subduction zones, the oceanic lithosphere serves

  20. Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean WEALTH FROM OCEANS FLAGSHIP Jock of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY3 | Thunnus tonggol Thunnus obesus Thunnus albacares Thunnus of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY4 | Species SCA DR SIA SFA Thunnus alalunga + + + 0 Thunnus albacares + + + 0