Sample records for typical northeastern households

  1. Energy-Efficient Lighting The typical American family spends more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy-Efficient Lighting The typical American family spends more than $1,500 a year on household their energy efficiency is taken into account. CFLs last 8­10 times longer than standard incandescent bulbs energy bills--and many households spend considerably more. Costs could climb even higher in the future

  2. Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    over a larger area and releases them into the air. Pouring hazardous liquids on the ground can poisonHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion should be considered hazardous. You cannot treat hazardous wastes like other kinds of garbage

  3. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1...

  4. The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HOW MANY HYBRID HOUSEHOLDS IN THE CALIFORNIA NEW CAR MARKET?average 2.43 cars per household, then the hybrid householdnumber of multi-car households that fit our hybrid household

  5. Typical Pure Nonequilibrium Steady States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takaaki Monnai; Kazuya Yuasa

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that typicality holds for a class of nonequilibrium systems, i.e., nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs): almost all the pure states properly sampled from a certain Hilbert space well represent a NESS and characterize its intrinsic thermal nature. We clarify the relevant Hilbert space from which the pure states are to be sampled, and construct practically all the typical pure NESSs. The scattering approach leads us to the natural extension of the typicality for equilibrium systems. Each pure NESS correctly yields the expectation values of observables given by the standard ensemble approach. It means that we can calculate the expectation values in a NESS with only a single pure NESS. We provide an explicit construction of the typical pure NESS for a model with two reservoirs, and see that it correctly reproduces the Landauer-type formula for the current flowing steadily between the reservoirs.

  6. Essays on microeconomics of the household

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahhaj, Zaki

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These essays are concerned with the problem of cooperation among individuals in a household and among households in a community under lack of commitment. The first chapter provides a theoretical investigation of consumption ...

  7. Assessment of Recreational Fishery in Northeastern Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vale, Arturo J., III

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northeastern region of Mexico has developed rapidly over the last few decades and reservoir construction has accompanied the growth of the region. As a result, recreational and sport fishing have become very popular. ...

  8. Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Garcia, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Families in early Ptolemaic Egypt. In The Hellenistic world:granary models, and domestic economy in ancient Egypt. InThe archaeology and art of ancient Egypt: Essays in Honor of

  9. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a. Household

  10. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a. Household6a.

  11. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a.8a. Household

  12. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a.8a. Household9a.

  13. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001

  14. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 20012a.

  15. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households,

  16. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households,4a.

  17. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households,4a.5a.

  18. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a. Household

  19. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a. Household1a.

  20. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a.a. Household

  1. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a. Household

  2. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a. Household9a.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  American household carbon footprint. ” Ecological and  limitations) of carbon footprint estimates toward of the art in carbon footprint analyses for California, 

  4. ROAD AND STREAM NETWORK CONNECTIVITY NORTHEASTERN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THESIS ROAD AND STREAM NETWORK CONNECTIVITY NORTHEASTERN PUERTO RICO Submitted by Kirk Ryan: NORTHEASTERN PUERTO RICO BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE CONNECTIVITY NORTHEASTERN PUERTO RICO The research performed in this thesis evaluated road and stream network

  5. NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY Graduate School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeser, Miriam

    a lot of platform specific code integrated into the rest of the application code, making portability's generic hardware interface to the specific API used by the selected special purpose processor would also like to thank Professor Laurie Smith King and the rest of the members of the Northeastern

  6. Evolving Patterns of Household Computer Use: 1999-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatesh, Alladi; Dunkle, Debora E.; Wortman, Amanda

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 14. Education/Learning: household type, education, andeducation/learning activities: household type, education,related work and learning are specific to certain types of

  7. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

  8. The World Distribution of Household Wealth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DAVIES, JAMES B; Shorrocks, Anthony; Sandstrom, Susanna; WOLFF, EDWARD N

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. B. (1993). ‘The Distribution of Wealth in Canada’.Estimating the World Distribution of Household Wealth’.Tide: Changes in the Distribution of Wealth in the US, 1989-

  9. Household gasoline demand in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalensee, Richard

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuing rapid growth in U.S. gasoline consumption threatens to exacerbate environmental and congestion problems. We use flexible semiparametric and nonparametric methods to guide analysis of household gasoline consumption, ...

  10. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  11. anwr northeastern alaska: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Late Pleistocene and Holocene glaciation of the Fish Lake valley, northeastern Alaska Range, Geosciences Websites Summary: in the...

  12. Household batteries: Evaluation of collection methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seeberger, D.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While it is difficult to prove that a specific material is causing contamination in a landfill, tests have been conducted at waste-to-energy facilities that indicate that household batteries contribute significant amounts of heavy metals to both air emissions and ash residue. Hennepin County, MN, used a dual approach for developing and implementing a special household battery collection. Alternative collection methods were examined; test collections were conducted. The second phase examined operating and disposal policy issues. This report describes the results of the grant project, moving from a broad examination of the construction and content of batteries, to a description of the pilot collection programs, and ending with a discussion of variables affecting the cost and operation of a comprehensive battery collection program. Three out-of-state companies (PA, NY) were found that accept spent batteries; difficulties in reclaiming household batteries are discussed.

  13. Household batteries: Evaluation of collection methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seeberger, D.A.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    While it is difficult to prove that a specific material is causing contamination in a landfill, tests have been conducted at waste-to-energy facilities that indicate that household batteries contribute significant amounts of heavy metals to both air emissions and ash residue. Hennepin County, MN, used a dual approach for developing and implementing a special household battery collection. Alternative collection methods were examined; test collections were conducted. The second phase examined operating and disposal policy issues. This report describes the results of the grant project, moving from a broad examination of the construction and content of batteries, to a description of the pilot collection programs, and ending with a discussion of variables affecting the cost and operation of a comprehensive battery collection program. Three out-of-state companies (PA, NY) were found that accept spent batteries; difficulties in reclaiming household batteries are discussed.

  14. Traits Affecting Household Livestock Marketing Decisions in Rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traits Affecting Household Livestock Marketing Decisions in Rural Kenya Katherine L. Baldwin community of Central Kenya, we regressed household offtake rate of both cattle and smallstock against in Kenya. Because pastoralist economies depend almost exclusively upon livestock production, most recent

  15. Essays on household decision making in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, James W. (James Wesley)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation contains three essays on household decision making in the areas of education and health in developing countries. The first chapter explores intra-household decision making in the context of conditional ...

  16. Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension impurities can be corrected if they are a nuisance. Before beginning any treatment plan, have water tested select the most effective and economical treatment method. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: composite fibers typically aligned...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    composite fibers typically aligned in a 45 pattern with respect to the blade axis New Material Tests Show Biaxial Laminate Creep Is Important for Large Wind-Turbine Blades On...

  18. Design and Control of Household CHP Fuel Cell System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Design and Control of Household CHP Fuel Cell System PhD. project Dissertation Anders Risum and Control of Household CHP Fuel Cell System" Anders R. Korsgaard, M.Sc. Mechanical Engineering, e-mail: ark for micro combined heat and power (CHP) systems for local households. Several components in the PEM fuel

  19. Demographic Patterns and Household Saving in China Chadwick C. Curtis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    Demographic Patterns and Household Saving in China Chadwick C. Curtis University of Richmond the aggregate household saving rate. We focus on China because it is experiencing an historic demographic transition and has had a massive increase in household saving. We conduct a quantitative investigation using

  20. Poverty and Productivity in Female-Headed Households in Zimbabwe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horrell, Sara; Krishnan, Pramila

    A household survey conducted in rural Zimbabwe in 2001 is used to compare the position of de facto and de jure female-headed households to those with a male head. These households are characterised by different forms of poverty that impinge...

  1. THE DESIRE TO ACQUIRE: FORECASTING THE EVOLUTION OF HOUSEHOLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy-using devices in the average U.S. household that used over 4,700 kWh of electricity, natural gas-using devices to energy price, household income, and the cost of these devices. This analysis findsTHE DESIRE TO ACQUIRE: FORECASTING THE EVOLUTION OF HOUSEHOLD ENERGY SERVICES by Steven Groves BASc

  2. A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Borg, Edwards, Kimpel A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    's goal is to investigate the weekly per capita indoor water use of three households in Davis, CaliforniaA Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Borg, Edwards, Kimpel A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Maisie Borg, Orion Edwards & Sarah Kimpel Abstract Over the past several decades

  3. New Biorefinery Will Bring Jobs to Northeastern Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In northeastern Oregon, ZeaChem, a Colorado-based biofuel company, recently broke ground on a 250,000 gallon integrated cellulosic biorefinery. The technology development project is expected to be operating in 2011.

  4. Ecology and Geography of Plague Transmission Areas in Northeastern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, John R.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ameida, Alzira

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Plague in Brazil is poorly known and now rarely seen, so studies of its ecology are difficult. We used ecological niche models of historical (1966-present) records of human plague cases across northeastern Brazil to assess hypotheses regarding...

  5. assam northeastern india: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AGRIWATCH, November, Food and Agriculture Singh, Nirvikar 2006-01-01 40 Natural gas pricing in the Northeastern U.S. MIT - DSpace Summary: This paper examines natural gas...

  6. Natural gas pricing in the Northeastern U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunnarshaug, Jasmin

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines natural gas pricing at five citygate locations in the northeastern United States using daily and weekly price series for the years 1994-97. In particular, the effects of the natural gas price at Henry ...

  7. The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by electric and hybrid vehicles", SAE Technical Papers No.household response to hybrid vehicles. Finally, we suggestas electric or hybrid vehicles. Transitions in choices of

  8. TYPICAL HOT WATER DRAW PATTERNS BASED ON FIELD DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Jim; Melody, Moya

    2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    There is significant variation in hot water use and draw patterns among households. This report describes typical hot water use patterns in single-family residences in North America. We found that daily hot water use is highly variable both among residences and within the same residence. We compared the results of our analysis of the field data to the conditions and draw patterns established in the current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test procedure for residential water heaters. The results show a higher number of smaller draws at lower flow rates than used in the test procedure. The data from which the draw patterns were developed were obtained from 12 separate field studies. This report describes the ways in which we managed, cleaned, and analyzed the data and the results of our data analysis. After preparing the data, we used the complete data set to analyze inlet and outlet water temperatures. Then we divided the data into three clusters reflecting house configurations that demonstrated small, medium, or large median daily hot water use. We developed the three clusters partly to reflect efforts of the ASHRAE standard project committee (SPC) 118.2 to revise the test procedure for residential water heaters to incorporate a range of draw patterns. ASHRAE SPC 118.2 has identified the need to separately evaluate at least three, and perhaps as many as five, different water heater capacities. We analyzed the daily hot water use data within each cluster in terms of volume and number of hot water draws. The daily draw patterns in each cluster were characterized using distributions for volume of draws, duration of draws, time since previous draw, and flow rates.

  9. Macrurous Decapods from the Bearpaw Shale (Cretaceous: Campanian) of Northeastern Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    Macrurous Decapods from the Bearpaw Shale (Cretaceous: Campanian) of Northeastern Montana Rodney M THE BEARPAW SHALE (CRETACEOUS: CAMPANIAN) OF NORTHEASTERN MONTANA RODNEY M. FELDMANN, GALE A. BISHOP Shale of north- eastern Montana were studied to characterize the occurrence, preservation

  10. Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households, March 13, 2014. Call Slides and Discussion Summary More...

  11. California Household Transportation Survey - Datasets - OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from more than 42,500 households via multiple data-collection methods, including computer-assisted telephone interviewing, online and mail surveys, wearable and in-vehicle...

  12. Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimring, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neighborhood Program GETS – Green Energy Training ServicesGJGEI – Green Jobs, Green Energy Initiative CEWO – Cleanincome households. The Green Energy Training Services (GETS)

  13. Residential Network Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households Photo of a row of townhomes. Eligible Better Buildings Residential Network members reported completing 27,563 home energy upgrades...

  14. assessing household solid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: Water End?Use Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy Technologies Transportation Assessment of Household Carbon Footprint...

  15. Regional patterns of U.S. household carbon emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pizer, William; Sanchirico, James N.; Batz, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA), Residential Energy Consumption Survey (http://gasoline is EIA Household vehicle energy use survey (http://survey is 1994 not 1993 (labeled with an *). The EIA

  16. Putting People's Common Sense into Knowledge Bases of Household Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    , and Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous Systems Group Department of Informatics Technische Universität München {kunzel,tenorth,beetz}@in.tum.de Abstract. Unlike people, household robots cannot rely

  17. Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

  18. achieve household waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system will help keep your water safe. For more information, visit the Virginia Household Water Quality Program website www.wellwater.bse.vt.edu. unknown authors 30 The...

  19. On future household structure Department of Computer Science and Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Løw, Erik

    of the population, such as household size, health or disability status, region of residence, labour market status household forecast helps policy makers, planners, and other forecast users in the fields of housing, energy size. A similar method could be applied to obtain probabilistic forecasts for other divisions

  20. Women, Work and Household Electrification in Rural India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    v Women, Work and Household Electrification in Rural India We must not believe, certainly electrification in rural India, the answer, it seems, would clearly point in a particular direction. On the one, that in the event of full electrification at the household level, rural women stand to be most affected in terms

  1. Modelling the Energy Demand of Households in a Combined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steininger, Karl W.

    . Emissions from passenger transport, households'electricity and heat consumption are growing rapidly despite demand analysis for electricity (e.g. Larsen and Nesbakken, 2004; Holtedahl and Joutz, 2004Modelling the Energy Demand of Households in a Combined Top Down/Bottom Up Approach Kurt Kratena

  2. argentina northeastern captive: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    argentina northeastern captive First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Fibrous-clay mineral...

  3. Megadroughts in Northeastern US History Implications for our Future?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). *Shorter but possibly more intense droughts occurred 5,480 and 5,745 years ago as seen by new XRF data; droughts 5-6000 years ago also evident MWP Kenna measuring elemental abundances with XRF Futureanalyses #12 & duration over past 15,000 years in Hudson Valley & Northeastern US -Use XRF to fill in gaps in Piermont

  4. Manipulating decision making of typical agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Yukalov; D. Sornette

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate how the choice of decision makers can be varied under the presence of risk and uncertainty. Our analysis is based on the approach we have previously applied to individual decision makers, which we now generalize to the case of decision makers that are members of a society. The approach employs the mathematical techniques that are common in quantum theory, justifying our naming as Quantum Decision Theory. However, we do not assume that decision makers are quantum objects. The techniques of quantum theory are needed only for defining the prospect probabilities taking into account such hidden variables as behavioral biases and other subconscious feelings. The approach describes an agent's choice as a probabilistic event occurring with a probability that is the sum of a utility factor and of an attraction factor. The attraction factor embodies subjective and unconscious dimensions in the mind of the decision maker. We show that the typical aggregate amplitude of the attraction factor is $1/4$, and it can be either positive or negative depending on the relative attraction of the competing choices. The most efficient way of varying the decision makers choice is realized by influencing the attraction factor. This can be done in two ways. One method is to arrange in a special manner the payoff weights, which induces the required changes of the values of attraction factors. We show that a slight variation of the payoff weights can invert the sign of the attraction factors and reverse the decision preferences, even when the prospect utilities remain unchanged. The second method of influencing the decision makers choice is by providing information to decision makers. The methods of influencing decision making are illustrated by several experiments, whose outcomes are compared quantitatively with the predictions of our approach.

  5. Deep cuts in household greenhouse gas emissions Andrew Blakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep cuts in household greenhouse gas emissions Andrew Blakers Director, Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Australian National University Ph 61 2 6125 5905 Andrew.blakers@anu.edu.au Web: http

  6. Householder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 1721, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higham, Nicholas J.

    for discussions. This year's symposium is held at Peebles Hotel Hydro in the small town of Peebles (populationHouseholder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 17­21, 2002 Peebles Hotel Hydro, Scotland

  7. Who counts? how the state (re)creates households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walther, Carol Sue

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    different data sources, I produce five different indices to determine settlement patterns of same-sex households in various geographic areas. Secondly, drawing on variables operationalized as cultural schema and resources, I identify characteristics...

  8. acute household accidental: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system will help keep your water safe. For more information, visit the Virginia Household Water Quality Program website at www.wellwater.bse. vt.edu. unknown authors 27...

  9. aa household alkaline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system will help keep your water safe. For more information, visit the Virginia Household Water Quality Program website at www.wellwater.bse. vt.edu. unknown authors 26...

  10. Smoothing consumption across households and time : essays in development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinnan, Cynthia Georgia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies two strategies that households may use to keep their consumption smooth in the face of fluctuations in income and expenses: credit (borrowing and savings) and insurance (state contingent transfers between ...

  11. Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

  12. Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Not) just your typical Lab spin off Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government Lab" Far from Silicon Valley, Descartes...

  13. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual households. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies.

  14. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, J.D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, J.E. [and others

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual household. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies. 21 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Significant reduction of surface solar irradiance induced by aerosols in a suburban region in northeastern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Significant reduction of surface solar irradiance induced by aerosols in a suburban region in northeastern China Xiangao Xia,1 Hongbin Chen,1 Zhanqing Li,1,2 Pucai Wang,1 and Jiankai Wang1 Received 25 May region in northeastern China. Aerosol properties derived from Sun photometer measurements and aerosol

  16. Widespread elevated atmospheric SF6 mixing ratios in the Northeastern United States: Implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    Widespread elevated atmospheric SF6 mixing ratios in the Northeastern United States: Implications; Unsaturated zone; Northeastern USA; SF6 Summary SF6 is a promising transient tracer for groundwater dating, but elevated levels of atmospheric SF6 may limit application of this dating method in urban areas. To deter

  17. Did the northeastern Gulf of Mexico become greener after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    #12;Did the northeastern Gulf of Mexico become greener after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill; published 3 May 2011. [1] Assessment of direct and indirect impacts of oil and dispersants on the marine ecosystem in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico (NEGOM) from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (April ­ July 2010

  18. J. Nvar et al.Stand biomass in Tamaulipan thornscrub of northeastern Mexico Original article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    J. Návar et al.Stand biomass in Tamaulipan thornscrub of northeastern Mexico Original article Estimating stand biomass in the Tamaulipan thornscrub of northeastern Mexico José Návara* , Eduardo Méndeza standing biomass measurements and estimates using quadrat attributes in the Tamaulipan thornscrub

  19. Winter distribution and abundance of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) off Northeastern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões-Lopes, Paulo César

    Brazil Alexandre N. Zerbini* , Artur Andriolo+ , Jesuina M. da Rocha# , Paulo César Simões'). The northeastern coast of Brazil was an important whaling ground in the 20th century. Shipboard sighting surveys off northeastern Brazil suggests that the species is reoccupying historical areas of distribution

  20. Assessment of Inundation Risk from Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge in Northeastern Coastal National Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    Assessment of Inundation Risk from Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge in Northeastern Coastal National of inundation risk from sea level rise and storm surge in northeastern coastal national parks. Journal of Coastal Research, 00(0), 000­000. Coconut Creek (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Sea level rise and an increase

  1. New York Household Travel Patterns: A Comparison Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1969, the U. S. Department of Transportation began collecting detailed data on personal travel to address various transportation planning issues. These issues range from assessing transportation investment programs to developing new technologies to alleviate congestion. This 1969 survey was the birth of the Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. Longer-distance travel was collected in 1977 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed to the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and collected both daily and longer-distance trips in one survey. In addition to the number of sample households that the national NPTS/NHTS survey allotted to New York State (NYS), the state procured an additional sample of households in both the 1995 and 2001 surveys. In the 1995 survey, NYS procured an addition sample of more than 9,000 households, increasing the final NY NPTS sample size to a total of 11,004 households. Again in 2001, NYS procured 12,000 additional sample households, increasing the final New York NHTS sample size to a total of 13,423 households with usable data. These additional sample households allowed NYS to address transportation planning issues pertinent to geographic areas significantly smaller than for what the national NPTS and NHTS data are intended. Specifically, these larger sample sizes enable detailed analysis of twelve individual Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs). Furthermore, they allowed NYS to address trends in travel behavior over time. In this report, travel data for the entire NYS were compared to those of the rest of the country with respect to personal travel behavior and key travel determinants. The influence of New York City (NYC) data on the comparisons of the state of New York to the rest of the country was also examined. Moreover, the analysis examined the relationship between population density and travel patterns, and the similarities and differences among New York MPOs. The 1995 and 2001 survey data make it possible to examine and identify travel trends over time. This report does not address, however, the causes of the differences and/or trends.

  2. A Glance at China’s Household Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Known for its scale, China is the most populous country with the world’s third largest economy. In the context of rising living standards, a relatively lower share of household consumption in its GDP, a strong domestic market and globalization, China is witnessing an unavoidable increase in household consumption, related energy consumption and carbon emissions. Chinese policy decision makers and researchers are well aware of these challenges and keen to promote green lifestyles. China has developed a series of energy policies and programs, and launched a wide?range social marketing activities to promote energy conservation.

  3. Northeastern Rural E M C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy ResourcesGranby,Plains,Northampton,St. Louis,Northeastern

  4. Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    increased by 47%. The number of workers per household has changed the least of the statistics shown here. There has been a decline in the number of persons per household from...

  5. Using Multiple Household Food Inventories to Measure Food Availability in the Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisk, Cheree L.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting multiple household food inventories over the course of 30 days to examine weekly food variability. Household food availability influences the foods individuals choose...

  6. Rebound Effect in Energy Efficient Appliance Adopting Households 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Jacob Matthew

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper uses data from smart meter technology to estimate the occurrence of energy rebound, a “substitution” and “income’ effect where the price-per-use of an appliance falls relative to its energy efficiency. This causes households to have more...

  7. Household scale slow sand filtration in the Dominican Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donison, Kori S. (Kori Shay), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow sand filtration is a method of water treatment that has been used for hundreds of years. In the past two decades, there has been resurgence in interest in slow sand filtration, particularly as a low-cost, household-scale ...

  8. Microcredit Program Participation and Household Food Security in Rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    and per capita calorie consumption, reduces the incidence of food poverty and the prevalence the impact of participation status on different measures of food insecurity -- household calorie consumption and consumption (Dercon and Krishnan, 2000; Dostie et al., 2002; Khandker et al., 2012). Income from non

  9. Effects of household dynamics on resource consumption and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrlich, Paul R.

    influence per capita consumption7,8 and thus biodiversity through, for example, consumption of wood for fuel, and resultant higher per capita resource con- sumption in smaller households15­19 pose serious challenges on resource consumption and biodiversity Jianguo Liu*, Gretchen C. Daily, Paul R. Ehrlich & Gary W. Luck

  10. The residential landscape: fluxes of elements and the role of household decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    The residential landscape: fluxes of elements and the role of household decisions Cinzia Fissore biogeochemical cycling of elements through residential household landscapes to evaluate the importance of annual 55108, USA #12;Introduction The household landscape represents a key feature in the residential areas

  11. Figure 1. Typical Slow Sand Filter Schematic Supernatant Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure 1. Typical Slow Sand Filter Schematic Headspace Supernatant Water Schmutzdecke Raw water Supernatant drain Filter drain & backfill Sand media Support gravel Drain tile Adjustable weir Overflow weir Vent Control valve Treated Water Effluent flow control structure Overflow Assessing Temperature

  12. andisol typic hapludand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from positive to negative from an input range Berns, Hans-Gerd 6 The typical Turing degree CERN Preprints Summary: The Turing degree of a real measures the computational...

  13. Gearbox Typical Failure Modes, Detection, and Mitigation Methods (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation was given at the AWEA Operations & Maintenance and Safety Seminar and focused on what the typical gearbox failure modes are, how to detect them using detection techniques, and strategies that help mitigate these failures.

  14. Structure of The Dixie Valley Geothermal System, a "Typical"...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dixie Valley Geothermal System, a "Typical" Basin and Range Geothermal System, From Thermal and Gravity Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  15. Typical support and Sanov large deviations of correlated states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Bjelakovic; J. -D. Deuschel; T. Krueger; R. Seiler; Ra. Siegmund-Schultze; A. Szkola

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete stationary classical processes as well as quantum lattice states are asymptotically confined to their respective typical support, the exponential growth rate of which is given by the (maximal ergodic) entropy. In the iid case the distinguishability of typical supports can be asymptotically specified by means of the relative entropy, according to Sanov's theorem. We give an extension to the correlated case, referring to the newly introduced class of HP-states.

  16. Mesozoic giant fleas from northeastern China (Siphonaptera): Taxonomy and implications for palaeodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, DiYing; Engel, Michael S.; Cai, ChenYang; Nel, André

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently discovered definite giant fleas from the Middle Jurassic Daohugou fauna and the Early Cretaceous Jehol fauna of northeastern China represent significant evidence for understanding ectoparasitism in the Mesozoic ...

  17. Late Holocene hurricane activity and climate variability in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Daniel Philip

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hurricane activity in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico and its relationship to regional and large-scale climate variability during the Late Holocene is explored. A 4500-year record of hurricane-induced storm surges is ...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting northeastern brazil Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Guy- ana, known as the Guianas-Brazil... of northeastern Brazil, French Guiana, Suriname and Guyana (1975-77). In A. C. Jones and L. Villegas (Editors... working group...

  19. Northeastern University E c o n o m i c s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    questions about Northeastern University and the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. *myPAWS/DARS The most important source of official curricular information is the Degree Audit and Reporting System (DARS

  20. Geology and engineering geology of a Wilcox lignite deposit in northeastern Rusk County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, William F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GEOLOGY AND ENGINEERING GEOLOGY OF A WILCOX LIGNITE DEPOSIT IN NORTHEASTERN RUSK COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by William F. Cole Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) ad of Department) August 1980 ABSTRACT Geology and Engineering Geology of a Wilcox Lignite Deposit in Northeastern Rusk County, Texas (August, 1980) William 7. Cole, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman...

  1. A contribution to the Tertiary geology and paleontology of northeastern Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galbreath, E. C.

    1953-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS VERTEBRATA ARTICLE 4 Pages 1-120, Plates 1-2, Figures 1-26 A CONTRIBUTION TO THE TERTIARY GEOLOGY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF NORTHEASTERN COLORADO By EDWIN C. GALBREATH UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PUBLICATIONS... 1-2, FIGURES 1-26 A CONTRIBUTION TO THE TERTIARY GEOLOGY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF NORTHEASTERN COLORADO By EDWIN C. GALBREATH CONTENTS PACK FAG: ABSTRACT 7 Order Sauna MACARTNEY 38 INTRODUCTION 8 Family Iguanidae GRAY 38Exostinus serratus COPE...

  2. Origin and distribution of sand types, northeastern U.S. Atlantic continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leschak, Pamela

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the northeastern U. S. Atlantic continental shelf during the maximum advance of the Laurentide ice sheet in the late Pleistocene. . . . . . 18 Summary map of surface tidal currents and bottom current flow on the northeastern U. S. Atlantic conti- nental shelf... is very irregular and consists of a series of large, northwest-trending tidal ridges separated by flat-floored troughs (Stewart and Jordan, 1964; Uchupi, 1968). The southern half of the bank's surface is a smooth, featureless plain that slopes gently...

  3. The Effect of Marketing Messages, Liquidity Constraints, and Household Bargaining on Willingness to Pay for a Nontraditional Cook-stove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltramo, Theresa; Levine, David I; Blalock, Garrick

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rural households are on average poorer than urban counterparts and have low rates of electrification-

  4. Two typical processes ... Isentropic("mechanical" reversible, elastic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    is coupled and accompanied with energy conversions and dissipation to heat/thermal energy ... Carnot cycle12/28/2011 1 Two typical processes ... · Isentropic("mechanical" reversible, elastic) where useful provides for de-coupling of thermal energy from other types and, YES!, for reversible heat transfer

  5. 1 INTRODUCTION A typical flexible pavement system includes four

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 INTRODUCTION A typical flexible pavement system includes four distinct layers: asphalt concrete course in order to reduce costs or to minimize capil- lary action under the pavement. Figure 1: Cross-section of flexible pavement system (Muench 2006) Pavement distress may occur due to either traffic or environmental

  6. Robust Neuroimaging-Based Classification Techniques of Autistic vs. Typically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farag, Aly A.

    abnormalities in several brain regions. Increased head size was the first observed characteristic in children1 Robust Neuroimaging-Based Classification Techniques of Autistic vs. Typically Developing Brain with autism. According to the published studies, different anatomical structures of the brain have been

  7. Safety for an Autonomous Bucket Excavator During Typical Landscaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Karsten

    Safety for an Autonomous Bucket Excavator During Typical Landscaping Tasks Gregor Zolynski, Daniel the goal of automating a mobile bucket excavator for excavation and loading tasks. This document contains a short introduction to the autonomous bucket excavator THOR, a concept for low-level safety using laser

  8. Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

  9. Pollak and Wachter on the Household Production Function Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, William A.

    1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the ith commodity. As Pollak and Wachter have observed, much of the appeal of the commodity shadow-price approach lies in its ability to use functions having known neoclassical properties. However, Pollak and Wachter maintain that, if the constraint 7r(P...). But the commodity shadow prices 7r(P, Z) do depend upon Z whenever house- hold production exhibits jointness, which Pollak and Wachter maintain is inherently characteristic of household production processes. Hence 1 Pollack and Wachter have considered...

  10. Essays on Price Dynamics, Welfare Analysis, Household Food Insecurity in Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magana Lemus, David

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher and more volatile food prices, as reported in recent years, have consequences on household welfare and potentially on public policy. Analysis of agricultural commodities price dynamics, welfare ...

  11. Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    household GDP is corrected for Purchase Power Parity (PPP).The PPP factor adjusts currency market exchange rates (MER)20% for countries with average PPP adjusted incomes below $

  12. Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to a hybrid vehicle whichcombines multipleor 180 mile hybrid electric vehicle. Natural gas vehicles (1994) "Demand Electric Vehicles in Hybrid for Households:

  13. Effect of Income on Appliances in U.S. Households, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entails how people live, the factors that cause the most differences in home lifestyle, including energy use in geographic location, socioeconomics and household income.

  14. "Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than...

  15. "Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than...

  16. Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael, S; Berube, A; Deakin, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences in 10 Household Automobile Ownership Rates:hauseltoldr lacking automobiles were mmit like! ) to be leftWithout 3 Access to an Automobile. Top Ten Metropolitan

  17. DENDROCLIMATOLOGY ALONG CLIFF ENVIRONMENTS OF NORTHEASTERN WEST VIRGINIA: A COMPARISON OF RIDGETOP PINES AND CLIFF-LINE RED CEDAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sturt

    DENDROCLIMATOLOGY ALONG CLIFF ENVIRONMENTS OF NORTHEASTERN WEST VIRGINIA: A COMPARISON OF RIDGETOP and compare two drought-sensitive tree-ring chronologies from cliff sites in northeastern West Virginia; one), held at The Mountain Institute on Spruce Knob, West Virginia, we sought to explore

  18. NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2008 15(3):375390 Status and Distribution of Fish in an Acid-impacted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    of the northeastern US. Introduction The ecological impacts of anthropogenic acidification (acid rain) on fishNORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2008 15(3):375­390 Status and Distribution of Fish in an Acid to chemical barriers that limit upstream movement during high flow in a few streams. As recovery from acid

  19. Tectonic and climatic controls on coastal sedimentation: The Late PlioceneMiddle Pleistocene of northeastern Rhodes, Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    of northeastern Rhodes, Greece Jean-Jacques Cornée a,, Pierre Moissette a , Sébastien Joannin a , Jean-Pierre Suc Athens, Greece e FRE 2761 Géologie des Systèmes Carbonatés, Université de Provence, case 67, 3 place of northeastern Rhodes (Greece) were deposited in an active tectonic setting. They provide an excellent

  20. Anatomy and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical-subtropical transition zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatomy and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical-subtropical transition zone, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 118, doi:10.1002/ 2013JC009339. 1. Introduction [2] Mesoscale eddy

  1. Amazon River water in the northeastern Caribbean Sea and its effect on larval reef fish assemblages during April 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amazon River water in the northeastern Caribbean Sea and its effect on larval reef fish assemblages.S.A. ABSTRACT During April to June 2009, a large bolus of Amazon River water impacted the northeastern Caribbean Ocean waters to the north, with Caribbean surface waters showing intermediate values. Plankton net tows

  2. SSI response of a typical shear wall structure. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.J.; Schewe, E.C.; Maslenikov, O.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Simplified Methods project of the US NRC-funded Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has as its goal the development of a methodology to perform routine seismic probabilistic risk assessments of commercial nuclear power plants. The study reported here develops calibration factors to relate best estimate response to design values accounting for approximations and simplifications in SSI analysis procedures. Nineteen cases were analyzed and in-structure response compared. The structure of interest was a typical shear wall structure. 6 references, 44 figures, 22 tables.

  3. Is the Sun Embedded in a Typical Interstellar Cloud?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. Frisch

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical properties and kinematics of the partially ionized interstellar material near the Sun are typical of warm diffuse clouds in the solar vicinity. The interstellar magnetic field at the heliosphere and the kinematics of nearby clouds are naturally explained in terms of the S1 superbubble shell. The interstellar radiation field at the Sun appears to be harder than the field ionizing ambient diffuse gas, which may be a consequence of the low opacity of the tiny cloud surrounding the heliosphere. The spatial context of the Local Bubble is consistent with our location in the Orion spur.

  4. Improving Device-level Electricity Consumption Breakdowns in Private Households Using ON/OFF Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recommen- dations on how to reduce the overall energy consumption of the household. In this paper, we build Descriptors H.4 [Information Systems Applications]: Miscellaneous 1. INTRODUCTION The energy sectorImproving Device-level Electricity Consumption Breakdowns in Private Households Using ON/OFF Events

  5. Changing household behaviors to curb climate change: How hard can it be? Shahzeen Z. Attaria,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    efforts to reduce household energy consumption. As part of a recent national survey on public perceptions: E-mail: shahzeen.attari@gmail.com #12;The residential sector contributes over 20% of energy reduce household energy consumption by nearly 30%. Examples include tuning up the car twice a year

  6. Dimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be made from any carbonaceous feedstock, including natural gas, coal, or biomass, using establishedDimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China Eric D. Larson Princeton gas (LPG) as a household cooking fuel. As such, DME is an attractive fuel for clean cooking. DME can

  7. UNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diallo, Ibrahima

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    UNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE By © 2013 IBRAHIMA DIALLO Submitted to the graduate degree program in Economics and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas... version of the following dissertation: UNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE ________________________________ (Chairperson) William A. Barnett Date...

  8. Frequency and longitudinal trends of household care product use Rebecca E. Moran a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    SUPERB Indoor environment d-limonene a b s t r a c t The use of household cleaning products and air infiltrating to the indoor environment to form potentially toxic secondary pollutants. Although realistic, frequencies of use of eight types of household cleaning products and air fresheners and the performance

  9. Deforestation and Cattle Ranching in the Brazilian Amazon: External Capital and Household Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Robert T.

    Deforestation and Cattle Ranching in the Brazilian Amazon: External Capital and Household Processes decomposes recent deforestation in four study areas in the Brazilian Amazon into components associated deforestation with respect to the proximate causes of their farming systems, and the household drivers

  10. Logistic regression models for predicting trip reporting accuracy in GPS-enhanced household travel surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Timothy Lee

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ...................................................................................................... 47 7 Significance Levels of Variables in Each Model......................................... 49 A-1 Example of Household Data File Format (Laredo) ..................................... 60 A...-2 Example of Household Data File Format Codes (Laredo) .......................... 62 A-3 Example of Person Data File Format (Laredo)............................................ 63 A-4 Example...

  11. Predicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , occupancy prediction, smart heating, energy management, smart home, energy efficiency Corresponding author.e. the household having too low a temperature when the residents come back home ­ triggering the heatingPredicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis

  12. Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use DEBORAH H. BENNETTa, cleaning products, passive sampling, SUPERB, longitudinal. Introduction Personal care and household care products, such as cleaning products and pesticides, are frequently used in most house- holds although

  13. Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation's aftermath concerned the size and composition of the area's populations that lacked access to an automobile for all U.S. metropolitan areas that reside in a household without access to an automobile. Finally, we

  14. Household- and Market-Level Perspectives on the Peter Pan Peanut Butter Recall Using Nielsen Homescan Panel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhtavoryan, Rafael

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Using household level scanner data for 2006, 2007, and 2008, this dissertation consists of four studies, which present household- and market-level analyses of food safety issues concerning the 2007 Peter Pan recall on the demand for peanut butter...

  15. "Certainly the Proper Business of Woman": Household and Estate Management Techniques of Eighteenth-Century French Noblewomen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utech, Sally

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This project explores the legal, economic, and social aspects of household and estate management in eighteenth-century France. It investigates two paradoxes surrounding noblewomen and household management. The first involves ...

  16. Modeling household adoption of earthquake hazard adjustments: a longitudinal panel study of Southern California and Western Washington residents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arlikatti, Sudha S

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research, aimed at advancing the theory of environmental hazard adjustment processes by contrasting households from three cities in a high seismic hazard area with households from three other cities in a moderate ...

  17. Load Component Database of Household Appliances and Small Office Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Xie, YuLong; Huang, Zhenyu; Puyleart, Francis; Yang, Steve

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the development of a load component database for household appliances and office equipment. To develop more accurate load models at both transmission and distribution level, a better understanding on the individual behaviors of home appliances and office equipment under power system voltage and frequency variations becomes more and more critical. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has begun a series of voltage and frequency tests against home appliances and office equipments since 2005. Since 2006, Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has collaborated with BPA personnel and developed a load component database based on these appliance testing results to facilitate the load model validation work for the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In this paper, the testing procedure and testing results are first presented. The load model parameters are then derived and grouped. Recommendations are given for aggregating the individual appliance models to feeder level, the models of which are used for distribution and transmission level studies.

  18. Spatial Distribution of U.S. Household Carbon Footprints Reveals Suburbanization Undermines Greenhouse Gas Benefits of Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    with predominantly coal-fired electricity.10 Income, household size, and social factors have been shown to affect

  19. Patterns of Stove Usage after Introduction of an Advanced Cookstove: The Long-Term Application of Household Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT: Household air pollution generated from solid fuel use for cooking is one of the leading risk% of households rely on solid fuelsincluding wood, dung, grass, coal, and crop residues for cooking.1 The 2010 of Household Sensors Ajay Pillarisetti,*, Mayur Vaswani, Darby Jack,§ Kalpana Balakrishnan, Michael N. Bates

  20. 112Proceedings of the 2009 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium GTR-NRS-P-66 Diane Kuehn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    112Proceedings of the 2009 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium GTR-NRS-P-66 Diane Kuehn (McAvoy and Dustin 1983, Vander Stoep and Gramann 1987, Duncan and Martin 2002, Kuehn and Thompson erosion) (Kuehn and Habig 2005, Kuehn and Thompson 2007). The strong stewardship ethic of many ELODWA

  1. Geoarchaeology and Late Quaternary Geomorphology of the Middle South Platte River, Northeastern Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Vance T.

    Geoarchaeology and Late Quaternary Geomorphology of the Middle South Platte River, Northeastern Investigations were conducted along the middle South Platte River to better define the geomorphic contexts and Mountain, 1960;Wheat, 1972,1979; Wilmsen and Roberts, 1978;Stanford, 1978). Someare along the middleSouthPlatte

  2. Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United influencing total fish biomass in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass, stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from

  3. Late Quaternary deposition and facies model for karstic Lake Estanya (North-eastern Spain)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Late Quaternary deposition and facies model for karstic Lake Estanya (North-eastern Spain) MARIO-50059 Zaragoza, Spain (E-mail: mariomm@ipe.csic.es) EAWAG, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Research Ca´diz, Poli´gono Ri´o San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Ca´diz), Spain Associate Editor: Stephen

  4. Fibrous-clay mineral formation and soil evolution in Aridisols of northeastern Patagonia, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Fibrous-clay mineral formation and soil evolution in Aridisols of northeastern Patagonia, Argentina Patagónico, CONICET, Avd. Brown s/n, 9120, Puerto Madryn, Chubut, Argentina b Departamento de Edafología, EPS horizons; Chubut province of Argentina 1. Introduction Palygorskite and sepiolite are clay minerals

  5. SHORTER NOTES An Adiantopsis Hybrid from Northeastern Argentina and Vicinity.--During

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, Michael S.

    SHORTER NOTES An Adiantopsis Hybrid from Northeastern Argentina and Vicinity.--During a recent collecting trip to the Parque Nacional Iguazu´, Misiones, Argentina, an unusual specimen of Adiantopsis and often sympatric in the American tropics. In contrast, the hybrid is restricted to Argentina, Brazil

  6. A Deterministic Method for Initializing K-means Clustering Northeastern University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dy, Jennifer G.

    A Deterministic Method for Initializing K-means Clustering Ting Su Northeastern University Boston@ece.neu.edu Abstract The performance of K-means clustering depends on the initial guess of partition. In this paper, we. The criterion that K-means clustering minimizes is the SSE (sum-squared-error) criterion. The first principal di

  7. Smallmouth Bass Seasonal Dynamics in Northeastern South Dakota Glacial Lakes Thomas D. Bacula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Game, Fish and Parks, and South Dakota State University. #12;iv ABSTRACT Smallmouth BassSmallmouth Bass Seasonal Dynamics in Northeastern South Dakota Glacial Lakes BY Thomas D. Bacula and Fisheries Science (Fisheries Option) South Dakota State University 2009 #12;11 Smallmouth Bass Seasonal

  8. Dynamics of wood recruitment in streams of the northeastern US Dana R. Warren a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    : Large woody debris LWD Riparian forest Wood recruitment Wood dynamics Stream restoration Debris dam restoration efforts often incorporate large wood. In most cases, however, stream restoration projectsDynamics of wood recruitment in streams of the northeastern US Dana R. Warren a, *, Clifford E

  9. Air Quality Impacts of Distributed Energy Resources Implemented in the Northeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    of the United States have appropriate characteristics in terms of market deregulation, natural gas prices of the northeastern United States. A methodol- ogy for predicting future market penetration of DER that considers economics and emission factors was used to estimate the most likely implementation of DER. The methodology

  10. NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2006 13(1):3538 Sea Lamprey Attached to a Greenland Shark in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2006 13(1):35­38 Sea Lamprey Attached to a Greenland Shark in the St fork length, male Somniosus microcephalus (Greenland shark) on 9 October 2004 in Baie St. Pancrace, St observation of a sea lamprey attached to a Somniosus microcephalus (Bloch and Schneider) (Greenland shark

  11. Floods, Habitat Hydraulics and Upstream Migration of Neritina virginea (Gastropoda: Neritidae) in Northeastern Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) in Northeastern Puerto Rico JUAN F. BLANCO 1 AND FREDERICK N. SCATENA 2 1 Department of Biology, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, P.O. Box 23360, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931­3360. Corresponding author. 1990, 1992; Liu and Resh 1997), and Puerto Rico (Covich and McDowell 1996; Pyron and Covich 2003

  12. Assessing XRF for the geochemical characterization of radiolarian chert artifacts from northeastern North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    Assessing XRF for the geochemical characterization of radiolarian chert artifacts from northeastern 2012 Keywords: Chert XRF Geochemistry Non-destructive Weathering Quarries Quebec a b s t r a c-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) as a first-order technique to determine chert whole-rock geochemistry for archaeological

  13. Anthropogenic and Natural Emissions of Mercury (Hg) in the northeastern United Jeffrey MacAdam Sigler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Xuhui

    Abstract Anthropogenic and Natural Emissions of Mercury (Hg) in the northeastern United States impact may depend on the emission rate. Anthropogenic Hg emissions in the United States are poorly characterized. Natural Hg emissions are poorly understood worldwide, due to lack of data or measurement systems

  14. Mesoscale eddies in the northeastern Pacific tropical-subtropical transition zone: Statistical characterization from satellite altimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesoscale eddies in the northeastern Pacific tropical-subtropical transition zone: Statistical February 2012; revised 24 August 2012; accepted 6 September 2012; published 24 October 2012. [1] Mesoscale cycle. Although mesoscale eddies in these areas have been previously reported, this study provides

  15. NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2009 16(2):307313 Variation in Ozone Sensitivity Within Indian Hemp and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2009 16(2):307­313 Variation in Ozone Sensitivity Within Indian Hemp , and Dennis R. Decoteau1 Abstract - Sixteen selections of Apocynum cannabinum (Indian Hemp) and nine, adaxial stipple, similar to symptoms ascribed to ambient ozone in the field. Indian Hemp was more

  16. Pressurized pyrolysis and gasification of Chinese typical coal samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanping Chen; Zhiwu Luo; Haiping Yang; Fudong Ju; Shihong Zhang [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to understand the pyrolysis and gasification behavior of different Chinese coal samples at different pressures. First, the pyrolysis of four typical Chinese coals samples (Xiaolongtan brown coal, Shenfu bituminous coal, Pingzhai anthracite coal, and Heshan lean coal) were carried out using a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer at ambient pressure and 3 MPa, respectively. The surface structure and elemental component of the resultant char were measured with an automated gas adsorption apparatus and element analyzer. It was observed that higher pressure suppressed the primary pyrolysis, while the secondary pyrolysis of coal particles was promoted. With respect to the resultant solid char, the carbon content increased while H content decreased; however, the pore structure varied greatly with increasing pressure for different coal samples. For Xiaolongtan brown coal (XLT) char, it decreased greatly, while it increased obviously for the other three char types. Then, the isothermal gasification behavior of solid char particles was investigated using an ambient thermal analyzer with CO{sub 2} as the gasifying agent at 1000{sup o}C. The gasification reactivity of solid char was decreased greatly with increasing pyrolysis pressure. However, the extent of change displayed a vital relation with the characteristics of the original coal sample. 26 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  18. Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the next 20-30 years as China builds large quantity ofof power generation in China from 0.230 in 2003 to 0.164 kgHousehold Appliances in China Jiang Lin Environmental Energy

  19. 34 Pauline Kristiansen – life in the household, growing up in north-west Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 34 Length of track 1 hour 12 minutes Title of track Pauline Kristiansen – life in the household...

  20. Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with three or more vehicles grew from 2% in 1960 to nearly 20% in 2010. Before 1990, the most common number of vehicles per household was one, but since 1990, the most...

  1. Monitoring effective use of household water treatment and safe storage technologies in Ethiopia and Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Matthew M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Household water treatment and storage (HWTS) technologies dissemination is beginning to scale-up to reach the almost 900 million people without access to an improved water supply (WHO/UNICEF/JMP, 2008). Without well-informed ...

  2. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Household wastewater treatment systems (septic systems) can contaminate ground water unless they are properly designed, constructed and maintained. This publication describes various kinds of systems and guides the homeowner in assessing...

  3. Distributional Impacts of Carbon Pricing: A General Equilibrium Approach with Micro-Data for Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausch, Sebastian

    Many policies to limit greenhouse gas emissions have at their core efforts to put a price on carbon emissions. Carbon pricing impacts households both by raising the cost of carbon intensive products and by changing factor ...

  4. Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

  5. MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) of the causative parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida bitten by infected insect vectors. There are 130 species in the subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera

  6. Reconstituting Lives: Somali Women's Efforts to Reformulate Household and Community Values in Kansas City, Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippi-Franz, Melissa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research addresses what Somali women living in Kansas City, Missouri do to assist their households and communities to come to terms with the consequences of forced migration. Women's contributions to wellbeing are found ...

  7. Towards Practical and Grounded Knowledge Representation Systems for Autonomous Household Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Moritz Tenorth, Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous Systems, Technische Universit¨at M¨unchen {tenorth, beetz}@cs.tum.edu Abstract-- Mobile household robots need much knowledge about objects, places

  8. Taxonomy and distribution of sea anemones (Cnidaria: Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia) from deep water of the northeastern Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eash-Loucks, Wendy E.; Fautin, Daphne G.

    2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Sea anemones sensu lato (members of cnidarian orders Actiniaria and Corallimorpharia) occurring in water of the northeastern Pacific Ocean greater than 1,000 m (to the abyssal plain) are poorly known. Based on the literature and specimens we...

  9. Seasonal and interannual differences in surface chlorophyll stocks and integrated water column chlorophyll stocks in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, William Wallerich

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico Chemical and Hydrography study (NEGOM-COH), nine oceanographic cruises were fielded during the spring, summer and fall seasons from November 1997 to August ...

  10. Structural restoration of Louann Salt and overlying sediments, De Soto Canyon Salt Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Mengdong

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continental margin of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico is suited for seismic stratigraphic analysis and salt tectonism analysis. Jurassic strata include the Louann Salt on the continental shelf and upper slope of the Destin Dome OCS area...

  11. The effects of cash cropping on household expediture patterns in rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Fred Ken

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the hypotheses tested from the general problem statement is in order. The first hypothesis tested was that the average total expenditure for both commercial and send. -subsistence households are the same. Given that total expenditures are regarded as a proxy.... , University of Zambia at Lusaka Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Carl E. Shafer The aims of the study are to determine significant differences in the patterns and levels of expenditure by semi-subsistence and commercial farm households in rural Kenya...

  12. The Determinants of Homeonwership in Presence of Shocks Experienced by Mexican Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez Cabrera, Jesus Antonio 1977-

    2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of a death of household head. Death changes the economic and social face of a family, but the effect is usually less widespread than natural disasters. Juarez Torres (2010) examines the household capacity to recovery from shocks based... DEDICATION To my Lord, for showing me patience and love. To my wife, Miriam Juarez Torres, because your amazing love enlighten my road. Thank you for each prayer and words you gave me. To my kids, Emilio Lopez Juarez and Lilian Helena Lopez Juarez...

  13. Household income pooling and the demand for food: does family financial structure matter?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perusquia Corres, Ernesto

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    HOUSEHOLD INCOME POOLING AND THE DEMAND FOR FOOD: DOES FAMILY FINANCIAL STRUCTURE MATTER? A Dissertation by ERNESTO PERUSQUIA CORRES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2006 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics HOUSEHOLD INCOME POOLING AND THE DEMAND FOR FOOD: DOES FAMILY FINANCIAL STRUCTURE MATTER? A Dissertation by ERNESTO PERUSQUIA CORRES Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  14. Overview of CFC replacement issues for household refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vineyard, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Roke, L. [Fisher and Paykel, Auckland (New Zealand); Hallett, F. [Frigidaire, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1974, the famous ozone depletion theory of Rowland and Molina claimed that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) diffuse into the stratosphere where they are broken down by photolysis to release chlorine atoms that catalytically destroy ozone. Although the understanding of the science is still imperfect, there is little doubt that CFCs play a major role in the Antarctic ozone hole phenomenon and the decline in ozone observed in the rest of the world. Another issue that has become increasingly important is the potential of CFCs to change the earth`s temperature and to modify the climate. While the main impact in global warming is made by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide, CFCs and other trace gases also contribute to this effect. In an effort to respond to the global environmental threat, a CFC protocol was adopted during a diplomatic conference in Montreal. This document, known as the Montreal Protocol, was ratified in 1988 and put into effect on January 1, 1989. In accordance with Article 6 of the Montreal Protocol, the countries that signed the agreement shall periodically assess the control measures provided for in the Protocol. As part of that assessment process, household refrigeration was investigated to determine the status of CFC-12 replacements. The conclusion was that much progress has been made towards finding a suitable replacement. Compressors designed for HFC-134a have efficiencies comparable to those for CFC-12 and acceptable reliability tests have been obtained with ester lubricants. In addition, other replacements such as R-152a and refrigerant mixtures exist, but will require more study. Cycle options, such as the Stirling cycle, may be viable, but are further out in the future. The impact of new refrigerants is expected to result in elimination of CFC-12 consumption in developed countries by 1997 and in developing countries by 2005.

  15. First Data on Lake Level Changes in Northeastern Siberia during the Postglacial Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilo, N A; Anderson, P M; Brown, T A; Lozhkin, A V; Pakhomov, A Y; Solomatkina, T B

    2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Moraines of the Tyellakh Group [1] (QIII{sub 2-4}) preserved in river valleys of the northeastern Kolyma River basin indicate development of cirque-valley glaciers originating in the Kilgan Mountains located at the northeastern periphery of the Kolyma Ridge that separates drainage basins of the Sea of Okhotsk and Kolyma River. Moraines host lakes with a length of up to 1-5 km and a relatively small width depending on the valley bottom dimension. The study of lacustrine sediments, their bed-by-bed palynological analysis, and radiocarbon dating provided the first information on lake levels during the final glacial stage of the Late Pleistocene, as well as the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary and Holocene, for the upper reaches of the Kolyma River.

  16. Drilling history and stratigraphic correlation of Rose Run sandstone of northeastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, C.C.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, 40 known tests have penetrated the Knox unconformity in Ashtabula, Lake, Trumbull, Geauga, and Portage Counties, Ohio. Prior to 1980, there were only 22 tests. Of these, only 10 penetrated and logged rocks older than the Rose Run sandstone. In the period 1980-1986, two Rose Run discoveries were drilled, one in New Lyme Township of Ashtabula County and one in Burton Township of Geauga County. Both discovery wells have been offset. Attempts have been made to correlate these two areas with older tests in northeastern Ohio and with the Rose Run sandstones of Coshocton County. In northeastern Ohio, preliminary studies indicate a Rose Run sandstone and/or dolomite interval approximately 100 ft thick. The upper 50 ft is predominantly sandstone and the lower 50 ft changes locally from sandstone to dolomite. The upper sandy member can be correlated to the A, B, and C sandstone units of Coshocton County.

  17. The potential for commercial use of wildlife in some North-Eastern Tuli Block farms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nchunga, Mushanana Lawrence

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH ? EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis by Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH-EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga A proved as to style and content by: ) (Chairman...

  18. The potential for commercial use of wildlife in some North-Eastern Tuli Block farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nchunga, Mushanana Lawrence

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH ? EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis by Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE POTENTIAL FOR COMMERCIAL USE OF WILDLIFE IN SOME NORTH-EASTERN TULI BLOCK FARMS A Thesis Mushanana Lawrence Nchunga A proved as to style and content by: ) (Chairman...

  19. H{sub 2}-rich and Hydrocarbon Gas Recovered in a Deep Precambrian Well in Northeastern Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, K. David, E-mail: dnewell@kgs.ku.edu; Doveton, John H.; Merriam, Daniel F. [University of Kansas, Kansas Geological Survey (United States); Lollar, Barbara Sherwood [University of Toronto, Department of Geology (Canada)], E-mail: bslollar@chem.utoronto.ca; Waggoner, William M. [WTW Oil Co., Inc. (United States)], E-mail: bill@wtwoil.com; Magnuson, L. Michael [University of Kansas, Kansas Geological Survey (United States)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In late 2005 and early 2006, the WTW Operating, LLC (W.T.W. Oil Co., Inc.) no. 1 Wilson well (T.D. = 5772 ft; 1759.3 m) was drilled for 1826 ft (556.6 m) into Precambrian basement underlying the Forest City Basin in northeastern Kansas. Approximately 4500 of the 380,000 wells drilled in Kansas penetrate Precambrian basement. Except for two previous wells drilled into the arkoses and basalts of the 1.1-Ga Midcontinent Rift and another well drilled in 1929 in basement on the Nemaha Uplift east of the Midcontinent Rift, this well represents the deepest penetration into basement rocks in the state to date. Granite is the typical lithology observed in wells that penetrate the Precambrian in the northern Midcontinent. Although no cores were taken to definitively identify lithologies, well cuttings and petrophysical logs indicate that this well encountered basement metamorphic rocks consisting of schist, gneiss, and amphibolitic gneiss, all cut by aplite dikes.The well was cased and perforated in the Precambrian, and then acidized. After several days of swabbing operations, the well produced shows of low-Btu gas, dominated by the non-flammable component gases of nitrogen (20%), carbon dioxide (43%), and helium (1%). Combustible components include methane (26%), hydrogen (10%), and higher molecular-weight hydrocarbons (1%). Although Coveney and others [Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull., v. 71, no, 1, p. 39-48, 1987] identified H{sub 2}-rich gas in two wells located close to the Midcontinent Rift in eastern Kansas, this study indicates that high levels of H{sub 2} may be a more widespread phenomenon than previously thought. Unlike previous results, the gases in this study have a significant component of hydrocarbon gas, as well as H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}. Although redox reactions between iron-bearing minerals and groundwater are a possible source of H{sub 2} in the Precambrian basement rocks, the hydrocarbon gas does not exhibit the characteristics typically associated with proposed abiogenic hydrocarbon gases from Precambrian Shield sites in Canada, Finland, and South Africa. Compositional and isotopic signatures for gas from the no. 1 Wilson well are consistent with a predominantly thermogenic origin, with possible mixing with a component of microbial gas. Given the geologic history of uplift and rifting this region, and the major fracture systems present in the basement, this hydrocarbon gas likely migrated from source rocks and reservoirs in the overlying Paleozoic sediments and is not evidence for abiogenic hydrocarbons generated in situ in the Precambrian basement.

  20. The SUN Action database : collecting and analyzing typical actions for visual scene types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsson, Catherine Anne White

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work in human and machine vision has increasingly focused on the problem of scene recognition. Scene types are largely defined by the actions one might typically do there: an office is a place someone would typically ...

  1. Housing deficits as a frame for housing policy: Demographic change, economic crisis and household formation in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monkkonen, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    states passion for social housing. Vanguard Nigeria. Asianto help expand access to housing in Indonesia. Manila: PressThe transformation of housing and household structures in

  2. Household energy use in urban Venezuela: Implications from surveys in Maracaibo, Valencia, Merida, and Barcelona-Puerto La Cruz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Sathaye, J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies the most important results of a comparative analysis of household commercial energy use in Venezuelan urban cities. The use of modern fuels is widespread among all cities. Cooking consumes the largest share of urban household energy use. The survey documents no use of biomass and a negligible use of kerosene for cooking. LPG, natural gas, and kerosene are the main fuels available. LPG is the fuel choice of low-income households in all cities except Maracaibo, where 40% of all households use natural gas. Electricity consumption in Venezuela`s urban households is remarkably high compared with the levels used in households in comparable Latin American countries and in households of industrialized nations which confront harsher climatic conditions and, therefore, use electricity for water and space heating. The penetration of appliances in Venezuela`s urban households is very high. The appliances available on the market are inefficient, and there are inefficient patterns of energy use among the population. Climate conditions and the urban built form all play important roles in determining the high level of energy consumption in Venezuelan urban households. It is important to acknowledge the opportunities for introducing energy efficiency and conservation in Venezuela`s residential sector, particularly given current economic and financial constraints, which may hamper the future provision of energy services.

  3. Development of the household sample for furnace and boilerlife-cycle cost analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, Jim

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated. The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

  4. NYSERDA's Green Jobs-Green New York Program: Extending Energy Efficiency Financing To Underserved Households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimring, Mark; Fuller, Merrian

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The New York legislature passed the Green Jobs-Green New York (GJGNY) Act in 2009. Administered by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), GJGNY programs provide New Yorkers with access to free or low-cost energy assessments,1 energy upgrade services,2 low-cost financing, and training for various 'green-collar' careers. Launched in November 2010, GJGNY's residential initiative is notable for its use of novel underwriting criteria to expand access to energy efficiency financing for households seeking to participate in New York's Home Performance with Energy Star (HPwES) program.3 The GJGNY financing program is a valuable test of whether alternatives to credit scores can be used to responsibly expand credit opportunities for households that do not qualify for traditional lending products and, in doing so, enable more households to make energy efficiency upgrades.

  5. Direct dating of Eocene reverse faulting in northeastern Tibet using Ar-dating of fault clays and low-temperature thermochronometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct dating of Eocene reverse faulting in northeastern Tibet using Ar-dating of fault clays fault of northeastern Tibet by dating several size fractions of fault gouge clay that represent variable Ma and continued until at least Middle Miocene time and that authigenic clay growth occurred

  6. Long Term Dynamics of Inequalities between French Households concerning Automobile COLLET, Roger; BOUCQ, Elise; MADRE, Jean-Loup; HIVERT, Laurent.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Long Term Dynamics of Inequalities between French Households concerning Automobile COLLET, Roger TERM DYNAMICS OF INEQUALITIES BETWEEN FRENCH HOUSEHOLDS CONCERNING AUTOMOBILE Roger Collet, INRETS of automobile. As the curves representing car ownership (number of cars per adult) and car use (annual mileage

  7. Northeastern regional timber stumpage prices: 1961-91. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sendak, P.E.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State and regional weighted averages were calculated for timber stumpage prices for the northeastern region. The weighting factor was the timber volume harvested. The regional price series for hardwood sawtimber, softwood sawtimber, hardwood pulpwood, and softwood pulpwood are reported for the 31-year period, 1961 to 1991. Hardwood sawtimber prices increased at the average annual rate of 10.3 percent (nominal), softwood sawtimber at 6.4 percent, hardwood pulpwood at 6.5 percent, and softwood pulpwood at 5.3 percent. Inflation, as measured by the All-commodity, Producer Price Index, averaged 5.7 percent per year over the 31-year period.

  8. Bathymetric records of marine shelled mollusca from the northeastern shelf of Yucatan, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treece, Granvil D

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. Harold W. Harry Micromolluscs consisting of 189 species of gastropods and 149 species of pelecypods from 11 samples ranging from 15 to 260 fathoms along the northeastern Campeche Shelf and upper continental elope of Yucatan are reported...), the Caribbean Sea, the Bahamas, Bermuda and part of the Atlantic coast of the United States. The sampled area lies along the Yucatan Strait and to the north and west thereof, on the edge of the broad Campeche shelf (Map 1). The Yucatan Strait lies between...

  9. Assessing the Interaction between Real Estate and Equity in Households Portfolio Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    that households taking positions in one asset (home or stock) encounter a positive position in the other asset considering their stock market participation and home tenure choices. There is already a huge body of literature on housing status (own/rent) decisions and many contributions doc- umented the low stock market

  10. Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past years the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed an econometric model that predicts appliance ownership at the household level based on macroeconomic variables such as household income (corrected for purchase power parity), electrification, urbanization and climate variables. Hundreds of data points from around the world were collected in order to understand trends in acquisition of new appliances by households, especially in developing countries. The appliances covered by this model are refrigerators, lighting fixtures, air conditioners, washing machines and televisions. The approach followed allows the modeler to construct a bottom-up analysis based at the end use and the household level. It captures the appliance uptake and the saturation effect which will affect the energy demand growth in the residential sector. With this approach, the modeler can also account for stock changes in technology and efficiency as a function of time. This serves two important functions with regard to evaluation of the impact of energy efficiency policies. First, it provides insight into which end uses will be responsible for the largest share of demand growth, and therefore should be policy priorities. Second, it provides a characterization of the rate at which policies affecting new equipment penetrate the appliance stock. Over the past 3 years, this method has been used to support the development of energy demand forecasts at the country, region or global level.

  11. Finding the creatures of habit; Clustering households based on their flexibility in using electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    electricity Ian Dent, Uwe Aickelin and Tom Rodden School of Computer Science University of Nottingham, UK, AB15 8QH tony.craig@hutton.ac.uk ABSTRACT Changes in the UK electricity market, particularly to change households' electricity usage patterns for the benefit of the overall sys- tem. Users show

  12. Applications of demand analysis for the dairy industry using household scanner data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockton, Matthew C.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of the represented cities. 9 Table 2. Percent of Households by Region Region Percent East 20.3 West 20.0 South 34.3 Central 25.3 The scanner information was collected by date of purchase and included only those panelist that purchased...

  13. Rice inventory credit in Madagascar : diversity of rural household strategies around an hybrid financial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rice inventory credit in Madagascar : diversity of rural household strategies around an hybrid been offering an innovative individual rice inventory credit to its members since 1993. Starting from the acknowledgement that the inventory credit is a hybrid product, which involves a mix of in kind and in cash flows

  14. Journal: Ecological Applications1 Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus fluxes in household ecosystems in the3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    with several29 components of household activities including air and motor vehicle travel, food consumption,30 home energy use, landscape, pets, and paper and plastic use for 360 owner-occupied, stand-alone31 vehicle transportation, together with home energy use, accounted for 85% of total C33 consumption

  15. Energy Policy 30 (2002) 815826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Policy 30 (2002) 815­826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy School of Public Policy and Energy and Resources Group (ERG), 310 Barrows Hall, University of California in disease from a range of interventions, including changes in energy technology (stove or fuel) and cooking

  16. A Multi Agent-Based Framework for Simulating Household PHEV Distribution and Electric Distribution Network Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL] [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Hoe Kyoung [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation of household attributes such as income, travel distance, age, household member, and education for different residential areas may generate different market penetration rates for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). Residential areas with higher PHEV ownership could increase peak electric demand locally and require utilities to upgrade the electric distribution infrastructure even though the capacity of the regional power grid is under-utilized. Estimating the future PHEV ownership distribution at the residential household level can help us understand the impact of PHEV fleet on power line congestion, transformer overload and other unforeseen problems at the local residential distribution network level. It can also help utilities manage the timing of recharging demand to maximize load factors and utilization of existing distribution resources. This paper presents a multi agent-based simulation framework for 1) modeling spatial distribution of PHEV ownership at local residential household level, 2) discovering PHEV hot zones where PHEV ownership may quickly increase in the near future, and 3) estimating the impacts of the increasing PHEV ownership on the local electric distribution network with different charging strategies. In this paper, we use Knox County, TN as a case study to show the simulation results of the agent-based model (ABM) framework. However, the framework can be easily applied to other local areas in the US.

  17. DETERMINANTS OF HOUSEHOLD PARTICIPATION IN WATER SOURCE MANAGEMENT: ACHEFER, AMHARA REGION, ETHIOPIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    , ETHIOPIA A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University In Partial in Ethiopia are among the lowest in Sub-Saharan Africa. While governmental and non- governmental organizations out involving 16 water supply systems and 160 households within Achefer area, in Amhara, Ethiopia

  18. HOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the dynamic variation in wholesale energy costs. This can be accomplished by letting retail prices varyHOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS Ahmad Faruqui and Sanem Sergici1 November 13, 2008 Since the energy crisis disrupted markets

  19. Reforming Household Energy Markets: Some Welfare Effects in the United Catherine Waddams Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    final energy prices (though those of monopoly inputs such as transmission and distribution remainReforming Household Energy Markets: Some Welfare Effects in the United Kingdom by Catherine Waddams Price Centre for Competition and Regulation and School of Management University of East Anglia, UK

  20. Derived Willingness-to-Pay for Household Water Use with Price and Probabilistic Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    a greater frequency of shortages in exchange for reduced water bills Howe and Smith 1994 . Relatively little, investments in water supply reliability enhancement can alter the frequency of all shortage levels soDerived Willingness-to-Pay for Household Water Use with Price and Probabilistic Supply Roberto

  1. Household Vehicle Ownership by Vehicle Type: Application of a Multivariate Negative Binomial Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    related to household size, income, population density (of zone of residence), and vehicle prices 1970's and early 1980's. Continual improvements in computation power permit more rigorous statistical to new energy issues and a focus on global warming policies, renewed consideration should be given

  2. Are domestic load profiles stable over time? An attempt to identify target households for demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Are domestic load profiles stable over time? An attempt to identify target households for demand Bamberg, Germany Email: thorsten.staake@uni-bamberg.de Abstract--Elaborating demand side management future demand side will largely depend on an automatic control of larger loads, it is also widely agreed

  3. Predicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , energy management, smart home, energy efficiency, thermostat strategy, heating setback Corresponding, a heating control system may require some time to heat a home to a comfortable temperature after itsPredicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis

  4. Towards a Plan Library for Household Robots Armin Muller and Michael Beetz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Towards a Plan Library for Household Robots Armin M¨uller and Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous {muellear,beetz}@cs.tum.edu Abstract This paper describes the structure for a plan library of a ser- vice (M¨uller, Kirsch, & Beetz 2007). This paper is about writing general, robust default plans

  5. THE HOUSEHOLD AS SECURITY: STRATEGIES OF RURAL-URBAN MIGRANTS IN CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    205 CHAPTER 11 THE HOUSEHOLD AS SECURITY: STRATEGIES OF RURAL-URBAN MIGRANTS IN CHINA C. Cindy Fan and lack of economic opportunities on their own. Agriculture faces an uncertain future, so do peasant work in urban industries and services, the sectors of the Chinese economy characterized by poorly paid

  6. EVOLUTION OF THE HOUSEHOLD VEHICLE FLEET: ANTICIPATING FLEET COMPOSITION, PHEV ADOPTION AND GHG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    EVOLUTION OF THE HOUSEHOLD VEHICLE FLEET: ANTICIPATING FLEET COMPOSITION, PHEV ADOPTION AND GHG evolution, vehicle ownership, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), climate change policy, stated preference, opinion survey, microsimulation ABSTRACT In todays world of volatile fuel prices and climate

  7. Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiencyof Household Appliances in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    China is already the second's largest energy consumer in the world after the United States, and its demand for energy is expected to continue to grow rapidly in the foreseeable future, due to its fast economic growth and its low level of energy use per capita. From 2001 to 2005, the growth rate of energy consumption in China has exceeded the growth rate of its economy (NBS, 2006), raising serious concerns about the consequences of such energy use on local environment and global climate. It is widely expected that China is likely to overtake the US in energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the first half of the 21st century. Therefore, there is considerable interest in the international community in searching for options that may help China slow down its growth in energy consumption and GHG emissions through improving energy efficiency and adopting more environmentally friendly fuel supplies such as renewable energy. This study examines the energy saving potential of three major residential energy end uses: household refrigeration, air-conditioning, and water heating. China is already the largest consumer market in the world for household appliances, and increasingly the global production base for consumer appliances. Sales of household refrigerators, room air-conditioners, and water heaters are growing rapidly due to rising incomes and booming housing market. At the same time, the energy use of Chinese appliances is relatively inefficient compared to similar products in the developed economies. Therefore, the potential for energy savings through improving appliance efficiency is substantial. This study focuses particularly on the impact of more stringent energy efficiency standards for household appliances, given that such policies are found to be very effective in improving the efficiency of household appliances, and are well established both in China and around world (CLASP, 2006).

  8. Ophiolitic terranes of northern and central Alaska and their correlatives in Canada and northeastern Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, W.W. Jr. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All of the major ophiolitic terranes (Angayucham, Tozitna, Innoko, Seventymile, and Goodnews terranes) in the northern and central Alaska belong to the Tethyan-type' of Moores (1982) and were obducted onto Paleozoic and Proterozoic continental and continental margin terranes in Mesozoic time. Tethyan-type' ophiolitic assemblages also occur in the Slide Mountain terrane in the Canadian Cordillera and extend from western Alaska into northeastern Russia. Although investigators have suggested widely different ages from their times of abduction onto the continent, these ophiolitic terranes display some remarkably similar features: (1) they consist of a stack of imbricated thrust slices dominated by ocean floor sediments, basalt, and high-level gabbro of late Paleozoic and Triassic age; (2) their mafic-ultramafic complexes generally are confined to the uppermost thrust sheets; (3) they lack the large tectonic melanges zones and younger accretionary flysch deposits associated with the ophiolitic terranes of southern Alaska and the Koryak region of northeastern Russia; (4) blueschist mineral assemblages occur in the lower part of these ophiolite terranes and (or) in the underlying continental terranes; and (5) they are bordered on their outboard' side by Mesozoic intraoceanic volcanic arc terranes. Recent geochemical and geologic studies of the mafic-ultramafic complexes in the Anagayucham and Tozitna terranes strongly suggest they were generated in a supra-subduction zone (SSZ) and that they are directly overlain by volcanic rocks of the Koyukuk terrane.

  9. Metals in fish from the Upper Benue River and lakes Geriyo and Njuwa in northeastern Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eromosele, C.O.; Eromosele, I.C.; Muktar, S.L.M.; Birdling, S.A. [Federal Univ. of Technology, Yola (Nigeria)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lakes Geriyo and Njuwa occupy natural depressions near the upper Benue River in northeastern Nigeria. The lakes are flooded by the river during the rainy season spanning the months of May to September. Fishing activities on the lakes and river provide fish for consumption by the local communities. Industrial activity around the upper Benue River and the lakes is low and there is no information on other activities with the potential for polluting the Benue River as it flows from neighboring Cameroon. However, an unconfirmed report indicated high levels of lead in the upper Benue River, generally speculated as arising from biogeometrical factors. Trace elements, some of which are toxic, may accumulate in edible marine organisms to levels which may be deleterious to human health. For the upper Benue River and its associate lakes, Geriyo and Njuwa, there is yet no report of a systematic study to assess the levels of metals in fish found in these waters. This paper presents the results of a study on metal levels in fish collected from Lakes Geriyo and Njuwa and upper Benue River in northeastern Nigeria. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Archaeofaunal insights on pinniped-human interactions in the northeastern Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford-Gonzales, D; Newsome, S; Koch, P; Guilderson, T; Snodgrass, J; Burton, R

    2004-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Human exploitation of pinnipeds has considerable antiquity but shows increasing impacts on population numbers in the Holocene. Pinnipeds are a rich source of fat as well as protein. A few well-documented cases of regional extirpation of seals and sea lions by non-industrial peoples exist. The northeastern Pacific region, from southern California to Alaska, has yielded archaeological evidence for distributions and abundances of eared seals that differs markedly from historically documented biogeography. This is especially true of the northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus), among the most common pinnipeds in many archaeological sites from the Santa Barbara Channel area through to Kodiak Islands. This chapter reviews contemporary eared seal biogeography, evidence for the earlier timing and extent, of occurrence of northern fur seals along the northeastern Pacific coast, zooarchaeological and isotopic evidence for their foraging and probable maintenance of rookeries in lower latitudes, and for their disappearance from the southernmost part of their ancient distribution well before European contact. It also reviews ongoing debates over the behavioral ecology of ancient fur seals and over humans role in contributing to their disappearance.

  11. S U P P L E M E N T A R T I C L E Determinants of Household Costs Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheingans, Richard

    S U P P L E M E N T A R T I C L E Determinants of Household Costs Associated With Childhood households. We used survey data from sites in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan to estimate the costs borne by households due to childhood diarrhea, including direct medical costs, direct nonmedical costs

  12. Agricultural and Resource Economics Review 39/2 (April 2010) iiivi Copyright 2010 Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, James J.

    Agricultural and Resource Economics Review 39/2 (April 2010) iii­vi Copyright 2010 Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association FOREWORD Special Issue on Experimental Methods in Environmental, Natural Resource, and Agricultural Economics Kent D. Messer and James J. Murphy Nearly two decades ago

  13. GROWTH OF PACIFIC SAUR~ COWLABlS SAlRA, IN THE NORTHEASTERN AND NORTHWESTERN PACIFIC OCEANI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the northeastern and northwestern Pacific Ocean was studied using otolith growth increments. We found that growth, Cololabis saira (Brevoort), is distributed throughout the North Pacific Ocean and is one of the most the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Details of sampling and methods of reading otoliths are summarized in Table 1

  14. Spatial and temporal variability of plankton stocks from acoustic backscatter intensity and direct measurements in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Rebecca Lee

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in conjunction with sea truth zooplankton samples. As part of the DeSoto Canyon Eddy Intrusion Study, twelve Broadband ADCPs were moored along four cross-margin lines in the DeSoto Canyon area of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These upward-looking ADCPs were...

  15. A comparative molecular analysis of water-filled limestone sinkholes in north-eastern Mexicoemi_2324 226..240

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science and Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401, USA. 2 Department of geological. Summary Sistema Zacatón in north-eastern Mexico is host to several deep, water-filled, anoxic, karstic (Huber et al., 2007) and soil (Roesch et al., 2007) samples. Comparative methods that exploit the large

  16. Abundance and distribution of paralarval cephalopods in relation to mesoscale hydrographic features in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cady, Robert B

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Additional specimens were collected from 1m² MOCNESS tows taken during a 1997 Student Training and Research cruise, as well as from meter net tows done as part of 1998 and 1999 'NEGOM' (Northeastern Gulf of Mexico) Chemical Oceanography and Hydrography...

  17. Forest carbon storage in the northeastern United States: Net effects of harvesting frequency, post-harvest retention, and wood products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    26 December 2009 Keywords: Carbon sequestration Wood products Structural retention Harvesting tradeoffs among scenarios using a factorial treatment design and two-way ANOVA. Mean carbon sequestrationForest carbon storage in the northeastern United States: Net effects of harvesting frequency, post

  18. Unmet Housing Rehabilitation and Household Goods Needs in Texas During Katrina-Rita, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley, Dayna

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    and household 7 goods. Differences in housing needs per confounding variables will be analyzed according to adjusted Census data by county for size. The data will be analyzed using SAS? and mapped using ARC GIS?. Hypothesis 1: Unmet housing renovation... of the variation in housing variables by geographical location overall and per disaster phase. The analyses were conducted using Excel and SAS. The mapping was done using ArcGIS and ArcInfo. 17 CHAPTER III RESULTS There were a...

  19. Brain Bases of Reading Fluency in Typical Reading and Impaired Fluency in Dyslexia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christodoulou, Joanna

    Although the neural systems supporting single word reading are well studied, there are limited direct comparisons between typical and dyslexic readers of the neural correlates of reading fluency. Reading fluency deficits ...

  20. Ground-water effects of the UCG experiments at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-water changes and subsidence effects associated with three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments have been monitored at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. It was found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. These contaminants may be of environmental significance if they find their way, in sufficient concentrations, into surface waters, or into aquifers from which water is extracted for drinking or agricultural purposes. Fortunately, the concentrations of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, recent field measurements indicate that there may be significant limitations on this natural cleansing process. The contaminants of potential concern, and the mechanisms that affect their deposition and persistence have been identified.

  1. Development of program implementation, evaluation, and selection tools for household water treatment and safe storage systems in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baffrey, Robert Michael Nuval, 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past six years, the MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering's Master of Engineering program has undertaken various projects involved with the design and implementation of a wide range of household ...

  2. An estimated one of every six households (16.2 percent) in Texas lives in poverty. Research has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relevance An estimated one of every six households (16.2 percent) in Texas lives in poverty. Research has shown that individuals who live in poverty have dietary intakes that are not in agreement

  3. Seismic stratigraphy and geologic history of Jurassic rocks, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, L.M.; Buffler, R.T. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A grid of two-dimensional seismic data tied to exploration wells defines four Jurassic sequences in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These sequences correlate with well-known northern Gulf of Mexico basin stratigraphic units: the Louann Salt (L sequence), Norphlet and Smackover formations (N-S sequence), Haynesville Formation (H sequence), and Cotton Valley Group (C sequence). The Jurassic section overlies a basement surface characterized by broad highs (Middle Ground arch and Southern platform) and lows (Apalachicola basin and Tampa embayment). This basement structure controlled the distribution, thickness, and paleogeography of all the Jurassic sequences, but its influence became progressively less pronounced as sediment filled the basin. The Jurassic geologic history of the region is developed from an interpretation of these sequences. Well control documents the presence of Louann Salt in the Apalachicola basin, whereas in the Tampa embayment the interval is interpreted only from seismic data. Salt movement on the West Florida Shelf began early, during Norphlet-Smackover deposition, and slowed dramatically by the end of Haynesville deposition. Smackover paleogeography includes progradation of a carbonate shelf in the Apalachicola basin and the Tampa embayment, as well as development of carbonate buildups updip of basement hingelines, over basement highs, and above early salt structures. In the Apalachicola basin, Haynesville clastic sedimentation updip was coeval with carbonate deposition downdip, and a localized carbonate shelf margin developed to the southwest. Haynesville clastic sedimentation may have prevailed in the Tampa embayment, where oblique clinoforms represent shelf margin progradation. During deposition of the Cotton Valley sequence, the northeastern Gulf of Mexico was characterized by delta-plain and delta-platform sedimentation with seismically defined shelf margin progradation only in the Tampa embayment.

  4. Local attitudes, knowledge and values regarding natural resource use in the range of the Maroon-fronted Parrot in northeastern Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madero-Farias, Alma Alida

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New ecosystem management policies for a national park in northeastern Mexico emphasize the need for stakeholder participation. To facilitate public participation, an environmental education program should be designed for ...

  5. EVALUATION OF TROQUE VS CLOSURE BOLT PRELOAD FOR A TYPICAL CONTAINMENT VESSEL UNDER SERVICE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive material package containment vessels typically employ bolted closures of various configurations. Closure bolts must retain the lid of a package and must maintain required seal loads, while subjected to internal pressure, impact loads and vibration. The need for insuring that the specified preload is achieved in closure bolts for radioactive materials packagings has been a continual subject of concern for both designers and regulatory reviewers. The extensive literature on threaded fasteners provides sound guidance on design and torque specification for closure bolts. The literature also shows the uncertainty associated with use of torque to establish preload is typically between 10 and 35%. These studies have been performed under controlled, laboratory conditions. The ability to insure required preload in normal service is, consequently, an important question. The study described here investigated the relationship between indicated torque and resulting bolt load for a typical radioactive materials package closure using methods available under normal service conditions.

  6. Basement/cover rock relations of the Dry Fork Ridge Anticline termination, northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennings, Peter Hill

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana. (August 1986) Peter Hill Hennings, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John H. Spang Field mapping on scales of 1:6, 000 and 1: 12, 000 indicate that the basement involved... in the Field Area Methodology DATA. PAGE I 3 7 10 12 17 25 25 28 Field Map. Interpretive Data: Cross Sections Dry Fork Ridge Anticline. Faole Point Anticline and the Mountain Flank. . Basement Geometry. Fracture Analysis...

  7. Method for estimating potential tree-grade distributions for northeastern forest species. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaussy, D.A.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized logistic regression was used to distribute trees into four potential tree grades for 20 northeastern species groups. The potential tree grade is defined as the tree grade based on the length and amount of clear cuttings and defects only, disregarding minimum grading diameter. The algorithms described use site index and tree diameter as the predictive variables, allowing the equations to be incorporated into individual-tree growth and yield simulators such as NE-TWIGS.

  8. The changing character of household waste in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 as a function of home heating methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doležalová, Markéta, E-mail: mdolezalova@email.cz [Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Benatska 2, 128 01 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Benešová, Libuše [Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Benatska 2, 128 01 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Závodská, Anita [School of Adult and Continuing Education, Barry University, 8001 SW 36th Street, Suite #1, Davie, FL 33328 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The character of household waste in the three different types of households were assesed. • The quantity, density and composition of household waste were determined. • The physicochemical characteristics were determined. • The changing character of household waste during past 10 years was described. • The potential of energy recovery of household waste in Czech republic was assesed. - Abstract: The authors of this paper report on the changing character of household waste, in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 in households differentiated by their heating methods. The data presented are the result of two projects, financed by the Czech Ministry of Environment, which were undertaken during this time period with the aim of focusing on the waste characterisation and complete analysis of the physicochemical properties of the household waste. In the Czech Republic, the composition of household waste varies significantly between different types of households based on the methods of home heating employed. For the purposes of these studies, the types of homes were divided into three categories – urban, mixed and rural. Some of the biggest differences were found in the quantities of certain subsample categories, especially fine residue (matter smaller than 20 mm), between urban households with central heating and rural households that primarily employ solid fuel such coal or wood. The use of these solid fuels increases the fraction of the finer categories because of the higher presence of ash. Heating values of the residual household waste from the three categories varied very significantly, ranging from 6.8 MJ/kg to 14.2 MJ/kg in 1999 and from 6.8 MJ/kg to 10.5 MJ/kg in 2009 depending on the type of household and season. The same factors affect moisture of residual household waste which varied from 23.2% to 33.3%. The chemical parameters also varied significantly, especially in the quantities of Tl, As, Cr, Zn, Fe and Mn, which were higher in rural households. Because knowledge about the properties of household waste, as well as its physicochemical characteristics, is very important not only for future waste management, but also for the prediction of the behaviour and influence of the waste on the environment as the country continues to streamline its legislation to the European Union’s solid waste mandates, the results of these studies were employed by the Czech Ministry of Environment to optimise the national waste management strategy.

  9. Radiation dose estimates for typical piloted NTR lunar and Mars mission engine operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnitzler, B.G. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Borowski, S.K. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural and manmade radiation environments to be encountered during lunar and Mars missions are qualitatively summarized. The computational methods available to characterize the radiation environment produced by an operating nuclear propulsion system are discussed. Mission profiles and vehicle configurations are presented for a typical all-propulsive, fully reusable lunar mission and for a typical all-propulsive Mars mission. Estimates of crew location biological doses are developed for all propulsive maneuvers. Post-shutdown dose rates near the nuclear engine are estimated at selected mission times. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Household magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstitute / TexasA4. U.S. Vehicles

  11. The Impact of Carbon Control on Low-Income Household Electricity and Gasoline Expenditures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In July of 2007 The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its impact analysis of 'The Climate Stewardship And Innovation Act of 2007,' known as S.280. This legislation, cosponsored by Senators Joseph Lieberman and John McCain, was designed to significantly cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions over time through a 'cap-and-trade' system, briefly described below, that would gradually but extensively reduce such emissions over many decades. S.280 is one of several proposals that have emerged in recent years to come to grips with the nation's role in causing human-induced global climate change. EIA produced an analysis of this proposal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to generate price projections for electricity and gasoline under the proposed cap-and-trade system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated those price projections into a data base derived from the EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 and the EIA public use files from the National Household Transportation Survey (NHTS) for 2001 to develop a preliminary assessment of impact of these types of policies on low-income consumers. ORNL will analyze the impacts of other specific proposals as EIA makes its projections for them available. The EIA price projections for electricity and gasoline under the S.280 climate change proposal, integrated with RECS and NHTS for 2001, help identify the potential effects on household electric bills and gasoline expenditures, which represent S.280's two largest direct impacts on low-income household budgets in the proposed legislation. The analysis may prove useful in understanding the needs and remedies for the distributive impacts of such policies and how these may vary based on patterns of location, housing and vehicle stock, and energy usage.

  12. Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

  13. Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

  14. WEEE and portable batteries in residual household waste: Quantification and characterisation of misplaced waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigum, Marianne, E-mail: mkkb@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Petersen, Claus, E-mail: claus_petersen@econet.dk [Econet A/S, Strandboulevarden 122, 5, 2100 København Ø (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • We analyse 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 Danish households. • We quantify and characterise misplaced WEEE and portable batteries. • We compare misplaced WEEE and batteries to collection through dedicated schemes. • Characterisation showed that primarily small WEEE and light sources are misplaced. • Significant amounts of misplaced batteries were discarded as built-in WEEE. - Abstract: A total of 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 households in 12 Danish municipalities was analysed and revealed that 89.6 kg of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), 11 kg of batteries, 2.2 kg of toners and 16 kg of cables had been wrongfully discarded. This corresponds to a Danish household discarding 29 g of WEEE (7 items per year), 4 g of batteries (9 batteries per year), 1 g of toners and 7 g of unidentifiable cables on average per week, constituting 0.34% (w/w), 0.04% (w/w), 0.01% (w/w) and 0.09% (w/w), respectively, of residual waste. The study also found that misplaced WEEE and batteries in the residual waste constituted 16% and 39%, respectively, of what is being collected properly through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. This shows that a large amount of batteries are being discarded with the residual waste, whereas WEEE seems to be collected relatively successfully through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. Characterisation of the misplaced batteries showed that 20% (w/w) of the discarded batteries were discarded as part of WEEE (built-in). Primarily alkaline batteries, carbon zinc batteries and alkaline button cell batteries were found to be discarded with the residual household waste. Characterisation of WEEE showed that primarily small WEEE (WEEE directive categories 2, 5a, 6, 7 and 9) and light sources (WEEE directive category 5b) were misplaced. Electric tooth brushes, watches, clocks, headphones, flashlights, bicycle lights, and cables were items most frequently found. It is recommended that these findings are taken into account when designing new or improving existing special waste collection schemes. Improving the collection of WEEE is also recommended as one way to also improve the collection of batteries due to the large fraction of batteries found as built-in. The findings in this study were comparable to other western European studies, suggesting that the recommendations made in this study could apply to other western European countries as well.

  15. Assessing Student Learning We typically assess student learning in terms of their grades on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champagne, Frances A.

    need to be student-focused rather than instructor-focused. Focus on the learning resulting fromAssessing Student Learning We typically assess student learning in terms of their grades on quizzes should be linked to our learning objectives. To properly assess student learning, you need to know what

  16. Strain Storage Typically, mycobacteria can be stored as lyophilized stocks, agar slants, or frozen stocks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strain Storage Typically, mycobacteria can be stored as lyophilized stocks, agar slants, or frozen stocks. Since lyophilization is not a cost-effective product storage alternative for virulent M. tuberculosis and agar slants can take up considerable BSL3 storage space, the best alternative for strain

  17. Refrigerator: Refrigerators and freezers are not typically constructed to assure that there is no

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    LAB SAFETY Refrigerator: Refrigerators and freezers are not typically constructed to assure temperature of the refrigerator rises. This results in an increase in the concentration of flammable vapors within the refrigerator's interior. When power is restored, a spark generated by the refrigerator light

  18. Fig. 1. Typical topological arrangement of a hybrid fuel cell vehicle drive train [2].

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Fig. 1. Typical topological arrangement of a hybrid fuel cell vehicle drive train [2]. TABLE I designed with more robust features. I. INTRODUCTION Fuel cell vehicles (FCV) are widely considered of a hybrid fuel cell vehicle is shown in Fig. 1 [2]. Developments in hybrid automobile industry have

  19. SIR GILBERT WALKER AND A CONNECTION BETWEEN EL NIO AND STATISTICS: FROM "TYPICAL CAMBRIDGE DON" TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    autocorrelations (e. g., R statistical programming language) Speech compression #12;11 #12;12 (2) SIR GILBERT Research Boulder, CO USA Home page: www.isse.ucar.edu/staff/katz/ Reference: Katz, R.W. (2002). Statistical1 SIR GILBERT WALKER AND A CONNECTION BETWEEN EL NIÑO AND STATISTICS: FROM "TYPICAL CAMBRIDGE DON

  20. Typical College Student Diet Food Derived Microorganisms and Their Relation to the Human Gastrointestinal Microflora 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haselhorst, Alexandria J.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    or not different foods contain unique bacterial profiles and if there is a correlation between foods and the types of bacteria that may be present. This study was based on diets that are typically consumed by college students. Six meals, two breakfasts, two lunches...

  1. Origin of alkali-feldspar granites: An example from the Poimena Granite, northeastern Tasmania, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackenzie, D.E.; Black, L.P.; Sun, Shensu (Bureau of Mineral Resources, Canberra (Australia))

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lottah Granite is a composite pluton of tin mineralized strongly peraluminous alkali-feldspar granite which intrudes the Poimena Granite, a major component of the mid-Devonian Blue Tier Batholith of northeastern Tasmania. Earlier workers interpreted the Lottah Granite as a metasomatised differentiate of the Poimena Granite. The Poimena Granite is a slightly peraluminous, felsic, I-type biotite granite which contains restite minerals and shows linear trends on Harker plots, both consistent with restite separation. The mineralogy, chemical variation, and isotopic characteristics of the Lottah Granite are consistent with origin as a magma genetically unrelated to the host granite. The Lottah Granite contains sanidine, albite, topaz, zinnwaldite and other minerals consistent with crystallization from a melt. Furthermore, Rb-Sr isotopic dating indicates that the Lottah Granite was emplaced about 10 Ma after the Poimena Granite, and initial Sr and Nd isotope ratios indicate that the Lottah Granite was derived from a higher-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, higher-{epsilon}Nd source composition. Chemical and mineralogical evolution of the Lottah Granite conform to the experimental behavior of Li-F-rich melts, and indicate a possible crystallization temperature range as extreme as 750-430{degree}C. Many other examples of alkali-feldspar granite, and much of the associated mineralization, are probably also of essentially primary magmatic origin rather than of metasomatic or hydrothermal origin as commonly interpreted. They may also be genetically unrelated to granites with which they are associated.

  2. Test of four stand growth simulators for the northeastern United States. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuler, T.M.; Marquis, D.A.; Ernst, R.L.; Simpson, B.T.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SILVAH, FIBER, NE-TWIGS, and OAKSIM simulators, commonly used in the northeastern United States, were evaluated by comparing predicted stand development with actual stand development records for periods ranging from 15 to 50 years. Results varied with stand parameter, forest type, projection length, and geographic area. Except in the spruce-fir forest type where FIBER stands out as the best simulator, no single simulator is clearly superior to the others for all locations within a forest type. In general, FIBER, NE-TWIGS, and SILVAH performed best in the northern hardwood (beech-birch-maple) forest type: NE-TWIGS and SILVAH performed best in the Allegheny hardwood (cherry-maple) forest type; SILVAH and OAKSIM performed best in the oak-hickory forest type; and SILVAH was most suitable in the transition hardwood (mixture of northern hardwoods and oaks) forest type. The results give growth and yield model users more information for selecting the simulator most suitable for their particular needs. The results also can be used as a diagnostic tool for growth and yield model development.

  3. Cold flow production of crude bitumen at the Burnt Lake Project, northeastern Alberta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeung, K.C. [Suncor, Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The bitumen from the Clearwater Formation of the Cold Lake oil sands deposit in northeastern Alberta, Canada, has been deemed to be too viscous for production without the addition of heat. Since the 1970s, various operators have experimented with cyclic steam stimulation and steamflood. By 1990, cyclic steam injection was the only commercial recovery process in this area. Between 1990 and 1993, Suncor tested the cold flow production of crude bitumen at the Burnt Lake Project. Bitumen and sand were produced together through the use of progressive cavity pumps without the assistance of steam. The initial wells produced at unexpectedly high rates. As the test was expanded to a larger area, the productivity was found to vary significantly. Damage of the shale caprock in some of the initial wells was observed, probably due to sand production and change in in situ stresses. This then caused water influx from the aquifer above the caprock to the oil sands reservoir and prohibited bitumen production. This paper discusses the production performance of the wells, the challenges of cold flow production, and the results of various field research programs undertaken in an attempt to tackle these challenges.

  4. A case study of ultralightweight cementing practices in the Northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, T.D.; Benge, O.G.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wells in the northeastern United States are generally drilled to a depth of from 3,000 to 6,000 ft. They are usually air drilled through several incompetent formations among which are the Marcellus and Coffee shales. Completions in this area are hampered by very low fracture gradients of 0.4 to 0.6 psi/ft, with most of the formations containing a large number of natural fractures. During cementing, pressures in excess of 1,100-psi hydrostatic can result in breakdown of the formation leading to incomplete fillup on the cement job. This paper will discuss the existing completion practices in this area, which include the use of multistage cementing, and the incorporation of cementing baskets and other downhole tools. The current cement systems in use and the problems encountered in using them will also be discussed. Several case histories of new cementing techniques, using ultralightweight foam-cementing systems, will be presented along with the job design used on these wells. Bond logging of the foam-cemented wells creates an array of special problems for the logging companies, due to the ultra-low densities and the high porosities of these special cementing systems. Newly developed techniques for logging these wells will be discussed, along with the bond logs from the case histories.

  5. Implications of ground-water measurements at the Hoe Creek UCG site in northeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.; Raber, E.; Ganow, H.C.; Stone, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) promises to become an important source of synthetic fuels. In an effort to provide timely information concerning the environmental implications of the UCG process, we are conducting investigations in conjunction with the UCG experiments carried out in northeastern Wyoming by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. Cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection were also investigated, using surface and subsurface geotechnical instruments, post-burn coring, and hydraulic head measurements. We have found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. Fortunately, the concentrations of many of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, some of these materials seem likely to remain in the local groundwater, at low concentrations, for several years. We have attempted to interpret our results in terms of concepts that will assist in the development of effective and practicable control technologies.

  6. Depositional setting of the Jurassic Haynesville seismic sequence in the Apalachicola Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, L.M.; Buffler, R.T. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic and well data from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico were used to define the seismic stratigraphy, geologic history, and depositional setting of the Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) Haynesville sequence in the Apalachicola basin. The data show that Haynesville clastic sedimentation updip was coeval with Haynesville carbonate deposition downdip. The regional Jurassic seismic stratigraphic framework includes, in ascending order, the Louann Salt Norphlet-Smackover, Haynesville, and Cotton Valley sequences. In the vicinity of Destin dome, wells have penetrated Haynesville sandstones, shales, and anhydrites. These clastics correlate with low amplitude, low-continuity reflections that characterize the Haynesville over a broad area updip. Similar reflections within the overlying (Tithonian-earliest Berriasian) Cotton Valley clastic sequence make seismic definition of the top Haynesville sequence boundary difficult updip. As Haynesville clastics are replaced by carbonates downdip, a high amplitude reflection marks the top of the sequence. Haynesville carbonates conformably overlie (Oxfordian) Smackover carbonates in the basin center, and the lower sequence boundary cannot be defined where disrupted by growth faults associated with early movement of the (Callovian ) Louann Salt. Sigmoid clinoforms document Haynesville shelf margin development Seismic facies also include oblique clinoforms that prograde eastward into the basin from the Southern Platform and Middle Ground Arch. No wells penetrate this facies. Mapping of the seismic facies and correlation with well data suggest a depositional setting for the Haynesville sequence in which influx of terrigenous clastics probably derived from adjacent land areas to the north and northeast filled a broad lagoon behind a carbonate shelf margin.

  7. Evolution of the Apalachicola basin (northeastern Gulf of Mexico) during the Jurassic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, L.M.; Buffler, R.T. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A grid of multichannel seismic correlated with well data defines four Jurassic seismic sequences in the Apalachicola basin of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These sequences, which developed in response to basin architecture, sea level fluctuations, sediment supply, and salt movement document the depositional history of the basin during the Jurassic. Evaporation of water entering the basin resulted in deposition of the (Callovian ) Louann Salt sequence. The Louann generally lacks internal reflections, except updip where discontinuous parallel-divergent reflections probably represent interbedding of salt with clastics around the basin margin. The updip limit of thick salt coincides with a basement hinge line. The second sequence contains rocks of the Norphlet and Smackover formations. Norphlet clastics were deposited during a sea level rise. As the transgression continued, Oxfordian Smackover carbonates were deposited and upward shoaling occurred as sea level reached a stillstand. Smackover carbonates prograded over a shallow shelf, and buildups occurred over salt structures, basement highs, and basement hinge lines. The sequence thickens locally into growth faults associated with salt movement. During deposition of the Kimmeridgian Haynesville sequence, clastics entered the basin updip and carbonate deposition continued downdip. Growth faulting continued and a prominent shelf margin was established. Coarse fluvial and deltaic sediments of the Tithonian-earliest Berriasian Cotton Valley group comprise the final sequence. The Knowles Limestone records a transgression toward the end of the sequence. Progradation of the Knowles and establishment of a prominent shelf margin set the foundation for development of the overlying Lower Cretaceous margin.

  8. Experience with improved charcoal and wood stoves for households and institutions in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyman, E.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts at promoting more fuel-efficient charcoal stoves to replace traditional charcoal stoves in Kenya offer some lessons for the dissemination of appropriate technologies. This paper looks at the market-based approach which has made the Kenyan charcoal stoves project a success. Trends in woodfuels (wood and charcoal) consumption in Kenya are identified; the traditional technology for charcoal combustion and the upgraded traditional technologies are described; production achievement and the dissemination and promotion strategy used are examined; and a financial and economic analysis is performed with social, health and environmental effects assessed. Other ways to achieve a more favourable balance between woodfuels consumption and supply are then discussed looking at more efficient charcoal kilns and household woodstoves, improved institutional stoves and increased wood production. The replication potential of the Kenya experiment in other countries is also explored. The lessons learnt from the the Kenya experience concern the relationship between technology, choice and delivery systems as they interact with, economic, institutional, and policy factors. In this case, the design work accepted the traditional technology as a starting point which helped ensure widespread acceptance by households. The potential desirability of relying on local artisans to manufacture consumer durables using existing private sector channels to market these goods is also shown. It also highlights the importance of going beyond a laissez-faire approach and supporting training, demonstration, and publicity to faciliate the workings of the private sector. In the Kenyan case, technology choice was relatively unsubsidized and left ot the preferences of consumers.

  9. Measuring Pb bioavailability from household dusts using an in vitro model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, D.P.; McLaughlin, M.J.; Naidu, R.; Smith, L.H.; Maynard, E.J.; Calder, I.C.

    1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite an extensive cleanup program in the Port Pirie region, South Australia, the levels of lead (Pb) in blood of children have been found to exceed the level of concern (10 {micro}g/dL). The ingestion of household dust is a major pathway for elevated blood lead by children in the community. Significant differences in levels of Pb in blood in children were observed in various localities around the smelter. In this study an in vitro test was assessed as one method for determining the bioavailability of Pb in household dust and for predicting levels of Pb in blood of children. The solubility of Pb in the dust decreased significantly as pH of the in vitro mixture increased. Correlation studies with average blood Pb levels of children in the corresponding area and in vitro measures of Pb bioavailability found that the best relationship was with total dust Pb. A significant positive relationship was also found with Pb concentrations determined in the in vitro test at pH 3.0. This suggested that for these dust samples, which all had a similar environmental matrix, the use of the in vitro test was not a better indicator of blood Pb levels in children compared with a total Pb analysis.

  10. A Method for Modeling Household Occupant Behavior to Simulate Residential Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Brandon J [ORNL] [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a statistical method for modeling the behavior of household occupants to estimate residential energy consumption. Using data gathered by the U.S. Census Bureau in the American Time Use Survey (ATUS), actions carried out by survey respondents are categorized into ten distinct activities. These activities are defined to correspond to the major energy consuming loads commonly found within the residential sector. Next, time varying minute resolution Markov chain based statistical models of different occupant types are developed. Using these behavioral models, individual occupants are simulated to show how an occupant interacts with the major residential energy consuming loads throughout the day. From these simulations, the minimum number of occupants, and consequently the minimum number of multiple occupant households, needing to be simulated to produce a statistically accurate representation of aggregate residential behavior can be determined. Finally, future work will involve the use of these occupant models along side residential load models to produce a high-resolution energy consumption profile and estimate the potential for demand response from residential loads.

  11. Recovery and separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karvelas, D.E.; Jody, B.J.; Poykala, J.A. Jr.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.; Arman, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.]|[Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory is conducting research to develop a cost- effective and environmentally acceptable process for the separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances. The process under development has separated individual high purity (greater than 99.5%) acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and high- impact polystyrene (HIPS) from commingled plastics generated by appliance-shredding and metal-recovery operations. The process consists of size-reduction steps for the commingled plastics, followed by a series of gravity-separation techniques to separate plastic materials of different densities. Individual plastics of similar densities, such as ABS and HIPS, are further separated by using a chemical solution. By controlling the surface tension, the density, and the temperature of the chemical solution we are able to selectively float/separate plastics that have different surface energies. This separation technique has proven to be highly effective in recovering high-purity plastics materials from discarded household appliances. A conceptual design of a continuous process to recover high-value plastics from discarded appliances is also discussed. In addition to plastics separation research, Argonne National Laboratory is conducting research to develop cost-effective techniques for improving the mechanical properties of plastics recovered from appliances.

  12. Gender stereotypes of typical and ideal man, woman and person: the impact of role inferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Nancy Deane

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Housekeeping Mai ntenance of home 1. 40 0. 58 2. 01 0. 82 1. 59 1. 00 0. 225 0. 452 -0. 496 -0. 715 -0. 143 0. 305 9. 19 11. 14 20. 71 22. 76 11. 82 16. 67 4. 38 4. 48 10. 81 7. 71 6. 36 4. 05 7. 09 7. 95 4. 43 2. 76 3. 09 3. 90 Note. Higher numbers... sex, F(2, 121)=3. 23, p&. 05, and target role, F(1, 121)=22. 90, p&. 001. Planned comparisons revealed that the typical man was rated as possessing significantly fewer feminine positive traits than the typical woman, F(1, 121)=6. 53, p&. 01...

  13. An Agricultural Economic Survey of Rockwall County, Texas : A Typical Blackland Cotton Farming Area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.)

    1925-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TfXAS AGRICULTURAL fXPfRIMfNT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President BULLETIN NO. 327 February, 1925 DIVISION OF FARM AND RANCH ECONOMICS AN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC SURVEY OF ROCKWALL COUNTY, TEXAS A... Typical Blackland Cotton Farming Area B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS STAFF (As of May 1, 1925) ADMINISTRATION G. N. STROMAN, Ph. D., Agronomist, B. YOUNGBLOOD, M. S., Ph. D., DiTector Cotton Breeding A. B. CONNER, M. S...

  14. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation ManagementMobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Managementtechnology-management, and strategic-marketing lenses to the problem of commercializing H 2 FCVs, other EDVs, and other Mobile

  15. Stratigraphic architecture of the Tonganoxie Paleovalley Fill (Lower Virgilian) in Northeastern Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, H.R. [Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States); Gibling, M.R.; Wightman, W.G. [Dalhousie Univ., Nova Scotia (Canada)] [and others

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lower Pennsylvanian paleovalley-confined sandstones are important petroleum reservoirs in the Midwest. In Kansas, such reservoirs have produced approximately 220 million bbl of oil and 1.7 tcf of gas. Valley-fill successions tend to become muddy upward, but there can be considerable local heterogeneity in which reservoir sandstones pass laterally into muddy sandstones or nonreservoir shales. The lack of understanding of this reservoir heterogeneity can lead to low drilling success rates. The Tonganoxie paleovalley (Upper Pennsylvanian, northeastern Kansas) contains facies very similar to Lower Pennsylvanian (Morrowan) valley fills, and can provide an outcrop- and subsurface-based model of sandstone deposition. The Tonganoxie paleovalley was incised during lowered sea level and filled during the subsequent transgression. Sandstones occur in four distinct architectural elements that were deposited during different phases of transgression. Type I sandstone consists of a belt of sandstone and conglomerate 3-18 m thick and confined to the trunk valley and wider portions of tributary valleys. Type I sandstone consists of amalgamated channel fills, has little or no mud, and has the highest porosity and permeability. The type I sandstone is overlain by estuarine deposits of sandstone (type II sandstones), rippled argillaceous sandstone to sandy mudstone, and coal. Most of the paleovalley was filled during this stage. The type II sandstones are narrow (1.5 km wide) arcuate bodies up to 8 km long and were likely deposited in tidal point bars near the fluvial to tidal transition, are either isolated sandstone bodies or are incised into type I sandstone. Type III sandstone bodies occur at the upstream limits of narrow tributaries and are probably bay-head deltas. Well logs indicate a range of mud content. Type IV sandstone is a thin (3 m) discontinuous sheet of marine sandstone deposited after most of the paleovalley had been filled.

  16. Depositional and subrosional Salina halite-bed terminations in northeastern Ohio are structurally controlled

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coogan, A.H.; Peng, S. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Halite bed-bearing Silurian Salina Group units B through F-4 occur in the subsurface of northeastern Ohio where they have been restudied in a five county (Ashtabula, Geauga, Lake, Portage, Trumbull) area of the eastern interior salt basin at the edge of the Appalachian Basin. Three major factors affect the distributional pattern of the salts. First is the underlying topography, especially the presence of thick (reef-like) Lockport Dolomite over a basement gravity and magnetic high on the west side of the study area. Second is the preferential subsidence along fault zones which bound the depositional limits of some salts, for example the southern B salt edge at the Suffield Fault Zone. Third is the patterned removal of salt in the subsurface in northeast Ashtabula County along northwest trending fault zones. The F-2, F-1 and D salts progressively disappear to the northeast in Ashtabula County, toward Lake Erie and the Pennsylvania border in northwest trending bands which coincide with identified lineaments in adjacent Pennsylvania, e.g. the Home-Gallizen lineament or are subparallel to it and similar ones e.g. the Blaisville-Broad Top and Tyrone-Mount Union lineaments. The cause of the progressively deeper removal of halite beds from the Salina F-2, F-1, D and B units can be attributed to fresh or brackish water influx and subrosion below the sub-Oriskany (Acadian) unconformity. No salt beds are found shallower than 300 feet below the Oriskany horizon base. It appears that maps of Salina salt beds reflect penecontemporaneous Paleozoic structural (hence topographic) features and hydrologic regimes.

  17. Sedimentary tectonic patterns associated with Middle Devonian Tioga and Kawkawlin Tuffs in Northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennison, J.M.; Textoris, D.A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of lithofacies maps of northeastern United States within 2 m below and above the the Tioga Ash middle coarse zone in the Appalachian and Illinois basins and the equivalent Kawkawlin Bentonite in the Michigan basin reveals a pronounced sea level rise about 0.3 m stratigraphically beneath the Tioga middle coarse zone. Removing effects of the rise yields a facies residual indicating these sedimentary tectonic patterns during the volcanic eruption: (1) Tioga volcanic source present near Fredericksburg, Virginia, on the 38th Parallel zone of the North American plate, now hidden beneath the Blue Ridge crystalline overthrust, (2) the Acadian orogeny beginning with rise of low-grade metamorphic terrane near the volcanic center, (3) Browns Mountain growth anticline extending southward across present Valley and Ridge outcrops, (4) east-northeast-trending hinge line controlling Onondaga pinncacle reefs in New York and Pennsylvania, (5) western Rome trough boundary in northwestern West Virginia subsiding to the east, (6) tectonically negative Rome trough in eastern Kentucky, (7) Waverly arch reactivating in southern Ohio, (8) Marcellus Shale initially prograding from a source near Fredericksburg, Virginia (only later did New England Acadian uplift become the dominant source of siliciclastics reaching New York), (9) dolomite flat of Indiana and Illinois receiving normal marine wafers from the south, (10) restriction of Tioga to southeastern Illinois basin, suggesting only that part of the basin was tectonically negative, and (11) apparent absence of Kawkawlin tuff in extreme eastern Michigan basin, suggesting a margin emergent as sabkha dolomite and evaporites, with more normal marine waters entering across the downwarped Chatham Sag.

  18. Impacts of Climate Conditions and Adaptations on Agricultural Output and Household Income in Inner Mongolia, China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wenjuan

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change has imposed significant challenges on global dryland systems. In this dissertation, Inner Mongolia, a typical dryland system in the world’s largest developing county, China, was selected as an example to ...

  19. An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Kimberly; Dale, Larry; Fujita, K. Sydny

    2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes our study of the price elasticity of demand for home appliances, including refrigerators, clothes washers, and dishwashers. In the context of increasingly stringent appliance standards, we are interested in what kind of impact the increased manufacturing costs caused by higher efficiency requirements will have on appliance sales. We begin with a review of existing economics literature describing the impact of economic variables on the sale of durable goods.We then describe the market for home appliances and changes in this market over the past 20 years, performing regression analysis on the shipments of home appliances and relevant economic variables including changes to operating cost and household income. Based on our analysis, we conclude that the demand for home appliances is price inelastic.

  20. Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part of the total energy consumed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    consumption and for about 50% of the total electricity consumption [1]. Therefore it is important to explore one of them. The interviewees preferred receiving electricity consumption feedback from a bill, a web1 Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part

  1. Changing Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages and Tobacco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in energy consumption. Patterns of Consumption--Historic Trends Electricity & Gas We'll start with historicChanging Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages analysis of consumption patterns of different commodities in the U.S. shed light on the consumption

  2. Water availability at farm household level a case study in the Nyando district in South-Western Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water availability at farm household level ­ a case study in the Nyando district in South of Crop Production Ecology Uppsala 2011 Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences #12;2 Water: Women collecting water in a well, Onjiko, Kenya. Photo: Erika Näslund Keywords: Water availability

  3. The value of bushmeat and other wild foods to rural households living in extreme poverty in Democratic Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    The value of bushmeat and other wild foods to rural households living in extreme poverty between poverty and the use of wild foods, namely bushmeat, fish and wild plants, within a Congolese poverty (income below US$1 per capita per day). Our analyses indicate that wild foods play a small role

  4. Workshop on Demand Response, Ballerup, 7. February 2006 www.risoe.dk Curtailment of Household Equipments A Danish Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workshop on Demand Response, Ballerup, 7. February 2006 www.risoe.dk Curtailment of Household Frame · 189 Respondents · Power consumption: 5000 ­ 6000 kWh per year · No electrical heating · Products hours 3 hours 3 hours Question 9 Question 10 Question 13 Price(DKK/kWh) 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% Response

  5. Residential energy use and conservation in Venezuela: Results and implications of a household survey in Caracas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Ketoff, A.; Masera, O.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the final report of a study of residential energy use in Caracas, the capital of Venezuela. It contains the findings of a household energy-use survey held in Caracas in 1988 and examines options for introducing energy conservation measures in the Venezuelan residential sector. Oil exports form the backbone of the Venezuelan economy. Improving energy efficiency in Venezuela will help free domestic oil resources that can be sold to the rest of the world. Energy conservation will also contribute to a faster recovery of the economy by reducing the need for major investments in new energy facilities, allowing the Venezuelan government to direct its financial investments towards other areas of development. Local environmental benefits will constitute an important additional by-product of implementing energy-efficiency policies in Venezuela. Caracas`s residential sector shows great potential for energy conservation. The sector is characterized by high saturation levels of major appliances, inefficiency of appliances available in the market, and by careless patterns of energy use. Household energy use per capita average 6.5 GJ/per year which is higher than most cities in developing countries; most of this energy is used for cooking. Electricity accounts for 41% of all energy use, while LPG and natural gas constitute the remainder. Specific options for inducing energy conservation and energy efficiency in Caracas`s residential sector include energy-pricing policies, fuel switching, particularly from electricity to gas, improving the energy performance of new appliances and customer information. To ensure the accomplishment of an energy-efficiency strategy, a concerted effort by energy users, manufacturers, utility companies, government agencies, and research institutions will be needed.

  6. Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and high temperature cooling_REHVA Guidebook, Federation ofEvaluation of cooling performance of thermally activatedsystem with evaporative cooling source for typical United

  7. The construction manager is typically selected at the beginning of the design process. The Guaranteed Maximum Price is usually prepared based on 50% Construction Documents. In these typical cases the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sura, Philip

    The construction manager is typically selected at the beginning of the design process. The Guaranteed Maximum Price is usually prepared based on 50% Construction Documents. In these typical cases and 50% Construction Documents. The deliverable at 50% Construction Documents includes the Guaranteed

  8. Weather data analysis based on typical weather sequence analysis. Application: energy building simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mathieu; Garde, Francois; Boyer, Harry

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In building studies dealing about energy efficiency and comfort, simulation software need relevant weather files with optimal time steps. Few tools generate extreme and mean values of simultaneous hourly data including correlation between the climatic parameters. This paper presents the C++ Runeole software based on typical weather sequences analysis. It runs an analysis process of a stochastic continuous multivariable phenomenon with frequencies properties applied to a climatic database. The database analysis associates basic statistics, PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and automatic classifications. Different ways of applying these methods will be presented. All the results are stored in the Runeole internal database that allows an easy selection of weather sequences. The extreme sequences are used for system and building sizing and the mean sequences are used for the determination of the annual cooling loads as proposed by Audrier-Cros (Audrier-Cros, 1984). This weather analysis was tested with the datab...

  9. Thermal performance of typical light frame walls with reflective surface insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.G. (Jim Walter Research Corp., St. Petersburg, FL (US)); Riskowski, G.L.; Christianson, L.L. (Agricultural Engineering Dept., Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (US))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of tests were conducted in a guarded hotbox to evaluate the thermal performance (R-value) of wall constructions typical of light-frame buildings that are commonly used in agricultural applications. The systems were insulated with either a commercially available foil-faced bubble pack material (FFBP) or foil-faced polyisocyanurate (PIR) foam board. Tests were conducted under two different temperature conditions, chosen to be representative of a midwestern winter and summer. This paper reports temperatures of the surfaces bounding the reflective airspaces measured and the R-value calculated. These data were used in the ASHRAE series/parallel calculations and the resultant R-value was compared to the measured R-value. Agreement was usually better than 10%.

  10. Can electron by Compton scattering be considered as a typical detector of the photon propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladan Pankovic; Darko Kapor; Miodrag Krmar

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we consider a possibility that Compton scattering can be considered as a typical measurement (detection) procedure within which electron behaves as the measuring apparatus, i.e. detector (pointer) of the propagation of the photon as the measured object. It represents a realistic variant of the old gendanken (though) experiment (discussed by Einstein, Bohr, Dirac, Feynman) of the interaction between the single photon as the measured object and a movable mirror as the measuring apparatus, i.e. detector (pointer). Here collapse by measurement is successfully modeled by spontaneous (non-dynamical) unitary symmetry (superposition) breaking (effective hiding) representing an especial case of the spontaneous (non-dynamical) breaking (effective hiding) of the dynamical symmetries. All this is full agreement with all existing experimental data and represents the definitive solution of the old problem of "micro" theoretical foundation of measurement or old problem of the foundation of quantum mechanics as a local (luminal) physical theory.

  11. Ecophysiological Responses of C3 Forbs and C4 Grasses to Drought and Rain on a Tallgrass Prairie in Northeastern Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Craig E.; Harris, Fred S.; Norman, Frank J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecophysiological responses to drought and a 3-cm rain were measured in seven C3 forb and five C4 grass species on a tallgrass prairie in northeastern Kansas. In general, midday leaf water potentials and conductances increased after rain to a greater...

  12. 2D versus 1D ground-motion modelling for the Friuli region, north-eastern Italy1 W. Imperatori1, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2D versus 1D ground-motion modelling for the Friuli region, north-eastern Italy1 2 W. Imperatori1 and CO2 Storage Security Division, BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, 450607 Orléans Cedex 2, France.8 9 affects ground motions, particularly in terms of peak ground velocity (PGV). The decay of PGV14

  13. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gent, Janneane F., E-mail: janneane.gent@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Kezik, Julie M., E-mail: julie.colburn@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Hill, Melissa E., E-mail: melissa.hill@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Tsai, Eling, E-mail: tsai.umiami@gmail.com [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)] [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Li, De-Wei, E-mail: DeWei.Li@ct.gov [Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory, 153 Cook Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)] [Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory, 153 Cook Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States); Leaderer, Brian P., E-mail: brian.leaderer@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g and Can f 1>1.2 {mu}g/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 {mu}g/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes were sampled for these allergens and asthma morbidity monitored during the subsequent month. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children exposed and sensitized to Penicillium, Der p, Fel d, Can f risk increased asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These children might benefit from targeted intervention strategies.

  14. Status of not-in-kind refrigeration technologies for household space conditioning, water heating and food refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, Pradeep [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of the next generation not-in-kind technologies to replace conventional vapor compression refrigeration technology for household applications. Such technologies are sought to provide energy savings or other environmental benefits for space conditioning, water heating and refrigeration for domestic use. These alternative technologies include: thermoacoustic refrigeration, thermoelectric refrigeration, thermotunneling, magnetic refrigeration, Stirling cycle refrigeration, pulse tube refrigeration, Malone cycle refrigeration, absorption refrigeration, adsorption refrigeration, and compressor driven metal hydride heat pumps. Furthermore, heat pump water heating and integrated heat pump systems are also discussed due to their significant energy saving potential for water heating and space conditioning in households. The paper provides a snapshot of the future R&D needs for each of the technologies along with the associated barriers. Both thermoelectric and magnetic technologies look relatively attractive due to recent developments in the materials and prototypes being manufactured.

  15. The evolving price of household LED lamps: Recent trends and historical comparisons for the US market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Brian F.; Ngo, Allison T.; Alstone, Andrea L.; Fisseha, Kibret S.

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, household LED light bulbs (LED A lamps) have undergone a dramatic price decline. Since late 2011, we have been collecting data, on a weekly basis, for retail offerings of LED A lamps on the Internet. The resulting data set allows us to track the recent price decline in detail. LED A lamp prices declined roughly exponentially with time in 2011-2014, with decline rates of 28percent to 44percent per year depending on lumen output, and with higher-lumen lamps exhibiting more rapid price declines. By combining the Internet price data with publicly available lamp shipments indices for the US market, it is also possible to correlate LED A lamp prices against cumulative production, yielding an experience curve for LED A lamps. In 2012-2013, LED A lamp prices declined by 20-25percent for each doubling in cumulative shipments. Similar analysis of historical data for other lighting technologies reveals that LED prices have fallen significantly more rapidly with cumulative production than did their technological predecessors, which exhibited a historical decline of 14-15percent per doubling of production.

  16. LCA for household waste management when planning a new urban settlement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slagstad, Helene, E-mail: helene.slagstad@ntnu.no [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Brattebo, Helge [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Household waste management of a new carbon neutral settlement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EASEWASTE as a LCA tool to compare different centralised and decentralised solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental benefit or close to zero impact in most of the categories. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper and metal recycling important for the outcome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the challenges of waste prevention planning. - Abstract: When planning for a new urban settlement, industrial ecology tools like scenario building and life cycle assessment can be used to assess the environmental quality of different infrastructure solutions. In Trondheim, a new greenfield settlement with carbon-neutral ambitions is being planned and five different scenarios for the waste management system of the new settlement have been compared. The results show small differences among the scenarios, however, some benefits from increased source separation of paper and metal could be found. The settlement should connect to the existing waste management system of the city, and not resort to decentralised waste treatment or recovery methods. However, as this is an urban development project with ambitious goals for lifestyle changes, effort should be put into research and initiatives for proactive waste prevention and reuse issues.

  17. Influence of assumptions about household waste composition in waste management LCAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slagstad, Helene, E-mail: helene.slagstad@ntnu.no [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Brattebo, Helge [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainty in waste composition of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systematically changed waste composition in a constructed waste management system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste composition important for the results of accounting LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust results for comparative LCA. - Abstract: This article takes a detailed look at an uncertainty factor in waste management LCA that has not been widely discussed previously, namely the uncertainty in waste composition. Waste composition is influenced by many factors; it can vary from year to year, seasonally, and with location, for example. The data publicly available at a municipal level can be highly aggregated and sometimes incomplete, and performing composition analysis is technically challenging. Uncertainty is therefore always present in waste composition. This article performs uncertainty analysis on a systematically modified waste composition using a constructed waste management system. In addition the environmental impacts of several waste management strategies are compared when applied to five different cities. We thus discuss the effect of uncertainty in both accounting LCA and comparative LCA. We found the waste composition to be important for the total environmental impact of the system, especially for the global warming, nutrient enrichment and human toxicity via water impact categories.

  18. Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Beverly; Coleman, Beverly K.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Destaillats, Hugo; Nazaroff, William W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) data from a series of small-chamber experiments in which terpene-rich vapors from household products were combined with ozone under conditions analogous to product use indoors. Reagents were introduced into a continuously ventilated 198 L chamber at steady rates. Consistently, at the time of ozone introduction, nucleation occurred exhibiting behavior similar to atmospheric events. The initial nucleation burst and growth was followed by a period in which approximately stable particle levels were established reflecting a balance between new particle formation, condensational growth, and removal by ventilation. Airborne particles were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, 10 to 400 nm) in every experiment and with an optical particle counter (OPC, 0.1 to 2.0 ?m) in a subset. Parameters for a three-mode lognormal fit to the size distribution at steady state were determined for each experiment. Increasing the supply ozone level increased the steady-state mass concentration and yield of SOA from each product tested. Decreasing the air-exchange rate increased the yield. The steady-state fine-particle mass concentration (PM1.1) ranged from 10 to> 300 mu g m-3 and yields ranged from 5percent to 37percent. Steady-state nucleation rates and SOA mass formation rates were on the order of 10 cm-3 s-1 and 10 mu g m-3 min-1, respectively.

  19. Typical atmospheric aerosol behavior at the Cherenkov Telescope Array candidate sites in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piacentini, Rubén D; Micheletti, María I; Salum, Graciela M; Maya, Javier; Mancilla, Alexis; García, Beatriz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosols from natural and antropogenic sources are one of the atmospheric components that have the largest spacial-temporal variability, depending on the type (land or ocean) surface, human activity and climatic conditions (mainly temperature and wind). Since Cherenkov photons generated by the incidence of a primary ultraenergetic cosmic gamma photon have a spectral intensity distribution concentrated in the UV and visible ranges [Hillas AM. Space Science Reviews, 75, 17-30, 1996], it is important to know the aerosol concentration and its contribution to atmospheric radiative transfer. We present results of this concentration measured in typical rather calm (not windy) days at San Antonio de los Cobres (SAC) and El Leoncito/CASLEO proposed Argentinean Andes range sites for the placement of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). In both places, the aerosol concentration has a peak in the 2.5-5.0$\\mu$m range of the mean aerosol diameter and a very low mean total concentration of 0.097$\\mu$g/m$^3$ (0.365$\\mu$g/m$^...

  20. LBB evaluation for a typical Japanese PWR primary loop by using the US NRC approved methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swamy, S.A.; Bhowmick, D.C.; Prager, D.E. [Westinghouse Nuclear Technology Division, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regulatory requirements for postulated pipe ruptures have changed significantly since the first nuclear plants were designed. The Leak-Before-Break (LBB) methodology is now accepted as a technically justifiable approach for eliminating postulation of double-ended guillotine breaks (DEGB) in high energy piping systems. The previous pipe rupture design requirements for nuclear power plant applications are responsible for all the numerous and massive pipe whip restraints and jet shields installed for each plant. This results in significant plant congestion, increased labor costs and radiation dosage for normal maintenance and inspection. Also the restraints increase the probability of interference between the piping and supporting structures during plant heatup, thereby potentially impacting overall plant reliability. The LBB approach to eliminate postulating ruptures in high energy piping systems is a significant improvement to former regulatory methodologies, and therefore, the LBB approach to design is gaining worldwide acceptance. However, the methods and criteria for LBB evaluation depend upon the policy of individual country and significant effort continues towards accomplishing uniformity on a global basis. In this paper the historical development of the U.S. LBB criteria will be traced and the results of an LBB evaluation for a typical Japanese PWR primary loop applying U.S. NRC approved methods will be presented. In addition, another approach using the Japanese LBB criteria will be shown and compared with the U.S. criteria. The comparison will be highlighted in this paper with detailed discussion.

  1. Cost comparison between private and public collection of residual household waste: Multiple case studies in the Flemish region of Belgium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, R., E-mail: ray.jacobsen@ugent.be [Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Buysse, J., E-mail: j.buysse@ugent.be [Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Gellynck, X., E-mail: xavier.gellynck@ugent.be [Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The goal is to compare collection costs for residual household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have clustered all municipalities in order to find mutual comparable pairs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each pair consists of one private and one public operating waste collection program. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All cases show that private service has lower costs than public service. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipalities were contacted to identify the deeper causes for the waste management program. - Abstract: The rising pressure in terms of cost efficiency on public services pushes governments to transfer part of those services to the private sector. A trend towards more privatizing can be noticed in the collection of municipal household waste. This paper reports the findings of a research project aiming to compare the cost between the service of private and public collection of residual household waste. Multiple case studies of municipalities about the Flemish region of Belgium were conducted. Data concerning the year 2009 were gathered through in-depth interviews in 2010. In total 12 municipalities were investigated, divided into three mutual comparable pairs with a weekly and three mutual comparable pairs with a fortnightly residual waste collection. The results give a rough indication that in all cases the cost of private service is lower than public service in the collection of household waste. Albeit that there is an interest in establishing whether there are differences in the costs and service levels between public and private waste collection services, there are clear difficulties in establishing comparisons that can be made without having to rely on a large number of assumptions and corrections. However, given the cost difference, it remains the responsibility of the municipalities to decide upon the service they offer their citizens, regardless the cost efficiency: public or private.

  2. The economics of US greenhouse gas emissions reduction policy : assessing distributional effects across households and the 50 United States using a recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Look, Wesley Allen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The political economy of US climate policy has revolved around state- and district- level distributional economics, and to a lesser extent household-level distribution questions. Many politicians and analysts have suggested ...

  3. Collection and representation of GIS data to aid household water treatment and safe storage technology implementation in the northern region of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanCalcar, Jenny E. (Jenny Elizabeth)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, a start-up social business called Pure Home Water (PHW) was begun in Ghana to promote and sell household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) technologies. The original aim of the company was to offer a variety ...

  4. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Managementtechnology-management, and strategic-marketing lenses to the problem of commercializing H 2 FCVs, other EDVs, and other Mobile

  5. Simulation of household in-home and transportation energy use : an integrated behavioral model for estimating energy consumption at the neighborhood scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Feifei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Household in-home activities and out-of-home transportation are two major sources of urban energy consumption. In light of China's rapid urbanization and income growth, changing lifestyles and consumer patterns - evident ...

  6. Critical Path Method (CPM) Scheduling, Basic Engineering, and Project Approach for Typical Substation Engineering-Procurement-Construction (EPC) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamir, Dewan R.

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Field Project provides an overview of the typical substation Engineering-Procurement-Construction (EPC) project delivery method, the work breakdown structure, activities and sequences in the Critical Path Method (CPM) schedule, basic substation...

  7. Passive gust load alleviation through bend-twist coupling of composite beams on typical commercial airplane wings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauthier Perron, Sébastien

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of bend-twist coupling on typical commercial airplane wings are evaluated. An analytical formulation of the orthotropic box beam bending stiffness matrix is derived by combining Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and ...

  8. A life cycle approach to the management of household food waste - A Swedish full-scale case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A., E-mail: anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Department of Chemical Engineering, Box 124, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Lund University, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Department of Chemical Engineering, Box 124, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Lund University, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Highlights: > The comparison of three different methods for management of household food waste show that anaerobic digestion provides greater environmental benefits in relation to global warming potential, acidification and ozone depilation compared to incineration and composting of food waste. Use of produced biogas as car fuel provides larger environmental benefits compared to a use of biogas for heat and power production. > The use of produced digestate from the anaerobic digestion as substitution for chemical fertilizer on farmland provides avoidance of environmental burdens in the same ratio as the substitution of fossil fuels with produced biogas. > Sensitivity analyses show that results are highly sensitive to assumptions regarding the environmental burdens connected to heat and energy supposedly substituted by the waste treatment. - Abstract: Environmental impacts from incineration, decentralised composting and centralised anaerobic digestion of solid organic household waste are compared using the EASEWASTE LCA-tool. The comparison is based on a full scale case study in southern Sweden and used input-data related to aspects such as source-separation behaviour, transport distances, etc. are site-specific. Results show that biological treatment methods - both anaerobic and aerobic, result in net avoidance of GHG-emissions, but give a larger contribution both to nutrient enrichment and acidification when compared to incineration. Results are to a high degree dependent on energy substitution and emissions during biological processes. It was seen that if it is assumed that produced biogas substitute electricity based on Danish coal power, this is preferable before use of biogas as car fuel. Use of biogas for Danish electricity substitution was also determined to be more beneficial compared to incineration of organic household waste. This is a result mainly of the use of plastic bags in the incineration alternative (compared to paper bags in the anaerobic) and the use of biofertiliser (digestate) from anaerobic treatment as substitution of chemical fertilisers used in an incineration alternative. Net impact related to GWP from the management chain varies from a contribution of 2.6 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/household and year if incineration is utilised, to an avoidance of 5.6 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/household and year if choosing anaerobic digestion and using produced biogas as car fuel. Impacts are often dependent on processes allocated far from the control of local decision-makers, indicating the importance of a holistic approach and extended collaboration between agents in the waste management chain.

  9. Ecological niche modeling and differentiation of populations of *Triatoma brasiliensis* Neiva, 1911, the most important Chagas disease vector in northeastern Brazil (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Jane; Peterson, A. Townsend; Beard, C. Ben

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ECOLOGIC NICHE MODELING AND DIFFERENTIATION OF POPULATIONS OF TRIATOMA BRASILIENSIS NEIVA, 1911, THE MOST IMPORTANT CHAGAS’ DISEASE VECTOR IN NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL (HEMIPTERA, REDUVIIDAE, TRIATOMINAE) JANE COSTA, A. TOWNSEND PETERSON, AND C. BEN BEARD...– 404. 2. Costa J, Almeida CE, Dotson E, Lins A, Vinhaes M, Silveira AC, Beard CB, 2001. Domiciliary surveillance of Triatoma brasil- iensis (Hemiptera-Reduviidae-Triatominae). Mem Inst Os- waldo Cruz (Submitted). 3. Silveira AC, Vinhaes MC, 1999...

  10. Local attitudes, knowledge and values regarding natural resource use in the range of the Maroon-fronted Parrot in northeastern Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madero-Farias, Alma Alida

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Maroon-Fronted Parrot in Northeastern Mexico. (August 2000) Alma Alida Madero-Farias, I. A. Z, , Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Mexico. Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Jane M. Packard New ecosystem management policies... while studying. That allowed me to finish my degree and to fund this project. From the Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, I am grateful to Dr. Irma Gomez from the Graduate School in Administration and Business Management...

  11. Career Options for MBA Graduates An MBA graduate typically works in upper management positions with small and large corporations or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Career Options for MBA Graduates An MBA graduate typically works in upper management positions with small and large corporations or nonprofit organizations. Managers are needed in all businesses. The type of job often depends on prior work experience and elective courses taken in the MBA program. Popular job

  12. Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical Intra-oceanic Arc1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical at Dallas, Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083-0688, USA A B S T R A C T Major element compositions of glass of these lavas reflects accumulation of plagioclase. Glass inclusions also show the common occurrence of felsic

  13. Proc. IEEE PowerTech, Bucharest, June 2009. 1 Abstract-Power flow studies are typically used to determine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    Proc. IEEE PowerTech, Bucharest, June 2009. 1 Abstract-Power flow studies are typically used on the use of optimization techniques and worst-case scenario analysis. The application of these techniques assessment), thus allowing to evaluate the level of confidence of power flow studies. These algorithms should

  14. BS in Environmental Science: Typical Program of Study1 4 year (2011 Catalog) Fall Quarter Winter Quarter Spring Quarter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, John

    BS in Environmental Science: Typical Program of Study1 ­ 4 year (2011 Catalog) Fall Quarter Sciences (5) Core (5)4 ENSC 100Introduction to Environmental Science (2)5 Core (5) Sophomore BIOL) 1 In order to earn a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science, a student must complete 180

  15. Simulation of Control Options for HVAC Management of a Typical Office Julien CAILLET julien.caillet@mines-paristech.fr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Simulation of Control Options for HVAC Management of a Typical Office Building. Julien CAILLET thermal comfort and to reduce energy consumption of buildings. Among defect correction, HVAC control appears as a way of significant improvement. HVAC control is examined by using a dynamic simulation

  16. SIMULATION OF A TYPICAL HOUSE IN THE REGION OF ANTANANARIVO, MADAGASCAR DETERMINATION OF PASSIVE SOLUTIONS USING LOCAL MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SIMULATION OF A TYPICAL HOUSE IN THE REGION OF ANTANANARIVO, MADAGASCAR DETERMINATION OF PASSIVE union ABSTRACT This paper deals with new proposals for the design of passive solutions adapted use raw wood to warm the poorly designed houses. This leads to a large scale deforestation

  17. Source Contribution Analysis of Surface Particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Concentrations in Northeastern Asia by Source-receptor Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inomata, Yayoi; Kajino, Mizuo; Sato, Keiichi; Ohara, Toshimasa; Kurokawa, Jun-Ichi; Ueda, Hiromasa; Tang, Ning; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi; Akimoto, Hajime

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed the sourceereceptor relationships for particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in northeastern Asia using an aerosol chemical transport model. The model successfully simulated the observed concentrations. In Beijing (China) benzo[a]pyren (BaP) concentrations are due to emissions from its own domain. In Noto, Oki and Tsushima (Japan), transboundary transport from northern China (>40°N, 40-60%) and central China (30-40°N, 10-40%) largely influences BaP concentrations from winter to spring, whereas the relative contribution from central China is dominant (90%) in Hedo. In the summer, the contribution from Japanese domestic sources increases (40-80%) at the 4 sites. Contributions from Japan and Russia are additional source of BaP over the northwestern Pacific Ocean in summer. The contribution rates for the concentrations from each domain are different among PAH species depending on their particulate phase oxidation rates. Reaction with O3 on particulate surfaces may be an important component of the PAH oxidation processes.

  18. Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg: depositional model for northeastern De Soto salt basin, eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemmer, D.A.; Reagan, R.L.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available well control, seismic reflection geometries, and seismic modeling suggest the interpretation of a Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg in the northeastern De Soto salt basin. Ranging in thickness from less than 100 ft to nearly 1000 ft, the Norphlet erg encompasses an area of approximately 700 mi/sup 2/. Separated from the major gas accumulation in the Norphlet in the Mobile Bay area by the offshore extension of the Pensacola arch, the Norphlet erg appears to be oriented transverse to the axis of the De Soto salt basin. Seismic signatures for the Smackover carbonate, Norphlet sand, and Louann Salt intervals are investigated using synthetic seismograms generated from six wells in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. General characteristics about the reflection coefficients from the major units in the interval are noted. The reflection coefficient information and synthetic seismograms are used to interpret seismic data on a regional basis. Two-dimensional, vertical-incidence, ray-trace modeling of the seismic data is done to aid the interpretation on a detailed basis. Interpreted Norphlet sandstone thicknesses and Louann Salt structures are combined to support the Norphlet Formation sand erg hypothesis.

  19. Linking Household Food Inventories with Dietary Recalls to Examine the Association between Nutrient Availability and Dietary Intake among Mexican-origin Children who Reside in Texas Border Region Colonias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Jennifer Becker

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between household food inventories (HFI) and dietary recalls among Mexican-origin children (ages 6-11 years old) who reside in Texas border region colonias. Household food availability is a...

  20. Estimating the impact of the 'digital switchover' on disposal of WEEE at household waste recycling centres in England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ongondo, F.O. [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Lanchester Building, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Williams, I.D., E-mail: idw@soton.ac.uk [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Lanchester Building, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Keynes, S. [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Lanchester Building, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Hampshire County Council (HCC) as a case study, this paper evaluates and discusses the estimated impacts of the so-called digital switchover (DSO) (scheduled for 2012 in Hampshire) on Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs) in England and the UK. Two public surveys of Hampshire residents were used to collect data on their preparedness for and awareness of the switchover and its implications. The survey also sought to establish the quantities of televisions (TVs) and TV related devices that are ready for the DSO. The quantities of TV and related devices that are likely to be disposed via HCC's collection network have been established and compared to the County's current handling capacities for waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE). Best and worst case potential net disposal scenarios have been established and the latter compared to Government projections. In addition, the potential environmental, logistical, financial and legal impacts of the WEEE arising as a consequence of the switchover have been identified and discussed. The results indicate that the majority of TVs both in Hampshire and the UK are digital ready and that awareness of the switchover is high. In contrast, most recording devices in Hampshire are not ready for the DSO. Awareness of the timeframe of the event remains modest however and about half of Hampshire households were not aware that TV recording devices will be affected by the switchover. A significant proportion of waste TVs and related equipment would be taken to HWRCs in contrast to smaller items such as remote controls that would more likely be disposed with normal household waste. Projected figures for the DSO year show that if Hampshire maintained its current collection capacity for WEEE it would experience a handling shortfall of around {approx}100 K for TVs and recording devices, respectively. The most important finding of the study is that the UK Government may have substantially underestimated the quantities of TV and related devices that will be disposed during the switchover. The potential impacts for local and national WEEE management have been discussed. The paper concludes by making recommendations to address identified issues.

  1. Separate collection of household food waste for anaerobic degradation - Comparison of different techniques from a systems perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A., E-mail: Anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four modern and innovative systems for household food waste collection are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct emissions and resource use were based on full-scale data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conservation of nutrients/energy content over the system was considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systems with high energy/nutrient recovery are most environmentally beneficial. - Abstract: Four systems for household food waste collection are compared in relation the environmental impact categories eutrophication potential, acidification potential, global warming potential as well as energy use. Also, a hotspot analysis is performed in order to suggest improvements in each of the compared collection systems. Separate collection of household food waste in paper bags (with and without drying prior to collection) with use of kitchen grinders and with use of vacuum system in kitchen sinks were compared. In all cases, food waste was used for anaerobic digestion with energy and nutrient recovery in all cases. Compared systems all resulted in net avoidance of assessed environmental impact categories; eutrophication potential (-0.1 to -2.4 kg NO{sub 3}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), acidification potential (-0.4 to -1.0 kg SO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), global warming potential (-790 to -960 kg CO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste) and primary energy use (-1.7 to -3.6 GJ/ton food waste). Collection with vacuum system results in the largest net avoidance of primary energy use, while disposal of food waste in paper bags for decentralized drying before collection result in a larger net avoidance of global warming, eutrophication and acidification. However, both these systems not have been taken into use in large scale systems yet and further investigations are needed in order to confirm the outcomes from the comparison. Ranking of scenarios differ largely if considering only emissions in the foreground system, indicating the importance of taking also downstream emissions into consideration when comparing different collection systems. The hot spot identification shows that losses of organic matter in mechanical pretreatment as well as tank connected food waste disposal systems and energy in drying and vacuum systems reply to the largest impact on the results in each system respectively.

  2. First waste-to-energy power station put into operation in Vietnam has successfully produced electricity from household and industrial waste as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    electricity from household and industrial waste as a newly-generated power supply has come online, its average cost per watt would be about half the price of electricity produced by other plants with the national electricity grid. On Wednesday, August 3, the Ho Chi Minh City Urban Environment Management

  3. Contaminant distributions at typical U.S. uranium milling facilities and their effect on remedial action decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamp, S. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office; Jackson, T.J. [Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dotson, P.W. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past operations at uranium processing sites throughout the US have resulted in local contamination of soils and ground water by radionuclides, toxic metals, or both. Understanding the origin of contamination and how the constituents are distributed is a basic element for planning remedial action decisions. This report describes the radiological and nonradiological species found in ground water at a typical US uranium milling facility. The report will provide the audience with an understanding of the vast spectrum of contaminants that must be controlled in planning solutions to the long-term management of these waste materials.

  4. Measured piping and component heat losses from a typical SFBP (Solar in Federal Buildings Program) solar system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francetic, J.S.; Robinson, K.S.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent comprehensive monitoring of solar energy systems has indicated that heat losses from system piping and components are much higher than originally expected. Theoretical analyses conducted at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) predict that operating plus standby (during shutdown) heat losses from a typical solar system could equal up to one-third of the total gross solar energy collected by the system. Detailed heat loss experiments were conducted on a Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP)-monitored site to identify and quantify actual piping, component, and thermosiphon heat losses for a typical day. The selected solar system, SFBP 4008, is a solar space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) system located at the Eisenhower Memorial Museum at Abilene, Kansas. The system has 4200 ft/sup 2/ of collector array located at a considerable distance from the mechanical building. Long lengths of exterior above-ground and buried piping connect the collectors to the mechanical room. Valves and pumps are uninsulated. The heat loss experiments at the Eisenhower site showed that 25% of the energy collected on a summer day was lost in pipes and components. Detailed results are given. 8 refs., 64 figs., 17 tabs.

  5. Energy-Performance-Based Design-Build Process: Strategies for Procuring High-Performance Buildings on Typical Construction Budgets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheib, J.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL experienced a significant increase in employees and facilities on our 327-acre main campus in Golden, Colorado over the past five years. To support this growth, researchers developed and demonstrated a new building acquisition method that successfully integrates energy efficiency requirements into the design-build requests for proposals and contracts. We piloted this energy performance based design-build process with our first new construction project in 2008. We have since replicated and evolved the process for large office buildings, a smart grid research laboratory, a supercomputer, a parking structure, and a cafeteria. Each project incorporated aggressive efficiency strategies using contractual energy use requirements in the design-build contracts, all on typical construction budgets. We have found that when energy efficiency is a core project requirement as defined at the beginning of a project, innovative design-build teams can integrate the most cost effective and high performance efficiency strategies on typical construction budgets. When the design-build contract includes measurable energy requirements and is set up to incentivize design-build teams to focus on achieving high performance in actual operations, owners can now expect their facilities to perform. As NREL completed the new construction in 2013, we have documented our best practices in training materials and a how-to guide so that other owners and owner's representatives can replicate our successes and learn from our experiences in attaining market viable, world-class energy performance in the built environment.

  6. EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127byFormsConsumption 1994 4

  7. Performance Evaluation of A Household Refrigerator Using Cuo Nanoparticle Lubricant Mixture and Various Other Compressor Oils with Different Condenser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreejith. K

    Abstract:- The objective of this paper was to study the performance of household refrigerator having both air and water-cooled condenser, with 0.06 % mass fraction CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture and different types of compressor oils. The experiment was done using HFC134a as the refrigerant, CuO nanoparticles, Polyol-ester oil (POE) oil which is used as the conventional lubricant in the household refrigerator and SUNISO 3GS mineral oil as the lubricant alternatively. The result indicates that the refrigerator performance had improved while using CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture. The performance was also improved when HFC134a/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system was used instead of HFC134a/POE oil system and there was also an enhancement when water-cooled condenser was used instead of the conventional air-cooled condenser on all load conditions. The HFC134a/CuO/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system works normally and safely in the refrigerator. HFC134a/CuO/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system reduced the energy consumption between 12 % and 19 % when compared with the HFC134a/POE oil system and between 9 % and 14 % while working with water-cooled condenser on various load conditions. There was also an enhancement in coefficient of performance (COP) when CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture was used instead of POE oil as the lubricant. The water cooled heat exchanger was designed and the system was modified by retrofitting it, along with the conventional air-cooled condenser by making a bypass line and thus the system can be utilized as a waste heat recovery unit. Experimental result shows that about 200 litres of hot water at a temperature of about 58ºC over a day can be generated. Techno economic analysis shows that the installation cost and running cost of the waste heat recovery system for a day is much lower than that of a conventional

  8. Childhood lead poisoning near abandoned lead mining and smelting areas: A case study of two affected households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moehr, A.D. (Jasper County Health Dept., Webb City, MO (United States)); Roberts, D.W.; Phillips, P.E.; Evans, R.G.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October, 1990 the Missouri Dept. of Health entered a contract with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to conduct an exposure study at the Jasper County, Missouri Superfund Site. The primary concern was exposure to elevated levels of lead and cadmium resulting from previous mining of lead and zinc in the area. Several individuals were found to have elevated lead levels and this article is a case study of two households where children with elevated levels resided. Due to the lowering of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) standard for a level of concern in childhood lead poisoning from 25 [mu]g/dl to 10 [mu]g/dl, many environmental heath personnel may be requested to evaluate exposure routes and give advice regarding risk reduction to families who reside in areas not previously thought to be problematic. Accomplishing this risk reduction may require passage of local ordinances requiring lead abatement, additional training of field personnel, and cooperative work with other public and governmental entities.

  9. Characterizing Walk Trips in communities by Using Data from 2009 National Household Travel Survey, American Community Survey, and Other Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [Macrosys] [Macrosys; Wilson, Daniel W [ORNL] [ORNL; Murakami, Elaine [FHWA USDOT] [FHWA USDOT

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-motorized travel (i.e. walking and bicycling) are of increasing interest to the transportation profession, especially in context with energy consumption, reducing vehicular congestion, urban development patterns, and promotion of healthier life styles. This research project aimed to identify factors impacting the amount of travel for both walk and bike trips at the Census block group or tract level, using several public and private data sources. The key survey of travel behavior is the 2009 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) which had over 87,000 walk trips for persons 16 and over, and over 6000 bike trips for persons 16 and over. The NHTS, in conjunction with the Census Bureau s American Community Survey, street density measures using Census Bureau TIGER, WalkScore , Nielsen Claritas employment estimates, and several other sources were used for this study. Stepwise Logistic Regression modeling techniques as well as Discriminant Analysis were applied using the integrated data set. While the models performed reasonably well for walk trips, travel by bike was abandoned due to sparseness of data. This paper discusses data sources utilized and modeling processes conducted under this study. It also presents a summary of findings and addresses data challenges and lesson-learned from this research effort.

  10. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  11. Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reimers-Arias, Carlos Alberto

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border. (August 2009) Carlos Alberto Reimers-Arias, B.Arch., Universidad Sim?n Bol?var; M.Arch., Mc... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Andrew D. Seidel Robin F. Abrams Committee Members, Marlynn L. May Robert B. Warden Head of Department, Glen T. Mills August 2009 Major Subject: Architecture iii ABSTRACT...

  12. Fermilab Today | Northeastern University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruaryInThe,Michigan State University

  13. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William [Harvard University, SEAS; Foster, David R. [Harvard University, Harvard Forest; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University, OEB

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  14. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

  15. SSI response of a typical shear wall structure. Appendix B. In-structure response spectra comparisons. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.J.; Schewe, E.C.; Maslenikov, O.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this study were two-fold: (1) develop building response calibration factors, i.e., factors which relate best estimate or median level response to responses calculated by selected design procedures. Soil-structure interaction was the phenomenon of interest because significant simplifications are frequently introduced in its treatment; and (2) the second objective can be viewed in the context of a question: what effect does placing an identical structure on different sites and with different foundation conditions have on structure response. The structure selected for this study is a part of the Zion AFT complex. Only the auxiliary, fuel-handling, and diesel generator buildings were studied. This structure is a connected group of shear-wall buildings constructed of reinforced concrete, typical of nuclear power plant structures. The bases of comparison for this study were structure responses: peak in-structure accelerations (27 components), and peak wall forces and moments (111 components). In-structure response spectra were also considered. This appendix contains in-structure response spectra comparisons in detail.

  16. Biodegradable Products Institute is an organization that certifies that so-called "biodegradable" plastic products will safely break down in a typical commercial composting facility. www.bpiworld.org.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    -called "biodegradable" plastic products will safely break down in a typical commercial composting facility. www

  17. Keeping Household Records. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormack, Linda

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transactiwl or enable you to GtbgCk MI others' * prove your ownership of property e define your fegal and financial rights ease management of your home and financi fairs Many papers could and should be di Don't become a junk collector, but don't th... valuable papers either. Know what family r keep where and why. Papers to Keep in Your Home File Certain important papers and records need to refer to or update often are best kept Store them in a &%, convenient @ace. A home business center will help...

  18. Managing Household Ant Pests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, Bastiaan M.

    2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    can tolerate the stings, but some people are very sensitive to fire ant venom and must seek medical attention. Foraging workers may enter a house in search of food, moisture or nesting sites, particularly during hot, dry periods or during floods... System become queen ants in new colonies. They may choose indoor nesting sites if suitable ones are not available outdoors. When she ?nds a nesting site, the queen loses her wings and begins to lay eggs, which hatch into legless, grub-like larvae...

  19. Essays on household finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferman, Bruno

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of three essays. The first chapter studies whether credit demand is sensitive to interest rates, to the prominence of interest rate disclosure, and to nudges. Consumer credit regulations usually ...

  20. Keeping Household Records.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormack, Linda

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Keep these while you own the ve the vehicle is stolen, the title is evidence of ship. Church records Baptismal and confirmat tificates are acceptable evidence of your bi when obtaining a delayed birth certificate. may be kept in home files. re..., allergies, diseases and immunizations for 4 all family members. Also record place and date of birth, doctors, medications and blood type. Insurance pblicies Keep these at home for con- venient referral about your coverage. Tax returns Keep...

  1. Try This: Household Magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending:Schedule FYHousehold Magnets

  2. Reply to N. C. Higgins' comment on origin of alkali-feldspar granites: An example from the Poimena Granite, northeastern Tasmania, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKenzie, D.E.; Sun, S.S.; Black, L.P. (Bureau of Mineral Resources, Canberra (Australia))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper acts as a rebuttal to comments made by other scientists regarding the origin of the Poimena Granite as discussed in an earlier paper by these authors. The Lottah Granite and the enclosing Poimena Granite of northeastern Tasmania represent one of the best documented and most intensely Li-F-rich alkali-feldspar granite and its much more voluminous biotite granite host. The issue under debate is which of the two most generally supported models for the origin of Li-F-Sn granites-magmatic or metasomatic-hydrothermal-best explains the data obtained from the Lottah and Poimena Granites It is not the authors intent to imply that alkali-feldspar granites cannot be generated from granites similar to the Poimena Granite by fractional crystallization: the St. Austell Granite is an excellent example of such a relationship. Nor do the authors intend to imply that metasomatic and hydrothermal processes have not operated at all in the Lottah Granite. They seek rather to demonstrate that magmatic processes alone are capable of generating alkali-feldspar granites enriched in Sn, Li, Rb, F etc. and that such granites need not be genetically linked to spatially associated normal granites. Some of the arguments and data are subsequently presented in this paper.

  3. Recognition and delineation of Paleokarst zones by the use of wireline logs in the bitumen-saturated upper Devonian Grosmont formation of Northeastern Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dembicki, E.A.; Machel, H.G. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation in northeastern Alberta, Canada, is a shallow-marine carbonate platform complex that was subaerially exposed for hundreds of millions of years between the Mississippian(?) and Cretaceous. During this lengthy exposure period, an extensive karst system developed that is characterized by an irregular erosional surface, meter-size (several feet) dissolution cavities, collapse breccias, sinkholes, paleosols, and fractures. The karsted Grosmont Formation, which contains giant reserves of bitumen, sub-crops beneath Cretaceous clastic sediments of the giant Athabasca tar sands deposit. The paleokarst in the Grosmont Formation can be recognized on wireline logs in relatively nonargillaceous carbonate intervals (<30 API units on the gamma-ray log) as excursions of the caliper log, off-scale neutron-density porosity readings, and severe cycle skipping of the acoustic log. The paleokarst is more prevalent in the upper units of the Grosmont Formation, and the effects of karstification decrease toward stratigraphically older and deeper units. The paleokarst usually occurs within 35 m (115 ft) of the erosional surface. The reservoir properties of the Grosmont Formation (e.g., thickness, porosity, permeability, and seal effectiveness) are significantly influenced by karstification. Depending upon the location, karstification has either benefited or degraded the reservoir characteristics. Benefits include porosity values greater than 40% (up to 100% in caverns) and permeability values of 30,000 md in severely fractured intervals. Detrimental reservoir characteristics include erosion, porosity and permeability reduction, and seal ineffectiveness.

  4. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

  5. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

  6. Atmospheric mercury in Changbai Mountain area, northeastern China I. The seasonal distribution pattern of total gaseous mercury and its potential sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Q.; Feng, X.B.; Lu, J.L.; Zheng, W.; Song, X.J.; Han, S.J.; Xu, H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang (China). Inst. of Geochemistry

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An intensive field campaign for the measurement of total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations in ambient air was conducted in Changbai Mountain area from 5 August 2005 to 5 July 2006 using an automatic atmospheric mercury analyzer (Tekran 2537A), which was the first time TGM was monitored at a remote area in northeastern China. 99% of the hourly TGM concentrations fell between 1.28 and 9.49 ng m{sup -3} with an annual arithmetic mean of 3.58 {+-} 1.78 ng m{sup -3}, which was significantly elevated compared to values obtained in remote areas of Europe and North America. Seasonal mean TGM concentrations displayed a descending trend as follows: winter, spring, fall, and summer. Compared to spring/winter, TGM concentrations were lower in the summer/fall but the standard deviation (SD) of TGM levels was higher and indicated a correlation with anthropogenic emissions. TGM concentrations showed seasonal differences with respect to meteorological parameters: TGM levels in spring/winter were most correlated with wind speed, and correlated with solar radiation only in the winter, while TGM levels in summer/fall periods were most correlated with air temperature. There was a strong diurnal variation of seasonal TGM with significantly higher concentrations in daytime/nighttime compared to the early morning. The seasonal diel TGM pattern indicated regional biofuel and coal combustion were the primary mercury sources.

  7. PV modules, with a life measured in decades, will typically be in place longer than the outdoor unit of a HVAC system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    PV modules, with a life measured in decades, will typically be in place longer than the outdoor and repaired promptly. PV systems suffer gradual degradation that is often not monitored, and the PV array may with copper conductors. On the other hand, PV systems have numerous modules (tens to thousands) and mounting

  8. Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part 2: Case Demonstration for a Typical Climate System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Zheng, K.; Wu, L.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In this part, a simulated air handling unit (AHU) system in Omaha NE is used to demonstrate the energy savings performance in one typical climate year. This AHU system has a static pressure reset system and two constant static pressure systems, one having...

  9. Corrosion of reinforcing steel is typically one of the main problems causing deterioration of concrete structures. The Microcomposite Multistructural Formable (MMFX) steel, which is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel is typically one of the main problems causing deterioration available steel, has proven to have high corrosion resistance in comparison with conventional steel without provides a high resistance to corrosion due to severe environmental exposure in comparison to the use

  10. Energy Use Savings for a Typical New Residential Dwelling Unit Based on the 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) require a substantial improvement in energy efficiency compared to the 2006 IECC. This report averages the energy use savings for a typical new residential dwelling unit based on the 2009 and 2012 IECC compared to the 2006 IECC. Results are reported by the eight climate zones in the IECC and for the national average.

  11. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pink vertical line represents a driving threshold for plug-vertical lines representing the typical driving thresholds52mi of driving per refueling (chapter 2) At full, red-line

  12. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pink vertical line represents a driving threshold for plug-vertical lines representing the typical driving thresholds52mi of driving per refueling (chapter 2) At full, red-line

  13. Postnatal penile growth concurrent with mini-puberty predicts later sex-typed play behavior: Evidence for neurobehavioral effects of the postnatal androgen surge in typically developing boys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasterski, Vickie; Acerini, Carlo L.; Dunger, David B.; Ong, Ken K.; Hughes, Ieuan A.; Thankamony, Ajay; Hines, Melissa

    2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    it remains until puberty (Achermann and Hadders-Algra, 2006). Though these parallel proce terized, their potential behavioral consequences, postnatal period, have yet to be fully understood. Experimental studies of rats and non-humanp exposure during... –192. Constantinescu, M., Hines, M., 2012. Relating prenatal testosterone exposure to postnatal be- havior in typically developing children: methods and findings. Child Dev. Perspect. 1–7. de Graaf-Peters, V.B., Hadders-Algra, M., 2006. Ontogeny of the human central...

  14. RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Sub-basin and the Conecuh Sub-basin of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida panhandle. This task includes identification of the petroleum systems in these basins and the characterization of the overburden, source, reservoir and seal rocks of the petroleum systems and of the associated petroleum traps. Second, emphasis is on petroleum system modeling. This task includes the assessment of the timing of deep (>15,000 ft) gas generation, expulsion, migration, entrapment and alteration (thermal cracking of oil to gas). Third, emphasis is on resource assessment. This task includes the volumetric calculation of the total in-place hydrocarbon resource generated, the determination of the volume of the generated hydrocarbon resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas, the estimation of the volume of deep gas that was expelled, migrated and entrapped, and the calculation of the potential volume of gas in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) reservoirs resulting from the process of thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons and their transformation to gas in the reservoir. Fourth, emphasis is on identifying those areas in the onshore interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource.

  15. As you know, water costs continue to rise, but you can do something to help yourself. Households can check their plumbing fixtures and irrigation systems for leaks. This checklist will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Households can check their plumbing fixtures and irrigation systems for leaks. This checklist will help you a certification program focused on water efficiency to ensure that your in-ground irrigation system is not leaking tape and a wrench. 8. Consult with an irrigation installer (WaterSense partner) who has passed

  16. Suggestion of typical phases of in-vessel fuel-debris by thermodynamic calculation for decommissioning technology of Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Yano, Kimihiko; Kaji, Naoya; Washiya, Tadahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Kondo, Yoshikazu; Noguchi, Yoshikazu [PESCO Co.Ltd. (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the decommissioning of the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), the characterization of fuel-debris in cores of Units 1-3 is necessary. In this study, typical phases of the in-vessel fuel-debris were estimated using a thermodynamic equilibrium (TDE) calculation. The FactSage program and NUCLEA database were applied to estimate the phase equilibria of debris. It was confirmed that the TDE calculation using the database can reproduce the phase separation behavior of debris observed in the Three Mile Island accident. In the TDE calculation of 1F, the oxygen potential [G(O{sub 2})] was assumed to be a variable. At low G(O{sub 2}) where metallic zirconium remains, (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2} were found as oxides, and oxygen-dispersed Zr, Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U), and Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2} were found as metals. With an increase in zirconium oxidation, the mass of those metals, especially Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2}, decreased, but the other phases of metals hardly changed qualitatively. Consequently, (U,Zr)O{sub 2} is suggested as a typical phase of oxide, and Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U) is suggested as that of metal. However, a more detailed estimation is necessary to consider the distribution of Fe in the reactor pressure vessel through core-melt progression. (authors)

  17. Detection of long-term trends in carbon accumulation by forests in Northeastern U. S. and determination of causal factors: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy; David R. Foster

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall project goal was to quantify the trends and variability for Net ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and energy by northeastern forests, with particular attention to the role of succession, differences in species composition, legacies of past land use, and disturbances. Measurements included flux measurements and observations of biomass accumulation using ecosystem modeling as a framework for data interpretation. Continuation of the long-term record at the Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) Tower was a priority. The final quality-assured CO{sub 2}-flux data now extend through 2010. Data through 2011 are collected but not yet finalized. Biomass observations on the plot array centered on the tower are extended to 2011. Two additional towers in a hemlock stand (HEM) and a younger deciduous stand (LPH) complement the EMS tower by focusing on stands with different species composition or age distribution and disturbance history, but comparable climate and soil type. Over the period since 1993 the forest has added 24.4 Mg-C ha{sup -1} in the living trees. Annual net carbon uptake had been increasing from about 2 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} in the early 1990s to nearly 6 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} by 2008, but declined in 2009-2010. We attribute the increasing carbon uptake to a combination of warmer temperatures, increased photosynthetic efficiency, and increased influence by subcanopy hemlocks that are active in the early spring and late autumn when temperatures are above freezing but the deciduous canopy is bare. Not all of the increased carbon accumulation was found in woody biomass. Results from a study using data to optimize parameters in an ecosystem process model indicate that significant changes in model parameters for photosynthetic capacity and shifts in allocation to slow cycling soil organic matter are necessary for the model to match the observed trends. The emerging working hypothesis is that the pattern of increasing carbon uptake over the early 2000's represents a transient pulse that will eventually end as decomposition of the accumulated carbon catches up.

  18. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project has been reservoir description and characterization. This effort has included four tasks: (1) geoscientific reservoir characterization, (2) the study of rock-fluid interactions, (3) petrophysical and engineering characterization and (4) data integration. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 1. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been initiated. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization is progressing. Data on reservoir production rate and pressure history at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been tabulated, and porosity data from core analysis has been correlated with porosity as observed from well log response. Data integration is on schedule, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database for reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation for the reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs for each of these fields.

  19. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been essentially completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The model represents an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic model served as the framework for the simulations. A technology workshop on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields was conducted to transfer the results of the project to the petroleum industry.

  20. northeastern Washington's Okanogan County. The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7.31 acre habitat acquisition in Washington's Okanogan River Watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). The Okanogan River Watershed was selected as a focus for restoration...

  1. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

  2. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on reservoir architecture and geographic distribution of Smackover reservoirs is the fabric and texture of the depositional lithofacies, diagenesis (chiefly dolomitization) is a significant factor that preserves and enhances reservoir quality. The evaporative pumping mechanism is favored to explain the dolomitization of the thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone reservoir flow units at Appleton and Vocation Fields. Geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and the testing and applying the resulting integrated geologic-engineering models have shown that little oil remains to be recovered at Appleton Field and a significant amount of oil remains to be recovered at Vocation Field through a strategic infill drilling program. The drive mechanisms for primary production in Appleton and Vocation Fields remain effective; therefore, the initiation of a pressure maintenance program or enhanced recovery project is not required at this time. The integrated geologic-engineering model developed for a low-relief paleohigh (Appleton Field) was tested for three scenarios involving the variables of present-day structural elevation and the presence/absence of potential reef thrombolite lithofacies. In each case, the predictions based upon the model were correct. From this modeling, the characteristics of the ideal prospect in the basement ridge play include a low-relief paleohigh associated with dendroidal/chaotic thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone that has sufficient present-day structural relief so that these carbonates rest above the oil-water contact. Such a prospect was identified from the modeling, and it is located northwest of well Permit No. 3854B (Appleton Field) and south of well No. Permit No.11030B (Northwest Appleton Field).

  3. Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

  4. EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy Use:

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127byFormsConsumption 1994

  5. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Households with Children Households Without Children

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic 1. Introduction4.

  6. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study were: (1) to perform resource assessment of the thermogenic gas resources in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) natural gas reservoirs of the onshore interior salt basins of the north central and northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling; and (2) to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the deep thermogenic gas resource that is available for potential recovery and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential for this thermogenic gas resource. Petroleum source rock analysis and petroleum system characterization and modeling, including thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling, have shown that the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation served as the regional petroleum source rock in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Thus, the estimates of the total hydrocarbons, oil, and gas generated and expelled are based on the assumption that the Smackover Formation is the main petroleum source rock in these basins and subbasins. The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the North Louisiana Salt Basin in this study using a petroleum system approach compares favorably with the total volume of hydrocarbons generated published by Zimmermann (1999). In this study, the estimate is 2,870 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate is 2,640 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the Platte River software application. The estimate of Zimmermann (1999) is 2,000 to 2,500 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 6,400 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 12,800 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Barnaby (2006) estimated that the total gas volume generated for this basin ranges from 4,000 to 8,000 TCF. Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Lewan (2002) concluded that much of the thermogenic gas produced in this basin is the result of cracking of oil to gas in deeply buried reservoirs. The efficiency of expulsion, migration and trapping has been estimated to range from 0.5 to 10 percent for certain basins (Schmoker, 1994: Zimmerman, 1999). The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin is 910 billion barrels using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated is 1,540 billion barrels using the Platte River software application. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 3,130 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 4,050 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Claypool and Mancini (1989) report that the conversion of oil to gas in reservoirs is a significant source of thermogenic gas in this basin. The Manila and Conecuh Subbasins are oil-prone. Although these subbasins are thermally mature for oil generation and expulsion, they are not thermally mature for secondary, non-associated gas generation and expulsion. The gas produced from the highly productive gas condensate fields (Big Escambia Creek and Flomaton fields) in these subbasins has been interpreted to be, in part, a product of the cracking of oil to gas and thermochemical reduction of evaporite sulfate in the reservoirs (Claypool and Mancini, 1989). The areas in the North Louisiana and Mississippi Interior Salt Basins with high potential for deeply buried gas reservoirs (>15,000 ft) have been identified. In the North Louisiana Salt Basin, these potential reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous facies, especially the Smackover, Cotton Valley, Hosston, and Sligo units. The estimate of the secondary, non-associated gas generated from cracking of oil in the source rock from depths below 12,000 feet in this basin is 4,800 TCF. Assuming an expul

  7. Electricity Prices for Households - EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (U.S. Dollars per Kilowatthour) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.023 NA NA Australia 0.091 0.092 0.094 0.098 NA NA NA NA NA...

  8. Setting Your Household in Order.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chenoweth, Lillian

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CERTIFICATE & FILING FOR BENEFITS Myaddress __________________________________________________________________ _ street city county state zip code Citizen of _____________ Race ____ Birthplace ________ Date of Birth ______ _ Social Security Number... employment began with this employer _____________________ _ If you own your own business: Business partner ____________________________ _ Homeaddress _____________________________ _ Partnership agreement? YES __ NO __ Filed _______________ _ Partnership...

  9. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic Feet)Historical1

  10. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic

  11. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic1. Introduction The

  12. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 d d XAir

  13. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 d d

  14. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 d d1a.

  15. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 d

  16. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 da. Air

  17. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 da.

  18. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0 da.3a.

  19. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 0

  20. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 05a. Air

  1. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 05a.

  2. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P 05a.2001

  3. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P

  4. ac_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P9a. Air

  5. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P9a.

  6. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P9a.0a.

  7. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3 P9a.0a.1a.

  8. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3

  9. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3a. Appliances

  10. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3a.

  11. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3a.3a.

  12. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3a.3a.4a.

  13. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0 3a.3a.4a.5a.

  14. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 0

  15. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 02001 Appliance

  16. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 02001

  17. appl_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1 020019a.

  18. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August 2001)

  19. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August 2001)0a.

  20. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August

  1. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August2a.

  2. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August2a.a.

  3. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August2a.a.2a.

  4. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I 1August2a.a.2a.3a.

  5. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I

  6. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a.

  7. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980 Summary

  8. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980 Summary0a. Home

  9. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980 Summary0a.

  10. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980 Summary0a.2a.

  11. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980 Summary0a.2a.a.

  12. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights19980

  13. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights199803a. Home Office

  14. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights199803a. Home

  15. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights199803a. Home9a. Home

  16. housingunit_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 201230 Highlights199803a. Home9a.

  17. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total per SquareQ2

  18. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total per SquareQ21a.

  19. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total per

  20. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera. Space

  1. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera. Space2a.

  2. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera. Space2a.3a.

  3. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.

  4. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.5a. Space

  5. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.5a. Space6a.

  6. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.5a.

  7. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.5a.8a. Space

  8. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996 Total pera.5a.8a.

  9. usage_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 2012302Q),1996September

  10. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3, 2001Air

  11. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3, 2001Air0a.

  12. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3, 2001Air0a.1a.

  13. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,

  14. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a. Air

  15. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a. Air2a. Air

  16. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a. Air2a.

  17. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a. Air2a.4a.

  18. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.

  19. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.6a. Air

  20. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.6a. Air2001

  1. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.6a.

  2. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.6a.9a. Air

  3. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.6a.9a.

  4. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.6a.9a.0a.

  5. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE.&Gasolinein7"10"3,a.6a.9a.0a.1a.

  6. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks

  7. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.

  8. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.2001 Appliance Types

  9. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.2001 Appliance

  10. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.2001 Appliance9a.

  11. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.2001

  12. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a.

  13. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a.a.

  14. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a.a.3a.

  15. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a.a.3a.5a.

  16. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a.a.3a.5a.6a.

  17. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million

  18. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a.TableHome Office

  19. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a.TableHome Office0a.

  20. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a.TableHome Office0a.1a.

  1. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a.TableHome

  2. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a.TableHomea. Home

  3. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a.TableHomea. Home2a.

  4. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a.TableHomea. Home2a.3a.

  5. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a.TableHomea.

  6. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a.TableHomea.9a. Home

  7. housingunit_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a.TableHomea.9a.

  8. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone,8,1996and Methane Emissions(

  9. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone,8,1996and Methane Emissions(1a.

  10. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone,8,1996and Methane

  11. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone,8,1996and Methane2a. Space

  12. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone,8,1996and Methane2a. Space3a.

  13. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone,8,1996and Methane2a. Space3a.4a.

  14. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone,8,1996and Methane2a.

  15. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone,8,1996and Methane2a.6a. Space

  16. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone,8,1996and Methane2a.6a. Space8a.

  17. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone,8,1996and Methane2a.6a.

  18. usage_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone,8,1996and8.1 64.1 4.2 1.8Usage

  19. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year in61999

  20. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year in61999C

  1. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year in61999C.

  2. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year

  3. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year. Vehicle

  4. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year. Vehicle

  5. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year. Vehicle

  6. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year.

  7. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year.Detailed

  8. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year.DetailedW

  9. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in e-waste: Level and transfer in a typical e-waste recycling site in Shanghai, Eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yue; Duan, Yan-Ping, E-mail: duanyanping@tongji.edu.cn; Huang, Fan; Yang, Jing; Xiang, Nan; Meng, Xiang-Zhou; Chen, Ling

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • PBDEs were detected in the majority of e-waste. • PBDEs were found in TVs made in China after 1990. • The levels of ?PBDEs in e-waste made in Japan far exceed the threshold limit of RoHS. • The inappropriate recycling and disposal of e-waste is an important source of PBDEs. - Abstract: Very few data for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were available in the electronic waste (e-waste) as one of the most PBDEs emission source. This study reported concentrations of PBDEs in e-waste including printer, rice cooker, computer monitor, TV, electric iron and water dispenser, as well as dust from e-waste, e-waste dismantling workshop and surface soil from inside and outside of an e-waste recycling plant in Shanghai, Eastern China. The results showed that PBDEs were detected in the majority of e-waste, and the concentrations of ?PBDEs ranged from not detected to 175 g/kg, with a mean value of 10.8 g/kg. PBDEs were found in TVs made in China after 1990. The mean concentrations of ?PBDEs in e-waste made in Korea, Japan, Singapore and China were 1.84 g/kg, 20.5 g/kg, 0.91 g/kg, 4.48 g/kg, respectively. The levels of ?PBDEs in e-waste made in Japan far exceed the threshold limit of RoHS (1.00 g/kg). BDE-209 dominated in e-waste, accounting for over 93%. The compositional patterns of PBDEs congeners resembled the profile of Saytex 102E, indicating the source of deca-BDE. Among the samples of dust and surface soil from a typical e-waste recycling site, the highest concentrations of ?{sub 18}PBDEs and BDE-209 were found in dust in e-waste, ranging from 1960 to 340,710 ng/g and from 910 to 320,400 ng/g, which were 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than other samples. It suggested that PBDEs released from e-waste via dust, and then transferred to surrounding environment.

  10. A review of the production characteristics and economics of the Denver-Julesburg Basin Codell/Niobrara play in Northeastern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J.D.; Fields, R.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Codell sandstone and Niobrara limestone is the source of a major oil and gas play in the west central portion of the Denver-Julesburg Basin. The play is developing in an 800,000-acre (323,748 ha) area north of Denver, Colorado. Even though the first discovery of producible hydrocarbons in the Codell was made in 1955, few wells in the study area were completed in the Codell and Niobrara prior to 1981. Approximately 1,170 wells were completed between 1981 and Decenber 1985 in the Codell, either singly or multiply with other formations. Development on 40-acre (16 ha) spacing over the entire 800,000 acres (323,748 ha) could result in 20,000 wells being drilled or recompleted into the Codell. Production profiles of Codell and Codell/Niobrara wells are characterized by very rapid initial declines followed by a gradual flattening, which is typical of low-permeability formations. Average production profiles were developed for Codell and Codell/Niobrara Wells for use in the economic analyses. Production data was also analyzed based on area and operator. Cumulative gas-oil ratios after 12 months of production were mapped and contoured for Codell wells. Economic analyses using both constant and escalated prices and costs are presented for five different production profiles. Sensitivities of net present value to oil and gas prices, drilling and completion costs, operating and maintenance costs, and various production profiles are analyzed and presented in a spider diagram.

  11. For: Delegates predominantly from business but a few places will be reserved for senior repre-sentatives from the public sector and NGOs. Business delegates are typically senior execu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    - sentatives from the public sector and NGOs. Business delegates are typically senior execu- tives and maintain a Pro- gramme which brings together business leaders and key public sector and civil society global trends and challenges: energy and natural resource security, cities, consumption, emerging

  12. 19USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. A variety of vascular plant species exhibit typical foliar injury symptoms when exposed to ambient ozone, making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    exhibit typical foliar injury symptoms when exposed to ambient ozone, making them useful as bioindicators ozone monitors are not available. Bioindicators are often introduced plant species known as sentinels. They are known to be sensitive to ozone and will respond rapidly if they are given special care to ensure ozone

  13. Department Climate Workshops: "Typical" Themes Positives Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    power and responsibility fairly, hold people accountable o Provide goals and directions, good teamwork, good conflict resolution process o Quality scholarship, research, highly skilled people o Hierarchy, people acting as if they are "better" than others, poor leadership structure o Turf

  14. SPECIAL ACQUISITION REQUIREMENTS ? TYPICAL ISSUES ASSOCIATED...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of following examples, which are listed at FAR 7.503(c): (1) The direct conduct of criminal investigations (2) The control of prosecutions and performance of adjudicatory...

  15. Champlain Valley AHEC Northeastern Vermont AHEC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    , in collaboration with many partners, improves access to quality health care through its focus on workforce and residents at Fletcher Allen Health Care; and support to help recruit and retain a high-quality healthcare improvement programming to Vermont's primary care practitioners and supports community health education. AHEC

  16. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for residential natural gas combustion in California was estimates for natural gas combustion could be found in the for residential natural gas  combustion based on data from 

  17. The World Distribution of Household Wealth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DAVIES, JAMES B; Shorrocks, Anthony; Sandstrom, Susanna; WOLFF, EDWARD N

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or consumption usually use PPP (purchasing power parity)Some alternative estimates using PPP rates are discussed inhave been constructed on a PPP basis. 16 14 The estimated

  18. Do Disaster Expectations Explain Household Portfolios?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan, Sule

    durable ex- penditure information; and ?nally, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1983-1994) that allows me to calibrate group speci?c income process parameters. Limited het- 3 erogeneity in all parameters is allowed for by estimating the structural... innovations to excess return to be correlated with innovations to per- manent or transitory income in normal market times. Allowing for such a correlation is straightforward and would reduce the ex-ante disaster probability and disaster size needed to match...

  19. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residential natural gas combustion in California was based estimates for natural gas combustion could be found in the residential natural gas  combustion based on data from the 

  20. Survey of Household Energy Use (SHEU)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and 1997. Its goal is to gather data on the energy and physical characteristics of private dwellings to number of dwellings, dwelling area, energy consumption and energy intensity. The target population. The number of dwellings is expressed in units; energy consumption, in gigajoules (GJ); heated area, in square

  1. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption categories and includes a diversity of items such as property taxes, luggage,  clocks, lawn and garden supplies, and pet 

  2. Model development for household waste prevention behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortoleto, Ana Paula, E-mail: a.bortoleto@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kurisu, Kiyo H.; Hanaki, Keisuke [Department of Urban Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model waste prevention behaviour using structure equation modelling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We merge attitude-behaviour theories with wider models from environmental psychology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main behaviour predictors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental concern, moral obligation and inconvenience are the main influence on the behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste prevention and recycling are different dimensions of waste management behaviour. - Abstract: Understanding waste prevention behaviour (WPB) could enable local governments and decision makers to design more-effective policies for reducing the amount of waste that is generated. By merging well-known attitude-behaviour theories with elements from wider models from environmental psychology, an extensive cognitive framework that provides new and valuable insights is developed for understanding the involvement of individuals in waste prevention. The results confirm the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour and of Schwartz's altruistic behaviour model as bases for modelling participation in waste prevention. A more elaborate integrated model of prevention was shown to be necessary for the complete analysis of attitudinal aspects associated with waste prevention. A postal survey of 158 respondents provided empirical support for eight of 12 hypotheses. The proposed structural equation indicates that personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main predictors and that, unlike the case of recycling, subjective norms have a weak influence on WPB. It also suggests that, since social norms have not presented a direct influence, WPB is likely to be influenced by a concern for the environment and the community as well by perceptions of moral obligation and inconvenience. Results also proved that recycling and waste prevention represent different dimensions of waste management behaviour requiring particular approaches to increase individuals' engagement in future policies.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Television Water heating Technology Measure Upgrade to SEER=and space heating  technologies, personal computers,  pool technology or process within a given sector, such as lighting and heating, 

  4. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    database contains energy and cost savings estimates for hundreds  of different industrial technology energy savings estimates for industrial HVAC, refrigeration, and  lighting systems were derived using technology measure data from the IAC database.  technology unit energy consumption (UEC) 6  and saturation data from the California  Residential Appliance Saturation  Survey (RASS) database (

  5. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lighting and heating, ventilation, and air  conditioning (potential  Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning Refrigeration Space Heating Ventilation ENERGY STAR PCs and

  6. Product List: Pesticides and Household Chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Killer #08D Raid Outdoor Ant and Roach Killer #012D Spectracide Bug Stop #016D 9/6/2007 Page 2 of 17 Spray #021A CB-80 #025A Hart 2 in 1 Flea Spray #029A Hot Shot Roach and Ant #033A Antrol Spray #019C and Roach Spray #020D Black Jack #024D Grants Kills Ants Ant, Spider and Flea Killer #028D Hot Shot Flying

  7. Liquidity Constraints, Household Wealth, and Entrepreneurship Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairlie, Robert W.; Krashinsky, Harry A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the 1 st and 95 th percentiles of the asset distribution,for individuals above the 95 th percentile. The constancy ofassets are in the 95 th percentile or higher because of much

  8. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11 Table 2: Estimated natural gas end use UECs and 95%annual supply chain natural gas related GHG emissions per2: Estimated annual direct natural gas GHG emissions per

  9. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    method known as life?cycle assessment  (LCA), which is a Input?Output Life Cycle Assessment (EIO? LCA) model.  Input?Output Life?Cycle  Assessment (EIO?LCA) model (

  10. Next Generation Household Refrigerator | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines |NewStateDepartment of EnergyofandNext

  11. Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site

  12. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - Appendix C

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Year.DetailedW

  13. Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1

  14. Next Generation Household Refrigerator | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed KhanDepartment of Energy NewNovember 6, 2013JulyIn

  15. Alston S. Householder Fellowship | Careers | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973ManagedStrategic|AljazeeraO S o'ware a nd

  16. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagram 1: A Typical Tank Water Heater Source: http://California households. Tank water heaters stayed constant.the same impact as tank water heaters. The project results

  17. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    areas, typically have: - low median household incomes - high unemployment - high poverty (see "Designations" section in website's FAQs) 6 www.sba.gov There are 4 kinds of...

  18. Mortgage default and student outcomes, the solar home price premium, and the magnitude of housing price declines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dastrup, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    households face typically higher time of use prices for any electricityelectricity prices in San Diego County are tiered by monthly consumption, with each householdHouseholds may be uncertain about how much electricity the solar panels will generate, the future price of electricity

  19. Pulse Energy Typical Curve Validation Draft December 15, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes, technologies for building energy performance monitoring, smart buildings, ongoing commissioning-based energy information system (EIS) software for commercial buildings. One distinguishing aspect of the Pulse to advance the deployment of EIS, which are capable of enabling up to 20% reductions in building energy use

  20. Single-Hop Case Typically, linear regression (using the last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperature, voltage, etc... (30-100 ppm) Christoph Lenzen, Philipp Sommer, Roger Wattenhofer Computer of the 2nd International Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, 2004. [Sommer09] P. Sommer and R International Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks, 2009. [Lenzen09] C. Lenzen, P. Sommer