Sample records for typical high typical

  1. Typical Pure Nonequilibrium Steady States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takaaki Monnai; Kazuya Yuasa

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that typicality holds for a class of nonequilibrium systems, i.e., nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs): almost all the pure states properly sampled from a certain Hilbert space well represent a NESS and characterize its intrinsic thermal nature. We clarify the relevant Hilbert space from which the pure states are to be sampled, and construct practically all the typical pure NESSs. The scattering approach leads us to the natural extension of the typicality for equilibrium systems. Each pure NESS correctly yields the expectation values of observables given by the standard ensemble approach. It means that we can calculate the expectation values in a NESS with only a single pure NESS. We provide an explicit construction of the typical pure NESS for a model with two reservoirs, and see that it correctly reproduces the Landauer-type formula for the current flowing steadily between the reservoirs.

  2. Energy-Performance-Based Design-Build Process: Strategies for Procuring High-Performance Buildings on Typical Construction Budgets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheib, J.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL experienced a significant increase in employees and facilities on our 327-acre main campus in Golden, Colorado over the past five years. To support this growth, researchers developed and demonstrated a new building acquisition method that successfully integrates energy efficiency requirements into the design-build requests for proposals and contracts. We piloted this energy performance based design-build process with our first new construction project in 2008. We have since replicated and evolved the process for large office buildings, a smart grid research laboratory, a supercomputer, a parking structure, and a cafeteria. Each project incorporated aggressive efficiency strategies using contractual energy use requirements in the design-build contracts, all on typical construction budgets. We have found that when energy efficiency is a core project requirement as defined at the beginning of a project, innovative design-build teams can integrate the most cost effective and high performance efficiency strategies on typical construction budgets. When the design-build contract includes measurable energy requirements and is set up to incentivize design-build teams to focus on achieving high performance in actual operations, owners can now expect their facilities to perform. As NREL completed the new construction in 2013, we have documented our best practices in training materials and a how-to guide so that other owners and owner's representatives can replicate our successes and learn from our experiences in attaining market viable, world-class energy performance in the built environment.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: composite fibers typically aligned...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    composite fibers typically aligned in a 45 pattern with respect to the blade axis New Material Tests Show Biaxial Laminate Creep Is Important for Large Wind-Turbine Blades On...

  4. Manipulating decision making of typical agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Yukalov; D. Sornette

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate how the choice of decision makers can be varied under the presence of risk and uncertainty. Our analysis is based on the approach we have previously applied to individual decision makers, which we now generalize to the case of decision makers that are members of a society. The approach employs the mathematical techniques that are common in quantum theory, justifying our naming as Quantum Decision Theory. However, we do not assume that decision makers are quantum objects. The techniques of quantum theory are needed only for defining the prospect probabilities taking into account such hidden variables as behavioral biases and other subconscious feelings. The approach describes an agent's choice as a probabilistic event occurring with a probability that is the sum of a utility factor and of an attraction factor. The attraction factor embodies subjective and unconscious dimensions in the mind of the decision maker. We show that the typical aggregate amplitude of the attraction factor is $1/4$, and it can be either positive or negative depending on the relative attraction of the competing choices. The most efficient way of varying the decision makers choice is realized by influencing the attraction factor. This can be done in two ways. One method is to arrange in a special manner the payoff weights, which induces the required changes of the values of attraction factors. We show that a slight variation of the payoff weights can invert the sign of the attraction factors and reverse the decision preferences, even when the prospect utilities remain unchanged. The second method of influencing the decision makers choice is by providing information to decision makers. The methods of influencing decision making are illustrated by several experiments, whose outcomes are compared quantitatively with the predictions of our approach.

  5. Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Not) just your typical Lab spin off Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government Lab" Far from Silicon Valley, Descartes...

  6. Department Climate Workshops: "Typical" Themes Positives Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    power and responsibility fairly, hold people accountable o Provide goals and directions, good teamwork, good conflict resolution process o Quality scholarship, research, highly skilled people o Hierarchy, people acting as if they are "better" than others, poor leadership structure o Turf

  7. Figure 1. Typical Slow Sand Filter Schematic Supernatant Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure 1. Typical Slow Sand Filter Schematic Headspace Supernatant Water Schmutzdecke Raw water Supernatant drain Filter drain & backfill Sand media Support gravel Drain tile Adjustable weir Overflow weir Vent Control valve Treated Water Effluent flow control structure Overflow Assessing Temperature

  8. andisol typic hapludand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from positive to negative from an input range Berns, Hans-Gerd 6 The typical Turing degree CERN Preprints Summary: The Turing degree of a real measures the computational...

  9. Gearbox Typical Failure Modes, Detection, and Mitigation Methods (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation was given at the AWEA Operations & Maintenance and Safety Seminar and focused on what the typical gearbox failure modes are, how to detect them using detection techniques, and strategies that help mitigate these failures.

  10. Structure of The Dixie Valley Geothermal System, a "Typical"...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dixie Valley Geothermal System, a "Typical" Basin and Range Geothermal System, From Thermal and Gravity Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  11. Typical support and Sanov large deviations of correlated states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Bjelakovic; J. -D. Deuschel; T. Krueger; R. Seiler; Ra. Siegmund-Schultze; A. Szkola

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete stationary classical processes as well as quantum lattice states are asymptotically confined to their respective typical support, the exponential growth rate of which is given by the (maximal ergodic) entropy. In the iid case the distinguishability of typical supports can be asymptotically specified by means of the relative entropy, according to Sanov's theorem. We give an extension to the correlated case, referring to the newly introduced class of HP-states.

  12. Two typical processes ... Isentropic("mechanical" reversible, elastic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    is coupled and accompanied with energy conversions and dissipation to heat/thermal energy ... Carnot cycle12/28/2011 1 Two typical processes ... · Isentropic("mechanical" reversible, elastic) where useful provides for de-coupling of thermal energy from other types and, YES!, for reversible heat transfer

  13. Energy-Efficient Lighting The typical American family spends more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy-Efficient Lighting The typical American family spends more than $1,500 a year on household their energy efficiency is taken into account. CFLs last 8­10 times longer than standard incandescent bulbs energy bills--and many households spend considerably more. Costs could climb even higher in the future

  14. 1 INTRODUCTION A typical flexible pavement system includes four

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 INTRODUCTION A typical flexible pavement system includes four distinct layers: asphalt concrete course in order to reduce costs or to minimize capil- lary action under the pavement. Figure 1: Cross-section of flexible pavement system (Muench 2006) Pavement distress may occur due to either traffic or environmental

  15. Robust Neuroimaging-Based Classification Techniques of Autistic vs. Typically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farag, Aly A.

    abnormalities in several brain regions. Increased head size was the first observed characteristic in children1 Robust Neuroimaging-Based Classification Techniques of Autistic vs. Typically Developing Brain with autism. According to the published studies, different anatomical structures of the brain have been

  16. Safety for an Autonomous Bucket Excavator During Typical Landscaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Karsten

    Safety for an Autonomous Bucket Excavator During Typical Landscaping Tasks Gregor Zolynski, Daniel the goal of automating a mobile bucket excavator for excavation and loading tasks. This document contains a short introduction to the autonomous bucket excavator THOR, a concept for low-level safety using laser

  17. Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

  18. TYPICAL HOT WATER DRAW PATTERNS BASED ON FIELD DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Jim; Melody, Moya

    2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    There is significant variation in hot water use and draw patterns among households. This report describes typical hot water use patterns in single-family residences in North America. We found that daily hot water use is highly variable both among residences and within the same residence. We compared the results of our analysis of the field data to the conditions and draw patterns established in the current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test procedure for residential water heaters. The results show a higher number of smaller draws at lower flow rates than used in the test procedure. The data from which the draw patterns were developed were obtained from 12 separate field studies. This report describes the ways in which we managed, cleaned, and analyzed the data and the results of our data analysis. After preparing the data, we used the complete data set to analyze inlet and outlet water temperatures. Then we divided the data into three clusters reflecting house configurations that demonstrated small, medium, or large median daily hot water use. We developed the three clusters partly to reflect efforts of the ASHRAE standard project committee (SPC) 118.2 to revise the test procedure for residential water heaters to incorporate a range of draw patterns. ASHRAE SPC 118.2 has identified the need to separately evaluate at least three, and perhaps as many as five, different water heater capacities. We analyzed the daily hot water use data within each cluster in terms of volume and number of hot water draws. The daily draw patterns in each cluster were characterized using distributions for volume of draws, duration of draws, time since previous draw, and flow rates.

  19. SSI response of a typical shear wall structure. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.J.; Schewe, E.C.; Maslenikov, O.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Simplified Methods project of the US NRC-funded Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has as its goal the development of a methodology to perform routine seismic probabilistic risk assessments of commercial nuclear power plants. The study reported here develops calibration factors to relate best estimate response to design values accounting for approximations and simplifications in SSI analysis procedures. Nineteen cases were analyzed and in-structure response compared. The structure of interest was a typical shear wall structure. 6 references, 44 figures, 22 tables.

  20. Is the Sun Embedded in a Typical Interstellar Cloud?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. Frisch

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical properties and kinematics of the partially ionized interstellar material near the Sun are typical of warm diffuse clouds in the solar vicinity. The interstellar magnetic field at the heliosphere and the kinematics of nearby clouds are naturally explained in terms of the S1 superbubble shell. The interstellar radiation field at the Sun appears to be harder than the field ionizing ambient diffuse gas, which may be a consequence of the low opacity of the tiny cloud surrounding the heliosphere. The spatial context of the Local Bubble is consistent with our location in the Orion spur.

  1. Pressurized pyrolysis and gasification of Chinese typical coal samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanping Chen; Zhiwu Luo; Haiping Yang; Fudong Ju; Shihong Zhang [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to understand the pyrolysis and gasification behavior of different Chinese coal samples at different pressures. First, the pyrolysis of four typical Chinese coals samples (Xiaolongtan brown coal, Shenfu bituminous coal, Pingzhai anthracite coal, and Heshan lean coal) were carried out using a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer at ambient pressure and 3 MPa, respectively. The surface structure and elemental component of the resultant char were measured with an automated gas adsorption apparatus and element analyzer. It was observed that higher pressure suppressed the primary pyrolysis, while the secondary pyrolysis of coal particles was promoted. With respect to the resultant solid char, the carbon content increased while H content decreased; however, the pore structure varied greatly with increasing pressure for different coal samples. For Xiaolongtan brown coal (XLT) char, it decreased greatly, while it increased obviously for the other three char types. Then, the isothermal gasification behavior of solid char particles was investigated using an ambient thermal analyzer with CO{sub 2} as the gasifying agent at 1000{sup o}C. The gasification reactivity of solid char was decreased greatly with increasing pyrolysis pressure. However, the extent of change displayed a vital relation with the characteristics of the original coal sample. 26 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and high temperature cooling_REHVA Guidebook, Federation ofEvaluation of cooling performance of thermally activatedsystem with evaporative cooling source for typical United

  3. The SUN Action database : collecting and analyzing typical actions for visual scene types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsson, Catherine Anne White

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work in human and machine vision has increasingly focused on the problem of scene recognition. Scene types are largely defined by the actions one might typically do there: an office is a place someone would typically ...

  4. Table 1. HARVESTING MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES Strategy Name Use Typical location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    channels Partial cutting systems PARTIAL To minimize fan destabilization Fans with high destabilization To reduce the logging debris load For gullies with high debris flow potential FS197C RVA 2002/03 #12;Table 2, BUFFER Hb NOLOG Hb NOLOG M LOG/CLWD M BUFFER, LS/CTWD Mb BUFFER, PARTIAL Mb BUFFE, PARTIA, LS/CLWD L LOG

  5. Typical Problems of AHU and Air Movement in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occupied zones #0;?#0;?#0;?#0;? Wrong Air Handling Process and ControlWrong Air Handling Process and Control #0;?#0;?#0;?#0;? TP4: Dislike fresh air?TP4: Dislike fresh air? #0;?#0;?#0;?#0;? TP5: Reheat of VAVBOX at partial load time in summerTP5: Reheat... of VAVBOX at partial load time in summer #0;?#0;?#0;?#0;? Unexpected Air Movement in BuildingsUnexpected Air Movement in Buildings #0;?#0;?#0;?#0;? TP6: Chimney effect leading to fresh air intake in highTP6: Chimney effect leading to fresh air intake in high...

  6. SECONDARY CLASSROOM VOCABULARY: DATA FROM TYPICALLY DEVELOPING STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKim Thomas, Sarah Summer

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ……………………………………….. Inclusion Vocabulary Purpose 1 II METHODS………………………………………………. Participants Data Collection Transcription Analyses 24 III RESULTS………………………………………………... Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5 Total Middle School High School Language...………………………………………... 82 F Vocabulary Frequency Analysis Script…………………... 83 G Vocabulary Frequency Lists Class 1 Total Frequency………………… Fringe Frequency…...................... Context Core Frequency………... 84 86 87 Class 2 Total Frequency………………… Fringe...

  7. Brain Bases of Reading Fluency in Typical Reading and Impaired Fluency in Dyslexia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christodoulou, Joanna

    Although the neural systems supporting single word reading are well studied, there are limited direct comparisons between typical and dyslexic readers of the neural correlates of reading fluency. Reading fluency deficits ...

  8. EVALUATION OF TROQUE VS CLOSURE BOLT PRELOAD FOR A TYPICAL CONTAINMENT VESSEL UNDER SERVICE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive material package containment vessels typically employ bolted closures of various configurations. Closure bolts must retain the lid of a package and must maintain required seal loads, while subjected to internal pressure, impact loads and vibration. The need for insuring that the specified preload is achieved in closure bolts for radioactive materials packagings has been a continual subject of concern for both designers and regulatory reviewers. The extensive literature on threaded fasteners provides sound guidance on design and torque specification for closure bolts. The literature also shows the uncertainty associated with use of torque to establish preload is typically between 10 and 35%. These studies have been performed under controlled, laboratory conditions. The ability to insure required preload in normal service is, consequently, an important question. The study described here investigated the relationship between indicated torque and resulting bolt load for a typical radioactive materials package closure using methods available under normal service conditions.

  9. Radiation dose estimates for typical piloted NTR lunar and Mars mission engine operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnitzler, B.G. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Borowski, S.K. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural and manmade radiation environments to be encountered during lunar and Mars missions are qualitatively summarized. The computational methods available to characterize the radiation environment produced by an operating nuclear propulsion system are discussed. Mission profiles and vehicle configurations are presented for a typical all-propulsive, fully reusable lunar mission and for a typical all-propulsive Mars mission. Estimates of crew location biological doses are developed for all propulsive maneuvers. Post-shutdown dose rates near the nuclear engine are estimated at selected mission times. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Assessing Student Learning We typically assess student learning in terms of their grades on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champagne, Frances A.

    need to be student-focused rather than instructor-focused. Focus on the learning resulting fromAssessing Student Learning We typically assess student learning in terms of their grades on quizzes should be linked to our learning objectives. To properly assess student learning, you need to know what

  11. Strain Storage Typically, mycobacteria can be stored as lyophilized stocks, agar slants, or frozen stocks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strain Storage Typically, mycobacteria can be stored as lyophilized stocks, agar slants, or frozen stocks. Since lyophilization is not a cost-effective product storage alternative for virulent M. tuberculosis and agar slants can take up considerable BSL3 storage space, the best alternative for strain

  12. Refrigerator: Refrigerators and freezers are not typically constructed to assure that there is no

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    LAB SAFETY Refrigerator: Refrigerators and freezers are not typically constructed to assure temperature of the refrigerator rises. This results in an increase in the concentration of flammable vapors within the refrigerator's interior. When power is restored, a spark generated by the refrigerator light

  13. Fig. 1. Typical topological arrangement of a hybrid fuel cell vehicle drive train [2].

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Fig. 1. Typical topological arrangement of a hybrid fuel cell vehicle drive train [2]. TABLE I designed with more robust features. I. INTRODUCTION Fuel cell vehicles (FCV) are widely considered of a hybrid fuel cell vehicle is shown in Fig. 1 [2]. Developments in hybrid automobile industry have

  14. SIR GILBERT WALKER AND A CONNECTION BETWEEN EL NIO AND STATISTICS: FROM "TYPICAL CAMBRIDGE DON" TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    autocorrelations (e. g., R statistical programming language) Speech compression #12;11 #12;12 (2) SIR GILBERT Research Boulder, CO USA Home page: www.isse.ucar.edu/staff/katz/ Reference: Katz, R.W. (2002). Statistical1 SIR GILBERT WALKER AND A CONNECTION BETWEEN EL NIÑO AND STATISTICS: FROM "TYPICAL CAMBRIDGE DON

  15. Typical College Student Diet Food Derived Microorganisms and Their Relation to the Human Gastrointestinal Microflora 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haselhorst, Alexandria J.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    or not different foods contain unique bacterial profiles and if there is a correlation between foods and the types of bacteria that may be present. This study was based on diets that are typically consumed by college students. Six meals, two breakfasts, two lunches...

  16. LBB evaluation for a typical Japanese PWR primary loop by using the US NRC approved methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swamy, S.A.; Bhowmick, D.C.; Prager, D.E. [Westinghouse Nuclear Technology Division, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regulatory requirements for postulated pipe ruptures have changed significantly since the first nuclear plants were designed. The Leak-Before-Break (LBB) methodology is now accepted as a technically justifiable approach for eliminating postulation of double-ended guillotine breaks (DEGB) in high energy piping systems. The previous pipe rupture design requirements for nuclear power plant applications are responsible for all the numerous and massive pipe whip restraints and jet shields installed for each plant. This results in significant plant congestion, increased labor costs and radiation dosage for normal maintenance and inspection. Also the restraints increase the probability of interference between the piping and supporting structures during plant heatup, thereby potentially impacting overall plant reliability. The LBB approach to eliminate postulating ruptures in high energy piping systems is a significant improvement to former regulatory methodologies, and therefore, the LBB approach to design is gaining worldwide acceptance. However, the methods and criteria for LBB evaluation depend upon the policy of individual country and significant effort continues towards accomplishing uniformity on a global basis. In this paper the historical development of the U.S. LBB criteria will be traced and the results of an LBB evaluation for a typical Japanese PWR primary loop applying U.S. NRC approved methods will be presented. In addition, another approach using the Japanese LBB criteria will be shown and compared with the U.S. criteria. The comparison will be highlighted in this paper with detailed discussion.

  17. Gender stereotypes of typical and ideal man, woman and person: the impact of role inferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Nancy Deane

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Housekeeping Mai ntenance of home 1. 40 0. 58 2. 01 0. 82 1. 59 1. 00 0. 225 0. 452 -0. 496 -0. 715 -0. 143 0. 305 9. 19 11. 14 20. 71 22. 76 11. 82 16. 67 4. 38 4. 48 10. 81 7. 71 6. 36 4. 05 7. 09 7. 95 4. 43 2. 76 3. 09 3. 90 Note. Higher numbers... sex, F(2, 121)=3. 23, p&. 05, and target role, F(1, 121)=22. 90, p&. 001. Planned comparisons revealed that the typical man was rated as possessing significantly fewer feminine positive traits than the typical woman, F(1, 121)=6. 53, p&. 01...

  18. An Agricultural Economic Survey of Rockwall County, Texas : A Typical Blackland Cotton Farming Area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.)

    1925-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TfXAS AGRICULTURAL fXPfRIMfNT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President BULLETIN NO. 327 February, 1925 DIVISION OF FARM AND RANCH ECONOMICS AN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC SURVEY OF ROCKWALL COUNTY, TEXAS A... Typical Blackland Cotton Farming Area B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS STAFF (As of May 1, 1925) ADMINISTRATION G. N. STROMAN, Ph. D., Agronomist, B. YOUNGBLOOD, M. S., Ph. D., DiTector Cotton Breeding A. B. CONNER, M. S...

  19. The construction manager is typically selected at the beginning of the design process. The Guaranteed Maximum Price is usually prepared based on 50% Construction Documents. In these typical cases the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sura, Philip

    The construction manager is typically selected at the beginning of the design process. The Guaranteed Maximum Price is usually prepared based on 50% Construction Documents. In these typical cases and 50% Construction Documents. The deliverable at 50% Construction Documents includes the Guaranteed

  20. Weather data analysis based on typical weather sequence analysis. Application: energy building simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mathieu; Garde, Francois; Boyer, Harry

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In building studies dealing about energy efficiency and comfort, simulation software need relevant weather files with optimal time steps. Few tools generate extreme and mean values of simultaneous hourly data including correlation between the climatic parameters. This paper presents the C++ Runeole software based on typical weather sequences analysis. It runs an analysis process of a stochastic continuous multivariable phenomenon with frequencies properties applied to a climatic database. The database analysis associates basic statistics, PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and automatic classifications. Different ways of applying these methods will be presented. All the results are stored in the Runeole internal database that allows an easy selection of weather sequences. The extreme sequences are used for system and building sizing and the mean sequences are used for the determination of the annual cooling loads as proposed by Audrier-Cros (Audrier-Cros, 1984). This weather analysis was tested with the datab...

  1. Thermal performance of typical light frame walls with reflective surface insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.G. (Jim Walter Research Corp., St. Petersburg, FL (US)); Riskowski, G.L.; Christianson, L.L. (Agricultural Engineering Dept., Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (US))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of tests were conducted in a guarded hotbox to evaluate the thermal performance (R-value) of wall constructions typical of light-frame buildings that are commonly used in agricultural applications. The systems were insulated with either a commercially available foil-faced bubble pack material (FFBP) or foil-faced polyisocyanurate (PIR) foam board. Tests were conducted under two different temperature conditions, chosen to be representative of a midwestern winter and summer. This paper reports temperatures of the surfaces bounding the reflective airspaces measured and the R-value calculated. These data were used in the ASHRAE series/parallel calculations and the resultant R-value was compared to the measured R-value. Agreement was usually better than 10%.

  2. Can electron by Compton scattering be considered as a typical detector of the photon propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladan Pankovic; Darko Kapor; Miodrag Krmar

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we consider a possibility that Compton scattering can be considered as a typical measurement (detection) procedure within which electron behaves as the measuring apparatus, i.e. detector (pointer) of the propagation of the photon as the measured object. It represents a realistic variant of the old gendanken (though) experiment (discussed by Einstein, Bohr, Dirac, Feynman) of the interaction between the single photon as the measured object and a movable mirror as the measuring apparatus, i.e. detector (pointer). Here collapse by measurement is successfully modeled by spontaneous (non-dynamical) unitary symmetry (superposition) breaking (effective hiding) representing an especial case of the spontaneous (non-dynamical) breaking (effective hiding) of the dynamical symmetries. All this is full agreement with all existing experimental data and represents the definitive solution of the old problem of "micro" theoretical foundation of measurement or old problem of the foundation of quantum mechanics as a local (luminal) physical theory.

  3. Typical atmospheric aerosol behavior at the Cherenkov Telescope Array candidate sites in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piacentini, Rubén D; Micheletti, María I; Salum, Graciela M; Maya, Javier; Mancilla, Alexis; García, Beatriz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosols from natural and antropogenic sources are one of the atmospheric components that have the largest spacial-temporal variability, depending on the type (land or ocean) surface, human activity and climatic conditions (mainly temperature and wind). Since Cherenkov photons generated by the incidence of a primary ultraenergetic cosmic gamma photon have a spectral intensity distribution concentrated in the UV and visible ranges [Hillas AM. Space Science Reviews, 75, 17-30, 1996], it is important to know the aerosol concentration and its contribution to atmospheric radiative transfer. We present results of this concentration measured in typical rather calm (not windy) days at San Antonio de los Cobres (SAC) and El Leoncito/CASLEO proposed Argentinean Andes range sites for the placement of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). In both places, the aerosol concentration has a peak in the 2.5-5.0$\\mu$m range of the mean aerosol diameter and a very low mean total concentration of 0.097$\\mu$g/m$^3$ (0.365$\\mu$g/m$^...

  4. Critical Path Method (CPM) Scheduling, Basic Engineering, and Project Approach for Typical Substation Engineering-Procurement-Construction (EPC) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamir, Dewan R.

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Field Project provides an overview of the typical substation Engineering-Procurement-Construction (EPC) project delivery method, the work breakdown structure, activities and sequences in the Critical Path Method (CPM) schedule, basic substation...

  5. Passive gust load alleviation through bend-twist coupling of composite beams on typical commercial airplane wings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauthier Perron, Sébastien

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of bend-twist coupling on typical commercial airplane wings are evaluated. An analytical formulation of the orthotropic box beam bending stiffness matrix is derived by combining Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and ...

  6. Corrosion of reinforcing steel is typically one of the main problems causing deterioration of concrete structures. The Microcomposite Multistructural Formable (MMFX) steel, which is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel is typically one of the main problems causing deterioration available steel, has proven to have high corrosion resistance in comparison with conventional steel without provides a high resistance to corrosion due to severe environmental exposure in comparison to the use

  7. Career Options for MBA Graduates An MBA graduate typically works in upper management positions with small and large corporations or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Career Options for MBA Graduates An MBA graduate typically works in upper management positions with small and large corporations or nonprofit organizations. Managers are needed in all businesses. The type of job often depends on prior work experience and elective courses taken in the MBA program. Popular job

  8. Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical Intra-oceanic Arc1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical at Dallas, Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083-0688, USA A B S T R A C T Major element compositions of glass of these lavas reflects accumulation of plagioclase. Glass inclusions also show the common occurrence of felsic

  9. Proc. IEEE PowerTech, Bucharest, June 2009. 1 Abstract-Power flow studies are typically used to determine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    Proc. IEEE PowerTech, Bucharest, June 2009. 1 Abstract-Power flow studies are typically used on the use of optimization techniques and worst-case scenario analysis. The application of these techniques assessment), thus allowing to evaluate the level of confidence of power flow studies. These algorithms should

  10. BS in Environmental Science: Typical Program of Study1 4 year (2011 Catalog) Fall Quarter Winter Quarter Spring Quarter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, John

    BS in Environmental Science: Typical Program of Study1 ­ 4 year (2011 Catalog) Fall Quarter Sciences (5) Core (5)4 ENSC 100Introduction to Environmental Science (2)5 Core (5) Sophomore BIOL) 1 In order to earn a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science, a student must complete 180

  11. Simulation of Control Options for HVAC Management of a Typical Office Julien CAILLET julien.caillet@mines-paristech.fr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Simulation of Control Options for HVAC Management of a Typical Office Building. Julien CAILLET thermal comfort and to reduce energy consumption of buildings. Among defect correction, HVAC control appears as a way of significant improvement. HVAC control is examined by using a dynamic simulation

  12. SIMULATION OF A TYPICAL HOUSE IN THE REGION OF ANTANANARIVO, MADAGASCAR DETERMINATION OF PASSIVE SOLUTIONS USING LOCAL MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SIMULATION OF A TYPICAL HOUSE IN THE REGION OF ANTANANARIVO, MADAGASCAR DETERMINATION OF PASSIVE union ABSTRACT This paper deals with new proposals for the design of passive solutions adapted use raw wood to warm the poorly designed houses. This leads to a large scale deforestation

  13. Determination of a peak benzene exposure to consumers at typical self-service gasoline stations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carapezza, Ted

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the public exposure to benzene at the self-serv1ce gas pump seems of paramount importance dur1ng this time of the highly publicized benzene hazard and increased gasoline consumption. These factors produced the amtivating effect for th1s research effort wh... Table ~Pa e I. HUMAN INHALATION EXPOSURE TO GASOLINE VAPOR. I I. SELF-SERVICE GASOLINE STATIONS . III. SAMPLING RESULTS IV. FIELD DATA: STATION I V. FIELD DATA: STATION II VI. FIEI D DATA: STATION III. VI I. FIELD DATA: STATION IV . VIII...

  14. Estimating solar access of typical residential rooftops: A case study in San Jose, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen M.; Gupta, Smita; Akbari, Hashem; Pomerantz, Melvin

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Shadows cast by trees and buildings can limit the solar access of rooftop solar-energy systems, including photovoltaic panels and thermal collectors. This study characterizes rooftop shading in a residential neighborhood of San Jose, CA, one of four regions analyzed in a wider study of the solar access of California homes.High-resolution orthophotos and LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) measurements of surface height were used to create a digital elevation model of all trees and buildings in a 4 km2 residential neighborhood. Hourly shading of roofing planes (the flat elements of roofs) was computed geometrically from the digital elevation model. Parcel boundaries were used to determine the extent to which roofing planes were shaded by trees and buildings in neighboring parcels.In the year in which surface heights were measured (2005), shadows from all sources ("total shading") reduced the insolation received by S-, SW-, and W-facing residential roofing planes in the study area by 13 - 16percent. Shadows cast by trees and buildings in neighboring parcels reduced insolation by no more than 2percent. After 30 years of simulated maximal tree growth, annual total shading increased to 19 - 22percent, and annual extraparcel shading increased to 3 - 4percent.

  15. Contaminant distributions at typical U.S. uranium milling facilities and their effect on remedial action decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamp, S. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office; Jackson, T.J. [Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dotson, P.W. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past operations at uranium processing sites throughout the US have resulted in local contamination of soils and ground water by radionuclides, toxic metals, or both. Understanding the origin of contamination and how the constituents are distributed is a basic element for planning remedial action decisions. This report describes the radiological and nonradiological species found in ground water at a typical US uranium milling facility. The report will provide the audience with an understanding of the vast spectrum of contaminants that must be controlled in planning solutions to the long-term management of these waste materials.

  16. Measured piping and component heat losses from a typical SFBP (Solar in Federal Buildings Program) solar system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francetic, J.S.; Robinson, K.S.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent comprehensive monitoring of solar energy systems has indicated that heat losses from system piping and components are much higher than originally expected. Theoretical analyses conducted at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) predict that operating plus standby (during shutdown) heat losses from a typical solar system could equal up to one-third of the total gross solar energy collected by the system. Detailed heat loss experiments were conducted on a Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP)-monitored site to identify and quantify actual piping, component, and thermosiphon heat losses for a typical day. The selected solar system, SFBP 4008, is a solar space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) system located at the Eisenhower Memorial Museum at Abilene, Kansas. The system has 4200 ft/sup 2/ of collector array located at a considerable distance from the mechanical building. Long lengths of exterior above-ground and buried piping connect the collectors to the mechanical room. Valves and pumps are uninsulated. The heat loss experiments at the Eisenhower site showed that 25% of the energy collected on a summer day was lost in pipes and components. Detailed results are given. 8 refs., 64 figs., 17 tabs.

  17. SSI response of a typical shear wall structure. Appendix B. In-structure response spectra comparisons. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.J.; Schewe, E.C.; Maslenikov, O.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this study were two-fold: (1) develop building response calibration factors, i.e., factors which relate best estimate or median level response to responses calculated by selected design procedures. Soil-structure interaction was the phenomenon of interest because significant simplifications are frequently introduced in its treatment; and (2) the second objective can be viewed in the context of a question: what effect does placing an identical structure on different sites and with different foundation conditions have on structure response. The structure selected for this study is a part of the Zion AFT complex. Only the auxiliary, fuel-handling, and diesel generator buildings were studied. This structure is a connected group of shear-wall buildings constructed of reinforced concrete, typical of nuclear power plant structures. The bases of comparison for this study were structure responses: peak in-structure accelerations (27 components), and peak wall forces and moments (111 components). In-structure response spectra were also considered. This appendix contains in-structure response spectra comparisons in detail.

  18. Biodegradable Products Institute is an organization that certifies that so-called "biodegradable" plastic products will safely break down in a typical commercial composting facility. www.bpiworld.org.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    -called "biodegradable" plastic products will safely break down in a typical commercial composting facility. www

  19. PV modules, with a life measured in decades, will typically be in place longer than the outdoor unit of a HVAC system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    PV modules, with a life measured in decades, will typically be in place longer than the outdoor and repaired promptly. PV systems suffer gradual degradation that is often not monitored, and the PV array may with copper conductors. On the other hand, PV systems have numerous modules (tens to thousands) and mounting

  20. Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part 2: Case Demonstration for a Typical Climate System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Zheng, K.; Wu, L.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In this part, a simulated air handling unit (AHU) system in Omaha NE is used to demonstrate the energy savings performance in one typical climate year. This AHU system has a static pressure reset system and two constant static pressure systems, one having...

  1. Energy Use Savings for a Typical New Residential Dwelling Unit Based on the 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) require a substantial improvement in energy efficiency compared to the 2006 IECC. This report averages the energy use savings for a typical new residential dwelling unit based on the 2009 and 2012 IECC compared to the 2006 IECC. Results are reported by the eight climate zones in the IECC and for the national average.

  2. Title: Analytic Evolutions in the Digital Ocean Until recently, the collection of data regarding the activity of learners typically required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of tests. The high cost of data collection and manipulation led to a relative paucity of data we referTitle: Analytic Evolutions in the Digital Ocean Abstract: Until recently, the collection of data performance data. This leads to a potential wealth of informative data we call the digital ocean. The two eras

  3. Postnatal penile growth concurrent with mini-puberty predicts later sex-typed play behavior: Evidence for neurobehavioral effects of the postnatal androgen surge in typically developing boys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasterski, Vickie; Acerini, Carlo L.; Dunger, David B.; Ong, Ken K.; Hughes, Ieuan A.; Thankamony, Ajay; Hines, Melissa

    2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    it remains until puberty (Achermann and Hadders-Algra, 2006). Though these parallel proce terized, their potential behavioral consequences, postnatal period, have yet to be fully understood. Experimental studies of rats and non-humanp exposure during... –192. Constantinescu, M., Hines, M., 2012. Relating prenatal testosterone exposure to postnatal be- havior in typically developing children: methods and findings. Child Dev. Perspect. 1–7. de Graaf-Peters, V.B., Hadders-Algra, M., 2006. Ontogeny of the human central...

  4. Chandra Deep X-ray Observation of a Typical Galactic Plane Region and Near-Infrared Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Ebisawa; M. Tsujimoto; A. Paizis; K. Hamaguchi; A. Bamba; R. Cutri; H. Kaneda; Y. Maeda; G. Sato; A. Senda; M. Ueno; S. Yamauchi; V. Beckmann; T. J. -L. Courvoisier; P. Dubath; E. Nishihara

    2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer Imaging array (ACIS-I), we have carried out a deep hard X-ray observation of the Galactic plane region at (l,b) ~ (28.5, 0.0), where no discrete X-ray source had been reported previously. We have detected 274 new point X-ray sources (4 sigma confidence) as well as strong Galactic diffuse emission within two partially overlapping ACIS-I fields (~250 arcmin^2in total). Sum of all the detected point source fluxes accounts for only ~ 10 % of the total X-ray flux in the field of view. Even hypothesizing a new population of much dimmer and numerous Galactic point sources, the total observed X-ray flux cannot be explained. Therefore, we conclude that X-ray emission from the Galactic plane has truly diffuse origin. Only 26 point sources were detected both in the soft and hard bands, indicating that there are two distinct classes of the X-ray sources distinguished by the spectral hardness ratio. Surface number density of the hard sources is only slightly higher than that measured at the high Galactic latitude regions, indicating that majority of the hard sources are background AGNs. Following up the Chandra observation, we have performed a near-infrared (NIR) survey with SOFI at ESO/NTT. Almost all the soft X-ray sources have been identified in NIR and their spectral types are consistent with main-sequence stars, suggesting most of them are nearby X-ray active stars. On the other hand, only 22 % of the hard sources had NIR counterparts, which are presumably Galactic. From X-ray and NIR spectral study, they are most likely to be quiescent cataclysmic variables. We have also carried out a precise spectral study of the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission excluding the point sources.

  5. Suggestion of typical phases of in-vessel fuel-debris by thermodynamic calculation for decommissioning technology of Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Yano, Kimihiko; Kaji, Naoya; Washiya, Tadahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Kondo, Yoshikazu; Noguchi, Yoshikazu [PESCO Co.Ltd. (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the decommissioning of the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), the characterization of fuel-debris in cores of Units 1-3 is necessary. In this study, typical phases of the in-vessel fuel-debris were estimated using a thermodynamic equilibrium (TDE) calculation. The FactSage program and NUCLEA database were applied to estimate the phase equilibria of debris. It was confirmed that the TDE calculation using the database can reproduce the phase separation behavior of debris observed in the Three Mile Island accident. In the TDE calculation of 1F, the oxygen potential [G(O{sub 2})] was assumed to be a variable. At low G(O{sub 2}) where metallic zirconium remains, (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2} were found as oxides, and oxygen-dispersed Zr, Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U), and Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2} were found as metals. With an increase in zirconium oxidation, the mass of those metals, especially Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2}, decreased, but the other phases of metals hardly changed qualitatively. Consequently, (U,Zr)O{sub 2} is suggested as a typical phase of oxide, and Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U) is suggested as that of metal. However, a more detailed estimation is necessary to consider the distribution of Fe in the reactor pressure vessel through core-melt progression. (authors)

  6. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in e-waste: Level and transfer in a typical e-waste recycling site in Shanghai, Eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yue; Duan, Yan-Ping, E-mail: duanyanping@tongji.edu.cn; Huang, Fan; Yang, Jing; Xiang, Nan; Meng, Xiang-Zhou; Chen, Ling

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • PBDEs were detected in the majority of e-waste. • PBDEs were found in TVs made in China after 1990. • The levels of ?PBDEs in e-waste made in Japan far exceed the threshold limit of RoHS. • The inappropriate recycling and disposal of e-waste is an important source of PBDEs. - Abstract: Very few data for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were available in the electronic waste (e-waste) as one of the most PBDEs emission source. This study reported concentrations of PBDEs in e-waste including printer, rice cooker, computer monitor, TV, electric iron and water dispenser, as well as dust from e-waste, e-waste dismantling workshop and surface soil from inside and outside of an e-waste recycling plant in Shanghai, Eastern China. The results showed that PBDEs were detected in the majority of e-waste, and the concentrations of ?PBDEs ranged from not detected to 175 g/kg, with a mean value of 10.8 g/kg. PBDEs were found in TVs made in China after 1990. The mean concentrations of ?PBDEs in e-waste made in Korea, Japan, Singapore and China were 1.84 g/kg, 20.5 g/kg, 0.91 g/kg, 4.48 g/kg, respectively. The levels of ?PBDEs in e-waste made in Japan far exceed the threshold limit of RoHS (1.00 g/kg). BDE-209 dominated in e-waste, accounting for over 93%. The compositional patterns of PBDEs congeners resembled the profile of Saytex 102E, indicating the source of deca-BDE. Among the samples of dust and surface soil from a typical e-waste recycling site, the highest concentrations of ?{sub 18}PBDEs and BDE-209 were found in dust in e-waste, ranging from 1960 to 340,710 ng/g and from 910 to 320,400 ng/g, which were 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than other samples. It suggested that PBDEs released from e-waste via dust, and then transferred to surrounding environment.

  7. For: Delegates predominantly from business but a few places will be reserved for senior repre-sentatives from the public sector and NGOs. Business delegates are typically senior execu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    - sentatives from the public sector and NGOs. Business delegates are typically senior execu- tives and maintain a Pro- gramme which brings together business leaders and key public sector and civil society global trends and challenges: energy and natural resource security, cities, consumption, emerging

  8. 19USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. A variety of vascular plant species exhibit typical foliar injury symptoms when exposed to ambient ozone, making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    exhibit typical foliar injury symptoms when exposed to ambient ozone, making them useful as bioindicators ozone monitors are not available. Bioindicators are often introduced plant species known as sentinels. They are known to be sensitive to ozone and will respond rapidly if they are given special care to ensure ozone

  9. Impact of Alternative Energy Prices, Tenure Arrangements and Irrigation Technologies on a Typical Texas High Plains Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petty, J. A.; Lacewell, R. D.; Hardin, D. C.; Whitson, R. E.

    and new technology. The model includes a Fortran sub-routine that adjusts irrigation factors each year based on the linear programming solution of the previous year. After calculating new pumping energy requirements, well yield, and pumping lift...

  10. SPECIAL ACQUISITION REQUIREMENTS ? TYPICAL ISSUES ASSOCIATED...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of following examples, which are listed at FAR 7.503(c): (1) The direct conduct of criminal investigations (2) The control of prosecutions and performance of adjudicatory...

  11. Structural impacts of the 1985 farm bill on typical farms in the Texas Southern High Plains and delta region of Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Charles Frederick

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Living Expenses Maximum Family Living Expenses Acres of Irrigated Cotton Acres of Dryland Cotton 44 51 41 126 327 561 91 236 406 1. 64 1. 44 1. 26 38750 100550 172750 94469 174458 163318 0 0 25000 5000 5000 5000 26172 49747 82237 42511 78506...

  12. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    is highly recommended for persons wishing to enter a program of study in veterinary medicine. Researching Outlook Handbook http://www.bls.gov/oco (type in general term for career of interest) Georgia Career Center Post Graduation Survey at www.career.uga.edu/gradsurveyresults/ and search for alumni on Linked

  13. Measured solubilities and speciations of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in a typical groundwater (J-13) from the Yucca Mountain region; Milestone report 3010-WBS 1.2.3.4.1.3.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitsche, H.; Gatti, R.C.; Standifer, E.M. [and others] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solubility and speciation data are important in understanding aqueous radionuclide transport through the geosphere. They define the source term for transport retardation processes such as sorption and colloid formation. Solubility and speciation data are useful in verifying the validity of geochemical codes that are part of predictive transport models. Results are presented from solubility and speciation experiments of {sup 237}NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, {sup 239}Pu{sup 4+}, {sup 241}Am{sup 3+}/Nd{sup 3+}, and {sup 243}Am{sup 3+} in J-13 groundwater (from the Yucca Mountain region, Nevada, which is being investigated as a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site) at three different temperatures (25{degree}, 60{degree}, and 90{degree}C) and pH values (5.9, 7.0, and 8.5). The solubility-controlling steady-state solids were identified and the speciation and/or oxidation states present in the supernatant solutions were determined. The neptunium solubility decreased with increasing temperature and pH. Plutonium concentrations decreased with increasing temperature and showed no trend with pH. The americium solutions showed no clear solubility trend with increasing temperature and increasing pH.

  14. Pulse Energy Typical Curve Validation Draft December 15, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes, technologies for building energy performance monitoring, smart buildings, ongoing commissioning-based energy information system (EIS) software for commercial buildings. One distinguishing aspect of the Pulse to advance the deployment of EIS, which are capable of enabling up to 20% reductions in building energy use

  15. Single-Hop Case Typically, linear regression (using the last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperature, voltage, etc... (30-100 ppm) Christoph Lenzen, Philipp Sommer, Roger Wattenhofer Computer of the 2nd International Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, 2004. [Sommer09] P. Sommer and R International Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks, 2009. [Lenzen09] C. Lenzen, P. Sommer

  16. Analysis of a typical Midwestern structure subjected to seismic loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Jason Frazier

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The extent of damage and casualties in Midwest cities such as St. Louis during an earthquake caused by the New Madrid fault system will be due in part to the performance of buildings. Dynamic nonlinear analysis of a reinforced concrete building...

  17. Typical Properties of Winners and Losers in Discrete Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beier, René

    .g., trav­ eling salesperson, shortest path, minimum spanning tree as well as various scheduling and packing and a linear objective function over {0,1} n . By parameterizing which constraints are of stochastic and which of individual problems. Our analysis covers various probability distributions for the choice of the stochastic

  18. Typical Properties of Winners and Losers in Discrete Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voecking, Berthold

    -studied optimization problems like, e.g., trav- eling salesperson, shortest path, minimum spanning tree as well function over {0,1}n. By parameterizing which constraints are of stochastic and which are of adversarial of individual problems. Our analysis covers various probability distributions for the choice of the stochastic

  19. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, T. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  20. TYPICAL HOT WATER DRAW PATTERNS BASED ON FIELD DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable Energy Laboratory Natural Resources Canada GasRenewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) performed with Integrated Building and Construction Solutions (IBACOS) Natural Resources Canada

  1. On the Absence of Ferromagnetism in Typical 2D Ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biskup, Marek

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the Ising systems in d dimensions with nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic interactions and long-range repulsive (antiferromagnetic) interactions that decay with power s of the distance. The physical context of such models is discussed; primarily this is d = 2 and s = 3 where, at long distances, genuine magnetic interactions between genuine magnetic dipoles are of this form.We prove that when the power of decay lies above d and does not exceed d + 1, then for all temperatures the spontaneous magnetization is zero. In contrast, we also show that for powers exceeding d + 1 (with d {ge} 2) magnetic order can occur.

  2. TYPICAL HOT WATER DRAW PATTERNS BASED ON FIELD DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Rating Residential Water Heaters. Atlanta, GA: ASHRAE,for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, andthe Energy Consumption of Water Heaters. Title 10 Code of

  3. MULTIFRACTAL SPECTRA OF TYPICAL AND PREVALENT FREDERIC BAYART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) }, it is well known that dimH(E-(µ; )) for any [0, dimH(K)] dimP(E+ (µ; )) for any [0, dimP(K)], where dimH(E) (resp. dimP(E)) denotes the Hausdorff (resp. the packing) dimension of E. By appropriate. The maps dimH E-(µ; ) and dimP E+(µ; ) are called the lower and the upper singularity spectrum of µ

  4. The Problem Conventional office lighting typically consists of bright fluo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by delamping--result in lower power consump- tion. The PLS, which features light-emitting diode (LED lighting is reduced and three light-emitting diode (LED) task lights (two desk lamps and one undercabinet

  5. Gradient–Controlled, Typical–Distance Clustering for Global ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An economical rule is one that does not spend a huge number of local searches to detect. that all minima have been found. The “region of attraction” or the ...

  6. Base-Exchange Properties of Some Typical Texas Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

    1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    31321 25905 29434 31833 29426 29438 29425 29365 26089 25967 25959 25869 26823 total exchange capacity Total exchange capacity Comparison of three Soil type Crockett fine sandy loam.. Amarillo fine sandy loam. .. Webb fine sandy loam.... .... Amarillo fine sandy loam. .. Yahola fine sandy loam. ... Willacy fine sandy loam.. .. Lomalto clay loam.. ...... Hidalgo clay loam. ........ Raymondville fine sandy loam.. ................. Victoria clay loam.. ...... Wilson clay...

  7. Sustainable urban forms for Chinese typical new towns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Sunhwa, 1980-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomena of exploding world urban population and sharply decreasing global arable lands are illustrated in contemporary China in a dramatically amplified form. Construction of many new towns in rural areas has been ...

  8. Signatures of Heating and Cooling Energy Consumption for Typical AHUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -duct system, the cold deck temperature is set to 55 OF. The hot deck temperature is reset based on the outside air temperature: it is set to 1 10 OF when the outside air temperature is below 40 OF and linearly decreases to 80 OF when the outside air... Cold deck temperature set point T, Supply air Floor area Changes made decreased from 55 OF to 53 OF raised from 1.2 cfm/ft2 to 1.3 cfm/ft2 raised from 120,000 ft2 to 130,000 ft2 - - Hot deck temperature set point Th 1 Outside air flow I...

  9. Waste Energy Analysis Recovery for a Typical Food Processing Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, P. H.; Mann, L., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy analysis made for the Joan of Arc Food Processing Plant in St. Francisville, Louisiana indicated that a significant quantity of waste heat energy was being released to the atmosphere in the forms of low quality steam and hot flue gases...

  10. ON THE ABSENCE OF FERROMAGNETISM IN TYPICAL 2D FERROMAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems interacting via Coulomb forces (s = 1), dipolar interactions (s = 3) as well as interactions.A. Kivelson. Reproduction, by any means, of the entire article for non- commercial purposes is permitted are forbidden for antiferromagnetic power law interactions with range d

  11. Typical Clothing Ensemble Insulation Levels for Sixteen Body Parts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Juyoun; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Comfort.1994 CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen Bodya mesh arm chair whose insulation level was measured. FigureExperimental Conditions. CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen

  12. Development of white matter pathways in typically developing preadolescent children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Davis, PhD b,c , Claudia Buss, PhD c , Ana Solodkin, PhD d ,Muftuler LT, Davis EP, Buss C, Head K, Hasso AN, Sandman CA.

  13. Sleep and Cortisol in Preschool-Aged Children with Autism and Typically Developing Children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, Sharon Audrey

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    after administration of 5-HTP, a precursor to serotonin.age berghs, 22 CONT before 5-HTP years of no differences inHealthy teen Belgium (post- HTP volunteers available from

  14. Creep and shrinkage of concrete typical of four geographical areas of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram, Leonard Lee

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creep Curves; Concrete Made at Lufkin 19 Creep Curves for 1000 and 2000 psi Stress 20 Creep Curves for the Four Locations 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 50 LIST OF FIGURES (CONTD) Figure Page 21 Predicted Cambers, Prediction Method Prom... installation of gaging points. A set of specimens consisted of 4 loaded prisms, 4 unloaded prisms, and 18 cylinders. Of the loaded prisms, two were loaded to 1000 psi and two were loaded to 2000 psi sustained stress. They were axially loaded parallel...

  15. augments male-typical sexual: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    patients with severely restricted peripheral Peli, Eli 83 RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access SMART: scalable and modular augmented reality Engineering Websites Summary: RESEARCH...

  16. Depletion region - spatial variation with reverse bias voltage of typical diffused p-n junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swasdee, Manot

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' t I k ) 2N22(SA' IN2122A 2N2218AI 2N2219AI 2N2221AI 2N2222A &curUnuud) SMALL SIGNAL FORWARO CIIRRENT CAIN TunrM, Mrme ANO VOLTAGE FEEOeACK RATIO versus COLLECTOR CURRENT Vca f0v Q I KC 2N221M. 1A22220 Io N 10 ID Is 100 60? la VI al al DS... used to store the potential V(I) - Node potentials - Dummy variables used to store the value of (I-1. 5) H and (I - 0. 5) e H, respectively B. Computer Program Figure II-1 is a flow chart of the numerical techniques used for determining...

  17. Attenuation of typical sex differences in 800 adults with autism vs. 3,900 controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Cassidy, Sarah; Auyeung, Bonnie; Allison, Carrie; Achoukhi, Maryam; Robertson, Sarah; Pohl, Alexa; Lai, Meng-Chuan

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ; Published July 16, 2014 Copyright: #2; 2014 Baron-Cohen et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided... . Most previous studies also suffer from relatively small sample sizes. An exception is the largest study to date using the Simons Simplex Collection, comparing autism symptoms in 304 female and 2,114 male children with ‘simplex’ autism, aged 4–18 years...

  18. GEOLOGY, December 2007 1063 Semi-arid and arid rivers typically exhibit increasing salinity levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmerom, Yemane

    of a sedimentary brine source. These groundwater fluxes, while very small (. Furthermore, 36 Cl/Cl ratios and 234 U values for these brines are close to secular equilibrium, indicating brine ages on the order of millions of years. The recognition of a substantial geologic salinity source

  19. Estimating solar access of typical residential rooftops: A case study in San Jose, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data Center (NREL MIDC) Solar Position and Intensity (J.A. and Beckman, W. A.. 2006. Solar Engineering of ThermalOF ROOFING PLANES (%) IN SOLAR ACCESS VIOLATION BY MONTH AND

  20. IIFET 2010 Montpellier Proceedings5 Species Products Areas/ localisation Actors Product typicity Adding-value Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ; different fishing villages Small-scale fishermen Not really (only extensive fishing methods which do not overexploit the stocks : handline ; encircling gillnet « félé-félé » ; beach seine) Fair-Fish, Switzerland of the Sea 2007 World Export : Swiss consumer via Migros supermarket + minimum of fair- fish products

  1. HOW BEHAVE THE TYPICAL Lq-DIMENSIONS OF MEASURES? FREDERIC BAYART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . The Hausdorff and the packing dimension of E are denoted respectively by dimH(E) and dimP(E). Also, for a subset

  2. Typically, hotel bathroom lights are left on between five to eight hours per occupied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -public spaces, the energy efficient, super bright light-emitting diode (LED) nightlight remains on whenever

  3. California Struggles With Its On a typically sunny October day in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    . And recycled water will be used in order to do the landscaping. And solar panels will be used to ¡IOM, that's not healthy," Tep- per says. People power Such is the power of the statute known throughout the law to stymie even the most powerful developers and elected of- ficials. But citizens' ability to slow

  4. #!/usr/bin/python # Program mref.py converts typical .tex file into ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... links by reference to MR database using MREF # Written by Bartlomiej Siudeja # Based on script mrefh.py by Jim Pitman pitman@stat.berkeley.edu 10/10/03.

  5. An Economic Study of a Typical Ranching Area on the Edwards Plateau of Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngblood, B. (Bonney); Cox, Alonzo B. (Alonzo Bettis)

    1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lands 91 ........... Amount and Function of Each Class of Land 92 .................................... All Lands 92 ................................. Cultivated Lands 92 ..................... Tillable Lands Still in Grass 95 Arable Land... in the study into cul- tivated land, tillable land still in grass, non-arable grazing land; the average number of each per ranch, the distribution ............................. of lands by percentages 93 Showing the cultivated lands; the average number...

  6. Top-K Queries on Uncertain Data: On Score Distribution and Typical Answers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Tingjian

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertain data arises in a number of domains, including data integration and sensor networks. Top-k queries that rank results according to some user-defined score are an important tool for exploring large uncertain data ...

  7. FAPC 108 / 1 Table 1. Products typically handled by sanitary centrifugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    , and Cosmetic Act, as well as other standards. Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) were developed to establish Other Cleaning solutions FAPC-108Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service · Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources FOOD TECHNOLOGY FACTS FOOD & Agricultural Products Center FAPC Sanitary Pump

  8. The economical use of standby equipment for a typical Kraft process pulp and paper mill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Elmer Adrain

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the pine system is about 350 tons of pulp per day. The ~Pa er Mill The Beater Room - In the beater room the paper making chemicals such as rosin, size, alum, and clay are added to the pulp in a mixing chest. Size is any substance which is added to a... it in on the supposition that it may do some good, Alum, used to denote aluminum sulphate, is used to precipitate the dissolved rosin in the size on the fibers of the paper. This is sometimes referred to as "setting" the size. Alum tends to make the paper hard...

  9. Analysis of drainage and consolidation at typical uranium mill tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayer, M.J.; Conbere, W.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer code TRUNC was used to analyze three aspects of uranium mill tailings dewatering: the coupling of consolidation and fluid flow, drainage design, and cover load. One-dimensional simulations of the effects of consolidation on fluid flow within a tailings pile of either slimes or a sand/slimes mix showed that drainage flux was greater for a consolidating system early in the simulation. However, after days 1400 and 160 of the simulations for the slimes and sand/slimes mix, respectively, the fluxes from the nonconsolidating systems were greater. In the sand/slimes mix, the nonconsolidating system had a cumulative flux by day 5000 that was 93% of that of the consolidating system. At the same time, in the slimes tailings piles the nonconsolidating system had a cumulative flux of only 34% of that of the consolidating system. This difference indicates that consolidation and fluid flow should not be decoupled for the slimes. Two-dimensional simulations of an actual tailings pile drainage design showed that a sand blanket drain increased the rate of drainage and settlement. The sand blanket drain also significantly reduced differential settlement across the pile. This indicates that the use of a sand blanket drain could enable earlier placement of the cover system after tailings emplacement. In simulations of covered and uncovered tailings piles, nearly the same quantity of water was removed from each, but drainage occurred much more slowly without the cover; hence, surface settlement was slower when the tailings pile was not covered. 10 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. A study of typical farm service buildings to determine panel sizes and loadings in current use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, William Stuart

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ ~ ~ ~ . ~ . . . ~ ~ ~ . . ~ , ~ . . . . ~ . . . ~ ~ ~ . ~ ? 62 Wind Pzessures ln Pounds per Square Foot of Surface Area with the Wind Assumed to be Blowing Perpen? dlcular to the Side of a Cables Poof Structure ??65 XVI ' Wind Pressures in Pounds per Square Foot of Surface Area with the Mind Assumed... Foot of Horisontally Projected Roof Area ~ ~ . . . . . . . . . . ~ , . 69 I'I( EMAIL 1 ~ Nap of the Dnited States Showing the 'weather Districts, ~ 15 IX ~ Nsp of the United States Showing the Weather kiegions for llnd Design Velocitg Purposes...

  11. U.S EPA Research Triangle Park Campus, Typical Office Wing

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Research Triangle Park, NC The EPA's new RTP campus includes laboratories and offices for over 2,000 people. One of the three 3-story office blocks is described here. The building sits on the shore of an artificial lake, and is part of a larger campus of federal facilities that share a central cooling plant.

  12. Page 1 / 14 An experience of dependability assessment of a typical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firenze, Università degli Studi di

    its dependability attributes related to Safety Integrity Levels as defined by IEC61508 standard. Currently, an emergent standard which does not address any specific industrial sector is IEC 61508. IEC on programmable electronic systems can be addressed. The strategy proposed by IEC 61508 takes into account

  13. On the Relations among Linguistic Subsystems in Typically Developing Children and Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polse, Lara Rosalin

    in reading prediction. Annals of Dyslexia, 51, 179-202. doi:D. , & Morfidi, E. (2010). Dutch dyslexia in adulthood: CoreFrom 3-16 years of age. Dyslexia, 11(2), 79-92. doi:

  14. Thermosyphon Cooler Hybrid System Providing Water Resiliency in a typical Chemical Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, T. P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .p.carter@jci.com ESL-IE-14-05-20 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 2Johnson Controls is a globally diversified company in the building and automotive industries Automotive Experience...Building Efficiency Power Solutions • 170,000 Employees • Serving Customers in 150+ Countries • $42.7B in Revenue in 2013 • Headquartered in Milwaukee, WI ESL-IE-14-05-20 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20...

  15. Application-specific integrated circuit design for a typical pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battle, R.E.; Manges, W.W.; Emery, M.S.; Vendermolen, R.I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bhatt, S. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the use of application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in nuclear plant safety systems. ASICs have certain advantages over software-based systems because they can be simple enough to be thoroughly tested, and they can be tailored to replace existing equipment. An architecture to replace a pressurized water reactor pressure channel trip is presented. Methods of implementing digital algorithms are also discussed.

  16. Photo of the Week: Not Your Typical Jet Engine | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ve-years-building-next-generation-reactors-0" target"blank">Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), one of the Department's Energy Innovation...

  17. SLEEP, Vol. 32, No. 11, 2009 1521 THE DIAGNOSIS OF SLEEP APNEA TYPICALLY IN-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : This is a feasibility study designed to evaluate the accuracy of thermal infrared imaging (TIRI) as a noncontact method (na- sal pressure [Pn], oronasal thermistor, expired CO2 waveform [PE CO2 ]) using contact sensors.1-5 A subject can come in contact with at least 20 such sensors during a study. These sensors and the wires can

  18. Typical Generation Costs New generation must be continuously planned and built to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    . 12a: 2006 Electric Energy Production by Fuel Source #12;2 Fig. 12b: 2006 Electric Energy Production

  19. Operational control and maintenance integrity of typical and atypical coil tube steam generating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardwood, E.S.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coil tube steam generators are low water volume to boiler horsepower (bhp) rating, rapid steaming units which occupy substantially less space per boiler horsepower than equivalent conventional tire tube and water tube boilers. These units can be retrofitted into existing steam systems with relative ease and are more efficient than the generators they replace. During the early 1970's they became a popular choice for steam generation in commercial, institutional and light to medium industrial applications. Although these boiler designs do not require skilled or certified operators, an appreciation for a number of the operational conditions that result in lower unscheduled maintenance, increased reliability and availability cycles would be beneficial to facility owners, managers, and operators. Conditions which afford lower operating and maintenance costs will be discussed from a practical point of view. An overview of boiler design and operation is also included. Pitfalls are provided for operational and idle conditions. Water treatment application, as well as steam system operations not conducive to maintaining long term system integrity; with resolutions, will be addressed.

  20. The impact of sheared vs. sawn timber in the typical southern pine plywood mill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swinney, Russell Garrett

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Areas of impact from sheared logs within the plywood manufacturing process. 20 5. BP grade veneer peeled from the butt end of a sawn log 25 6. BP grade veneer peeled from the butt end of a sheared log. 26 7. Visible defects in veneer resulting from... two block log is trimmed four to six inches to eliminate obvious shear damage, then the log will be too short to get two 103-inch blocks. The result is that one block will be chipped for sale to a pulp mill rather than peeled for veneer for use...

  1. Typical College Student Diet Food Derived Microorganisms and Their Relation to the Human Gastrointestinal Microflora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haselhorst, Alexandria J.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    not yet concrete (11). These probiotics are presently sold commercially in fermented dairy products such as yogurt. Dannon?s Activia? (which contain Bifidus regularis?) and Yakult? (which contains Lactobacillus casei) are examples of such product.... There are reports that in the future, these probiotics may be found in fermented vegetables and meat (11). Prebiotics can be defined as non-digestible food that beneficially affects the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of bacteria...

  2. Versatile Indian sari: Clothing insulation with different drapes of typical sari ensembles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indraganti, Madhavi; Lee, Juyoun; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extension of the Clothing Insulation Database for Standardand air movement on that insulation. , s.l. : s.n. Havenith,Estimation of the thermal insulation and evaporative

  3. Estimating solar access of typical residential rooftops: A case study in San Jose, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the installation of a solar collector on the property ofabsorption area upon that solar collector surface on thesolar-energy systems, including photovoltaic panels and thermal collectors.

  4. Creep and shrinkage of concrete typical of four geographical areas of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram, Leonard Lee

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the long axes by hydraulic jacks and the loads were sustained by means of heavy helical springs. During the loading operation, the load was monitored with a load cell. Figure 2 (a), (b), and (c) show the concrete prism, gage insert, and steel frame... 6, 710 6, 770 7, 530 7, 420 5, 370 5, 400 5, 250 5, 850 4, 440 5, 320 5, 130 4, 740 4, 520 8, 020 8, 500 8, 320 8, 500 7, 080 6, 840 7, 960 7, 350 5, 650 5, 680 5, 430 5, 480 5, 050 5, 020 4, 400 4, 550 '&Average of 2...

  5. Abundance and distribution of potential arthropod prey species in a typical Golden cheeked Warbler habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Michael Andrew

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and has found 97 genera, including 38 tribes and 13 families. He has determined that 41% of the species that he's collected are at or near the northern boundary of their range, 39% are in midrange, 18% are near the eastern boundary of their range, 17...

  6. Variation in the autism candidate gene GABRB3 modulates tactile sensitivity in typically developing children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavassoli, Teresa; Auyeung, Bonnie; Murphy, Laura C; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    City, CA, USA). The genotyping call rate was 99.45%. No SNP deviated significantly from Hardy- Weinberg equilibrium (P <0.05) (as determined using http://www.changbioscience.com/genetics/hardy). Statistical analysis UNPHASED 3.1.4 was used to test...

  7. This is a typical amateur-astronomer's green laser pointer, shown with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Joshua Edward

    arrested the preceding week after allegedly shining a green laser at a private jet on approach to a nearby airport and then at a police helicopter dispatched to search for the culprit. According to the criminal on the Use ... 8/19/10 9:32 AM http://www.printthis.clickability.com/pt/cpt?action=cpt&title=S... 1 of 5 #12

  8. Estimating solar access of typical residential rooftops: A case study in San Jose, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and/or thermal collection by rooftop solar-energy equipment.solar access of rooftop solar-energy systems, including photovoltaic panels and thermalsolar access of rooftop solar-energy systems, including photovoltaic panels and thermal

  9. Typical Oak Ridge cemesto houses and city bus | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Zandofpoint motional StarkFuel Cells

  10. Six Sigma in Design Engineering - A Case Study and Implementation of Typical Pile Cap Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoog, Reggie

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ..............................................................................11-4 11.4 Project Charter ..................................................................................11-5 11.5 Examples of tools used (CTQ tree, FMEA, CTQ Prioritization) .........11-6 11.6 ?As is? process map...

  11. Structure of The Dixie Valley Geothermal System, a "Typical" Basin and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to: navigation, search Name StratosolarInformation|Range

  12. DOE Announces Webinars on High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars October 23: Live Webinar on High...

  13. A New Paradigm in Sources and Physics of High-Power Ionospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    materials operated at high power microwave (HPM) devices to replace the current , ionospheric modificaHPM to re-examine the coupling typical university HPM laboratory condi

  14. Nanoscale high-temperature superconductivity P. Mohanty a,*, J.Y.T. Wei b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Raj

    of high-temperature superconducting nanoscale devices, including Y-junctions, four-probe wires and rings-Tc superconducting (HTS) cuprate structures are only a few nanometers in size [1]. Scan- ning tunneling microscopy on a typical HTS surface gives microscopic length scales of unit cells and do- mains, typically in the range

  15. A Prototype Radon Filter for Air A typical, recurring problem in low-background physics is the contamination of sensitive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the contamination of sensitive surfaces of experimental apparata with the radioactive decay products of 222Rn . What

  16. The typical time for a grad student to get a PhD in this country is ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    While children spend their first 1 year coming to grips with fundamental issues of motion and eating, they develop speech in the next year and grammar soon ...

  17. How we come to process 'what' and 'where' in our visual environment : insights from typical and atypical developmental populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Brianna Michelle

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    magnocellular theory of dyslexia." Trends in Neurosciencesdisorders, including dyslexia ( the ‘magnocellulardisorders, including dyslexia (the ‘magnocellular

  18. Metrics (and Methodologies) for Evaluating Energy and Water Impacts of Alternative Process Cooling Systems in a Typical Chemical Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, T. P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and automotive industries Automotive ExperienceBuilding Efficiency Power Solutions • 170,000 Employees • Serving Customers in 150+ Countries • $42.7B in Revenue in 2013 • Headquartered in Milwaukee, WI ESL-IE-14-05-19 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial... Johnson Controls, Building Efficiency thomas.p.carter@jci.com ESL-IE-14-05-19 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 2Johnson Controls is a globally diversified company in the building...

  19. Social Media revolutionising the building industry towards sustainability Buildings have typically been a conservative industry seeing only incremental changes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and operate our buildings. This specialised platform is supported by Europe's most influential Green Building building practitioners. A project strongly supported by Europe to develop green economy. 1 #12;2 A database, to ensure strong roots in their respective building sectors : Green Building Council in Germany and Romania

  20. are typically installed in conduit. Electrical metallic tubing (EMT) is commonly used, and, where allowed by local codes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    methods required in PV systems that operate ungrounded and use the new transformerless inverters, but is acceptable only when properly attached to the supporting structure. PV output conductors routed through the building to the DC PV disconnect must be installed in metal conduit. Nonmetallic conduits

  1. Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was simulated. The radiant cooling system was an exposedcooling + radiant cooling system alone may not be able toembedded surface radiant cooling systems. Table 3 summarizes

  2. Formation and fragmentation of superclusters in semiconductors: The alloy properties of semiconductors are typically viewed as emerging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    , Los Alamos National Laboratory, 60 Telsa "Long-Pulse" magnet Citation: K. Alberi, S. A. Crooker, B

  3. Simulation as a Tool to Develop Guidelines of Envelope Design of a Typical Office Building in Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samaan, M.M.; Ahmed, A.N.; Farag, O.M.A.; El-Sayed Khalil, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the use of building performance simulation software in order to develop guidelines for designing energy-efficient office building. In Egypt energy codes for all building types are being under development. On the other hand...

  4. BPA, Transmission, I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Project, diagram of typical access roads and gate, posted March 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade Later: AreAugust 19,1B O NMay

  5. Development of a high-efficiency solar micro-inverter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayman, Alexander Khaled

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In typical solar power installations, multiple modules are connected to the grid through a single high-power inverter. However, an alternative approach is to connect each solar module directly to the grid through a ...

  6. Operator Performance in Long Duration Control Operations: Switching from Low to High Task Load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornburg, K. M.

    Long duration, low task load environments are typical for nuclear power plant control rooms, where operators, after hours of operating under a low task load situation, may have to shift to a high task load situation. The ...

  7. Structural performance of early 20th century masonry high rise buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buntrock, Rebecca (Rebecca Miriam)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early generation high rise buildings built between 1890 and World War 11 represent a technical transition between traditional load bearing masonry construction and modern curtain wall systems, and are typically referred ...

  8. Coupling: Impact and Implications for High-Resolution Time-Lapse Seismic Surveying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Shelby Lynn

    2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions with repeat shots has a different effect on surface waves and compressional waves. This observation has potential application to wavefield separation. Acquisition approaches typically used to optimize 2D or 3D high-resolution seismic surveys may...

  9. Selective high-affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each binds different regions on the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  10. Study of Energy and Demand Savings on a High Efficiency Hydraulic Pump System with Infinite Turn Down Technology (ITDT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sfeir, R. A.; Kanungo, A.; Liou, S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed field measurement and verification of electrical energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings is conducted on an injection molding machine used in typical plastic manufacturing facility retrofitted with a high efficiency hydraulic pump system...

  11. Study of turbulent single-phase heat transfer and onset of nucleate boiling in high aspect ratio mini-channels to support the MITR LEU conversion/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Eric Christopher

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer in high aspect ratio mini-channels has important applications for materials test reactors using plate-type fuel. These fuel plates typically possess coolant channels with hydraulic diameters on the order of ...

  12. Calculational analysis of structural activation induced by 20-100 MeV proton beam loss in high-power linear accelerators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Stacey Kirsten

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to obtain dose rate estimates at several locations near the accelerator. To perform these calculations, simplified computer models were developed from detailed engineering drawings of a typical high-power accelerator design. This research focused on the 20...

  13. High School or PSEO: Important Differences to Consider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    High School or PSEO: Important Differences to Consider High School College High school set priorities Most classes are arranged for you The school year is typically 36 weeks long You may Teachers often arrange test dates to avoid conflict with school events Grades are given for most assigned

  14. Mode-Locked Fibre Lasers with High-Energy Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    , including generation of ultra-short and high-energy pulses. Since the invention of the laser researchers, technological, medical, and other applications. High energies and ultra-short pulse durations are both resonators. In addition, the path to high-energy ultra-short pulses is, typically, further complicated

  15. GUIDANCE ON ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS This document includes definitions and examples of expenditure types that would typically be considered unallowable direct charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    GUIDANCE ON ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS This document includes definitions and examples Circular A-21 and the Cost Accounting Standards (CAS). This document is meant to be a reference tool to as needed. This document is general in nature and is NOT an exhaustive list of unallowable costs for all

  16. CSE 4383/6383, Quiz 3 Fall 2011 Name / Net ID__________________________ 1. Explain a typical approach for poisoning the cache of a DNS server.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramkumar, Mahalingam

    approach for poisoning the cache of a DNS server. Attacker sets up a domain,and runs a DNS sever to poison and immediately send the fake response (using appropriate sequence numbers, and addressing

  17. An investigation to determine the optimum number of supports for a typical supersonic tactical aircraft aileron with and without wing bending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Marion Charles

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    " 2g II A. Syy, O 0 A C". Q A 4 4 4 P O O a CU V) V) ~ 0 ? 1. ") t' I Go 25, PAR AP S C r. F'oa Case 111 ? WiNr. BEgoitug (8 ~MR: 5%~ REESSHEREE% ~ RRRREERIRRIREEIR~E54%~ EEEIRRI%%4EIRRWRIRKEE&IRRRWREISIRRR4%REIE RIRRERI~es ERR~+g4RP... AS S'IOWN IN FI G A-1 I'0 PRI VEN I' Ro TAT ION OF IHF . !O!NT, BY THE ADOPI ED SIGN ONVENI I ONy IHE FEMW I S 0 II VL N A POSITIVE S I GIV S INDE I I PRODLICES OOHPRESSI ON IN THE TOP F I BER, FEMw FEMw F I G, A-1 o APPL I cAI' I ON OF FEMw, DE...

  18. An investigation to determine the optimum number of supports for a typical supersonic tactical aircraft aileron with and without wing bending 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Marion Charles

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 I AGRAMS FOR CASE 1 I-R I G ID 4/I NG ~ 12 SPAB CAP FOR CASE l1-RIGID WING SPAR CAP INERTIA DISTRIBUTION FOR CASE 1 I? RIGIO WING. . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -- * ~ 'l5 PIGMENT 0 I STRI BUT I QN FOR CASE I I'I-Rl G ID WING 16 SHEAB AND /1OMENT DIAGRAMS...4IHUH VALUE BASED Qll TNE ABOVE RATIO AND A HAILIHUN VALUE WITEN ALL SUPPORTS HAVE AN EQUAL WK I SN T DKTERH I NKD BY THE SUPPORT WK I DHT AT HAX I NUH SHEAR o THE A I L EBON CONNECTED TO A R I 0 I D Inl I NG IF THE AILERON DOES NOT BEND UNDER...

  19. Populations of southern pine beetle (SPB) are typically substructured into local aggregations, each with tens of thousands of individual beetles. These

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayres, Matthew.P.

    and death rate of individuals. However, for most of the year SPB populations tend to be substructured United States, where they have been most studied, these spots tend to have an annual life cycle of the birth rate and death rate of spots. SPB abundance in a landscape grows when there are more spots in one

  20. Size always matters : an investigation of the influence of connection length on the organization of white-matter in typical development and in autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, John D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozonoff, S. , Coon, H. , Krasny, L. , Dinh, E. , Nice, J. ,Ozonoff, S. , Coon, H. , Krasny, L. , Dinh, E. , Nice, J. ,Ozonoff, S. , Coon, H. , Krasny, L. , Dinh, E. , Nice, J. ,

  1. *May require additional education or certification. ***For more detailed information regarding typical duties, salary, training, etc please look at the Occupational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    /Universities · Consulting Firms · Cosmetic Companies · Energy Department (Government) · Environmental Agencies · Fish://www.aaas.org/ · American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) www.aafs.org · Botanical Society of America (BSA) www

  2. When asked to envision a typical workspace, most of us imagine neutral colors, generic cubicles, and fluorescent lights. The work done in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and metal is actually a carefully positioned network of optical instruments that Caltech scientists use of Jeff Kimble, William L. Valentine Professor and professor setup to transport laser light through

  3. I2S2 Idealised Scientific Research Activity Lifecycle Model The model represents the processes and phases of a typical physical science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    I2S2 Idealised Scientific Research Activity Lifecycle Model The model represents the processes include: development of the research proposal; its peer-review; carrying out of the experiment; equipment configuration and calibration data; processing software and associated control parameters; wikis

  4. THE EFFECTS OF THERAPIST-MEDIATED SIGNALS AND PARTICIPANT-MEDIATED RESPONSES ON THE DELAY TOLERANCE OF TYPICALLY DEVELOPING PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newquist, Matthew H.

    2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the current study was to compare the effects of providing a brief versus a continuous signal during delays to reinforcement on preschool children's tolerance of delays and to assess whether children's delay ...

  5. Appendix G: Sample Laboratory Report There is no set length for a problem report but experience shows that good reports are typically three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    E me tin = qV sme tin (s is the separation distance between the 2 parallel deflection plates) Deflection = 1 2 atin 2 + tout = 1 2 atin 2 + D vII = 1 2 qV sme L vII 2 + qV sme L vII D vII = qV sme

  6. Appendix F: Sample Laboratory Report There is no set length for a problem report but experience shows that good reports are typically three pages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    velocity due to the deflection plates: tin = L II = a tin = qE me tin = qV sme tin (s is the separation atin 2 + tout = 1 2 atin 2 + D vII = 1 2 qV sme L vII 2 + qV sme L vII D vII = qV sme L vII( )2

  7. int. j. remote sensing, 2001, vol. 22, no. 2 & 3, 275295 Non-isotropy of the upward radiance eld in typical coastal (Case 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    more importantly, when carrying out at-sea radiometric measurements in support of calibration of remote above the water body (essentially governed by the solar angle). Based on the use of lookup tables (for. In such waters, the optical properties are no longer determined by the sole presence of algal cells

  8. LASERS TO THE RESCUE In popular culture, lasers are typically used by the bad guys to menace superheroes. But at the Beckman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christine Cheng participates in a 3-D word search during Caltech's infamous Ditch Day, held this past. The 3-D word search was part of the Ender's Game stack organized by Lloyd House seniors. Other & SCIENCE FALL 2013 random walk #12;Number of experiments our printing representative ran to find the source

  9. Students gain experience through new internship When the summer began, Samrakshak Lamichhane wasn't certain what a typical work day might

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Students gain experience through new internship program When the summer began, Samrakshak internship program, Lamichhane and three other undergraduates got a taste of real-world operations and gained

  10. Semantic and pragmatic language development in typical acquisition, autism spectrum disorders, and Williams syndrome with reference to developmental neurogenetics of the latter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modyanova, Nadezhda N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The elucidation of the biological bases of a complex trait like human language proceeds from identification of precise behavioral phenotypes to investigation of the underlying genes. The human behavioral parts of this ...

  11. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. VI. RADIO OBSERVATIONS AT z {approx}< 1 AND CONSISTENCY WITH TYPICAL STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalowski, M. J.; Dunlop, J. S. [SUPA (Scottish Universities Physics Alliance), Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Kamble, A.; Kaplan, D. L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kruehler, T. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Reinfrank, R. F. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bonavera, L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, Avda. de los Castros s/n, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Castro Ceron, J. M. [Department of Radio Astronomy, Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex (INTA-NASA/INSA), Ctra. M-531, km. 7, E-28.294 Robledo de Chavela (Madrid) (Spain); Ibar, E. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Garrett, M. A. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Jakobsson, P. [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Massardi, M. [INAF-Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Pal, S. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA (Australia); Sollerman, J. [Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Van der Horst, A. J., E-mail: mm@roe.ac.uk [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to determine the level of obscured star formation activity and dust attenuation in a sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts, and to test the hypothesis that GRB hosts have properties consistent with those of the general star-forming galaxy populations. We present a radio continuum survey of all z < 1 GRB hosts in The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) sample supplemented with radio data for all (mostly pre-Swift) GRB-SN hosts discovered before 2006 October. We present new radio data for 22 objects and have obtained a detection for three of them (GRB 980425, 021211, 031203; none in the TOUGH sample), increasing the number of radio-detected GRB hosts from two to five. The star formation rate (SFR) for the GRB 021211 host of {approx}825 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, the highest ever reported for a GRB host, places it in the category of ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We found that at least {approx}63% of GRB hosts have SFR < 100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and at most {approx}8% can have SFR > 500 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. For the undetected hosts the mean radio flux (<35 {mu}Jy 3{sigma}) corresponds to an average SFR < 15 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Moreover, {approx}> 88% of the z {approx}< 1 GRB hosts have ultraviolet dust attenuation A{sub UV} < 6.7 mag (visual attenuation A{sub V} < 3 mag). Hence, we did not find evidence for large dust obscuration in a majority of GRB hosts. Finally, we found that the distributions of SFRs and A{sub UV} of GRB hosts are consistent with those of Lyman break galaxies, H{alpha} emitters at similar redshifts, and of galaxies from cosmological simulations. The similarity of the GRB population with other star-forming galaxies is consistent with the hypothesis that GRBs, a least at z {approx}< 1, trace a large fraction of all star formation, and are therefore less biased indicators than once thought.

  12. SPECIAL ACQUISITION REQUIREMENTS ─ TYPICAL ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH PERSONAL SERVICES AND INHERENTLY GOVERNMENTAL FUNCITONS WHEN CONTRACTORS WORK IN THE FEDERAL WORKPLACE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913|| Department ofSOLID4,Sam

  13. International Conference on Microwave and High Frequency Heating Nottingham, UK, September 2013 Underwater Microwave Ignition of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerby, Eli

    -cost operation [4, 5]. Thermite reaction as a self-propagated, high-temperature synthesis (SHS) process, Localized microwave heating, underwater ignition, combustion. INTRODUCTION Self-propagated thermite reactions between metal-oxide and metals typically burn at high flame temperatures, and require high

  14. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste uranium oxides The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  15. HIGH RESOLUTION SEDIMENT DYNAMICS IN SALT-WEDGE ESTUARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay, David

    and Columbia River estuaries switch between two extremes of mixing on very small horizontal scales; over compared well with in situ settling tube observations, typically within a factor of 2. ACCOMPLISHMENTS arm of the Fraser River estuary (Figure 1). River flow during the study was very high, approximately

  16. Iterative Learning Control Applications to High Power Microwave Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    high­peak power microwave (HPM) sources typically operate in the single shot regime because commercial HPM systems that operate at modest repetition rates, two examples of which include a system based is then to implement the control algorithms on a physical tube in order to build a ``smart tube'' HPM source. By smart

  17. Iterative Learning Control Applications to High Power Microwave Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    high-peak power microwave (HPM) sources typically operate in the single shot regime because commercial HPM systems that operate at modest repetition rates, two examples of which include a system based is then to implement the control algorithms on a physical tube in order to build a "smart tube" HPM source. By smart

  18. Iterative Learning Control Applications to High Power Microwave Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction Present day high-peak power microwave (HPM) sources typically operate in the * *single shot], [2]. There are however commercial HPM systems that operate at modest repetition rates, two examples repetition* * rate is attractive for practical implementation of an HPM system. The physics

  19. Iterative Learning Control Applications to High Power Microwave Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Present day high­peak power microwave (HPM) sources typically operate in the single shot regime because commercial HPM systems that operate at modest repetition rates, two examples of which include a system based implementation of an HPM system. The physics of the interaction between a relativistic electron beam and various

  20. Iterative Learning Control Applications to High Power Microwave Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    day high-peak power microwave (HPM) sources typically operate in the * *single shot regime because commercial HPM systems that operate at modest repetition rates, two examples of* * which include a system the control algorithms on a * *physical tube in order to build a "smart tube" HPM source. By smart tube we

  1. NETWORKING FOR HIGH ENERGY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS AS GLOBAL E-SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    an overview of the status and outlook for the world's research networks, technology advances, and the problemNETWORKING FOR HIGH ENERGY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS AS GLOBAL E-SCIENCE Harvey B Newman, California are vital for every phase of high energy physicists' work. Our bandwidth usage, and the typical capacity

  2. High Speed Compressors P.B. Bailey, M. W. Dadd, C. R. Stone.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 High Speed Compressors P.B. Bailey, M. W. Dadd, C. R. Stone. Oxford University, Department compressors with a high power density, and one method of achieving this is to increase the operating frequency of the compressor. The `Oxford' type clearance seal/flexure bearing compressors are typically operated close

  3. High surface area crystalline titanium dioxide: potential and limits in electrochemical energy storage and catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    High surface area crystalline titanium dioxide: potential and limits in electrochemical energy-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz, Germany Abstract Titanium dioxide is one, as support in catalysis etc. Common synthesis methods of titanium dioxide typically require a high

  4. FRICTION FACTOR IN HIGH PRESSURE NATURAL GAS PIPELINES FROM ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

    FRICTION FACTOR IN HIGH PRESSURE NATURAL GAS PIPELINES FROM ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS DETERMINATION DU and Technology, Norway ABSTRACT Pressure drop experiments on natural gas flow at 80 to 120 bar pressure and high of natural gas at typical operating pressures (100-180 bar). At such Reynolds numbers the classical Colebrook

  5. Evaluation of high strength concrete prestressed bridge girder design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuadros Olave, Gladys

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    : Closed Box CIP................................................................................................................70 4.16 Typical Bridges with HSC Prestressed Members Structural Type: AASHTO Beam...

  6. Updated: 2013.07.30 BB! 1 This schedule is written for 13 weeks of instruction. In a typical semester there are 14 teaching weeks, thus some flexibility is built in.This schedule is written for 13 weeks of instruction. In a typical semester there are 14 t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biondini, Gino

    -11 of the standard 7th edition of J. Stewart, Calculus: EarlyTranscendentals. Prerequisites: NYS Regents Course B of Mathematics Office of Undergraduate Studies 233 Mathematics Building E-mail: math-undergrad@buffalo.edu Ph

  7. Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holton, J.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The high performance lighting strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner's expectations for high quality lighting.

  8. Falsifying High-Scale Baryogenesis with Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Lepton Flavor Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deppisch, Frank F; Hirsch, Martin; Huang, Wei-Chih; Päs, Heinrich

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions that manifest themselves as lepton number violating processes at low energies in combination with sphaleron transitions typically erase any pre-existing baryon asymmetry of the universe. In this letter, we discuss the constraints obtained from an observation of neutrinoless double beta decay in this context. If a new physics mechanism of neutrinoless double beta decay is observed, typical scenarios of high-scale baryogenesis will be excluded unless the baryon asymmetry is stabilized via some new mechanism. We also sketch how this conclusion can be extended beyond the first lepton generation by incorporating lepton flavor violating processes.

  9. Falsifying High-Scale Baryogenesis with Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Lepton Flavor Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; Julia Harz; Martin Hirsch; Wei-Chih Huang; Heinrich Päs

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions that manifest themselves as lepton number violating processes at low energies in combination with sphaleron transitions typically erase any pre-existing baryon asymmetry of the universe. In this letter, we discuss the constraints obtained from an observation of neutrinoless double beta decay in this context. If a new physics mechanism of neutrinoless double beta decay is observed, typical scenarios of high-scale baryogenesis will be excluded unless the baryon asymmetry is stabilized via some new mechanism. We also sketch how this conclusion can be extended beyond the first lepton generation by incorporating lepton flavor violating processes.

  10. Diagnostic Characterization of High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries For Use in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diagnostic Characterization of High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries For Use in Hybrid Electric Vehicles generated specifically for performance characterization of these batteries in HEV applications in contrast to the constant-current profiles typically used in the characterization of lithium-ion batteries for portable

  11. High resolution low-temperature superconductivity superconducting quantum interference device microscope for imaging magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Benjamin P.

    -temperature superconducting niobium wire coupled to the input circuit of a superconducting quantum interference device SQUID-stated advantages of high-temperature superconductivity HTS over the more advanced low- temperature superconductivity LTS is that the higher oper- ating temperature, typically around 77 K, allows HTS SQUIDs

  12. MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH GAMMA RADIATION DOSE USING THE MEMS BASED DOSIMETER AND RADIOLISYS EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Power Plants (NPP) and high energy physics facilities as Large Hadron Collider (LHC). All in the world and about 50 under construction, we are all concern about the safety operation of these facilities due to the cumulative absorbed dose. Needless to say that the typical NPP of 3rd generation

  13. Turbulent structure of high-density suspensions formed under waves Michael P. Lamb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; KEYWORDS: wave boundary layer, oscillatory, high-density suspension, fluid mud, turbulent kinetic energy on the interactions between turbulent wave boundary layers and a predominantly silt-sized sediment bed. Under a wide, and sediment concentration revealed that the wave boundary layer, while typically >1 cm thick in sediment

  14. A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xiaofan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption, typical load (power) profile, and time spent inby plug-load meters provides detailed power profiles of

  15. Proceeding of Energy Week 1996, ASME APPLICATION OF THE U.S. HIGH CYCLE FATIGUE DATA BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TURBINE BLADE LIFETIME PREDICTIONS Herbert J. Sutherland Wind Energy Technology Sandia National the service lifetime of wind turbine blades using the high-cycle fatigue data base for typical U.S. blade blades. The LIFE2 fatigue analysis code for wind turbines is then used for the fatigue analysis

  16. HIGH-FIELD-SIDE PELLET INJECTION TECHNOLOGY S. K. Combs, L. R. Baylor, C. R. Foust, M. J. Gouge,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIGH-FIELD-SIDE PELLET INJECTION TECHNOLOGY S. K. Combs, L. R. Baylor, C. R. Foust, M. J. Gouge, T of pellets, composed of frozen hydrogen isotopes and multimillimeter in size, is com- monly used for core tubes have typically been used to trans- port/deliver pellets from the acceleration device to the out

  17. 208 IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 35, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 1999 Design and Optimization of High-Speed Resonant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­efficiency product (BWE) is independent of the design parameter and depends only on material parameters and . Although typical III­V compound semiconductors have very large values resulting in high BWE at visible wavelengths, at optical communication wavelengths (1.3 and 1.55 m and recently 850 nm) and thus BWE remain

  18. High Redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts: Observational Signatures of Superconducting Cosmic Strings?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. S. Cheng; Yun-Wei Yu; T. Harko

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), GRBs 080913 and 090423, challenge the conventional GRB progenitor models by their short durations, typical for short GRBs, and their high energy releases, typical for long GRBs. Meanwhile, the GRB rate inferred from high-redshift GRBs also remarkably exceeds the prediction of the collapsar model, with an ordinary star formation history. We show that all these contradictions could be eliminated naturally, if we ascribe some high-redshift GRBs to electromagnetic bursts of superconducting cosmic strings. High-redshift GRBs could become a reasonable way to test the superconducting cosmic string model, because the event rate of cosmic string bursts increases rapidly with increasing redshifts, whereas the collapsar rate decreases.

  19. Critical Review Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sources such as wind, solar or biomass, but the energy requirements are high (5.6 kWh/ m3H2) and typical A S S E , , § A N D R E N ´E A . R O Z E N D A L | Hydrogen Energy Center, and Department of Civil, The Netherlands, and Advanced Water Management Centre (AWMC), The University of Queensland, Qld 4072, Australia

  20. Raw material preparation for ultra high production rate sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kortmann, H.A.; Ritz, V.J. [Studiengesellschaft fuer Eisenerzaufbereitung, Liebenburg-Othfresen (Germany); Cappel, F.; Weisel, H.; Richter, G. [LURGI AG, Frankfurt (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An R and D program in pot grate sintering showed, that an intensive preparation of ores, additives and coke breeze improves the sintering capacity. The tests were conducted using an ore mixture composed of typical ores imported to Europe. The highest capacities were attained up to 63.8 t/m{sup 2} {times} 24 h maximum for a sinter which well fulfills the high requirements on chemical, physical and metallurgical properties.

  1. Temperature-Accelerated Degradation of GaN HEMTs under High-Power Stress: Activation Energy of Drain-Current Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    that allows device characterization through external test equipment [1]. A flow chart of a typical stepTemperature-Accelerated Degradation of GaN HEMTs under High- Power Stress: Activation Energy on this observation, we demonstrate a new scheme to extract the activation energy (Ea) of device degradation from step

  2. Measurements of carbon monoxide mixing ratios in Houston using a compact high-power CW DFB-QCL-based QEPAS sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and water heaters, stoves and other gasoline pow- ered equipment used in households. Typically, CO levels of 0.5­5 ppm are expected in homes in the absence of high-efficiency heaters and stoves. In spaces where gas stoves/heaters are operated, the CO concentration can increase up to 30 ppm [6]. In this work

  3. Ultra High-Rate Germanium (UHRGe) Modeling Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting research to develop a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector that can provide both the high resolution typical of germanium and high signal throughput. Such detectors may be beneficial for a variety of potential applications ranging from safeguards measurements of used fuel to material detection and verification using active interrogation techniques. This report describes some of the initial radiation transport modeling efforts that have been conducted to help guide the design of the detector as well as a description of the process used to generate the source spectrum for the used fuel application evaluation.

  4. Method for producing high dielectric strength microvalves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirby, Brian J. (San Francisco, CA); Reichmuth, David S. (Oakland, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A microvalve having a cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, polymer monolith for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. The microvalve contains a porous fluorinated polymer monolithic element whose pores are filled with an electrically insulating, high dielectric strength fluid, typically a perfluorinated liquid. This combination provides a microvalve that combines high dielectric strength with extremely low electrical conductivity. These microvalves have been shown to have resistivities of at least 100 G.OMEGA. and are compatible with solvents such as water at a pH between 2.7 and 9.0, 1-1 propanol, acetonitrile, and acetone.

  5. DOE Announces Webinars on High Impact Building Technologies,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars November 4: Finding the Next Big Thing(s)...

  6. High Efficiency Fans and High Efficiency Electrical Motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breedlove, C. W.

    Replacing nominal efficient electrical motors with premium efficiency can save on electrical power costs in cotton gins. Connected horsepower load on industrial air fans is approximately 60% of the total horsepower in a typical cotton gin...

  7. Introduction to Cost Control Strategies for Zero Energy Buildings: High-Performance Design and Construction on a Budget (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Momentum behind zero energy building design and construction is increasing, presenting a tremendous opportunity for advancing energy performance in the commercial building industry. At the same time, there is a lingering perception that zero energy buildings must be cost prohibitive or limited to showcase projects. Fortunately, an increasing number of projects are demonstrating that high performance can be achieved within typical budgets. This factsheet highlights replicable, recommended strategies for achieving high performance on a budget, based on experiences from past projects.

  8. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Perfect Circle Renewable Energy Railroads Resource Mgmt/Research Shaw Group South Shore YMCA SunTrust Bank desire to "make a difference" when it comes to wise, efficient, and productive management of public

  9. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    and technical training in preparation for work in such industries as meat and poultry processing, canning, freezing, pickling, preserving, and the preparation and preservation of specialty food products

  10. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Daniel

    Tenneco Packaging Timber Companies Trees Atlanta URS Corporation U.S. Forest Service Webb Properties Forester Research Technician Resource Forester Shift Manager Survey Forester Timber Appraiser and Buyer Timber Broker Tree Surgeon Urban Forester Wood Buyer Possible Employers American Forest Management, Inc

  11. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Timber Company Processing Plants Purina Mills Southern States Williams Dairy To learn what types of positions and companies UGA students are working with, see the UGA Career Center Post Graduation Survey

  12. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Ernst & Young Federal Express Federal Reserve Bank Federated Systems Group General Electric General on Find Occupations) Occupational Outlook Handbook http://www.bls.gov/oco (type in general term for career NCR Corporation Omni Hotels Powerplan Consultants Powerserve International Proctor & Gamble Co

  13. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    management and air pollution control, recycling, waste disposal, radiation protection, industrial hygiene habitation (house or home) and for other organisms, and to remediate pollution sites. It involves waste water. It also includes studies on the environmental impact of proposed construction projects. Researching Job

  14. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Coordinator Construction Project Leader Credit Analyst Credit Manager Development Associate Evaluation Project Manager Property Tax Consultant Project Manager Real Estate Agent Real Estate Appraisal Real are working with, see the UGA Career Center Post Graduation Survey at www

  15. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    and the impact of that content on society. Graduates find careers in the film, television, radio, cable Assistant Program Manager Project Manager Promotion Writer/Producer Public Relations Specialist Radio Graduation Survey at www.career.uga.edu/gradsurveyresults/ and search for alumni on Linked In at www

  16. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    . Thus, some graduates pursue careers in fields quite unrelated to music. A bachelor's degree Publicist Music Software Music Therapist Orchestra Librarian Orchestra Manager Project Coordinator Public students are working with, see the UGA Career Center Post Graduation Survey at www

  17. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    , and stormwater management. p. 413-430. IN Aitkenhead-Peterson, J., A. Volder (ed.). Urban ecosystem ecology. 55

  18. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Analyst Clinical Research Assistant Conservation Technician Ecosystem Manager Educator Environmental Consultant Environmental Technician Environmental Scientist Field Research Biologist Genetic Engineer Energy BASF The Chemical Company Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Companies Biotechnology Chemical Companies

  19. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Environmental Scientist Possible Employers Emory University Hospital BioLab EPA Biotechnology Firms Food and concepts in medicine, biotechnology and veterinary sciences. Approximately half of the Cellular Biology working as laboratory technicians in the biotechnology industry or in Academia. In addition, other

  20. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Accountant Actuary Aerospace Engineer Analyst Appraiser Bank Examiner Biometrician/Biostatistician Budget Public Health Statistician Product Management Analyst Project Manager Research Analyst Risk & Insurance Grp.Insurance Justice Department Local & State Planning Offices Lost Control Representative Market

  1. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    to these options when choosing a possible career path. Description of Spanish Students majoring in Spanish to a development of language proficiency and an understanding of the Spanish-speaking world. This world primarily consists of the language, culture and literature of Spanish-speaking countries found in South America

  2. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Sublime Behavior Marketing The Coca-Cola Company Toyota To learn what types of positions and companies UGA

  3. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Clarence LLC Coca-Cola CRDS Global Department of Homeland Security Dillon Law Firm DRT Strategies El Pomar

  4. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Research and Technology Centers for Disease Control CIBAVision The Coca-Cola Company Covanta Energy Dalton

  5. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Chick-fil-A Coca-Cola Consolidated Graphics Cox Media E&J Gallo Eli Lilly Fidelity Bank Georgia Pacific

  6. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Company AT&T Bank of America Capgemini Caterpillar Financial Chick-fil-A Citigroup Global Markets Coca-Cola

  7. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    -fil-A Clear Channel Communication Coca-Cola Company, The Cox Publishing Creative Loafing Fahlgren Mortine

  8. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Departments School Nutrition Programs The Coca-Cola Company The J.M. Smucker Company The Partnership for Food

  9. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Chick-fil-A Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Coca Cola Company, The Cookerly PR Dodge Communications

  10. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    of Atlanta Cingular Wireless Coca-Cola Courtyard by Marriott CVS E&J Gallo Winery Enterprise Rent-A-Car Ernst

  11. B.S. GEOLOGY (Earth Science Subplan) CHECKLIST of required courses for major The Earth Science Subplan is typically a secondary major accompanying a B.S. in Education.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    B.S. GEOLOGY (Earth Science Subplan) CHECKLIST of required courses for major The Earth Science ­ The Earth or take GEOSCI 131 - Experiencing Geology Lab and GEOSCI 105 - Dynamic Earth 4 (1) (4) 1st year Geology Core Courses: 5 courses, 18 credits Course Credits When to take: GEOSCI 201 ­ History of the Earth

  12. Zevenhoven & Kilpinen CROSS EFFECTS, TOTAL SYSTEM LAY-OUT 13.6.2001 10-1 Figure 10.1 Typical pulverised coal combustion and gas clean-up system: dry scrubber +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    pulverised coal combustion and gas clean-up system: dry scrubber + baghouse filter for SO2 and particulate For a conventional pulverised coal-fired power plant a set-up is shown in Figure 10.1, with a gas clean-up system scrubber (pH ~ 6) 60 - 70 7 Re-heater 350 - 400 8 SCR DeNOx 300 - 400 9 Active coke bed 100 - 150 Figure 10

  13. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    . Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. It is the branch of engineering Engineer Conservation Engineer Controls Engineer Cooperative Manufacturing Engineer Design Engineer

  14. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    . Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited Civil Engineer Conservation Engineer Controls Engineer Cooperative Manufacturing Engineer Design Food Engineer Illuminating Engineer Manufacturing Engineer Mechanical Engineer Molding Analysis

  15. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    . Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited into large-scale manufacturing. In fact, they are integral to a variety of manufacturing industries, such as food manufacturing and agro-technology. Researching Job Titles and Careers O*NET http

  16. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    . Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited, a value that is approximately four times larger than the next largest manufacturing industry. Food Dairy Manufacturing Purdue Chicken Republic Biscuit Corporation Safeway Schwan Food Company Seaboard

  17. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    . Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited Engineer Civil Engineer Conservation Engineer Controls Engineer Cooperative Manufacturing Engineer Design Food Engineer Illuminating Engineer Manufacturing Engineer Mechanical Engineer Molding Analysis

  18. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    . Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited Civil Engineer Conservation Engineer Controls Engineer Cooperative Manufacturing Engineer Design Food Engineer Illuminating Engineer Management Analyst Manufacturing Engineer Mechanical Engineer

  19. 1. c) For all five types, the distribution is quite symmetric. Hearthlog typically burns the longest, with a mean of about 2:40. Wax Logs and Duraflame have a mean about 10 minutes lower. Hot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preston, Scott

    the longest, with a mean of about 2:40. Wax Logs and Duraflame have a mean about 10 minutes lower. Hot Logs:15. For all but Wax Logs, the distributions have similar variability ­ each has a standard deviation around 9 minutes. Wax Logs burn more consistently near the mean time ­ the standard deviation is just over 5

  20. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    . In addition to studying landmasses, Geography focuses on climate, and, sea, air, plant, mineral resources analysis, climatology, resource conservation, or cartography. Students trained in geography bring increased awareness of global issues, sensitivity to cultural differences, and an understanding of the complexity

  1. Many qualitative properties of the product and the process are of interest during semiconduc-tor manufacturing. One of the typical examples is the sidewall surface roughness of an etched pol-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    will show how categorical models can be used to tune a process, and later to control it via SPC charts

  2. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    students include tourism development, protected area management, environmental education (with schools to these options when choosing a possible career path. Description of Natural Resource Recreation and Tourism The Natural Resource Recreation and Tourism major prepares students to work in environmental settings (of

  3. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Ditrich Engineering Services Cobb County Department of Transportation ConAgra, Inc. Cryolife, Inc. Dynamco Eaton Corporation EcoMetrix Environmental Mgmt EMC Corporation EnSafe Epic Systems Corp FAA Food Machinery Service

  4. The following are typical equations and conversions for calculating flux densities of sensible, latent and carbon dioxide from eddy covariances presented by Kevin Tu, St. Louis (10/97). The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Kevin

    , latent and carbon dioxide from eddy covariances presented by Kevin Tu, St. Louis (10/97). The properties

  5. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    are interested in entering medical or veterinary school, this major may be of interest to you. Researching Job Handbook http://www.bls.gov/oco (type in general term for career of interest) Georgia Career Information.career.uga.edu/gradsurveyresults/ and search for alumni on Linked In at www.linkedin.com. Campus Resources Animal and Dairy Science Clubs

  6. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    professional programs, like business, journalism, or information science. Others enter careers in government://www.bls.gov/oco (type in general term for career of interest) Georgia Career Information Center http.career.uga.edu/gradsurveyresults/ and search for alumni on Linked In at www.linkedin.com. What can I do with a major in Religion The University

  7. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    of accounting classes to provide the basic tools to enter an accounting position. Should a student wish://online.onetcenter.org (click on Find Occupations) Occupational Outlook Handbook http://www.bls.gov/oco (type in general term.career.uga.edu/gradsurveyresults/ and search for alumni on Linked In at www.linkedin.com. What can I do with a major in Accounting

  8. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    and biological sciences. Agricultural economics provides a strong theoretical background for those entering) Occupational Outlook Handbook http://www.bls.gov/oco (type in general term for career of interest) Georgia, see the UGA Career Center Post Graduation Survey at www.career.uga.edu/gradsurveyresults/ and search

  9. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    may also enter programs that grant a master's degree in education, as well as certification Outlook Handbook http://www.bls.gov/oco (type in general term for career of interest) Georgia Career.career.uga.edu/gradsurveyresults/ and search for alumni on Linked In at www.linkedin.com. What can I do with a major in Early Childhood

  10. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    , social work, the media, counseling, urban planning, statistics, marketing, health, social sciences Correspondent Foreign Service Officer Historian Hotel Manager Interpreter / Translator Journalist Lexicographer are working with, see the UGA Career Center Post Graduation Survey at www

  11. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    as the science of learning from data: everything from planning for the collection of data and data management, and presentation of data. Statisticians contribute to the design of surveys and experiments; collection, processing. Sampling-obtaining information about a population of people or group of things by surveying a small portion

  12. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Food Production, Foodservice Management, Foodservice Purchasing, Food Equipment and Kitchen Planning to these options when choosing a possible career path. Description of Consumer Foods Recent surveys project Demonstrator Food Marketing Manager Food Service Director Freelance Food & Travel Writer Instructor Marketing

  13. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Analyst Mathematician Network Engineer PeopleSoft Administrator Programmer Project Manager Quality Control Corporation Oracle Power Plan Research and Development Firms Siemens Teradata TopQuadrant Treasury Department Graduation Survey at www.career.uga.edu/gradsurveyresults/ and search for alumni on Linked In at www

  14. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Physicist Molecular Physicist Atomic Physicist Nuclear Physicist Biophysicist Plasma Physicist Nuclear Plant State Physicist Stratigrapher Technical Consultant Military Weapons Designer Possible Employers Ahlberg Engineering, Inc. Aberdeen Proving Ground, Test Ctr. Aerospace Corporation AT&T Labs Organization Brookhaven

  15. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    arena and the means of competing in a multi-cultural, global environment. Students are introduced BearingPoint, Inc. BMW Capgemini Caterpillar Financial Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) Comer Imaging

  16. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    ") Possible Job Titles Actor Administrator of Arts Programs Agent Booking Manager Broadcast Technology Box of Performing Art Lighting Designer Management Marketing and Advertising Miniature Set Designer Personal Manager Playwriting Producing Promoter Private Instruction Property Design Public Relations Manager Riggers

  17. This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand that some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Probation/Parole Officer Program Coordinator Project Consultant Property Manager Research Associate Sales administration, personal rights and freedoms, justice, and political authority. Like all good liberal arts majors and public administration, as well as doctoral programs in political science. Political Science is also

  18. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Preliminary Economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the potential market for process heat produced by a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the environmental benefits reduced CO2 emissions will have on these markets, and the typical economics of projects using these applications. It gives examples of HTGR technological applications to industrial processes in the typical co-generation supply of process heat and electricity, the conversion of coal to transportation fuels and chemical process feedstock, and the production of ammonia as a feedstock for the production of ammonia derivatives, including fertilizer. It also demonstrates how uncertainties in capital costs and financial factors affect the economics of HTGR technology by analyzing the use of HTGR technology in the application of HTGR and high temperature steam electrolysis processes to produce hydrogen.

  19. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M. (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John B. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Marra, James C. (Aiken, SC)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  20. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  1. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  2. High time resolution observations of the solar wind and backstreaming ions in the earth's foreshock region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Formisano, V.; Orsini, S.; Bonifazi, C.; Egidi, A.; Moreno, G.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of the solar wind with ions backstreaming from the earth's bow shock is studied at high time resolution. It turns out that the bulk velocity of the solar wind oscillates, both in magnitude and direction, with typical periods of approx.1 minute in presence of the 'diffuse' ion population. Oscillations of comparable periods are also observed in the angular distribution and energy spectrum of the diffuse ions.

  3. INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

  4. High-sensitivity, high-speed continuous imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watson, Scott A; Bender, III, Howard A

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous imaging system for recording low levels of light typically extending over small distances with high-frame rates and with a large number of frames is described. Photodiode pixels disposed in an array having a chosen geometry, each pixel having a dedicated amplifier, analog-to-digital convertor, and memory, provide parallel operation of the system. When combined with a plurality of scintillators responsive to a selected source of radiation, in a scintillator array, the light from each scintillator being directed to a single corresponding photodiode in close proximity or lens-coupled thereto, embodiments of the present imaging system may provide images of x-ray, gamma ray, proton, and neutron sources with high efficiency.

  5. High-frequency electromagnetic properties of epitaxial Bi2FeCrO6 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-frequency electromagnetic properties of epitaxial Bi2FeCrO6 thin films grown by pulsed laser on the electromagnetic (EM) properties in high-frequency domain (HF) of multiferroic Bi2FeCrO6 (BFCO) thin films. The films were epitaxially grown on SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser ablation. Typical 50 nm-thick BFCO

  6. Recoil proton distribution in high energy photoproduction processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bartos; E. A. Kuraev; Yu. P. Peresunko; E. A. Vinokurov

    2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    For high energy linearly polarized photon--proton scattering we have calculated the azimuthal and polar angle distributions in inclusive on recoil proton experimental setup. We have taken into account the production of lepton and pseudoscalar meson charged pairs. The typical values of cross sections are of order of hundreds of picobarn. The size of polarization effects are of order of several percents. The results are generalized for the case of electroproduction processes on the proton at rest and for high energy proton production process on resting proton.

  7. High density harp or wire scanner for particle beam diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritsche, Craig T. (Overland Park, KS); Krogh, Michael L. (Lee's Summit, MO)

    1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A diagnostic detector head harp (23) used to detect and characterize high energy particle beams using an array of closely spaced detector wires (21), typically carbon wires, spaced less than 0.1 cm (0.040 inch) connected to a hybrid microcircuit (25) formed on a ceramic substrate (26). A method to fabricate harps (23) to obtain carbon wire spacing and density not previously available utilizing hybrid microcircuit technology. The hybrid microcircuit (25) disposed on the ceramic substrate (26) connects electrically between the detector wires (21) and diagnostic equipment (37) which analyzes pulses generated in the detector wires (21) by the high energy particle beams.

  8. High density harp or wire scanner for particle beam diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritsche, C.T.; Krogh, M.L.

    1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a diagnostic detector head harp used to detect and characterize high energy particle beams using an array of closely spaced detector wires, typically carbon wires, spaced less than 0.1 cm (0.040 inch) connected to a hybrid microcircuit formed on a ceramic substrate. A method to fabricate harps to obtain carbon wire spacing and density not previously available utilizing hybrid microcircuit technology. The hybrid microcircuit disposed on the ceramic substrate connects electrically between the detector wires and diagnostic equipment which analyzes pulses generated in the detector wires by the high energy particle beams. 6 figs.

  9. UV curing and photoresist outgassing in high energy implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.A.; Erokhin, Y.; Horsky, T. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thick photoresists, typically 3 microns or more in thickness, necessary for high energy implantation present some unique problems. The outgassing of thick photoresist In high energy applications varies from that of thinner resist and lower energies. It requires appropriate processing to cure without reticulation of field regions deformity of features, or blistering during subsequent processing. This paper examines different resist treatments and their effects on implanter pressure during processing. Data on outgassing of thick photoresist, outgassing effects on absolute dose and dose uniformity as measured by sheet resistance contour maps, and the variation in gas composition are presented.

  10. Quasi-optical network analyzers and high-reliability RF MEMS switched capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grichener, Alexander

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is the po- tential for power loss into substrate modesexcessive substrate mode power loss is typically less thanlens in order to eliminate power loss to substrate modes and

  11. Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides background information about (1) the electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of high-voltage transmission lines at typical voltages and line configurations and (2) typical transmission line costs to assist on alternatives in environmental documents. EMF strengths at 0 {+-} 200 ft from centerline were calculated for ac overhead lines, and for 345 and 230-kV ac underground line and for a {+-}450-kV dc overhead line. Compacting and height sensitivity factors were computed for the variation in EMFs when line conductors are moved closer or raised. Estimated costs for the lines are presented and discussed so that the impact of using alternative strategies for reducing EMF strengths and the implications of implementing the strategies can be better appreciated.

  12. High Efficiency Colloidal Quantum Dot Phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahen, Keith

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The project showed that non-Cd containing, InP-based nanocrystals (semiconductor materials with dimensions of ~6 nm) have high potential for enabling next-generation, nanocrystal-based, on chip phosphors for solid state lighting. Typical nanocrystals fall short of the requirements for on chip phosphors due to their loss of quantum efficiency under the operating conditions of LEDs, such as, high temperature (up to 150 °C) and high optical flux (up to 200 W/cm2). The InP-based nanocrystals invented during this project maintain high quantum efficiency (>80%) in polymer-based films under these operating conditions for emission wavelengths ranging from ~530 to 620 nm. These nanocrystals also show other desirable attributes, such as, lack of blinking (a common problem with nanocrystals which limits their performance) and no increase in the emission spectral width from room to 150 °C (emitters with narrower spectral widths enable higher efficiency LEDs). Prior to these nanocrystals, no nanocrystal system (regardless of nanocrystal type) showed this collection of properties; in fact, other nanocrystal systems are typically limited to showing only one desirable trait (such as high temperature stability) but being deficient in other properties (such as high flux stability). The project showed that one can reproducibly obtain these properties by generating a novel compositional structure inside of the nanomaterials; in addition, the project formulated an initial theoretical framework linking the compositional structure to the list of high performance optical properties. Over the course of the project, the synthetic methodology for producing the novel composition was evolved to enable the synthesis of these nanomaterials at a cost approximately equal to that required for forming typical conventional nanocrystals. Given the above results, the last major remaining step prior to scale up of the nanomaterials is to limit the oxidation of these materials during the tens of thousands of hours of LED operation. Once the LED phosphor lifetime specifications are met, these nanocrystals will enable white LEDs for solid state lighting to simultaneously have increased efficiency and improved light quality, in addition to enabling the creation of custom light spectrums. These improvements to white LEDs will help accelerate the adoption of SSL, leading to large savings in US and worldwide energy costs.

  13. Vitrification of high sulfate wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.A.; Whittington, K.F.; Peters, R.D.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) through the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is investigating the application of vitrification technology to mixed wastes within the DOE system This work involves identifying waste streams, laboratory testing to identify glass formulations and characterize the vitrified product, and demonstration testing with the actual waste in a pilot-scale system. Part of this program is investigating process limits for various waste components, specifically those components that typically create problems for the application of vitrification, such as sulfate, chloride, and phosphate. This work describes results from vitrification testing for a high-sulfate waste, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basin waste at Hanford. A low melting phosphate glass formulation has been developed for a waste stream high in sodium and sulfate. At melt temperatures in the range of 1,000 C to 1,200 C, sulfate in the waste is decomposed to gaseous oxides and driven off during melting, while the remainder of the oxides stay in the melt. Decomposition of the sulfates eliminates the processing problems typically encountered in vitrification of sulfate-containing wastes, resulting in separation of the sulfate from the remainder of the waste and allowing the sulfate to be collected in the off-gas system and treated as a secondary waste stream. Both the vitreous product and intentionally devitrified samples are durable when compared to reference glasses by TCLP and DI water leach tests. Simple, short tests to evaluate the compatibility of the glasses with potential melter materials found minimal corrosion with most materials.

  14. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  15. Preparation of high porosity xerogels by chemical surface modification.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deshpande, Ravindra (51 Michelle Dr. Apt. A 11, Lancaster, PA 17603); Smith, Douglas M. (1412 Marquette Pl. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides an extremely porous xerogel dried at vacuum-to-below supercritical pressures but having the properties of aerogels which are typically dried at supercritical pressures. This is done by reacting the internal pore surface of the wet gel with organic substances in order to change the contact angle of the fluid meniscus in the pores during drying. Shrinkage of the gel (which is normally prevented by use of high autoclave pressures, such that the pore fluid is at temperature and pressure above its critical values) is avoided even at vacuum or ambient pressures.

  16. Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jantzen, Carol M. (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John B. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Marra, James C. (Aiken, SC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  17. Growth of Early Supermassive Black Holes and the High-Redshift Eddington Ratio Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeGraf, Colin; Khandai, Nishikanta; Croft, Rupert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a new large-scale (~ 0.75 Gpc)^3 hydrodynamic cosmological simulation we investigate the growth rate of supermassive black holes in the early universe (z > 4.75). Remarkably, we find a clear peak in the typical Eddington ratio at black hole masses of 4-8 * 10^7 solar masses (typically found in halos of ~7 * 10^11 to 10^12 solar masses), independent of redshift and indicative that most of BH growth occurs in the cold-flow dominated regime. Black hole growth is by and large regulated by the evolution of gas density. The typical Eddington ratio at a given mass scales simply as cosmological density (1+z)^3 and the peak is caused by the competition between increased gas density available in more massive hosts, and a decrease due to strong AGN feedback that deprives the black hole of sufficient gas to fuel further rapid growth in the high mass end. In addition to evolution in the mean Eddington ratio, we show that the distribution of Eddington ratio among both mass-selected and luminosity-selected samples is ...

  18. Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

  19. Solar wind suprathermal electron Stahl widths across high-speed stream structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skoug, Ruth M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steinberg, John T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goodrich, Katherine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Brett R [DARTMUTH UNIV.

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Suprathermal electrons (100-1500 eV) observed in the solar wind typically show a strahl distribution, that is, a beam directed away from the Sun along the magnetic field direction. The strahl width observed at 1 AU is highly variable, ranging from 10-70 degrees. The obsenred finite width of the strahl results from the competition between beam focusing as the interplanetary magnetic field strength drops with distance from the Sun, and pitch-angle scattering as the beam interacts with the solar wind plasma in transit from the sun. Here we examine strahl width, observed with ACE SWEPAM across high-speed stream structures to investigate variations in electron scattering as a function of local plasma characteristics. We find that narrow strahls (less than 20 degrees wide), indicating reduced scattering, are observed within high-speed streams. Narrow strahls are also observed in both very low temperature solar wind, in association with ICMEs. Case studies of high-speed streams typically show the strahl narrowing at the leading edge of the stream. In some cases, the strahl narrows at the reverse shock or pressure wave, in other cases at the stream interface. The narrowing can either occur discontinuously or gradually over a period of hours. Within the high-speed wind, the strahl remains narrow for a period of hours to days, and then gradually broadens. The strahl width is roughly constant at all energies across these structures. For some fraction of high-speed streams, counterstreaming is associated with passage of the corotating interaction region. In these cases, we find the widths of the two counterstreaming beams frequently differ by more than 40 degrees. This dramatic difference in strahl width contrasts with observations in the solar wind as a whole, in which counterstreaming strahls typically differ in width by less than 20 degrees.

  20. High-Resolution Simulation of Hurricane Bonnie (1998). Part I: The Organization of Eyewall Vertical Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion SCOTT A. BRAUN Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Branch, Laboratory for Atmospheres, NASA Goddard-induced wavenumber-1 asymmetry, the instantaneous vertical motion is typically associated with deep updraft towers. The updrafts towers are typically associated with eyewall mesovortices rotating cyclonically around the eyewall

  1. Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Otto, N.C.; Warner, B.T.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

  2. Alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete containing high-alkali cement and granite aggregate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owsiak, Z

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses results of the research into the influence of high-alkali Portland cement on granite aggregate. The deformation of the concrete structure occurred after 18 months. The research was carried out by means of a scanning electron microscope equipped with a high-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer that allowed observation of unpolished sections of concrete bars exhibiting the cracking pattern typical of the alkali-silica reaction. Both the microscopic observation and the X-ray elemental analysis confirm the presence of alkali-silica gel and secondary ettringite in the cracks.

  3. Highly Retrievable Spinwave-Photon Entanglement Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng-Jun Yang; Xu-Jie Wang; Jun Li; Jun Rui; Xiao-Hui Bao; Jian-Wei Pan

    2015-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Entanglement between a single photon and a quantum memory forms the building blocks for quantum repeater and quantum network. Previous entanglement sources are typically with low retrieval efficiency, which limits future larger-scale applications. Here, we report a source of highly retrievable spinwave-photon entanglement. Polarization entanglement is created through interaction of a single photon with ensemble of atoms inside a low-finesse ring cavity. The cavity is engineered to be resonant for dual spinwave modes, which thus enables efficient retrieval of the spinwave qubit. An intrinsic retrieval efficiency up to 76(4)% has been observed. Such a highly retrievable atom-photon entanglement source will be very useful in future larger-scale quantum repeater and quantum network applications.

  4. FATIGUE AND FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    for essentially unchanged between -250 and 13oooc, involving a softening and creep cavitation, which typically in such properties (8); however, in situ crystallization can provide an applications as gas turbines, piston engines

  5. Spacecraft computing systems with high-level specifications and FPGAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ong, Elwin, 1979-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A typical modem spacecraft requires computer processing in every major subsystem. The most popular method to carry out these processing requirements involves the use of a primary computer based on microprocessors. To carry ...

  6. Sparkling Diamonds – Reducing High Energy in the Frozen North

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    De Beers, the undisputed world leader in diamond mining, in a typically proactive approach, completed an energy review at the Snap Lake Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories. What makes the approach unique is that the mine is still under...

  7. Guiding Center Equations of High Accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.B. White, G. Spizzo and M. Gobbin

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Guiding center simulations are an important means of predicting the effect of resistive and ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities on particle distributions in toroidal magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion research devices. Because saturated instabilities typically have amplitudes of ?#14;B/B of a few times 10-4 numerical accuracy is of concern in discovering the effect of mode particle resonances. We develop a means of following guiding center orbits which is greatly superior to the methods currently in use. In the presence of ripple or time dependent magnetic perturbations both energy and canonical momentum are conserved to better than one part in 1014, and the relation between changes in canonical momentum and energy is also conserved to very high order.

  8. High strength air-dried aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  9. High resolution patterning of silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertino, M.F.; Hund, J.F.; Sosa, J.; Zhang, G.; Sotiriou-Leventis, C.; Leventis, N.; Tokuhiro, A.T.; Terry, J. (UMR-MUST); (IIT)

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional metallic structures are fabricated with high spatial resolution in silica aerogels. In our method, silica hydrogels are prepared with a standard base-catalyzed route, and exchanged with an aqueous solution typically containing Ag{sup +} ions (1 M) and 2-propanol (0.2 M). The metal ions are reduced photolytically with a table-top ultraviolet lamp, or radiolytically, with a focused X-ray beam. We fabricated dots and lines as small as 30 x 70 {micro}m, protruding for several mm into the bulk of the materials. The hydrogels are eventually supercritically dried to yield aerogels, without any measurable change in the shape and spatial resolution of the lithographed structures. Transmission electron microscopy shows that illuminated regions are composed by Ag clusters with a size of several {micro}m, separated by thin layers of silica.

  10. Disk Accretion Onto High-Mass Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Lubow; M. Seibert; P. Artymowicz

    1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the nonlinear, two-dimensional response of a gaseous, viscous protoplanetary disk to the presence of a planet of one Jupiter mass (1 M_J) and greater that orbits a 1 solar mass star by using the ZEUS hydrodynamics code with high resolution near the planet's Roche lobe. The planet is assumed to be in a circular orbit about the central star and is not allowed to migrate. A gap is formed about the orbit of the planet, but there is a nonaxisymmetric flow through the gap and onto the planet. The gap partitions the disk into an inner (outer) disk that extends inside (outside) the planet's orbit. For a 1 M_J planet and typical disk parameters, the accretion through the gap onto the planet is highly efficient. For typical disk parameters, the mass doubling time scale is less than 10^5 years, considerably shorter than the disk lifetime. Following shocks near the L1 and L2 Lagrange points, disk material enters the Roche lobe in the form of two gas streams. Shocks occur within the Roche lobe as the gas streams collide, and shocks lead to rapid inflow towards the planet within much of planet's Roche lobe. Shocks also propagate in the inner and outer disks that orbit the star. For higher mass planets (of order 6 M_J), the flow rate onto the planet is considerably reduced, which suggests an upper mass limit to planets in the range of 10 M_J. This rate reduction is related to the fact that the gap width increases relative to the Roche (Hill sphere) radius with increasing planetary mass. The flow in the gap affects planetary migration. For the 1 M_J planet case, mass can penetrate from the outer disk to the inner disk, so that the inner disk is not depleted. The results suggest that most of the mass in gas giant planets is acquired by flows through gaps.

  11. Coupling highly excited nuclei to the atomic shell in dense astrophysical plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan Helmrich; Katja Spenneberg; Adriana Pálffy

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In dense astrophysical plasmas, neutron capture populates highly excited nuclear states close to the neutron threshold. The impact of additional low-energy nuclear excitations via coupling to the atomic shell on the ability of the so-formed compound nucleus to retain the captured neutron is investigated. We focus on the mechanism of nuclear excitation by electron capture in plasmas characterized by electron fluxes typical for the slow neutron capture process of stellar nucleosynthesis. The small effect of this further excitation on the neutron capture and gamma decay sequence relevant for nucleosynthesis is quantified and compared to the corresponding effect of an additional low-energy photoexcitation step.

  12. Modular, High-Volume Fuel Cell Leak-Test Suite and Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ru Chen; Ian Kaye

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cell stacks are typically hand-assembled and tested. As a result the manufacturing process is labor-intensive and time-consuming. The fluid leakage in fuel cell stacks may reduce fuel cell performance, damage fuel cell stack, or even cause fire and become a safety hazard. Leak check is a critical step in the fuel cell stack manufacturing. The fuel cell industry is in need of fuel cell leak-test processes and equipment that is automatic, robust, and high throughput. The equipment should reduce fuel cell manufacturing cost.

  13. Ring shaped 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission around a young high-mass star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bartkiewicz; M. Szymczak; H. J. van Langevelde

    2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on EVN imaging of the 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission from the candidate high-mass protostar G23.657-0.127. The masers originate in a nearly circular ring of 127 mas radius and 12 mas width. The ring structure points at a central exciting object which characteristics are typical for a young massive star; its bolometric luminosity is estimated to be methanol masers originate in a spherical bubble or in a rotating disc seen nearly face-on.

  14. A design for a high voltage magnet coil ringer test set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koska, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Sims, R.E. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By discharging a bank of charged capacitors through a high power SCR switch into an SSC dipole magnet assembly, it is possible to ``ring`` the coil and develop a voltage stress of greater than 50 volts turn-to-turn, thereby verifying the insulation integrity. We will present an overview of the test set design for a 2 kV isolated SCR firing circuit, including safety features, selectable capacitor banks, and digital waveform storage system. Results from testing typical coils and magnets will be included. Possible upgrades are also discussed.

  15. A design for a high voltage magnet coil ringer test set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koska, W. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Sims, R.E. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By discharging a bank of charged capacitors through a high power SCR switch into an SSC dipole magnet assembly, it is possible to ring'' the coil and develop a voltage stress of greater than 50 volts turn-to-turn, thereby verifying the insulation integrity. We will present an overview of the test set design for a 2 kV isolated SCR firing circuit, including safety features, selectable capacitor banks, and digital waveform storage system. Results from testing typical coils and magnets will be included. Possible upgrades are also discussed.

  16. Cerium-Based Magnets: Novel High Energy Permanent Magnet Without Critical Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: Ames Laboratory will develop a new class of permanent magnets based on the more commonly available element cerium for use in both EVs and renewable power generators. Cerium is 4 times more abundant and significantly less expensive than the rare earth element neodymium, which is frequently used in today’s most powerful magnets. Ames Laboratory will combine other metal elements with cerium to create a new magnet that can remain stable at the high temperatures typically found in electric motors. This new magnetic material will ultimately be demonstrated in a prototype electric motor, representing a cost-effective and efficient alternative to neodymium-based motors.

  17. Synthesis and luminescence properties of rare earth activated phosphors for near UV-emitting LEDs for efficacious generation of white light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jinkyu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high-color-rendering LED lamps using oxyfluoride andin white LED. (a) Typical LED lamp package. (b) Uniformin white LED. (a) Typical LED lamp package. (b) Uniform

  18. Control Design and Implementation of Hard Disk Drive Servos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nie, Jianbin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is typically a low frequency disturbance. Windage, which isis pri- marily a high frequency disturbance. Non-repeatableis typically a low frequency disturbance. Windage, which is

  19. Comparison of diesel spray combustion in different high-temperature, high-pressure facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christiansen, Caspar (Technical University of Denmark); Hermant, Laurent (IFP); Malbec, Louis-Marie (IFP); Bruneaux, Gilles (IFP); Genzale, Caroline L.; Pickett, Lyle M.; Schramm, Jesper (Technical University of Denmark)

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diesel spray experiments at controlled high-temperature and high-pressure conditions offer the potential for an improved understanding of diesel combustion, and for the development of more accurate CFD models that will ultimately be used to improve engine design. Several spray chamber facilities capable of high-temperature, high-pressure conditions typical of engine combustion have been developed, but uncertainties about their operation exist because of the uniqueness of each facility. For the IMEM meeting, we describe results from comparative studies using constant-volume vessels at Sandia National Laboratories and IFP. Targeting the same ambient gas conditions (900 K, 60 bar, 22.8 kg/m{sup 3}, 15% oxygen) and sharing the same injector (common rail, 1500 bar, KS1.5/86 nozzle, 0.090 mm orifice diameter, n-dodecane, 363 K), we describe detailed measurements of the temperature and pressure boundary conditions at each facility, followed by observations of spray penetration, ignition, and combustion using high-speed imaging. Performing experiments at the same high-temperature, high-pressure operating conditions is an objective of the Engine Combustion Network (http://www.ca.sandia.gov/ECN/), which seeks to leverage the research capabilities and advanced diagnostics of all participants in the ECN. We expect that this effort will generate a high-quality dataset to be used for advanced computational model development at engine conditions.

  20. Glass formulation for phase 1 high-level waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to provide potential glass formulations for prospective Phase 1 High-Level Waste (HLW) vitrification at Hanford. The results reported here will be used to aid in developing a Phase 1 HLW vitrification request for proposal (RFP) and facilitate the evaluation of ensuing proposals. The following factors were considered in the glass formulation effort: impact on total glass volume of requiring the vendor to process each of the tank compositions independently versus as a blend; effects of imposing typical values of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} content and waste loading in HLW borosilicate glasses as restrictions on the vendors (according to WAPS 1995, the typical values are 5--10 wt% B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 20--40 wt% waste oxide loading); impacts of restricting the processing temperature to 1,150 C on eventual glass volume; and effects of caustic washing on any of the selected tank wastes relative to glass volume.

  1. Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qvist, Staffan Alexander

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    breeder reactors typically operate with an inner core of high fissile content surrounded by breeding blankets

  2. Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in a Ni-5Cr binary alloy exposed to high-temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution microscopy of a high-purity Ni-5Cr alloy exposed to 360°C hydrogenated water reveals intergranular selective oxidation of Cr accompanied by local Cr depletion and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM). The corrosion-product oxide consists of a porous, interconnected network of Cr2O3 platelets with no further O ingress into the metal ahead. Extensive grain boundary depletion of Cr (to <0.05at.%) is observed typically 20–100 nm wide as a result of DIGM and reaching depths of many micrometers beyond the oxidation front.

  3. IN-SITU ASSAY OF TRANSURANIC RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRAL GAMMA LOGGING - A HANFORD CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROHAY VJ; HENWOOD P; MCCAIN R

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

  4. Methanol masers : Reliable tracers of the early stages of high-mass star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Ellingsen

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The GLIMPSE and MSX surveys have been used to examine the mid-infrared properties of a statistically complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. The GLIMPSE point sources associated with methanol masers are clearly distinguished from the majority, typically having extremely red mid-infrared colors, similar to those expected of low-mass class 0 young stellar objects. The intensity of the GLIMPSE sources associated with methanol masers is typically 4 magnitudes brighter at 8.0 micron than at 3.6 micron. Targeted searches towards GLIMPSE point sources with [3.6]-[4.5] > 1.3 and an 8.0 micron magnitude less than 10 will detect more than 80% of class II methanol masers. Many of the methanol masers are associated with sources within infrared dark clouds (IRDC) which are believed to mark regions where high-mass star formation is in its very early stages. The presence of class II methanol masers in a significant fraction of IRDC suggests that high-mass star formation is common in these regions. Different maser species are thought to trace different evolutionary phases of the high-mass star formation process. Comparison of the properties of the GLIMPSE sources associated with class II methanol masers and other maser species shows interesting trends, consistent with class I methanol masers tracing a generally earlier evolutionary phase and OH masers tracing a later evolutionary phase.

  5. Designing high power targets with computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covrig, S. D. [Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High power liquid hydrogen (LH2) targets, up to 850 W, have been widely used at Jefferson Lab for the 6 GeV physics program. The typical luminosity loss of a 20 cm long LH2 target was 20% for a beam current of 100 ?A rastered on a square of side 2 mm on the target. The 35 cm long, 2500 W LH2 target for the Qweak experiment had a luminosity loss of 0.8% at 180 ?A beam rastered on a square of side 4 mm at the target. The Qweak target was the highest power liquid hydrogen target in the world and with the lowest noise figure. The Qweak target was the first one designed with CFD at Jefferson Lab. A CFD facility is being established at Jefferson Lab to design, build and test a new generation of low noise high power targets.

  6. High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) imager. Final report, 29 August 1991-29 August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance, C.; Eather, R.

    1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-light-level monochromatic imaging system was designed and fabricated which was optimized to detect and record optical emissions associated with high-power rf heating of the ionosphere. The instrument is capable of detecting very low intensities, of the order of 1 Rayleigh, from typical ionospheric atomic and molecular emissions. This is achieved through co-adding of ON images during heater pulses and subtraction of OFF (background) images between pulses. Images can be displayed and analyzed in real time and stored in optical disc for later analysis. Full image processing software is provided which was customized for this application and uses menu or mouse user interaction.

  7. High pressure discharges in cavities formed by microfabrication techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, B.A.; Cammack, D.A.; Pinker, R.D.; Racz, J. [Philips Electronics North America Corporation, Philips Research, Briarcliff Manor, New York 10510 (United States)] [Philips Electronics North America Corporation, Philips Research, Briarcliff Manor, New York 10510 (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure discharges are the basis of small high intensity light sources. In this work, we demonstrate the formation of high pressure discharges, in cavities formed by applying micromachining and integrated circuit techniques to quartz substrates. Cavities containing varying amounts of mercury and argon were fabricated to obtain high pressure discharges. A high pressure mercury discharge was formed in the electrodeless cavities by exciting them with a microwave source, operating at 2.45 GHz and in the electroded cavities by applying a dc voltage. The contraction of the discharge into a high pressure arc was observed. A broad emission spectrum due to self-absorption and collisions between excited atoms and normal atoms, typical of high pressure mercury discharges, was measured. The light output and efficacy increased with increasing pressure. The measured voltage was used to estimate the pressure within the electroded cavities, which is as high as 127 atm for one of the two cavities discussed in this work. Efficacies over 40 lumens per watt were obtained for the electrodeless cavities and over 50 scr(l)m/W for the electroded cavities. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Rotational viscometer for high-pressure high-temperature fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Kenneth R. (Knoxville, TN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a novel rotational viscometer which is well adapted for use with fluids at high temperatures and/or pressures. In one embodiment, the viscometer includes a substantially non-magnetic tube having a closed end and having an open end in communication with a fluid whose viscosity is to be determined. An annular drive magnet is mounted for rotation about the tube. The tube encompasses and supports a rotatable shaft assembly which carries a rotor, or bob, for insertion in the fluid. Affixed to the shaft are (a) a second magnet which is magnetically coupled to the drive magnet and (b) a third magnet. In a typical operation, the drive magnet is rotated to turn the shaft assembly while the shaft rotor is immersed in the fluid. The viscous drag on the rotor causes the shaft assembly to lag the rotation of the drive magnet by an amount which is a function of the amount of viscous drag. A first magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the drive magnet. A second magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the third magnet. An output is generated indicative of the phase difference between the two waveforms.

  9. ALPHN: A computer program for calculating ([alpha], n) neutron production in canisters of high-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, R.; Hermann, O.W.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of neutron production from ([alpha], n) reactions in canisters of immobilized high-level waste containing borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic compositions is significant and must be considered when estimating neutron shielding requirements. The personal computer program ALPHA calculates the ([alpha], n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the ([alpha], n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The ([alpha], n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass and do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister. In a typical application, these cases might represent the same canister of vitrified high-level waste at eight different decay times. Run time for a typical problem containing 20 chemical species, 24 actinides, and 8 decay times was 35 s on an IBM AT personal computer. Results of an example based on an expected canister composition at the Defense Waste Processing Facility are shown.

  10. ALPHN: A computer program for calculating ({alpha}, n) neutron production in canisters of high-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, R.; Hermann, O.W.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of neutron production from ({alpha}, n) reactions in canisters of immobilized high-level waste containing borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic compositions is significant and must be considered when estimating neutron shielding requirements. The personal computer program ALPHA calculates the ({alpha}, n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the ({alpha}, n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The ({alpha}, n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass and do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister. In a typical application, these cases might represent the same canister of vitrified high-level waste at eight different decay times. Run time for a typical problem containing 20 chemical species, 24 actinides, and 8 decay times was 35 s on an IBM AT personal computer. Results of an example based on an expected canister composition at the Defense Waste Processing Facility are shown.

  11. Real-time spot size camera for pulsed high-energy radiographic machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, S.A.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focal spot size of an x-ray source is a critical parameter which degrades resolution in a flash radiograph. For best results, a small round focal spot is required. Therefore, a fast and accurate measurement of the spot size is highly desirable to facilitate machine tuning. This paper describes two systems developed for Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays (PHERMEX) facility. The first uses a CCD camera combined with high-brightness floors, while the second utilizes phosphor storage screens. Other techniques typically record only the line spread function on radiographic film, while systems in this paper measure the more general two-dimensional point-spread function and associated modulation transfer function in real time for shot-to-shot comparison.

  12. Real-time spot size camera for pulsed high-energy radiographic machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, S.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focal spot size of an x-ray source is a critical parameter which degrades resolution in a flash radiograph. For best results, a small round focal spot is required. Therefore, a fast and accurate measurement of the spot size is highly desirable to facilitate machine tuning. This paper describes two systems developed for Los Alamos National Laboratory's Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays (PHERMEX) facility. The first uses a CCD camera combined with high-brightness floors, while the second utilizes phosphor storage screens. Other techniques typically record only the line spread function on radiographic film, while systems in this paper measure the more general two-dimensional point-spread function and associated modulation transfer function in real time for shot-to-shot comparison.

  13. High Efficiency, High Performance Clothes Dryer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Pescatore; Phil Carbone

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This program covered the development of two separate products; an electric heat pump clothes dryer and a modulating gas dryer. These development efforts were independent of one another and are presented in this report in two separate volumes. Volume 1 details the Heat Pump Dryer Development while Volume 2 details the Modulating Gas Dryer Development. In both product development efforts, the intent was to develop high efficiency, high performance designs that would be attractive to US consumers. Working with Whirlpool Corporation as our commercial partner, TIAX applied this approach of satisfying consumer needs throughout the Product Development Process for both dryer designs. Heat pump clothes dryers have been in existence for years, especially in Europe, but have not been able to penetrate the market. This has been especially true in the US market where no volume production heat pump dryers are available. The issue has typically been around two key areas: cost and performance. Cost is a given in that a heat pump clothes dryer has numerous additional components associated with it. While heat pump dryers have been able to achieve significant energy savings compared to standard electric resistance dryers (over 50% in some cases), designs to date have been hampered by excessively long dry times, a major market driver in the US. The development work done on the heat pump dryer over the course of this program led to a demonstration dryer that delivered the following performance characteristics: (1) 40-50% energy savings on large loads with 35 F lower fabric temperatures and similar dry times; (2) 10-30 F reduction in fabric temperature for delicate loads with up to 50% energy savings and 30-40% time savings; (3) Improved fabric temperature uniformity; and (4) Robust performance across a range of vent restrictions. For the gas dryer development, the concept developed was one of modulating the gas flow to the dryer throughout the dry cycle. Through heat modulation in a gas dryer, significant time and energy savings, combined with dramatically reduced fabric temperatures, was achieved in a cost-effective manner. The key design factor lay in developing a system that matches the heat input to the dryer with the fabrics ability to absorb it. The development work done on the modulating gas dryer over the course of this program led to a demonstration dryer that delivered the following performance characteristics: (1) Up to 25% reduction in energy consumption for small and medium loads; (2) Up to 35% time savings for large loads with 10-15% energy reduction and no adverse effect on cloth temperatures; (3) Reduced fabric temperatures, dry times and 18% energy reduction for delicate loads; and, (4) Robust performance across a range of vent restrictions.

  14. Results of a preliminary, high power RF thruster test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, L.; Karras, T.; Frind, G.; Holmes, D.G.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program was to demonstrate a high power electrodeless, RF electric propulsion concept. This was successfully accomplished. No attempt was made to optimize the design of the thruster with regard to physical dimensions, mass flow, nozzle shape, operational frequency, or power level. Measurements made were chamber pressure, total and static pressures at the nozzle exit plane and exhaust tank pressure. Mass flows range from about 0.4 to 1 gm/sec and, assuming perfect gas relationships, specific impulses up to 580 sec were obtained. Typical chamber pressure was 300 torr exhausting to a tank pressure of about 10 torr. Working fluids used were argon, helium and mixtures of the two. No degration of the device was detected after 12 start/stop cycles, about three hours of total run time, and a maximum input power of 70 kW. 10 refs.

  15. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ki Ha (Lafayette, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple and compact method and apparatus for detecting high frequency electric fields, particularly in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 100 MHz, uses a compact toroidal antenna. For typical geophysical applications the sensor will be used to detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from about 1 MHz, in particular in the frequency range between 1 to 100 MHz, to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Time-varying magnetic fields associated with time-varying electric fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroidal coil. The electric field at the center of (and perpendicular to the plane of) the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroidal coil one can easily and accurately determine the electric field.

  16. High-Performance Palladium Based Membrane for Hydrogen Separation and Purification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hopkins

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies'�Hydrogen Fuels R&D effort is to research, develop, and validate technologies for producing, storing, and delivering hydrogen in an efficient, clean, safe, reliable, and affordable manner. A key program technical milestone for hydrogen technology readiness is to produce hydrogen from diverse, domestic resources at $2.00-$3.00 per gallon of gasoline equivalent (gge) delivered, untaxed. Low-cost, high-temperature hydrogen separation membranes represent a key enabling technology for small-scale distributed hydrogen production units. Availability of such membranes with high selectivity and high permeability for hydrogen will allow their integration with hydrocarbon reforming and water gas shift reactions, potentially reducing the cost of hydrogen produced. Pd-metal-based dense membranes are known for their excellent hydrogen selectivity and permeability characteristics, however, utilization of these membranes has so far been limited to small scale niche markets for hydrogen purification primarily due to the relatively high cost of Pd-alloy tubes compared to pressure swing adsorption (PSA) units. This project was aimed at development of thin-film Pd-alloy membranes deposited on Pall Corporation's DOE-based AccuSep® porous metal tube substrates to form a composite hydrogen separation membrane for these applications. Pall's composite membrane development addressed the typical limitations of composite structures by developing robust membranes capable of withstanding thermal and mechanical stresses resulting from high temperature (400C), high pressure (400 psi steam methane reformer and 1000 psi coal) operations and thermal cycling involved in conventional hydrogen production. In addition, the Pd-alloy membrane composition was optimized to be able to offer the most stability in the typical synthesis gas environments produced by reforming of natural gas and bio-derived liquid fuels (BILI) validating the technical effectiveness and economic feasibility of the technology demonstrated. Results from this research added technology and product design information that offers the potential to significantly advance the commercial viability of hydrogen production.

  17. High power battery test methods for hybrid vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, G.L.; Haskins, H.; Heinrich, B.; Sutula, R.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commonly used EV battery tests are not very suitable for testing hybrid vehicle batteries, which may be primarily intended to supply vehicle acceleration power. The capacity of hybrid vehicle batteries will be relatively small, they will typically operate over a restricted range of states-of-charge, and they may seldom if ever be fully recharged. Further, hybrid propulsion system designs will commonly impose a higher regeneration content than is typical for electric vehicles. New test methods have been developed for use in characterizing battery performance and life for hybrid vehicle use. The procedures described in this paper were developed from the requirements of the government-industry cooperative Partnership for A New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program; however, they are expected to have broad application to the testing of energy storage devices for hybrid vehicles. The most important performance measure for a high power battery is its pulse power capability as a function of state-of-charge for both discharge and regeneration pulses. It is also important to characterize cycle life, although the {open_quote}cycles{close_quote} involved are quite different from the conventional full-discharge, full-recharge cycle commonly used for EV batteries, This paper illustrates in detail several test profiles which have been selected for PNGV battery testing, along with some sample results and lessons learned to date from the use of these test profiles. The relationship between the PNGV energy storage requirements and these tests is described so that application of the test methods can be made to other hybrid vehicle performance requirements as well. The resulting test procedures can be used to characterize the pulse power capability of high power energy storage devices including batteries and ultracapacitors, as well as the life expectancy of such devices, for either power assist or dual mode hybrid propulsion system designs.

  18. The Role of Lithium Conditioning in Achieving High Performance, Long Pulse H-mode Discharges in the NSTX and EAST Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maingi, Rajesh [PPPL; Mansfield, D. K. [PPPL; Gong, X. Z. [IPPCAS; Sun, Z. [IPPCAS; Bell, M. G. [PPPL

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the role of lithium wall conditioning on the achievement of high performance, long pulse discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is documented. Common observations include recycling reduction and elimination of ELMs. In NSTX, lithium conditioning typically resulted in ELM-free operation with impurity accumulation, which was ameliorated e.g. with pulsed 3D fields to trigger controlled ELMs. Active lithium conditioning in EAST discharges has overcome this problem, producing an ELM-free Hmode with controlled density and impurities.

  19. Monitoring microbe-induced physical property changes using high-frequency acoustic waveform data: Toward the development of a microbial megascope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kenneth Hurst

    2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of microbe generated gas bubbles in controlled, saturated sediment columns utilizing a novel technique involving acoustic wave propagation. Specifically, the effect of denitrifying bacteria on saturated flow conditions was evaluated in light of the stimulated production of N{sub 2} gas and the resulting plugging of the pore throats. The propagation of high frequency acoustic waves through the sediment columns was used to locate those regions in the column where gas accumulation occurred. Over a period of six weeks, regions of gas accumulation resulted in the attenuation of acoustic wave energies with the decreases in amplitude typically greater than one order of magnitude.

  20. Tailored Materials for High Efficiency CIDI Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, G.J.; Jana, S.

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the project, Tailored Materials for High Efficiency Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines, is to enable the implementation of new combustion strategies, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), that have the potential to significantly increase the energy efficiency of current diesel engines and decrease fuel consumption and environmental emissions. These strategies, however, are increasing the demands on conventional engine materials, either from increases in peak cylinder pressure (PCP) or from increases in the temperature of operation. The specific objective of this project is to investigate the application of a new material processing technology, friction stir processing (FSP), to improve the thermal and mechanical properties of engine components. The concept is to modify the surfaces of conventional, low-cost engine materials. The project focused primarily on FSP in aluminum materials that are compositional analogs to the typical piston and head alloys seen in small- to mid-sized CIDI engines. Investigations have been primarily of two types over the duration of this project: (1) FSP of a cast hypoeutectic Al-Si-Mg (A356/357) alloy with no introduction of any new components, and (2) FSP of Al-Cu-Ni alloys (Alloy 339) by physically stirring-in various quantities of carbon nanotubes/nanofibers or carbon fibers. Experimental work to date on aluminum systems has shown significant increases in fatigue lifetime and stress-level performance in aluminum-silicon alloys using friction processing alone, but work to demonstrate the addition of carbon nanotubes and fibers into aluminum substrates has shown mixed results due primarily to the difficulty in achieving porosity-free, homogeneous distributions of the particulate. A limited effort to understand the effects of FSP on steel materials was also undertaken during the course of this project. Processed regions were created in high-strength, low-alloyed steels up to 0.5 in. deep that showed significant grain refinement and homogeneous microstructures favorable to increased fracture toughness and fatigue performance. The final tasks of the project demonstrated that the FSP concept can be applied to a relevant part geometry by fabricating diesel piston crowns with FSP regions applied selectively to the edge of the bowl rim. This area of the piston typically suffers from conditions at high PCP that cause severe thermal fatigue issues. It is expected that, given the data from coupon testing, the durability of pistons modified by FSP will allow much higher fatigue lifetime and potentially also greater resistance to elevated stress-level effects on fatigue.

  1. Evaluation of current drive requirements and operating characteristics of a high bootstrap fraction advanced tokamak reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor potential of some advanced physics operating modes proposed for the TPX physics program are examined. A moderate aspect ratio (A = 4.5 as in TPX), 2 GW reactor is analyzed because of its potential for steady-state, non-inductive operation with high bootstrap current fraction. Particle, energy and toroidal current equations are evolved to steady-state conditions using the 1-1/2-D time-dependent WHIST transport code. The solutions are therefore consistent with particle, energy and current sources and assumed transport models. Fast wave current drive (FWCD) provides the axial seed current. The bootstrap current typically provides 80-90% of the current, while feedback on the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) power maintains the total current. The sensitivity of the plasma power amplification factor, Q {equivalent_to} P{sub fus}/P{sub aux}, to variations in the plasma properties is examined. The auxiliary current drive power, P{sub aux} = P{sub LH} + P{sub FW}; bootstrap current fraction: current drive efficiency; and other parameters are evaluated. The plasma is thermodynamically stable for the energy confinement model assumed (a multiple of ITER89P). The FWCD and LHCD sources provide attractive control possibilities, not only for the current profile, but also for the total fusion power since the gain on the incremental auxiliary power is typically 10-30 in these calculations when overall Q {approx} 30.

  2. High-Velocity Features of Calcium and Silicon in the Spectra of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Marion, G H; Wheeler, J Craig; Barna, Barnabas; Szalai, Tamas; Mulligan, Brian; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "High-velocity features" (HVFs) are spectral features in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that have minima indicating significantly higher (by greater than about 6000 km/s) velocities than typical "photospheric-velocity features" (PVFs). The PVFs are absorption features with minima indicating typical photospheric (i.e., bulk ejecta) velocities (usually ~9000-15,000 km/s near B-band maximum brightness). In this work we undertake the most in-depth study of HVFs ever performed. The dataset used herein consists of 445 low-resolution optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectra (at epochs up to 5 d past maximum brightness) of 210 low-redshift SNe Ia that follow the "Phillips relation." A series of Gaussian functions is fit to the data in order to characterise possible HVFs of Ca II H&K, Si II {\\lambda}6355, and the Ca II NIR triplet. The temporal evolution of the velocities and strengths of the PVFs and HVFs of these three spectral features is investigated, as are possible correlations with other SN Ia observables. We f...

  3. Design of a near-field coded aperture cameras for high-resolution medical and industrial gamma-ray imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accorsi, Roberto, 1971-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coded Aperture Imaging is a technique originally developed for X-ray astronomy, where typical imaging problems are characterized by far-field geometry and an object made of point sources distributed over a mainly dark ...

  4. Automated Manufacturing of High Efficiency Modules: Final Subcontract Technical Status Report, 21 March 2005 - 31 August 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, D.; Jester, T.; Bunea, G.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SunPower Corp. describes its research to develop low-cost, next-generation SunPower modules with 30-year warranties and at least 50% higher energy production per area relative to today's typical multicrystalline Si modules.

  5. Design and modeling of a high flux cooling device based on thin film evaporation from thin nanoporous membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhengmao

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat dissipation is a limiting factor in the performance of integrated circuits, power electronics and laser diodes. State-of-the-art solutions typically use air-cooled heat sinks, which have limited performance owing to ...

  6. High-temperature, high-pressure bonding of nested tubular metallic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quinby, Thomas C. (Kingston, TN)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a tool for effecting high-temperature, high-compression bonding between the confronting faces of nested, tubular, metallic components. In a typical application, the tool is used to produce tubular target assemblies for irradiation in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, the target assembly comprising a uranium foil and an aluminum-alloy substrate. The tool preferably is composed throughout of graphite. It comprises a tubular restraining member in which a mechanically expandable tubular core is mounted to form an annulus with the member. The components to be bonded are mounted in nested relation in the annulus. The expandable core is formed of individually movable, axially elongated segments whose outer faces cooperatively define a cylindrical pressing surface and whose inner faces cooperatively define two opposed, inwardly tapered, axial bores. Tapered rams extend respectively into the bores. The loaded tool is mounted in a conventional hot-press provided with evacuation means, heaters for maintaining its interior at bonding temperature, and hydraulic cylinders for maintaining a selected inwardly directed pressure on the tapered rams. With the hot-press evacuated and the loaded tool at the desired temperature, the cylinders are actuated to apply the selected pressure to the rams. The rams in turn expand the segmented core to maintain the nested components in compression against the restraining member. These conditions are maintained until the confronting faces of the nested components are joined in a continuous, uniform bond characterized by high thermal conductivity.

  7. On the highly reddened members in 6 young galactic star clusters - a multiwavelength study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, B; Sanwal, B B; Bessell, M S; Kumar, Brijesh; Sagar, Ram

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral and reddening properties of 211 highly reddened proper motion members with $V $70%) of program stars in NGC 1976, NGC 2244, NGC 6530 and NGC 6611 show anomalous reddening with $R_{V}$ = $5.11\\pm0.11$, $3.60\\pm0.05$, $3.87\\pm0.05$ and $3.56\\pm 0.02$, respectively, indicating the presence of grain size dust larger than that typical to the diffuse medium. A small number of stars in NGC 1976, NGC 2244 and NGC 6611 also show normal behavior while the cluster NGC 6823 appears to have a normal reddening. Three highly luminous late type giants, one in NGC 2244 and two in NGC 6530, appears to be member and are in post-hydrogen-core-burning stages suggesting a prolonged duration ($\\sim$ 25 Myrs) of star formation.

  8. Using long-baseline interferometric gravitational waves detectors for high precision measures of the gravitational acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Corda

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A derivation of the optical axis lenght fluctations due by tilts of the mirrors of the Fabry-Perot cavity of long-baseline interferometers for the detection of gravitational waves in presence of the gravitational field of the earth is discussed. By comparing with the typical tilt-induced noises it is shown that this potential signal, which is considered a weak source of noise, is negligible for the first generation of gravitational waves interferometers, but, in principle, this effect could be used for high precision measures of the gravitational acceleration if advanced projects will achieve an high sensitivity. In that case the precision of the misure could be higher than the gravimeter realized by the Istituto di Metrologia ``Gustavo Colonnetti''.

  9. High pressure melt ejection and direct containment heating in ice condenser containments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.; Carroll, D.E.; Tills, J.L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A response of a typical ice condenser containment to a high pressure melt dispersal accident has been studied. While ice beds may be effective in reducing the potential loading caused by direct heating of the containment atmosphere, analyses suggest two other modes of containment failure that have not been previously identified. Calculations with the CONTAIN code indicate that ejected core debris may interact with steam from the primary system, generating sufficient hydrogen to threaten containment integrity. Further, if the debris ejected into the cavity promptly fails the seal table, the dispersed material could enter the in-core instrument room and attack the containment liner. The timing of the failure of the seal table is highly dependent on the characteristics of the debris-to-steel energy transfer.

  10. Development of a dual MCP framing camera for high energy x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumi, N., E-mail: izumi2@llnl.gov; Hall, G. N.; Carpenter, A. C.; Allen, F. V.; Cruz, J. G.; Felker, B.; Hargrove, D.; Holder, J.; Lumbard, A.; Montesanti, R.; Palmer, N. E.; Piston, K.; Stone, G.; Thao, M.; Vern, R.; Zacharias, R.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently developed diagnostic techniques at LLNL require recording backlit images of extremely dense imploded plasmas using hard x-rays, and demand the detector to be sensitive to photons with energies higher than 50 keV [R. Tommasini et al., Phys. Phys. Plasmas 18, 056309 (2011); G. N. Hall et al., “AXIS: An instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using ARC on the NIF,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)]. To increase the sensitivity in the high energy region, we propose to use a combination of two MCPs. The first MCP is operated in a low gain regime and works as a thick photocathode, and the second MCP works as a high gain electron multiplier. We tested the concept of this dual MCP configuration and succeeded in obtaining a detective quantum efficiency of 4.5% for 59 keV x-rays, 3 times larger than with a single plate of the thickness typically used in NIF framing cameras.

  11. Pitting Corrosion in CVD SiC at 300?C in Deoxygenated High-Purity Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Pitman, Stan G.; Senor, David J.; Geelhood, Ken J.; Painter, Chad L.

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SiC is a candidate for nuclear applications at elevated temperatures but has not been fully studied under typical light-water reactor operating conditions, such as moderate temperatures and high pressures. Coupons of high-purity chemical vapor deposited SiC were exposed to deoxygenated, pressurized water at 573K and 100 Bar for up to 4000 hours. Ceramographic examination of the exposed SiC surfaces revealed both embryonic and large, d > 300 µm, pits on the surface. The pits were characterized using scanning electron microscopy for structure and chemistry analysis. Pit densities were also determined by standard counting methods. The chemical analysis revealed that the pits are associated with the formation of silica and subsequent loss of Si, which is expected due to several suggested reactions between SiC and water.

  12. Constraining and applying a generic high-density equation of state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark G. Alford; G. F. Burgio; Sophia Han; Gabriele Taranto; Dario Zappalà

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the "constant speed of sound" (CSS) parameterization of the equation of state of high density matter, and its application to the Field Correlator Method (FCM) model of quark matter. We show how observational constraints on the maximum mass and typical radius of neutron stars are expressed as constraints on the CSS parameters. We find that the observation of a $2\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$ star already severely constrains the CSS parameters, and is particularly difficult to accommodate if the squared speed of sound in the high density phase is assumed to be around $1/3$ or less. We show that the FCM equation of state can be accurately represented by the CSS parameterization. We display the mapping between the FCM and CSS parameters, and see that FCM only allows equations of state in a restricted subspace of the CSS parameters.

  13. Constraining and applying a generic high-density equation of state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Mark G; Han, Sophia; Taranto, Gabriele; Zappalà, Dario

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the "constant speed of sound" (CSS) parameterization of the equation of state of high density matter, and its application to the Field Correlator Method (FCM) model of quark matter. We show how observational constraints on the maximum mass and typical radius of neutron stars are expressed as constraints on the CSS parameters. We find that the observation of a $2\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$ star already severely constrains the CSS parameters, and is particularly difficult to accommodate if the squared speed of sound in the high density phase is assumed to be around $1/3$ or less. We show that the FCM equation of state can be accurately represented by the CSS parameterization. We display the mapping between the FCM and CSS parameters, and see that FCM only allows equations of state in a restricted subspace of the CSS parameters.

  14. Electrochromic window with high reflectivity modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Gerouki, Alexandra (Medford, MA); Liu, Te-Yang (Arlington, MA); Goldner, Mark A. (Cambridge, MA); Haas, Terry E. (Southborough, MA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-layered, active, thin film, solid-state electrochromic device having a high reflectivity in the near infrared in a colored state, a high reflectivity and transmissivity modulation when switching between colored and bleached states, a low absorptivity in the near infrared, and fast switching times, and methods for its manufacture and switching are provided. In one embodiment, a multi-layered device comprising a first indium tin oxide transparent electronic conductor, a transparent ion blocking layer, a tungsten oxide electrochromic anode, a lithium ion conducting-electrically resistive electrolyte, a complimentary lithium mixed metal oxide electrochromic cathode, a transparent ohmic contact layer, a second indium oxide transparent electronic conductor, and a silicon nitride encapsulant is provided. Through elimination of optional intermediate layers, simplified device designs are provided as alternative embodiments. Typical colored-state reflectivity of the multi-layered device is greater than 50% in the near infrared, bleached-state reflectivity is less than 40% in the visible, bleached-state transmissivity is greater than 60% in the near infrared and greater than 40% in the visible, and spectral absorbance is less than 50% in the range from 0.65-2.5 .mu.m.

  15. High speed exhaust gas recirculation valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fensom, Rod (Peterborough, GB); Kidder, David J. (Peterborough, GB)

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to minimize pollutants such as Nox, internal combustion engines typically include an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve that can be used to redirect a portion of exhaust gases to an intake conduit, such as an intake manifold, so that the redirected exhaust gases will be recycled. It is desirable to have an EGR valve with fast-acting capabilities, and it is also desirable to have the EGR valve take up as little space as possible. An exhaust gas recirculation valve is provided that includes an exhaust passage tube, a valve element pivotally mounted within the exhaust passage tube, a linear actuator; and a gear train. The gear train includes a rack gear operatively connected to the linear actuator, and at least one rotatable gear meshing with the rack gear and operatively connected to the valve element to cause rotation of the valve element upon actuation of the linear actuator. The apparatus provides a highly compact package having a high-speed valve actuation capability.

  16. Electrochromic window with high reflectivity modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldner, R.B.; Gerouki, A.; Liu, T.Y.; Goldner, M.A.; Haas, T.E.

    2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-layered, active, thin film, solid-state electrochromic device having a high reflectivity in the near infrared in a colored state, a high reflectivity and transmissivity modulation when switching between colored and bleached states, a low absorptivity in the near infrared, and fast switching times, and methods for its manufacture and switching are provided. In one embodiment, a multi-layered device comprising a first indium tin oxide transparent electronic conductor, a transparent ion blocking layer, a tungsten oxide electrochromic anode, a lithium ion conducting-electrically resistive electrolyte, a complimentary lithium mixed metal oxide electrochromic cathode, a transparent ohmic contact layer, a second indium oxide transparent electronic conductor, and a silicon nitride encapsulant is provided. Through elimination of optional intermediate layers, simplified device designs are provided as alternative embodiments. Typical colored-state reflectivity of the multi-layered device is greater than 50% in the near infrared, bleached-state reflectivity is less than 40% in the visible, bleached-state transmissivity is greater than 60% in the near infrared and greater than 40% in the visible, and spectral absorbance is less than 50% in the range from 0.65-2.5 mum.

  17. The land around typical Darfur refugee camps is cleared of all wood 2 T H E T R O U B L E W I T H C O O K I N Gthe impact of biomass-burning on health & enviornment and what we are doing about it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    ] International Energy Agency,2002,World Energy Outlook,OECD,Paris,pp 365-393.Chap 13. [2] UNDP,1997,Energy after in Developing Countries,"Annual Review of Energy and the Environment,10,pp.407­429. [5] Epidemiological Bulletin,State of the World's Forests,FAO,Rome,p113,Annex 2. [9] FAO,2000,Haiti Country Report:Forestry Outlook

  18. X-ray and Multiwavelength Insights into the Inner Structure of High-Luminosity Disc-Like Emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, B; Eracleous, M; Wu, Jian; Hall, P B; Rafiee, A; Schneider, D P; Wu, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present X-ray and multiwavelength studies of a sample of eight high-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with disc-like H\\beta emission-line profiles selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. These sources have higher redshift (z~0.6) than the majority of the known disc-like emitters, and they occupy a largely unexplored space in the luminosity-redshift plane. Seven sources have typical AGN X-ray spectra with power-law photon indices of \\Gamma~1.4-2.0; two of them show some X-ray absorption (column density N_H~10^{21}-10^{22} cm^{-2}$ for neutral gas). The other source, J0850+4451, has only three hard X-ray photons detected and is probably heavily obscured (N_H>3x10^{23} cm^{-2}). This object is also identified as a low-ionization broad absorption line (BAL) quasar based on Mg II \\lambda2799 absorption; it is the first disc-like emitter reported that is also a BAL quasar. The IR-to-UV spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these eight sources are similar to the mean SEDs of typical qu...

  19. Arecibo imaging of compact high-velocity clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, W B; Chengalur, J N

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten isolated compact high-velocity clouds (CHVCs) of the type cataloged by Braun & Burton (1999) have been imaged with the Arecibo telescope and were found to have a nested core/halo morphology. We argue that a combination of high-resolution filled-aperture and synthesis data is crucial to determining the intrinsic properties of the CHVCs. We identify the halos as Warm Neutral Medium surrounding one or more cores in the Cool Neutral Medium phase. These halos are clearly detected and resolved by the Arecibo filled-aperture imaging, which reaches a limiting sensitivity (1 sigma) of N_H about 2x10^17 cm^-2 over the typical 70 km/s linewidth at zero intensity. The FWHM linewidth of the halo gas is found to be 25 km/s, consistent with a WNM thermal broadening within 10^4 K gas. Substantial asymmetries are found at high N_H (>10^18.5 cm^-2) levels in 60% of our sample. A high degree of reflection-symmetry is found at low N_H (<10^18.5 cm^-2) in all sources studied at these levels. The column-density profiles...

  20. Microwave characterization of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, D.W.; Gray, E.R.; Arendt, P.N.; Beery, J.G.; Bennett, B.L.; Brown, D.R.; Houlton, R.J.; Jahan, M.S.; Klapetzky, A.J.; Maez, M.A.; Raistrick, I.D.; Reeves, G.A.; Rusnak, B.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thick (10-15 {mu}m) Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O films have been deposited onto yttria-stabilized zirconia and Ag substrates by d.c. magnetron sputtering techniques. Direct deposition onto 1'' diameter yttria-stabilized zirconia yields films with typical 22 GHz surface resistance (R{sub s}) values of 5.2 {plus minus} 2 m{Omega} and 52 {plus minus} 2 m{Omega} at 10 K and 77 K, respectively. For comparison, R{sub s} of Cu at this same frequency is 10 m{Omega} at 4 K and 22 m{Omega} at 77 K. Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O films have also been deposited onto 1'' diameter Ag substrates using Au/Cu, Cu, and BaF{sub 2} buffer layers. The lowest R{sub s} values were obtained on films with a BaF{sub 2} buffer layer, typical values being 7.8 {plus minus} 2 m{Omega} and 30.6 {plus minus} 2 m{Omega} (measured at 22 GHz) at 10 K and 77 K, respectively. Larger films (1.5'' diameter) with similar R{sub s} values were prepared using this same technique, demonstrating that the fabrication process can be scaled to larger surface areas. These films are promising for radiofrequency cavity applications because they are thick (50-75 times the London penetration depth), have relatively large surface areas, are fabricated on metallic substrates, and have R{sub s} values that are competitive with Cu at 77 K and are lower than Cu at 4 K. Because they are polycrystalline and unoriented, it is anticipated that their R{sub s} values can be lowered by improving the processing technique. High-quality films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} have been electron-beam deposited onto 1'' LaGaO{sub 3} and 1.5'' LaAlO{sub 3} substrates. The 1'' sample is characterized by R{sub s} values of 0.2 {plus minus} 0.1 m{Omega} at 4 K and 18.6 {plus minus} 2 m{Omega} at 77 K. The 4-K value is only 2-4 times higher than Nb. The 1.5'' sample has R{sub s} values (measured at 18 GHz) of 0.93 {plus minus} 2 m{Omega} and 71 {plus minus} 3 m{Omega} at 10 K and 77 K, respectively. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  1. High Integrity Can Design Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaber, E.L.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is chartered with facilitating the disposition of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel to allow disposal at a geologic repository. This is done through coordination with the repository program and by assisting DOE Site owners of SNF with needed information, standardized requirements, packaging approaches, etc. The High Integrity Can (HIC) will be manufactured to provide a substitute or barrier enhancement for normal fuel geometry and cladding. The can would be nested inside the DOE standardized canister which is designed to interface with the repository waste package. The HIC approach may provide the following benefits over typical canning approaches for DOE SNF. (a) It allows ready calculation and management of criticality issues for miscellaneous. (b) It segments and further isolates damaged or otherwise problem materials from normal SNF in the repository package. (c) It provides a very long term corrosion barrier. (d) It provides an extra internal pressure barrier for particulates, gaseous fission products, hydrogen, and water vapor. (e) It delays any potential release of fission products to the repository environment. (f) It maintains an additional level of fuel geometry control during design basis accidents, rock-fall, and seismic events. (g) When seal welded, it could provide the additional containment required for shipments involving plutonium content in excess of 20 Ci. (10 CFR 71.63.b) if integrated with an appropriate cask design. Long term corrosion protection is central to the HIC concept. The material selected for the HIC (Hastelloy C-22) has undergone extensive testing for repository service. The most severe theoretical interactions between iron, repository water containing chlorides and other repository construction materials have been tested. These expected chemical species have not been shown capable of corroding the selected HIC material. Therefore, the HIC should provide a significant barrier to DOE SNF dispersal long after most commercial SNF has degraded and begun moving into the repository environment.

  2. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhl, James Eugene (Albuquerque, NM); Warpinski, Norman Raymond (Albuquerque, NM); Whetten, Ernest Blayne (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves.

  3. High speed point derivative microseismic detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhl, J.E.; Warpinski, N.R.; Whetten, E.B.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed microseismic event detector constructed in accordance with the present invention uses a point derivative comb to quickly and accurately detect microseismic events. Compressional and shear waves impinging upon microseismic receiver stations disposed to collect waves are converted into digital data and analyzed using a point derivative comb including assurance of quiet periods prior to declaration of microseismic events. If a sufficient number of quiet periods have passed, the square of a two point derivative of the incoming digital signal is compared to a trip level threshold exceeding the determined noise level to declare a valid trial event. The squaring of the derivative emphasizes the differences between noise and signal, and the valid event is preferably declared when the trip threshold has been exceeded over a temporal comb width to realize a comb over a given time period. Once a trial event has been declared, the event is verified through a spatial comb, which applies the temporal event comb to additional stations. The detector according to the present invention quickly and accurately detects initial compressional waves indicative of a microseismic event which typically exceed the ambient cultural noise level by a small amount, and distinguishes the waves from subsequent larger amplitude shear waves. 9 figs.

  4. Measurement method for roll angular displacement with a high resolution by using diffraction gratings and a heterodyne interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Shanzhi, E-mail: shanzhit@gmail.com [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China) [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Wang, Zhao [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)] [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Gao, Jianmin; Guo, Junjie [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710054 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710054 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The roll angle measurement is difficult to be achieved directly using a typical commercial interferometer due to its low sensitivity in axial direction, where the axial direction is orthogonal to the plane of the roll angular displacement. A roll angle measurement method combined diffraction gratings with a laser heterodyne interferometer is discussed in this paper. The diffraction grating placed in the plane of a roll angular displacement and the interferometer arranged in the plane's orthogonal direction, constitute the measurement pattern for the roll angle with high resolution. The roll angular displacement, considered as the linear, can be tested precisely when the corresponding angle is very small. Using the proposed method, the angle roll measurement obtains the high resolution of 0.002{sup ?}. Experiment has proved its feasibility and practicability.

  5. 12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N; Constantin, C G; Niemann, C; Neumayer, P; Chung, H; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Glenzer, S H; Girard, F

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr K{alpha} source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility. The contrast ratio (K{alpha} to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultra short pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10{sup -5}. Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr K{alpha} and K{beta} x-rays are emitted from a roughly 1 x 2 mm emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70 eV (i.e. mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of K{alpha} to K{beta}. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy K{alpha} source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

  6. Modeling Liquefaction Targeted Age: Elementary to High School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    , well-sorted sand water Introduction This activity allows students to construct a small-scale model smaller scale. Liquefaction is typically limited to relatively loose, silty or sandy soil deposits where://igs.indiana.edu/Earthquakes/) Miscellaneous Map 81 (scale,1:193,061) and 86 ( scale, 1:500,000): Map of Indiana Showing Liquefaction Potential

  7. Computationally Efficient Regularized Inversion for Highly Parameterized MODFLOW Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    . INTRODUCTION The inverse problem in groundwater modeling is generally ill-posed and non-unique. The typical geological heterogeneity has not been possible in common groundwater modeling practice. The principal reasons-Marquardt methods, and (3) lack of experience within the groundwater modeling community with regularized inversion

  8. Hybrid magnet devices for molecule manipulation and small scale high gradient-field applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Humphries, David E. (El Cerrito, CA); Hong, Seok-Cheol (Seoul, KR); Cozzarelli, legal representative, Linda A. (Berkeley, CA); Pollard, Martin J. (El Cerrito, CA); Cozzarelli, Nicholas R. (Berkeley, CA)

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are hybrid magnetic tweezers able to exert approximately 1 nN of force to 4.5 .mu.m magnetic bead. The maximum force was experimentally measured to be .about.900 pN which is in good agreement with theoretical estimations and other measurements. In addition, a new analysis scheme that permits fast real-time position measurement in typical geometry of magnetic tweezers has been developed and described in detail.

  9. IMPROVED CCD DETECTORS FOR HIGH SPEED, CHARGE EXCHANGE SPECTROSCOPY STUDIES ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.H. BURRELL; P. GOHIL; R.J. GROEBNER; D.H. KAPLAN; D.G. NILSON; J.I. ROBINSON; D.M. THOMAS

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tokamak plasmas utilized in magnetic fusion research provide access to some of the longest duration, highest temperature plasmas on earth. For example, on the DIII-D tokamak, plasmas lasting up to 10 seconds have been produced with ion temperatures up to 27 keV and electron temperatures up to 15 keV in toroidal plasmas with 1.7 m major radius, 0.65 m half width and 2.5 m vertical height. Typical particle densities in these plasmas are in the range of 2.0 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} through 2.0 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. Spectroscopic measurements of line radiation from highly ionized atoms provide one of the key techniques for determining the plasma parameters in tokamak discharges.

  10. Plasma Chemistries for High Density Plasma Etching of SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, H.; Hahn, Y.B.; Hays, D.A.; Hong, J.; Jung, K.B.; Lester, L.F.; Ostling, M.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.; Zetterling, C.-M; Zhang, L.

    1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of different plasma chemistries, including SF6, Cl2, IC1 and IBr, have been examined for dry etching of 6H-SiC in high ion density plasma tools (Inductively Coupled Plasma and Electron Cyclotron Resonance). Rates up to 4,500~"min-1 were obtained for SF6 plasmas, while much lower rates (S800~.min-') were achieved with Cl2, ICl and IBr. The F2- based chemistries have poor selectivity for SiC over photoresist masks (typically 0.4-0.5), but Ni masks are more robust, and allow etch depths 210pm in the SiC. A micromachining process (sequential etch/deposition (<2,000Angstrom min-1) for SiC steps) designed for Si produces relatively low etch rates.

  11. Development of fast cooling pulsed magnets at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Tao; Sun, Quqin; Zhao, Jianlong; Jiang, Fan; Li, Liang; Xu, Qiang [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)] [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Herlach, Fritz [Department of Physics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Physics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed magnets with fast cooling channels have been developed at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. Between the inner and outer sections of a coil wound with a continuous length of CuNb wire, G10 rods with cross section 4 mm × 5 mm were inserted as spacers around the entire circumference, parallel to the coil axis. The free space between adjacent rods is 6 mm. The liquid nitrogen flows freely in the channels between these rods, and in the direction perpendicular to the rods through grooves provided in the rods. For a typical 60 T pulsed magnetic field with pulse duration of 40 ms, the cooling time between subsequent pulses is reduced from 160 min to 35 min. Subsequently, the same technology was applied to a 50 T magnet with 300 ms pulse duration. The cooling time of this magnet was reduced from 480 min to 65 min.

  12. Total hemispherical emittance measured at high temperatures by the calorimetric method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiFilippo, F. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Mirtich, M.J.; Banks, B.A. [Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Stidham, C.; Kussmaul, M. [Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A calorimetric vacuum emissometer (CVE) capable of measuring total hemispherical emittance of surfaces at elevated temperatures was designed, built, and tested. Several materials with a wide range of emittances were measured in the CVE between 773 to 923 K. These results were compared to values calculated from spectral emittance curves measured in a room temperature Hohlraum reflectometer and in an open-air elevated temperature emissometer. The results differed by as much as 0.2 for some materials but were in closer agreement for the more highly-emitting, diffuse-reflecting samples. The differences were attributed to temperature, atmospheric, and directional effects, and errors in the Hohlraum and emissometer measurements ({+-} 5 percent). The probable error of the CVE measurements was typically less than 1 percent.

  13. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  14. NREL/SCE High Penetration PV Integration Project: FY13 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, B. A.; Shah, S.; Norris, B. L.; Dise, J. H.; Yu, L.; Paradis, D.; Katiraei, F.; Seguin, R.; Costyk, D.; Woyak, J.; Jung, J.; Russell, K.; Broadwater, R.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Southern California Edison (SCE), Quanta Technology, Satcon Technology Corporation, Electrical Distribution Design (EDD), and Clean Power Research (CPR) teamed to analyze the impacts of high penetration levels of photovoltaic (PV) systems interconnected onto the SCE distribution system. This project was designed specifically to benefit from the experience that SCE and the project team would gain during the installation of 500 megawatts (MW) of utility-scale PV systems (with 1-5 MW typical ratings) starting in 2010 and completing in 2015 within SCE's service territory through a program approved by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC). This report provides the findings of the research completed under the project to date.

  15. Alternatives for high-level waste forms, containers, and container processing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.W.

    1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates alternatives for high-level waste forms, containers, container processing systems, and onsite interim storage. Glass waste forms considered are cullet, marbles, gems, and monolithic glass. Small and large containers configured with several combinations of overpack confinement and shield casks are evaluated for these waste forms. Onsite interim storage concepts including canister storage building, bore holes, and storage pad were configured with various glass forms and canister alternatives. All favorable options include the monolithic glass production process as the waste form. Of the favorable options the unshielded 4- and 7-canister overpack options have the greatest technical assurance associated with their design concepts due to their process packaging and storage methods. These canisters are 0.68 m and 0.54 m in diameter respectively and 4.57 m tall. Life-cycle costs are not a discriminating factor in most cases, varying typically less than 15 percent.

  16. Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control.

  17. Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. 14 figs.

  18. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program: High Performance Manufactured Home Prototyping and Construction Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewes, T.; Peeks, B.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program (NEEM) administrator, have been collaborating to conduct research on new specifications that would improve on the energy requirements of a NEEM home. In its role as administrator, NEW administers the technical specs, performs research and engineering analysis, implements ongoing construction quality management procedures, and maintains a central database with home tracking. This project prototyped and assessed the performances of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that are not commonly deployed in the manufacturing setting. The package of measures is able to reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50 percent over typical manufactured homes produced in the northwest.

  19. VUV-absorption cross section of CO2 at high temperatures and impact on exoplanet atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venot, Olivia; Bénilan, Yves; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Hébrard, Eric; Larcher, Gwenaelle; Schwell, Martin; Dobrijevic, Michel; Selsis, Franck

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption cross sections are an essential ingredient of photochemical atmosphere models. Exoplanet searches have unveiled a large population of short-period objects with hot atmospheres, very different from what we find in our solar system. Transiting exoplanets whose atmospheres can now be studied by transit spectroscopy receive extremely strong UV fluxes and have typical temperatures ranging from 400 to 2500 K. At these temperatures, UV photolysis cross section data are severely lacking. Our goal is to provide high-temperature absorption cross sections and their temperature dependency for important atmospheric compounds. This study is dedicated to CO2, which is observed and photodissociated in exoplanet atmospheres. We performed these measurements for the 115 - 200 nm range at 300, 410, 480, and 550 K. In the 195 - 230 nm range, we worked at seven temperatures between 465 and 800 K. We found that the absorption cross section of CO2 is very sensitive to temperature, especially above 160 nm....

  20. A high-performance workflow system for subsurface simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Xingyuan; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Gosink, Luke J.; Keating, Elizabeth; Lansing, Carina; Moeglein, William AM; Murray, Christopher J.; Pau, George Shu Heng; Porter, Ellen A.; Purohit, Sumit; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Waichler, Scott R.

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface modeling applications typically neglect uncertainty in the conceptual models, past or future scenarios, and attribute most or all uncertainty to errors in model parameters. In this contribution, uncertainty in technetium-99 transport in a heterogeneous, deep vadose zone is explored with respect to the conceptual model using a next generation user environment called Akuna. Akuna provides a range of tools to manage environmental modeling projects, from managing simulation data to visualizing results from high-performance computational simulators. Core toolsets accessible through the user interface include model setup, grid generation, parameter estimation, and uncertainty quantification. The BC Cribs site at Hanford in southeastern Washington State is used to demonstrate Akuna capabilities. At the BC Cribs site, conceptualization of the system is highly uncertain because only sparse information is available for the geologic conceptual model, the physical and chemical properties of the sediments, and the history of waste disposal operations. Using the Akuna toolset to perform an analysis of conservative solute transport, significant prediction uncertainty in simulated concentrations is demonstrated by conceptual model variation. This demonstrates that conceptual model uncertainty is an important consideration in sparse data environments such as BC Cribs. It is also demonstrated that Akuna and the underlying toolset provides an integrated modeling environment that streamlines model setup, parameter optimization, and uncertainty analyses for high-performance computing applications.

  1. Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas M. Lillo

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work evaluates the suitability of iron aluminide coatings for use in high temperature fossil fuel combustion environments, such as boiler applications. The coatings are applied using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray techniques. Iron aluminide coatings, with the nominal composition of Fe3Al, were applied to various high temperature structural materials (316 Stainless Steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel and Inconel 600) that typically lack inherent resistance to environmental degradation found in fossil fuel combustion atmospheres. Coating/substrate combinations were subjected to thermal cycling to evaluate the effect of HVOF parameters, coating thickness, substrate material and substrate surface roughness on the resistance to coating delamination and cracking. It was found that substrate surface roughness had a profound influence on the performance of a given substrate/coating system and that surface preparation techniques will need to be tailored to the specific substrate material. Also, higher particle velocity during HVOF thermal spray deposition of the iron aluminide coatings tended to result in better-performing coating/substrate systems with less delamination at the coating/substrate interface. Some combinations of HVOF parameters, coating thickness and substrate materials were found to perform extremely well even at temperatures up to 900oC. However, in some cases, substantial reactions at the interface were observed.

  2. High Energy Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward McCullough; Patrick Dhooge; Jonathan Nimitz

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project determined the performance of a new high efficiency refrigerant, Ikon B, in a residential air conditioner designed to use R-22. The refrigerant R-22, used in residential and small commercial air conditioners, is being phased out of production in developed countries beginning this year because of concerns regarding its ozone depletion potential. Although a replacement refrigerant, R-410A, is available, it operates at much higher pressure than R-22 and requires new equipment. R-22 air conditioners will continue to be in use for many years to come. Air conditioning is a large part of expensive summer peak power use in many parts of the U.S. Previous testing and computer simulations of Ikon B indicated that it would have 20 - 25% higher coefficient of performance (COP, the amount of cooling obtained per energy used) than R-22 in an air-cooled air conditioner. In this project, a typical new R-22 residential air conditioner was obtained, installed in a large environmental chamber, instrumented, and run both with its original charge of R-22 and then with Ikon B. In the environmental chamber, controlled temperature and humidity could be maintained to obtain repeatable and comparable energy use results. Tests with Ikon B included runs with and without a power controller, and an extended run for several months with subsequent analyses to check compatibility of Ikon B with the air conditioner materials and lubricant. Baseline energy use of the air conditioner with its original R-22 charge was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. After changeover to Ikon B and a larger expansion orifice, energy use was measured at 90 deg F and 100 deg F. Ikon B proved to have about 19% higher COP at 90 deg F and about 26% higher COP at 100 deg F versus R-22. Ikon B had about 20% lower cooling capacity at 90 deg F and about 17% lower cooling capacity at 100 deg F versus R-22 in this system. All results over multiple runs were within 1% relative standard deviation (RSD). All of these values agree well with previous results and computer simulations of Ikon B performance versus R-22. The lower cooling capacity of Ikon B is not a concern unless a particular air conditioner is near its maximum cooling capacity in application. Typically, oversized A/C systems are installed by contractors to cover contingencies. In the extended run with Ikon B, which lasted about 4.5 months at 100 deg F ambient temperature and 68% compressor on time, the air conditioner performed well with no significant loss of energy efficiency. Post-run analysis of the refrigerant, compressor lubricant oil, compressor, compressor outlet tubing, and the filter/dryer showed minor effects but nothing that was considered significant. The project was very successful. All objectives were achieved, and the performance of Ikon B indicates that it can easily be retrofitted into R-22 air conditioners to give 15 - 20% energy savings and a 1 - 3 year payback of retrofit costs depending on location and use. Ikon B has the potential to be a successful commercial product.

  3. High-resolution imaging of compact high-velocity clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Braun; Butler Burton

    1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Six examples of the compact, isolated high-velocity HI clouds (CHVCs) identified by Braun and Burton (1999) have been imaged with the WSRT. The 65 confirmed objects in this class define a dynamically cold system, with a global minimum for the velocity dispersion of only 70 km/s, found in the Local Group Standard of Rest, while in-falling at 100 km/s toward the LG barycenter. These objects have a characteristic morphology, in which several compact cores are embedded in a diffuse halo. The compact cores typically account for 40% of the HI line flux while covering some 15% of the source area. The cores are the cool condensed phase of HI, the CNM, with temp. near 100 K, while the halos appear to be a shielding column of warm diffuse HI, the WNM, with temp. near 8000 K. We detect a core with one of the narrowest HI emission lines ever observed, with intrinsic FWHM of 2 km/s and 75 K brightness. From a comparison of column and volume densities we derive a distance in the range 0.5 to 1 Mpc. We determine a metallicity for this same object of 0.04 to 0.07 solar. Comparably high distances are implied by demanding the stability of objects with multiple cores, which show relative velocities as large as 70 km/s on 30 arcmin scales. Many compact cores show systematic velocity gradients along the major axis of their elliptical extent which are consistent with circular rotation. Several of the derived rotation curves are well-fit by Navarro, Frenk, and White (1997) cold dark matter profiles. These kinematic signatures imply a high dark-to-visible mass ratio of 10-50, for D=0.7Mpc, which scales as 1/D. The implied dark matter halos dominate the mass volume density within the central 2 kpc (10 arcmin) of each source, providing a sufficent hydrostatic pressure to allow local CNM condensation. (abridged)

  4. Small high cooling power space cooler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E. [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Redondo Beach, Ca, 90278 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  5. High Efficiency Engine Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Kruiswyk

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Caterpillar's Product Development and Global Technology Division carried out a research program on waste heat recovery with support from DOE (Department of Energy) and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The objective of the program was to develop a new air management and exhaust energy recovery system that would demonstrate a minimum 10% improvement in thermal efficiency over a base heavy-duty on-highway diesel truck engine. The base engine for this program was a 2007 C15 15.2L series-turbocharged on-highway truck engine with a LPL (low-pressure loop) exhaust recirculation system. The focus of the program was on the development of high efficiency turbomachinery and a high efficiency turbocompound waste heat recovery system. The focus of each area of development was as follows: (1) For turbine stages, the focus was on investigation and development of technologies that would improve on-engine exhaust energy utilization compared to the conventional radial turbines in widespread use today. (2) For compressor stages, the focus was on investigating compressor wheel design parameters beyond the range typically utilized in production, to determine the potential efficiency benefits thereof. (3) For turbocompound, the focus was on the development of a robust bearing system that would provide higher bearing efficiencies compared to systems used in turbocompound power turbines in production. None of the turbocharger technologies investigated involved addition of moving parts, actuators, or exotic materials, thereby increasing the likelihood of a favorable cost-value tradeoff for each technology. And the turbocompound system requires less hardware addition than competing bottoming cycle technologies, making it a more attractive solution from a cost and packaging standpoint. Main outcomes of the program are as follows: (1) Two turbine technologies that demonstrated up to 6% improvement in turbine efficiency on gas stand and 1-3% improvement in thermal efficiency in on-engine testing. (2) A compressor technology that demonstrated 1.5% improvement in compressor efficiency on gas stand compared to production available compressors. (3) A power turbine with high efficiency bearing system that demonstrated excellent rotordynamic stability throughout the required speed range, up to 60,000 rpm. (4) A predicted improvement (using engine simulation) in engine thermal efficiency of 7% at the peak torque design point, when combining the technologies developed in this program.

  6. Review Of Low-Flow Bladder Pump And High-Volume Air Piston Pump Groundwater Sampling Systems At Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, S. S.; Bailey, G. A.; Jackson, T. O.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1996, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) has run both a portable high-volume air-piston pump system and a dedicated, low-flow bladder pump system to collect groundwater samples. The groundwater contaminants of concern at SNL/NM are nitrate and the volatile organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloethene (PCE). Regulatory acceptance is more common for the high-volume air piston pump system, especially for programs like SNL/NM's, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes logistical and analytical results of the groundwater sampling systems used at SNL/NM. With two modifications to the off-the-shelf low-flow bladder pump, SNL/NM consistently operates the dedicated low-flow system at depths greater than 450 feet below ground surface. As such, the low-flow sampling system requires fewer personnel, less time and materials, and generates less purge and decontamination water than does the high-volume system. However, the bladder pump cannot work in wells with less than 4 feet of water. A review of turbidity and laboratory analytical results for TCE, PCE, and chromium (Cr) from six wells highlight the affect or lack of affects the sampling systems have on groundwater samples. In the PVC wells, turbidity typically remained < 5 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) regardless of the sampling system. In the wells with a stainless steel screen, turbidity typically remained < 5 NTU only with the low-flow system. When the high-volume system was used, the turbidity and Cr concentration typically increased an order of magnitude. TCE concentrations at two wells did not appear to be sensitive to the sampling method used. However, PCE and TCE concentrations dropped an order of magnitude when the high-volume system was used at two other wells. This paper recommends that SNL/NM collaborate with other facilities with similar groundwater depths, continue to pursue regulatory approval for using dedicated the lowflow system, and review data for sample system affects on nitrate concentrations.

  7. Review of low-flow bladder pump and high-volume air piston pump groundwater sampling systems at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Sue S.; Jackson, Timmie Okchumpulla (Weston Solutions, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Bailey, Glenn A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1996, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) has run both a portable high-volume air-piston pump system and a dedicated, low-flow bladder pump system to collect groundwater samples. The groundwater contaminants of concern at SNL/NM are nitrate and the volatile organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloethene (PCE). Regulatory acceptance is more common for the high-volume air piston pump system, especially for programs like SNL/NM's, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes logistical and analytical results of the groundwater sampling systems used at SNL/NM. With two modifications to the off-the-shelf low-flow bladder pump, SNL/NM consistently operates the dedicated low-flow system at depths greater than 450 feet below ground surface. As such, the low-flow sampling system requires fewer personnel, less time and materials, and generates less purge and decontamination water than does the high-volume system. However, the bladder pump cannot work in wells with less than 4 feet of water. A review of turbidity and laboratory analytical results for TCE, PCE, and chromium (Cr) from six wells highlight the affect or lack of affects the sampling systems have on groundwater samples. In the PVC wells, turbidity typically remained < 5 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) regardless of the sampling system. In the wells with a stainless steel screen, turbidity typically remained < 5 NTU only with the low-flow system. When the high-volume system was used, the turbidity and Cr concentration typically increased an order of magnitude. TCE concentrations at two wells did not appear to be sensitive to the sampling method used. However, PCE and TCE concentrations dropped an order of magnitude when the high-volume system was used at two other wells. This paper recommends that SNL/NM collaborate with other facilities with similar groundwater depths, continue to pursue regulatory approval for using dedicated the lowflow system, and review data for sample system affects on nitrate concentrations.

  8. AUTONOMOUS ULTRA-LOW POWER ELF/VLF RECEIVER SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    less v #12;power than a typical LED indicator lamp while capturing high fidelity ELF/VLF magnetic field

  9. DUST EXTINCTION BIAS IN THE COLUMN DENSITY DISTRIBUTION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: HIGH COLUMN DENSITY, LOW-REDSHIFT GRBs ARE MORE HEAVILY OBSCURED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Darach [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Jakobsson, Pall, E-mail: darach@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: pja@raunvis.hi.is [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 5, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have more soft-X-ray absorption than expected from the foreground gas column in the Galaxy. While the redshift of the absorption can in general not be constrained from current X-ray observations, it has been assumed that the absorption is due to metals in the host galaxy of the GRB. The large sample of X-ray afterglows and redshifts now available allows the construction of statistically meaningful distributions of the metal column densities. We construct such a sample and show, as found in previous studies, that the typical absorbing column density (N{sub H{sub X}}) increases substantially with redshift, with few high column density objects found at low-to-moderate redshifts. We show, however, that when highly extinguished bursts are included in the sample, using redshifts from their host galaxies, high column density sources are also found at low-to-moderate redshift. We infer from individual objects in the sample and from observations of blazars that the increase in column density with redshift is unlikely to be related to metals in the intergalactic medium or intervening absorbers. Instead we show that the origin of the apparent increase with redshift is primarily due to dust extinction bias: GRBs with high X-ray absorption column densities found at z {approx}< 4 typically have very high dust extinction column densities, while those found at the highest redshifts do not. It is unclear how such a strongly evolving N{sub H{sub X}}/A{sub V} ratio would arise, and based on current data, remains a puzzle.

  10. Identification and Removal of High Frequency Temporal Noise in a Nd:YAG Macro-Pulse Laser Assisted with a Diagnostic Streak Camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Marlett, Bechtel Nevada; Ke-Xun Sun Bechtel Nevada

    2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the use of a reference streak camera (SC) to diagnose laser performance and guide modifications to remove high frequency noise from Bechtel Nevada's long-pulse laser. The upgraded laser exhibits less than 0.1% high frequency noise in cumulative spectra, exceeding National Ignition Facility (NIF) calibration specifications. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments require full characterization of streak cameras over a wide range of sweep speeds (10 ns to 480 ns). This paradigm of metrology poses stringent spectral requirements on the laser source for streak camera calibration. Recently, Bechtel Nevada worked with a laser vendor to develop a high performance, multi-wavelength Nd:YAG laser to meet NIF calibration requirements. For a typical NIF streak camera with a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, the flat field calibration at 30 ns requires a smooth laser spectrum over 33 MHz to 68 GHz. Streak cameras are the appropriate instrumentation for measuring laser amplitude noise at these very high frequencies since the upper end spectral content is beyond the frequency response of typical optoelectronic detectors for a single shot pulse. The SC was used to measure a similar laser at its second harmonic wavelength (532 nm), to establish baseline spectra for testing signal analysis algorithms. The SC was then used to measure the new custom calibration laser. In both spatial-temporal measurements and cumulative spectra, 6-8 GHz oscillations were identified. The oscillations were found to be caused by inter-surface reflections between amplifiers. Additional variations in the SC spectral data were found to result from temperature instabilities in the seeding laser. Based on these findings, laser upgrades were made to remove the high frequency noise from the laser output.

  11. High throughput parallel backside contacting and periodic texturing for high-efficiency solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniel, Claus; Blue, Craig A.; Ott, Ronald D.

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are configurations of long-range ordered features of solar cell materials, and methods for forming same. Some features include electrical access openings through a backing layer to a photovoltaic material in the solar cell. Some features include textured features disposed adjacent a surface of a solar cell material. Typically the long-range ordered features are formed by ablating the solar cell material with a laser interference pattern from at least two laser beams.

  12. Streaking at high energies with electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ipp, Andreas; Evers, Joerg; Keitel, Christoph H.; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    State-of-the-art attosecond metrology deals with the detection and characterization of photon pulses with typical energies up to the hundreds of eV and time resolution of several tens of attoseconds. Such short pulses are used for example to control the motion of electrons on the atomic scale or to measure inner-shell atomic dynamics. The next challenge of time-resolving the inner-nuclear dynamics, transient meson states and resonances requires photon pulses below attosecond duration and with energies exceeding the MeV scale. Here we discuss a detection scheme for time-resolving high-energy gamma ray pulses down to the zeptosecond timescale. The scheme is based on the concept of attosecond streak imaging, but instead of conversion of photons into electrons in a nonlinear medium, the high-energy process of electron-positron pair creation is utilized. These pairs are produced in vacuum through the collision of a test pulse to be characterized with an intense laser pulse, and they acquire additional energy and momentum depending on their phase in the streaking pulse at the moment of production. A coincidence measurement of the electron and positron momenta after the interaction provides information on the pair production phase within the streaking pulse. We examine the limitations imposed by quantum radiation reaction in multiphoton Compton scattering on this detection scheme, and discuss other necessary conditions to render the scheme feasible in the upcoming Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) laser facility.

  13. Corrosion assessment of refractory materials for high temperature waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.C.; Congdon, J.W.; Kielpinski, A.L. [and others

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of vitrification technologies are being evaluated to immobilize radioactive and hazardous wastes following years of nuclear materials production throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The compositions and physical forms of these wastes are diverse ranging from inorganic sludges to organic liquids to heterogeneous debris. Melt and off-gas products can be very corrosive at the high temperatures required to melt many of these waste streams. Ensuring material durability is required to develop viable treatment processes. Corrosion testing of materials in some of the anticipated severe environments is an important aspect of the materials identification and selection process. Corrosion coupon tests on typical materials used in Joule heated melters were completed using glass compositions with high salt contents. The presence of chloride in the melts caused the most severe attack. In the metal alloys, oxidation was the predominant corrosion mechanism, while in the tested refractory material enhanced dissolution of the refractory into the glass was observed. Corrosion testing of numerous different refractory materials was performed in a plasma vitrification system using a surrogate heterogeneous debris waste. Extensive corrosion was observed in all tested materials.

  14. Model biases in high-burnup fast reactor simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Touran, N.; Cheatham, J.; Petroski, R. [TerraPower LLC, 11235 S.E. 6th St, Bellevue, WA 98004 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new code system called the Advanced Reactor Modeling Interface (ARMI) has been developed that loosely couples multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulations to provide rapid, user-friendly, high-fidelity full systems analysis. Incorporating neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, safety/transient, fuel performance, core mechanical, and economic analyses, ARMI provides 'one-click' assessments of many multi-disciplined performance metrics and constraints that historically require iterations between many diverse experts. The capabilities of ARMI are implemented in this study to quantify neutronic biases of various modeling approximations typically made in fast reactor analysis at an equilibrium condition, after many repetitive shuffles. Sensitivities at equilibrium that result in very high discharge burnup are considered ( and >20% FIMA), as motivated by the development of the Traveling Wave Reactor. Model approximations discussed include homogenization, neutronic and depletion mesh resolution, thermal-hydraulic coupling, explicit control rod insertion, burnup-dependent cross sections, fission product model, burn chain truncation, and dynamic fuel performance. The sensitivities of these approximations on equilibrium discharge burnup, k{sub eff}, power density, delayed neutron fraction, and coolant temperature coefficient are discussed. (authors)

  15. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berzak Hopkins, L.? F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meezan, N.? B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le Pape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Divol, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mackinnon, A.? J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ho, D.? D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hohenberger, M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Jones, O.? S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kyrala, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Milovich, J.? L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ralph, J.? E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J.? S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benedetti, L.? R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Biener, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bond, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bradley, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caggiano, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Callahan, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerjan, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Church, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Clark, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dylla-Spears, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eckart, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edgell, D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Field, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fittinghoff, D.? N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Grim, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guler, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Haan, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hamza, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hartouni, E.? P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hatarik, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Herrmann, H.? W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hinkel, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hoover, D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Huang, H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Izumi, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khan, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kozioziemski, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kroll, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacPhee, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Merrill, F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moody, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated in a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (? ~ 3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8 X 10¹? neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ~27X.

  16. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berzak Hopkins, L.? F.; Meezan, N.? B.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Mackinnon, A.? J.; Ho, D.? D.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O.? S.; Kyrala, G.; Milovich, J.? L.; et al

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated inmore »a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (? ~ 3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8 X 10¹? neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ~27X.« less

  17. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

  18. Jitter Tracking Bandwidth Optimization Using Active-Inductor-Based Bandpass Filtering in High-speed Forwarded Clock Transceivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    po ns e(d B) 20 Equating equation (2.21) and (2.23), it can be approximated that g1827g3045 ? g2009g3030 g1827, (2.24) g2010g3045 ? g3436g2009g3013 + g2009g30092g2009g3030 g3440 g2010. (2.25) Equation (2.25) is established for small g.... The typical skew value for high speed forwarded clock system is 5 to 10 UI. Differential Jitter A data jitter sequence is given by g1836g3005 = g1836g3017 g1871g1861g1866 g34352g2024g1858g3037 g1847g1835 ? g1866g3439, (2.29) g1836g3017 is the peak...

  19. Preliminary studies of coolant by-pass flows in a prismatic very high temperature reactor using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiroyuki Sato; Richard Johnson; Richard Schultz

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations of a typical prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) were conducted to investigate the influence of gap geometry on flow and temperature distributions in the reactor core using commercial CFD code FLUENT. Parametric calculations changing the gap width in a whole core length model of fuel and reflector columns were performed. The simulations show the effects of core by-pass flows in the heated core region by comparing results for several gap widths including zero gap width. The calculation results underline the importance of considering inter-column gap width for the evaluation of maximum fuel temperatures and temperature gradients in fuel blocks. In addition, it is shown that temperatures of core outlet flow from gaps and channels are strongly affected by the gap width of by-pass flow in the reactor core.

  20. Using X-ray catalogues to find counterparts to unassociated high-energy Fermi/LAT sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landi, R; Stephen, J B; Masetti, N; Malizia, A; Ubertini, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalogue of sources (1FHL) emitting at high energies (above 10 GeV) reports the details of 514 objects detected in the first three years of the Fermi mission. Of these, 71 were reported as unidentified in the 1FHL catalogue, although six are likely to be associated with a supernova remnant (SNR), a Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN) or a combination of both, thereby leaving a list of 65 still unassociated objects. Herein, we report a preliminary analysis on this sample of objects concentrating on nine 1FHL sources, which were found to have a clear optical extragalactic classification. They are all blazar, eight BL Lac and one flat spectrum radio quasar, typically at redshift greater than 0.1.

  1. Direct first-principles simulation of a high-performance electron emitter: Lithium-oxide-coated diamond surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: yoshi-miyamoto@aist.go.jp; Miyazaki, Takehide [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takeuchi, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); JST, ALCA, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined the field emission properties of lithium(Li)/oxygen(O)-co-terminated diamond (001) surface [C(001)-LiO] through real-time electron dynamics simulation under an applied field. The current emitted from this surface was found to be more than four-fold that emitted by an H-terminated (001) surface, the latter being a typical negative electron affinity system. This high performance is attributed to the Li layer, which bends the potential wall of O-induced electron pockets down in the direction of vacuum, thus facilitating electron emission. Detailed analysis of the emitted electrons and the profile of the self-consistent potential elucidated that the role of O atoms changes from an electron barrier on OH-terminated diamond surfaces to an outlet for electron emission on C(001)-LiO.

  2. High efficiency InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes with asymmetric triangular multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Chiao-Yun; Li, Hen; Lu, Tien-Chang, E-mail: timtclu@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we demonstrated high efficiency InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) with asymmetric triangular multiple quantum wells (MQWs). Asymmetric triangular MQWs not only contribute to uniform carrier distribution in InGaN/GaN MQWs but also yield a low Auger recombination rate. In addition, asymmetric triangular MQWs with gallium face-oriented inclination band profiles can be immune from the polarization charge originating from typical c-plane InGaN/GaN quantum well structures. In the experiment, LEDs incorporated with asymmetric triangular MQWs with gallium face-oriented inclination band profiles exhibited a 60.0% external quantum efficiency at 20?mA and a 27.0% efficiency droop at 100?mA (corresponding to a current density of 69?A/cm{sup 2}), which accounted for an 11.7% efficiency improvement and a 31.1% droop reduction compared with symmetric square quantum well structure LEDs.

  3. Soot particle sizing during high-pressure Diesel spray combustion via time-resolved laser-induced incandescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryser, R.; Gerber, T.; Dreier, T. [Reaction Analysis Group, Department of General Energy, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-pulse time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TiRe-LII) signal transients from soot particulates were acquired during unsteady high pressure Diesel combustion in a constant volume cell for typical top dead center conditions during a Diesel engine cycle. Measurements were performed for initial gas pressures between 1 and 3 MPa, injection pressures between 50 and 130 MPa and laser probe timings between 5 and 16 ms after start of fuel injection. In separate experiments and for the same cell operating conditions gas temperatures were deduced from spectrally resolved soot pyrometry measurements. Implementing the LII model of Kock et al. [Combust. Flame 147 (2006) 79-92] ensemble mean soot particle diameters were evaluated from least-squares fitting of theoretical cooling curves to experimental TiRe-LII signal transients. Since in the experiments the environmental gas temperature and the width of an assumed particle size distribution were not known, the effects of the initial choice of these parameters on retrieved particle diameters were investigated. It is shown that evaluated mean particle diameters are only slightly biased by the choice of typical size distribution widths and gas temperatures. For a fixed combustion phase mean particle diameters are not much affected by gas pressure, however they become smaller at high fuel injection pressure. At a mean chamber pressure of 1.39 MPa evaluated mean particle diameters increased by a factor of two for probe delays between 5 and 16 ms after start of injection irrespective of the choices of first-guess fitting variables, indicating a certain robustness of data analysis procedure. (author)

  4. Soot particle sizing during high-pressure Diesel spray combustion via time-resolved laser-induced incandescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryser, R.; Gerber, T.; Dreier, T. [Reaction Analysis Group, Department of General Energy, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-pulse time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (TiRe-LII) signal transients from soot particulates were acquired during unsteady high pressure Diesel combustion in a constant volume cell for typical top dead center conditions during a Diesel engine cycle. Measurements were performed for initial gas pressures between 1 and 3 MPa, injection pressures between 50 and 130 MPa and laser probe timings between 5 and 16 ms after start of fuel injection. In separate experiments and for the same cell operating conditions gas temperatures were deduced from spectrally resolved soot pyrometry measurements. Implementing the LII model of Kock et al. [Combust. Flame 147 (20006) 79-92] ensemble mean soot particle diameters were evaluated from least-squares fitting of theoretical cooling curves to experimental TiRe-LII signal transients. Since in the experiments the environmental gas temperature and the width of an assumed particle size distribution were not known, the effects of the initial choice of these parameters on retrieved particle diameters were investigated. It is shown that evaluated mean particle diameters are only slightly biased by the choice of typical size distribution widths and gas temperatures. For a fixed combustion phase mean particle diameters are not much affected by gas pressure, however they become smaller at high fuel injection pressure. At a mean chamber pressure of 1.39 MPa evaluated mean particle diameters increased by a factor of two for probe delays between 5 and 16 ms after start of injection irrespective of the choices of first-guess fitting variables, indicating a certain robustness of data analysis procedure. (author)

  5. We determined basic stellar parameters and the chemical abundances of a small sample of 15 hot, H-rich post-AGB stars using high-resolution, high-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnstedt, Jürgen

    stages of post-AGB stellar evolution. Spectral analysis The photospheric model spectral energy of Science Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics Acknowledgements TR is supported by the German Aerospace] denotes log [mass fraction / solar mass fraction]. The typical error is 0.3 dex. Table 1: Parameters

  6. The raw router : gigabit routing on a general-purpose microprocessor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James William, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventionally, high-speed routers are built using custom hardware, typically dubbed as network processors. A prominent example of such a network processor is the Intel IXP1200. Such a network processor typically takes ...

  7. Desulfurization of hot fuel gas produced from high-chlorine Illinois coals. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Brien, W.S. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States); Gupta, R.P. [Research Triangle Inst., Durham, NC (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a primary need to increase the utilization of Illinois coal resources by developing new methods of converting the coal into electricity by highly efficient and environmentally acceptable systems. New coal gasification processes are now being developed that can generate electricity with high thermal efficiency in either an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system or a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). Both of-these new coal-to-electricity pathways require that the coal-derived fuel gas be at a high temperature and be free of potential pollutants, such as-sulfur compounds. Unfortunately, some high-sulfur Illinois coals also contain significant chlorine which converts into hydrogen chloride (HCI) in the coal gas. This project investigates the effect of HCI, in concentrations typical of a gasifier fed by high-chlorine Illinois coals, on zinc-titanate sorbents that are currently being developed for H{sub 2}S and COS removal from hot coal gas. This study is designed to identify any deleterious changes in the sorbent caused by HCI, both in adsorptive operation and in the regeneration cycle, and will pave the way to modify the sorbent formulation or the process operating procedure to remove HCl along with the H{sub 2}S and COS from hot coal gas. This will negate any harmful consequences Of utilizing high-chlorine Illinois coal in these processes.

  8. High temperature mechanical performance of a hot isostatically pressed silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.; Lin, C.K.J. [and others] [and others

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon nitride ceramics are an attractive material of choice for designers and manufacturers of advanced gas turbine engine components for many reasons. These materials typically have potentially high temperatures of usefulness (up to 1400{degrees}C), are chemically inert, have a relatively low specific gravity (important for inertial effects), and are good thermal conductors (i.e., resistant to thermal shock). In order for manufacturers to take advantage of these inherent properties of silicon nitride, the high-temperature mechanical performance of the material must first be characterized. The mechanical response of silicon nitride to static, dynamic, and cyclic conditions at elevated temperatures, along with reliable and representative data, is critical information that gas turbine engine designers and manufacturers require for the confident insertion of silicon nitride components into gas turbine engines. This final report describes the high-temperature mechanical characterization and analyses that were conducted on a candidate structural silicon nitride ceramic. The high-temperature strength, static fatigue (creep rupture), and dynamic and cyclic fatigue performance were characterized. The efforts put forth were part of Work Breakdown Structure Subelement 3.2.1, {open_quotes}Rotor Data Base Generation.{close_quotes} PY6 is comparable to other hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitrides currently being considered for advanced gas turbine engine applications.

  9. Design of an Integrated Laboratory Scale Test for Hydrogen Production via High Temperature Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.K. Housley; K.G. Condie; J.E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is researching the feasibility of high-temperature steam electrolysis for high-efficiency carbon-free hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Typical temperatures for high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) are between 800º-900ºC, consistent with anticipated coolant outlet temperatures of advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors. An Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test is underway to study issues such as thermal management, multiple-stack electrical configuration, pre-heating of process gases, and heat recuperation that will be crucial in any large-scale implementation of HTE. The current ILS design includes three electrolysis modules in a single hot zone. Of special design significance is preheating of the inlet streams by superheaters to 830°C before entering the hot zone. The ILS system is assembled on a 10’ x 16’ skid that includes electronics, power supplies, air compressor, pumps, superheaters, , hot zone, condensers, and dew-point sensor vessels. The ILS support system consists of three independent, parallel supplies of electrical power, sweep gas streams, and feedstock gas mixtures of hydrogen and steam to the electrolysis modules. Each electrolysis module has its own support and instrumentation system, allowing for independent testing under different operating conditions. The hot zone is an insulated enclosure utilizing electrical heating panels to maintain operating conditions. The target hydrogen production rate for the ILS is 5000 Nl/hr.

  10. Transformation of Fine Microstructure of WWER-1000 Materials After High Dose Irradiation and Annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zabusov, Oleg O. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Chernobaeva, A. A. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Nikolaev, Yury A. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Kuleshova, E. A. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Russell, Kaye F [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High nickel WWER-1000 RPV materials were irradiated at high dose rate up to doses close to design values and exceeding these values. The complex investigation of the materials was carried out using LEAP, SEM, AES and Charpy tests. It has been shown that the DBTT shift was conditioned by formation of late-blooming phases (LBP) precipitates, but at a certain fluence this phenomenon looks to saturate. Nevertheless, even with a non-increasing number density of LBP, the DBTT shift continues to increase with fluence. This increase can be induced by intergranular embrittlement. SEM has shown the presence of intergranular fracture on Charpy fracture surfaces and AES revealed a phosphorus content in the grain boundaries (GB) about 20% at. A model of irradiation-induced GB segregation of phosphorus at high nickel content has been used to calculate the phosphorus content in the GBs. The calculations confirm the value obtained by AES and show a significant increase in the GB content at fluxes typical of normal WWER-1000 RPV operation. The same model shows further increase of phosphorus content in high Ni steels during post-irradiation annealing. Thus, in spite of LBP dissolution during early stages of annealing at 450C, full recovery of the DBTT could not be obtained due to intergranular embrittlement.

  11. Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave. Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Hernandez, Michael [XScell corp., 2134 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

  12. Development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.C.; DePoorter, G.L.; Munoz, D.R.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have initiated a three phase investigation of the development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer usable lifetimes. This report presents the results of the first phase of the study, performed from Aug. 1989 through Feb. 1991, which shows that significant energy saving are possible through the use of high temperature insulating fibers that better retain their efficient insulating properties during the service lifetime of the fibers. The remaining phases of this program include the pilot scale development and then full scale production feasibility development and evaluation of enhanced high temperature refractory insulting fibers. This first proof of principle phase of the program presents a summary of the current use patterns of refractory fibers, a laboratory evaluation of the high temperature performance characteristics of selected typical refractory fibers and an analysis of the potential energy savings through the use of enhanced refractory fibers. The current use patterns of refractory fibers span a wide range of industries and high temperature furnaces within those industries. The majority of high temperature fiber applications are in furnaces operating between 2000 and 26000{degrees}F. The fibers used in furnaces operating within this range provide attractive thermal resistance and low thermal storage at reasonable cost. A series of heat treatment studies performed for this phase of the program has shown that the refractory fibers, as initially manufactured, have attractive thermal conductivities for high temperature applications but the fibers go through rapid devitrification and subsequent crystal growth upon high temperature exposure. Development of improved fibers, maintaining the favorable characteristics of the existing as-manufactured fibers, could save between 1 and 4% of the energy consumed in high temperature furnaces using refractory fibers.

  13. Arecibo imaging of compact high-velocity clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Burton; R. Braun; J. N. Chengalur

    2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten isolated compact high-velocity clouds (CHVCs) of the type cataloged by Braun & Burton (1999) have been imaged with the Arecibo telescope and were found to have a nested core/halo morphology. We argue that a combination of high-resolution filled-aperture and synthesis data is crucial to determining the intrinsic properties of the CHVCs. We identify the halos as Warm Neutral Medium surrounding one or more cores in the Cool Neutral Medium phase. These halos are clearly detected and resolved by the Arecibo filled-aperture imaging, which reaches a limiting sensitivity (1 sigma) of N_H about 2x10^17 cm^-2 over the typical 70 km/s linewidth at zero intensity. The FWHM linewidth of the halo gas is found to be 25 km/s, consistent with a WNM thermal broadening within 10^4 K gas. Substantial asymmetries are found at high N_H (>10^18.5 cm^-2) levels in 60% of our sample. A high degree of reflection-symmetry is found at low N_H (<10^18.5 cm^-2) in all sources studied at these levels. The column-density profiles of the envelopes are described well by the sky-plane projection of a spherical exponential in atomic volume density, which allows estimating the characteristic central halo column density, N_H(0) = 4.1+/-3.2x10^19 cm^-2, and characteristic exponential scale-length, h_B=420+/-90 arcsec. For plausible values of the thermal pressure at the CNM/WNM interface, these edge profiles allow distance estimates to be made for the individual CHVCs studied here which range between 150 and 850 kpc. (abridged)

  14. High energy electron beam joining of ceramic components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A. [and others

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High strength, hermetic braze joints between ceramic components have been produced using high energy electron beams. With a penetration depth into a typical ceramic of {approximately}1 cm for a 10 MeV electron beam, this method provides the capability for rapid, transient brazing operations where temperature control of critical components is essential. The method deposits energy directly into a buried joint, allowing otherwise inaccessible interfaces to be brazed. Because of transient heating, higher thermal conductivity, lower heat capacity, and lower melting temperature of braze metals relative to the ceramic materials, a pulsed high power beam can melt a braze metal without producing excessive ceramic temperatures. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this process related to ceramic coupons as well as ceramic and glass tubes. The transient thermal response was predicted, using as input the energy absorption predicted from the coupled electron-photon transport analysis. The joining experiments were conducted with an RF Linac accelerator at 10-13 MV. The repetition rate of the pulsed beam was varied between 8 and 120 Hz, the average beam current was varied between 8 and 120 microamps, and the power was varied up to 1.5 kW. These beam parameters gave a beam power density between 0.2 to 2 kW/cm{sup 2}. The duration of the joining runs varied from 5 to 600 sec. Joining experiments have provided high strength between alumina - alumina and alumina - cermet joints in cylindrical geometry. These joints provided good hermetic seals. A series of tests was conducted to determine the minimum beam power and exposure time for producing, a hermetic seal.

  15. High-resolution NMR process analyzer for oxygenates in gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skloss, T.W.; Kim, A.J.; Haw, J.F. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a high-resolution 42-MHz[sup 1]HFT-NMR instrument that is suitable for use as a process analyzer and demonstrate its use in the determination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in a flowing stream of gasoline. This spectrometer is based on a 55-kg permanent magnet with essentially no fringe field. A spectral resolution of 3 Hz was typically obtained for spinning samples, and this performance was only slightly degraded with flowing samples. We report a procedure for magnet drift compensation using a software procedure rather than a field-frequency lock channel. This procedure allowed signal averaging without loss of resolution. Regulatory changes to be implemented in the near future have created a need for the development of methods for the determination of MTBE and other oxygenates in reformulated gasolines. Existing methods employing gas chromatography are not fast enough for process control of a gasoline blender and suffer from other limitations. This study demonstrates that process analysis NMR is well-suited to the determination of MTBE in a simulated gasoline blender. The detection limit of 0.5 vol % MTBE was obtained with a measurement time of 1 min. The absolute standard deviation of independent determinations was 0.17% when the MTBE concentration was 10%, a nominal value. Preliminary results also suggest that the method may be applicable to gasolines containing mixtures of oxygenate additives as well as the measurement of aromatic and olefinic hydrogens. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Cryogenic System for a High Temperature Superconducting Power Transmission Cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, J.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Martin, R.; Sinha, U.; Stovall, J.P.

    1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems for power transmission are under development that will use pressurized liquid nitrogen to provide cooling of the cable and termination hardware. Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been operating a prototype HTS cable system that contains many of the typical components needed for a commercial power transmission application. It is being used to conduct research in the development of components and systems for eventual commercial deployment. The cryogenic system was built by Air Products and Chemicals, Allentown, Pennsylvania, and can circulate up to 0.35 kg/s of liquid nitrogen at temperatures as low as 67 K at pressures of 1 to 10 bars. Sufficient cooling is provided for testing a 5-m-long HTS transmission cable system that includes the terminations required for room temperature electrical connections. Testing of the 5-m HTS transmission cable has been conducted at the design ac conditions of 1250 A and 7.5 kV line to ground. This paper contains a description of the essential features of the HTS cable cryogenic system and performance results obtained during operation of the system. The salient features of the operation that are important in large commercial HTS cable applications will be discussed.

  17. The Dynamics of Flux Tubes in a High Beta Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. T. Vishniac

    1994-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest a new model for the structure of a magnetic field embedded high $\\beta$ turbulent plasma, based on the popular notion that the magnetic field will tend to separate into individual flux tubes. We point out that interactions between the flux tubes will be dominated by coherent effects stemming from the turbulent wakes created as the fluid streams by the flux tubes. Balancing the attraction caused by shielding effects with turbulent diffusion we find that flux tubes have typical radii comparable to the local Mach number squared times the large scale eddy length, are arranged in a one dimensional fractal pattern, have a radius of curvature comparable to the largest scale eddies in the turbulence, and have an internal magnetic pressure comparable to the ambient pressure. When the average magnetic energy density is much less than the turbulent energy density the radius, internal magnetic field and curvature scale of the flux tubes will be smaller than these estimates. Realistic resistivity does not alter the macroscopic properties of the fluid or the large scale magnetic field. In either case we show that the Sweet-Parker reconnection rate is much faster than an eddy turnover time. Realistic stellar plasmas are expected to either be in the ideal limit (e.g. the solar photosphere) or the resistive limit (most of the solar convection zone). All current numerical simulations of three dimensional MHD turbulence are in the viscous regime and are inapplicable to stars or accretion disks.

  18. Stochastic Optimization for Collision Selection in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Whiteson; D. Whiteson

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The underlying structure of matter can be deeply probed via precision measurements of the mass of the \\emph{top quark}, the most massive observed fundamental particle. Top quarks can be produced and studied only in collisions at high energy particle accelerators. Most collisions, however, do not produce top quarks; making precise measurements requires culling these collisions into a sample that is rich in collisions producing top quarks (\\emph{signal}) and spare in collisions producing other particles (\\emph{background}). Collision selection is typically performed with heuristics or supervised learning methods. However, such approaches are suboptimal because they assume that the selector with the highest classification accuracy will yield a mass measurement with the smallest statistical uncertainty. In practice, however, the mass measurement is more sensitive to some backgrounds than others. Hence, this paper presents a new approach that uses stochastic optimization techniques to directly search for selectors that minimize statistical uncertainty in the top quark mass measurement. Empirical results confirm that stochastically optimized selectors have much smaller uncertainty. This new approach contributes substantially to our knowledge of the top quark's mass, as the new selectors are currently in use selecting real collisions.

  19. High temperature oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C.S.; Jha, B. [Texas Instruments, Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic catalytic converters for automotive emission control is becoming an important application for heat resistant alloys as more design opportunities are realized. The service conditions and design of metallic catalytic converters require the alloy to be highly oxidation resistant at gauges typically at 50 microns or less. For conventional heat resistant alloy design the goal is to form a well adherent scale on the alloy surface to protect the alloy matrix from being oxidized. However, the thin gauge results in a limited supply of alloying elements that can form the protective scale on the surface. The alloy chemistry has to be optimized to have the minimum oxidation while maintaining processing characteristics. Furthermore, the ratio of scale thickness to foil gauge is significant and the stress state between them introduces measurable permanent distortion of the foil. In this study, the effect of alloying elements on the oxidation behavior of commonly used Fe-Cr-Al alloys was quantified by the oxidation weight gain and length change measurements.

  20. Simulations of magnetic hysteresis loops at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plumer, M. L.; Whitehead, J. P.; Fal, T. J. [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 3X7 (Canada); Ek, J. van [Western Digital Corporation, San Jose, California 94588 (United States); Mercer, J. I. [Department of Computer Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 3X7 (Canada)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetic Monte-Carlo algorithm as well as standard micromagnetics are used to simulate MH loops of high anisotropy magnetic recording media at both short and long time scales over a wide range of temperatures relevant to heat-assisted magnetic recording. Microscopic parameters, common to both methods, were determined by fitting to experimental data on single-layer FePt-based media that uses the Magneto-Optic Kerr effect with a slow sweep rate of 700 Oe/s. Saturation moment, uniaxial anisotropy, and exchange constants are given an intrinsic temperature dependence based on published atomistic simulations of FePt grains with an effective Curie temperature of 680 K. Our results show good agreement between micromagnetics and kinetic Monte Carlo results over a wide range of sweep rates. Loops at the slow experimental sweep rates are found to become more square-shaped, with an increasing slope, as temperature increases from 300 K. These effects also occur at higher sweep rates, typical of recording speeds, but are much less pronounced. These results demonstrate the need for accurate determination of intrinsic thermal properties of future recording media as input to micromagnetic models as well as the sensitivity of the switching behavior of thin magnetic films to applied field sweep rates at higher temperatures.

  1. High Reliability R-10 Windows Using Vacuum Insulating Glass Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, David

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this effort was for EverSealed Windows (“EverSealed” or “ESW”) to design, assemble, thermally and environmentally test and demonstrate a Vacuum Insulating Glass Unit (“VIGU” or “VIG”) that would enable a whole window to meet or exceed the an R-10 insulating value (U-factor ? 0.1). To produce a VIGU that could withstand any North American environment, ESW believed it needed to design, produce and use a flexible edge seal system. This is because a rigid edge seal, used by all other know VIG producers and developers, limits the size and/or thermal environment of the VIG to where the unit is not practical for typical IG sizes and cannot withstand severe outdoor environments. The rigid-sealed VIG’s use would be limited to mild climates where it would not have a reasonable economic payback when compared to traditional double-pane or triple-pane IGs. ESW’s goals, in addition to achieving a sufficiently high R-value to enable a whole window to achieve R-10, included creating a VIG design that could be produced for a cost equal to or lower than a traditional triple-pane IG (low-e, argon filled). ESW achieved these goals. EverSealed produced, tested and demonstrated a flexible edge-seal VIG that had an R-13 insulating value and the edge-seal system durability to operate reliably for at least 40 years in the harshest climates of North America.

  2. High-Integrity Software, Computation and the Scientific Method Les Hatton, CISM, Kingston University, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatton, Les

    -critical systems. Such systems on failure, have a direct impact on human safety or indirectly by dam- aging-integrity systems are fundamentally those systems which on failure, have a significant impact on humans, or imaging software. · Mission-critical systems. Such systems on failure, are typically associated

  3. Quantifying sediment transport across an undisturbed prairie landscape using cesium-137 and high resolution topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heimsath, Arjun M.

    and quantify soil erosion at the Konza Prairie Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site, an undisturbed in soils at our site. 137 Cs soil concentrations and amounts typically vary by 10% to 30% on small scales of soil erosion across different types of landscapes is critical, therefore, for developing sustainable

  4. High Diversity Multi-Block Space-Time Code for Broadcasting Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    seen as a two-block matrix. It enjoys a flexible transmission rate and a diversity order of 8 for a 2x2 to the power of four of the constellation size. The STBC parameters have been optimized to suit fading channels with and without erasure events. These events are typical of single frequency networks that are becoming a popular

  5. High-throughput two-hybrid analysis The promise and the peril

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Maitreya

    , reduction in reagent costs and further refinements of the approach. As throughput escalates, so does use. The first stage is the initial description of a method: the prototype version. Typically. For a large fraction of new technologies, few other examples beyond this proto- type are ever described

  6. Exploring Cost-Effective, High Performance Residential Retrofits for Affordable Housing in the Hot Humid Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIlvaine, J.; Sutherland, K.; Chandra, S.; Schleith, K.

    , and programmable thermostats. Further, they are ? Figure 5 Typical attic insulation pre- retrofit (top) and post-retrofit (bottom) ESL-HH-10-08-17 ? 10? ? requiring duct leakage tests to be performed on all homes with a goal of 6 cfm or less...

  7. HIGH PRESSURE VAPOR TRANSPORT OF ZnGeP 2 : II. THREEDIMENSIONAL SIMULATION OF GASDYNAMICS UNDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the laser damage threshold of ZnGeP 2 non­linear optical devices that are built with bulk single crystals in HPVT crystal growth. Introduction Non­linear optical interactions in birefringent materials find laser) radiation. Typically, these materials have been processed using bulk crystal growth techniques

  8. A single step route to highly concentrated nanotube solutions Adam J. Clancy1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of an acetonitrile-ethanol mixture [1]. The addition of no morethanfivevolumepercentacetonitrileinethanolresultsinadramaticreductionofthemeanSWNTdiameter. In the absence of acetonitrile, the mean diameter returns to the ~2 nm typical by the addition or absence of acetonitrile in the feedstock, and this diameter change is both reversible

  9. Observational constraints on the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae : the case for missing high mass stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smartt, S J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last 15 years, the supernova community has endeavoured to identify progenitor stars of core-collapse supernovae in high resolution archival images of their galaxies.This review compiles results (from 1999 - 2013) in a distance limited sample and discusses the implications. The vast majority of the detections of progenitor stars are of type II-P, II-L or IIb with one type Ib progenitor system detected and many more upper limits for progenitors of Ibc supernovae (14). The data for these 45 supernovae progenitors illustrate a remarkable deficit of high luminosity stars above an apparent limit of Log L ~= 5.1 dex. For a typical Salpeter IMF, one would expect to have found 13 high luminosity and high mass progenitors. There is, possibly, only one object in this time and volume limited sample that is unambiguously high mass (the progenitor of SN2009ip). The possible biases due to the influence of circumstellar dust and sample selection methods are reviewed. It does not appear likely that these can explain ...

  10. Moisture and Structural Analysis for High Performance Hybrid Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work conducted by the Building Science Corporation (BSC) Building America Research Team's 'Energy Efficient Housing Research Partnerships' project. Based on past experience in the Building America program, they have found that combinations of materials and approaches---in other words, systems--usually provide optimum performance. No single manufacturer typically provides all of the components for an assembly, nor has the specific understanding of all the individual components necessary for optimum performance.

  11. High Density H-Mode Discharges with Gas Fueling and Good Confinement on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.W. Leonard; T.H. Osborne; M.A. Mahdavi; M.E. Fenstermacher; C.J. Lasnier; T.W. Petrie; J.G.Watkins

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H-mode operation at high density is an attractive regime for future reactor-grade tokamaks [1]. High density maximizes fusion power output while the high confinement of H-mode keeps the plasma energy loss below the alpha heating power. One concern though is the energy released due to individual ELMs must be kept small to protect the diverter target from excess ablation. We report on discharges in DIII-D with electron densities as high as 1.45 times the Greenwald density, n{sub GW}(10{sup 20}m{sup -3})=I{sub p}(MA)/[{pi}{sup 2}(m)], with good confinement, H{sub ITER89P}=1.9, and ELMs with energy amplitude small enough to protect the divertor. These results were achieved at low triangularity single-null divertor, {delta}{approx}0.0 with a plasma current of 1.2 MA, q{sub 95} {approx} 3-4, and moderate neutral beam heating power of 2-4 MW. The density was controlled by moderate gas puffing and private flux pumping. A typical discharge is shown in Fig. 1 where upon gas puffing the pedestal density, n{sub e,epd}, quickly rises to {approx}0.8 x n{sub GW}. The confinement initially drops with the gas puff, on a longer timescale the central density rises, peaking the profile and increasing the confinement until an MHD instability terminates the high density and high confinement phase of the discharge. In this report we describe in detail edge pedestal changes and its effect on confinement as the density is increased. We then describe peaking of the density profile that offsets degradation of the pedestal at high density and restores good confinement. Finally we describe the small benign ELMs that result at these high densities.

  12. Shock waves in a Z-pinch and the formation of high energy density plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, H. U. [Magneto-Inertial Fusion Technologies Inc. (MIFTI), Irvine, California 92612 (United States) and Department of Physics, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Wessel, F. J. [Department of Physics, University of California Irvine, Irvine California 92697 (United States); Ney, P. [Mount San Jacinto College, Menifee, California 92584 (United States); Presura, R. [University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, Nevada 89557-0208 (United States); Ellahi, Rahmat [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, FBAS, IIU, Islamabad (Pakistan) and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Shukla, P. K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Z-pinch liner, imploding onto a target plasma, evolves in a step-wise manner, producing a stable, magneto-inertial, high-energy-density plasma compression. The typical configuration is a cylindrical, high-atomic-number liner imploding onto a low-atomic-number target. The parameters for a terawatt-class machine (e.g., Zebra at the University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada Terawatt Facility) have been simulated. The 2-1/2 D MHD code, MACH2, was used to study this configuration. The requirements are for an initial radius of a few mm for stable implosion; the material densities properly distributed, so that the target is effectively heated initially by shock heating and finally by adiabatic compression; and the liner's thickness adjusted to promote radial current transport and subsequent current amplification in the target. Since the shock velocity is smaller in the liner, than in the target, a stable-shock forms at the interface, allowing the central load to accelerate magnetically and inertially, producing a magneto-inertial implosion and high-energy density plasma. Comparing the implosion dynamics of a low-Z target with those of a high-Z target demonstrates the role of shock waves in terms of compression and heating. In the case of a high-Z target, the shock wave does not play a significant heating role. The shock waves carry current and transport the magnetic field, producing a high density on-axis, at relatively low temperature. Whereas, in the case of a low-Z target, the fast moving shock wave preheats the target during the initial implosion phase, and the later adiabatic compression further heats the target to very high energy density. As a result, the compression ratio required for heating the low-Z plasma to very high energy densities is greatly reduced.

  13. Dynamically stable, self-similarly evolving, and self-organized states of high beta tokamak and reversed pinch plasmas and advanced active control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi; Fukasawa, Toshinobu [Division of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Generalized simultaneous eigenvalue equations derived from a generalized theory of self-organization are applied to a set of simultaneous equations for two-fluid model plasmas. An advanced active control by using theoretical time constants is proposed by predicting quantities to be controlled. Typical high beta numerical configurations are presented for the ultra low q tokamak plasmas and the reversed-field pinch (RFP) ones in cylindrical geometry by solving the set of simultaneous eigenvalue equations. Improved confinement with no detectable saw-teeth oscillations in tokamak experiments is reasonably explained by the shortest time constant of ion flow. The shortest time constant of poloidal ion flow is shown to be a reasonable mechanism for suppression of magnetic fluctuations by pulsed poloidal current drives in RFP experiments. The bifurcation from basic eigenmodes to mixed ones deduced from stability conditions for eigenvalues is shown to be a good candidate for the experimental bifurcation from standard RFP plasmas to their improved confinement regimes.

  14. Power Spectrum Analysis for Optical Tweezers, II: Laser Wavelength Dependence of Parasitic Filtering, and how to Achieve High Band-Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg-Sørensen, K; Weber, T; Schmidt, C F; Flyvbjerg, H; Berg-Sorensen, Kirstine; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Weber, Tom; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a typical optical tweezers detection system, the position of a trapped object is determined from laser light impinging on a quadrant photodiode. When the laser is infrared and the photodiode is of silicon, they can act together as an unintended low-pass filter. This parasitic effect is due to the high transparency of silicon to near-infrared light. A simple model that accounts for this phenomenon (Berg-Sorensen et al., J. Appl. Phys., 93, 3167-3176 (2003)) is here solved for frequencies up to 100 kHz, and for laser wavelengths between 750 and 1064 nm. The solution is applied to experimental data in the same range, and is demonstrated to give this detection system of optical tweezers a bandwidth, accuracy, and precision that is limited only by the data acquisition board's band-width and bandpass ripples, here 96.7 kHz, resp. 0.005 dB.

  15. Survey of waste package designs for disposal of high-level waste/spent fuel in selected foreign countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a survey of the waste package strategies for seven western countries with active nuclear power programs that are pursuing disposal of spent nuclear fuel or high-level wastes in deep geologic rock formations. Information, current as of January 1989, is given on the leading waste package concepts for Belgium, Canada, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All but two of the countries surveyed (France and the UK) have developed design concepts for their repositories, but none of the countries has developed its final waste repository or package concept. Waste package concepts are under study in all the countries surveyed, except the UK. Most of the countries have not yet developed a reference concept and are considering several concepts. Most of the information presented in this report is for the current reference or leading concepts. All canisters for the wastes are cylindrical, and are made of metal (stainless steel, mild steel, titanium, or copper). The canister concepts have relatively thin walls, except those for spent fuel in Sweden and Germany. Diagrams are presented for the reference or leading concepts for canisters for the countries surveyed. The expected lifetimes of the conceptual canisters in their respective disposal environment are typically 500 to 1,000 years, with Sweden's copper canister expected to last as long as one million years. Overpack containers that would contain the canisters are being considered in some of the countries. All of the countries surveyed, except one (Germany) are currently planning to utilize a buffer material (typically bentonite) surrounding the disposal package in the repository. Most of the countries surveyed plan to limit the maximum temperature in the buffer material to about 100{degree}C. 52 refs., 9 figs.

  16. In-situ Phase Transformation and Deformation of Iron at High Pressure andTemperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason; Nasiatka, James; Voltolini, Marco; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a membrane based mechanism to allow for pressure change of a sample in aradial diffraction diamond anvil cell (rDAC) and simultaneous infra-red laser heating, itis now possible to investigate texture changes during deformation and phasetransformations over a wide range of temperature-pressure conditions. The device isused to study bcc (alpha), fcc (gamma) and hcp (epislon) iron. In bcc iron, room temperature compression generates a texture characterized by (100) and (111) poles parallel to the compression direction. During the deformation induced phase transformation to hcp iron, a subset of orientations are favored to transform to the hcp structure first and generate a texture of (01-10) at high angles to the compression direction. Upon further deformation, the remaining grains transform, resulting in a texture that obeys the Burgers relationship of (110)bcc // (0001)hcp. This is in contrast to high temperature results that indicate that texture is developed through dominant pyramidal {2-1-12}<2-1-13> and basal (0001)-{2-1-10} slip based on polycrystal plasticity modeling. We also observe that the high temperature fcc phase develops a 110 texture typical for fcc metals deformed in compression.

  17. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies of Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draganic, Ilija N [ORNL; Seely, D. G. [Albion College; McCammon, D [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Havener, Charles C [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate studies of low energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H like, and He like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H like ions of C, N, O and fully stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV u 20 keV u) and compared to previous H oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV u 3.3 keV u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  18. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies Of Highly Charged Ions On Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Seely, D. G. [Department of Physics, Albion College, Albion, MI 49224 (United States); McCammon, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate studies of low-energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X-ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H-like, and He-like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H-like ions of C, N, O and fully-stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV/u-20 keV/u) and compared to previous H-oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV/u-3.3 keV/u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H-oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  19. Westerbork HI observations of high-velocity clouds near M31 and M33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Westmeier; R. Braun; D. Thilker

    2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have undertaken high-resolution follow-up of a sample of high velocity HI clouds apparently associated with M31. Our sample was chosen from the population of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) detected out to 50 kpc projected radius of the Andromeda Galaxy by Thilker et al. (2004) with the Green Bank Telescope. Nine pointings were observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope to determine the physical parameters of these objects and to find clues to their origin. One additional pointing was directed at a similar object near M33. At 2' resolution we detect 16 individual HVCs around M31 and 1 HVC near M33 with typical HI masses of a few times 10^5 solar masses and sizes of the order of 1 kpc. Estimates of the dynamical and virial masses of some of the HVCs indicate that they are likely gravitationally dominated by additional mass components such as dark matter or ionised gas. Twelve of the clouds are concentrated in an area of only 1 by 1 degree at a projected separation of less than 15 kpc from the disk of M31. This HVC complex has a rather complicated morphological and kinematical structure and partly overlaps with the giant stellar stream of M31, suggesting a tidal origin. Another detected feature is in close proximity, in both position and velocity, with NGC 205, perhaps also indicative of tidal processes. Other HVCs in our survey are isolated and might represent primordial, dark-matter dominated clouds.

  20. Effective electro-optical modulation with high extinction ratio by a graphene-silicon microring resonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Yunhong; Xiao, Sanshui; Hu, Hao; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Mortensen, N Asger; Yvind, Kresten

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene opens up for novel optoelectronic applications thanks to its high carrier mobility, ultra-large absorption bandwidth, and extremely fast material response. In particular, the opportunity to control optoelectronic properties through tuning of Fermi level enables electro-optical modulation, optical-optical switching, and other optoelectronics applications. However, achieving a high modulation depth remains a challenge because of the modest graphene-light interaction in the graphene-silicon devices, typically, utilizing only a monolayer or few layers of graphene. Here, we comprehensively study the interaction between graphene and a microring resonator, and its influence on the optical modulation depth. We demonstrate graphene-silicon microring devices showing a high modulation depth of 12.5 dB with a relatively low bias voltage of 8.8 V. On-off electro-optical switching with an extinction ratio of 3.8 dB is successfully demonstrated by applying a square-waveform with a 4 V peak-to-peak voltage.

  1. Coarse-grained simulations of vortex dynamics and transition in complex high-Re flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, Fernando F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulent flow complexity in applications in engineering, geophysics and astrophysics typically requires achieving accurate and dependable large scale predictions of highly nonlinear processes with under-resolved computer simulation models. Laboratory observations typically demonstrate the end outcome of complex non-linear three-dimensional physical processes with many unexplained details and mechanisms. Carefully controlled computational experiments based on the numerical solution of the conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy, provide insights into the underlying flow dynamics. Relevant computational fluid dynamics issues to be addressed relate to the modeling of the unresolved tlow conditions at the subgrid scale (SGS) level - within a computational cell, and at the supergrid (SPG) scale - at initialization and beyond computational boundaries. SGS and SPG information must be prescribed for closure of the equations solved numerically. SGS models appear explicitly or implicitly as additional source tenns in the modified flow equations solved by the numerical solutions being calculated, while SPG models provide the necessary set of initial and boundary conditions that must be prescribed to ensure unique well-posed solutions. From this perspective, it is clear that the simulation process is inherently determined by the SGS and SPG information prescription process. On the other hand, observables in laboratory experiments are always characterized by the finite scales of the instrumental resolution of measuring/visualizing devices, and subject as well to SPG issues. It is thus important to recognize the inherently intrusive nature of observations based on numerical or laboratory experiments. Ultimately, verification and validation (V & V) frameworks and appropriate metrics for the specific problems at hand are needed to establish predictability of the simulation model. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) - resolving all relevant space/time scales, is prohibitively expensive in the foreseeable future for most practical flows of interest at moderate-to-high Reynolds number (Re). On the other end of the simulation spectrum are the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approaches - which model the turbulent effects. In the coarsegrained large eddy simulation (LES) strategies, the large energy containing structures are resolved, the smaller structures are filtered out, and unresolved SGS effects are modeled. By necessity - rather than choice, LES effectively becomes the intermediate approach between DNS and RANS. Extensive work has demonstrated that predictive simulations of turbulent velocity fields are possible using a particular LES denoted implicit LES (ILES), using the class of nonoscillatory finite-volume (NFV) numerical algorithms. Use of the modified equation as framework for theoretical analysis, demonstrates that leading truncation tenns associated with NFV methods provide implicit SGS models of mixed anisotropic type and regularized motion of discrete observables. Tests in fundamental applications ranging from canonical to very complex flows indicate that ILES is competitive with conventional LES in the LES realm proper - flows driven by large scale features. High-Re flows are vortex dominated and governed by short convective timescales compared to those of diffusion, and kinematically characterized at the smallest scales by slender worm vortices with insignificant internal structure. This motivates nominally inviscid ILES methods capable of capturing the high-Re dissipation dynamics and of handling vortices as shocks in shock capturing schemes. Depending on flow regimes, initial conditions, and resolution, additional modeling may be needed to emulate SGS driven physics, such as backscatter, chemical reaction, material mixing, and near-wall flow-dynamics - where typically-intertwined SGS/SPG issues need to be addressed. A major research focus is recognizing when additional explicit models and/or numerical treatments are needed and ensuring that mixed explicit and implicit SGS models can effectively act in

  2. High-surface-area hydrated lime for SO2 control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; Moran, D.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States). Minerals Engineering Section)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1986, the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), has been developing a process to produce high-surface-area hydrated lime (HSAHL) with more activity for adsorbing SO2 than commercially available hydrated lime. HSAHL prepared by the ISGS method as considerably higher surface area and porosity, and smaller mean particle diameter and crystallite size than commercial hydrated lime. The process has been optimized in a batch, bench-scale reactor and has been scaled-up to a 20--100 lb/hr process optimization unit (POU). Experiments have been conducted to optimize the ISGS hydration process and identify key parameters influencing hydrate properties for SO2 capture (surface area, porosity, particle size, and crystallite size). The known how is available to tailor properties of hydrated limes for specific SO2 removal applications. Pilot-scale tests conducted with the HSAHL under conditions typical of burning high-sulfur coals have achieved up to 90% SO2 capture in various DSI systems. The removal results are enough to bring most high-sulfur coals into compliance with acid rain legislation goals for the year 2000. The focus of the POU program is to generate critical engineering data necessary for the private sector to scale-up the process to a commercial level and provide estimates of the optimal cost of construction and operation of a commercial plant. ISGS is currently participating in a clean coal technology program (CCT-1) by providing 50 tons of HSAHL for a demonstration test at Illinois Power's Hennepin station in January 1993.

  3. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; et al

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant formore »detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3 × 106 cm–2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.« less

  4. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3 × 106 cm–2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  5. Integrating High Penetrations of PV into Southern California: Year 2 Project Update; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, B.; Neal, R.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern California Edison (SCE) is well into a five-year project to install a total of 500 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) energy within its utility service territory. Typical installations to date are 1-3 MW peak rooftop PV systems that interconnect to medium-voltage urban distribution circuits or larger (5 MW peak) ground-mounted systems that connect to medium-voltage rural distribution circuits. Some of the PV system interconnections have resulted in distribution circuits that have a significant amount of PV generation compared to customer load, resulting in high-penetration PV integration scenarios. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SCE have assembled a team of distribution modeling, resource assessment, and PV inverter technology experts in order to investigate a few of the high-penetration PV distribution circuits. Currently, the distribution circuits being studied include an urban circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 46% and a rural circuit with a PV penetration of approximately 60%. In both cases, power flow on the circuit reverses direction, compared to traditional circuit operation, during periods of high PV power production and low circuit loading. Research efforts during year two of the five-year project were focused on modeling the distribution system level impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, the development and installation of distribution circuit data acquisition equipment appropriate for quantifying the impacts of high-penetration PV integrations, and investigating high-penetration PV impact mitigation strategies. This paper outlines these research efforts and discusses the following activities in more detail: the development of a quasi-static time-series test feeder for evaluating high-penetration PV integration modeling tools; the advanced inverter functions being investigated for deployment in the project's field demonstration and a power hardware-in-loop test of a 500-kW PV inverter implementing a limited set of advanced inverter functions.

  6. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  7. California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peffer, Therese E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regarding power consumption and typical load profiles forregarding power consumption and typical load profiles for

  8. Possible source of ancient carbon in phytolith concentrates from harvested grasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, G. M; Alexandre, A.; Southon, J. R; Treseder, K. K; Corbineau, R.; Reyerson, P. E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    classified as high, intermediate, and non-Si accumulators.High accumulators typically exhibit SiO 2 concentrations >dry weight, whereas non-accumulators exclude it (Marschner,

  9. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    areas, typically have: - low median household incomes - high unemployment - high poverty (see "Designations" section in website's FAQs) 6 www.sba.gov There are 4 kinds of...

  10. Supported by the National Science Foundation and the State of Florida 1 REPORTSNATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    .S. Shvindlerman3 Magnetic Driving Force cont. on page 6 N H M F L M a g n e t s Engineered for Unique Needs and Sometimes Unworldly Destinations In the first years of the laboratory, NHMFL magnet engineers, designers of magnets engineered to the specific needs of customers. Typically when crystals are grown, the presence

  11. J. Phys. III France 6 (1996) 475-480 APRIL 1996, PAGE 475 High-Efficiency Heater for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoluminescence PACS.07.65.-b Optical spectroscopy and spectrometers PACS.07.20.Hy Furnaces Abstract. The paper a thin metal (e.g. tantalum or nickel-chrome) strip, with typical dimensions of about o.025 cm x (1-2) cm

  12. Finite-temperature phase diagram of a spin-polarized ultracold Fermi gas in a highly elongated harmonic trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    manuscript received 10 April 2008; published 1 August 2008 We investigate the finite-temperature properties-temperature phase diagram. For typical interactions, we find that the exotic FFLO phase survives below one of lithium atoms with unequal spin populations 8­13 . This type of matter is of great interest

  13. A Network-on-Chip Router for Low-Latency and High-Throughput Dimension-Order Routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasheed, Shalimar

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    , Karthik Prabhu, Manoj Prasad, Preshmitha Rajagopal, Kousik Ramasamy, Parthiban Ravikumar, Gowtham Ravisankar, Ashwini Ravindran, Morgan Suhm, Marissa Suhm, Grant Suhm, Afsaneh Yazdani, Baman Yazdani. These wonderful people vi have helped me... ...................................................................................................... 5 1.2 Contributions ............................................................................................................ 6 2. A TYPICAL NOC ROUTER MICROARCHITECTURE ............................................ 8 2.1 Router Pipeline...

  14. Simulation of Dehumidification Characteristics of High Efficiency Residential Central Air-Conditioners in Hot and Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katipamula, S.; O'Neal, D.; Somasundram, S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) thermostat set point and dead band, and (ill) sizing of unit relative to the design load of the residence. The units are evaluated on their ability to maintain conditions in the ASHRAE comfort zone in a typical residence in Houston area. The units...

  15. Assessment of kinetic modeling for lean H2/CH4/O2/diluent flames at high pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Yiguang

    : Hydrogen; Methane; Syngas; Flame speed; Chemical mechanism 1. Introduction The H2/O2 reaction system CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other small hydrocarbons (synthetic gas or "syngas") from coal or biomass gasification [2]. Typical syngas mixtures can contain significant amounts of small molecular weight

  16. High Efficiency Solar-based Catalytic Structure for CO{sub 2} Reforming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menkara, Hisham

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout this project, we developed and optimized various photocatalyst structures for CO{sub 2} reforming into hydrocarbon fuels and various commodity chemical products. We also built several closed-loop and continuous fixed-bed photocatalytic reactor system prototypes for a larger-scale demonstration of CO{sub 2} reforming into hydrocarbons, mainly methane and formic acid. The results achieved have indicated that with each type of reactor and structure, high reforming yields can be obtained by refining the structural and operational conditions of the reactor, as well as by using various sacrificial agents (hole scavengers). We have also demonstrated, for the first time, that an aqueous solution containing acid whey (a common bio waste) is a highly effective hole scavenger for a solar-based photocatalytic reactor system and can help reform CO{sub 2} into several products at once. The optimization tasks performed throughout the project have resulted in efficiency increase in our conventional reactors from an initial 0.02% to about 0.25%, which is 10X higher than our original project goal. When acid whey was used as a sacrificial agent, the achieved energy efficiency for formic acid alone was ~0.4%, which is 16X that of our original project goal and higher than anything ever reported for a solar-based photocatalytic reactor. Therefore, by carefully selecting sacrificial agents, it should be possible to reach energy efficiency in the range of the photosynthetic efficiency of typical crop and biofuel plants (1-3%).

  17. High-Purity Germanium Spectroscopy at Rates in Excess of 10^{6} Events/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanDevender, Brent A.; Dion, Michael P.; Fast, James E.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Wilen, Christopher D.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wright, Michael E.

    2014-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—In gamma spectroscopy, a compromise must be made between energy resolution and event-rate capability. Some foreseen nuclear material safeguards applications require a spectrometer with energy resolution typical of high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, operated at rates up to and exceeding 106 events per second. We report the performance of an HPGe spectrometer adapted to run at such rates. Our system consists of a commercial semi-coaxial HPGe detector, a modified high-voltagerail, resistive-feedback, charge-sensitive preamplifier and a continuous waveform digitizer. Digitized waveforms are analyzed offline with a novel time-variant trapezoidal filter algorithm. Several time-invariant trapezoidal filters are run in parallel and the slowest one not rejected by instantaneous pileup conditions is used to measure each pulse height. We have attained full-widthat- half-maximum energy resolution of less than 8 keV measured at 662 keV with 1:08*106 per second incoming event rate and 38% throughput. An additional constraint on the width of the fast trigger filter removes a significant amount of edge pileup that passes the first pileup cut, reducing throughput to 26%. While better resolution has been reported by other authors, our throughput is over an order of magnitude higher than any other reported HPGe system operated at such an event rate.

  18. An Embedded System for Safe, Secure and Reliable Execution of High Consequence Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCCOY,JAMES A.

    2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As more complex and functionally diverse requirements are placed on high consequence embedded applications, ensuring safe and secure operation requires an execution environment that is ultra reliable from a system viewpoint. In many cases the safety and security of the system depends upon the reliable cooperation between the hardware and the software to meet real-time system throughput requirements. The selection of a microprocessor and its associated development environment for an embedded application has the most far-reaching effects on the development and production of the system than any other element in the design. The effects of this choice ripple through the remainder of the hardware design and profoundly affect the entire software development process. While state-of-the-art software engineering principles indicate that an object oriented (OO) methodology provides a superior development environment, traditional programming languages available for microprocessors targeted for deeply embedded applications do not directly support OO techniques. Furthermore, the microprocessors themselves do not typically support nor do they enforce an OO environment. This paper describes a system level approach for the design of a microprocessor intended for use in deeply embedded high consequence applications that both supports and enforces an OO execution environment.

  19. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babij, Micha?; Kowalski, Zbigniew W., E-mail: zbigniew.w.kowalski@pwr.wroc.pl; Nitsch, Karol; Gotszalk, Teodor [Wroc?aw University of Technology, Wybrze?e Wyspia?skiego 27, 50-370 Wroc?aw (Poland)] [Wroc?aw University of Technology, Wybrze?e Wyspia?skiego 27, 50-370 Wroc?aw (Poland); Silberring, Jerzy [AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)] [AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  20. Application of soft X-ray lasers for probing high density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R. [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reliability and characteristics of collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers make them ideal for a wide variety of plasma diagnostics. These systems now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {Angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ps pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup -4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this paper we will describe the use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Using an x-ray laser and a multilayer mirror imaging system we have studied hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1-2 {mu}m spatial resolution. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beamsplitters we have constructed and used a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {Angstrom} to probe 1-3 mm size laser produced plasmas with peak electron densities of 4 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. A comparison of our results with computer simulations will be presented.

  1. Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial muon flux: A lookup table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. Typical cosmic ray energies may be much higher than the ~ 1 GeV flux which normally dominates. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the radiation dose. Muons contribute 85% to the radiation dose from cosmic rays. This enhanced dose could be potentially harmful to the biosphere. This mechanism has been discussed extensively in literature but has never been quantified. Here, we have developed a lookup table that can be used to quantify this effect by modeling terrestrial muon flux from any arbitrary cosmic ray spectra with 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries. This will enable us to compute the radiation dose on terrestrial planetary surfaces from a number of astrophysical sources.

  2. Microstructural Characterization of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fast Reactor Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melissa C. Teague; Brian P. Gorman; Steven L. Hayes; Douglas L. Porter; Jeffrey King

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High burn-up mixed oxide fuel with local burn-ups of 3.4–23.7% FIMA (fissions per initial metal atom) were destructively examined as part of a research project to understand the performance of oxide fuel at extreme burn-ups. Optical metallography of fuel cross-sections measured the fuel-to-cladding gap, clad thickness, and central void evolution in the samples. The fuel-to-cladding gap closed significantly in samples with burn-ups below 7–9% FIMA. Samples with burn-ups in excess of 7–9% FIMA had a reopening of the fuel-to-cladding gap and evidence of joint oxide-gain (JOG) formation. Signs of axial fuel migration to the top of the fuel column were observed in the fuel pin with a peak burn-up of 23.7% FIMA. Additionally, high burn-up structure (HBS) was observed in the two highest burn-up samples (23.7% and 21.3% FIMA). The HBS layers were found to be 3–5 times thicker than the layers found in typical LWR fuel. The results of the study indicate that formation of JOG and or HBS prevents any significant fuel-cladding mechanical interaction from occurring, thereby extending the potential life of the fuel elements.

  3. Condensation potential in high thermal performance walls. Hot, humid summer climate. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, G.E.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To observe actual moisture patterns and the potential for condensation due to long periods of air conditioning in a hot, humid climate, a test structure was constructed near Gulfport, Mississippi, for exposure of eight types of insulated wall panels at controlled indoor conditions and typical outdoor weather conditions. Panels were instrumented with moisture sensors and tested without (Phase 1) and with (Phase 2) penetrations (electrical outlets) in the indoor surface. There was no sustained condensation in any of the walls during either winter season. One type of high thermal performance wall had sustained condensation during both summers, but the wall dried out as the weather became cooler, and moisture content of framing never exceeded 17 percent. Low-permeance sheathing appeared to provide resistance to the buildup of moisture during summer in walls with high overall R values. Penetrating the walls with electrical outlets resulted in slightly higher moisture levels in all of the walls throughout the year. This paper should be useful to building designers, builders, and building code officials in establishing vapor retarder requirements for walls.

  4. Applications of Nd:YAG laser micromanufacturing in High Temperature Gas Reactor research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. J. van Rooyen; C. A. Smal; J. Steyn; H. Greyling

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two innovative applications of Nd:YAG laser micromachining techniques are demonstrated in this publication. Research projects to determine the fission product transport mechanisms in TRISO coated particles necessitate heat treatment studies as well as the manufacturing of a unique sealed system for experimentation at very high temperatures. This article describes firstly the design and creation of an alumina jig designed to contain 500 {mu}m diameter ZrO2 spheres intended for annealing experiments at temperatures up to 1600 C. Functional requirements of this jig are the precision positioning of spheres for laser ablation, welding and post weld heat treatment in order to ensure process repeatability and accurate indexing of individual spheres. The design challenges and the performance of the holding device are reported. Secondly the manufacture of a sealing system using laser micromachining is reported. ZrO2 micro plugs isolate the openings of micro-machined cavities to produce a gas-tight seal fit for application in a high temperature environment. The technique is described along with a discussion of the problems experienced during the sealing process. Typical problems experienced were seating dimensions and the relative small size ({approx} 200 {mu}m) of these plugs that posed handling challenges. Manufacturing processes for both the tapered seating cavity and the plug are demonstrated. In conclusion, this article demonstrates the application of Nd-YAG micromachining in an innovative way to solve practical research problems.

  5. Influence of microstructure on the flow behavior of duplex stainless steels at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balancin, O.; Hoffmann, W.A.M.; Jonas, J.J.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three kinds of duplex stainless steel, with different ferrite-to-austenite ratios, were deformed in torsion over the temperature range 900 C to 1,200 C; the corresponding microstructural evolution was observed and correlated with the deformation conditions. The shapes of the high-temperature flow curves depend strongly on the volume fractions of the phases, the characteristics of the ferrite-austenite interface, and the active softening mechanism. At low volume fractions of austenite, the mechanical behavior is determined by the ferrite matrix and the flow curves are typical of materials that soften by continuous dynamic recrystallization. When the volume fraction of austenite is increased, coherent {gamma} particles distributed within the grains and at the grain boundaries hinder the deformation of the softer {alpha} matrix, increasing both the yield and the peak stress. These peaked flow curves are characterized by rapid work hardening followed by extensive flow softening; under these conditions, the hard austenite particles become aligned with the deformation direction after large strains. AT high volume fractions of austenite ({approximately}50%), the material tends to form a duplex structure, with the flow curves displaying extended work-hardening and work-softening regions; however, a drastic decrease is observed in ductility because of the dissimilar plastic behaviors of the two phases.

  6. Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Bussons, J; Coyne, D G; De Young, T R; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kelley, L A; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Williams, D A; Westerhoff, S; Wilson, M E; Xu, X; Yodh, G B

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro telescope monitors the northern sky for 100 GeV to 100 TeV transient emission through continuous very high energy wide-field observations. The large effective area and ~100 GeV energy threshold of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity than previous instruments and a fluence sensitivity at VHE energies comparable to that of dedicated gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE observations can place important constraints on gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitor and emission models. We present limits on the VHE flux of 40 s -- 3 h duration transients nearby to earth, as well as sensitivity distributions which have been corrected for gamma-ray absorption by extragalactic background light and cosmological effects. The sensitivity distributions suggest that the typical intrinsic VHE fluence of GRBs is similar or weaker than the keV -- MeV emission, and we demonstrate how these sensitivit...

  7. The high-redshift gamma-ray burst GRB140515A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melandri, A; D'Avanzo, P; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Nappo, F; Nava, L; Japelj, J; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Oates, S; Campana, S; Covino, S; D'Elia, V; Ghirlanda, G; Gafton, E; Ghisellini, G; Gnedin, N; Goldoni, P; Gorosabel, J; Libbrecht, T; Malesani, D; Salvaterra, R; Thone, C C; Vergani, S D; Xu, D; Tagliaferri, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-redshift gamma-ray bursts have several advantages for the study of the distant universe, providing unique information about the structure and properties of the galaxies in which they exploded. Spectroscopic identification with large ground-based telescopes has improved our knowledge of the class of such distant events. We present the multi-wavelength analysis of the high-$z$ Swift gamma-ray burst GRB140515A ($z = 6.327$). The best estimate of the neutral hydrogen fraction of the intergalactic medium (IGM) towards the burst is $x_{HI} \\leq 0.002$. The spectral absorption lines detected for this event are the weakest lines ever observed in gamma-ray burst afterglows, suggesting that GRB140515A exploded in a very low density environment. Its circum-burst medium is characterised by an average extinction (A$_{\\rm V} \\sim 0.1$) that seems to be typical of $z \\ge 6$ events. The observed multi-band light curves are explained either with a very flat injected spectrum ($p = 1.7$) or with a multi-component emission...

  8. Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Milagro Collaboration; R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; J. Bussons; D. G. Coyne; T. DeYoung; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; E. Hays; C. M. Hoffman; L. A. Kelley; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; D. A. Williams; S. Westerhoff; M. E. Wilson; X. Xu; G. B. Yodh

    2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro telescope monitors the northern sky for 100 GeV to 100 TeV transient emission through continuous very high energy wide-field observations. The large effective area and ~100 GeV energy threshold of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity than previous instruments and a fluence sensitivity at VHE energies comparable to that of dedicated gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE observations can place important constraints on gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitor and emission models. We present limits on the VHE flux of 40 s -- 3 h duration transients nearby to earth, as well as sensitivity distributions which have been corrected for gamma-ray absorption by extragalactic background light and cosmological effects. The sensitivity distributions suggest that the typical intrinsic VHE fluence of GRBs is similar or weaker than the keV -- MeV emission, and we demonstrate how these sensitivity distributions may be used to place observational constraints on the absolute VHE luminosity of gamma-ray bursts for any GRB emission and progenitor model.

  9. Development of High Efficiency Carbon Dioxide Commercial Heat Pump Water Heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael PETERSEN; Chad D. BOWERS; Stefan ELBEL; Pega HRNJAK

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although heat pump water heaters are today widely accepted in both Japan and Europe, where energy costs are high and government incentives for their use exist, acceptance of such products in the US has been limited. While this trend is slowly changing with the introduction of heat pump water heaters into the residential market, but acceptance remains low in the commercial sector. The objective of the presented work is the development of a high efficiency R744 heat pump water heater for commercial applications with effective utilization of the cooling capability for air conditioning and/or refrigeration. The ultimate goal is to achieve total system COP of up to 8. This unit will be targeted at commercial use where some cooling load is typically needed year round, such as restaurants, hotels, nursing homes, and hospitals. This paper presents the performance results from the development of four R744 commercial heat pump water heater packages of approximately 35 kW and comparison to a commercially available baseline R134a unit of the same capacity and footprint. In addition, the influences of an internal heat exchanger and an enhanced evaporator on the system performance are described and recommendations are made for further improvements of the R744 system.

  10. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A. (CP Industries, McKeesport, PA)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  11. $XMM-Newton$ $?$ project: III. Gas mass fraction shape in high redshift clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachida Sadat; Alain Blanchard; Sebastien C. Vauclair; David H. Lumb; James Bartlett; A. K. Romer; Jean-Philippe Bernard; Michel Boer; Philippe Marty; Jukka Nevalainen; Douglas J. Burke; C. A. Collins; Robert C. Nichol

    2005-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the gas mass fraction, $f\\_{\\rm gas},$ behavior in $XMM-Newton$ $\\Omega$ project. The typical $f\\_{\\rm gas}$ shape of high redshift galaxy clusters follows the global shape inferred at low redshift quite well. This result is consistent with the gravitational instability picture leading to self similar structures for both the dark and baryonic matter. However, the mean $f\\_{\\rm gas} in distant clusters shows some differences to local ones, indicating a departure from strict scaling. This result is consistent with the observed evolution in the luminosity-temperature relation. We quantitatively investigate this departure from scaling laws. Within the local sample we used, a moderate but clear variation of the amplitude of the gas mass fraction with temperature is found, a trend that weakens in the outer regions. These variations do not explain departure from scaling laws of our distant clusters. An important implication of our results is that the gas fraction evolution, a test of the cosmological parameters, can lead to biased values when applied at radii smaller than the virial radius. From our $XMM$ clusters, the apparent gas fraction at the virial radius is consistent with a non-evolving universal value in a high matter density model and not with a concordance.

  12. In situ Formation of Highly Conducting Covalent Au-C Contacts for Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Z.L.; Hybertsen, M.; Skouta, R.; Vazquez, H.; Widawsky, J.R.; Schneebeli, S.; Chen, W.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charge transport across metal-molecule interfaces has an important role in organic electronics. Typically, chemical link groups such as thiols or amines are used to bind organic molecules to metal electrodes in single-molecule circuits, with these groups controlling both the physical structure and the electronic coupling at the interface. Direct metal-carbon coupling has been shown through C60, benzene and {pi}-stacked benzene but ideally the carbon backbone of the molecule should be covalently bonded to the electrode without intervening link groups. Here, we demonstrate a method to create junctions with such contacts. Trimethyl tin (SnMe{sub 3})-terminated polymethylene chains are used to form single-molecule junctions with a break-junction technique. Gold atoms at the electrode displace the SnMe{sub 3} linkers, leading to the formation of direct Au-C bonded single-molecule junctions with a conductance that is {approx}100 times larger than analogous alkanes with most other terminations. The conductance of these Au-C bonded alkanes decreases exponentially with molecular length, with a decay constant of 0.97 per methylene, consistent with a non-resonant transport mechanism. Control experiments and ab initio calculations show that high conductances are achieved because a covalent Au-C sigma ({sigma}) bond is formed. This offers a new method for making reproducible and highly conducting metal-organic contacts.

  13. Highly Aligned Carbon Fiber in Polymer Composite Structures via Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tekinalp, Halil L [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Velez-Garcia, Gregorio M [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL; Ozcan, Soydan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additive manufacturing, diverging from traditional manufacturing techniques, such as casting and machining materials, can handle complex shapes with great design flexibility without the typical waste. Although this technique has been mainly used for rapid prototyping, interest is growing in using this method to directly manufacture actual parts of complex shape. To use 3D-printing additive manufacturing in wide spread applications, the technique and the feedstock materials require improvements to meet the mechanical requirements of load-bearing components. Thus, we investigated the short fiber (0.2 mm to 0.4 mm) reinforced acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene composites as a feedstock for 3D-printing in terms of their processibility, microstructure and mechanical performance; and also provided comparison with traditional compression molded composites. The tensile strength and modulus of 3D-printed samples increased ~115% and ~700%, respectively. 3D-printer yielded samples with very high fiber orientation in printing direction (up to 91.5 %), whereas, compression molding process yielded samples with significantly less fiber orientation. Microstructure-mechanical property relationships revealed that although the relatively high porosity is observed in the 3D-printed composites as compared to those produced by the conventional compression molding technique, they both exhibited comparable tensile strength and modulus. This phenomena is explained based on the changes in fiber orientation, dispersion and void formation.

  14. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arntz, Floyd; /Diversified Tech., Bedford; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel short-pulse concept (SLIM) suited to a new generation of a high gradient induction particle accelerators is described herein. It applies advanced solid state semiconductor technology and modern microfabrication techniques to a coreless induction method of charged particle acceleration first proven on a macro scale in the 1960's. Because this approach avoids use of magnetic materials there is the prospect of such an accelerator working efficiently with accelerating pulses in the nanosecond range and, potentially, at megahertz pulse rates. The principal accelerator section is envisioned as a stack of coreless induction cells, the only active element within each being a single, extremely fast (subnanosecond) solid state opening switch: a Drift Step Recovery Diode (DSRD). Each coreless induction cell incorporates an electromagnetic pulse compressor in which inductive energy developed within a transmission-line feed structure over a period of tens of nanoseconds is diverted to the acceleration of the passing charge packet for a few nanoseconds by the abrupt opening of the DSRD switch. The duration of this accelerating output pulse--typically two-to-four nanoseconds--is precisely determined by a microfabricated pulse forming line connected to the cell. Because the accelerating pulse is only nanoseconds in duration, longitudinal accelerating gradients approaching 100 MeV per meter are believed to be achievable without inciting breakdown. Further benefits of this approach are that, (1) only a low voltage power supply is required to produce the high accelerating gradient, and, (2) since the DSRD switch is normally closed, voltage stress is limited to a few nanoseconds per period, hence the susceptibility to hostile environment conditions such as ionizing radiation, mismatch (e.g. in medical applications the peak beam current may be low), strong electromagnetic noise levels, etc is expected to be minimal. Finally, we observe the SLIM concept is not limited to linac applications; for instance, it could be employed to both accelerate the beam and to stabilize the superbunch mode of operation in circular track machines.

  15. INCONEL 690 CORROSION IN WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT) HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS MELTS RICH IN ALUMINUM & BISMUTH & CHROMIUM OR ALUMINUM/SODIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; FENG Z; GAN H; PEGG IL

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal corrosion tests were conducted with four high waste loading non-Fe-limited HLW glass compositions. The results at 1150 C (the WTP nominal melter operating temperature) show corrosion performance for all four glasses that is comparable to that of other typical borosilicate waste glasses, including HLW glass compositions that have been developed for iron-limited WTP streams. Of the four glasses tested, the Bi-limited composition shows the greatest extent of corrosion, which may be related to its higher phosphorus content. Tests at higher suggest that a moderate elevation of the melter operating temperature (up to 1200 C) should not result in any significant increase in Inconel corrosion. However, corrosion rates did increase significantly at yet higher temperatures (1230 C). Very little difference was observed with and without the presence of an electric current density of 6 A/inch{sup 2}, which is the typical upper design limit for Inconel electrodes. The data show a roughly linear relationship between the thickness of the oxide scale on the coupon and the Cr-depletion depth, which is consistent with the chromium depletion providing the material source for scale growth. Analysis of the time dependence of the Cr depletion profiles measured at 1200 C suggests that diffusion of Cr in the Ni-based Inconel alloy controls the depletion depth of Cr inside the alloy. The diffusion coefficient derived from the experimental data agrees within one order of magnitude with the published diffusion coefficient data for Cr in Ni matrices; the difference is likely due to the contribution from faster grain boundary diffusion in the tested Inconel alloy. A simple diffusion model based on these data predicts that Inconel 690 alloy will suffer Cr depletion damage to a depth of about 1 cm over a five year service life at 1200 C in these glasses.

  16. High-mass star formation triggered by collision between CO filaments in N159 West in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukui, Yasuo; Tokuda, Kazuki; Morioka, Yuuki; Onishi, Toshikazu; Torii, Kazufumi; Ohama, Akio; Nayak, Omnarayani; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Kawamura, Akiko; Saigo, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Madden, Suzanna; Galametz, Maud; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Mizuno, Norikazu; Chen, Rosie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out 13CO (J=2-1) observations of the active star-forming region N159 West in the LMC with ALMA. We have found that the CO distribution at a sub-pc scale is highly elongated with a small width. These elongated clouds called "filaments" show straight or curved distributions with a typical width of 0.5-1.0 pc and a length of 5-10 pc. All the known infrared YSOs are located toward the filaments. We have found broad CO wings of two molecular outflows toward young high-mass stars in N159W-N and N159W-S, whose dynamical timescale is ~10^4 yrs. This is the first discovery of protostellar outflow in external galaxies. For N159W-S which is located toward an intersection of two filaments we set up a hypothesis that the two filaments collided with each other ~10^5 yrs ago and triggered formation of the high-mass star having ~37Mo. The colliding clouds show significant enhancement in linewidth in the intersection, suggesting excitation of turbulence in the shocked interface layer between them as is consist...

  17. Spectral, temporal and temperature features of the nonlinear response of high-temperature superconductors in transient nonlinear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobyrev, Yu V; Petnikova, V M; Rudenko, K V; Shuvalov, Vladimir V [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that basic properties of the nonlinear response of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) observed in femtosecond and picosecond pump-probe experiments at high and low pump levels in various variants of the pump-probe spectroscopy, including one- and two-photon excited-state probing, can be interpreted by using two assumptions. The spectral and temperature properties of the HTSC response at low pump levels can be explained taking into account the contributions from interband electronic transitions to the dielectric constant. At the same time, drastic variations in the HTSC response kinetics (temporal features) observed at high pump levels (for a typical pump pulse energy of {approx}10{sup -7} J in a focal spot of diameter 150 {mu}m) can be explained by assuming the existence of a 'frozen' (metastable) energy gap in the electronic spectrum of a HTSC. In this case, all the conditions required for the interpretation of a drastic decrease in the relaxation rate of a nonlinear response (degeneracy) are realised due to the specific distribution of the electronic state density immediately after the formation of the energy gap in the electronic spectrum of the HTSC. (review)

  18. Processing of Bi-2212 and Nb$_3$Sn studied in situ by high energy synchrotron diffraction and micro-tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadar, Julian

    Next generation superconducting wires have been studied to obtain more information on the evolution of phase growth, crystallite size and strain state during wire processing. The high energy scattering beam line ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility provides a very high flux of high energy photons for very fast in situ X-ray diffraction and micro-tomography studies of Bi-2212/Ag and Nb$_3$S/Cu wire samples. The typical wire processing conditions could be imitated in the X-ray transparent furnace at ID15 for diffraction and tomography studies. Efficient data analysis is mandatory in order to handle the very fast data acquisition rate. For this purpose an Excel-VBA based program was developed that allows a semi-automated fitting and tracking of peaks with pre-set constraints. With this method, more than one thousand diffraction patterns have been analysed to extract d-spacing, peak intensity and peak width values. X ray absorption micro tomograms were recorded simultaneously with the X-ray diffrac...

  19. Evaluation of electropolished stainless steel electrodes for use in DC high voltage photoelectron guns

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    BastaniNejad, Mahzad; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.; Forman, Eric; Covert, Steven; Hansknecht, John; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Poelker, Matthew; Das, Lopa; Kelley, Michael; Williams, Phillip

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DC high voltage photoelectron guns are used to produce polarized electron beams for accelerator-based nuclear and high-energy physics research. Low-level field emission (~nA) from the cathode electrode degrades the vacuum within the photogun and reduces the photoelectron yield of the delicate GaAs-based photocathode used to produce the electron beams. High-level field emission (>?A) can cause significant damage the photogun. To minimize field emission, stainless steel electrodes are typically diamond-paste polished, a labor-intensive process often yielding field emission performance with a high degree of variability, sample to sample. As an alternative approach and as comparative study, the performance of electrodes electropolishedmore »by conventional commercially available methods is presented. Our observations indicate the electropolished electrodes exhibited less field emission upon the initial application of high voltage, but showed less improvement with gas conditioning compared to the diamond-paste polished electrodes. In contrast, the diamond-paste polished electrodes responded favorably to gas conditioning, and ultimately reached higher voltages and field strengths without field emission, compared to electrodes that were only electropolished. The best performing electrode was one that was both diamond-paste polished and electropolished, reaching a field strength of 18.7 MV/m while generating less than 100 pA of field emission. The speculate that the combined processes were the most effective at reducing both large and small scale topography. However, surface science evaluation indicates topography cannot be the only relevant parameter when it comes to predicting field emission performance.« less

  20. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The authors conclude that Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron is promising for proton therapy.

  1. General Properties on Applying the Principle of Minimum Sensitivity to High-order Perturbative QCD Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang Ma; Xing-Gang Wu; Hong-Hao Ma; Hua-Yong Han

    2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the key components of perturbative QCD theory, it is helpful to find a systematic and reliable way to set the renormalization scale for a high-energy process. The conventional treatment is to take a typical momentum as the renormalization scale, which assigns an arbitrary range and an arbitrary systematic error to pQCD predictions, leading to the well-known renormalization scheme and scale ambiguities. As a practical solution for such scale setting problem, the "Principle of Minimum Sensitivity" (PMS), has been proposed in the literature. The PMS suggests to determine an optimal scale for the pQCD approximant of an observable by requiring its slope over the scheme and scale changes to vanish. In the paper, we present a detailed discussion on general properties of PMS by utilizing three quantities $R_{e^+e^-}$, $R_\\tau$ and $\\Gamma(H\\rightarrow b\\bar{b})$ up to four-loop QCD corrections. After applying the PMS, the accuracy of pQCD prediction, the pQCD convergence, the pQCD predictive power and etc., have been discussed. Furthermore, we compare PMS with another fundamental scale setting approach, i.e. the Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC)... Our results show that PMS does provide a practical way to set the effective scale for high-energy process, and the PMS prediction agrees with the PMC one by including enough high-order QCD corrections, both of which shall be more accurate than the prediction under the conventional scale setting. However, the PMS pQCD convergence is an accidental, which usually fails to achieve a correct prediction of unknown high-order contributions with next-to-leading order QCD correction only, i.e. it is always far from the "true" values predicted by including more high-order contributions.

  2. DUST ATTENUATION IN UV-SELECTED STARBURSTS AT HIGH REDSHIFT AND THEIR LOCAL COUNTERPARTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE COSMIC STAR FORMATION RATE DENSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overzier, Roderik A.; Wang Jing [Max-Planck-Institut for Astrophysics, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Armus, Lee; Howell, Justin [Spitzer Science Center, Caltech, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Buat, Veronique [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, OAMP, Universite Aix-marseille, CNRS, 38 rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Meurer, Gerhardt [ICRAR/University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Seibert, Mark [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Siana, Brian; Goncalves, Thiago S.; Martin, D. Christopher; Neill, James D. [California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Basu-Zych, Antara [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Charlot, Stephane [PMC Univ Paris 06, UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States); Salim, Samir [National Optical Astronomical Observatories, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Schiminovich, David, E-mail: overzier@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, MC 2457, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new analysis of the dust obscuration in starburst galaxies at low and high redshifts. This study is motivated by our unique sample of the most extreme UV-selected starburst galaxies in the nearby universe (z < 0.3), found to be good analogs of high-redshift Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) in most of their physical properties. We find that the dust properties of the Lyman break analogs (LBAs) are consistent with the relation derived previously by Meurer et al. (M99) that is commonly used to dust-correct star formation rate (SFR) measurements at a very wide range of redshifts. We directly compare our results with high-redshift samples (LBGs, 'BzK', and submillimeter galaxies at z {approx} 2-3) having IR data either from Spitzer or Herschel. The attenuation in typical LBGs at z {approx} 2-3 and LBAs is very similar. Because LBAs are much better analogs to LBGs compared to previous local star-forming samples, including M99, the practice of dust-correcting the SFRs of high-redshift galaxies based on the local calibration is now placed on a much more solid ground. We illustrate the importance of this result by showing how the locally calibrated relation between UV measurements and extinction is used to estimate the integrated, dust-corrected SFR density at z {approx_equal} 2-6.

  3. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor, Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuel performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

  4. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granero, Domingo, E-mail: dgranero@eresa.com [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain)] [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain)] [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, Javier [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain)] [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain)] [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about ?3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than ?1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet ?3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were ?7% for {sup 60}Co, ?0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and ?2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For lower energy radionuclides like {sup 169}Yb, bolus may be needed; and (iii) for the interstitial case, at least a 0.1 cm bolus is advised for {sup 60}Co to avoid underdosing superficial target layers. For {sup 192}Ir and {sup 169}Yb, no bolus is needed. For those cases where no bolus is needed, its use might be detrimental as the lack of radiation scatter may be beneficial to the patient, although the 2% tolerance for dose calculation accuracy recommended in the AAPM TG-56 report is not fulfilled.

  5. Viability of Pushrod Dilatometry Techniques for High Temperature In-Pile Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. Daw; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. C. Crepeau

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the performance of new fuel, cladding, and structural materials for use in advanced and existing nuclear reactors, robust instrumentation is needed. Changes in material deformation are typically evaluated out-of-pile, where properties of materials are measured after samples were irradiated for a specified length of time. To address this problem, a series of tests were performed to examine the viability of using pushrod dilatometer techniques for in-pile instrumentation to measure deformation. The tests were performed in three phases. First, familiarity was gained in the use and accuracy of this system by testing samples with well defined thermal elongation characteristics. Second, high temperature data for steels, specifically SA533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) Low Alloy Steel and Stainless Steel 304 (SS304), found in Light Water Reactor (LWR) vessels, were aquired. Finally, data were obtained from a short pushrod in a horizontal geometry to data obtained from a longer pushrod in a vertical geometry, the configuration likely to be used for in-situ measurements. Results of testing show that previously accepted data for the structural steels tested, SA533B1 and SS304, are inaccurate at high temperatures (above 500 oC) due to extrpolation of high temperature data. This is especially true for SA533B1, as previous data do not account for the phase transformation of the material between 730 oC and 830 oC. Also, comparison of results for horizontal and vertical configurations show a maximum percent difference of 2.02% for high temperature data.

  6. High-stability cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope based on a closed-cycle cryostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackley, Jason D.; Kislitsyn, Dmitry A.; Beaman, Daniel K.; Nazin, George V., E-mail: gnazin@uoregon.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 1253 University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States); Ulrich, Stefan [RHK Technology, Inc., 1050 East Maple Road, Troy, Michigan 48083 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design and operation of a cryogenic ultra-high vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscope (STM) coupled to a closed-cycle cryostat (CCC). The STM is thermally linked to the CCC through helium exchange gas confined inside a volume enclosed by highly flexible rubber bellows. The STM is thus mechanically decoupled from the CCC, which results in a significant reduction of the mechanical noise transferred from the CCC to the STM. Noise analysis of the tunneling current shows current fluctuations up to 4% of the total current, which translates into tip-sample distance variations of up to 1.5 picometers. This noise level is sufficiently low for atomic-resolution imaging of a wide variety of surfaces. To demonstrate this, atomic-resolution images of Au(111) and NaCl(100)/Au(111) surfaces, as well as of carbon nanotubes deposited on Au(111), were obtained. Thermal drift analysis showed that under optimized conditions, the lateral stability of the STM scanner can be as low as 0.18 Å/h. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy measurements based on the lock-in technique were also carried out, and showed no detectable presence of noise from the closed-cycle cryostat. Using this cooling approach, temperatures as low as 16 K at the STM scanner have been achieved, with the complete cool-down of the system typically taking up to 12 h. These results demonstrate that the constructed CCC-coupled STM is a highly stable instrument capable of highly detailed spectroscopic investigations of materials and surfaces at the atomic scale.

  7. Feasibility of high volume sampling for determination of total suspended particulate matter and trace metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Meulen, A.; Hofschreuder, P.; van de Vate, J.F.; Oeseburg, F.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of the high volume sampling method (HVS) in extended control networks for the routine determination of total suspended particulate matter and trace metals, particularly traffic lead, has been explored. The HVS coarse particle sampling effectiveness obtained in wind tunnel studies is assumed to be indicative of the effectiveness under typical ambient meteorological conditions. For TSP, available data indicate the mass of the coarse fraction above 5 ..mu..m to range between about 10% and 90% of the total mass. Subsequently, when sampling TSP the total mass can be underestimated by up to appoximately 30%; the corresponding standard deviation is as high as approximately 15%. Differences in coarse particle sampling characteristics can result in systematic inter-HVS deviations up to 20% of the total mass. Traffic lead consists of a direct automotive tailpipe component (by and large below 30 ..mu..m) and a vehicular resuspended one (some 100-300 ..mu..m). Near the road the total (i.e., direct + resuspended) mass of traffic lead collected ranges from 70% to 120% of the direct automotive emissions; the corresponding TSP standard deviation can be as high as 15% owing to the contribution of resuspended lead. Away from the road (>50m) the resuspended component is depleted substantially due to deposition. Subsequently, the mass collected ranges between 70% and 110% of the direct lead; the standard deviation can be as high as 10%. The evaluation of the applicability of HVS under extreme wind speed situations is beyond the scope of this work. Under such conditions the coarse particle sampling effectiveness could be affected considerably. Hence under extreme situations the applicability of HVS should be left to the discretion of the user. 33 references.

  8. Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major objective of the coal-fired high performance power systems (HIPPS) program is to achieve significant increases in the thermodynamic efficiency of coal use for electric power generation. Through increased efficiency, all airborne emissions can be decreased, including emissions of carbon dioxide. High Performance power systems as defined for this program are coal-fired, high efficiency systems where the combustion products from coal do not contact the gas turbine. Typically, this type of a system will involve some indirect heating of gas turbine inlet air and then topping combustion with a cleaner fuel. The topping combustion fuel can be natural gas or another relatively clean fuel. Fuel gas derived from coal is an acceptable fuel for the topping combustion. The ultimate goal for HIPPS is to, have a system that has 95 percent of its heat input from coal. Interim systems that have at least 65 percent heat input from coal are acceptable, but these systems are required to have a clear development path to a system that is 95 percent coal-fired. A three phase program has been planned for the development of HIPPS. Phase 1, reported herein, includes the development of a conceptual design for a commercial plant. Technical and economic feasibility have been analysed for this plant. Preliminary R&D on some aspects of the system were also done in Phase 1, and a Research, Development and Test plan was developed for Phase 2. Work in Phase 2 include s the testing and analysis that is required to develop the technology base for a prototype plant. This work includes pilot plant testing at a scale of around 50 MMBtu/hr heat input. The culmination of the Phase 2 effort will be a site-specific design and test plan for a prototype plant. Phase 3 is the construction and testing of this plant.

  9. Neutron Halo Isomers in Stable Nuclei and their Possible Application for the Production of Low Energy, Pulsed, Polarized Neutron Beams of High Intensity and High Brilliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Habs; M. Gross; P. G. Thirolf; P. Böni

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to search for neutron halo isomers populated via $\\gamma$-capture in stable nuclei with mass numbers of about A=140-180 or A=40-60, where the $4s_{1/2}$ or $3s_{1/2}$ neutron shell model state reaches zero binding energy. These halo nuclei can be produced for the first time with new $\\gamma$-beams of high intensity and small band width ($\\le$ 0.1%) achievable via Compton back-scattering off brilliant electron beams thus offering a promising perspective to selectively populate these isomers with small separation energies of 1 eV to a few keV. Similar to single-neutron halo states for very light, extremely neutron-rich, radioactive nuclei \\cite{hansen95,tanihata96,aumann00}, the low neutron separation energy and short-range nuclear force allows the neutron to tunnel far out into free space much beyond the nuclear core radius. This results in prolonged half lives of the isomers for the $\\gamma$-decay back to the ground state in the 100 ps-$\\mu$s range. Similar to the treatment of photodisintegration of the deuteron, the neutron release from the neutron halo isomer via a second, low-energy, intense photon beam has a known much larger cross section with a typical energy threshold behavior. In the second step, the neutrons can be released as a low-energy, pulsed, polarized neutron beam of high intensity and high brilliance, possibly being much superior to presently existing beams from reactors or spallation neutron sources.

  10. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

  11. Tuning magnetic disorder in diluted magnetic semiconductors using high fields to 89 Tesla

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crooker, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Samarth, Nitin [PENN STATE U

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe recent and ongoing studies at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos using the new '100 Tesla Multi-Shot Magnet', which is presently delivering fields up to {approx}89 T during its commissioning. We discuss the first experiments performed in this magnet system, wherein the linewidth of low-temperature photoluminescence spectra was used to directly reveal the degree of magnetic alloy disorder 'seen' by excitons in single Zn{sub 0.80}Cd{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.08}Se quantum wells. The magnetic potential landscape in II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is typically smoothed when the embedded Mn{sup 2+} spins align in an applied field. However, an important (but heretofore untested) prediction of current models of compositional disorder is that magnetic alloy fluctuations in many DMS compounds should increase again in very large magnetic fields approaching 100 T. We observed precisely this increase above {approx}70 T, in agreement with a simple model of magnetic alloy disorder.

  12. HIGH-DENSITY, BIO-COMPATIBLE, AND HERMETIC ELECTRICAL FEEDTHROUGHS USING EXTRUDED METAL VIAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tooker, A; Shah, K; Tolosa, V; Sheth, H; Felix, S; Delima, T; Pannu, S

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Implanted medical devices such as pacemakers and neural prosthetics require that the electronic components that power these devices are protected from the harsh chemical and biological environment of the body. Typically, the electronics are hermetically sealed inside a bio-compatible package containing feedthroughs that transmit electrical signals, while being impermeable to particles or moisture. We present a novel approach for fabricating one of the highest densities of biocompatible hermetic feedthroughs in alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Alumina substrates with laser machined vias of 200 {mu}m pitch were conformally metallized and lithographically patterned. Hermetic electrical feedthroughs were formed by extruding metal studbumps partially through the vias. Hermeticity testing showed leak rates better than 9x10{sup -10} torr-l/s. Based on our preliminary results and process optimization, this extruded metal via approach is a high-density, low temperature, cost-effective, and robust method of miniaturizing electrical feedthroughs for a wide range of implantable bio-medical device applications.

  13. HIGH-DENSITY, BIO-COMPATIBLE, AND HERMETIC ELECTRICAL FEEDTHROUGHS USING EXTRUDED METAL VIAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, K G; Delima, T; Felix, S; Sheth, H; Tolosa, V; Tooker, A; Pannu, S S

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Implanted medical devices such as pacemakers and neural prosthetics require that the electronic components that power these devices are protected from the harsh chemical and biological environment of the body. Typically, the electronics are hermetically sealed inside a bio-compatible package containing feedthroughs that transmit electrical signals, while being impermeable to particles or moisture. We present a novel approach for fabricating one of the highest densities of biocompatible hermetic feedthroughs in alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Alumina substrates with laser machined vias of 200 {micro}m pitch were conformally metallized and lithographically patterned. Hermetic electrical feedthroughs were formed by extruding metal stud-bumps partially through the vias. Hermeticity testing showed leak rates better than 9 x 10{sup -10} torr-l/s. Based on our preliminary results and process optimization, this extruded metal via approach is a high-density, low temperature, cost-effective, and robust method of miniaturizing electrical feedthroughs for a wide range of implantable bio-medical device applications.

  14. Key Elements of and Materials Performance Targets for Highly Insulating Window Frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Grynning, Steinar; Arasteh, Dariush; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Goudey, Howdy

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal performance of windows is important for energy efficient buildings. Windows typically account for about 30-50 percent of the transmission losses though the building envelope, even if their area fraction of the envelope is far less. The reason for this can be found by comparing the thermal transmittance (U-factor) of windows to the U-factor of their opaque counterparts (wall, roof and floor constructions). In well insulated buildings the U-factor of walls, roofs an floors can be between 0.1-0.2 W/(m2K). The best windows have U-values of about 0.7-1.0. It is therefore obvious that the U-factor of windows needs to be reduced, even though looking at the whole energy balance for windows (i.e. solar gains minus transmission losses) makes the picture more complex.In high performance windows the frame design and material use is of utmost importance, as the frame performance is usually the limiting factor for reducing the total window U-factor further. This paper describes simulation studies analyzing the effects on frame and edge-of-glass U-factors of different surface emissivities as well as frame material and spacer conductivities. The goal of this work is to define materials research targets for window frame components that will result in better frame thermal performance than is exhibited by the best products available on the market today.

  15. Nanocomposite thin films for high temperature optical gas sensing of hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a plasmon resonance-based method for H.sub.2 sensing in a gas stream at temperatures greater than about 500.degree. C. utilizing a hydrogen sensing material. The hydrogen sensing material is comprised of gold nanoparticles having an average nanoparticle diameter of less than about 100 nanometers dispersed in an inert matrix having a bandgap greater than or equal to 5 eV, and an oxygen ion conductivity less than approximately 10.sup.-7 S/cm at a temperature of 700.degree. C. Exemplary inert matrix materials include SiO.sub.2, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3N.sub.4 as well as modifications to modify the effective refractive indices through combinations and/or doping of such materials. At high temperatures, blue shift of the plasmon resonance optical absorption peak indicates the presence of H.sub.2. The method disclosed offers significant advantage over active and reducible matrix materials typically utilized, such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) or TiO.sub.2.

  16. Gas breakdown driven by L band short-pulse high-power microwave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Yiming; Yuan Chengwei; Qian Baoliang [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High power microwave (HPM) driven gas breakdown is a major factor in limiting the radiation and transmission of HPM. A method that HPM driven gas breakdown could be obtained by changing the aperture of horn antenna is studied in this paper. Changing the effective aperture of horn antenna can adjust the electric field in near field zone, leading to gas breakdown. With this method, measurements of air and SF{sub 6} breakdowns are carried out on a magnetically insulated transmission-line oscillators, which is capable of generating HPM with pulse duration of 30 ns, and frequency of 1.74 GHz. The typical breakdown waveforms of air and SF{sub 6} are presented. Besides, the breakdown field strengths of the two gases are derived at different pressures. It is found that the effects of air and SF{sub 6} breakdown on the transmission of HPM are different: air breakdown mainly shortens the pulse width of HPM while SF{sub 6} breakdown mainly reduces the peak output power of HPM. The electric field threshold of SF{sub 6} is about 2.4 times larger than that of air. These differences suggest that gas properties have a great effect on the transmission characteristic of HPM in gases.

  17. Strontium ruthenate perovskites with high specific capacitance for use in electrochemical capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilde, P.M.; Guther, T.J.; Oesten, R.; Garche, J.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium ruthenates with the perovskite type structure ABO{sub 3} have been shown to exhibit attractive capacitive properties. Doping on the A site with La lead to typical capacitance values of 21 F/g. These materials were synthesized by coprecipitating metal hydroxides from a stoichiometric salt solution and subsequent firing at 800 C in air. In this paper the authors present a new procedure to synthesize the materials which are crystalline and nevertheless show appreciable capacitances in contrast to ruthenium dioxide material, which only works in a hydrated amorphous structure. The process basically consists in a pyrolysis of concentrated metal salt solutions of the respective chlorides and nitrates at 500 C for several minutes. Excess soluble phases are removed by washing out with water. X-ray diffraction experiments revealed similar phase purity and crystallinity as known from the coprecipitated materials. However the measured capacitances of undoped perovskites reached high values of 200 F/g exceeding twenty times the value of respective coprecipitated materials. First experiments on doping the materials promise further progress. The new synthesis route introduces a higher surface area by leaving cavities from leached soluble phases and bulk defects into the crystal structure. The first effect increases the number of active sites in contact with the electrolyte while the latter enhances the protonic conduction which is necessary to keep the charge balance within the material during cycling.

  18. Complex composite engineering architectures for nuclear and high-radiation environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kornreich, Drew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaidya, Rajendra U [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) is a novel overarching approach to bridge length and time scales in computational materials science and engineering. This approach integrates all elements of multi-scale modeling (including various empirical and science-based models) with materials informatics to provide users the opportunity to tailor material selections based on stringent application needs. Typically, materials engineering has focused on structural requirements (stress, strain, modulus, fracture toughness etc.) while multi-scale modeling has been science focused (mechanical threshold strength model, grain-size models, solid-solution strengthening models etc.). Materials informatics (mechanical property inventories) on the other hand, is extensively data focused. All of these elements are combined within the framework of ICME to create architecture for the development, selection and design new composite materials for challenging environments. We propose development of the foundations for applying ICME to composite materials development for nuclear and high-radiation environments (including nuclear-fusion energy reactors, nuclear-fission reactors, and accelerators). We expect to combine all elements of current material models (including thermo-mechanical and finite-element models) into the ICME framework. This will be accomplished through the use of a various mathematical modeling constructs. These constructs will allow the integration of constituent models, which in tum would allow us to use the adaptive strengths of using a combinatorial scheme (fabrication and computational) for creating new composite materials. A sample problem where these concepts are used is provided in this summary.

  19. The soft gamma-ray pulsar population: an high-energy overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuiper, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At high-energy gamma-rays (>100 MeV) the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite already detected more than 145 rotation-powered pulsars (RPPs), while the number of pulsars seen at soft gamma-rays (20 keV - 30 MeV) remained small. We present a catalogue of 18 non-recycled RPPs from which presently non-thermal pulsed emission has been securely detected at soft gamma-rays above 20 keV, and characterize their pulse profiles and energy spectra. For 14 of them we report new results, (re)analysing mainly data from RXTE, INTEGRAL, XMM-Newton and Chandra. The soft gamma-pulsars are all fast rotators and on average ~9.3x younger and ~ 43x more energetic than the Fermi LAT sample. The majority (11 members) exhibits broad, structured single pulse profiles, and only 6 have double (or even multiple, Vela) pulses. Fifteen soft gamma-ray pulsar show hard power-law spectra in the hard X-ray band and reach maximum luminosities typically in the MeV range. For only 7 of the 18 soft gamma-ray pulsars pulsed emission ha...

  20. Development of high productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejiri, T.; Hamamoto, N.; Hisada, S.; Iwasawa, K.; Kawakami, K.; Kokuryu, K.; Miyamoto, N.; Nogami, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasada, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashita, T. [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., LTD., 575, Kuze-tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2' is developed. In semiconductor manufacturing field, improvement of the productivity is continuously required. Especially mass production lines recently tend to use low energy beam and 2 pass implant for higher throughput. The 'Evo2' has been developed in an effort to fulfill these requirements. The 'Evo2' increases low energy beam current by 150 to 250% by applying electrostatic einzel lens called 'V-lens' installed at the exit of the Collimator magnet. This lens is also able to control the beam incident angle by adjusting the upper and lower electrode's voltages independently. Besides, mechanical scanning speed is enhanced to minimize process time of 2 pass implant, while also frequency of the fast beam scanning is enhanced to keep dose uniformity. In addition, a vacuum pumping capability at the target chamber is enhanced to reduce a vacuum waiting time during processing photo-resist wafers. This improvement achieved to reduce process time by 40% for a specific recipe. Furthermore, a modified Indirectly Heated Cathode with electron active Reflection 2 (IHC-R2) ion source which has a long life time filament has been installed. These new elements and/or functions have realized typically 25% improvement of productivity compared to standard EXCEED, and also improve a precise implantation capability.

  1. Heat transfer issues in high-heat-load synchrotron x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Mills, D.M.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a short description of the synchrotron radiation x-ray sources and the associated power loads is given, followed by a brief description of typical synchrotron components and their heat load. It is emphasized that the design goals for most of these components is to limit (a) temperature, (b) stresses, or (c) strains in the system. Each design calls for a different geometry, material selection, and cooling scheme. Cooling schemes that have been utilized so far are primarily single phase and include simple macrochannel cooling, microchannel cooling, contact cooling, pin-post cooling, porous-flow cooling, jet cooling, etc. Water, liquid metals, and various cryogenic coolants have been used. Because the trend in x-ray beam development is towards brighter (i.e., more powerful) beams and assuming that no radical changes in the design of x-ray generating machines occurs in the next few years, it is fair to state that the utilization of various effective cooling schemes and, in particular, two-phase flow (e.g., subcooled boiling) warrants further investigation. This, however, requires a thorough examination of stability and reliability of two-phase flows for high-heat-flux components operating in ultrahigh vacuum with stringent reliability requirements.

  2. Phase boundaries and deformation in high nitrogen duplex stainless steels; 1: Rolling texture development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akdut, N. (Inst. fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, Aachen (Germany). RWTH Aachen); Foct, J. (Univ. de Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq (France). Lab. de Metallurgie Physique)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The texture development during cold rolling of two nitrogen alloyed duplex stainless steels with different nitrogen contents and different microstructures were investigated. The fcc phases of both duplex steels show an almost identical texture development in contrast to the ferritic phases. In single phase ferritic steels a typical fiber type texture develops to slip on [110], [112] and [123] planes. In contrast to this, the ferritic phase of duplex steel D1 deforms mainly by slip on [110] planes so that no typical fiber type texture can be observed. The texture development of the cast specimen D2 is characterized by its random character in the ferritic phase. This proves that besides the microstructure, nitrogen strongly influences the deformation mechanisms. Furthermore, it appears that for both phases the intensities of the cold rolling textures decrease. Induced by the phase boundaries, strong shear components appear as well as the activation of additional slip systems and the refinement of the microstructure.

  3. The need for high-gate dielectrics and metal gates in advanced integrated circuits has reopened the door to Ge and IIIV compounds as potential replacements for silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    characterization techniques with first-principles simulations. Surface Defects and Passivation of Ge and III of Ge­Hf bonds at the interface, as recently predicted from first-principles simula- tions,24­26 as well to an epitaxial reactor, where it is baked in H2 at a typical temperature of 600­650°C to obtain a clean Ge

  4. 1 Draft 0.7 25/10/2004 17:12 EX/3-4 Equilibrium and Stability of High-Beta Plasmas in Wendelstein 7-AS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Stuart

    as the heating power was supplied or until the power handling capability of the plasma-facing components configuration. The decrease in beta for vacuum rotational transform field B=0.9 ­ 1.1 T and a vacuum rotational transform ext ~ 0.5. A typical example is shown in Fig. 1

  5. Klein-Nishina effects on the high-energy gamma-ray emission of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xiangyu [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China) and Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics (Nanjing University), Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prompt and long-lived high-energy (>100 MeV) gamma-ray emission has been detected by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) recently from more than ten gamma-ray bursts. It has been suggested that such emission is produced by synchrotron radiation of electrons accelerated in internal and external shocks. Here we show that, during both the prompt and early afterglow phase, inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of these electrons with synchrotron photons are typically in the Klein-Nishina (KN) regime. For the prompt emission, the KN effect may strongly suppress the IC component, which is consistent with one single spectral component seen in some strong bursts, such as in GRB080916C and GRB090217. The KN inverse-Compton cooling may also affect the low-energy electron number distribution and hence results in a low-energy synchrotron photon spectrum harder than the standard fast-cooling spectrum n({nu}){proportional_to}{nu}{sup -3/2}. During the early afterglow, KN effect leads to a low Compton-Y parameter, which is generally less than a few in the first tens of seconds for a wide range of parameter space. Furthermore, we suggest that the KN effect can explain the somewhat faster than expected decay of the early-time high-energy emission observed in some GRBs.

  6. The SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. III. Comparison with High-Resolution Spectroscopy of SDSS/SEGUE Field Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Allende Prieto; T. Sivarani; T. C. Beers; Y. S. Lee; L. Koesterke; M. Shetrone; C. Sneden; D. L. Lambert; R. Wilhelm; C. M. Rockosi; D. Lai; B. Yanny; I. I. Ivans; J. A. Johnson; W. Aoki; C. A. L. Bailer-Jones; P. Re Fiorentin

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report high-resolution spectroscopy of 125 field stars previously observed as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and its program for Galactic studies, the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). These spectra are used to measure radial velocities and to derive atmospheric parameters, which we compare with those reported by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP). The SSPP obtains estimates of these quantities based on SDSS ugriz photometry and low-resolution (R = 2000) spectroscopy. For F- and G-type stars observed with high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), we empirically determine the typical random uncertainties in the radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities delivered by the SSPP to be 2.4 km/s, 130 K (2.2%), 0.21 dex, and 0.11 dex, respectively, with systematic uncertainties of a similar magnitude in the effective temperatures and metallicities. We estimate random errors for lower S/N spectra based on numerical simulations.

  7. 3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring; Joe Hartvigsen

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-Electrolysis Grant Hawkes1, James O’Brien1, Carl Stoots1, Stephen Herring1 Joe Hartvigsen2 1 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, grant.hawkes@inl.gov 2 Ceramatec Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah INTRODUCTION A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. This paper presents CFD results of this model compared with experimental results. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to produce syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A strong interest exists in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. If biomass is used as the carbon source, the overall process is climate neutral. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. With the price of oil currently around $60 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of syn-gas production from CO2 and water, with no consumption of fossil fuels, and no production of greenhouse gases. Thermal CO2-splitting and water splitting for syn-gas production can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis, using high-temperature nuclear process heat and electricity. A high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-syn-gas conversion efficiency of 45 to 55%.

  8. Occupational Exposure to Benzene from Painting with Epoxy and Other High Performance Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JAHN, STEVEN

    2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the discovery of trace benzene in paint products, an assessment was needed to determine potential for benzene exposures to exceed the established ACGIH Threshold Limit Value (TLV) during painting operations. Sample data was collected by area industrial hygienists for benzene during routine maintenance and construction activities at Savannah River Site. A set of available data from the IH database, Sentry, was analyzed to provide guidance to the industrial hygiene staff and draw conclusions on the exposure potential during typical painting operations.

  9. Research and Development of High-Power and High-Energy Electrochemical Storage Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No, author

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The accomplishments and technology progressmade during the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26- 05NT42403 (duration: July 11, 2005 through April 30, 2014, funded for $125 million in cost- shared research) are summarized in this Final Technical Report for a total of thirty-seven (37) collaborative programs organized by the United States Advanced Battery Consortium, LLC (USABC). The USABC is a partnership, formed in 1991, between the three U.S. domestic automakers Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors, to sponsor development of advanced high-performance batteries for electric and hybrid electric vehicle applications. The USABC provides a unique opportunity for developers to leverage their resources in combination with those of the automotive industry and the Federal government. This type of pre-competitive cooperation minimizes duplication of effort and risk of failure, and maximizes the benefits to the public of the government funds. A major goal of this program is to promote advanced battery development that can lead to commercialization within the domestic, and as appropriate, the foreign battery industry. A further goal of this program is to maintain a consortium that engages the battery manufacturers with the automobile manufacturers and other key stakeholders, universities, the National Laboratories, and manufacturers and developers that supply critical materials and components to the battery industry. Typically, the USABC defines and establishes consensus goals, conducts pre-competitive, vehicle-related research and development (R&D) in advanced battery technology. The R&D carried out by the USABC is an integral part of the DOE’s effort to develop advanced transportation technologies that will significantly improve fuel economy, comply with projected emissions and safety regulations, and use domestically produced fuels. The USABC advanced battery development plan has the following three focus areas: 1. Existing technology validation, implementation, and cost reduction. 2. Identification of the next viable technology with emphasis on the potential to meet USABC cost and operating temperature range goals. 3. Support high-risk, high-reward battery technology R&D. Specific to the Cooperative Agreement DE- FC26-05NT42403, addressing High-Energy and High Power Energy Storage Technologies, the USABC focus was on understanding and addressing the following factors (listed in priority of effort): • Cost: Reducing the current cost of lithium- ion batteries (currently about 2-3 times the FreedomCAR target ($20/kW). • Low Temperature Performance: Improving the discharge power and removing lithium plating during regenerative braking. • Calendar Life: Achieving 15-year life and getting accurate life prediction. • Abuse Tolerance: Developing a system level tolerance to overcharge, crush, and high temperature exposure. This Final Technical Report compilation is submitted in fulfillment of the subject Cooperative Agreement, and is intended to serve as a ready-reference for the outcomes of following eight categories of projects conducted by the USABC under award from the DOE’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ) Vehicle Technologies Program: USABC DoE Final Report – DoE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-95EE50425 8 Protected Information 1. Electric Vehicle (EV) (Section A of this report) 2. Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) (Section B 3. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) (Section C) 4. Low-Energy Energy Storage Systems (LEESS) (Section D) 5. Technology Assessment Program (TAP) (Section E) 6. Ultracapacitors (Section F) 7. 12 Volt Start-Stop (Section G) 8. Separators (Section H) The report summarizes the main areas of activity undertaken in collaboration with the supplier community and the National Laboratories. Copies of the individual supplier final reports are available upon request. Using project gap analysis versus defined USABC goals in each area, the report documents known technology limits and provides direction on future areas of technology and performance needs for vehicle applicatio

  10. Production of low-sulfur binder pitch from high-sulfur Illinois coals. Technical report, December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to produce electrode binder pitch with sulfur content below 0.6 wt% from high-sulfur Illinois coal mild gasification liquids. In previous ICCI projects at IGT, flash thermocracking (FTC) was used to successfully upgrade the properties of mild gasification pitch, yielding a suitable blending stock for use as a binder in the production of carbon electrodes for the aluminum industry. However, in pitches from high-sulfur (4%) Illinois coal, the pitch sulfur content is still unacceptably high at 2%. In this project, two approaches to sulfur reduction are being explored in conjunction with FTC: (1) the use of conventionally cleaned coal with low ({approximately}1%) sulfur as a mild gasification feedstock, and (2) direct biodesulfurization of the liquids prior to FTC. In Case 1, the crude pitch is being produced by mild gasification of IBC-109 coal in an existing IGT bench-scale reactor, followed by distillation to isolate the crude pitch. In Case 2, the crude pitch for biodesulfurization was obtained from Illinois No. 6 coal tests conducted in the IGT mild gasification PRU in 1990. Biodesulfurization is to be performed by contacting the pitch with Rhodococcus Rhodochrous IGTS8 biocatalyst. Following preparation of the crude pitches, pitch upgrading experiments are to be conducted in a continuous FTC reactor constructed in previous ICCI-sponsored studies. The finished pitch is then characterized for physical and chemical properties (density, softening point, QI, TI, coking value, and elemental composition), and compared to typical specifications for binder pitches.

  11. Frequency of Solar-Like Systems and of Ice and Gas Giants Beyond the Snow Line from High-Magnification Microlensing Events in 2005-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, A; Gaudi, B S; Udalski, A; Bond, I A; Greenhill, J; Street, R A; Dominik, M; Sumi, T; Szymanski, M K; Han, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first measurement of planet frequency beyond the "snow line" for planet/star mass-ratios[-4.5200) microlensing events during 2005-8. The sample host stars have typical mass M_host 0.5 Msun, and detection is sensitive to planets over a range of projected separations (R_E/s_max,R_E*s_max), where R_E 3.5 AU sqrt(M_host/Msun) is the Einstein radius and s_max (q/5e-5)^{2/3}, corresponding to deprojected separations ~3 times the "snow line". Though frenetic, the observations constitute a "controlled experiment", which permits measurement of absolute planet frequency. High-mag events are rare, but the high-mag channel is efficient: half of high-mag events were successfully monitored and half of these yielded planet detections. The planet frequency derived from microlensing is a factor 7 larger than from RV studies at factor ~25 smaller separations [2

  12. A Very High Spectral Resolution Study of Ground-State OH Masers in W3(OH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Walter F. Brisken; Loránt O. Sjouwerman

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present VLBA observations of the ground-state hydroxyl masers in W3(OH) at 0.02 km s-1 spectral resolution. Over 250 masers are detected, including 56 Zeeman pairs. Lineshapes are predominantly Gaussian or combinations of several Gaussians, with normalized deviations typically of the same magnitude as in masers in other species. Typical FWHM maser linewidths are 0.15 to 0.38 km s-1 and are larger in the 1665 MHz transition than in the other three ground-state transitions. The satellite-line 1612 and 1720 MHz masers show no evidence of sigma^+/-2,3 components. The spatial positions of most masers are seen to vary across the line profile, with many spots showing clear, organized positional gradients. Equivalent line-of-sight velocity gradients in the plane of the sky typically range from 0.01 to 1 km s-1 AU-1 (i.e., positional gradients of 1 to 100 AU (km s-1)-1). Small velocity gradients in the 1667 MHz transition support theoretical predictions that 1667 MHz masers appear in regions with small velocity shifts along the amplification length. Deconvolved maser spot sizes appear to be larger in the line wings but do not support a spherical maser geometry.

  13. Side-by-Side Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To examine the energy, air leakage, and thermal performance of highly insulating windows, a field evaluation was undertaken in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built “Lab Homes” located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The “baseline” Lab Home B was retrofitted with “standard” double-pane clear aluminum-frame slider windows and patio doors, while the “experimental” Lab Home A was retrofitted with Jeld-Wen® triple-pane vinyl-frame slider windows and patio doors with a U-factor of 0.2 and solar heat gain coefficient of 0.19. To assess the window, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2012 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The measured energy savings in Lab Home B averaged 5,821 watt-hours per day (Wh/day) during the heating season and 6,518 Wh/day during the cooling season. The overall whole-house energy savings of Lab Home B compared to Lab Home A are 11.6% ± 1.53% for the heating season and 18.4 ± 2.06% for the cooling season for identical occupancy conditions with no window coverings deployed. Extrapolating these energy savings numbers based on typical average heating degree days and cooling degree days per year yields an estimated annual energy savings of 12.2%, or 1,784 kWh/yr. The data suggest that highly insulating windows are an effective energy-saving measure that should be considered for high-performance new homes and in existing retrofits. However, the cost effectiveness of the measure, as determined by the simple payback period, suggests that highly insulating window costs continue to make windows difficult to justify on a cost basis alone. Additional reductions in costs via improvements in manufacturing and/or market penetration that continue to drive down costs will make highly insulating windows much more viable as a cost-effective energy efficiency measure. This study also illustrates that highly insulating windows have important impacts on peak load, occupant comfort, and condensation potential, which are not captured in the energy savings calculation. More consistent and uniform interior temperature distributions suggest that highly insulated windows, as part of a high performance building envelope, may enable more centralized duct design and downsized HVAC systems. Shorter, more centralized duct systems and smaller HVAC systems to yield additional cost savings, making highly insulating windows more cost effective as part of a package of new construction or retrofit measures which achieve significant reductions in home energy use.

  14. Advanced Combustion and Emission Control Techical Team Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    engines and fewer cylinders. The power densities of such engines are typically high. Engines for Hybrid Application Hybrid electric vehicles have appeared for more than a...

  15. access devices evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unnecessarily long query processing times, since web accesses exhibit high and variable latency. Fortunately, web sources can be probed in parallel, and each source can typically...

  16. Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appen, Jan von

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    additional losses and the investment cost of appropriatelywhich require high investment costs. [4,5,9]. Since dynamicsizing implies higher investment cost upfront, and typical

  17. Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Phillip N.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tion, using an assumed resuspension rate. 4. Convert theright plot to a “resuspension” curve. Continue downward intoa given dose, a high resuspension rate, and a typical real-

  18. DOE Announces Webinars on Property Assessed Clean Energy Financing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars October 2: Live Webinar on High...

  19. Microsoft Word - 10PVSC_PVsim_rev31_CT edits_06 14 10_clean.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Each of the power supplies is a high-speed switching power supply that utilizes power MOSFET technology to minimize the output capacitor and inductor, which typically...

  20. EFFECT OF COULOMB COLLISIONS ON THE GRAVITATIONAL SETTLING OF LOW AND HIGH FIRST IONIZATION POTENTIAL ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bo, Iselin M. Th. [Piazza Europa 16, I-52026 Pian di Sco (Italy); Esser, Ruth [Institute of Science and Technology, University of Tromso, NO-9037 Tromso (Norway); Lie-Svendsen, Oystein, E-mail: iselinbo@online.no, E-mail: ruth.esser@uit.no, E-mail: Oystein.Lie-Svendsen@ffi.no [Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI), P.O. Box 25, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We model the effect of gravitational settling in the upper chromosphere on O, Fe, Si, and Ne, studying whether Coulomb collisions between ionized low First Ionization Potential (FIP) elements and protons is sufficient to cause abundance enhancements relative to oxygen. We find that low-FIP abundance enhancements comparable to observed values can be obtained provided the hydrogen ionization degree lies in the approximate range 10%-30%, which agrees with chromospheric models. Lower or higher hydrogen ionization causes the FIP-effect to become smaller or absent (depletion of all heavy elements). Iron must be almost fully ionized in order to become enriched relative to high-FIP elements, and this requires a high iron photoionization rate. The time scale necessary to produce the enrichment increases rapidly with increasing H ionization. For iron in a background from a semiempirical chromospheric model, with an H ion fraction of the order of 30%-40% in the upper chromosphere, 1-2 hr of settling is required to produce enhancements comparable to observations. The absolute abundance (relative to H), which monotonically decreases with time during settling, has by that time decreased by less than 50% in the same altitude region. With the same background conditions, the silicon abundance is more strongly enhanced by the settling than the iron abundance. The high-FIP element neon is depleted, relative to O and low-FIP elements, in the same background and altitude region where iron is enhanced, typically by 50% or more relative to O after 1-2 hr of settling.