National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for type wave basin

  1. Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarrensource HistoryOregon:WattQuizWaunitaWauseon,Basin

  2. Alden Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy ResourcesAirAlamoCalifornia:Wave Basin Jump to:

  3. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  4. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Deike; Benjamin Miquel; Pablo Gutiérrez-Matus; Timothée Jamin; Benoit Semin; Michael Berhanu; Eric Falcon; Félicien Bonnefoy

    2015-09-02

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely decaying gravity wave turbulence in the closed basin. No self-similar decay of the spectrum is observed, whereas its Fourier modes decay first as a time power law due to nonlinear mechanisms, and then exponentially due to linear viscous damping. We estimate the linear, nonlinear and dissipative time scales to test the time scale separation that highlights the important role of a large scale Fourier mode. By estimation of the mean energy flux from the initial decay of wave energy, the Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant is evaluated and found to be compatible with a recent theoretical value.

  5. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Deike; Benjamin Miquel; Pablo Gutiérrez-Matus; Timothée Jamin; Benoit Semin; Sébastien Aumaitre; Michael Berhanu; Eric Falcon; Félicien BONNEFOY

    2014-12-16

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely decaying gravity wave turbulence in the closed basin. No self-similar decay of the spectrum is observed, whereas its Fourier modes decay first as a time power law due to nonlinear mechanisms, and then exponentially due to linear viscous damping. We estimate the linear, nonlinear and dissipative time scales to test the time scale separation that highlights the important role of a large scale Fourier mode. By estimation of the mean energy flux from the initial decay of wave energy, the Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant is evaluated and found to be compatible with a recent theoretical value.

  6. Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynnMassachusetts:Ohio:WebsiteInformationHawthorneNewHayfield,Wave

  7. Sheets Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low EmissionTianhongKansas: Energy Resources JumpSheets Wave

  8. OTRC Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis, Minnesota:Nulato,Nyack, - Mining andChapterOTRC Wave

  9. International Collaborative Tsunamis, Storm Surge, and Wave-Structure Interaction Research Opportunities Using the Oregon State Multidirectional Wave Basin and Large Wave Flume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yim, Solomon C.

    1 International Collaborative Tsunamis, Storm Surge, and Wave-Structure Interaction Research experimental facility for tsunami and wave- structure interaction research, supported by the US National Science Foundation's Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) program. The Tsunami Wave Basin

  10. NEES Multidirectional Wave Basin for Tsunami Research Solomon C. Yim1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yim, Solomon C.

    -wave runup behavior is critical if we are to develop appropriate warning systems and evacuation strategiesNEES Multidirectional Wave Basin for Tsunami Research Solomon C. Yim1 , Harry H. Yeh2 , Daniel T requirements posed by tsunami researchers, with basin dimensions and wave generation capabilities closely

  11. Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An integrated 10-year study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgiou, Georgios

    Data bank Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An integrated 10-year Article history: Received 30 July 2013 Accepted 25 March 2014 Available online Keywords: Wave energy Numerical atmospheric Wave modeling a b s t r a c t The main characteristics of wave energy potential over

  12. Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An integrated 10-year study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgiou, Georgios

    that remains to be covered before wave energy science and technology reach the maturity level of its windData bank Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An integrated 10-year Article history: Received 30 July 2013 Accepted 25 March 2014 Available online Keywords: Wave energy

  13. P-WAVE TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC DATA INTERPRETATION AT RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P-WAVE TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC DATA INTERPRETATION AT RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO by Donald-lapse seismic surveys, shot by the Reservoir Characterization Project in the fall of 2003 and 2004, at Rulison seismic can monitor tight gas reservoirs, to a limited extent, over a short period of time. Repeat surveys

  14. DeFrees Small Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments Inc JumpIowa:Minnesota:DaylightingDeFrees Flume 1Small Wave

  15. University of Iowa Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnited States: Energy ResourcesPark CommunityWindIowa Wave

  16. Basin-scale availability of salmonid spawning gravel as influenced by channel type and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Basin-scale availability of salmonid spawning gravel as influenced by channel type and hydraulic roughness on salmonid spawning-gravel availability in mountain catchments. Digital elevation models more than 65% of the potential available spawning habitat at our study sites. Results further indicate

  17. P-wave re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with boulders (has been accepted for poster presentation at EAGE conference, Leipzig 1998)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    P-wave re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with boulders (has been accepted for poster to the computation of re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with four boulders located in the upper bed of the coal. Tselentis, pers. comm.). The model is composed of a low velocity layer, upper bed, four boulders, coal seam

  18. Parametric spatial solitary waves due to type II second-harmonic generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parametric spatial solitary waves due to type II second-harmonic generation Alexander V. Buryak either 1 or 2 is generated). A particular case of this three-wave interaction, formally described analyze (1 1)- and (2 1)-dimensional self-guided beams (spatial solitons) due to three-wave para- metric

  19. SMOOTH TYPE II BLOW UP SOLUTIONS TO THE FOUR DIMENSIONAL ENERGY CRITICAL WAVE EQUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphaël, Pierre

    SMOOTH TYPE II BLOW UP SOLUTIONS TO THE FOUR DIMENSIONAL ENERGY CRITICAL WAVE EQUATION MATTHIEU HILLAIRET AND PIERRE RAPHA¨EL Abstract. We exhibit C type II blow up solutions to the focusing energy critical wave equation in dimension N = 4. These solutions admit near blow up time a decomposiiton u(t, x

  20. Fast Traveling-Wave Reactor of the Channel Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusov, Vitaliy D; Vashchenko, Volodymyr N; Chernezhenko, Sergei A; Kakaev, Andrei A; Pantak, Oksana I

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to solve the technological problems of the TWR based on the technical concept described in our priority of invention reference, which makes it impossible, in particular, for the fuel claddings damaging doses of fast neutrons to excess the ~200 dpa limit. Thus the essence of the technical concept is to provide a given neutron flux at the fuel claddings by setting the appropriate speed of the fuel motion relative to the nuclear burning wave. The basic design of the fast uranium-plutonium nuclear traveling-wave reactor with a softened neutron spectrum is developed, which solves the problem of the radiation resistance of the fuel claddings material.

  1. Fast Traveling-Wave Reactor of the Channel Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitaliy D. Rusov; Victor A. Tarasov; Volodymyr N. Vashchenko; Sergei A. Chernezhenko; Andrei A. Kakaev; Oksana I. Pantak

    2015-04-06

    The main aim of this paper is to solve the technological problems of the TWR based on the technical concept described in our priority of invention reference, which makes it impossible, in particular, for the fuel claddings damaging doses of fast neutrons to excess the ~200 dpa limit. Thus the essence of the technical concept is to provide a given neutron flux at the fuel claddings by setting the appropriate speed of the fuel motion relative to the nuclear burning wave. The basic design of the fast uranium-plutonium nuclear traveling-wave reactor with a softened neutron spectrum is developed, which solves the problem of the radiation resistance of the fuel claddings material.

  2. Relations for a periodic array of flap-type wave energy converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renzi, Emiliano

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the interaction of plane incident waves with a wave farm in the open ocean. The farm consists of a periodic array of large flap-type wave energy converters. A linear inviscid potential-flow model, already developed by the authors for a single flap in a channel, is considered. Asymptotic analysis of the wave field allows to obtain new expressions of the reflection, transmission and radiation coefficients of the system. It is shown that, unlike a line of heaving buoys, an array of flap-type converters is able to exploit resonance of the system transverse modes in order to attain high capture factor levels. Relations between the hydrodynamic coefficients are derived and applied for optimising the power output of the wave farm.

  3. Wind waves in shallow microtidal basins and the dynamic equilibrium of tidal flats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    resuspension by wind waves and is applied to the Venice lagoon, Italy. Model results show that the equilibrium becomes emergent, the inundation period decreases, so that less sediment deposits leading to a reduction

  4. Kinematics of ICMEs/shocks: blast wave reconstruction using type II emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corona-Romero, P; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E; de-la-Luz, V; Mejia-Ambriz, J C

    2015-01-01

    We present a physical methodology to reconstruct the trajectory of interplanetary shocks using type II radio emission data. This technique calculates the shock trajectory assuming that the disturbance propagates as a blast wave in the interplanetary medium. We applied this Blast Wave Reconstruction (BWR) technique to analyze eight fast Earth-directed ICMEs/shocks associated with type II emissions. The technique deduces a shock trajectory that reproduces the type II frequency drifts, and calculates shock onset speed, shock transit time and shock speed at 1~AU. There were good agreements comparing the BWR results with the type II spectra, with data from coronagraph images, {\\it in situ} measurements, and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations. Perturbations on the type II data affect the accuracy of the BWR technique. This methodology could be applied to track interplanetary shocks causing TII emissions in real-time, to predict the shock arrival time and shock speed at 1~AU.

  5. Evidence for wave coupling in type III emissions P. Henri,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , within the frame of the quasi-linear theory, takes advantage of the turbulent state of the solar corona of the waves are used in order to check first the conservation of momentum and energy, through Fourier analyses emissions, J. Geophys. Res., 114, A03103, doi:10.1029/2008JA013738. 1. Introduction [2] Solar type III radio

  6. A classification of channel-reach morphology in mountain drainage basins synthesizes stream morphologies into seven distinct reach types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    ABSTRACT A classification of channel-reach morphology in mountain drainage basins synthesizes channel condition and response potential in mountain drainage basins. Field investigations demonstrate mountain channels and their lowland counterparts (e.g., Surell, 1841; Dana, 1850; Shaler, 1891

  7. Development and performance evaluation of an electromagnetic-type shock wave generator for lipolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, S. M., E-mail: liangsm@cc.feu.edu.tw; Yang, Z. Y. [Department of Industrial Design, Far East University, No. 49, Zhonghua Road, Xinshi District, Tainan City 744, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Industrial Design, Far East University, No. 49, Zhonghua Road, Xinshi District, Tainan City 744, Taiwan (China); Chang, M. H. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, East District, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, East District, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    This study aims at the design and development of electromagnetic-type intermittent shock wave generation in a liquid. The shock wave generated is focused at a focal point through an acoustic lens. This hardware device mainly consists of a full-wave bridge rectifier, 6 capacitors, a spark gap, and a flat coil. A metal disk is mounted in a liquid-filled tube and is placed in close proximity to the flat coil. Due to the repulsive force existing between the coil and disk shock waves are generated, while an eddy current is induced in the metal disk. Some components and materials associated with the device are also described. By increasing the capacitance content to enhance electric energy level, a highly focused pressure can be achieved at the focal point through an acoustic lens in order to lyse fat tissue. Focused pressures were measured at the focal point and its vicinity for different operation voltages. The designed shock wave generator with an energy intensity of 0.0016 mJ/mm{sup 2} (at 4 kV) and 2000 firings or higher energy intensities with 1000 firings is found to be able to disrupt pig fat tissue.

  8. Importance of wind conditions, fetch, and water levels on wave-generated shear stresses in shallow intertidal basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    Importance of wind conditions, fetch, and water levels on wave-generated shear stresses in shallow, and wind direction on water depth, fetch, and the resulting wave-generated shear stresses. We identify four. Wiberg (2009), Importance of wind conditions, fetch, and water levels on wave-generated shear stresses

  9. Wake of the flood: ascribing functions to the wave of type III effector proteins of phytopathogenic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dangl, Jeff

    Wake of the flood: ascribing functions to the wave of type III effector proteins of phytopathogenic cell for the pathogen's benefit. This is evidenced by the flood of effector genes that have recently

  10. Gravitational Wave Emission from the Single-Degenerate Channel of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Falta; Robert T. Fisher; Gaurav Khanna

    2011-05-28

    The thermonuclear explosion of a C/O white dwarf as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) generates a kinetic energy comparable to that released by a massive star during a SN II event. Current observations and theoretical models have established that SNe Ia are asymmetric, and therefore--like SNe II--potential sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. We perform the first detailed calculations of the GW emission for a SN Ia of any type within the single-degenerate channel. The gravitationally-confined detonation (GCD) mechanism predicts a strongly-polarized GW burst in the frequency band around 1 Hz. Third-generation spaceborne GW observatories currently in planning may be able to detect this predicted signal from SNe Ia at distances up to 1 Mpc. If observable, GWs may offer a direct probe into the first few seconds of the SNe Ia detonation.

  11. Quantum Noise in Differential-type Gravitational-wave Interferometer and Signal Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsushi Nishizawa; Seiji Kawamura; Masa-aki Sakagami

    2007-06-03

    There exists the standard quantum limit (SQL), derived from Heisenberg's uncertainty relation, in the sensitivity of laser interferometer gravitational-wave detectors. However, in the context of a full quantum-mechanical approach, SQL can be overcome using the correlation of shot noise and radiation-pressure noise. So far, signal recycling, which is one of the methods to overcome SQL, is considered only in a recombined-type interferometer such as Advanced-LIGO, LCGT, and GEO600. In this paper, we investigated quantum noise and the possibility of signal recycling in a differential-type interferometer. As a result, we found that signal recycling is possible and creates at most three dips in the sensitivity curve of the detector. Then, taking advantage of the third additional dip and comparing the sensitivity of a differential-type interferometer with that of a next-generation Japanese GW interferometer, LCGT, we found that SNR of inspiral binary is improved by a factor of 1.43 for neutron star binary, 2.28 for 50 M_sun black hole binary, and 2.94 for 100 M_sun black hole binary. We also found that power recycling to increase laser power is possible in our signal-recycling configuration of a detector.

  12. Decoupling vector wave equation, Proca and Maxwell equations in Petrov type N space-times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koray Düzta?; ?brahim Semiz

    2015-08-23

    In this work we use Newman-Penrose (NP) two-spinor formalism to derive decoupled equations for vector fields in Petrov type N space-times. In the NP formalism, a four vector can be represented by one complex and two real scalars. Then, a decoupled second order differential equation for one of the real scalars can be derived from the vector wave equation if the space-time is of type N. The solution for this scalar can --in principle-- be used to derive decoupled equations for the other scalars. These results can be directly applies to Proca equation for massive vector fields. We also evaluate Maxwell equations in terms of NP complex scalars of electromagnetism. We derive a decoupled second order differential equation for $\\phi_0$, valid in type N space-times. Substituting any solution for $\\phi_0$ in Maxwell equations, leads to two first order differential equations for $\\phi_1$. We show that these first order equations identically satisfy integrability conditions. Thus, any solution for $\\phi_0$ guarantees the existence of a solution for $\\phi_1$, via either of the first order differential equations.

  13. Evaluation of solitary waves as a mechanism for oil transport in poroelastic media: A case study of the South Eugene Island field, Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Ajit; Appold, Martin S.; Nunn, Jeffrey A.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrocarbons in shallow reservoirs of the Eugene Island 330 field in the Gulf of Mexico basin are thought to have migrated rapidly along low permeability sediments of the Red fault zone as discrete pressure pulses from source rocks at depths of about 4.5 km. The aim of this research was to evaluate the hypothesis that these pressure pulses represent solitary waves by investigating the mechanics of solitary wave formation and motion and wave oil transport capability. A two-dimensional numerical model of Eugene Island minibasin formation predicted overpressures at the hydrocarbon source depth to increase at an average rate of 30 Pa/yr, reaching 52 MPa by the present day and oil velocities of 1E�¢����12 m/yr, far too low for kilometer scale oil transport to fill shallow Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs within the 3.6 million year minibasin history. Calculations from a separate one-dimensional model that used the pressure generation rate from the two-dimensional model showed that solitary waves could only form and migrate within sediments that have very low permeabilities between 1E�¢����25 to 1E�¢����24 m2 and that are highly overpressured to 91-93% of lithostatic pressure. Solitary waves were found to have a maximum pore volume of 105 m3, to travel a maximum distance of 1-2 km, and to have a maximum velocity of 1E�¢����3 m/yr. Based on these results, solitary waves are unlikely to have transported oil to the shallowest reservoirs in the Eugene Island field in a poroelastic fault gouge rheology at the pressure generation rates likely to have been caused by disequilibrium compaction and hydrocarbon generation. However, solitary waves could perhaps be important agents for oil transport in other locations where reservoirs are closer to the source rocks, where the pore space is occupied by more than one fluid, or where sudden fracturing of overpressured hydrocarbon source sediments would allow the solitary waves to propagate as shock waves. Hydrocarbons in shallow reservoirs of the Eugene Island 330 field in the Gulf of Mexico basin are thought to have migrated rapidly along low permeability sediments of the Red fault zone as discrete pressure pulses from source rocks at depths of about 4.5 km. The aim of this research was to evaluate the hypothesis that these pressure pulses represent solitary waves by investigating the mechanics of solitary wave formation and motion and wave oil transport capability. A two-dimensional numerical model of Eugene Island minibasin formation predicted overpressures at the hydrocarbon source depth to increase at an average rate of 30 Pa/yr, reaching 52 MPa by the present day and oil velocities of 1E�¢����12 m/yr, far too low for kilometer scale oil transport to fill shallow Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs within the 3.6 million year minibasin history. Calculations from a separate one-dimensional model that used the pressure generation rate from the two-dimensional model showed that solitary waves could only form and migrate within sediments that have very low permeabilities between 1E�¢����25 to 1E�¢����24 m2 and that are highly overpressured to 91-93% of lithostatic pressure. Solitary waves were found to have a maximum pore volume of 100,000 m3, to travel a maximum distance of 1-2 km, and to have a maximum velocity of 1E�¢����3 m/yr. Based on these results, solitary waves are unlikely to have transported oil to the shallowest reservoirs in the Eugene Island field in a poroelastic fault gouge rheology at the pressure generation rates likely to have been caused by disequilibrium compaction and hydrocarbon generation. However, solitary waves could perhaps be important agents for oil transport in other locations where reservoirs are closer to the source rocks, where the pore space is occupied by more than one fl

  14. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

  15. General formulation for magnetohydrodynamic wave propagation, fire-hose, and mirror instabilities in Harris-type current sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hau, L.-N. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China); Lai, Y.-T. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    Harris-type current sheets with the magnetic field model of B-vector=B{sub x}(z)x-caret+B{sub y}(z)y-caret have many important applications to space, astrophysical, and laboratory plasmas for which the temperature or pressure usually exhibits the gyrotropic form of p{r_reversible}=p{sub Parallel-To }b-caretb-caret+p{sub Up-Tack }(I{r_reversible}-b-caretb-caret). Here, p{sub Parallel-To} and p{sub Up-Tack} are, respectively, to be the pressure component along and perpendicular to the local magnetic field, b-caret=B-vector/B. This study presents the general formulation for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation, fire-hose, and mirror instabilities in general Harris-type current sheets. The wave equations are expressed in terms of the four MHD characteristic speeds of fast, intermediate, slow, and cusp waves, and in the local (k{sub Parallel-To },k{sub Up-Tack },z) coordinates. Here, k{sub Parallel-To} and k{sub Up-Tack} are, respectively, to be the wave vector along and perpendicular to the local magnetic field. The parameter regimes for the existence of discrete and resonant modes are identified, which may become unstable at the local fire-hose and mirror instability thresholds. Numerical solutions for discrete eigenmodes are shown for stable and unstable cases. The results have important implications for the anomalous heating and stability of thin current sheets.

  16. MAGNETIC ROSSBY WAVES IN THE SOLAR TACHOCLINE AND RIEGER-TYPE PERIODICITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Carbonell, Marc; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.e E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.e

    2010-02-01

    Apart from the eleven-year solar cycle, another periodicity around 155-160 days was discovered during solar cycle 21 in high-energy solar flares, and its presence in sunspot areas and strong magnetic flux has been also reported. This periodicity has an elusive and enigmatic character, since it usually appears only near the maxima of solar cycles, and seems to be related with a periodic emergence of strong magnetic flux at the solar surface. Therefore, it is probably connected with the tachocline, a thin layer located near the base of the solar convection zone, where a strong dynamo magnetic field is stored. We study the dynamics of Rossby waves in the tachocline in the presence of a toroidal magnetic field and latitudinal differential rotation. Our analysis shows that the magnetic Rossby waves are generally unstable and that the growth rates are sensitive to the magnetic field strength and to the latitudinal differential rotation parameters. Variation of the differential rotation and the magnetic field strength throughout the solar cycle enhance the growth rate of a particular harmonic in the upper part of the tachocline around the maximum of the solar cycle. This harmonic is symmetric with respect to the equator and has a period of 155-160 days. A rapid increase of the wave amplitude could give rise to a magnetic flux emergence leading to observed periodicities in solar activity indicators related to magnetic flux.

  17. Characterization of Two Types of Silanol Groups on Fused-Silica Surfaces Using Evanescent-Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    -site Langmuir equation to determine the relative populations of two different types of isolated silanol groups. CV+ binding at type I sites yields a free energy of adsorption of -29.9 ( 0.2 kJ/mol and a saturation of interface studies for improving the efficiency of chromatographic separations. When cationic mol- ecules

  18. Observation of a New Type of Low Frequency Waves at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richter, I; Auster, H -U; Fruehauff, D; Goetz, C; Heinisch, P; Perschke, C; Motschmann, U; Stoll, B; Altwegg, K; Burch, J; Carr, C; Cupido, E; Eriksson, A; Henri, P; Goldstein, R; Lebreton, J -P; Mokashi, P; Nemeth, Z; Nilsson, H; Rubin, M; Szegoe, K; Tsurutani, B T; Vallat, C; Volwerk, M; Glassmeier, K -H

    2015-01-01

    We report on magnetic field measurements made in the innermost coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in its low activity state. Quasi-coherent, large-amplitude ($\\delta B/B \\sim 2$), compressional magnetic field oscillations at $\\sim$ 40 mHz dominate the immediate plasma environment of the nucleus. This differs from previously studied comet-interaction regions where waves at the cometary ion gyro-frequencies are the main feature. Thus classical pick-up ion driven instabilities are unable to explain the observations. We propose a cross-field current instability associated with newborn cometary ion currents as a possible source mechanism.

  19. Effects of liquid pore water on acoustic wave propagation in snow as a Biot-type porous material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidler, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    A method to estimate phase velocity and attenuation of acoustic waves in the presence of liquid water in a snowpack is presented. The method is based on Biot's theory of wave propagation in porous materials. Empirical relations and a priori information is used to characterize snow as a porous material as a function of porosity. Plane wave theory and an equivalent pore fluid are used to solve Biot's differential equations and to asses the impact of the air and water in the pore space. The liquid water in the pore space of a snow pack reduces the velocity of the first compressional wave by roughly 300 m/s for every 0.1 increase in liquid water saturation. Also the attenuation of the compressional waves is increased with increasing liquid water content. Two end member models for compaction are evaluated to asses the importance of an independent density measurement for an estimate of liquid pore water saturation in snow with acoustic waves. The two end members correspond to no compaction at all and to a melting s...

  20. Geophys. J. Int. (1991) 107, 433-447 Paris Basin VSPs: case history establishing combinations of fine-layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    1991-01-01

    Geophys. J. Int. (1991) 107, 433-447 Paris Basin VSPs: case history establishing combinations This paper examines shear-wave splitting in multi-offset VSPs at a borehole site in the Paris Basin basins. Key words: crack (EDA) and fine-layer (PTL) anisotropy, sedimentary basins, shear

  1. Wind-wave modelling aspects within complicate topography S. Christopoulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Wind-wave modelling aspects within complicate topography S. Christopoulos Division of Hydraulics. Wave forecasting aspects for basins with complicate geomorphology, such as the Aegean Sea) to reproduce wind patterns over special basins, as well as three wave models incorporating different physics

  2. Basin analysis in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leighton, M.W. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Haney, D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (USA)); Hester, N. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

    1990-05-01

    In April 1989, the Illinois State Geological Survey and the Indiana and Kentucky Geological surveys formed the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC) for the purpose of advancing the geologic understanding of the Illinois basin and of developing basin-wide studies for the assessment and wise development of the Illinois basin energy, mineral, and water resources. Cooperative efforts include work on the AAPG Interior Cratonic Sag Basin volume, Springfield coal study, Paducah CUSMAP study in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, Illinois Basin Cross Section Project, Geologic Society of America Coal Division field trip and workshop on Lower Pennsylvanian geology, workshops in basin analysis, and the Tri-State Committee on correlations in the Pennsylvanian System of the Illinois Basin. A network of 16 regional surface to basement cross sections portraying the structural and stratigraphic framework of the total sedimentary section of the entire basin is in preparation. Based on more than 140 of the deepest wells with wireline logs, the sections will show formation boundaries and gross lithofacies of the entire stratigraphic column. A set of basin-wide maps shows structure, thickness, and coal quality of the economically important Springfield coal seam. These maps were generated from recently joined computerized databases of the three member surveys of IBC. A unified stratigraphic nomenclature of the Pennsylvanian System is being developed, including seven new members and seven new formation names. The goal is to simplify, standardize, and gradually improve the stratigraphic terminology to be used in the Illinois basin.

  3. Elastic wave propagation in an irregularly layered medium Rossana Vaia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komatitsch, Dimitri

    Sismologie (URA 195), Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4, Place Jussieu, 75252 -Paris Cedex 05, France by basin-induced surface waves (Kawase [1]). Analytical solutions of elastic wave propagation problems

  4. Plasma wave measurements with STEREO S/WAVES: Calibration, potential model, and preliminary results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Plasma wave measurements with STEREO S/WAVES: Calibration, potential model, and preliminary results] The S/WAVES experiments on the two STEREO spacecraft measure waves, both in situ plasma waves and remotely generated waves such as Type II and Type III solar bursts. A part of the experiment is aimed

  5. Master1GologiedesRservoirsDynamiquedesBassins-MichelSranne 2-Geodynamics of Sedimentary Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattin, Rodolphe

    ) N. Faults => initial subsidence d) LAB isotherm uplift =>increased geotherm a) Stop of extensional subsidence in rift basins (measured in borehole) True for any type of basin #12;13 Master1Géologiedes

  6. Simplified vibratory characterization of alluvial basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semblat, Jean-François; Duval, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    For the analysis of seismic wave amplification, modal methods are interesting tools to study the modal properties of geological structures. Modal approaches mainly lead to information on such parameters as fundamental frequencies and eigenmodes of alluvial basins. For a specific alluvial deposit in Nice (France), a simplified modal approach involving the Rayleigh method is considered. This approach assumes a set of admissible shape functions for the eigenmodes and allows a fast estimation of the fundamental frequency of the basin. The agreement between modal numerical results and experimental ones is satisfactory. The simplified modal method then appears as an efficient mean for the global vibratory characterization of geological structures towards resonance.

  7. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Basin Michigan 0.0192 0.0202 W 0.0188 W W W W 0.0246 3.1 W Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin New Jersey W W W W W W W W...

  8. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Basin Michigan 0.0174 0.0186 W 0.0182 W W W W 0.0269 5.6 W Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin New Jersey W W W W W W W W...

  9. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  10. Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to:Hilltop,Hinsdale County,1

  11. Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to:Hilltop,Hinsdale County,12

  12. Analytical solutions for energy spectra of electrons accelerated by nonrelativistic shock-waves in shell type supernova remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Zirakashvili; F. Aharonian

    2007-10-26

    %context {Recent observations of hard X-rays and very high energy gamma-rays from a number of young shell type supernova remnants indicate the importance of detailed quantitative studies of energy spectra of relativistic electrons formed via diffusive shock acceleration accompanied by intense nonthermal emission through synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering.} %aim {The aim of this work was derivation of exact asymptotic solutions of the kinetic equation which describes the energy distribution of shock-accelerated electrons for an arbitrary energy-dependence of the diffusion coefficient.} %method {The asymptotic solutions at low and very high energy domains coupled with numerical calculations in the intermediate energy range allow analytical presentations of energy spectra of electrons for the entire energy region.} %results {Under the assumption that the energy losses of electrons are dominated by synchrotron cooling, we derived the exact asymptotic spectra of electrons without any restriction on the diffusion coefficient. We also obtained simple analytical approximations which describe, with accuracy better than ten percent, the energy spectra of nonthermal emission of shock-accelerated electrons due to the synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering.} %conclusions {The results can be applied for interpretation of X-ray and gamma-ray observations of shell type supernova remnants, as well as other nonthermal high energy source populations like microquasars and large scale synchrotron jets of active galactic nuclei.

  13. Intrashelf basins: A geologic model for source-bed and reservoir facies deposition within carbonate shelves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, G. Jr. (Sauid Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-09-01

    Intrashelf basins (moats, inshore basins, shelf basins, differentiated shelf, and deep-water lagoons of others) are depressions of varying sizes and shapes that occur within tectonically passive and regionally extensive carbonate shelves. Intrashelf basins grade laterally and downdip (seaward) into shallow-water carbonates of the regional shelf, are separated from the open marine basin by the shelf margin, and are largely filled by fine-grained subtidal sediments having attributes of shallow- and deeper water sedimentation. These basins are commonly fringed or overlain by carbonate sands, reefs, or buildups. These facies may mimic those that occur along the regional shelf margin, and they can have trends that are at a high angle to that of the regional shelf. Intrashelf basins are not intracratonic basins. The history of most intrashelf basins is a few million to a few tens of million of years. Examples of intrashelf basins are known throughout the Phanerozoic; the southern portion of the Holocene Belize shelf is a modern example of an intrashelf basin. Two types of intrashelf basins are recognized. Coastal basins pass updip into coastal clastics of the craton with the basin primarily filled by fine clastics. Shelf basins occur on the outer part of the shelf, are surrounded by shallow-water carbonate facies, and are filled by peloidal lime mud, pelagics, and argillaceous carbonates. Intrashelf basins are commonly the site of organic-rich, source-bed deposition, resulting in the close proximity of source beds and reservoir facies that may fringe or overlie the basin. Examples of hydrocarbon-charged reservoirs that were sourced by an intrashelf basin include the Miocene Bombay High field, offshore India; the giant Jurassic (Arab-D) and Cretaceous (Shuaiba) reservoirs of the Arabian Shelf; the Lower Cretaceous Sunniland trend, South Florida basin; and the Permian-Pennsylvanian reservoirs surrounding the Tatum basin in southeastern New Mexico.

  14. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  15. Quantum-like gravity waves and vortices in a classical fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Nottale

    2009-01-09

    We have recently proposed a new general concept of macroscopic quantum-type experiment. It amounts to transform a classical fluid into a quantum-type fluid by the application of a quantum-like potential, either directly in a stationary configuration, or through a retro-active loop to simulate the time evolution. In this framework, the amplitude of the quantum potential depends on a macroscopic generalization of the Planck constant, which can be changed during the experiment, therefore simulating a quantum to classical transition. The experiment is exemplified here by an application of this concept to gravity waves at the surface of an incompressible liquid in a basin of finite height, with particular emphasis on the quantized vortex. We construct a complex wave function with the height of the fluid in the basin as its square modulus and the velocity potential as its phase. This wave function is solution of a nonlinear Schrodinger equation typical of superfluids. The quantum potential is therefore defined here in terms of the square root of the fluid height. We suggest two methods for applying this quantum-like potential to the fluid: (i) by the action of a force on the surface (wind, blower, pressure, field, etc...); (ii) by a curvature of the basin ground. In this last case the ground profile yields the quantum potential itself, while usually only the quantum force is accessible, so that such an experiment is expected to provide one with a macroscopic model of a quantum-type vacuum energy. These results may also be relevant to the study of freak waves, which have already been described by nonlinear Schrodinger equations.

  16. Scholte waves generated by seafloor topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    2012-01-01

    Seafloor topography can excite strong interface waves called Scholte waves that are often dispersive and characterized by slow propagation but large amplitude. This type of wave can be used to invert for near seafloor shear ...

  17. Does extreme internal-wave breaking matter for ocean mixing? J.A. MacKinnon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKinnon, Jennifer

    a substantial risk to offshore oil platforms [Cai et al., 2003]. However, internal waves are often perceived of the energy escapes to propagate up to thousands of km across ocean basins as low-mode waves [St. Lau- rent

  18. 2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand of waves. A #12;2011 Waves - 2 A standing wave is caused by superposing two similar (same frequency

  19. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  20. GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-05-08

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

  1. Mariner's Guide For Hurricane Awareness In The North Atlantic Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariner's Guide For Hurricane Awareness In The North Atlantic Basin Eric J. Holweg eholweg.navy.mil/data/oceans/gulfstream.html Hurricane Preparedness & Tracks: http://www.fema.gov/fema/trop.htm Time Zone Conversions: http.....................................................................................................2 · Tropical Wave · Tropical Disturbance · Tropical Depression · Tropical Storm · Hurricane

  2. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  3. Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

  4. Coronal shock waves observed in images H. S. Hudson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Hugh

    . The large-scale coronal shock waves observed from radio type II bursts and from More- ton waves have proven surprisingly difficult to detect in coronal images. I review the evidence for such waves in radio, optical, EUV-scale waves. The discovery of radio type II bursts showed immediately that these waves became shocks

  5. Analyzing Displacement Term's Memory Effect in a van der Pol Type Boundary Condition to Prove Chaotic Vibration of the Wave Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sze-Bi

    Chaotic Vibration of the Wave Equation Goong Chen Department of Mathematics, Texas A&M University College it is now known that chaotic vibration occurs. However, if the right-end van der Pol boundary condition technical difficulty arises as to how to define and determine chaotic vibration of the system. In this paper

  6. Wave Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Carcione, F. Cavallini, Simulation of waves in porn-viscoelastic rocks Saturated by immiscible ?uids. Numerical evidence ofa second slow wave,]. Comput.

  7. An electromagnetic analog of gravitational wave memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lydia Bieri; David Garfinkle

    2013-09-10

    We present an electromagnetic analog of gravitational wave memory. That is, we consider what change has occurred to a detector of electromagnetic radiation after the wave has passed. Rather than a distortion in the detector, as occurs in the gravitational wave case, we find a residual velocity (a "kick") to the charges in the detector. In analogy with the two types of gravitational wave memory ("ordinary" and "nonlinear") we find two types of electromagnetic kick.

  8. SHEAR WAVE TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MONITORING OF A TIGHT GAS SANDSTONE RESERVOIR, RULISON FIELD, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHEAR WAVE TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MONITORING OF A TIGHT GAS SANDSTONE RESERVOIR, RULISON FIELD focused specifically on the use of time-lapse (4D) poststack migrated shear-wave seismic data of shear wave data as a tool for monitoring 4D changes. The basin centered tight gas sandstone reservoir

  9. Modelling complex flood flow evolution in the middle Yellow River basin, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    Modelling complex flood flow evolution in the middle Yellow River basin, China Hongming He a January 2008 KEYWORDS Flood routing; Backwater flow; The middle Yellow River; River morphology Summary Flood routing processes in the middle Yellow River basin are complex since they consist of three types

  10. Heun equation, Teukolsky equation, and type-D metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Batic; H. Schmid

    2007-01-15

    Starting with the whole class of type-D vacuum backgrounds with cosmological constant we show that the separated Teukolsky equation for zero rest-mass fields with spin $s=\\pm 2$ (gravitational waves), $s=\\pm 1$ (electromagnetic waves) and $s=\\pm 1/2$ (neutrinos) is an Heun equation in disguise.

  11. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  12. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  13. Petroleum systems of Jianghan Basin, Hubel Province, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, A.E.; Schaps, S.; McGregor, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Jianghan Basin is a Cretaceous-Tertiary nonmarine rift basin superimposed on a late Precambrian to Jurassic passive margin and foreland basin succession deformed by mid-Mesozoic folding and thrusting. Hence the basin has potential for superimposed petroleum systems. Oil production is established in a Tertiary petroleum system developed in two major depocenters, the Jiangling (west) and Qianjiang (east) Depressions. Lacustrine source beds in the early Eocene Xingouzhui and late Eocene Qianjiang Formations generated hydrocarbons during local maximum basin fill in the Oligocene to present. Very early, low temperature generation of petroleum occurs where Type 1S Qianjiang Formation kerogen is present. Tertiary fluvial and deltaic sandstones form reservoirs that trap oil in highs or rollover structures formed by normal faulting and salt movement. The pre-rift section contains large folds and good source-beds, but has high exploration risk. Factors limiting effectiveness of older petroleum systems are: (1) Uplift and erosion of thrust structures; (2) Overmaturation of pre-Permian source rocks prior to folding and thrusting; (3) Limited extent of secondary maturation of Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic source beds; and (4) Disruption of older traps and seals by widespread normal faulting. Production of hydrocarbons from Permian and Triassic rocks to the west of Hubei suggests that further seismic work and drilling are merited to evaluate pre-Tertiary potential in the Jianghan Basin.

  14. Petroleum systems of Jianghan Basin, Hubel Province, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, A.E. ); Schaps, S.; McGregor, D. )

    1996-01-01

    The Jianghan Basin is a Cretaceous-Tertiary nonmarine rift basin superimposed on a late Precambrian to Jurassic passive margin and foreland basin succession deformed by mid-Mesozoic folding and thrusting. Hence the basin has potential for superimposed petroleum systems. Oil production is established in a Tertiary petroleum system developed in two major depocenters, the Jiangling (west) and Qianjiang (east) Depressions. Lacustrine source beds in the early Eocene Xingouzhui and late Eocene Qianjiang Formations generated hydrocarbons during local maximum basin fill in the Oligocene to present. Very early, low temperature generation of petroleum occurs where Type 1S Qianjiang Formation kerogen is present. Tertiary fluvial and deltaic sandstones form reservoirs that trap oil in highs or rollover structures formed by normal faulting and salt movement. The pre-rift section contains large folds and good source-beds, but has high exploration risk. Factors limiting effectiveness of older petroleum systems are: (1) Uplift and erosion of thrust structures; (2) Overmaturation of pre-Permian source rocks prior to folding and thrusting; (3) Limited extent of secondary maturation of Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic source beds; and (4) Disruption of older traps and seals by widespread normal faulting. Production of hydrocarbons from Permian and Triassic rocks to the west of Hubei suggests that further seismic work and drilling are merited to evaluate pre-Tertiary potential in the Jianghan Basin.

  15. Repository site definition in basalt: Pasco Basin, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzowski, R.V.; Nimick, F.B.; Muller, A.B.

    1982-03-01

    Discussion of the regional setting, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Pasco Basin are included in this report. Pasco basin is a structural and topographic basin of approximately 2000 mi/sup 2/ (5180 km/sup 2/) located within the Yakima Fold Belt Subprovince of the Columbia Plateau. The stratigraphic sequence within the basin consists of an undetermined thickness of lower Miocene and younger flood basalts with interbedded and overlying sedimentary units. This sequence rests upon a basement of probably diverse rock types that may range in age from precambrian through early Tertiary. Although a large amount of information is available on the hydrology of the unconfined aquifer system, ground-water flow within the basin is, in general, poorly understood. Recharge areas for the Mabton interbed and the Saddle Mountains Formation are the highlands surrounding the basin with the flow for these units toward Gable Butte - Gable Mountain and Lake Wallula. Gable Butte - Gable Mountain probably is a ground-water sink, although the vertical flow direction in this zone is uncertain. The amount of upward vertical leakage from the Saddle Mountains Formation into the overlying sediments or to the Columbia River is unknown. Units underlying the Mabton interbed may have a flow scheme similar to those higher units or a flow scheme dominated by interbasin flow. Upward vertical leakage either throughout the basin, dominantly to the Columbia River, or dominantly to Lake Wallula has been proposed for the discharge of the lower units. None of these proposals is verified. The lateral and vertical distribution of major and minor ions in solution, Eh and pH, and ion exchange between basalt and ground-water are not well defined for the basin. Changes in the redox potential from the level of the subsurface facility to the higher stratigraphic levels along with the numerous other factors influencing K/sub d/, result in a poor understanding of the retardation process.

  16. Wave Energy Extraction from buoys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnaud, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Different types of Wave Energy Converters currently tested or under development are using the vertical movement of floating bodies to generate electricity. For commercial applications, arrays have to be considered in order ...

  17. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  18. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio. The Sound Waves simulation becomes the source of an analogical mapping to Radio Waves. Concepts Radio Waves 1 - Sound Waves references water waves 2 - Water is analogy for Sound Waves 3 - Radio

  19. Caribbean basin framework, 2: Northern Central America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyburski, S.A.; Gordon, M.B.; Mann, P. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1991-03-01

    There are four Jurassic to Recent basin-forming periods in northern Central America (honduras, Honduran Borderlands, Belize, Guatemala, northern Nicaragua): (1) Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rifting and subsidence along normal faults in Honduras and Guatemala; rifts are suggested but are not well defined in Honduras by the distribution of clastic sediments and associated volcanic rocks. Rifting is attributed to the separation of Central America from the southern margin of the North American plate; (2) Cretaceous subsidence recorded by the development of a Cretaceous carbonate platform in Honduras, Guatemala, and Belize; subsidence is attributed to thermal subsidence of the rifted margins of the various blocks; (3) Late Cretaceous-Recent development of a volcanic arc along the western margin of Middle America and the northern margin of Honduras; (4) Late Cretaceous large-scale folding in Honduras, ophiolite obduction, and formation of a foredeep basin in Guatemala (Sepur trough); deformation is attributed to the collision between a north-facing arc in northern Honduras and the Nicaraguan Rise and the passive margin of Guatemala and Belize; and (5) Eocene to Recent strike-slip faulting along the present-day North American-Caribbean plate boundary in Guatemala, northern Honduras, and Belize. Strike-slip faults and basins form a California-type borderlands characterized by elongate basins that appear as half-grabens in profile. Counterclockwise rotation of the central honduras plateau, a thicker and topographically higher-than-average block within the plate boundary zone, is accommodated by rifting or strike-slip faults at its edges.

  20. Experimental Measurements and Numerical Prediction of the Effect of Waves on Mooring Line Forces for a Container Ship Moored to Pile Supported and Solid Wall Docks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luai, Andres B

    2013-05-03

    The conditions of a moored container ship are examined by a physical model in a wave basin and by a numerical simulation. Each condition, wave period, significant wave height and wave direction, was isolated and tested for a 50:1 scale model of a...

  1. Instability of large solitary water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiwu Lin

    2008-03-03

    We consider the linearized instability of 2D irrotational solitary water waves. The maxima of energy and the travel speed of solitary waves are not obtained at the highest wave, which has a 120 degree angle at the crest. Under the assumption of non-existence of secondary bifurcation which is confirmed numerically, we prove linear instability of solitary waves which are higher than the wave of maximal energy and lower than the wave of maximal travel speed. It is also shown that there exist unstable solitary waves approaching the highest wave. The unstable waves are of large amplitude and therefore this type of instability can not be captured by the approximate models derived under small amplitude assumptions. For the proof, we introduce a family of nonlocal dispersion operators to relate the linear instability problem with the elliptic nature of solitary waves. A continuity argument with a moving kernel formula is used to study these dispersion operators to yield the instability criterion.

  2. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  3. Wave Motion Unit code: MATH35012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    MATH35012 Wave Motion Unit code: MATH35012 Credit Rating: 10 Unit level: Level 3 Teaching period This course unit aims to elucidate some of the physical properties of important types of wave motion and their mathematical descriptions. Overview Wave motion occurs in the oceans, atmosphere and in the earth. Problems

  4. The Wave of the Future 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info The wave of the future.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 10577 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name The wave of the future.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 The Wave of the Future Story by Courtney Swyden THEWAVE OF THE FUTURE tx H2O | pg. 2 Plans use local involvement to enhance water quality Comprehensive watershed protection plans,outlining ways to preserve or restore water-sheds, are becoming a popular...

  5. Reservoir development in bryozoan bafflestone facies of the Ullin (Warsaw) Limestone (Middle Mississippian) in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasemi, Z.; Treworgy, J.D.; Norby, R.D.; Grube, J.P. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Recent drilling in Enfield South and Johnsonville fields in southern Illinois has encountered prolific petroleum-producing zones within the Ullin (Warsaw) Limestone. This and large cumulative production from a number of older wells in the Illinois basin indicate that the Ullin has greater reservoir potential than previously recognized. The Ullin reservoir facies is mainly a fenestrate bryozoan-dominated bafflestone developed on the flanks of Waulsortian-type mud mounds or on transported skeletal sand buildups. Subsurface geology and petrography reveal such porous bryozoan bafflestone facies (some with shows of oil) at various horizons within the Ullin. However, in part because of water problems in some areas, only the upper part of the Ullin has been tested thus far and, as a result, significant reservoirs in the deeper part of the unit may have been missed. Preliminary data indicate several facies in the Ullin that vary in their aerial distribution in the basin. These facies include (1) skeletal sand-wave facies and/or bryozoan bafflestone in the upper Ullin, (2) bryozoan bafflestone with a dense Waulsortian mud mound core, (3) thick bryozoan bafflestone over a skeletal grainstone facies, and (4) thick mud mound-dominated facies with thin porous flanking bafflestone/grainstone facies. Areas with facies type 1 and 2 have the highest potential for commercial reservoir development. Facies type 3, although quite porous, is commonly wet, and the porous facies type 4 may be localized and not extensive enough to be commercial. Petrographic examination shows excellent preservation of primary intra- and interparticle porosities within the bryozoan bafflestone facies. The generally stable original mineralogy prevented extensive dissolution-reprecipitation and occlusion of porosity. Further, the stable mineralogy and minor early marine cementation prevented later compaction and burial diagenesis.

  6. Wave–current interaction in the presence of a three-dimensional bathymetry: Deep water wave focusing in opposing current conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, V. Charland, J. Touboul, J.

    2014-09-15

    Large scale experiments were carried out in the Ocean Engineering Basin FIRST, France. A tri-dimensional bathymetry consisting of two symmetrical submerged mounds was displayed on the flat bed on both sides of the basin. Regular waves of frequency corresponding to deep water conditions above the bathymetry were generated in opposing current conditions. A strong tri-dimensional behaviour is observed for the wave amplitude, leading to a strong focusing (up to twice the incident amplitude) of the wave energy towards the central deeper zone. This amplification cannot be ascribed to the increase of the current intensity in the main wave direction, nor to a current gradient normally to the wave direction. A wave phase gradient, normal to its main direction, is observed up-wave (or downstream) the mounds. This phase lag depends on the wave amplitude, it is the higher for the moderate amplitude case. The experimental data are compared with calculations of a refraction-diffraction model assuming a depth-averaged current. If the model qualitatively predicts the wave amplification in the centerline of the basin, discrepancies are observed in the vicinity of the depth changes. The observed mean current vertical profile shape is then supposed to play a significant role in the wave focusing, especially near the steep slopes down-stream the mounds. In addition, the waves are found to modify substantially both horizontal and vertical current fields.

  7. Vacuum Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson

    2012-12-11

    As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

  8. Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    movements on an array of strike-slip and normal fault systems have resulted in the uplift and preservation of older basins in modern ranges. One of the best exposed of these is...

  9. A Unique Large-Scale, Multidirectional Basin for Collaborative Tsunami and Coastal Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pancake, Cherri M.

    -wave runup behavior is critical if we are to develop appropriate warning systems and evacuation strategiesA Unique Large-Scale, Multidirectional Basin for Collaborative Tsunami and Coastal Research Solomon a unique laboratory for the tsunami and coastal engineering communities. Under the Network for Earthquake

  10. WCCE ECCE TCCE Joint Conference: EARTHQUAKE & TSUNAMI BASIN SCALE TSUNAMI PROPAGATION MODELING USING BOUSSINESQ MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    WCCE ­ ECCE ­ TCCE Joint Conference: EARTHQUAKE & TSUNAMI 1 BASIN SCALE TSUNAMI PROPAGATION-scale tsunami modeling are based on the shallow water equations and neglect frequency dispersion effects in wave propagation. Recent studies on tsunami modeling revealed that such tsunami models may not be satisfactory

  11. Free energy basin-hopping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland-Cash, K.H.; Wales, D.J.; Chakrabarti, D.

    2015-02-17

    A global optimisation scheme is presented using basin-hopping with the acceptance criterion based on approximate free energy for the corresponding local minima of the potential energy. The method is illustrated for atomic and colloidal clusters...

  12. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  13. Basin analog approach answers characterization challenges of unconventional gas potential in frontier basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Kalwant

    2007-04-25

    in exploratory basins. We developed software, Basin Analog System (BAS), to perform and accelerate the process of identifying analog basins. Also, we built a database that includes geologic and petroleum systems information of intensely studied North America...

  14. Gravity waves in a rotating basin - normal modes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Thomas Clark

    1966-01-01

    of this research is the determination of the proper value of sigma which satisfies all of the necessary boundary conditions. Since the inner boundary conditions are specified, only the outer boundary remains to be satisfied. With the wall condition, equation... for sigma, the proper value of sigma can be obtained by systematic trial and error methods. The initial step in the method is determining the magnitude and range of the sigma array. A magnitude of sigma in the proximity of the Coriolis parameter, f...

  15. DeFrees Large Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments Inc JumpIowa:Minnesota:DaylightingDeFrees Flume 1

  16. L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: EnergyKulpsville, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to:Kyle, Texas:O

  17. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

  18. CORONAL WAVES, SHOCK FORMATION AND CORONAL MASS Received: . . . . . . ; Accepted: . . . . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Hugh

    waves was recognized early from the radio type II bursts, for which the high brightness temperaturesCORONAL WAVES, SHOCK FORMATION AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS Received: . . . . . . ; Accepted: . . . . . . Table of Contents 1 Shocks, blast waves, piston driven shocks 2 2 Identification of coronal waves 3 3

  19. POINTWISE GREEN FUNCTION BOUNDS AND STABILITY OF COMBUSTION WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texier, Benjamin - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

    POINTWISE GREEN FUNCTION BOUNDS AND STABILITY OF COMBUSTION WAVES GREGORY LYNG, MOHAMMADREZA ROOFI for traveling wave solutions of an abstract viscous combustion model including both Majda's model and the full-wave) approximation. Notably, our results apply to combustion waves of any type: weak or strong, detonations or defla

  20. The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x MegaWave2 System Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x Volume Two MegaWave2 System Library;Contents MegaWave2 System Library Contents 2 Contents 1 Introduction 6 1.1 What you will find in this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2 The MegaWave2 memory (internal) types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.3 File

  1. Fractional Electromagnetic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Gómez; J. J. Rosales; J. J. Bernal; V. I. Tkach; M. Guía

    2011-08-31

    In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

  2. The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x MegaWave2 System Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x Volume Two MegaWave2 System Library://www.cmla.ens-cachan.fr/Cmla/Megawave #12; Contents MegaWave2 System Library Contents 2 Contents 1 Introduction 6 1.1 What you will #12;nd) types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.3 File (external) types or #12;le formats

  3. Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wenyan 1983-

    2012-10-02

    potential in a target basin by finding a geological analog that has been explored enough that its resource potential is fully understood. In 2006, Singh developed a basin analog system BASIN (Basin Analog Systems INvestigation) in detail that could rapidly...

  4. The geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.E.; Keith, T.E.C. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); Hutchinson, R.A. (US National Park Service (US))

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone Caldera, one of the largest volcanic features of its type in the world. Hydrothermal activity may have been continuous for {gt}100,000 years B.P. Norris Basin includes the highest erupting geyser of recent water types, colors of organisms and inorganic precipitates, frequent changes in activity and chemistry, and very high subsurface temperatures ({gt}240{degrees}C). Norris Basin is only a part of the Norris-Mammoth Corridor that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. Norris Basin has a heat flow roughly 10 percent of that of the Yellowstone Caldera and requires an estimated 0.01 km{sup 3} of rhyolitic magma per year-a quantity far greater than the corridor's rate of eruption.

  5. Wave Propagation in Multiferroic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Scott Macklin

    2013-01-01

    130 SAW Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . .QuasiStatic MEE Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General MEE Wave Solution . . . . . . . . . . . .

  6. On a class of self-similar 2D surface water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sijue Wu

    2012-06-11

    We construct a class of self-similar surface water waves and study its properties. This class of surface waves appears to be in very good agreement with a common type of wave crests in the ocean.

  7. The Preliminary Guides to the MegaWave2 Software, Versions 2.x Volume Two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Two MegaWave2 System Library by Jacques FromentWave2 System Library Contents * * 2 Contents 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * *. . . . . . . . . 6 1.2 The MegaWave2 memory (internal) types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * *. . . . . . 6

  8. Theoretical and experimental study of nonlinear internal gravity wave beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabaei Befrouei, Ali, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    Continuously stratified fluids, like the atmosphere and the oceans, support internal gravity waves due to the effect of buoyancy. This type of wave motion is anisotropic since gravity provides a preferred direction. As a ...

  9. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions B. R. Sutherland fluid, vertically propagating internal gravity waves of moderately large amplitude can become unstable, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  10. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the Fifteenmile Creek Basin. This goal was addressed under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 703 (c) (1) - Action Item 4.2. Construction of fish...

  11. Water War in the Klamath Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carchidi, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Review: Water War in the Klamath Basin: Macho Law, CombatHolly and A. Dan Tarlock. Water War in the Klamath Basin:has rights to the limited water. Birds and ecosystems; fish

  12. Rainfall Generator for the Rhine Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandsma, Theo

    Rainfall Generator for the Rhine Basin Multi-site generation of weather variables by nearest +31.320.249218 #12;2 Rainfall Generator for the Rhine Basin #12;Multi-site generation of weather

  13. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  14. Multiple Oscillatory Modes of the Argentine Basin. Part II: The Spectral Origin of Basin Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijer, Wilbert

    Multiple Oscillatory Modes of the Argentine Basin. Part II: The Spectral Origin of Basin Modes et Approches Numériques, Paris, France SARAH T. GILLE Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla In this paper the spectrum of barotropic basin modes of the Argentine Basin is shown to be connected

  15. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hereman, Willy

    2013-01-01

    Encyclopedic article covering shallow water wave models used in oceanography and atmospheric science. Sections: Definition of the Subject; Introduction and Historical Perspective; Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations; Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics; Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions; Numerical Methods; Water Wave Experiments and Observations; Future Directions, and Bibliography.

  16. H-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  17. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The State of the Columbia River Basin Draft Fiscal Year 2009 ANNUAL REPORT To Congress and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish Basin, and a synopsis of the major activities of the Council during the fiscal year ending September 30

  18. Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAKENAS, B.J.

    1999-03-15

    Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period.

  19. Weakly Turbulent Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Compressible Low-{beta} Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2008-12-05

    In this Letter, weak-turbulence theory is used to investigate interactions among Alfven waves and fast and slow magnetosonic waves in collisionless low-{beta} plasmas. The wave kinetic equations are derived from the equations of magnetohydrodynamics, and extra terms are then added to model collisionless damping. These equations are used to provide a quantitative description of a variety of nonlinear processes, including parallel and perpendicular energy cascade, energy transfer between wave types, 'phase mixing', and the generation of backscattered Alfven waves.

  20. Inhomogeneous High Frequency Expansion-Free Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

    2007-06-18

    We describe a natural inhomogeneous generalization of high frequency plane gravitational waves. The waves are high frequency waves of the Kundt type whose null propagation direction in space-time has vanishing expansion, twist and shear but is not covariantly constant. The introduction of a cosmological constant is discussed in some detail and a comparison is made with high frequency gravity waves having wave fronts homeomorphic to 2-spheres.

  1. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for July, August, and September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2006-12-08

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring at the K Basins during July, August, and September 2006. Conditions remain very similar to those reported in the previous quarterly report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of basin water to the ground. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified in the coming quarters as a consequence of remedial action at KE Basin, i.e., removal of sludge and basin demolition.

  2. Basin and Petroleum System Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfander, Götz

    and development costs of new reserves and existing fields is immense: drilling wells, for example, may consume up to 85% of the total exploratory funds. Thus, the decision to drill should be taken in a sensible way of sedimentary basins and their hydrocarbon fluids. Executive Master Programme Participants will be able

  3. Wave variability and wave spectra for wind generated gravity waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretschneider, Charles L.

    1959-01-01

    A series of experiments of forces on a fixed vertical truncated column due to Stokes 5th order like waves were done in a wave tank. An effort was made to generate the waves as close as possible to theoretical Stokes 5th order waves. A systematic...

  4. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cabaret; P. Béquin; G. Theocharis; V. Andreev; V. E. Gusev; V. Tournat

    2015-01-09

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  5. Laminated Wave Turbulence: Generic Algorithms I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kartashova; A. Kartashov

    2006-09-07

    The model of laminated wave turbulence presented recently unites both types of turbulent wave systems - statistical wave turbulence (introduced by Kolmogorov and brought to the present form by numerous works of Zakharov and his scientific school since nineteen sixties) and discrete wave turbulence (developed in the works of Kartashova in nineteen nineties). The main new feature described by this model is the following: discrete effects do appear not only in the long-wave part of the spectral domain (corresponding to small wave numbers) but all through the spectra thus putting forth a novel problem - construction of fast algorithms for computations in integers of order $10^{12}$ and more. In this paper we present a generic algorithm for polynomial dispersion functions and illustrate it by application to gravity and planetary waves.

  6. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Water waves over arrays of horizontal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    )). More recently, the effect of Bragg resonance on the efficiency of certain types of wave-energy device

  7. Wind extremes in the North Sea Basin under climate change: An ensemble study of 12 CMIP5 GCMs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Wind extremes in the North Sea Basin under climate change: An ensemble study of 12 CMIP5 GCMs R. C levels and waves are generated by low atmospheric pressure and severe wind speeds during storm events. As a result of the geometry of the North Sea, not only the maximum wind speed is relevant, but also wind

  8. Guidelines in Wave Energy Conversion System Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiberteau, K. L.; Liu, Y.; Lee, J.; Kozman, T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an investigational study on wave energy converters (WECs). The types of WEC available from the market are studied first. The design considerations for implementing a WEC in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) are then evaluated...

  9. Deepwater Internal Wave Study and Application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Lei

    2013-12-10

    conforming to the physics of internal waves and to study the effects on offshore drilling semisubmersibles, different types of offshore hull forms and riser systems, including the large diameter cold water pipe of floating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion...

  10. Localization of Classical Waves I: Acoustic Waves.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Localization of Classical Waves I: Acoustic Waves. Alexander Figotin \\Lambda Department, 1997 Abstract We consider classical acoustic waves in a medium described by a position dependent mass the existence of localized waves, i.e., finite energy solutions of the acoustic equations with the property

  11. Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry An interferometer is an instrument that is sensitive to the interference of two or more waves (optical or acoustic). For example, an optical interferometer uses two interfering light beams to measure small length changes. Coda wave interferometry

  12. Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

  13. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER ARNAUD ROUGIREL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER MODEL ARNAUD ROUGIREL Abstract. In a context where for buoy-type ocean wave energy converter. The simplest model for this scheme is a non autonomous piecewise and periodic solutions, and compare the energy performance of this novel WEC with respect to the one of wave

  14. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for January, February, and March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes the results of groundwater monitoring near the K Basins for the period January, February, and March 2007.

  15. Wave-Packet Revivals for Quantum Systems with Nondegenerate Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Bluhm; Alan Kostelecky; Bogdan Tudose

    1996-09-26

    The revival structure of wave packets is examined for quantum systems having energies that depend on two nondegenerate quantum numbers. For such systems, the evolution of the wave packet is controlled by two classical periods and three revival times. These wave packets exhibit quantum beats in the initial motion as well as new types of long-term revivals. The issue of whether fractional revivals can form is addressed. We present an analytical proof showing that at certain times equal to rational fractions of the revival times the wave packet can reform as a sum of subsidiary waves and that both conventional and new types of fractional revivals can occur.

  16. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Appalachian Basin Florida W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W 20.35 W 64.82 31.4% 1,715 W 75.9% Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland 19.73 19.64 -0.4%...

  17. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Deep-Water Breaking Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brucker, Kyle A; Dommermuth, Douglas G; Adams, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The formulation of a canonical deep-water breaking wave problem is introduced, and the results of a set of three-dimensional numerical simulations for deep-water breaking waves are presented. In this paper fully nonlinear progressive waves are generated by applying a normal stress to the free surface. Precise control of the forcing allows for a systematic study of four types of deep-water breaking waves, characterized herein as weak plunging, plunging, strong plunging, and very strong plunging.

  18. Dendritic Actin Filament Nucleation Causes Traveling Waves and Patches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders E. Carlsson

    2010-05-28

    The polymerization of actin via branching at a cell membrane containing nucleation-promoting factors is simulated using a stochastic-growth methodology. The polymerized-actin distribution displays three types of behavior: a) traveling waves, b) moving patches, and c) random fluctuations. Increasing actin concentration causes a transition from patches to waves. The waves and patches move by a treadmilling mechanism which does not require myosin II. The effects of downregulation of key proteins on actin wave behavior are evaluated.

  19. Wave Energy Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity.

  20. Wave Control Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    focussing: in crossing seas due to coastal or submarine convergences. Moreover, (rogue) wave energy devices maker to create the highest rogue wave? geometry and dynamo in a new rogue wave energy device? maximum

  1. Timing and Tectonic implications of basin inversion in the Nam Con Son Basin and adjacent areas, southern South China Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Christopher Charles

    2001-01-01

    The Nam Con Son (NCS) Basin, located offshore of SE Vietnam, is one of several Tertiary rift basins that formed during initial Eocene(?)-Oligocene rifting. Following cessation of rifting at the end of Oligocene time, these basins were subjected...

  2. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for October, November, and December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-03-22

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring at the K Basins during October, November, and December 2006. Conditions remained very similar to those reported in the previous quarterly report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of basin water to the ground. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified in the coming months as a consequence of new wells having been installed near KW Basin as part of a pump-and-treat system for chromium contamination, and new wells installed between the KE Basin and the river to augment long-term monitoring in that area.

  3. Data Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to: navigation, searchDaimler Evonik JVDaofu CoBasin Jump to:

  4. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  5. Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio Grande and Buckman Wellfield Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio Grande and Buckman...

  6. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  7. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix...

  8. EIS-0522: Melvin R. Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EIS-0522: Melvin R. Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project; Kittitas County, Washington EIS-0522: Melvin R. Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project; Kittitas County,...

  9. Fast Computation Algorithm for Discrete Resonances among Gravity Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Kartashova

    2006-05-25

    Traditionally resonant interactions among short waves, with large real wave-numbers, were described statistically and only a small domain in spectral space with integer wave-numbers, discrete resonances, had to be studied separately in resonators. Numerical simulations of the last few years showed unambiguously the existence of some discrete effects in the short-waves part of the wave spectrum. Newly presented model of laminated turbulence explains theoretically appearance of these effects thus putting a novel problem - construction of fast algorithms for computation of solutions of resonance conditions with integer wave-numbers of order $10^3$ and more. Example of such an algorithm for 4-waves interactions of gravity waves is given. Its generalization on the different types of waves is briefly discussed.

  10. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond Angélil; Prasenjit Saha

    2015-05-20

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics - rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches - we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  11. 2010 Expenditures Report Columbia River Basin Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tables 27 Table 1A: Total Cost of BPA Fish & Wildlife Actions 29 Table 1B: Cumulative Expenditures 1978 and habitat, of the Columbia River Basin that have been affected by hydroelectric development. This program fish and wildlife affected by hydropower dams in the Columbia River Basin. The Power Act requires

  12. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Contact Information David Tarboton Utah State University of Utah 135 South 1460 East Rm 719 Salt Lake City, Utah (801) 581-5033 wjohnson. The Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory development team is highly committed to this concept

  13. 6, 839877, 2006 Mexico City basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    emitters of air pollutants leading to negative health effects and environmental degradation. The rate altitude basin with air pollutant concentrations above the health limits most days of the year. A mesoscale-dimensional wind patterns in25 the basin and found that the sea-breeze transports the polluted air mass up the moun

  14. Financial Sustainability of International River Basin Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    Financial Sustainability of International River Basin Organizations Final Report #12;Published by financing of a sample of African, Asian and European River Basin Organizations (RBOs). Its focus contributions to cov- er their regular run-ning costs. To a degree, the financial challenges some African RBOs

  15. urricane activity in the Atlantic basin increased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with levels in the 1970s and 1980s. For example, the accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index in the Atlantic of disturbances. Bottom: annual number (Aug­Oct) of North Atlantic basin hurricanes (1980­2005). See figures 2, is a crucial question for the future outlook of hurricane activity in the basin. It is difficult to distinguish

  16. On the tuning of a wave-energy driven oscillating-water-column seawater pump to polychromatic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godoy-Diana, Ramiro

    2007-01-01

    Performance of wave-energy devices of the oscillating water column (OWC) type is greatly enhanced when a resonant condition with the forcing waves is maintained. The natural frequency of such systems can in general be tuned to resonate with a given wave forcing frequency. In this paper we address the tuning of an OWC sea-water pump to polychromatic waves. We report results of wave tank experiments, which were conducted with a scale model of the pump. Also, a numerical solution for the pump equations, which were proven in previous work to successfully describe its behavior when driven by monochromatic waves, is tested with various polychromatic wave spectra. Results of the numerical model forced by the wave trains measured in the wave tank experiments are used to develop a tuning criterion for the sea-water pump.

  17. VENTURA BASIN LOS ANGELES BASIN CENTRAL COASTAL BASIN W Y T

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa.E. Great Basin OilVENTURA

  18. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  19. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-06-01

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  20. APMA 935 Analysis & Computation of Models Spring 2008 Waves & Stability in Models for Fluids & Geofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muraki, David J.

    & Geofluids The propagation of waves represents one of the fundamental mechanisms for the transport of energy and geophysical flows. Many of the new types of waves and instabilities introduced through these buoyancy effects captures an at- mospheric wave off the Australian coast, as evidenced by cloud and sea surface waves

  1. Chemical Wave Packet Propagation, Reflection, and Spreading Lingfa Yang and Irving R. Epstein*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Lingfa

    Chemical Wave Packet Propagation, Reflection, and Spreading Lingfa Yang and Irving R. Epstein 02454-9110 ReceiVed: May 8, 2002; In Final Form: July 10, 2002 Chemical waves can travel in well-defined packets. Two types of phase wave packets, distinguished by whether their component waves move toward

  2. Big Flippin' Wave Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Verdes, Campus Point, Coal Oil Point (Sands) Waves propagate perpendicular to isobaths (lines of constant

  3. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves nonlinear waves. Throughout the theory is based on the traditional assumptions that water is inviscid

  4. MHD Wave Propagation in the Neighbourhood of Two Null Points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. McLaughlin; A. W. Hood

    2007-12-11

    The nature of fast magnetoacoustic and Alfv\\'en waves is investigated in a zero $\\beta$ plasma in the neighbourhood of a pair of two-dimensional null points. This gives an indication of wave propagation in the low $\\beta$ solar corona, for a more complicated magnetic configuration than that looked at by McLaughlin & Hood (2004). It is found that the fast wave is attracted to the null points and that the front of the wave slows down as it approaches the null point pair, with the wave splitting and part of the wave accumulating at one null and the rest at the other. Current density will then accumulate at these points and ohmic dissipation will then extract the energy in the wave at these points. This suggests locations where wave heating will occur in the corona. The Alfv\\'en wave behaves in a different manner in that the wave accumulates along the separatrices. Hence, the current density will accumulate at this part of the topology and this is where wave heating will occur. However, the phenomenon of wave accumulation at a specific place is a feature of both wave types, and illustrates the importance of studying the topology of the corona when considering MHD wave propagation.

  5. Anelastic Limits for Euler Type Systems Didier Bresch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Métivier, Guy

    the acoustic wave disappears in a pure pressure term for the limit equation. The decoupling also occurs acoustic waves. The first example studied in this paper enters this category: it is a shallow-water type in infinite domains where the fast acoustic waves are rapidly dispersed at infinity and therefore have no time

  6. Neuse River Basin, North Carolina Ecosystem Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Neuse River Basin, North Carolina Ecosystem Restoration Project 5 October 2012 ABSTRACT: The study area encompasses the Neuse River Basin, the third-largest river basin in North Carolina. The Basin, upstream of the city of New Bern, North Carolina. At New Bern the river broadens dramatically and changes

  7. SUTTER BASIN, SUTTER & BUTTE COUNTIES, CA FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SUTTER BASIN, SUTTER & BUTTE COUNTIES, CA FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT 22 October 2013 ABSTRACT: The purpose of the Sutter Basin Project is to reduce overall flood risk to the Sutter Basin study area the risk to property damage due to flooding to the Sutter Basin area located in the Sutter and Butte

  8. Enforceable Security Policies Revisited DAVID BASIN, ETH Zurich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basin, David

    A Enforceable Security Policies Revisited DAVID BASIN, ETH Zurich VINCENT JUG´E, MINES Paris: Basin, D., Jug´e, V., Klaedtke, F., Zalinescu, E. Enforceable Security Policies Revisited. To appear is an extended version of the conference paper [Basin et al. 2012a]. Author's addresses: D. Basin, F. Klaedtke

  9. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  10. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 94, No. 6, pp. 22222228, December 2004 A Shallow Shear-Wave Velocity Transect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 1997) provisions (Building Seismic Safety Council [BSSC], 1998) sites are categorized for shaking-wave velocity measure- ments in the basin to be able to assess the success of alter- native NEHRP classification. Ambient seismic noise (vehicle traffic, etc.) excited Rayleigh waves in urban alluvium, eliminating

  11. The geometry of electron wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminov, Yurii A

    2013-02-28

    To each wave function we assign a codimension-two submanifold in Euclidean space. We study the case of the wave function of a single electron in the hydrogen atom or other hydrogen-type atoms with quantum numbers n, l, m in detail. We prove theorems describing the behaviour of the scalar and sectional curvature of the constructed submanifold, depending on the quantum numbers. We also consider the external geometry of the submanifold. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  12. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for April, May, and June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-08-08

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring near the K Basins during April, May, and June 2007. Conditions remained similar to those reported in the previous quarter’s report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of shielding water from either basin to the ground. During the current quarter, the first results from two new wells installed between KE Basin and the river became available. Groundwater conditions at each new well are reasonably consistent with adjacent wells and expectations, with the exception of anomalously high chromium concentrations at one of the new wells. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified for FY 2008 to take advantage of new wells recently installed near KW Basin as part of a pump-and-treat system for chromium contamination, and also the new wells recently installed between the KE Basin and the river, which augment long-term monitoring capability in that area.

  13. the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

  14. Direct simulation and deterministic prediction of large-scale nonlinear ocean wave-field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Guangyu, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    Despite its coarse approximation of physics, the phase-averaged wave spectrum model has been the only type of tool available for ocean wave prediction in the past 60 years. With the rapid advances in sensing technology, ...

  15. Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

  16. The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

  17. K-Basins S/RIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.J.

    1995-09-22

    The Standards/Requirements Identification Document(S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility

  18. K-Basins S/RIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    The Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES{ampersand}H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility.

  19. September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK at BINGHAMTON research programs in geochemistry, sedimentary geology, or Earth surface processes with the potential the position, visit the Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies website (www.geology

  20. Flathead Basin Commission Act of 1983 (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the Flathead Basin Commission, the purpose of which is to protect the Flathead Lake aquatic environment, its waters, and surrounding lands and natural resources. The Commission...

  1. River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

  2. WindWaveFloat Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alla Weinstein, Dominique Roddier, Kevin Banister

    2012-03-30

    Principle Power Inc. and National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) have completed a contract to assess the technical and economic feasibility of integrating wave energy converters into the WindFloat, resulting in a new concept called the WindWaveFloat (WWF). The concentration of several devices on one platform could offer a potential for both economic and operational advantages. Wind and wave energy converters can share the electrical cable and power transfer equipment to transport the electricity to shore. Access to multiple generation devices could be simplified, resulting in cost saving at the operational level. Overall capital costs may also be reduced, provided that the design of the foundation can be adapted to multiple devices with minimum modifications. Finally, the WindWaveFloat confers the ability to increase energy production from individual floating support structures, potentially leading to a reduction in levelized energy costs, an increase in the overall capacity factor, and greater stability of the electrical power delivered to the grid. The research conducted under this grant investigated the integration of several wave energy device types into the WindFloat platform. Several of the resulting system designs demonstrated technical feasibility, but the size and design constraints of the wave energy converters (technical and economic) make the WindWaveFloat concept economically unfeasible at this time. Not enough additional generation could be produced to make the additional expense associated with wave energy conversion integration into the WindFloat worthwhile.

  3. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. I. ACOUSTIC AND INERTIA-GRAVITY WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Imamura, T.; Read, P. L.; Luz, D.; Piccialli, A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes.

  4. Relativistic Quaternionic Wave Equation II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II J. Math. Phys.Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II Charles Schwartzcomponent quaternionic wave equation recently introduced. A

  5. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

  6. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long WaveShort Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave­Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW 1Ã , Hiu Ning CHAN 1 online June 11, 2013) The long wave­short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution equations

  7. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. Significant interactions and energy transfer can1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase

  8. Elastic interface acoustic waves in twinned crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Destrade

    2013-04-30

    A new type of Interface Acoustic Waves (IAW) is presented, for single-crystal orthotropic twins bonded symmetrically along a plane containing only one common crystallographic axis. The effective boundary conditions show that the waves are linearly polarized at the interface, either transversally or longitudinally. Then the secular equation is obtained in full analytical form using new relationships for the displacement-traction quadrivector at the interface. For Gallium Arsenide and for Silicon, it is found that the IAWs with transverse (resp. longitudinal) polarization at the interface are of the Stoneley (resp. leaky) type.

  9. Internal Wave Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Manikandan S.

    Internal waves are a ubiquitous and significant means of momentum and energy transport in the oceans, atmosphere, and astrophysical bodies. Here, we show that internal wave propagation in nonuniform density stratifications, ...

  10. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J.

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123–130). This ...

  11. Moreton Waves and EIT Waves Related to the Flare Events of June 3, 2012 and July 6, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Admiranto, A G; Yus'an, U; Puspitaningrum, E

    2015-01-01

    We present geometrical and kinematical analysis of Moreton waves and EIT waves observed on June 3, 2012 and Moreton waves observed on July 6, 2012. The Moreton waves were recorded in H$\\alpha$ images of Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) archive and EIT waves obtained from SDO/AIA observations, especially in 193 nm channel. The observed wave of June 3 has angular span of about $70^{\\circ}$ with a broad wave front associated to NOAA active region 11496. It was found that the speed of the wave that started propagating at 17.53 UT is between 950 to 1500 km/s. Related to this wave occurrence, there was solar type II and III radio bursts. The speed of the EIT in this respect about 247 km/sec. On the other hand, the wave of July 6 may be associated to X1.1 class flare that occurred at 23.01 UT around the 11514 active region. From the kinematical analysis, the wave propagated with the initial velocity of about 1180 km/s which is in agreement with coronal shock velocity derived from type II radio burst observati...

  12. Gravitational Waves on Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2004-03-12

    We consider a gravitational wave of arbitrary frequency incident on a normal or a super-conductor. The gravitationally induced fields inside the conductor are derived. The outward propagating EM waves are calculated for a low frequency wave on a small sphere and for a high frequency wave incident on a large disk. We estimate for both targets the GW to EM conversion efficiencies and also the magnitude of the superconductor's phase perturbation.

  13. Bragg grating rogue wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degasperis, Antonio; Aceves, Alejandro B

    2015-01-01

    We derive the rogue wave solution of the classical massive Thirring model, that describes nonlinear optical pulse propagation in Bragg gratings. Combining electromagnetically induced transparency with Bragg scattering four-wave mixing, may lead to extreme waves at extremely low powers.

  14. Wave Particles Cem Yuksel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    Wave Particles Cem Yuksel Computer Science Texas A&M University Donald H. House Visualization captured from our real-time simulation system (approximately 100,000 wave particles) Abstract We present a new method for the real-time simulation of fluid sur- face waves and their interactions with floating

  15. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    , known as parametric sub- harmonic instability, results generally when a disturbance of one frequency imparts energy to disturbances of half that frequency.13,14 Generally, a plane periodic internal wave, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  16. Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

  17. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

  18. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Shira Mountains, central Ucayali Basin, Peru? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez Alvarez, Jaime Orlando

    2008-10-10

    The Ucayali Basin is a Peruvian sub-Andean basin that initially formed during the extensive tectonics of the Early Paleozoic. Originally, the Ucayali Basin was part of a larger basin that extended east of the current ...

  19. Literature and information related to the natural resources of the North Aleutian Basin of Alaska.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stull, E.A.; Hlohowskyj, I.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-01-31

    The North Aleutian Basin Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) is a large geographic area with significant natural resources. The Basin includes most of the southeastern part of the Bering Sea Outer Continental Shelf, including all of Bristol Bay. The area supports important habitat for a wide variety of species and globally significant habitat for birds and marine mammals, including several federally listed species. Villages and communities of the Alaska Peninsula and other areas bordering or near the Basin rely on its natural resources (especially commercial and subsistence fishing) for much of their sustenance and livelihood. The offshore area of the North Aleutian Basin is considered to have important hydrocarbon reserves, especially natural gas. In 2006, the MMS released a draft proposed program, 'Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program, 2007-2012' and an accompanying draft programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS). The draft proposed program identified two lease sales proposed in the North Aleutian Basin in 2010 and 2012, subject to restrictions. The area proposed for leasing in the Basin was restricted to the Sale 92 Area in the southwestern portion. Additional EISs will be needed to evaluate the potential effects of specific lease actions, exploration activities, and development and production plans in the Basin. A full range of updated multidisciplinary scientific information will be needed to address oceanography, fate and effects of oil spills, marine ecosystems, fish, fisheries, birds, marine mammals, socioeconomics, and subsistence in the Basin. Scientific staff at Argonne National Laboratory were contracted to assist MMS with identifying and prioritizing information needs related to potential future oil and gas leasing and development activities in the North Aleutian Basin. Argonne focused on three related tasks: (1) identify and gather relevant literature published since 1996, (2) synthesize and summarize the literature, and (3) identify and prioritize remaining information needs. To assist in the latter task, MMS convened the North Aleutian Basin Information Status and Research Planning Meeting (the Planning Meeting) in Anchorage, Alaska, from November 28 through December 1, 2006. That meeting and its results are described in 'Proceedings of the North Aleutian Basin Information Status and Research Planning Meeting' (the Planning Meeting report)1. Citations for recent literature (1996-2006) to support an assessment of the impacts of oil and gas development on natural, cultural, and socioeconomic resources in the North Aleutian Basin were entered in a database. The database, a series of Microsoft Excel spreadsheets with links to many of the reference materials, was provided to MMS prior to the Planning Meeting and was made available for participants to use during the meeting. Many types of references were identified and collected from the literature, such as workshop and symposium proceedings, personal web pages, web pages of government and nongovernmental organizations, EISs, books and articles reporting research results, regulatory documents, technical reports, newspaper and newsletter articles, and theses and dissertations. The current report provides (1) a brief overview of the literature; (2) descriptions (in tabular form) of the databased references, including geographic area covered, topic, and species (where relevant); (3) synopses of the contents of the referenced documents and web pages; and (4) a full citation for each reference. At the Planning Meeting, subject matter experts with research experience in the North Aleutian Basin presented overviews of the area's resources, including oceanography, fish and shellfish populations, federal fisheries, commercial fishery economics, community socioeconomics, subsistence, seabirds and shorebirds, waterfowl, seals and sea lions, cetaceans, sea otters, and walruses. These presentations characterized the status of the resource, the current state of knowledge on the topic, and information needs related to an assessment of

  20. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  1. Constraints on Neoproterozoic paleogeography and Paleozoic orogenesis from paleomagnetic records of the Bitter Springs Formation, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson-Hysell, N. L; Maloof, A. C; Kirschvink, J. L; Evans, D. A. D; Halverson, G. P; Hurtgen, M. T

    2012-01-01

    carbonate rocks of the Paris Basin, France: implications forand Kodama, 2009) Paris Basin Limestones (Belkaaloul and

  2. Development of a thermoacoustic travelling-wave refrigerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    mean pressure. By that way, conduction losses on the cold heat exchanger are minimized. However to an acoustic wave. Thereby, gas particle pressure and velocity oscillate around a mean value. According of a travelling-wave, acoustic pressure and velocity are in phase inducing a Stirling type cycle. Over an acoustic

  3. Characterization of basin concrete in support of structural integrity demonstration for extended storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, A.

    2014-09-30

    Concrete core samples from C basin were characterized through material testing and analysis to verify the design inputs for structural analysis of the L Basin and to evaluate the type and extent of changes in the material condition of the concrete under extended service for fuel storage. To avoid the impact on operations, core samples were not collected from L area, but rather, several concrete core samples were taken from the C Basin prior to its closure. C basin was selected due to its similar environmental exposure and service history compared to L Basin. The microstructure and chemical composition of the concrete exposed to the water was profiled from the water surface into the wall to evaluate the impact and extent of exposure. No significant leaching of concrete components was observed. Ingress of carbonation or deleterious species was determined to be insignificant. No evidence of alkali-silica reactions (ASR) was observed. Ettringite was observed to form throughout the structure (in air voids or pores); however, the sulfur content was measured to be consistent with the initial concrete that was used to construct the facility. Similar ettringite trends were observed in the interior segments of the core samples. The compressive strength of the concrete at the mid-wall of the basin was measured, and similar microstructural analysis was conducted on these materials post compression testing. The microstructure was determined to be similar to near-surface segments of the core samples. The average strength was 4148 psi, which is well-above the design strength of 2500 psi. The analyses showed that phase alterations and minor cracking in a microstructure did not affect the design specification for the concrete.

  4. Independent focuses Philippines exploration on Visayan basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rillera, F.G.

    1995-08-21

    Cophil Exploration Corp., a Filipino public company, spearheaded 1995 Philippine oil and gas exploration activity with the start of its gas delineation drilling operations in Libertad, northern Cebu. Cophil and its Australian partners, Coplex Resources NL and PacRim Energy NL, have set out to complete a seven well onshore drilling program within this block this year. The companies are testing two modest shallow gas plays, Libertad and Dalingding, and a small oil play, Maya, all in northern Cebu about 500 km southeast of Manila. Following a short discussion on the geology and exploration history of the Visayan basin, this article briefly summarizes Cophil`s ongoing Cebu onshore drilling program. Afterwards, discussion focuses on identified exploration opportunities in the basin`s offshore sector.

  5. Independent External Evaluation of The Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent External Evaluation of The Columbia Basin Water Transactions Program (2003 of Water Transactions...............................................32 Program Administration......................................................................................................45 Annex 1: Evaluation Matrix Annex 2: Limiting Factors to Water Transactions in the Columbia Basin

  6. Fossil flat-slab subduction beneath the Illinois basin, USA Heather Bedle , Suzan van der Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Lee, Suzan

    .tecto.2006.06.003 #12;basin and mechanisms of basin formation, and interpret the Illinois basinFossil flat-slab subduction beneath the Illinois basin, USA Heather Bedle , Suzan van der Lee August 2006 Abstract The Illinois basin is one of several well-studied intracratonic sedimentary basins

  7. High latitude gravity waves at the Venus cloud tops as observed by the Venus Monitoring Camera on board Venus Express

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    in VMC images on the base of their morphology: long, medium, short and irregular type waves. With the aim (latitude and longitude), local time, solar zenith angle, packet length and width, orientation, and wavelength of each wave. The long type waves appear as long and nar- row straight features extending more

  8. Atlantic Mesozoic marginal basins: an Iberian view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R.C.L.

    1987-05-01

    In the light of theoretical models for crustal stretching that precedes ocean opening, it is unlikely that Iberian basins have mirror image counterparts beneath North American or other European continental shelves. However, certain Iberian sedimentary sequences are comparable to those found in other basins. Of particular note are (1) the almost identical pre-rift sequences in all these areas, (2) the development of Upper Jurassic carbonate buildups in Portugal, Morocco, and beneath the Scotian Shelf, and (3) the hydrocarbon-bearing Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous synrift and postrift siliciclastics of North America, Iberia, and Aquitaine. In the prerift sequences, Triassic red beds are capped by evaporites, which subsequently influenced the structural development of basins. Intertidal and supratidal carbonates occur at the base of the Jurassic and are overlain by Lower and Middle Jurassic limestone-shale sequences, which in places contain bituminous shales. In Portugal only, resedimented carbonates of Toarcian-Aalenian age are associated with an uplifted basement horst. In Portugal, Aquitaine, and eastern Canada, Middle Jurassic high-energy carbonate platforms developed. Synrift siliciclastic sequences show spectacular evidence for deposition within fault-bounded basins. In Portugal, lower Kimmeridgian clastics are up to 3 km thick, but Upper-Lower Cretaceous sequences are relatively thin (ca. 1 km), in contrast to those of the Basco-Cantabrian region where they exceed 10 km. In the latter region occurs the fluvially dominated Wealden (Upper Jurassic-Neocomian) and Urgonian carbonate platforms and associated basinal sediments. In the Asturias basin, Kimmeridgian shales and fluvially dominated deltaic sandstones succeed conglomeratic fluvial sandstones of uncertain age.

  9. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

  10. Columbia River Basin Research Plan Northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia River Basin Research Plan By the Northwest Power and Conservation Council February 2006................................................................................................................. 20 (11) Human Development

  11. Tectonic & Structural Controls of Great Basin Geothermal Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing...

  12. The paragenesis chemistry of alteration associated with the P2and fault in metamorphic rocks underlying the Athabasca Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The paragenesis chemistry of alteration associated with the P2and fault in metamorphic rocks underlying the Athabasca Basin The paragenesis chemistry of alteration associated with the P2and fault's largest high-grade uranium deposit. This deposit is classified as unconformity-type because it is located

  13. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Transportation Options in the Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Rostam-Abadi; S. S. Chen; Y. Lu

    2004-09-30

    This report describes carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture options from large stationary emission sources in the Illinois Basin, primarily focusing on coal-fired utility power plants. The CO{sub 2} emissions data were collected for utility power plants and industrial facilities over most of Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and western Kentucky. Coal-fired power plants are by far the largest CO{sub 2} emission sources in the Illinois Basin. The data revealed that sources within the Illinois Basin emit about 276 million tonnes of CO2 annually from 122 utility power plants and industrial facilities. Industrial facilities include 48 emission sources and contribute about 10% of total emissions. A process analysis study was conducted to review the suitability of various CO{sub 2} capture technologies for large stationary sources. The advantages and disadvantages of each class of technology were investigated. Based on these analyses, a suitable CO{sub 2} capture technology was assigned to each type of emission source in the Illinois Basin. Techno-economic studies were then conducted to evaluate the energy and economic performances of three coal-based power generation plants with CO{sub 2} capture facilities. The three plants considered were (1) pulverized coal (PC) + post combustion chemical absorption (monoethanolamine, or MEA), (2) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) + pre-combustion physical absorption (Selexol), and (3) oxygen-enriched coal combustion plants. A conventional PC power plant without CO2 capture was also investigated as a baseline plant for comparison. Gross capacities of 266, 533, and 1,054 MW were investigated at each power plant. The economic study considered the burning of both Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The cost estimation included the cost for compressing the CO{sub 2} stream to pipeline pressure. A process simulation software, CHEMCAD, was employed to perform steady-state simulations of power generation systems and CO{sub 2} capture processes. Financial models were developed to estimate the capital cost, operations and maintenance cost, cost of electricity, and CO{sub 2} avoidance cost. Results showed that, depending on the plant size and the type of coal burned, CO{sub 2} avoidance cost is between $47/t to $67/t for a PC +MEA plant, between $22.03/t to $32.05/t for an oxygen combustion plant, and between $13.58/t to $26.78/t for an IGCC + Selexol plant. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the impact on the CO2 avoidance cost of the heat of absorption of solvent in an MEA plant and energy consumption of the ASU in an oxy-coal combustion plant. An economic analysis of CO{sub 2} capture from an ethanol plant was also conducted. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture from an ethanol plant with a production capacity of 100 million gallons/year was estimated to be about $13.92/t.

  14. West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Exhibit D #12;Summary: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer Primary Credi90023!! #12;Sttmma1·y: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer Credit Profile US$16.STANDARDANDPOORS.COM/RATJNGSDJRECT MAY31 2013 2 I126639 I 301008236 #12;Summary: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer

  15. Part One: Overview I. The Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    included the construction of dams throughout the basin for such purposes as hydroelectric power, flood tributaries comprise one of the most intensively developed river basins for hydroelectric power in the world. Hydroelectric dams in the basin (Links marked are external, not part of the adopted Program) 7 #12;produce

  16. POLLUTION IN THE LOWER COLUMBIA BASIN IN 1948-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLLUTION IN THE LOWER COLUMBIA BASIN IN 1948- With particular reference to the Willamette River, intended to aid or direct management or utilization praotices and as gi.\\ides for administrative POLLUTION IN THE LOTOR COLIMRIA BASIN IN 1948 WITH PARTI CirW.R REFERENCE TO THE WTLLAJTETTE BASIN

  17. NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

  18. Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

    Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway A. SOUCHE*, M. DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological Processes (PGP), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway basins of western Norway are examples of supradetachment basins that formed in the hanging wall

  19. MHD waves in sunspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sych, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The review addresses the spatial frequency morphology of sources of sunspot oscillations and waves, including their localization, size, oscillation periods, height localization with the mechanism of cut-off frequency that forms the observed emission variability. Dynamic of sunspot wave processes, provides the information about the structure of wave fronts and their time variations, investigates the oscillation frequency transformation depending on the wave energy is shown. The initializing solar flares caused by trigger agents like magnetoacoustic waves, accelerated particle beams, and shocks are discussed. Special attention is paid to the relation between the flare reconnection periodic initialization and the dynamics of sunspot slow magnetoacoustic waves. A short review of theoretical models of sunspot oscillations is provided.

  20. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-08-01

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  1. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some findings and outstanding problems are also presented. Keywords: dusty plasmas, dust acoustic waves PACS: 52

  2. Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

  3. Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

  4. REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE PARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE PARTICLES A Dissertation by Cem Yuksel Submitted to the Office of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Computer Science #12;REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE, Valerie E. Taylor August 2010 Major Subject: Computer Science #12;iii ABSTRACT Real-time Water Waves

  5. GN Wave theory and TEBEM for Wave-Body Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GN Wave theory and TEBEM for Wave-Body Interaction Dr. BinBin Zhao and Professor Wenyang Duan of simulating irregular nonlinear water wave interaction with arbitrary floating bodies, the Green-Naghdi wave corners. The results show that the high-level GN theory can predict wave transformation over uneven seabed

  6. Evolution of extensional basins and basin and range topography west of Death Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, K. V.; McKenna, L. W.; Stock, J.; Knapp, J.; Page, L.; Sternlof, K.; Silverberg, D.; Wust, G.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1989-06-01

    complex in late Miocene (?) – early Pliocene time. The principal growth structure for the basin was the Emigrant detachment, which initiated and moved at a low angle. Modern Panamint Valley, west of the range, developed as a consequence of Late Pliocene...

  7. 8 River Basin Closure and Institutional Change in Mexico's LermaChapala Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    for irrigation expansion, and the drilling of new wells and the construction of new dams has been prohibited-exploitation, and influenced by the vested interests of the hydraulic ©CAB International 2005. Irrigation and River Basin

  8. Evidence of surface acoustic wave band gaps in the phononic crystals created on thin plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deymier, Pierre

    Evidence of surface acoustic wave band gaps in the phononic crystals created on thin plates Xinya acoustic wave SAW band gaps. In this letter, we report a new type of phononic crystals manufactured Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2167794 The propagation of acoustic waves in periodic composite

  9. Langmuir wave-packet generation from an electron beam propagating in the inhomogeneous solar wind.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Langmuir wave-packet generation from an electron beam propagating in the inhomogeneous solar wind of an electron beam in an homogeneous plasma leads to the generation of Lang- muir waves, that are electrostatic of the generation of plasma waves during type III radio bursts or close to the electron foreshock. It is also known

  10. Nonlinear and Multi-Wave Effects in Fast-Scale Laser-Plasma Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    shift of the wave and the incoherent energy associated with developing the final, phase-mixed state. These Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) type waves naturally arise in weakly driven, thermal plasmas, and extend shift of the wave, in agreement with recent numerical results. Energy conservation is employed

  11. Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: Effect of moisture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: Effect of moisture, product type, and material direction Guangping Han Qinglin Wu Xiping Wang Abstract The effect of moisture on longitudinal stress-wave veloc- ity, particleboard, and southern pine lumber was evaluated. It was shown that the stress-wave velocity decreased

  12. Lower crustal ow and the role of shear in basin subsidence: an example from the Dead Sea basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    Lower crustal £ow and the role of shear in basin subsidence: an example from the Dead Sea basin, MA 02543, USA Abstract We interpret large-scale subsidence (5^6 km depth) with little attendant that lower crustal flow would occur within the time frame of basin subsidence if the viscosity is 9 7U1019 ^1

  13. Columbia Basin Data Center The development of a Columbia Basin Data Center will provide extensive benefits for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia Basin Data Center 4/24/06 The Vision The development of a Columbia Basin Data Center, with the working title of the Columbia Basin Data Center would be charged with ensuring that important data. The Data Center would not be responsible for collecting and compiling data. That function would remain

  14. Trimodal steady water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnström; Erik Wahlén

    2013-10-31

    We construct three-dimensional families of small-amplitude gravity-driven rotational steady water waves on finite depth. The solutions contain counter-currents and multiple crests in each minimal period. Each such wave generically is a combination of three different Fourier modes, giving rise to a rich and complex variety of wave patterns. The bifurcation argument is based on a blow-up technique, taking advantage of three parameters associated with the vorticity distribution, the strength of the background stream, and the period of the wave.

  15. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  16. Blood Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-03-14

    Sox spent a hundred mil to acquire pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka; they probably weren't even aware that he is a Type O and that they make the best bankers, politicians and... you guessed it... professional baseball players. #ceas #hacker #japan #tsutsuien...

  17. BLUE RIVER BASIN (Dodson Industrial District)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    BLUE RIVER BASIN (Dodson Industrial District) Kansas City, Missouri MODIFICATION REQUEST capability to support this request. PROJECT PURPOSE Dodson Industrial District is located along the Blue of a 6,800 foot long levee- floodwall along the north bank of the Blue River from the Bannister Road

  18. TURKEY CREEK BASIN Kansas and Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    TURKEY CREEK BASIN Kansas and Missouri MODIFICATION REQUEST Modification to the authorized total the Turkey Creek channel and runoff from the adjacent hillsides, and the current depth of flooding along in the past decade. Additionally, the Turkey Creek tunnel constructed in 1919 to divert the channel away from

  19. Fast Facts About the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cost and availability, and the effect of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife. columbia River, and fish and wildlife affected by, the columbia River Basin hydropower dams. the council is a unique of the Council under the Act are to: 1. Develop a regional power plan to assure the Northwest an adequate

  20. Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

    2010-01-16

    in the last 10 years or so. We proposed geological descriptions of these two Basins. The key characteristics of the two models are the presence of channels and pinch-outs for depths of between 1 km and 2 km (these values are rescaled for our numerical purposes...

  1. Summary status of K Basins sludge characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, R.B.

    1995-01-20

    A number of activities are underway as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) related to the processing and disposing of sludge in the 105-K Basins (K Basins). Efforts to rigorously define data requirements for these activities are being made using the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process. Summaries of current sludge characterization data are required to both help support this DQO process and to allow continued progress with on-going engineering activities (e.g., evaluations of disposal alternatives). This document provides the status of K Basins sludge characterization data currently available to the Nuclear Fuel Evaluations group. This group is tasked by the SNFP to help develop and maintain the characterization baseline for the K Basins. The specific objectives of this document are to: (1) provide a current summary (and set of references) of sludge characterization data for use by SNFP initiatives, to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and to support on-going initiatives; (2) submit these data to an open forum for review and comment, and identify additional sources of significant data that may be available; (3) provide a summary of current data to use as part of the basis to develop requirements for additional sludge characterization data through the DQO process; (4) provide an overview of the intended activities that will be used to develop and maintain the sludge characterization baseline.

  2. Hydrodynamic Waves in an Anomalous Charged Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, Navid; Rezaei, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We study the collective excitations in a relativistic fluid with an anomalous conserved charge. In $3+1$ dimensions, in addition to two ordinary sound modes we find two propagating modes in presence of an external magnetic field: one with a velocity proportional to the coefficient of gauge-gravitational anomaly coefficient and the other with a velocity which depends on both chiral anomaly and the gauge gravitational anomaly coefficients. While the former is the Chiral Alfv\\'en wave recently found in arXiv:1505.05444, the latter is a new type of collective excitations originated from the density fluctuations. We refer to these modes as the Type-M and Type-D chiral Alfv\\'en waves respectively. We show that the Type-M Chiral Alfv\\'en mode is split into two chiral Alfv\\'en modes when taking into account the effect of dissipation processes in the fluid. In 1+1 dimensions we find only one propagating mode associated with the anomalous effects. We explicitly compute the velocity of this wave and show that in contras...

  3. Wave Energy challenges and possibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Wave Energy ­ challenges and possibilities By: Per Resen Steenstrup www.WaveStarEnergy.com Risø-R-1608(EN) 161 #12;© Wave energy is an old story.... The first wave energy patent is 200 years old. Over the last 100 years more than 200 new wave energy devices have been developped and more than 1.000 patents

  4. Okanogan Basin Spring Spawner Report for 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colville Tribes, Department of Fish & Wildlife

    2007-09-01

    The Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program collected data related to spring spawning anadromous salmonid stocks across the entire Okanogan River basin. Data were collected using redd surveys, traps, underwater video, and PIT-tag technology then summarized and analyzed using simple estimate models. From these efforts we estimated that 1,266 summer steelhead spawned in the Okanogan River basin and constructed 552 redds;152 of these fish where of natural origin. Of these, 121 summer steelhead, including 29 of natural origin, created an estimated 70 redds in the Canadian portion of the Okanagan basin. We estimated summer steelhead spawner escapement into each sub-watershed along with the number from natural origin and the number and density of redds. We documented redd desiccation in Loup Loup Creek, habitat utilization in Salmon Creek as a result of a new water lease program, and 10 spring Chinook returning to Omak Creek. High water through most of the redd survey period resulted in development of new modeling techniques and allowed us to survey additional tributaries including the observation of summer steelhead spawning in Wanacut Creek. These 2007 data provide additional support that redd surveys conducted within the United States are well founded and provide essential information for tracking the recovery of listed summer steelhead. Conversely, redd surveys do not appear to be the best approach for enumerating steelhead spawners or there distribution within Canada. We also identified that spawning distributions within the Okanogan River basin vary widely and stocking location may play an over riding roll in this variability.

  5. Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01

    In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

  6. Wave-Corpuscle Mechanics for Electric Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Anatoli; Figotin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    superposition in nonlinear wave dynamics. Rev. Math. Phys.6. Babin, A. , Figotin, A. : Wave-corpuscle mechanics forV. , Fortunato, D. : Solitary waves in the nonlinear wave

  7. Microstructural Design for Stress Wave Energy Management /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranian, Aref

    2013-01-01

    Nasser, S. , 2010. Stress-wave energy management throughNemat-Nasser, Stress-wave energy management through materialconstitute pressure wave energy and/or shear wave energy.

  8. Thickness of proximal ejecta from the Orientale Basin from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data: Implications for multi-ring basin formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fassett, Caleb I.

    Quantifying the ejecta distribution around large lunar basins is important to understanding the origin of basin rings, the volume of the transient cavity, the depth of sampling, and the nature of the basin formation ...

  9. Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

    2007-11-26

    Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

  10. Method and apparatus for suppressing waves in a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.

    2005-10-04

    Methods and apparatus for suppression of wave energy within a fluid-filled borehole using a low pressure acoustic barrier. In one embodiment, a flexible diaphragm type device is configured as an open bottomed tubular structure for disposition in a borehole to be filled with a gas to create a barrier to wave energy, including tube waves. In another embodiment, an expandable umbrella type device is used to define a chamber in which a gas is disposed. In yet another embodiment, a reverse acting bladder type device is suspended in the borehole. Due to its reverse acting properties, the bladder expands when internal pressure is reduced, and the reverse acting bladder device extends across the borehole to provide a low pressure wave energy barrier.

  11. Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Robin

    Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases Robin Kaiser and Mark D. Havey Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases #12;39 E xperimental developments permit in the transport proper- ties of electromagnetic radiation in strongly scattering random media. Even in weakly

  12. CATCHING THE FOURTH WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    CATCHING THE FOURTH WAVE YOU MAY HAVE RIDDEN THEM YOURSELF -- the swells that develop farther out beyond Toffler, the fourth wave -- biologi- cal intelligence and medical technology -- is on the horizon second and fourth nationally in terms of cities that receive the most research funds from the National

  13. Developing de Broglie Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

    2006-08-27

    The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

  14. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – 33rd scale experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha; Prudell, Joseph H.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe

    2013-07-29

    Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Power’s Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speed statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.

  15. Rayleigh WaveInternal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Rayleigh Wave­Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream B. R to the study of unstable jet flows and applications of this work for internal wave generation by dynamic remains poorly understood. Most investigations of shear­generation of inter­ nal waves in the atmosphere

  16. Rayleigh Wave-Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Rayleigh Wave-Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream B. R to the study of unstable jet flows and applications of this work for internal wave generation by dynamic remains poorly understood. Most investigations of shear-generation of inter- nal waves in the atmosphere

  17. An unsteady wave driver for narrowbanded waves: modeling nearshore circulation driven by wave groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    An unsteady wave driver for narrowbanded waves: modeling nearshore circulation driven by wave Abstract In this paper, we derive an unsteady refraction­diffraction model for narrowbanded water waves for use in computing coupled wave­current motion in the nearshore. The end result is a variable

  18. 105-K Basin Material Design Basis Feed Description for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities VOL 1 Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACKER, M.J.

    1999-11-04

    Metallic uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) is currently stored within two water filled pools, 105-KE Basin (KE Basin) and 105-KW Basin (KW Basin), at the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) is responsible to DOE for operation of these fuel storage pools and for the 2100 metric tons of SNF materials that they contain. The SNF Project mission includes safe removal and transportation of all SNF from these storage basins to a new storage facility in the 200 East Area. To accomplish this mission, the SNF Project modifies the existing KE Basin and KW Basin facilities and constructs two new facilities: the 100 K Area Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF), which drains and dries the SNF; and the 200 East Area Canister Storage Building (CSB), which stores the SNF. The purpose of this document is to describe the design basis feed compositions for materials stored or processed by SNF Project facilities and activities. This document is not intended to replace the Hanford Spent Fuel Inventory Baseline (WHC 1994b), but only to supplement it by providing more detail on the chemical and radiological inventories in the fuel (this volume) and sludge. A variety of feed definitions is required to support evaluation of specific facility and process considerations during the development of these new facilities. Six separate feed types have been identified for development of new storage or processing facilities. The approach for using each feed during design evaluations is to calculate the proposed facility flowsheet assuming each feed. The process flowsheet would then provide a basis for material compositions and quantities which are used in follow-on calculations.

  19. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brizard, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    model lies with the simple wave energy conservation law itthe recirculation of wave energy introduces interference e?particles, the tertiary-wave energy may be negative and thus

  20. Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil of CWP is on seismic modeling, imaging and inversion methods, as well as on improving the accuracy

  1. Derived Types What Are Derived Types?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Derived Types #12;What Are Derived Types? As usual, a hybrid of two, unrelated concepts C++, Python orientation comes in #12;Simple Derived Types TYPE Wheel INTEGER :: spokes REAL :: diameter, width CHARACTER(LEN=15) :: material END TYPE Wheel That defines a derived type Wheel Using derived types needs a special

  2. Derived Types What Are Derived Types?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Derived Types #12;What Are Derived Types? As usual, a hybrid of two, unrelated concepts C object orientation comes in This course will only describe the former. #12;Simple Derived Types TYPE That defines a derived type Wheel Using derived types needs a special syntax TYPE(Wheel) :: w1 #12;More

  3. Type: Renewal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy TwoEvent at the Pu Facility,Type IV COPV1

  4. Diagonalization of pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-05-21

    A coordinate transformation is found which diagonalizes the axisymmetric pp-waves. Its effect upon concrete solutions, including impulsive and shock waves, is discussed.

  5. Geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.E.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone caldera at the common intersection of the caldera rim and the Norris-Mammoth Corridor, a zone of faults, volcanic vents, and thermal activity that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. The dominant quartz sand is hydrothermally cemented by chalcedony and is extremely hard, thereby justifying the term hydrothermal quartzite. The fundamental water type in Norris Basin is nearly neutral in pH and high in Cl and SiO/sub 2/. Another common type of water in Norris Basin is high in SO/sub 4/ and moderately high in Cl, with Cl/SO/sub 4/ ratios differing considerably. This study provides no new conclusive data on an old problem, the source or sources of rare dissolved constitutents. An important part of this paper consists of examples of numerous changes in behavior and chemical composition of most springs and geysers, to extents not known elsewhere in the park and perhaps in the world. Hydrothermal mineralogy in core samples from three research holes drilled entirely in Lava Creek Tuff to a maximum depth of -331.6 m permits an interpretation of the hydrothermal alteration history. A model for large, long-lived, volcanic-hydrothermal activity is also suggested, involving all of the crust and upper mantle and using much recent geophysical data bearing on crust-mantle interrelations.

  6. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branch; Darren W. (Albuquerque, NM), Meyer; Grant D. (Ithaca, NY), Craighead; Harold G. (Ithaca, NY)

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  7. Management Of Hanford KW Basin Knockout Pot Sludge As Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, R. E. [CH2M HIll Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Evans, K. M. [AREVA, Avignon (France)

    2012-10-22

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) and AREVA Federal Services, LLC (AFS) have been working collaboratively to develop and deploy technologies to remove, transport, and interim store remote-handled sludge from the 10S-K West Reactor Fuel Storage Basin on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, WA, USA. Two disposal paths exist for the different types of sludge found in the K West (KW) Basin. One path is to be managed as Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) with eventual disposal at an SNF at a yet to be licensed repository. The second path will be disposed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, NM. This paper describes the systems developed and executed by the Knockout Pot (KOP) Disposition Subproject for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as SNF, (i.e., KOP material).

  8. San Juan Basin EC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources JumpDimas, California:County,Basin EC Jump to:

  9. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hereman, Willy A.M.

    . Water Wave Experiments and Observations VII. Future Directions VIII. Bibliography Glossary Deep water A surface wave is said to be in deep water if its wavelength is much shorter than the local water depthShallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer

  10. Long wave expansions for water waves over random topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    Long wave expansions for water waves over random topography Anne de Bouard1 , Walter Craig2 interacting with the random bottom. We show that the resulting influence of the random topography is expressed numbers: 76B15, 35Q53, 76M50, 60F17 Keywords :Water waves, random topography, long wave asymptotics #12

  11. On Generating Gravity Waves with Matter and Electromagnetic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

    2008-04-05

    If a homogeneous plane light-like shell collides head-on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

  12. P- and S-body wave tomography of the state of Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Leiph

    2010-04-01

    P- and S-body wave travel times collected from stations in and near the state of Nevada were inverted for P-wave velocity and the Vp/Vs ratio. These waves consist of Pn, Pg, Sn and Sg, but only the first arriving P and S waves were used in the inversion. Travel times were picked by University of Nevada Reno colleagues and were culled for inclusion in the tomographic inversion. The resulting tomographic model covers the entire state of Nevada to a depth of {approx}90 km; however, only the upper 40 km indicate relatively good resolution. Several features of interest are imaged including the Sierra Nevada, basin structures, and low velocities at depth below Yucca Mountain. These velocity structure images provide valuable information to aide in the interpretation of geothermal resource areas throughout the state on Nevada.

  13. Evolution of Rogue Waves in Interacting Wave Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Grönlund; B. Eliasson; M. Marklund

    2009-04-03

    Large amplitude water waves on deep water has long been known in the sea faring community, and the cause of great concern for, e.g., oil platform constructions. The concept of such freak waves is nowadays, thanks to satellite and radar measurements, well established within the scientific community. There are a number of important models and approaches for the theoretical description of such waves. By analyzing the scaling behavior of freak wave formation in a model of two interacting waves, described by two coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations, we show that there are two different dynamical scaling behaviors above and below a critical angle theta_c of the direction of the interacting waves below theta_c all wave systems evolve and display statistics similar to a wave system of non-interacting waves. The results equally apply to other systems described by the nonlinear Schroedinger equations, and should be of interest when designing optical wave guides.

  14. LABORATORY VII: WAVE OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VII: WAVE OPTICS Lab VII - 1 In this lab, you will solve problems in ways that take-like behavior. These conditions may be less familiar to you than the conditions for which geometrical optics

  15. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  16. Surface wave interferometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halliday, David Fraser

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

  17. Relativistic quaternionic wave equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, C

    2006-01-01

    Schrodinger ?time dependent? equation, ? 1 and ? 2 , then?TCP?. The current conservation equation ?3.2? is still truefor this extended wave equation ?8.1?, however, Eq. ?6.7?

  18. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  19. In Situ Observation of Type II Solar Radio Burst Source Region: a New Generation Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mechanisms: non-thermal -- shock waves -- Sun: radio radiation 1. Introduction Electromagnetic waves can by Cluster spacecraft (Escoubet et al. 1997). We observe intense radio waves above the local plasma frequencyIn Situ Observation of Type II Solar Radio Burst Source Region: a New Generation Mechanism M. V

  20. Novel type of chimera spiral waves arising from decoupling of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    epstein@brandeis.edu, E-mail: gaoqy@cumt.edu.cn 2 + Show Author Affiliations College of Chemical Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China)...

  1. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Holliday, V.T. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  2. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  3. Depositional environments, sequence stratigraphy, and trap configuration of lower Wolfcampian clastics along eastern edge of Midland basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, N.R.; Reuter, S.G.

    1989-03-01

    The Lower Permian (lower Wolfcampian) along the eastern edge of the Midland basin, west Texas, is characterized by ramp-type shelf margins. During eustatic lowstand, nearshore sedimentation shifted drastically to the west into a basinal setting below the Pennsylvanian (Canyon) shelf margin. Core descriptions demonstrate that lowstand systems tract (LST) and transgressive systems tract (TST) siliciclastics were deposited in deltaic and coastal-plain environments. Prodelta, delta-front, and stream-mouth bar facies are associated with the LST. Coastal-plain and distributary channels are preserved in the TST. The sequence stratigraphic framework indicates type 1 sequence boundaries at 287 Ma, 282 Ma, and 280 Ma in the lower Wolfcampian clastics. This lower Wolfcampian package of sedimentary rocks overlies the Pennsylvanian and is capped by the 279-Ma middle Wolfcampian unconformity. All three sequence boundaries and associated systems tract deposits exhibit a prograding stacking pattern within the sequence stratigraphic framework. Basinally restricted prograding LST deltaic rocks are overlain by backstepping TST deltaics and highstand systems tract (HST) outer marine shales. Production in lower Wolfcampian clastic fields is associated with fine-grained quartzarenites up to 45 ft thick which were deposited in stream-mouth bars. Delta-front and prodelta low-permeability shales encase the reservoir facies, forming lateral permeability barriers. HST outer marine shales deposited over the stream-mouth-bar sandstones act as a top seal, creating a stratigraphic trap and providing source for the high-BTU gas and oil produced from these basinally restricted LST deltaics.

  4. Wave Propagation in Multiferroic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Scott Macklin

    2013-01-01

    Waves in Magnetoelectric Materials . . . Need forApplication of Multiferroic Materials to Receive AntennaMaterials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  5. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness...

  6. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown...

  7. Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes...

  8. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

  9. Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  10. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Geothermal Systems in The Great Basin Using a Geographic Information System (GIS) - Part II, Coolbaugh, Zehner, Raines, Shevenell, Minor, Sawatzky and Oppliger. The...

  11. Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    php?titleVariableCrustalThicknessInTheWesternGreatBasin-ACompilationOfOldAndNewRefractionData&oldid793047" Categories: Missing Required Information Reference...

  12. Refraction Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005)...

  13. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data...

  14. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  15. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer...

  16. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data...

  17. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  18. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  19. Geothermometry At Nw Basin & Range Region (Shevenell & De Rocher...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermometry At Nw Basin & Range Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nw...

  20. Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element...

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer...

  2. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  3. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  4. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  5. Paleoecology and Paleobiogeography of the New York Appalachian Basin Eurypterids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paleoecology and Paleobiogeography of the New York Appalachian Basin Eurypterids Kimberly Lau resulted in a better understanding of the paleoecology and paleobiogeography of a poorly studied group

  6. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  7. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  8. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal...

  9. Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin and Range Geothermal Region Medical Hot Springs Geothermal Area Idaho Batholith Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Cascades Melozi Hot Springs Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal...

  10. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstrationn Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  11. Two-Phase Westward Encroachment of Basin and Range Extension...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Abstract 1 Structural, geophysical, and thermochronological data from the transition zone between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range province at latitude 39N...

  12. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  13. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  14. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  15. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  16. Preparing T Plant to Store K-Basin Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCKENNEY, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper will explain the history and status of the modification of the Hanford T Plant facility for storage of K Basin sludge.

  17. String Theory and Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan Iyer; Clifford V. Johnson; Jeffrey S. Pennington

    2010-02-05

    We uncover a remarkable role that an infinite hierarchy of non-linear differential equations plays in organizing and connecting certain {hat c}water wave hierarchy. We observe that there are several other string-like limits of the system, and conjecture that some of them are type IIA and IIB (A,D) minimal string backgrounds. We explain how these and several string-like special points arise and are connected. In some cases, the framework endows the theories with a non-perturbative definition for the first time. Notably, we discover that the Painleve IV equation plays a key role in organizing the string theory physics, joining its siblings, Painleve I and II, whose roles have previously been identified in this minimal string context.

  18. Acoustic wave front conjugation in a three-phase media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pushkina, N I

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic wave front reversal is studied in a sandy marine sediment that contains air bubbles in its fluid fraction. The considered phase conjugation is a four-wave nonlinear parametric sound interaction process caused by nonlinear bubble oscillations which are known to be dominant in acoustic nonlinear interactions in three-phase marine sediments. Two various mechanisms of phase conjugation are studied. One of them is based on the stimulated Raman-type sound scattering on resonance bubble oscillations. The second one is associated with sound interactions with bubble oscillations which frequencies are far from resonance bubble frequencies. Nonlinear equations to solve the wave-front conjugation problem are derived, expressions for acoustic wave amplitudes with a reversed wave front are obtained and compared for various frequencies of the excited bubble oscillations.

  19. Acoustic wave front reversal in a three-phase media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. I. Pushkina

    2015-03-05

    Acoustic wave front conjugation is studied in a sandy marine sediment that contains air bubbles in its fluid fraction. The considered phase conjugation is a four-wave nonlinear parametric sound interaction process caused by nonlinear bubble oscillations which are known to be dominant in acoustic nonlinear interactions in three-phase marine sediments. Two various mechanisms of phase conjugation are studied. One of them is based on the stimulated Raman-type sound scattering on resonance bubble oscillations. The second one is associated with sound interactions with bubble oscillations which frequencies are far from resonance bubble frequencies. Nonlinear equations to solve the wave-front conjugation problem are derived, expressions for acoustic wave amplitudes with a reversed wave front are obtained and compared for various frequencies of the excited bubble oscillations.

  20. Linear depressions and collapse features in the Northwest Hueco Basin, West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Scott D

    1997-01-01

    The Northwest Hueco Basin, located in the Northern Chihuahuan Desert, is a fault bounded basin filled predominantly with Plio-Pleistocene unconsolidated sediments. The basin contains long linear depressions that dominate the surface topography...

  1. Integrated Synthesis of the Permian Basin: Data and Models for Recovering Existing and Undiscovered Oil Resources from the Largest Oil-Bearing Basin in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Jackson; Katherine Jackson

    2008-09-30

    Large volumes of oil and gas remain in the mature basins of North America. This is nowhere more true than in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico. A critical barrier to recovery of this vast remaining resource, however, is information. Access to accurate geological data and analyses of the controls of hydrocarbon distribution is the key to the knowledge base as well as the incentives needed by oil and gas companies. The goals of this project were to collect, analyze, synthesize, and deliver to industry and the public fundamental information and data on the geology of oil and gas systems in the Permian Basin. This was accomplished in two ways. First we gathered all available data, organized it, and placed it on the web for ready access. Data include core analysis data, lists of pertinent published reports, lists of available cores, type logs, and selected PowerPoint presentations. We also created interpretive data such as type logs, geological cross sections, and geological maps and placed them in a geospatially-registered framework in ARC/GIS. Second, we created new written syntheses of selected reservoir plays in the Permian basin. Although only 8 plays were targeted for detailed analysis in the project proposal to DOE, 14 were completed. These include Ellenburger, Simpson, Montoya, Fusselman, Wristen, Thirtyone, Mississippian, Morrow, Atoka, Strawn, Canyon/Cisco, Wolfcamp, Artesia Group, and Delaware Mountain Group. These fully illustrated reports include critical summaries of published literature integrated with new unpublished research conducted during the project. As such these reports provide the most up-to-date analysis of the geological controls on reservoir development available. All reports are available for download on the project website and are also included in this final report. As stated in our proposal, technology transfer is perhaps the most important component of the project. In addition to providing direct access to data and reports through the web, we published 29 papers dealing with aspects of Permian Basin and Fort Worth Basin Paleozoic geology, and gave 35 oral and poster presentations at professional society meetings, and 116 oral and poster presentations at 10 project workshops, field trips, and short courses. These events were attended by hundreds of scientists and engineers representing dozens of oil and gas companies. This project and the data and interpretations that have resulted from it will serve industry, academic, and public needs for decades to come. It will be especially valuable to oil and gas companies in helping to better identify opportunities for development and exploration and reducing risk. The website will be continually added to and updated as additional data and information become available making it a long term source of key information for all interested in better understanding the Permian Basin.

  2. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OBSERVED ABOVE A QUIET-SUN REGION IN A DARK CAVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jiajia; Zhou Zhenjun; Wang Yuming; Liu Rui; Liao Chijian; Shen Chenglong; Zheng Huinan; Miao Bin; Su Zhenpeng; Wang, S.; Wang Bin E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn

    2012-10-20

    Waves play a crucial role in diagnosing the plasma properties of various structures in the solar corona and coronal heating. Slow magnetoacoustic (MA) waves are one of the important types of magnetohydrodynamic waves. In past decades, numerous slow MA waves were detected above active regions and coronal holes, but were rarely found elsewhere. Here, we investigate a 'tornado'-like structure consisting of quasi-periodic streaks within a dark cavity at about 40-110 Mm above a quiet-Sun region on 2011 September 25. Our analysis reveals that these streaks are actually slow MA wave trains. The properties of these wave trains, including phase speed, compression ratio, and kinetic energy density, are similar to those of the reported slow MA waves, except that the period of these waves is about 50 s, much shorter than the typical reported values (3-5 minutes).

  3. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report1538-1950DepartmentWaveWind Program R&DResearchWindow Types

  4. STUDY TYPES What is a "Study Type"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorf, Martin E.

    #12;STUDY TYPES What is a "Study Type"? A Study Type is a defined business process. Study Types work together to streamline workflow, track data & keep users informed. There are 2 Study Types in eCOMS: COMS and IACUC. The COMS Study: The COMS Study is an online form that a Principal Investigator fills

  5. Gravitational-wave Detection With Matter-wave Interferometers Based On Standing Light Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongfeng Gao; Peng Ju; Baocheng Zhang; Mingsheng Zhan

    2011-03-25

    We study the possibility of detecting gravitational-waves with matter-wave interferometers, where atom beams are split, deflected and recombined totally by standing light waves. Our calculation shows that the phase shift is dominated by terms proportional to the time derivative of the gravitational wave amplitude. Taking into account future improvements on current technologies, it is promising to build a matter-wave interferometer detector with desired sensitivity.

  6. Electron standing waves on the Si,,111...-3 3-Ag surface Norio Sato and Sakura Takeda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    Electron standing waves on the Si,,111...- 3 3-Ag surface Norio Sato and Sakura Takeda Department-0012, Japan Received 2 July 1998 Electron standing waves have been observed near step edges and out as a potential barrier for the surface-state electrons to make the standing waves, while the other type does not

  7. Experimental and Numerical Study of Spar Buoy-magnet/spring Oscillators Used as Wave Energy Annette R. Grilli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Experimental and Numerical Study of Spar Buoy-magnet/spring Oscillators Used as Wave Energy.g., latching) of the SSLG, in order to further improve power generation. KEYWORDS : Wave energy systems networks), based on captur- ing renewable wave energy. To do so, we design and optimize a new type

  8. Design Methodology for a SEAREV Wave Energy Marie Ruellan, Hamid BenAhmed, Bernard Multon, Christophe Josset, Aurelien Babarit,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Design Methodology for a SEAREV Wave Energy Converter Marie Ruellan, Hamid BenAhmed, Bernard by presenting two power take-off (PTO) technologies for the SEAREV wave energy converter (WEC) followed technologies in- tended to transform wave energy into electricity. The types of systems are twofold

  9. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: EnergyGreat Basin Geothermal Area Jump to:

  10. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants application for approval to stabilize the 105N Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces-to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin is a reinforced unlined concrete structure 150 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 24 feet deep. The basin is segregated into seven areas sharing a common pool of water; the Discharge/Viewing (``D``) Pit, the fuel segregation pit (including a water tunnel that connects the ``D`` pit and segregation pit), two storage basins designated as North Basin and South Basin, two cask load-out pits, and a fuel examination area. The North Basin floor is entirely covered and the South Basin is partly covered by a modular array of cubicles formed by boron concrete posts and boron concrete panels.

  11. Wave Propagation and Scattering for the RS2 Brane Cosmology Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alain Bachelot

    2009-09-21

    We study the wave equation for the gravitational waves in the Randal-Sundrum brane cosmology model. We solve the global Cauchy problem and we establish that the solutions are the sum of a slowly decaying massless wave localized near the brane, and a superposition of massive dispersive waves. We compute the kernel of the truncated resolvent. We prove some $L^1-L^{\\infty}$, $L^2-L^{\\infty}$ decay estimates and global $L^p$ Strichartz type inequalities. We develop the complete scattering theory : existence and asymptotic completeness of the wave operators, computation of the scattering matrix, determination of the resonances on the logarithmic Riemann surface.

  12. Depositional history of the Mississippian Ullin and Fort Payne Formations in the Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasemi, Z.; Treworgy, J.D.; Norby, R.D. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01

    Field and subsurface data suggest that the mid-Mississippian Ullin Limestone in the Illinois Basin is composed of coalesced Waulsortian-type mounds and porous bryozoan-dominated buildups. Waulsortian mounds in the basin contain a lime mudstone to wackestone core that is flanked and capped by in situ porous bryozoan bafflestone or transported crinoidal-bryozoan packstone and grainstone. The mound core facies appear to be most common in the lower part of the Ullin and is thicker in a deeper outer-ramp setting. Shoreward and up-section (upper part of the outer-ramp through mid-ramp setting), the core facies is generally thinner, while the flanking and capping facies are thicker. Isopachous maps of the Ullin and Fort Payne suggest the presence of several large areas of thick carbonate buildups (Ullin) surrounded by a deep-water, sub-oxic environment (Fort Payne) in the Illinois Basin. Progradation of these buildups and associated facies resulted in a shallower ramp setting during deposition of the upper Ullin. Storm-generated carbonate sandwaves became widespread on this ramp. Sandwaves were mobile and for the most part unfavorable sites for further development of thick mud mounds and/or in situ bryozoan buildups. However, isolated mounds and flanking buildups are present in the upper part of the Ullin, and, together with the sandwaves, formed an irregular topography that led to the development of oolitic grainstone shoals during deposition of the overlying Salem Limestone.

  13. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  14. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  16. Standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  17. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Michigan 13.74 16.13 17.4% 99.82 16.2% 840 32.1% 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W 40.18 W 94.03 42.7% 699 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Jersey W...

  18. Enhancing Sustainability in River Basin Management through Conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    11 Enhancing Sustainability in River Basin Management through Conflict Resolution: Comparative channels, and effluents of massive quantities of point and non-point pollution from pipe, earth and sky .to be achieved. Conflict is inherent in river basin management,1 wherein diverse 'stakes' are held

  19. Progress in Understanding the Structural Geology, Basin Evolution,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and local geologic mapping, drilling and coring, and seismic reflection profiling have in- creased vastly by intrabasinal highs. 4. Integration of stratigraphy and structural geology. The sedimentary deposits of half-graben are influenced by basin geometry; consequently, stratigraphy can be used to infer aspects of basin evolution

  20. Fraser River Basin &ssment Program Conceptual Monitoring Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Fraser River Basin &ssment Program Conceptual Monitoring Design Prepared for Environment Canada Vancouver, B.C. V6J 5C6 Michael Paine EVS Environment Consultants 195 Pemberton Avenue North Vancouver, B. 1993. Fraser River Basin Assessment Program: Conceptual Monitoring Design. Pqared for Conservation

  1. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-1 LAKE ONTARIO BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-1 LAKE ONTARIO BASIN: OVERLAND PRECIPITATION, 1972-73 David C. BASIC DATA 3. PROCEDURE 4. ACKNOWLEDGMBNTS APPENDIX. LAKE ONTARIO STATION SUMMARY Page iv 1 1 2 5 10 FIGURES 1. The United States portion of the Lake Ontario drainage basin with the precipitation stations

  2. Burialand exhumation historyof Pennsylvanian strata, central Appalachian basin: anintegrated study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodnar, Robert J.

    Burialand exhumation historyof Pennsylvanian strata, central Appalachian basin: anintegrated study of Pennsylvanian strata in the central Appalachian foreland basin is constrained by integrating palaeothermometers homogenization temperatures indicate thatburial ofLower andUpperPennsylvanian strata of theAppalachianPlateau in

  3. Analysis of Ignition Testing on K-West Basin Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Abrefah; F.H. Huang; W.M. Gerry; W.J. Gray; S.C. Marschman; T.A. Thornton

    1999-08-10

    Approximately 2100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) discharged from the N-Reactor have been stored underwater at the K-Basins in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The spent fuel has been stored in the K-East Basin since 1975 and in the K-West Basin since 1981. Some of the SNF elements in these basins have corroded because of various breaches in the Zircaloy cladding that occurred during fuel discharge operations and/or subsequent handling and storage in the basins. Consequently, radioactive material in the fuel has been released into the basin water, and water has leaked from the K-East Basin into the soil below. To protect the Columbia River, which is only 380 m from the basins, the SNF is scheduled to be removed and transported for interim dry storage in the 200 East Area, in the central portion of the Site. However, before being shipped, the corroded fuel elements will be loaded into Multi-Canister OverPacks and conditioned. The conditioning process will be selected based on the Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) (WHC 1995), which was prepared on the basis of the dry storage concept developed by the Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team (ITA 1994).

  4. Basin Resonances in the Equatorial Indian Ocean WEIQING HAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Weiqing

    Basin Resonances in the Equatorial Indian Ocean WEIQING HAN Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic, LOCEAN, Paris, France BENE´ T DUNCAN Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University in the equatorial Indian Ocean (IO) interact to form basin resonances at the semiannual (180 day) and 90-day periods

  5. Current Trends in Logical Frameworks and Metalanguages David Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basin, David

    Current Trends in Logical Frameworks and Metalanguages David Basin Universitat Freiburg, Institut-Level Programming Languages (PLI'99) in Paris in September 1999. This workshop brought together designers, im Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. intro-final.tex; 24/01/2001; 17:13; p.1 #12; 2 Basin

  6. Licking River Basin, Cynthiana, Kentucky 24 March 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Licking River Basin, Cynthiana, Kentucky 24 March 2006 Abstract: The recommended project would reduce flood damages in the communities of Cynthiana, Millersburg, and Paris, in the Licking River B Kentucky, by the construction of two dry bed detention basins on tributaries of the South Fork

  7. Modal Decay in the AustraliaAntarctic Basin WILBERT WEIJER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griesel, Alexa

    Modal Decay in the Australia­Antarctic Basin WILBERT WEIJER Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los VIVIER LOCEAN IPSL, Paris, France (Manuscript received 5 January 2009, in final form 11 June 2009) ABSTRACT The barotropic intraseasonal variability in the Australia­Antarctic Basin (AAB) is studied

  8. QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2012 We are discontinuing our early December quantitative hurricane forecast for the next year and giving a more qualitative discussion of the factors which will determine next year's Atlantic basin hurricane activity. Our early

  9. QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    1 QUALITATIVE DISCUSSION OF ATLANTIC BASIN SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY FOR 2015 We discontinued our early December quantitative hurricane forecast in 2012 and are now giving a more qualitative discussion of the factors which will determine next year's Atlantic basin hurricane activity. One of the big uncertainties

  10. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  11. Slow Waves in Fractures Filled with Viscous Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korneev, Valeri

    2008-01-08

    Stoneley guided waves in a fluid-filled fracture generally have larger amplitudes than other waves, and therefore, their properties need to be incorporated in more realistic models. In this study, a fracture is modeled as an infinite layer of viscous fluid bounded by two elastic half-spaces with identical parameters. For small fracture thickness, I obtain a simple dispersion equation for wave-propagation velocity. This velocity is much smaller than the velocity of a fluid wave in a Biot-type solution, in which fracture walls are assumed to be rigid. At seismic prospecting frequencies and realistic fracture thicknesses, the Stoneley guided wave has wavelengths on the order of several meters and an attenuation Q factor exceeding 10, which indicates the possibility of resonance excitation in fluid-bearing rocks. The velocity and attenuation of Stoneley guided waves are distinctly different at low frequencies for water and oil. The predominant role of fractures in fluid flow at field scales is supported by permeability data showing an increase of several orders of magnitude when compared to values obtained at laboratory scales. These data suggest that Stoneley guided waves should be taken into account in theories describing seismic wave propagation in fluid-saturated rocks.

  12. MHD wave propagation in the neighbourhood of a two-dimensional null point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. McLaughlin; A. W. Hood

    2007-12-11

    The nature of fast magnetoacoustic and Alfv\\'en waves is investigated in a zero $\\beta$ plasma. This gives an indication of wave propagation in the low $\\beta$ solar corona. It is found that for a two-dimensional null point, the fast wave is attracted to that point and the front of the wave slows down as it approaches the null point, causing the current density to accumulate there and rise rapidly. Ohmic dissipation will extract the energy in the wave at this point. This illustrates that null points play an important role in the rapid dissipation of fast magnetoacoustic waves and suggests the location where wave heating will occur in the corona. The Alfv\\'en wave behaves in a different manner in that the wave energy is dissipated along the separatrices. For Alfv\\'en waves that are decoupled from fast waves, the value of the plasma $\\beta$ is unimportant. However, the phenomenon of dissipating the majority of the wave energy at a specific place is a feature of both wave types.

  13. Thermoplastic waves in magnetars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beloborodov, Andrei M

    2014-01-01

    Magnetar activity is generated by shear motions of the neutron star surface, which relieve internal magnetic stresses. An analogy with earthquakes and faults is problematic, as the crust is permeated by strong magnetic fields, which greatly constrain crustal displacements. We describe a new deformation mechanism that is specific to strongly magnetized neutron stars. The magnetically stressed crust begins to move because of a thermoplastic instability, which launches a wave that shears the crust and burns its magnetic energy. The propagating wave front resembles the deflagration front in combustion physics. We describe the conditions for the instability, the front structure and velocity, and discuss implications for observed magnetar activity.

  14. ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

    2000-04-01

    Progress in year 2 of this project is highlighted by the completing of the writing and testing of the project database, ''Atlas'', and populating it with all the project data gathered to date. This includes digitization of 17,000+ original Scout Tickets for the Michigan Basin. Work continues on the Driller's Reports, where they have scanned about 50,000 pages out of an estimated 300,000 pages. All of the scanned images have been attached to ''Atlas'', the visual database viewer developed for this project. A complete set of the 1/24,000 USGS DEM (Digital Elevation Models) for the State of Michigan has been downloaded from the USGS Web sites, decompressed and converted to ArcView Grid files. A large-scale map (48 inches x 84 inches) has been constructed by mosaicking of the high-resolution files. This map shows excellent ground surface detail and has drawn much comment and requests for copies at the venues where it has been displayed. Although it was generated for mapping of surface lineations the map has other uses, particularly analysis of the glacial drift in Michigan. It presents unusual problems due to its size and they are working with vendors on compression and display algorithms (e.g. MrSID{copyright}) in an attempt to make it available over the Internet, both for viewing and download. A set of aeromagnetic data for the Michigan Basin has been acquired and is being incorporated into the study. As reported previously, the general fracture picture in the Michigan Basin is a dominant NW-SE trend with a conjugate NE-SW trend. Subsurface, DEM and gravity data support the interpretation of a graben-type deep basement structural trend coincident with the Michigan Basin Gravity High. They plan to incorporate the aeromagnetic data into this interpretation as well.

  15. Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indrebo, Ann Kristin

    2001-01-01

    runup. Laboratory measurements of irregular waves interfering with vertical platform cylinders were used to obtain the Weibull coefficients necessary for the analytical model. Six data sets with different configurations where the wave elevation...

  16. Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuksel, Cem

    2010-10-12

    This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

  17. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  18. mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    combiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .solutions . . . . . . . . mm-wave imaging for medical and

  19. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Retinal Wave Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Underlying Retinal Wave Generation By Kevin J Ford AUnderlying Retinal Wave Generation By Kevin J Ford Doctor ofwith age, so does the wave generation mechanism. The most

  20. Guided wave monitoring of prestressing tendons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nucera, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    and applications of ultrasonic waves. CRC series in pure andStrands by Guided Stress Waves, ASCE Journal of Materials inin Cable Stays via Guided Wave Magnetostrictive Ultrasonics,

  1. mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    4.1.1 Slow wave transmissioncombiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .

  2. Super compact equation for water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyachenko, A I; Zakharov, V E

    2015-01-01

    We derive very simple compact equation for gravity water waves which includes nonlinear wave term (`a la NLSE) and advection term (may results in wave breaking).

  3. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  4. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for the 105N Basin Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coenenberg, E.T. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations.

  5. Generating Electromagnetic Waves from Gravity Waves in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Hogan; S. O'Farrell

    2009-05-18

    Examples of test electromagnetic waves on a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker(FLRW) background are constructed from explicit perturbations of the FLRW space-times describing gravitational waves propagating in the isotropic universes. A possible physical mechanism for the production of the test electromagnetic waves is shown to be the coupling of the gravitational waves with a test magnetic field, confirming the observation of Marklund, Dunsby and Brodin [Phys.Rev. D62,101501(R) (2000)].

  6. Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Donald Eugene

    1962-01-01

    WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

  7. Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 Mark Person*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gable, Carl W.

    technical constraints on the injection of CO2 into deep (>1.5 km) reservoirs under supercritical75 this amount of annual CO2 production. Assuming that CO2 is emplaced as a80 supercritical fluid havingPage | 1 Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 2 3 4

  8. THE INTRACONTINENTAL BASINS (ICONS) ATLAS APPLICATIONS IN EASTERN AUSTRALIA PESA Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium III Sydney, 1417 September, 2008 275

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    & Johnson 2001). Up to eleven different mechanisms are listed by Klein (1995) to explain the cause crustal and lithospheric structure data of intracontinental basins extracted from our global analysis data. Secondly, the crustal structure of these basins is put into a plate kinematic and geodynamic

  9. LONG WAVE EXPANSIONS FOR WATER WAVES OVER RANDOM TOPOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LONG WAVE EXPANSIONS FOR WATER WAVES OVER RANDOM TOPOGRAPHY ANNE DE BOUARD 1 , WALTER CRAIG 2 with the ran­ dom bottom. We show that the resulting influence of the random topography is expressed in terms of bottom topography a#ects the equations describing the limit of solutions in the long wave regime. We

  10. Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment L. Allan James* Geography Department, University South Carolina Abstract The concept of sediment waves is reviewed and clarifications are proposed for nomenclature con- cerning vertical channel responses to large fluvial sediment fluxes over a period of a decade

  11. Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation The wave equation in an ideal fluid can be derived from hydrodynamics and the adia- batic relation between pressure and density. The equation for conservation of mass, Euler's equation (Newton's 2nd Law), and the adiabatic equation of state are respec

  12. Water Waves and Integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossen I. Ivanov

    2007-07-12

    The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

  13. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  14. Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington www.transformativewave.com #12;#12;North America are shifted to off peak times #12;#12;Transformative Wave Technologies www.transformativewave.com #12

  15. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California, State and Federal Agencies and their expectations in respect to potential wave power deployments Jim a huge amount of wave measurement data from various data sources Asfaw Beyene of the Department

  16. Water wave interactions Walter Craig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomann, Laurent

    Water wave interactions Walter Craig Department of Mathematics & Statistics ´EquationsMaster University) Water wave interactions 25 janvier 2011 1 / 34 #12;Joint work with: Philippe Guyenne University, Killam Research Fellows Program, Fields Institute Walter Craig (McMaster University) Water wave

  17. Extreme wave impinging and overtopping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Yong Uk

    2009-06-02

    This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi...

  18. 2, 70177025, 2014 Freaque wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NHESSD 2, 7017­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract to the corresponding final paper in NHESS if available. Brief Communication: Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  19. 2014 Tube -1 STANDING WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    2014 Tube - 1 STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN The objective of the experiment is: · To study the harmonic structure of standing waves in an air column. APPARATUS: Computer, FFTScope software, PC speaker will produce nothing noteworthy. But, if the phase relationship is correct, standing waves can be formed

  20. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    2000-10-25

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool (NDP) is southeast New Mexico is one of the nine projects selected in 1995 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for participation in the Class III Reservoir Field Demonstration Program. The goals of the DOE cost-shared Class Program are to: (1) extend economic production, (2) increase ultimate recovery, and (3) broaden information exchange and technology application. Reservoirs in the Class III Program are focused on slope-basin and deep-basin clastic depositional types.

  1. Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves In this chapter we will review selected properties of electromagnetic waves since radar involves the transmission, propagation and scattering of EM waves by various is the electrostatic force between two point charges. #12;Electromagnetic WavesElectromagnetic Waves Electric fields

  2. Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY February 2013 Academic Writing Guide Part 2 ­ Assignment Types: This section outlines the basic types of written assignments, providing structural elements and examples. #12;2 II. Assignment Types 1. Essay Writing

  3. BASIN-CENTERED GAS SYSTEMS OF THE U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin A. Popov; Vito F. Nuccio; Thaddeus S. Dyman; Timothy A. Gognat; Ronald C. Johnson; James W. Schmoker; Michael S. Wilson; Charles Bartberger

    2000-11-01

    The USGS is re-evaluating the resource potential of basin-centered gas accumulations in the U.S. because of changing perceptions of the geology of these accumulations, and the availability of new data since the USGS 1995 National Assessment of United States oil and gas resources (Gautier et al., 1996). To attain these objectives, this project used knowledge of basin-centered gas systems and procedures such as stratigraphic analysis, organic geochemistry, modeling of basin thermal dynamics, reservoir characterization, and pressure analysis. This project proceeded in two phases which had the following objectives: Phase I (4/1998 through 5/1999): Identify and describe the geologic and geographic distribution of potential basin-centered gas systems, and Phase II (6/1999 through 11/2000): For selected systems, estimate the location of those basin-centered gas resources that are likely to be produced over the next 30 years. In Phase I, we characterize thirty-three (33) potential basin-centered gas systems (or accumulations) based on information published in the literature or acquired from internal computerized well and reservoir data files. These newly defined potential accumulations vary from low to high risk and may or may not survive the rigorous geologic scrutiny leading towards full assessment by the USGS. For logistical reasons, not all basins received the level of detail desired or required.

  4. Chiral Heat Wave and wave mixing in chiral media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chernodub, M N

    2015-01-01

    We show that a hot rotating fluid of relativistic chiral fermions possesses a new gapless collective excitation associated with coherent propagation of energy density and chiral density waves along the axis of rotation. This excitation, which we call the Chiral Heat Wave, emerges due to a mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly. At finite density the Chiral Heat Wave couples to the Chiral Vortical Wave while in the presence of an external magnetic field it mixes with the Chiral Magnetic Wave. We find that the coupled waves - which are coherent fluctuations of the vector, axial and energy currents - have generally different velocities compared to the velocities of the individual waves. We also demonstrate that rotating chiral systems subjected to external magnetic field possess non-propagating metastable thermal excitations, the Dense Hot Spots.

  5. Biothem-based Mississippian transect from the Basin and Range Province to the Anadarko basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frye, M.W. ); Lane, H.R. ); Couples, G.D. )

    1991-03-01

    A west-to-east transect, constructed using the 'Biostratigraphic Package Approach' of Lane and Frye and illustrating the biostratigraphic, lithologic, and depositional sequence relationships within the Mississippian system, extends from the basin and range province across the Transcontinental Arch (TA) and into the Anadarko basin. The transect is based on both published and proprietary biostratigraphic data. It was constructed primarily to portray the regional distribution and exploration significance of biotherms relative to the axis of the TA. These biotherms are biostratigraphic units that are wedge- or lens-shaped bodies of strata that are bounded by paleontologically recognizable unconformities in their updip extents, are conformable with underlying and overlying biothems in their maximum shelfal development, are conformable or bounded by surfaces of nondeposition and or submarine erosion in their downdip, basinal extremities, and also contain a logical sequence of depositionally related facies. An unexpected result of constructing the transect was the recognition of an apparent compensatory temporal and spatial distribution of Mississippian biothems. This distribution is interpreted to imply that biothems deposited during relative highstand events on one flank of the TA are time-equivalent to biothems deposited during relative lowstand events on the opposite flank of the TA. Platescale tilting, along with local subsidence and uplift, is suggested as the overriding mechanism controlling deposition along the extent of the transect.

  6. Climate-and eustasy-driven cyclicity in Pennsylvanian fusulinid assemblages, Donets Basin (Ukraine)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montañez, Isabel Patricia

    to the formation of economically productive coal seams in the Donets Basin, western Europe, North America

  7. Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

  8. Two Problems in Computational Wave Dynamics: Klemp-Wilhelmson Splitting at Large Scales and Wave-Wave Instabilities in Rotating Mountain Waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viner, Kevin Carl

    2011-02-22

    IN COMPUTATIONAL WAVE DYNAMICS: KLEMP-WILHELMSON SPLITTING AT LARGE SCALES AND WAVE-WAVE INSTABILITIES IN ROTATING MOUNTAIN WAVES A Dissertation by KEVIN CARL VINER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2009 Major Subject: Atmospheric Sciences TWO PROBLEMS IN COMPUTATIONAL WAVE DYNAMICS: KLEMP-WILHELMSON SPLITTING AT LARGE SCALES AND WAVE-WAVE INSTABILITIES IN ROTATING MOUNTAIN WAVES A Dissertation...

  9. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  10. The geochemistry of uranium in the Orca Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Frederick Fewell

    1979-01-01

    in each sample was also measur. ed to gain insight concerning the origin and nature of Urea Basin deposits. For comparison, cores from the brine- filled Suakin and Atlantis II Deeps, both in the Red Sea, were also analyzed. Ores Basin sediments show... Deep where no uranium enrichment was also observed. The Atlantis II Deep, however, contains sediments significantly enriched in uranium. This basin differs from the other two in that its brin. e temperature is close to 40'C warmer. than average Red...

  11. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S. (comp.)

    1980-08-01

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  12. Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Showalter, Kenneth

    Noise sustained waves in subexcitable media: From chemical waves to brain waves P. Junga the threshold of pat- tern formation, noise can sustain locally coherent pat- terns. The patterns exhibit of nonequilibrium statistical phys- ics, noise has been recognized to play an important role in the formation

  13. Wave–vortex interactions in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yuan Bühler, Oliver

    2014-02-15

    This is a theoretical study of wave–vortex interaction effects in the two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which is a useful conceptual model for the limiting dynamics of superfluid quantum condensates at zero temperature. The particular wave–vortex interaction effects are associated with the scattering and refraction of small-scale linear waves by the straining flows induced by quantized point vortices and, crucially, with the concomitant nonlinear back-reaction, the remote recoil, that these scattered waves exert on the vortices. Our detailed model is a narrow, slowly varying wavetrain of small-amplitude waves refracted by one or two vortices. Weak interactions are studied using a suitable perturbation method in which the nonlinear recoil force on the vortex then arises at second order in wave amplitude, and is computed in terms of a Magnus-type force expression for both finite and infinite wavetrains. In the case of an infinite wavetrain, an explicit asymptotic formula for the scattering angle is also derived and cross-checked against numerical ray tracing. Finally, under suitable conditions a wavetrain can be so strongly refracted that it collapses all the way onto a zero-size point vortex. This is a strong wave–vortex interaction by definition. The conditions for such a collapse are derived and the validity of ray tracing theory during the singular collapse is investigated.

  14. Don't let the river run dry: Efficiency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    stream_source_info Don't let the river run dry.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 8105 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Don't let the river run dry.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 Don?t let the river run dry Effi ciency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin Story by Danielle Supercinski txH2O | pg. 6 An unknown fact to most is that high water demands by agriculture along with the ever-increasing urban...

  15. Don't let the river run dry: Efficiency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    stream_source_info Don't let the river run dry.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 8105 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Don't let the river run dry.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 Don?t let the river run dry Effi ciency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin Story by Danielle Supercinski txH2O | pg. 6 An unknown fact to most is that high water demands by agriculture along with the ever-increasing urban...

  16. wave velocity group velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    -11 3.5e-11 4e-11 4.5e-11 5e-11 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 location(nm) temperature(K) wave location 15 20 25 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 numberdensity(a.u.) frequency (THz) Summary Model Simulation Results Context. - Seitz and Koehler (1956) solve Boltzmann transport equations Monte Carlo approach is used to· 90 100 3e

  17. DNA waves and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

    2010-12-23

    Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

  18. Geology and geohydrology of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle. Report on the progress of nuclear waste isolation feasibility studies, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C.; Presley, M.W.; Handford, C.R.; Finley, R.J.; Dutton, S.P.; Baumgardner, R.W. Jr.; McGillis, K.A.; Simpkins, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Since early 1977, the Bureau of Economic Geology has been evaluating several salt-bearing basins within the State of Texas as part of the national nuclear repository program. The Bureau, a research unit of The University of Texas at Austin and the State of Texas, is carrying out a long-term program to gather and interpret all geologic and hydrologic information necessary for description, delineation, and evaluation of salt-bearing strata in the Palo Duro and Dalhart Basins of the Texas Panhandle. The program in FY 79 has been subdivided into four broad research tasks, which are addressed by a basin analysis group, a surface studies group, a geohydrology group, and a host-rock analysis group. The basin analysis group has delineated the structural and stratigraphic framework of the basins, initiated natural resource assessment, and integrated data from 8000 ft (2400 m) of core material into salt-stratigraphy models. Salt depth and thickness have been delineated for seven salt-bearing stratigraphic units. Concurrently, the surface studies group has collected ground and remotely sensed data to describe surficial processes, including salt solution, slope retreat/erosion mechanisms, geomorphic evolution, and fracture system development. The basin geohydrology group has begun evaluating both shallow and deep fluid circulation within the basins. The newly formed host-rock analysis group has initiated study of cores from two drilling sites for analysis of salt and the various lithologies overlying and interbedded with salt units. This paper, a summary report of progress in FY 79, presents principal conclusions and reviews methods used and types of data and maps generated.

  19. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Hydroelastic waves on fluid sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parau, Emilian I.

    ). In particular our work may find application in flat plate-type fuel assemblies found in nuclear reactor coolingUnder consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Hydroelastic waves on fluid sheets M. G. B 6BT, UK (Received 26 March 2012) Nonlinear travelling waves on a two-dimensional inviscid fluid

  20. Noninvasive electromechanical wave imaging and conduction-relevant velocity estimation in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    Noninvasive electromechanical wave imaging and conduction-relevant velocity estimation in vivo-correlation Displacement Electromechanical Left ventricle Myocardial Pacing a b s t r a c t Electromechanical wave imaging-type mice (n = 12) at high frame rates in order to take advantage of the transient electromechanical

  1. Fresnel tomography: a novel approach to the wave function reconstruction based on Fresnel representation of tomograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. De Nicola; R. Fedele; M. A. Man'ko; V. I. Man'ko

    2005-03-03

    New type of tomographic probability distribution, which contains complete information on the density matrix (wave function) related to the Fresnel transform of the complex wave function, is introduced. Relation to symplectic tomographic probability distribution is elucidated. Multimode generalization of the Fresnel tomography is presented. Examples of applications of the present approach are given.

  2. Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf their production is tied to light and wave energy, carbonate sediments are most effectively produced in shallow energy regime to be reliable indicators of facies type when considered in isolation. Consid- ered

  3. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

    2005-05-10

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

  4. A Typed Operational Semantics for Type Theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goguen, Healfdene

    Untyped reduction provides a natural operational semantics for type theory. Normalization results say that such a semantics is sound. However, this reduction does not take type information into account and gives no information ...

  5. CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

    2011-04-11

    An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

  6. Nonlinear acoustic waves in channels with variable cross sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir F. Kovalev; Oleg V. Rudenko

    2012-11-02

    The point symmetry group is studied for the generalized Webster-type equation describing non-linear acoustic waves in lossy channels with variable cross sections. It is shown that, for certain types of cross section profiles, the admitted symmetry group is extended and the invariant solutions corresponding to these profiles are obtained. Approximate analytic solutions to the generalized Webster equation are derived for channels with smoothly varying cross sections and arbitrary initial conditions.

  7. WaveScript: A Case-Study in Applying a Distributed Stream-Processing Language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, Ryan

    2008-01-31

    Applications that combine live data streams with embedded, parallel,and distributed processing are becoming more commonplace. WaveScriptis a domain-specific language that brings high-level, type-safe,garbage-collected ...

  8. Optimisation and comparison of integrated models of direct-drive linear machines for wave energy conversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crozier, Richard Carson

    2014-06-30

    Combined electrical and structural models of five types of permanent magnet linear electrical machines suitable for direct-drive power take-off on wave energy applications are presented. Electromagnetic models were ...

  9. A comparison of observed and modeled surface waves in southern Lake Michigan and the implications for models of sediment resuspension.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, N.; Lesht, B. M.; Schwab, D. J.; Environmental Research; Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab

    2004-06-25

    Subsurface pressure sensors were used to make measurements of surface waves during 18 deployments in southern Lake Michigan between 1998 and 2000. Most of the observations were made during the unstratified period (November--May) in water depths between 10 and 55 m. The observations (as well as those obtained from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) buoy 45007, which is located in the middle of the southern basin of the lake) were compared to the results obtained from the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL)-Donelan wave model implemented on a 2-km grid. The results show that the wave model does a good job of calculating the wave heights, but consistently underestimates the wave periods. In over 80% of the cases the bottom stresses calculated from both the observations and the wave model results agree as to whether or not resuspension occurs, but over 70% of this agreement is for cases when resuspension does not occur; both stresses predict resuspension about 6% of the time. Since the bottom stresses calculated from the model results are usually lower than those calculated from the observations, resuspension estimates based on the wave model parameters are also lower than those calculated from the observed waves.

  10. Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    against a direct link between the Yellowstone hotspot and the initiation of extension, casting additional doubt on the role of the hotspot in extension across the broader Basin and...

  11. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  12. Oil and gas resources in the West Siberian Basin, Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The study does not analyze the costs or technology necessary to achieve the estimates of the ultimate recoverable oil and gas. This study uses reservoir data to estimate recoverable oil and gas quantities which were aggregated to the field level. Field totals were summed to a basin total for discovered fields. An estimate of undiscovered oil and gas, from work of the US Geological Survey (USGS), was added to give a total basin resource volume. Recent production decline points out Russia`s need to continue development of its discovered recoverable oil and gas. Continued exploration is required to discover additional oil and gas that remains undiscovered in the basin.

  13. Negotiating nature : expertise and environment in the Klamath River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Nicholas Seong Chul

    2010-01-01

    "Negotiating Nature" explores resource management in action and the intertwined roles of law and science in environmental conflicts in the Upper Klamath River Basin in southern Oregon. I follow disputes over the management ...

  14. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors, 2008 U.S. Natural Gas Transporation Corridors out of Major...

  15. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  16. River Basin Economics and Management: International Trade, Allocation and Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural and Resource Economics, 27(1):16–39. Knapp, K.river basin. Agricultural Economics, 24:33–46. Schoup, G. ,satiable agents. Games and Economics Behavior, 64:35–50.

  17. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  18. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  19. Post-Formative Ceramics in the Eastern Grat Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Donald W

    1986-01-01

    Great Salt Lake Fremont Ceramics. In: The Levee Site and the1986). Post-Formative Ceramics in the Eastern Great Basin: A1977 Prehistoric Ceramics of the Fremont. Museiun of

  20. Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission was established as a bi-state commission composed of members from the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina. The purpose of the...

  1. Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through...

  2. A 76GHz PLL for mm-wave imaging applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Khoa M.

    A 76 GHz phase-locked loop (PLL) was designed in 0.13 ?m IBM BiCMOS8HP technology with the intended application of millimeter-wave imaging. The PLL has a type II second order loop filter. The voltage-controlled oscillator ...

  3. Infiltration in Porous Media with Dynamic Capillary Pressure: Travelling Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulshof, Joost

    Infiltration in Porous Media with Dynamic Capillary Pressure: Travelling Waves C. Cuesta # , C to gravity, results in a pseudo­parabolic Burgers type equation. We give a rigorous study of global of study in this paper. We confine ourselves to the particular case of unsaturated groundwater flow, where

  4. ULF Waves Associated with Enhanced Subauroral Proton Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ULF Waves Associated with Enhanced Subauroral Proton Precipitation Thomas J. Immel, S. B. Mende, H Abstract. Several types of sub-auroral proton precipitation events have been identified using and solar wind conditions and the mechanism driving the precipitation has often been assumed

  5. Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saulsbury, Bo; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2010-10-01

    As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

  6. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

  7. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  8. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Laboun, A.A.

    1987-05-01

    Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstones of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.

  9. Visayan Basin - the birthplace of Philippine petroleum exploration revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rillera, F.G. ); Durkee, E.F. )

    1994-07-01

    Petroleum exploration in the Philippines has its roots in the Visayan Basin in the central Philippines. This is a Tertiary basin with up to 30,000 ft of sedimentary fill. With numerous surface oil and gas manifestations known as early as 1888, the area was the site of the first attempts to establish commercial petroleum production in the country. Over the past 100 years, more than 200 wells have been drilled in the basin. Several of these have yielded significant oil and gas shows. Production, albeit noncommercial in scale, has been demonstrated to be present in some places. A review of past exploration data reveals that many of the earlier efforts failed due to poorly located tests from both structural and stratigraphic standpoints. Poor drilling and completion technology and lack of funding compounded the problems of early explorationists. Because of this, the basin remains relatively underexplored. A recent assessment by COPLEX and E.F. Durkee and Associates demonstrates the presence of many untested prospects in the basin. These prospects may contain recoverable oil and gas potential on the order of 5 to 10 MMBO onshore and 25 to 100 MMBO offshore. With new exploration ideas, innovative development concepts, and the benefit of modern technology, commercial oil and gas production from the basin may yet be realized.

  10. SOLITARY-WAVE AND MULTI-PULSED TRAVELING-WAVE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-00-81

    ential equations which model waves in a horizontal water channel traveling in ... undisturbed water depth and ? lies in [0,1]. ..... We content ourselves with.

  11. Plane wave solution for elastic wave scattering by a heterogeneous ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-05-28

    tory ultrasonic transmission tests across a synthetic fracture with known, regular geometry, Myer et al. 19855 found good agreement between measured waves ...

  12. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Nearshore Wave Propagation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Converter Effects on Nearshore Wave Propagation Jesse Roberts 1 , Grace Chang *2 , Craig Jones *3 Sandia National Laboratories 1515 Eubank SE, Albuquerque, NM 87123 USA 1...

  13. Deep-water gravity waves: nonlinear theory of wave groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mindlin, I M

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear initial-boundary value problem on deep-water gravity waves of finite amplitude is solved approximately (up to small terms of higher order) assuming that the waves are generated by an initial disturbance to the water and the horizontal dimensions of the initially disturbed body of the water are much larger than the magnitude of the free surface displacement. A numerable set of specific free surface waves is obtained in closed form and it is shown that free surface waves produced by an arbitrary initial disturbance to the water is a combination (not superposition: the waves are nonlinear) of the specific waves. A set of dispersive wave packets is found with one-to-one correspondence between the packets and positive integers, say, packet numbers, such that any initial free surface displacement gradually disintegrates into a number (limited or unlimited, depending on initial conditions) of the wave packets. The greater the packet number, the shorter the wavelength of the packet's carrier wave component,...

  14. Catching a Wave: Innovative Wave Energy Device Surfs for Power...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and cost-effective electricity from clean energy resources, including water. Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which generate power from waves, tides, or...

  15. PETROGRAPHY AND PROVENANCE OF VOLCANICLASTIC SANDS AND SANDSTONES RECOVERED FROM THE WOODLARK RIFT BASIN AND TROBRIAND FOREARC BASIN, LEG 180 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Timothy R; Robertson, Alastair H F

    2002-01-01

    Modal analysis of middle Miocene to Pleistocene volcaniclastic sands and sandstones recovered from Sites 1108, 1109, 1118, 1112, 1115, 1116, and 1114 within the Woodlark Basin during Leg 180 of the Ocean Drilling Program ...

  16. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Spencer

    2010-01-01

    and ?tting a straight line. Radio waves are refracted signi?We note that while radio waves are refracted downward inwaves, similar to radio waves, propagate with small (

  17. Basin structure of optimization based state and parameter estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Schumann-Bischoff; Ulrich Parlitz; Henry D. I. Abarbanel; Mark Kostuk; Daniel Rey; Michael Eldridge; Stefan Luther

    2015-07-08

    Most data based state and parameter estimation methods require suitable initial values or guesses to achieve convergence to the desired solution, which typically is a global minimum of some cost function. Unfortunately, however, other stable solutions (e.g., local minima) may exist and provide suboptimal or even wrong estimates. Here we demonstrate for a 9-dimensional Lorenz-96 model how to characterize the basin size of the global minimum when applying some particular optimization based estimation algorithm. We compare three different strategies for generating suitable initial guesses and we investigate the dependence of the solution on the given trajectory segment (underlying the measured time series). To address the question of how many state variables have to be measured for optimal performance, different types of multivariate time series are considered consisting of 1, 2, or 3 variables. Based on these time series the local observability of state variables and parameters of the Lorenz-96 model is investigated and confirmed using delay coordinates. This result is in good agreement with the observation that correct state and parameter estimation results are obtained if the optimization algorithm is initialized with initial guesses close to the true solution. In contrast, initialization with other exact solutions of the model equations (different from the true solution used to generate the time series) typically fails, i.e. the optimization procedure ends up in local minima different from the true solution. Initialization using random values in a box around the attractor exhibits success rates depending on the number of observables and the available time series (trajectory segment).

  18. Impacts of precipitation seasonality and ecosystem types on evapotranspiration in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T; Yu, Guirui; Tieszen, Larry L

    2010-01-01

    physical properties alter water and energy fluxes of an oak-The model simulates the energy, water, carbon, and momentumSeasonal variation of energy and water vapor exchange rates

  19. Impacts of precipitation seasonality and ecosystem types on evapotranspiration in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T; Yu, Guirui; Tieszen, Larry L

    2010-01-01

    of shoot water potential and vapor pressure difference, Treeterm average. [ 24 ] The vapor pressure deficit (VPD) wasb) precipitation, (c) vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and (d)

  20. Impacts of precipitation seasonality and ecosystem types on evapotranspiration in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T; Yu, Guirui; Tieszen, Larry L

    2010-01-01

    and K. Tan (2005), Precipitation patterns alter growth ofobserved global land precipitation variations during 1900 –and changes in global precipitation patterns: What do we

  1. Holographic model of hybrid and coexisting s-wave and p-wave Josephson junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuai Liu; Yong-Qiang Wang

    2015-10-27

    In this paper the holographic model for hybrid and coexisting s-wave and p-wave Josephson junction is constructed by a triplet charged scalar field coupled with a non-Abelian $SU(2)$ gauge fields in (3+1)-dimensional AdS spacetime. Depending on the value of chemical potential $\\mu$, one can show that there are four types of junctions (s+p-N-s+p, s+p-N-s, s+p-N-p and s-N-p). We show that DC current of all the hybrid and coexisting s-wave and p-wave junctions is proportional to the sine of the phase difference across the junction. In addition, the maximum current and the total condensation decays with the width of junction exponentially, respectively. For s+p-N-s and s-N-p junction, the maximum current decreases with growing temperature. Moreover, we find that the maximum current increases with growing temperature for s+p-N-s+p and s+p-N-p junction, which is in the different manner as the behaviour of s+p-N-s and s-N-p junction.

  2. Spin waves in the (

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscombe, O. J.; Chen, G. F.; Fang, Chen; Perring, T. G.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Christianson, Andrew D; Egami, Takeshi; Wang, Nanlin; Hu, Jiangping; Dai, Pengcheng

    2011-01-01

    We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

  3. Elements of Radio Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank G. Borg; Ismo Hakala; Jukka Määttälä

    2007-12-24

    We present a summary of the basic properties of the radio wave generation, propagation and reception, with a special attention to the gigahertz bandwidth region which is of interest for wireless sensor networks. We also present some measurement results which use the so-called RSSI indicator in order to track how the field strength varies with position and distance of the transceivers. We hope the paper may be useful to anyone who looks for a quick review of the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory with application to antennas.

  4. Solitary and shock waves in discrete double power-law materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. B. Herbold; V. F. Nesterenko

    2007-08-24

    A novel strongly nonlinear laminar metamaterial supporting new types of solitary and shock waves with impact energy mitigating capabilities is presented. It consists of steel plates with intermittent polymer toroidal rings acting as strongly nonlinear springs with large allowable strain. Their force-displacement relationship is described by the addition of two power-law relationships resulting in a solitary wave speed and width depending on the amplitude. This double nonlinearity allows splitting of an initial impulse into two separate strongly nonlinear solitary wave trains. Solitary and shock waves are observed experimentally and analyzed numerically in an assembly with Teflon o-rings.

  5. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

    2005-04-01

    The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the Trenton-Black River interval to delineation of regional limestone diagenesis in the basin. A consistent basin-wide pattern of marine and burial diagenesis that resulted in relatively low porosity and permeability in the subtidal facies of these rocks has been documented across the study area. Six diagenetic stages have been recognized: four marine diagenesis stages and two burial diagenesis stages. This dominance of extensive marine and burial diagenesis yielded rocks with low reservoir potential, with the exception of fractured limestone and dolostone reservoirs. Commercial amounts of porosity, permeability and petroleum accumulation appear to be restricted to areas where secondary porosity developed in association with hydrothermal fluid flow along faults and fractures related to basement tectonics. A broad range of geochemical and fluid inclusion analyses have aided in a better understanding of the origin of the dolomites in the Trenton and Black River Groups over the study area. The results of these analyses support a hydrothermal origin for all of the various dolomite types found to date. The fluid inclusion data suggest that all of the dolomite types analyzed formed from hot saline brines. The dolomite is enriched in iron and manganese, which supports a subsurface origin for the dolomitizing brine. Strontium isotope data suggest that the fluids passed through basement rocks or immature siliciclastic rocks prior to forming the dolomites. All of these data suggest a hot, subsurface origin for the dolomites. The project database continued to be redesigned, developed and deployed. Production data are being reformatted for standard relational database management system requirements. Use of the project intranet by industry partners essentially doubled during the reporting period.

  6. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  7. Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

    2008-05-06

    We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

  8. Random wave functions and percolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bogomolny; C. Schmit

    2007-08-31

    Recently it was conjectured that nodal domains of random wave functions are adequately described by critical percolation theory. In this paper we strengthen this conjecture in two respects. First, we show that, though wave function correlations decay slowly, a careful use of Harris' criterion confirms that these correlations are unessential and nodal domains of random wave functions belong to the same universality class as non critical percolation. Second, we argue that level domains of random wave functions are described by the non-critical percolation model.

  9. Types of Commissioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several commissioning types exist to address the specific needs of equipment and systems across both new and existing buildings. The following commissioning types provide a good overview.

  10. Postdoc Appointment Types

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Appointment Types Postdoc Appointment Types Most postdocs will be offered a postdoctoral research associate appointment. Each year, approximately 30 Postdoctoral Fellow...

  11. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockridge, P. (National Geophysical Data Center, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  12. Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2012-11-01

    In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states.

  13. General Analytic Results for Nonlinear Waves and Solitons in Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred C. Adams; Marco Fatuzzo; Richard Watkins

    1993-10-06

    We study nonlinear wave phenomena in self-gravitating fluid systems, with a particular emphasis on applications to molecular clouds. This paper presents analytical results for one spatial dimension. We show that a large class of physical systems can be described by theories with a ``charge density'' $q(\\rho)$; this quantity replaces the density on the right hand side of the Poisson equation for the gravitational potential. We use this formulation to prove general results about nonlinear wave motions in self-gravitating systems. We show that in order for stationary waves to exist, the total charge (the integral of the charge density over the wave profile) must vanish. This ``no-charge'' property for solitary waves is related to the capability of a system to be stable to gravitational perturbations for arbitrarily long wavelengths. We find necessary and sufficient conditions on the charge density for the existence of solitary waves and stationary waves. We then apply these results to study nonlinear waves in Jeans-type theories, Yukawa theories, and a pseudo-two-dimensional treatment. We study the allowed types of wave behavior for all of these models. Finally, we discuss the implications of this work for molecular cloud structure.

  14. The sup 36 Cl ages of the brines in the Magadi-Natron basin, east Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufman, A.; Margaritz, M.A.; Hollos, G. ); Paul, M.; Boaretto, E. ); Hillaire-Marcel, C. ); Taieb, M. )

    1990-10-01

    The depression in the East African Rift which includes both Lake Magadi and Lake Natron forms a closed basin within which almost all the dissolved chloride originates in precipitation, since there is no important source of very ancient sedimentary chloride. This provides an ideal setting for the evaluation of the {sup 36}Cl methodology as a geochemical and hydrological tracer. The main source of recent water, as represented by the most dilute samples measured, is characterized by a {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratio of 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}14}, in agreement with the calculated value expected in precipitation. Surface evaporation increases the chlorinity of the local freshwater inflow by about a factor of 110 without changing the isotopic ratio, indicating that little chloride enters the system in the form of sediment leachate. A second type of brine found in the basin occurs in a hot deep groundwater reservoir and is characterized by lower {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios (<1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}14}). By comparing this value with the 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} in recent recharge, one obtains an approximate salt accumulation age of 760 Ka which is consistent with thee time of the first appearance of the lake. These older brines also have lower {sup 18}O and {sup 2}H values which indicate that they were recharged during a climatically different era. The {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in the inflowing waters and in the accumulated brine, together with the known age of the Lake Magadi basin, may be used to estimate the importance of the hypogene and epigene, as opposed to the meteoric, mode of {sup 36}Cl production. Such a calculation shows that the hypogene and epigene processes together contribute less than 6% of the total {sup 36}Cl present in the lake.

  15. Crustal structure of mountain belts and basins: Industry and academic collaboration at Cornell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allmendinger, R.; Barazangi, M.; Brown, L. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Interdisciplinary investigations of the large-scale structure and evolution of key basins and orogenic belts around the world are the focal point of academic-industry interaction at Cornell. Ongoing and new initiatives with significant industry involvement include: Project INDEPTH (Interdisciplinary Deep Profiling of Tibet and the Himalayas), a multinational effort to delineate deep structure across the type example of active continent-continent collision. 300 km of deep reflection profiling was collected across the Himalaya: and southern Tibet Plateau in 1992 and 1994. CAP (Cornell Andes Project), a long-standing interdisciplinary effort to understand the structure and evolution of the Andes, with a focus on Argentina, Chile and Bolivia. A deep reflection profile is tentatively planned for 1997. Intra-plate Orogeny in the Middle East and North Africa is the focus of multidisciplinary regional syntheses of existing seismic reflection and other databases in Syria (Palmyrides)and Morocco (Atlas), with an emphasis on reactivation and inversion tectonics. Project URSEIS (Urals Reflection Seismic Experiment and Integrated Studies) is a collaboration with EUROPROBE to collect 500 km of vibroseis and dynamite deep reflection profiling across the southern Urals in 1995. Project CRATON, an element in COCORP`s systematic exploration of the continental US, is a nascent multi-disciplinary effort to understand the buried craton of the central US and the basins built upon it. Global Basins Research Network (GBRN) is a diversified observational and computational effort to image and model the movement of pore fluids in detail and on a regional scale for a producing oil structure in the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. A STUDY OF ROCK-WATER-NUCLEAR WASTE INTERACTIONS IN THE PASCO BASIN, WASHINGTON -- Part: Distribution and Composition of Secondary and Primary Mineral Phases in Basalts of the Pasco Basin, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, L.V.

    2010-01-01

    IN THE PASCO BASIN, WASHINGTON PART I DISTRIBUTION ANDOF THE PASCO BASIN, WASHINGTON L. V. Benson and L. S. TeagueBasin of southeastern Washington. In particular, we have

  17. Discrete wave turbulence of rotational capillary water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Constantin; Elena Kartashova; Erik Wahlén

    2010-05-12

    We study the discrete wave turbulent regime of capillary water waves with constant non-zero vorticity. The explicit Hamiltonian formulation and the corresponding coupling coefficient are obtained. We also present the construction and investigation of resonance clustering. Some physical implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  18. Topological horseshoes in travelling waves of discretized nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yi-Chiuan, E-mail: YCChen@math.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shyan-Shiou, E-mail: sschen@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Juan-Ming, E-mail: jmyuan@pu.edu.tw [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-15

    Applying the concept of anti-integrable limit to coupled map lattices originated from space-time discretized nonlinear wave equations, we show that there exist topological horseshoes in the phase space formed by the initial states of travelling wave solutions. In particular, the coupled map lattices display spatio-temporal chaos on the horseshoes.

  19. Hydroelastic response of a floating runway to cnoidal waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ertekin, R. C.; Xia, Dingwu

    2014-02-15

    The hydroelastic response of mat-type Very Large Floating Structures (VLFSs) to severe sea conditions, such as tsunamis and hurricanes, must be assessed for safety and survivability. An efficient and robust nonlinear hydroelastic model is required to predict accurately the motion of and the dynamic loads on a VLFS due to such large waves. We develop a nonlinear theory to predict the hydroelastic response of a VLFS in the presence of cnoidal waves and compare the predictions with the linear theory that is also developed here. This hydroelastic problem is formulated by directly coupling the structure with the fluid, by use of the Level I Green-Naghdi theory for the fluid motion and the Kirchhoff thin plate theory for the runway. The coupled fluid structure system, together with the appropriate jump conditions are solved in two-dimensions by the finite-difference method. The numerical model is used to study the nonlinear response of a VLFS to storm waves which are modeled by use of the cnoidal-wave theory. Parametric studies show that the nonlinearity of the waves is very important in accurately predicting the dynamic bending moment and wave run-up on a VLFS in high seas.

  20. Seismic waves in rocks with fluids and fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2007-05-14

    Seismic wave propagation through the earth is often stronglyaffected by the presence of fractures. When these fractures are filledwith fluids (oil, gas, water, CO2, etc.), the type and state of the fluid(liquid or gas) can make a large difference in the response of theseismic waves. This paper summarizes recent work on methods ofdeconstructing the effects of fractures, and any fluids within thesefractures, on seismic wave propagation as observed in reflection seismicdata. One method explored here is Thomsen's weak anisotropy approximationfor wave moveout (since fractures often induce elastic anisotropy due tononuniform crack-orientation statistics). Another method makes use ofsome very convenient fracture parameters introduced previously thatpermit a relatively simple deconstruction of the elastic and wavepropagation behavior in terms of a small number of fracture parameters(whenever this is appropriate, as is certainly the case for small crackdensities). Then, the quantitative effects of fluids on thesecrack-influence parameters are shown to be directly related to Skempton scoefficient B of undrained poroelasticity (where B typically ranges from0 to 1). In particular, the rigorous result obtained for the low crackdensity limit is that the crack-influence parameters are multiplied by afactor (1 ? B) for undrained systems. It is also shown how fractureanisotropy affects Rayleigh wave speed, and how measured Rayleigh wavespeeds can be used to infer shear wave speed of the fractured medium.Higher crack density results are also presented by incorporating recentsimulation data on such cracked systems.

  1. Utilizing Divers in Support of Spent Fuel Basin Closure Subproject

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen Nellesen

    2005-01-01

    A number of nuclear facilities in the world are aging and with this comes the fact that we have to either keep repairing them or decommission them. At the Department of Energy Idaho Site (DOEID) there are a number of facilities that are being decommissioned, but the facilities that pose the highest risk to the large aquifer that flows under the site are given highest priorities. Aging spent nuclear fuel pools at DOE-ID are among the facilities that pose the highest risk, therefore four pools were targeted for decommissioning in Fiscal Year 2004. To accomplish this task the Idaho Completion Project (ICP) of Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, put together an integrated Basin Closure Subproject team. The team was assigned a goal to look beyond traditional practices at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to find ways to get the basin closure work done safer and more efficiently. The Idaho Completion Project (ICP) was faced with a major challenge – cleaning and preparing aging spent nuclear fuel basins for closure by removing sludge and debris, as necessary, and removing water to eliminate a potential risk to the Snake River Plain Aquifer. The project included cleaning and removing water from four basins. Two of the main challenges to a project like this is the risk of contamination from the basin walls and floors becoming airborne as the water is removed and keeping personnel exposures ALARA. ICP’s baseline plan had workers standing at the edges of the basins and on rafts or bridge cranes and then using long-handled tools to manually scrub the walls of basin surfaces. This plan had significant risk of skin contamination events, workers falling into the water, or workers sustaining injuries from the awkward working position. Analysis of the safety and radiation dose risks presented by this approach drove the team to look for smarter ways to get the work done.

  2. WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE-MOMENTUM DENSITY OF EACH SPECIES OF A COLLISION-LESS PLASMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cary, John R.

    2012-01-01

    A LiBRARY ANL WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE-MOMENTUM DENSITYof Califomia. To be in WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE~HOMENTUMExpress1ons for the wave-energy density and wave-momentum

  3. Wave Mechanics and the Fifth Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson; James M. Overduin

    2013-01-28

    Replacing 4D Minkowski space by 5D canonical space leads to a clearer derivation of the main features of wave mechanics, including the wave function and the velocity of de Broglie waves. Recent tests of wave-particle duality could be adapted to investigate whether de Broglie waves are basically 4D or 5D in nature.

  4. Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: Internal wave fine structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomsovic, Steve

    Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: Internal wave fine structure 2004 Acoustic wave fields propagating long ranges through the ocean are refracted As acoustic waves propagate long ranges through the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities

  5. Using a Bore-Soliton-Splash to understand Rogue Waves, Tsunamis & Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    & new experiments, in portable BSS wave tank or Roombeek channel [7]. 7 New Wave Energy Device [2]. · Clarify connection Bore-Soliton-Splash with rogue waves and tsunamis. · New wave energy device

  6. Full wave simulations of fast wave heating losses in the scrape...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Full wave simulations of fast wave heating losses in the scrape-off layer of NSTX and NSTX-U Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Full wave simulations of fast wave heating...

  7. GravEn: Software for the simulation of gravitational wave detector network response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amber L. Stuver; Lee Samuel Finn

    2006-09-24

    Physically motivated gravitational wave signals are needed in order to study the behaviour and efficacy of different data analysis methods seeking their detection. GravEn, short for Gravitational-wave Engine, is a MATLAB software package that simulates the sampled response of a gravitational wave detector to incident gravitational waves. Incident waves can be specified in a data file or chosen from among a group of pre-programmed types commonly used for establishing the detection efficiency of analysis methods used for LIGO data analysis. Every aspect of a desired signal can be specified, such as start time of the simulation (including inter-sample start times), wave amplitude, source orientation to line of sight, location of the source in the sky, etc. Supported interferometric detectors include LIGO, GEO, Virgo and TAMA.

  8. Electron-cyclotron damping of helicon waves in low diverging magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-04-15

    Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to investigate wave propagation and absorption behavior of low-field (B{sub 0}<5 mT) helicon waves in the presence of a diverging magnetic field. The 1D electromagnetic simulations, which include experimental external magnetic field profiles, provide strong evidence for electron-cyclotron damping of helicon waves in the spatially decaying nonuniform magnetic field. For a dipole-type magnetic field configuration, the helicon waves are absence in the downstream (lower field) region of the plasma and are observed to be completely absorbed. As the magnetic field is changed slightly however, wave damping decreases, and waves are able to propagate freely downstream, confirming previous experimental measurements of this phenomenon.

  9. Design of Millimeter-Wave Power Ampliers in Silicon /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalantari, Nader

    2013-01-01

    1.1 Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier . . . . . . . . . .ported mm-wave power amplifiers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .GHz Tapered Constructive Wave Power 3.1 Traveling Wave Power

  10. Spatial and temporal modulation of internal waves and thermohaline structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Sylvia T

    2010-01-01

    timescale, the internal wave energy cascade that concludes2 addresses the internal wave energy cascade and its spatialto as the internal wave energy cascade. Internal waves

  11. Geothermal Exploration with Visible through Long Wave Infrared...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrometers Abstract Surface minerals of active geothermal systems have been mapped using visible-short wave infrared and mid wave and long wave imaging...

  12. Reprinted from JOURNAL OF GEOLOGY, 1990, vol. 98, p. 135-155. QUANTITATIVE FILLING MODEL FOR CONTINENTAL EXTENSIONAL BASINS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Blackheath region of the hinge area of the Triassic Richmond basin of Virginia. Outcrop studies and coal mine the hanging wall block of the basins, indicating that both the basins and their depositional surface areas

  13. The role of the Early Tertiary Uluk?sla Basin, southern Turkey, in suturing of the Mesozoic Tethys ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Matthew; Robertson, Alastair H F

    2002-01-01

    The Maastrichtian–Late Eocene Uluk?sla Basin is representative of the tectonic and sedimentary evolution of prominent Early Tertiary basins in central Anatolia, including the Tuzgolu and S ark?sla basins. The Uluk?sla ...

  14. Types of Lights Types of Lights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Types of Lights Types of Lights q So far we have studied point lights ­ Radiate in all direc7ons q Other lights ­ Direc7onal lights (posi7on-independent) ­ Spotlights #12;2 Direc1onal Lights q Shine in a single, uniform direc7on q All rays

  15. Effect of non-uniform slow wave structure in a relativistic backward wave oscillator with a resonant reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Changhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Sun, Jun; Song, Zhimin; Huo, Shaofei; Bai, Xianchen; Shi, Yanchao; Liu, Guozhi

    2013-11-15

    This paper provides a fresh insight into the effect of non-uniform slow wave structure (SWS) used in a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) with a resonant reflector. Compared with the uniform SWS, the reflection coefficient of the non-uniform SWS is higher, leading to a lower modulating electric field in the resonant reflector and a larger distance to maximize the modulation current. Moreover, for both types of RBWOs, stronger standing-wave field takes place at the rear part of the SWS. In addition, besides Cerenkov effects, the energy conversion process in the RBWO strongly depends on transit time effects. Thus, the matching condition between the distributions of harmonic current and standing wave field provides a profound influence on the beam-wave interaction. In the non-uniform RBWO, the region with a stronger standing wave field corresponds to a higher fundamental harmonic current distribution. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with a diode voltage of 1.02 MV and beam current of 13.2 kA, a microwave power of 4 GW has been obtained, compared to that of 3 GW in the uniform RBWO.

  16. Type II and Type III Radio Bursts and their Correlation with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, L M

    2015-01-01

    Using the Wind/WAVES radio observations from 2010-2013, we present an analysis of the 123 decametric-hectometric (DH) type II solar radio bursts during this period, the associated type III burst properties, and their correlation with solar energetic proton (SEP) properties determined from analysis of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations. We present a useful catalog of the type II burst, type III burst, Langmuir wave, and proton flux properties for these 123 events, which we employ to develop a statistical relationship between the radio properties and peak proton flux that can be used to forecast SEP events. We find that all SEP events with a peak > 10 MeV flux above 15 pfu are associated with a type II burst and virtually all SEP events, 92%, are also associated with a type III radio burst. Based on a principal component analysis, the radio burst properties that are most highly correlated with the occurrence of gradual SEP events and account for the most variance in the ra...

  17. Multi-time wave functions for quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrat, Sören; Tumulka, Roderich

    2014-06-15

    Multi-time wave functions such as ?(t{sub 1},x{sub 1},…,t{sub N},x{sub N}) have one time variable t{sub j} for each particle. This type of wave function arises as a relativistic generalization of the wave function ?(t,x{sub 1},…,x{sub N}) of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. We show here how a quantum field theory can be formulated in terms of multi-time wave functions. We mainly consider a particular quantum field theory that features particle creation and annihilation. Starting from the particle–position representation of state vectors in Fock space, we introduce multi-time wave functions with a variable number of time variables, set up multi-time evolution equations, and show that they are consistent. Moreover, we discuss the relation of the multi-time wave function to two other representations, the Tomonaga–Schwinger representation and the Heisenberg picture in terms of operator-valued fields on space–time. In a certain sense and under natural assumptions, we find that all three representations are equivalent; yet, we point out that the multi-time formulation has several technical and conceptual advantages. -- Highlights: •Multi-time wave functions are manifestly Lorentz-covariant objects. •We develop consistent multi-time equations with interaction for quantum field theory. •We discuss in detail a particular model with particle creation and annihilation. •We show how multi-time wave functions are related to the Tomonaga–Schwinger approach. •We show that they have a simple representation in terms of operator valued fields.

  18. Colliding axisymmetric pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-10-21

    An exact solution is found describing the collision of axisymmetric pp-waves with M=0. They are impulsive in character and their coordinate singularities become point curvature singularities at the boundaries of the interaction region. The solution is conformally flat. Concrete examples are given, involving an ultrarelativistic black hole against a burst of pure radiation or two colliding beam- like waves.

  19. Stratified Steady Periodic Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Walsh

    2009-02-11

    This paper considers two-dimensional stratified water waves propagating under the force of gravity over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. We prove the existence of a global continuum of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. These waves, moreover, can exhibit large density variation, speed and amplitude.

  20. Creating Wave-Focusing Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Ramm

    2008-05-16

    Basic ideas for creating wave-focusing materials by injecting small particles in a given material are described. The number of small particles to be injected around any point is calculated. Inverse scattering problem with fixed wavenumber and fixed incident direction of the plane acoustic wave is formulated and solved.

  1. Estimation of wave run-up on smooth, impermeable slopes using the wave momentum flux parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Estimation of wave run-up on smooth, impermeable slopes using the wave momentum flux parameter-examines existing wave run-up data for regular, irregular and solitary waves on smooth, impermeable plane slopes. A simple physical argument is used to derive a new wave run-up equation in terms of a dimensionless wave

  2. Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag in directionally effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag in directionally sheared flow. Quarterly Journal;AcceptedArticle Impact of non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves on mountain wave drag

  3. Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri approve the attached thesis Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Application of wave generator theory to the development of a Wave Energy Converter by Maila Sepri Principal

  4. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-13

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  5. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  6. Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

    1984-01-01

    would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thefeature of cross-field wave-energy transport, previous con-

  7. Microstructural Design for Stress Wave Energy Management /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranian, Aref

    2013-01-01

    Nasser, S. , 2010. Stress-wave energy management throughNemat-Nasser, Stress-wave energy management through materialS. , 2009. Acoustic wave-energy management in composite

  8. Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

    1984-01-01

    would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thecomposition of electrostatic-wave-energy field degrees of

  9. Microstructural Design for Stress Wave Energy Management /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranian, Aref

    2013-01-01

    mode of pressure wave and energy transfer into shearmode of pressure wave and energy transfer into shear mode ItNasser, S. , 2010. Stress-wave energy management through

  10. Deep-water gravity waves: theoretical estimating of wave parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mindlin, Ilia M

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses deep-water gravity waves of finite amplitude generated by an initial disturbance to the water. It is assumed that the horizontal dimensions of the initially disturbed body of the water are much larger than the magnitude of the free surface displacement in the origin of the waves. Initially the free surface has not yet been displaced from its equilibrium position, but the velocity field has already become different from zero. This means that the water at rest initially is set in motion suddenly by an impulse. Duration of formation of the wave origin and the maximum water elevation in the origin are estimated using the arrival times of the waves and the maximum wave-heights at certain locations obtained from gauge records at the locations, and the distances between the centre of the origin and each of the locations. For points situated at a long distance from the wave origin, forecast is made for the travel time and wave height at the points. The forecast is based on the data recorded by th...

  11. Walking Wave as a Model of Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Goryunov

    2012-05-02

    The concept of walking wave is introduced from classical relativistic positions. One- and three-dimensional walking waves considered with their wave equations and dispersion equations. It is shown that wave characteristics (de Broglie's and Compton's wavelengths) and corpuscular characteristics (energy-momentum vector and the rest mass) of particle may be expressed through parameters of walking wave. By that the new view on a number concepts of physic related with wave-particle duality is suggested.

  12. A multi-proxy approach to assessing isolation basin stratigraphy from the Lofoten Islands, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Raymond S.

    A multi-proxy approach to assessing isolation basin stratigraphy from the Lofoten Islands, Norway Lofoten Islands Norway This study takes a comprehensive approach to characterizing the isolation sequence source. Methods of characterizing isolation basin stratigraphy traditionally rely on microfossil

  13. Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

    1993-01-01

    The Brazos River Basin is representative of several major river basins in the Southwestern United States in regard to natural salt pollution. Geologic formations underlying portions of the upper watersheds of the Brazos, Colorado, Pecos, Canadian...

  14. Postglacial adjustment of steep, low-order drainage basins, Canadian Rocky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Postglacial adjustment of steep, low-order drainage basins, Canadian Rocky Mountains T. Hoffmann,1 sediment flux in mountain systems. An important, but not well constrained, aspect of Pleistocene glacial for mountain headwaters (with basin area

  15. Acoustic impedance inversion of the Lower Permian carbonate buildups in the Permian Basin, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo, Buenafama Aleman

    2004-11-15

    Carbonate reservoirs are usually diffcult to map and identify in seismic sections due to their complex structure, lithology and diagenetic frabrics. The Midland Basin, located in the Permian Basin of West Texas, is an excellent example...

  16. The structure of a Mesozoic basin beneath the Lake Tana area, Ethiopia, revealed by magnetotelluric imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that electrically resistive features in the model are related to volcanic materials intruded within the rift basin basin, northwest Ethiopia is an uplifted dome possibly related to the Afar mantle plume (Pik et al

  17. Screening model optimization for Panay River Basin planning in the Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millspaugh, John Henry

    2010-01-01

    The state of the water resources of the Panay River Basin have motivated studies and initial basin planning to mitigate flood damages, to produce hydroelectricity, and to increase irrigated rice areas. The goal of this ...

  18. Syn-tectonic sedimentary evolution of the Miocene atallar Basin, southwestern Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and sedimentological data are now presented. The Çatallar Basin lies in paraconformity on the Bey Dalari carbonate: Sedimentology; Biostratigraphy; Source of detritals; Miocene; Basin analyses; Lycian Nappes 1. Introduction

  19. Rock-water interactions of the Madison Aquifer, Mission Canyon Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spicer, James Frank

    1994-01-01

    The Williston Basin is located in the northern Great Plains of the United States. This area includes eastern Montana, northwestern South Dakota, and western North Dakota. The stratigraphy and geologic history of this basin are well understood...

  20. Depositional history of Lower Permian (Wolfcampian-Leonardian) carbonate buildups, Midland Basin, Upton County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, Catherine O'Hara

    1999-01-01

    A north-south oriented trend of Wolfcampian-Leonardian carbonate buildups is located in the southwestern Midland Basin, Upton County, Texas. The buildup trend is located west of the eastern faulted margin of the Central Basin Platform and north...