National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for type sp spray

  1. Formation of tungsten coatings by gas tunnel type plasma spraying Akira Kobayashia,*, Shahram Sharafatb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Formation of tungsten coatings by gas tunnel type plasma spraying Akira Kobayashia,*, Shahram deposited as a coating, it can protect the substrate surface from high heat flux. In this study, tungsten (W) sprayed coatings were formed on stainless steel substrates by gas tunnel type plasma spraying at a short

  2. The Mechanism of Inhibition of Antibody-based Inhibitors of Membrane-type Serine Protease 1 (MT-SP1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craik, Charles S.

    The Mechanism of Inhibition of Antibody-based Inhibitors of Membrane-type Serine Protease 1 (MT-SP1, 600 16th St. Genentech Hall, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA The mechanisms of inhibition of two novel sc-SP1 at low pH, and is a standard mechanism inhibitor of the protease. The mechanisms of inhibition

  3. Small Fruit and Grape Spray Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    .................................................................................42 Strawberry Spray Schedule

  4. Sandia Energy - Spray Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spray Combustion Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Engine Combustion Fuels Spray Combustion Spray CombustionAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:17:06+00:00 Fuel...

  5. Sandia Energy - Spray Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spray Combustion Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Engine Combustion Heavy Duty Spray Combustion Spray CombustionAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:00:56+00:00...

  6. Spray Calendar. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanborn, C. E. (Charles Emerson)

    1908-01-01

    with an arsenical. Used in the summer time while the foliage is on the tree. Has bad effect on scale insects infesting citrus trees. Also used for subjecting thrips and other similar small insects on truck crops. X. WHALE OIL SOAP EMULSION (STRONG SOLUTION... in Original Bulletin] W WORDS CONCERNING SPKA Y LNG MAC~INJ!~KY The frontispiece of this bulletin is intended to aid inexperienc parties in selecting spray machinery, who might not otherwise knc what would be best suited for their conditions...

  7. The Development of 70-Year-Old Wieslander Vegetation Type Maps and an Assessment of Landscape Change in the Central Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorne, James H; Kelsey, Rodd; Honig, Jacquelyn; Morgan, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Navarretia sp. Ribes sp. Salix sp. Tule Wild hay MonardellaTypes Annuals Grass Salix sp. Meadow Unidentified Code CAGResidence Water Ribes sp. Salix sp. Wild hay Unidentified

  8. Spray Coating of Photoresists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Spray Coating of Photoresists Revised: 2013-11-07 Source: www.microchemicals.eu sales@microchemicals.eu Spray Coating: Basics and Motivation Spray coating denotes the formation of a resist film via millions of µm-sized resist droplets moving towards the substrate. This coating technique

  9. Sandia Energy - Spray Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environment where mixing with fuel sprays occurs. The temperature, pressure, density, and composition of the in-cylinder gases as well as fuel injector conditions have a...

  10. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Jeffrey D. (Stuart, FL); Sanders, Stuart A. (Palm Beach Gardens, FL)

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  11. SP Newsprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-11-01

    This is a combined heat and power (CHP) project profile on a 45 MW steam turbine at SP Newsprint in Dublin, Georgia.

  12. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  13. Power series with Taylor coefficients of sum-product type and algebraic differential equations /SP-series and the interplay between their resurgence and differential properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Shweta

    2012-01-01

    The article is based on the differential properties of the inner generators (singularities) that occur while handling SP series (sum product series), power series whose Taylor coefficients can be written as sum-product combinations. It is an elaboration with numerical details and some explicit calculations of the chapter 6 of the joint article with Ecalle on these series. For all polynomial inputs $f$ and all monomial inputs $F$, the inner generators corresponding to them verify ordinary differential equations of linear homogeneous type with polynomial coefficients. Numerical results strongly suggest the non-existence of ODEs for functions $F$ that are rational but not monomial, i.e. not of the form ${(1-ax)}^p$, for $p \\in \\mathbb{Z}$.

  14. Directed spray mast

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; Siddall, Alvin A.; Cheng, William Y.; Counts, Kevin T.

    2005-05-10

    Disclosed is an elongated, tubular, compact high pressure sprayer apparatus for insertion into an access port of vessels having contaminated interior areas that require cleaning by high pressure water spray. The invention includes a spray nozzle and a camera adjacent thereto with means for rotating and raising and lowering the nozzle so that areas identified through the camera may be cleaned with a minimum production of waste water to be removed.

  15. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  16. Plasma-sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, H.

    1988-09-01

    Plasma spraying is one way to apply protective coatings. The hot, high-speed flame of a plasma gun can melt a powder of almost any ceramic or metal and spray it to form a coating for protection against corrosion, wear or high temperature. The technique carries much less risk of degrading the coating and substrate than many other high-temperature processes do, because the gas in the plasma flame is chemically inert and the target can be kept fairly cool. And yet a plasma gun can be only a little more cumbersome than a paint sprayer. Investigators are applying this technique to new materials. The General Electric Company is using vacuum plasma spraying to make freestanding components: intricate aircraft engine parts formed by plasma-spraying a superalloy on a removable substrate. Other workers spray ceramic particles or fibers and metal powder simulatious wrong, stiff composite materials: the ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix of metal. The author and colleagues at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have fabricated a thick film of high-temperature superconductor by plasma-spraying the compound in the form of a powder. 7 figs.

  17. Rain on the Roof-Evaporative Spray Roof Cooling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachman, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes evaporative spray roof cooling systems, their components, performance and applications in various climates and building types. The evolution of this indirect evaporative cooling technique is discussed. Psychrometric and sol...

  18. Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis of Hierarchically Structured Cathode Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kam, Kinson

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis of Hierarchically Structuredsuch as ultrasonic spray pyrolysis generate fine particlesusing ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. Our initial work has

  19. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Spray distribution systems for wastewater are much like lawn sprinkler systems, in that they spray treated wastewater over the surface of a yard. This publication explains how spray distribution systems work, what their design requirements are...

  20. Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using...

  1. Sandia Energy - Spray Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel Magnetization and Laser(TSPEARSolarSpray Combustion Home

  2. Sandia Energy - Spray Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel Magnetization and Laser(TSPEARSolarSpray Combustion

  3. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Men G. (Export, PA); Chernicoff, William P. (Harrisburg, PA)

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  4. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Men G. (Export, PA); Chernicoff, William P. (Harrisburg, PA)

    2000-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  5. Vacuum 65 (2002) 415425 Plasma spraying of micro-composite thermal barrier coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2002-01-01

    blades and vanes of gas turbine engines, turbine shrouds and combus- tor cans. These coatings increase. Keywords: Plasma spraying; Gas tunnel-type; Thermal barrier-composite coatings; Aluminum oxide; ZirconiumVacuum 65 (2002) 415­425 Plasma spraying of micro-composite thermal barrier coatings S. Sharafata

  6. EFFECTS OF FEEDING DDT-SPRAYED INSECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ifethods 1 Consumption by the Bluegill of Insects Sprayed with DDT in Oil 2 Consumption by Bluegills and Grapples of Insects Sprayed with a DDT Suspension 3 Consumption by Largemouth Black Bass of DDT-Sprayed Insects .... 4 Consumption by Smal Imouth Black Bass of DDT-Sprayed Insects.... 7 Results of the Direct

  7. Aerosol Spray Pyrolysis Synthesis of CZTS Nanostructures for Photovoltaic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exarhos, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Grown by Pneumatic Spray Pyrolysis. ” Thin Solid Films 535 (Films Grown by Spray Pyrolysis: Characterization by RamanFilms Prepared by Spray Pyrolysis. ” Physica Status Solidi (

  8. FeAl and Mo-Si-B Intermetallic Coatings Prepared by Thermal Spraying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Totemeier, T.C.; Wright, R.N.; Swank, W.D.

    2003-04-22

    FeAl and Mo-Si-B intermetallic coatings for elevated temperature environmental resistance were prepared using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) techniques. For both coating types, the effect of coating parameters (spray particle velocity and temperature) on the microstructure and physical properties of the coatings was assessed. Fe-24Al (wt.%) coatings were prepared using HVOF thermal spraying at spray particle velocities varying from 540 m/s to 700 m/s. Mo-13.4Si-2.6B coatings were prepared using APS at particle velocities of 180 and 350 m/s. Residual stresses in the HVOF FeAl coatings were compressive, while stresses in the APS Mo-Si-B coatings were tensile. In both cases, residual stresses became more compressive with increasing spray particle velocity due to increased peening imparted by the spray particles. The hardness and elastic moduli of FeAl coatings also increased with increasing particle velocity, again due to an increased peening effect. For Mo-Si-B coatings, plasma spraying at 180 m/s resulted in significant oxidation of the spray particles and conversion of the T1 phase into amorphous silica and {alpha}-Mo. The T1 phase was retained after spraying at 350 m/s.

  9. Coanda-Assisted Spray Manipulation Collar for a Commercial Plasma Spray Gun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Barton L.

    Coanda-Assisted Spray Manipulation Collar for a Commercial Plasma Spray Gun K. Mabey, B.L. Smith, G-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) collar was retrofitted to a Praxair SG-100 plasma spray gun. The CSM device makes it possible to change the direction of (vector) the plasma jet and powder without moving the gun

  10. Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

  11. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  12. Automotive Spray Paint Simulation Jonathan Konieczny1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Gary

    Automotive Spray Paint Simulation Jonathan Konieczny1, , John Heckman2 , Gary Meyer1 , Mark Manyen2 for the simulation of spray painting. Head mounted display goggles are combined with a tracking system to allow users to paint a virtual surface with a spray gun. Ray tracing is used to simulate droplets landing

  13. COANDA-ASSISTED SPRAY MANIPULATION IMPLEMENTATION TO PLASMA SPRAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Barton L.

    Engineering Approved: Dr. Barton Smith Dr. Robert Spall Major Professor Committee Member Dr. Christine Hailey Major Professor: Dr. Barton Smith Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Coanda-assisted Spray of zirconia powder up to several degrees. Doing so could realign the plasma with the powder, resulting

  14. Cleaning Mechanised Pesticide Spray Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , hoses, nozzles, valves and pumps of mechanised spraying equipment can contaminate operators and possibly bowls, hoses, tanks and pumps retain the most solution. This Technical Note sets out the procedures label for any special cleaning instructions. · Wear the protective clothing described on the pesticide

  15. Standard practice for modified salt spray (fog) testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers and sets forth conditions for five modifications in salt spray (fog) testing for specification purposes. These are in chronological order of their development: 1.1.1 Annex A1, acetic acid-salt spray test, continuous. 1.1.2 Annex A2, cyclic acidified salt spray test. 1.1.3 Annex A3, seawater acidified test, cyclic (SWAAT). 1.1.4 Annex A4, SO2 salt spray test, cyclic. 1.1.5 Annex A5, dilute electrolyte cyclic fog dry test. 1.2 This practice does not prescribe the type of modification, test specimen or exposure periods to be used for a specific product, nor the interpretation to be given to the results. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicabilit...

  16. Plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas S.; Folser, George R.

    2006-01-10

    A plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer is provided. The interlayer has particular application in connection with a solid oxide fuel cell used within a power generation system. The fuel cell advantageously comprises an air electrode, a plasma sprayed interlayer disposed on at least a portion of the air electrode, a plasma sprayed electrolyte disposed on at least a portion of the interlayer, and a fuel electrode applied on at least a portion of the electrolyte.

  17. Fuel Spray Analysis | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Spray Analysis Researchers inspect X-ray focusing optics at the Vehicle Technologies beamline at Argonne's Advenced Photon Source. The beamline uses one of the world's...

  18. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06

    A spray distribution system is very similar to a lawn irrigation system. Spray heads are used to distribute treated wastewater to the surface of the yard. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of spray ...

  19. Design of 7 wt.% Y2O3-ZrO2/Mullite Plasma-Sprayed Composite Coatings for Increased Creep Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trice, Rodney W.

    Design of 7 wt.% Y2O3-ZrO2/Mullite Plasma-Sprayed Composite Coatings for Increased Creep Resistance of the American Ceramic Society #12;2 Abstract Plasma-sprayed stand-alone coatings of 7 wt.% Y2O3-ZrO2 (YSZ three coating types in the as-sprayed condition at stresses from 40-80 MPa and temperatures of 1000

  20. X-Ray Characterization of Diesel Sprays | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sprays X-Ray Characterization of Diesel Sprays 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deerpowell.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  1. Development and Characterization of a Spray Deposited CNT/PVDF...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Development and Characterization of a Spray Deposited CNTPVDF Thin Film. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development and Characterization of a Spray...

  2. Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression Ignition Engine Applications Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression Ignition Engine...

  3. Thermal spray and cold spray analysis of density, porosity, and tensile Specimens for use with LIGA applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DECKER,MERLIN K.; SMITH,MARK F.

    2000-02-01

    This analysis provides a preliminary investigation into using Twin-Wire Arc Thermal Spray and Cold Spray as material deposition processes for LIGA applications. These spray material processes were studied to make an initial determination of their potential as alternatives to producing mechanical parts via the electroplating process. Three materials, UltraMachinable{reg_sign} Stainless Steel, BondArc{reg_sign}, and aluminum, were sprayed using Thermal Spray. Only aluminum was sprayed using the Cold Spray process. Following the spray procedure, the test specimens were released from a copper mold and then tested. Three tests, density, tensile strength, and porosity, were performed on the specimens to determine the spray effect on material properties. Twin-Wire Arc Thermal Spray did not demonstrate adequate deposition properties and does not appear to be a good process candidate for LIGA. However, Cold Spray yielded better density results and warrants further investigation to analyze the minimum feature size produced by the process.

  4. Elastic and Conductive Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevostianov, Igor

    Elastic and Conductive Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings in Relation and conductive properties of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings in terms of relevant microstructural parameters sprayed 1. Introduction The present review discusses the elastic stiffness of plasma-sprayed ceramic

  5. Spray-formed tooling and aluminum strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHugh, K.M.

    1995-11-01

    Spray forming is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. By combining rapid solidification processing with product shape control, spray forming can reduce manufacturing costs while improving product quality. De Laval nozzles offer an alternative method to the more conventional spray nozzle designs. Two applications are described: high-volume production of aluminum alloy strip, and the production of specialized tooling, such as injection molds and dies, for rapid prototyping.

  6. Theory vs. Practice in Direct Evaporative Roof Spray Cooling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, J. L.; Smith, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    mechanical air conditioning, roof spray cooling applies it directly to the largest source of external heat on a typical 1-2 story commercial/ industrial facility by spraying the roof with a fine mist of water and allowing the water to evaporate.../O SPRAY ROCCI Y/ SPRAY DIFFERUlCE (-0 ('0 (OF) ELECTRICAL CONPONENTS NANUFACTURING PLAKT, RIO PIEDRAS, PR This test was performed by company employees in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the roof spray cooling system recently installed...

  7. Spray bottle apparatus with force multiply pistons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and corresponding piston which is acted upon by the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  8. Spray bottle apparatus with pressure multiplying pistons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA); Gordon, Norman R. (Kennewick, WA); DeFord, Henry S. (Kennewick, WA)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is acted upon the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  9. Electrochemical aging of humectant-treated thermal-sprayed zinc anodes for cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, B.S. Jr.; Holcomb, G.R.; Bullard, S.J.; Russell, J.H.; Cramer, S.D.; Bennett, J.E.; Laylor, H.M.

    1999-07-01

    Humectants, substances that promote the retention of moisture, were studied to determine their effectiveness in improving the performance and extending the service life of both new and previously-aged thermal-sprayed Zn anodes used in impressed current (ICCP) and galvanic cathodic protection (GCP) systems for steel-reinforced concrete structures. Potassium acetate, lithium nitrate, and lithium bromide were applied to a series of thermal-sprayed Zn-coated concrete slabs before starting the ICCP or GCP experiment. All of the humectants altered the behavior of the thermal-sprayed Zn anodes. LiNO{sub 3} was the most beneficial for ICCP anodes and LiBr was the most beneficial for GCP anodes. Circuit resistances for ICCP anodes and galvanic current density for GCP anodes are compared on the basis of electrochemical aging, humidity, and type of humectant.

  10. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    1999-08-12

    Spray distribution systems for wastewater treated on site are much like lawn irrigation systems. This publication explains the advantages, disadvantages, maintenance steps and estimated costs of spray distribution systems.

  11. Modeling the structure of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prithiviraj, Manikandan

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes a model of coal water slurry (CWS) sprays and presents new experimental data for CWS viscosities. The model is based on the aerodynamic theory of spray atomization which has been successfully used ...

  12. Current problems in plasma spray processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berndt, C.C.; Brindley, W.; Goland, A.N.; Herman, H.; Houck, D.L.; Jones, K.; Miller, R.A.; Neiser, R.; Riggs, W.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.; Spanne, P.

    1991-12-31

    This detailed report summarizes 8 contributions from a thermal spray conference that was held in late 1991 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, Long Island, NY, USA). The subject of ``Plasma Spray Processing`` is presented under subject headings of Plasma-particle interactions, Deposit formation dynamics, Thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings, Mechanical properties of coatings, Feed stock materials, Porosity: An integrated approach, Manufacture of intermetallic coatings, and Synchrotron x-ray microtomographic methods for thermal spray materials. Each section is intended to present a concise statement of a specific practical and/or scientific problem, then describe current work that is being performed to investigate this area, and finally to suggest areas of research that may be fertile for future activity.

  13. Current problems in plasma spray processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berndt, C.C.; Brindley, W.; Goland, A.N.; Herman, H.; Houck, D.L.; Jones, K.; Miller, R.A.; Neiser, R.; Riggs, W.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.; Spanne, P. . Thermal Spray Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    This detailed report summarizes 8 contributions from a thermal spray conference that was held in late 1991 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, Long Island, NY, USA). The subject of Plasma Spray Processing'' is presented under subject headings of Plasma-particle interactions, Deposit formation dynamics, Thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings, Mechanical properties of coatings, Feed stock materials, Porosity: An integrated approach, Manufacture of intermetallic coatings, and Synchrotron x-ray microtomographic methods for thermal spray materials. Each section is intended to present a concise statement of a specific practical and/or scientific problem, then describe current work that is being performed to investigate this area, and finally to suggest areas of research that may be fertile for future activity.

  14. Porosity in plasma sprayed alumina coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilavsky, J.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Goland, A.N.; Long, G.G.; Krueger, S.; Allen, A.J.

    1994-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the porosity of plasma sprayed deposits of alumina in as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions. SANS results were compared with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and water immersion techniques. Multiple small-angle neutron scattering yields a volume-weighted effective pore radius (R{sub eff}), for pores with sizes between 0.08 and 10{mu}m, the pore volume in this size region, and from the Porod region, the surface area of pores of all sizes.

  15. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Characterization of a Binary Aluminum Alloy Spray - Application to the Spray Rolling Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. B. Johnson; J.-P. Delplanque; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; K. M. McHugh

    2005-02-01

    A stochastic, droplet-resolved model has been developed to describe the behavior of a binary aluminum alloy spray during the spray-rolling process. In this process, a molten aluminum alloy is atomized and the resulting spray is depostied on the rolls of a twin-roll caster to produce aluminum strip. The one-way coupled spray model allows the prediction of spray characteristics such as enthalph and solid fraction, and their distribution between the nozzle and the depostion surface. This paper outlines the model development and compares the predicted spray dynamics to PDI measurements performed in a controlled configuration. Predicted and measured droplet velocity and size distributions are presented for two points along the spray centerline along with predicted spray averaged specific enthalph and solid fraction curves.

  16. Development of ultrafast computed tomography of highly transient fuel sprays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    Development of ultrafast computed tomography of highly transient fuel sprays Xin Liu, Jinyuan Liu University, Ithaca, NY, USA 14853 ABSTRACT The detailed analysis of the fuel sprays has been well recognized emissions. However, the structure and dynamics of highly transient fuel sprays have never been visualized

  17. VR Spray Painting for Training and Design Jonathan Konieczny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Gary

    VR Spray Painting for Training and Design Jonathan Konieczny Gary Meyer Clement Shimizu University for the simulation of spray painting. Head mounted display goggles are combined with a tracking system to al- low users to paint a virtual surface with a spray gun. Ray tracing is used to simulate droplets landing

  18. Spectral Measures for $Sp(2)$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David E. Evans; Mathew Pugh

    2015-02-13

    Spectral measures provide invariants for braided subfactors via fusion modules. In this paper we study joint spectral measures associated to the compact connected rank two Lie group $SO(5)$ and its double cover the compact connected, simply-connected rank two Lie group $Sp(2)$, including the McKay graphs for the irreducible representations of $Sp(2)$ and $SO(5)$ and their maximal tori, and fusion modules associated to the $Sp(2)$ modular invariants.

  19. The effect of acoustics on an ethanol spray flame in a propane-fired pulse combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubey, R.K.; Black, D.L.; McQuay, M.Q. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.] [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Carvalho, J.A. Jr. [Inst. Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Cachoeira Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Comubustao e Propulsao] [Inst. Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Cachoeira Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Comubustao e Propulsao

    1997-07-01

    The influence of an acoustic field on the combustion characteristics of a hydrogen-stabilized ethanol spray flame has been experimentally investigated using a phase-Doppler particle analyzer in a propane-fired, Rijke-tube, pulse combustor. The controlled sinusoidal acoustic field in the combustor had a sound pressure level of 155 dB and a frequency of 80 Hz. Experiments were performed to study the effect of oscillations on Sauter-mean and arithmetic-mean diameters, droplet velocity, and droplet number density for the present operating conditions of the Rijke-tube combustor. Similar measurements were also performed on a water spray in the propane-fired reactor to study the effect of the acoustic field on the atomization process for the nozzle type used. Spectral analysis of the droplet axial velocity component for the oscillating conditions revealed a dominant frequency equal to the frequency of the sinusoidal acoustic wave in the combustor. The Sauter-mean diameter of the ethanol spray decreased by 15%, on average, in the presence of the acoustic field because of enhanced evaporation, while the droplet arrival rate at the probe volume increased due to changes in the flame structure. Analysis of the measured size distributions indicated that under an oscillating flow there was a larger population of droplets in the diameter range of 3--20 {micro}m. Experiments conducted with the water spray indicated that the oscillations did affect droplet size distributions in the ethanol spray due to enhanced evaporation caused by the relocation of the flame front inside and around the spray cone.

  20. Fourth Year -34 Credits Cr FA SP Fifth Year 29 Credits Cr FA SP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fourth Year - 34 Credits Cr FA SP Fifth Year ­ 29 Credits Cr FA SP Students: Please note Credits First Year - 28 Credits ­ Courses (prereqs) Cr FA SP Third Year ­ 35 Credits Cr FA SP Second Year

  1. Apparatus and method for spraying liquid materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvarez, J.L.; Watson, L.D.

    1988-01-21

    A method for spraying liquids involving a flow of gas which shears the liquid. A flow of gas is introduced in a converging-diverging nozzle where it meets and shears the liquid into small particles which are of a size and uniformity which can be controlled through adjustment of pressures and gas velocity. 5 figs.

  2. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Page, Steven J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Mal, Thomas (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  3. SPRAY FOAM IN ACCESSIBLE SPACES:BEST PRACTICES AND CASE STUDIES FOR RETROFIT IN MIXED-HUMID CLIMATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Gant, Kathy [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2013-12-01

    Heating and cooling the house is one of the homeowners major expenses. Reducing these costs, saving energy, and creating a healthier, more comfortable indoor environment are good reasons to consider improving the building thermal envelope. Improvements usually consider increasing the amount of insulation, reducing the infiltration of outside air, and controlling moisture in existing buildings. This report describes the use of spray foam materials to insulate, seal, and control moisture. This discussion is limited to treating areas that are accessible. What is accessible, however, can vary depending on the type of renovation. If the building has been gutted or exterior surfaces removed, there are more options. This report will look at areas to consider for spray foam application and discuss the types of spray foams available and their uses. A number of case studies are presented to show the effectiveness of this retrofit in existing houses based on performance data.

  4. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Tarte, L.A.

    1996-01-23

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment. 6 figs.

  5. Surface preparation via grit-blasting for thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Lundberg, L.B.; Hartley, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    The major reason for grit blasting for thermal spray applications is to ensure a strong mechanical bond between the substrate and the coating by the enhanced roughening of the substrate material. This study presents five statistically designed experiments that were accomplished to investigate the grit blasting process. The experiments were conducted using a Box statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. A substantial range of grit blasting parameters and their effect on the resultant substrate roughness were investigated, including grit type, pressure, working distance, and exposure time. The substrates were characterized for surface characteristics using image analysis. These attributes are correlated with the changes in operating parameters. Optimized process parameters for the two machines used in this study as predicted by the SDE analysis are presented.

  6. Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byrnes, Larry Edward (Rochester Hills, MI); Kramer, Martin Stephen (Clarkston, MI); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-08-26

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

  7. Advanced Diagnostics for High Pressure Spray Combustion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skeen, Scott A.; Manin, Julien Luc; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2014-06-01

    The development of accurate predictive engine simulations requires experimental data to both inform and validate the models, but very limited information is presently available about the chemical structure of high pressure spray flames under engine- relevant conditions. Probing such flames for chemical information using non- intrusive optical methods or intrusive sampling techniques, however, is challenging because of the physical and optical harshness of the environment. This work details two new diagnostics that have been developed and deployed to obtain quantitative species concentrations and soot volume fractions from a high-pressure combusting spray. A high-speed, high-pressure sampling system was developed to extract gaseous species (including soot precursor species) from within the flame for offline analysis by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A high-speed multi-wavelength optical extinction diagnostic was also developed to quantify transient and quasi-steady soot processes. High-pressure sampling and offline characterization of gas-phase species formed following the pre-burn event was accomplished as well as characterization of gas-phase species present in the lift-off region of a high-pressure n-dodecane spray flame. For the initial samples discussed in this work several species were identified, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); however, quantitative mole fractions were not determined. Nevertheless, the diagnostic developed here does have this capability. Quantitative, time-resolved measurements of soot extinction were also accomplished and the novel use of multiple incident wavelengths proved valuable toward characterizing changes in soot optical properties within different regions of the spray flame.

  8. Preserve the Investment-Antibiological Spray 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reidenbach, R.

    1987-01-01

    of the cooling tower. This is accomplished by pre venting internal wood decay which can result in unexpected structural failure and periodic repairs. The preservative spray procedure will also minimize the biological fouling of the plenum of the cool ing... tower and related heat exchange equipment. System reliability and efficiency will thus be maintained. INTRODUCTION The plenum area of a field erected, mechanical draft cooling tower receives little to no protec tion from biological attack once...

  9. Performance aspects of de Laval spray-forming nozzles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1993-05-01

    Spray forming is a multiphase fabrication technology in which a spray of finely atomized liquid droplets is directed onto a suitably shaped substrate or pattern to produce a coherent, near-net-shape deposit The technology can simplify materials processing where simultaneously improving product quality. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing spray-forming technology for producing near-net-shape solids and coatings of a variety of metals, polymers, and composite materials using de Laval nozzles. Here we briefly describe the flow field characterization and atomization behavior of liquid metals in linear de Laval nozzles, and illustrate their versatility by summarizing results from three spray-forming programs. In one program, low-carbon steel strip >0.75 mm was produced. In another program, polymer membranes {approximately} 5 {mu}m thick were spray formed. Finally, recent results in spray forming molds, dies, and related tooling for rapid prototyping are described.

  10. Performance aspects of de Laval spray-forming nozzles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    Spray forming is a multiphase fabrication technology in which a spray of finely atomized liquid droplets is directed onto a suitably shaped substrate or pattern to produce a coherent, near-net-shape deposit The technology can simplify materials processing where simultaneously improving product quality. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing spray-forming technology for producing near-net-shape solids and coatings of a variety of metals, polymers, and composite materials using de Laval nozzles. Here we briefly describe the flow field characterization and atomization behavior of liquid metals in linear de Laval nozzles, and illustrate their versatility by summarizing results from three spray-forming programs. In one program, low-carbon steel strip >0.75 mm was produced. In another program, polymer membranes [approximately] 5 [mu]m thick were spray formed. Finally, recent results in spray forming molds, dies, and related tooling for rapid prototyping are described.

  11. Reaction zone visualisation in swirling spray n-heptane flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, R.; Kariuki, J.; Dowlut, A.; Balachandran, R.; Mastorakos, E.

    2014-06-26

    = 5925 words Colloquium: Spray and droplet combustion (7) Alternative Colloquium: IC engine and Gas Turbine Combustion (11) Supplemental Material: no 2 Reaction zone visualisation in swirling spray n-heptane flames R. Yuan1,*, J... advanced turbulent combustion models. In gas turbines and industrial furnaces, the flame is virtually always stabilised by swirl. It can be argued that we know little about the fundamental processes of extinction of spray flames in recirculation zones...

  12. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pui, David Y. H. (Plymouth, MN); Chen, Da-Ren (Creve Coeur, MO)

    2009-03-03

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  13. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pui, David Y. H.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2015-06-09

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  14. Assessment of energy-efficiency improvements for paint spray booths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to inform industry and industrial associations of the economic and technical benefits achievable through spray booth control. A discussion of the energy use and potential for conservation in spray booths is presented. Descriptions, costs, and payback potentials of several spray booth control system concepts are provided. In addition, the technological barriers and the R and D needs to overcome these barriers are identified and discussed.

  15. Fifth Year -29 Credits Cr FA SP Fourth Year 32 Credits Cr FA SP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fifth Year - 29 Credits Cr FA SP Fourth Year ­ 32 Credits Cr FA SP Students: Please note Engineering First Year - 31 Credits ­ (prereqs) CR FA SP Third Year - 32 Credits Cr FA SP 3B Arts _____________ _______________ 6 Second Year - 34 Credits Cr FA SP Rev 5/18/2012 Courses are planned to be first be offered: BIOM

  16. Injector spray characterization of methanol in reciprocating engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, L.; Naegeli, D.

    1994-06-01

    This report covers a study that addressed cold-starting problems in alcohol-fueled, spark-ignition engines by using fine-spray port-fuel injectors to inject fuel directly into the cylinder. This task included development and characterization of some very fine-spray, port-fuel injectors for a methanol-fueled spark-ignition engine. After determining the spray characteristics, a computational study was performed to estimate the evaporation rate of the methanol fuel spray under cold-starting and steady-state conditions.

  17. E85 Optimized Engine through Boosting, Spray Optimized DIG, VCR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E85 Optimized Engine through Boosting, Spray Optimized GDi, VCR and Variable Valvetrain E85 Optimized Engine Enhanced Ethanol Engine And Vehicle Efficiency (Agreement 13425)...

  18. The effects of deposit thermal history on microstructure produced by uniform droplet spray forming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherng, Jean-Pei Jeanie

    2002-01-01

    Uniform droplet spray forming is a process aimed at producing near-net-shape parts directly from the liquid melt by spraying micron-sized droplets onto a movable target. In spray forming, the solidification rate of the ...

  19. header for SPIE use Influence of spraying distance and post-cooling on cryogen spray cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    . However, the spray characteristics and combination of CSC and heating (laser) to obtain optimal treatments treatments, such as hair removal4 . However, to obtain optimal cooling selectivity, the amount of heat in various laser dermatological procedures such as treatment of port wine stain birthmarks and hair removal

  20. X-Ray Characterization of Diesel Sprays and the Effects of Nozzle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sprays and the Effects of Nozzle Geometry X-Ray Characterization of Diesel Sprays and the Effects of Nozzle Geometry 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

  1. SECONDARY PRODUCTION OF CAPITELLA SP. 99 Secondary production of Capitella sp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Daniel

    ENRIQUECIMIENTO ORGÁNICO DIFERENTES. ­ Tres poblaciones del poliqueto Capitella sp. (Capitellidae), sometidas: Densidad, biomasa, producción secundaria, Capitella sp., Polychaeta, Mediterráneo noroccidental. SCI. MAR

  2. Alternative Heat Recovery Options for Single-Stage Spray Dryers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Many powdered products are dried to their final moisture content by use of spray dryers. A basic spray dryer mixes an aqueous feedstock with heated air, vaporizing the water in the feedstock and producing the final dried powder in a single stage...

  3. Advanced manufacturing by spray forming: Aluminum strip and microelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHugh, K.M.

    1994-12-31

    Spray forming is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. By combining rapid solidification processing with product shape control, spray forming can reduce manufacturing costs while improving product quality. INEL is developing a unique spray-forming method based on de Laval (converging/diverging) nozzle designs to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Properties of the spray-formed material are tailored by controlling the characteristics of the spray plume and substrate. Two examples are described: high-volume production of aluminum alloy strip, and the replication of micron-scale features in micropatterned polymers during the production of microelectromechanical systems.

  4. Argonne's SpEC Module

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Harper, Jason

    2014-06-05

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  5. Argonne's SpEC Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, Jason

    2014-05-05

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  6. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  7. Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads

  8. Solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes produced by a combination of suspension plasma spray and very low pressure plasma spray.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slamovich, Elliot (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Fleetwood, James (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); McCloskey, James F.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Trice, Rodney Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-07-01

    Plasma spray coating techniques allow unique control of electrolyte microstructures and properties as well as facilitating deposition on complex surfaces. This can enable significantly improved solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), including non-planar designs. SOFCs are promising because they directly convert the oxidization of fuel into electrical energy. However, electrolytes deposited using conventional plasma spray are porous and often greater than 50 microns thick. One solution to form dense, thin electrolytes of ideal composition for SOFCs is to combine suspension plasma spray (SPS) with very low pressure plasma spray (VLPPS). Increased compositional control is achieved due to dissolved dopant compounds in the suspension that are incorporated into the coating during plasma spraying. Thus, it is possible to change the chemistry of the feed stock during deposition. In the work reported, suspensions of sub-micron diameter 8 mol.% Y2O3-ZrO2 (YSZ) powders were sprayed on NiO-YSZ anodes at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Thermal Spray Research Laboratory (TSRL). These coatings were compared to the same suspensions doped with scandium nitrate at 3 to 8 mol%. The pressure in the chamber was 2.4 torr and the plasma was formed from a combination of argon and hydrogen gases. The resultant electrolytes were well adhered to the anode substrates and were approximately 10 microns thick. The microstructure of the resultant electrolytes will be reported as well as the electrolyte performance as part of a SOFC system via potentiodynamic testing and impedance spectroscopy.

  9. Planar velocity analysis of diesel spray shadow images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sedarsky, David; Blaisot, J-B; Rozé, C

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this work is to demonstrate how spatially resolved image information from diesel fuel injection events can be obtained using a forward-scatter imaging geometry, and used to calculate the velocities of liquid structures on the periphery of the spray. In order to obtain accurate velocities directly from individual diesel spray structures, those features need to be spatially resolved in the measurement. The distributed structures measured in a direct shadowgraphy arrangement cannot be reliably analyzed for this kind of velocity information. However, by utilizing an intense collimated light source and adding imaging optics which modify the signal collection, spatially resolved optical information can be retrieved from spray edge regions within a chosen object plane. This work discusses a set of measurements where a diesel spray is illuminated in rapid succession by two ultrafast laser pulses generated by a mode-locked Ti-Sapphire oscillator seeding a matched pair of regenerative amplifiers. Light fro...

  10. Covered Product Category: Pre-Rinse Spray Valves | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Using the Cost-Effectiveness Table In Table 2 above, the Required pre-rinse spray valve is cost-effective if its purchase price is no more than 435 above that of the Base...

  11. Ohmic contacts for solar cells by arc plasma spraying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Mandayam C. (Seekonk, MA); Roessler, Barton (Barrington, RI); Loferski, Joseph J. (Providence, RI)

    1982-01-01

    The method of applying ohmic contacts to a semiconductor, such as a silicon body or wafer used in solar cells, by the use of arc plasma spraying, and solar cells resulting therefrom.

  12. Spray carrier stability, plant mobility, and runoff potential of trifloxysulfuron 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matocha, Mark Andrew

    2009-06-02

    ); 2) determine the effect of spray carrier pH on absorption and translocation of radiolabeled trifloxysulfuron in Palmer amaranth and Texasweed (Caperonia palustris (L.) St. Hil.); 3) determine average edge-of-field concentrations, total mass losses...

  13. Method and apparatus for heat extraction by controlled spray cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Christopher Francis (5492 Lenore Ave., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Meeks, Ellen (304 Daisyfield Dr., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Kee, Robert (864 Lucille St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); McCarty, Kevin (304 Daisyfield Dr., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

    1999-01-01

    Two solutions to the problem of cooling a high temperature, high heat flux surface using controlled spray cooling are presented for use on a mandrel. In the first embodiment, spray cooling is used to provide a varying isothermal boundary layer on the side portions of a mandrel by providing that the spray can be moved axially along the mandrel. In the second embodiment, a spray of coolant is directed to the lower temperature surface of the mandrel. By taking advantage of super-Leidenfrost cooling, the temperature of the high temperature surface of the mandrel can be controlled by varying the mass flux rate of coolant droplets. The invention has particular applicability to the field of diamond synthesis using chemical vapor deposition techniques.

  14. Superoleophobic Surfaces through Control of Sprayed-on Stochastic Topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campos, Raymond

    The liquid repellency and surface topography characteristics of coatings comprising a sprayed-on mixture of fluoroalkyl-functional precipitated silica and a fluoropolymer binder were examined using contact and sliding angle ...

  15. Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardsley, M B

    2008-03-26

    The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

  16. Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

    2010-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

  17. Use of de Laval nozzles in spray forming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1993-04-01

    Spray forming is a near-net-shape fabrication technology in which a spray of finely atomized liquid droplets is deposited onto a suitably-shaped substrate or pattern to produce a coherent solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing, oftentimes while substantially improving product quality. Spray forming is applicable to a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offers property improvements resulting from rapid solidification (e.g. refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities, and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing spray-forming technology for producing near-net-shape solids and coatings of a variety of metals, polymers, and composite materials using de Laval nozzles. This paper briefly describes the atomization behavior of liquid metals in linear de Laval nozzles and illustrates the versatility of the process by summarizing results from two spray-forming programs. In one program, low-carbon steel strip > 0.75 mm thick was produced; in the other, polymer membranes {approximately}5 {mu}m thick were spray formed.

  18. A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-14

    A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

  19. Simulation of spray drying in superheated steam using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frydman, A.; Vasseur, J.; Ducept, F.; Sionneau, M.; Moureh, J.

    1999-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation and experimental validation of a spray dryer using superheated steam instead of air as drying medium, modeled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The model describes momentum, heat and mass transfer between two phases--a discrete phase of droplets, and a continuous gas phase--through a finite volume method. For the simulation, droplet size distribution is represented by 6 discrete classes of diameter, fitting to the experimental distribution injected from the nozzle orifice, taking into account their peculiar shrinkage during drying. This model is able to predict the most important features of the dryer: fields of gas temperature and gas velocity inside the chamber, droplets trajectories and eventual deposits on to the wall. The results of simulation are compared to a pilot scale dryer, using water. In the absence of risk of power ignition in steam, the authors have tested rather high steam inlet temperature (973K), thus obtaining a high volumic efficiency. The model is validated by comparison between experimental and predicted values of temperature inside the chamber, verifying the coupling between the 3 different types of transfer without adjustment. This type of model can be used for chamber design, or scale up. Using superheated steam instead of air in a spray dryer can allow a high volumic evaporation rate (20 k.h.m{sup 3}), high energy recovery and better environment control.

  20. Thermomechanical processing of plasma sprayed intermetallic sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Scorey, Clive (Cheshire, CT); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  1. Impaction of spray droplets on leaves: influence of formulation and leaf character on shatter, bounce and adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorr, Gary J; Mayo, Lisa C; McCue, Scott W; Forster, W Alison; Hanan, Jim; He, Xiongkui

    2015-01-01

    This paper combines experimental data with simple mathematical models to investigate the influence of spray formulation type and leaf character (wettability) on shatter, bounce and adhesion of droplets impacting with cotton, rice and wheat leaves. Impaction criteria that allow for different angles of the leaf surface and the droplet impact trajectory are presented; their predictions are based on whether combinations of droplet size and velocity lie above or below bounce and shatter boundaries. In the experimental component, real leaves are used, with all their inherent natural variability. Further, commercial agricultural spray nozzles are employed, resulting in a range of droplet characteristics. Given this natural variability, there is broad agreement between the data and predictions. As predicted, the shatter of droplets was found to increase as droplet size and velocity increased, and the surface became harder to wet. Bouncing of droplets occurred most frequently on hard to wet surfaces with high surface ...

  2. Advanced Research in Diesel Fuel Sprays Using X-rays from the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research in Diesel Fuel Sprays Using X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source Advanced Research in Diesel Fuel Sprays Using X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source 2003 DEER...

  3. Porous Carbon Powders Prepared by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis Sara E. Skrabalak and Kenneth S. Suslick*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Porous Carbon Powders Prepared by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis Sara E. Skrabalak and Kenneth S to the destruction of (relatively) expensive templates. Here, we use ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP)6, after pyrolysis, the

  4. Direct Visualization of Spray and Combustion Inside a DI-SI Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Visualization of Spray and Combustion Inside a DI-SI Engine and Its Implications to Flex-Fuel VVT Operations Direct Visualization of Spray and Combustion Inside a DI-SI Engine and...

  5. _q .. SP-6102 -" IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    _¢q .. SP-6102 -" READINGS IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Edited by Francis T. Hoban and William M. Lawbaugh co ! (NASA-SP-6102) REAOINGS IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING (NASa) 215 p N93-24678 --THRU-- N93-24693 Unclas H1/31 0158570 #12;.J T ,j J #12;READINGS IN SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Edited by Francis T. Hoban

  6. Characterization of plasma sprayed and explosively consolidated simulated lunar soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, S.J.; Inal, O.T.; Smith, M.F.

    1997-06-01

    Two methods for the use of lunar materials for the construction of shelters on the Moon are being proposed: explosive consolidation of the soil into structural components and plasma spraying of the soil to join components. The plasma-sprayed coating would also provide protection from the intense radiation. In this work, a mare simulant was plasma-sprayed onto a stainless steel substrate. Deposition of a 0.020 inch coating using power inputs of 23, 25, 27 and 29 kW were compared. Hardness of the coatings increased with each increase of power to the system, while porosity at the interface decreased. All coatings exhibited good adhesion. Simultaneously, an explosively consolidated sample was similarly characterized to afford a comparison of structural features associated with each mode of proposed use.

  7. Removal of Sarin Aerosol and Vapor by Water Sprays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockmann, John E.

    1998-09-01

    Falling water drops can collect particles and soluble or reactive vapor from the gas through which they fall. Rain is known to remove particles and vapors by the process of rainout. Water sprays can be used to remove radioactive aerosol from the atmosphere of a nuclear reactor containment building. There is a potential for water sprays to be used as a mitigation technique to remove chemical or bio- logical agents from the air. This paper is a quick-look at water spray removal. It is not definitive but rather provides a reasonable basic model for particle and gas removal and presents an example calcu- lation of sarin removal from a BART station. This work ~ a starting point and the results indicate that further modeling and exploration of additional mechanisms for particle and vapor removal may prove beneficial.

  8. Scaling up parallel scientific applications on the IBM SP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinner, David

    2004-01-01

    and Using the SP Switch NERSC IBM SP Memory Page NERSC MPI-Scientific Applicaitons on the IBM SP David Skinner, NERSCo Abstract o Colony Switch o IBM's MPI Implementation o MPI

  9. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollis, Kendall J; Pena, Maria I

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  10. Single nozzle spray cooling heat transfer mechanisms Bohumil Horacek, Kenneth T. Kiger, Jungho Kim *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jungho

    Single nozzle spray cooling heat transfer mechanisms Bohumil Horacek, Kenneth T. Kiger, Jungho Kim Abstract An investigation into single nozzle spray cooling heat transfer mechanisms with varying amounts the effective subcooling of the liquid, and shifted the spray cooling curves to higher wall temperatures

  11. A Two-Continua Approach to Eulerian Simulation of Water Spray Michael B. Nielsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Michael B.

    A Two-Continua Approach to Eulerian Simulation of Water Spray Michael B. Nielsen Ole Østerby Aarhus University Abstract Physics based simulation of the dynamics of water spray - water droplets dispersed in air, water jets and stormy seas. Spray phenomena are frequently en- countered by the visual effects industry

  12. Using Spray Oils For Insect Control Jim Johnson, Emeritus Professor, Entomology, MSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Using Spray Oils For Insect Control Jim Johnson, Emeritus Professor, Entomology, MSU Edited again to consider applying spray oils to fruit trees. For pests that overwinter as eggs, it is one to past years, it is still current and appropriate for your reference. Why use oils? Horticultural spray

  13. Deformation Mechanisms in Compression-Loaded, Stand-Alone Plasma-Sprayed Alumina Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trice, Rodney W.

    Deformation Mechanisms in Compression-Loaded, Stand-Alone Plasma-Sprayed Alumina Coatings Rodney W. It is proposed that the numerous defects in plasma- sprayed coatings, including porosity and microcracks, serve-SPRAYED coatings are frequently used as thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) or wear-resistant coatings. Mechanical

  14. High Surface Area Iron Oxide Microspheres via Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis of Ferritin Core Analogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    High Surface Area Iron Oxide Microspheres via Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis of Ferritin Core Analogues) and are difficult to scale-up. Spray pyrolysis and similar aerosol techniques are well- known as scalable synthetic particles with relatively high surface areas have been obtained with spray pyrolysis for carbon,33-40 silica

  15. Preparation of BaTiO3 nanoparticles by combustion spray pyrolysis Sangjin Leea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messing, Gary L.

    Preparation of BaTiO3 nanoparticles by combustion spray pyrolysis Sangjin Leea , Taehwan Sona were synthesized by combustion spray pyrolysis using a 1:1 molar ratio of oxidizer and fuel. To prepare. Keywords: BaTiO3; Nanomaterials; Spray pyrolysis; Combustion; Powder technology 1. Introduction Fine barium

  16. Effects of primary breakup modeling on spray and combustion characteristics of compression ignition engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    are com- pared with measurements for non-evaporating and evaporating sprays, as well as with flame measure in terms of liquid penetration, cone angle, spray axial velocity, and liquid mass distribution for non-evaporating penetration distance for evaporating sprays, and with respect to the flame lift-off loca- tion for combusting

  17. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 32:152159 (2003) Dynamic Behavior of Cryogen Spray Cooling: Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    2003-01-01

    of Mechanical Engineering, University of Akron, Ohio 44325 Background and Objectives: Cryogen spray cooling (CSC the skin and evaporates at the sprayed surface. These two characteristics are instrumental to achieveLasers in Surgery and Medicine 32:152­159 (2003) Dynamic Behavior of Cryogen Spray Cooling: Effects

  18. Preliminary SP-100/Stirling heat exchanger designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, P.; Tower, L.; Dawson, R.; Blue, B.; Dunn, P.

    1994-09-01

    Analytic modeling of several heat exchanger concepts to couple the SP-100 nuclear reactor lithium loop and the Space Stirling Power Convertor (SSPC) was performed. Four 25 kWe SSPC`s are used to produce the required 100 kW of electrical power. This design work focused on the interface between a single SSPC and the primary lithium loop. Manifolding to separate and collect the four channel flow was not modeled. This work modeled two separate types of heat exchanger interfaces (conductive coupling and radiative coupling) to explore their relative advantages and disadvantages. The minimum mass design of the conductively coupled concepts was 18 kg or 0.73 kg/kWe for a single 25 kWe convertor. The minimum mass radiatively coupled concept was 41 kg or 1.64 kg/kWe. The direct conduction heat exchanger provides a lighter weight system because of its ability to operate the Stirling convertor evaporator at higher heat fluxes than those attainable by the radiatively coupled systems. Additionally the conductively coupled concepts had relatively small volumes and provide potentially simpler assembly. Their disadvantages were the tight tolerances and material joining problems associated with this refractory to superalloy interface. The advantages of the radiatively coupled designs were the minimal material interface problems.

  19. A photographic study of fuel spray ignition in a rapid compression machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A.S.P.

    1986-01-01

    The process of spark ignition of fuel sprays in a rapid compression machine was analyzed using high-speed schlieren photography and pressure-time data. The combustion chamber studied simulates in a two-dimensional sense the three-dimensional arrangement of the piston bowl, injector and spark plug in a typical direct-injection stratified-charge (DISC) engine. The test hardware included a flat-seat straight-hole injector, a high-energy ignition system and an extended-electrode spark plug. The influence of amount of fuel injected, ignition dwell period (time between start of injection and start of ignition), swirl rate and direction, and spark-plug electrode-tip location on the ignition process was examined. For the test conditions studied, excessive spray penetration and fuel impingement on the walls was observed. The ignition process was observed to be governed by the delayed formation, growth and transport of a flame kernel which spreads to complete the major portion of the burn only after the injection process has been completed. The factors found to influence the evolution of the flame kernel could be possible mechanisms for the high cyclic variability and high hydrocarbon emissions observed for DISC engines of the type simulated.

  20. Reduce air, reduce compliance cost new patented spray booth technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis, F.

    1997-12-31

    A New Paint Spray Booth System that dramatically reduces air volumes normally required for capturing and controlling paint overspray that contains either Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) or Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP), or both. In turn, a substantial reduction in capital equipment expenditures for air abatement systems and air make-up heaters as well as related annual operating expenses is realized.

  1. Thermal Sprayed Coatings Used Against Corrosion and Corrosive Wear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 Thermal Sprayed Coatings Used Against Corrosion and Corrosive Wear P. Fauchais and A. Vardelle SPCTS, UMR 7315, University of Limoges, France 1. Introduction Coatings have historically been developed that can resist under specific conditions. They are usually distinguished by coating thickness: deposition

  2. Covered Product Category: Pre-Rinse Spray Valves

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including pre-rinse spray valves, which are a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  3. QUANTIFICATION OF HEAT FLUX FROM A REACTING THERMITE SPRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Nixon; Michelle Pantoya

    2009-07-01

    Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors can not survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite spray conditions are reported. Results indicate that this newly developed energetic material heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability.

  4. 11-05-15 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves: Availability of Provisional Analysis Tools; NODA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves: Availability of Provisional Analysis Tools; NODA

  5. ISSUANCE 2015-06-17: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

  6. SURFACTANT SPRAY: A NOVEL TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE FLOTATION DEINKING PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yulin Deng; Junyong Zhu

    2004-01-31

    Based on the fundamental understanding of ink removal and fiber loss mechanism in flotation deinking process, we developed this innovative technology using surfactant spray to improve the ink removal efficiency, reduce the water and fiber loss, reduce the chemical consumption and carry over in the flotation deinking. The innovative flotation deinking process uses a spray to deliver the frothing agent during flotation deinking to control several key process variables. The spray can control the foam stability and structure and modify the fluid dynamics to reduce the fibers entrapped in the froth layer. The froth formed at the top part of the flotation column will act as a physical filter to prevent the penetration of frothing agent into the pulp suspension to eliminate fiber contamination and unfavorable deinking surface chemistry modification due to surfactant adsorption on the fiber surface. Because of the filter effect, frothing agents will be better utilized. Under the sponsorships of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) and the member companies of the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, we studied the chem-mechanical mechanism of surfactant spray for flotation deinking using different furnishes, chemicals, and flotation devices in the past four years. In the final year of the project, we successfully conducted mill trials at Abitibi-Consolidated, Inc., Snowflake paper recycling operation of 100% mixture of ONP/OMG. Results from laboratory, pilot-plant and mill trials indicated that surfactant spray technology can significantly reduce fiber loss in flotation deinking. It can be concluded that paper industry can profit greatly when this technology is commercialized in flotation deinking mills.

  7. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

  8. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

  9. GAMBUSIA INFANS,sp. nov, Salamanca.Xlexico. NOTROPIS CHIHUAHUA, sp. nov. Salamanca.Xlexico.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EIGENMANNI, gen. et sp. nov, Mexico City, Mexico. NOTROPIS AZTECUS, ep. nov. Mexico City, JUexieo. CHIROSTOMA JORDAN I, sp. nov, ;lIexieo City, Mexico. #12;55 S.-REPORT ON A COLLECTION OF FISHES FROM THE RIVERS OF CENTRAL AND NORTHERN MEXICO. By ALBERT J. WOOLMAN. In the summer of 1891 the writer was -a member

  10. Characterization of Spray Lubricants for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-01-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. The cooling effects of the die lubricant were investigated using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), heat flux sensors (HFS), and infrared imaging. The evolution of the heat flux and pictures taken using a high speed infrared camera revealed that lubricant application was a transient process. The short time response of the HFS allows the monitoring and data acquisition of the surface temperature and heat flux without additional data processing. A similar set of experiments was performed with deionized water in order to assess the lubricant effect. The high heat flux obtained at 300 C was attributed to the wetting and absorbant properties of the lubricant. Pictures of the spray cone and lubricant flow on the die were also used to explain the heat flux evolution.

  11. dc-plasma-sprayed electronic-tube device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meek, T.T.

    1982-01-29

    An electronic tube and associated circuitry which is produced by dc plasma arc spraying techniques is described. The process is carried out in a single step automated process whereby both active and passive devices are produced at very low cost. The circuitry is extremely reliable and is capable of functioning in both high radiation and high temperature environments. The size of the electronic tubes produced are more than an order of magnitude smaller than conventional electronic tubes.

  12. Microlaminate composite structures by low pressure plasma spray deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    The low pressure plasma spray (LPPS) process has been utilized in the development and fabrication of metal/metal, metal/carbide, and metal/oxide composite structures; including particulate dispersion and both continuous and discontinuous laminates. This report describes the LPPS process and the development of copper/tungsten microlaminate structures utilizing this processing method. Microstructures and mechanical properties of the Cu/W composites are compared to conventionally produced constituent material properties. 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Vitrification of lead-based paint using thermal spray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, A.; Covey, S.W.; Lattimore, J.L.; Boy, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    Lead-based paint (LBP) primers have been used to protect steel structures from corrosion. Abrasive blasting is currently used to remove old LBP. During abrasive blasting a containment structure is required to keep the hazardous lead dust from contaminating air, soil, or water. A thermal spray vitrification (TSV) process to remove LBP was developed. Dried glass powder is melted in the high temperature flame of the thermal spray torch. When the glass strikes the substrate it is molten and reacts with the paint on the substrate. The organic components of the paint are pyrolyzed, while the lead ions are trapped on the surface of glass. The quenching stresses in the glass cause the glass to crack and spall off the substrate. The crumbled glass fragments can be collected and remelted, immobilizing the lead ions within the glass network, thereby preventing leaching. The resulting glass can be disposed of as non-hazardous waste. The process is dust-free, eliminating the need for containment. The volume of residue waste is less than for abrasive blasting and is nonhazardous. The concept and techniques of using the thermal spray vitrification process for the removal and the containment of lead from a section of a bridge containing lead-based paint have been successfully demonstrated.

  14. Measurement of gasoline spray propagation by means of synchrotron x- ray.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Y.; Powell, C.; Cuenca , R.; Poola, R.; Wang, J.

    2002-05-24

    A quantitative and time-resolved radiographic technique has been used to characterize hollow-cone gasoline sprays in the near-nozzle region. The highly penetrative nature of x-rays promises the direct measurements of dense sprays that are difficult to study by visible-light based techniques. Time-resolved x-radiography measurement enables us to map the mass distribution near the spray nozzle, even immediately adjacent to the orifice. The quantitative nature of the measurement also permits the re-construction of spray structure and the progress of the spray development. It is observed that the speed of fuel injected in the later part of the injection is higher than injected earlier and that the initial fuel speed variation caused the spray plume to be compressed in space.

  15. Physical stability of spray dried solid dispersions of amorphous tolfenamic acid and polyvinylpyrolidone K30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thybo, Pia

    2006-10-25

    October 2006 Side 3 Pia Thybo The Danish University of Pharmaceutical Sciences Spray Drying ?Simple up-scaling. Unique ability to produce specific particle size and volatile content regardless of dryer capacity ?Continuous reliable operation. Powder... ? Controlled Release formulations ? Masking of a bad taste Polymorphism ? Solubility/dissolution GPEN October 2006 Side 7 Pia Thybo The Danish University of Pharmaceutical Sciences Key Elements in Spray Drying Atomization of liquid feed into a spray of droplets...

  16. Purchasing Water-Efficient Faucets, Pre-Rinse Spray Valves, Showerhead...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Products & Technologies Energy-Efficient Products Purchasing Water-Efficient Faucets, Pre-Rinse Spray Valves, Showerheads, Toilets, and Urinals Purchasing Water-Efficient...

  17. Systems and methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  18. Methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Karen A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zatorski, Raymond A. (East Hampton, CT)

    2007-10-02

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Spray Combustion Cross-Cut Engine Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about spray conbustion...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Spray Combustion Cross-Cut Engine Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about spray combustion...

  1. Enia SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Enia SpA Place:

  2. Spray Foam Exterior Insulation with Stand-Off Furring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herk, Anatasia; Baker, Richard; Prahl, Duncan

    2014-03-01

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using "L" clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and "picture framing" the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing. Testing measurements will be provided in a later report, as well as utility impact (before and after), costs (labor and materials), construction time, standard specifications, and analysis for the exterior wall insulation strategy.

  3. Spray Foam Exterior Insulation with Stand-Off Furring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herk, A.; Baker, R.; Prahl, D.

    2014-03-01

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using 'L' clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and 'picture framing' the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing. Testing measurements will be provided in a later report, as well as utility impact (before and after), costs (labor and materials), construction time, standard specifications, and analysis for the exterior wall insulation strategy.

  4. Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen Ellis

    1993-01-01

    Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays generated by an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system for a diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with quartz...

  5. ILASS Americas, 21th Annual Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems, Orlando, Florida, May18-2, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    atomized sprays due to the wind shear by the coaxial gas flow. Higher precursor superheat increased its of soot from diesel engines [17]. Traditional operation of the spray burner requires atomization

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Earth Abundant and Nontoxic Metal Chalcogenides Produced via Aerosol Spray Pyrolysis for Photovoltaic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Patrick John

    2013-01-01

    of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis 100 (2013) 12–16. [43]M.T. Swihart: Spray pyrolysis synthesis of ZnS nanoparticlesvia Aerosol Spray Pyrolysis for Photovoltaic Applications A

  7. Spray forming process for producing molds, dies and related tooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1998-02-17

    A method is disclosed for spray forming manufacturing of near-net-shape molds, dies and related toolings, wherein liquid material such as molten metal, metallic alloys, or polymers are atomized into fine droplets by a high temperature, high velocity gas and deposited onto a pattern. Quenching of the atomized droplets provides a heat sink, thereby allowing undercooled and partially solidified droplets to be formed in-flight. Composites can be formed by combining the atomized droplets with solid particles such as whiskers or fibers. 17 figs.

  8. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at 8 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  9. Spray forming system for producing molds, dies and related tooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    A system for the spray forming manufacturing of near-net-shape molds, dies and related toolings, wherein liquid material such as molten metal, metallic alloys, or polymers are atomized into fine droplets by a high temperature, high velocity gas and deposited onto a pattern. Quenching of the atomized droplets provides a heat sink, thereby allowing undercooled and partially solidified droplets to be formed in-flight. Composites can be formed by combining the atomized droplets with solid particles such as powders, whiskers or fibers.

  10. Method and apparatus for atomization and spraying of molten metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobson, D.O.; Alexeff, I.; Sikka, V.K.

    1988-07-19

    A method and device for dispersing molten metal into fine particulate spray, the method comprises applying an electric current through the molten metal and simultaneously applying a magnetic field to the molten metal in a plane perpendicular to the electric current, whereby the molten metal is caused to form into droplets at an angle perpendicular to both the electric current and the magnetic field. The device comprises a structure for providing a molten metal, appropriately arranged electrodes for applying an electric current through the molten metal, and a magnet for providing a magnetic field in a plane perpendicular to the electric current. 11 figs.

  11. Study of the spray to globular transition in gas metal arc welding: a spectroscopic investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Study of the spray to globular transition in gas metal arc welding: a spectroscopic investigation of the spray to globular transition in gas metal arc welding: a spectroscopic investigation F Valensi1.iop.org/JPhysD/46/224005 Abstract The gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process is strongly influenced by the composition

  12. Spray and microjets produced by focusing a laser pulse into a hemispherical drop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Spray and microjets produced by focusing a laser pulse into a hemispherical drop S. T. Thoroddsen,1 surface and the Nd:YAG yttrium aluminum garnet laser pulse propagates through the drop and is focused near applications of laser disrup- tion of droplets is for generation of fine spray to improve combustion efficiency

  13. CaO-based sorbents for CO2 capture prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    CaO-based sorbents for CO2 capture prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis Maryam Sayyah,b Brandon R pyrolysis (USP) synthesis and charac- terization of composite calcium oxide-based sorbents for carbon of metal oxides, even on an industrial scale.18,19 We report here the rst use of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

  14. Large-eddy simulation of evaporating spray in a coaxial combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    Large-eddy simulation of evaporating spray in a coaxial combustor Sourabh V. Apte a,*, Krishnan, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Abstract Large-eddy simulation of an evaporating isopropyl alcohol spray Mahesh b , Parviz Moin c a School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State

  15. Thermo-fluid Dynamics of Flash Atomizing Sprays and Single Droplet Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vu, Henry

    2010-01-01

    spray resulting from churn flow in a 1.2 mm ID nozzle at 0?.a) bubbly, (b) slug, (c) churn, and (d) tip evaporation.spray resulting from churn flow in a 1.2 mm ID nozzle at 0?.

  16. LES/probability density function approach for the simulation of an ethanol spray flame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Venkat

    LES/probability density function approach for the simulation of an ethanol spray flame Colin Heye a an experimental pilot-stabilized ethanol spray flame. In this particular flame, droplet evaporation occurs away: Large-eddy simulation; Probability density function; Flamelet/progress variable approach; Ethanol

  17. Heat transfer through a water spray curtain under the effect of a strong radiative source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Heat transfer through a water spray curtain under the effect of a strong radiative source P. Boulet - mail Pascal.Boulet@lemta.uhp-nancy.fr Keywords : heat transfer, radiative transfer, vaporization, convection, water spray Abstract Heat transfer inside a participating medium, made of droplets flowing in gas

  18. Quantitative comparison of fuel spray images obtained using ultrafast coherent and incoherent double-pulsed illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purwar, Harsh; Idlahcen, Saïd; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Ménard, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative comparison between the high-pressure fuel spray images obtained experimentally using classical imaging with coherent and incoherent ultrafast illuminations recorded using a compatible CMOS camera. The ultrafast, incoherent illumination source was extracted from the supercontinuum generated by tightly focusing the femtosecond laser pulses in water. The average velocity maps computed using time-correlated image-pairs and spray edge complexity computed using the average curvature scale space maps are compared for the spray images obtained with the two illumination techniques and also for the numerically simulated spray using the coupled volume of fluid and level set method for interface tracking (direct numerical simulation or DNS). The spray images obtained with supercontinuum-derived, incoherent, ultrafast illumination are clearer, since the artifacts arising due to laser speckles and multiple diffraction effects are largely reduced and show a better correlation with the DNS results.

  19. Composite CaO-Based CO2 Sorbents Synthesized by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis: Experimental Results and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Composite CaO-Based CO2 Sorbents Synthesized by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis: Experimental Results by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) with both experimental results and modeling of the sorption process, even on an industrial scale.9,10 Recently, we reported the first use of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP

  20. Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis growth of ZnO and ZnO:Al nanostructured films: Application to photocatalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis growth of ZnO and ZnO:Al nanostructured films: Application on glass substrates by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis, a simple, environmental-friendly and inexpensive method­12]. Compared to other deposition techniques, spray pyrolysis offers several advantages like non-vacuum use

  1. VOL. 7, NO. 2, MARCH-APRIL 1991 J. PROPULSION 213 Computations of Turbulent EvaporatingSprays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    VOL. 7, NO. 2, MARCH-APRIL 1991 J. PROPULSION 213 Computations of Turbulent EvaporatingSprays S. K of turbulent evaporating sprays is reported. The major focus is to study the structure of turbulent evaporating sprays and to examine the sensitivity of their vaporization behavior to transient liquid-phase processes

  2. Phase transformation and wear studies of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia coatings containing various mol% of yttria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aruna, S.T. Balaji, N.; Rajam, K.S.

    2011-07-15

    Plasma sprayable grade zirconia powders doped with various mol% of yttria (0, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 mol%) were synthesized by a chemical co-precipitation route. The coprecipitation conditions were adjusted such that the powders possessed good flowability in the as calcined condition and thus avoiding the agglomeration step like spray drying. Identical plasma spray parameters were used for plasma spraying all the powders on stainless steel plates. The powders and plasma sprayed coatings were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Zirconia powders are susceptible to phase transformations when subjected to very high temperatures during plasma spraying and XRD is insensitive to the presence of some non crystalline phases and hence Raman spectroscopy was used as an important tool. The microstructure of the plasma sprayed coatings showed a bimodal distribution containing fully melted and unmelted zones. The microhardness and wear resistance of the plasma sprayed coatings were determined. Among the plasma sprayed coatings, 3 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia coating containing pure tetragonal zirconia showed the highest wear resistance. - Research Highlights: {yields} Preparation plasma sprayable YSZ powders without any agglomeration process and plasma spraying {yields} Phase transformation studies of plasma sprayed YSZ coatings by XRD and Raman spectroscopy {yields} Microstructure of the plasma sprayed coatings exhibited bimodal distribution {yields} Plasma sprayed 3 mol% YSZ coating exhibited the highest wear resistance {yields} Higher wear resistance is due to the higher fracture toughness of tetragonal 3 mol% YSZ phase.

  3. Non-linear elastic properties of plasma-sprayed zirconia coatings and associated relationships with processing conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Toshio

    Non-linear elastic properties of plasma-sprayed zirconia coatings and associated relationships cycling of plasma-sprayed zirconia coatings via curvature measurements revealed their in-plane non-linear of New York at Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA b Center for Thermal Spray Research, Department of Materials

  4. Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai-Quoc; Glass, Robert S.; Lee, Tae H.

    2005-01-25

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

  5. Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

  6. Water spray ejector system for steam injected engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, W.R.

    1991-10-08

    This paper describes a method of increasing the power output of a steam injected gas turbine engine. It comprises: a compressor, a combustor having a dome which receives fuel and steam from a dual flow nozzle, and a turbine in series combination with a gas flow path passing therethrough, and a system for injection of superheated steam into the gas flow path, the method comprising spraying water into the steam injection system where the water is evaporated by the superheated steam, mixing the evaporated water with the existing steam in the steam injection system so that the resultant steam is at a temperature of at least 28 degrees celsius (50 degrees fahrenheit) superheat and additional steam is added to the dome from the fuel nozzle to obtain a resultant increased mass flow of superheated steam mixture for injection into the gas flow path, and controlling the amount of water sprayed into the steam injection system to maximize the mass flow of superheated steam without quenching the flame.

  7. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2012-09-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of the study described in this report is to provide experimental data for the first key technical area, potential plugging of small breaches, by performing small-scale tests with a range of orifice sizes and orientations representative of the WTP conditions. The simulants used were chosen to represent the range of process stream properties in the WTP. Testing conducted after the plugging tests in the small- and large-scale test stands addresses the second key technical area, aerosol generation. The results of the small-scale aerosol generation tests are included in Mahoney et al. 2012. The area of spray generation from large breaches is covered by large-scale testing in Schonewill et al. 2012.

  8. ORANGE: Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck, `Valencia' EFFECT OF SPRAY VOLUME AND SPRAYER TYPE ON EFFICACY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    economically important pests of Florida citrus due in large part to their role in the spread of greening applied with a Durand WaylandTM 3P-10C-32 air blast speed sprayer operating at 2.3 mph and 200 psi with 4 Albuz ATR 80 nozzles per side delivering 40 gpa (white color nozzle) and 120 gpa (green color nozzle

  9. SP-100 coated-particle fuel development. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    This document is the final report of Phase I of the SP-100 Coated-Particle Fuel Development Program conducted by GA Technologies Inc. for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AT03-82SF11690. The general objective of the study conducted between September and December 1982 was to evaluate coated-particle type fuel as an alternate or backup fuel to the UO/sub 2/ tile-and-fin arrangement currently incorporated into the reference design of the SP-100 reactor core. This report presents and discusses the following topics in the order listed: the need for an alternative fuel for the SP-100 nuclear reactor; an abbreviated description of the reference and coated-particle fuel module concepts; the bases and results of the study and analysis leading to the preliminary design of a coated particle suitable for the SP-100 space power reactor; incorporation of the fuel particles into compacts and heat-pipe-cooled modules; initial efforts and plans to fabricate coated-particle fuel and fuel compacts; the design and performance of the proposed alternative core relative that of the reference fuel; and a summary of critical issues and conclusions consistent with the level of effort and duration of the study.

  10. Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant, Raleigh, North Carolina (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques - manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  11. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Smegal, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  12. Characterization of coal-water slurry fuel sprays from diesel engine injectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize coal-water slurry fuel sprays from diesel engine injectors. Since the combustion event is a strong function of the fuel spray, full characterization of the spray is a necessity for successful engine design and for modeling of the combustion process. Two experimental facilities were used at TAMU to study the injection of coal slurry fuels. The first experimental facility incorporates General Electric locomotive engine components (injection pump, fuel line, and nozzle) and a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal slurry fuel from the moving parts of the pump. The second experimental facility is based on an accumulator injector from General Electric. Instrumentation includes instantaneous needle lift and fuel line pressure. A pressurized visualization chamber was used to provide a spray environment which simulated the engine gas density and permitted the use of spray diagnostic techniques. The study was divided into two phases: (1) overall characterization of the spray, and (2) detailed droplet size and size distribution characterization. In addition to this overall characterization of the spray, the second phase of this study characterized the details of the atomization quality.

  13. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of this report is to present the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the large-scale test stand. The report includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodology, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging of small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. 2012a. The results of the aerosol measurements in the small-scale test stand are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012b).

  14. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2013-05-29

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and net generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of antifoam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. For the combination of both test stands, the round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the much larger flow rates and equipment that would be required. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

  15. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-11-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

  16. Fabrication of copper-based anodes via atmosphoric plasma spraying techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Chun (Monroeville, PA)

    2012-04-24

    A fuel electrode anode (18) for a solid oxide fuel cell is made by presenting a solid oxide fuel cell having an electrolyte surface (15), mixing copper powder with solid oxide electrolyte in a mixing step (24, 44) to provide a spray feedstock (30,50) which is fed into a plasma jet (32, 52) of a plasma torch to melt the spray feed stock and propel it onto an electrolyte surface (34, 54) where the spray feed stock flattens into lamellae layer upon solidification, where the layer (38, 59) is an anode coating with greater than 35 vol. % based on solids volume.

  17. Evaluation of a paint spray booth utilizing air recirculation. Final report June 1982-December 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, L.E.; Bryan, R.J.; Becvar, D.P.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the recirculating air spray booth process at the Deere and Company facility in Davenport, Iowa. The effort involved a field measurement program and subsequent analysis of flow rates and emission data from the spray booth to define the degree of enhancement of the emissions stream and permit more efficient and economical control of spray booth emissions. Energy conservation became a matter of concern for industrial operators during the late 1970s when energy costs began to climb rapidly. Deere and Company engineers noted

  18. Electrochemical Aging of Thermal-Sprayed Zinc Anodes on Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Bullard, S.J.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Cryer, C.B.; McGill, G.E.

    1996-10-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used in impressed current cathodic protection systems for some of Oregon's coastal reinforced concrete bridges. Electrochemical aging of zinc anodes results in physical and chemical changes at the zinc-concrete interface. Concrete surfaces heated prior to thermal-spraying had initial adhesion strengths 80 pct higher than unheated surfaces. For electrochemical aging greater than 200 kC/m{sup 2} (5.2 A h/ft{sup 2}), there was no difference in adhesion strengths for zinc on preheated and unheated concrete. Adhesion strengths decreased monotonically after about 400 to 600 kC/m{sup 2} (10.4 to 15.6 A-h/ft{sup 2}) as a result of the reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. A zone adjacent to the metallic zinc (and originally part of the zinc coating) was primarily zincite (ZnO), with minor constituents of wulfingite (Zn(OH){sub 2}), simonkolleite (Zn{sub 5}(OH) {sub 8}C{sub l2}{sup .}H{sub 2}O), and hydrated zinc hydroxide sulfates (Zn{sub 4}SO{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}{sup .}xH{sub 2}O). This zone is the locus for cohesive fracture when the zinc coating separates from the concrete during adhesion tests. Zinc ions substitute for calcium in the cement paste adjacent to the coating as the result of secondary mineralization. The initial estimate of the coating service life based on adhesion strength measurements in accelerated impressed current cathodic protection tests is about 27 years.

  19. Thoria-based cermet nuclear fuel : sintered microsphere fabrication by spray drying.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A.A.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Chandrmouli, V.; Anthonysamy, S.; Kuchibhotla, S.; Downar, T.J.

    2002-01-09

    Cermet nuclear fuels have been demonstrated to have significant potential to enhance fuel performance because of low internal fuel temperatures and low stored energy. The combination of these benefits with the inherent proliferation resistance, high burnup capability, and favorable neutronic properties of the thorium fuel cycle produces intriguing options for advanced nuclear fuel cycles. This paper describes aspects of a Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project with two primary goals: (1) Evaluate the feasibility of implementing the thorium fuel cycle in existing or advanced reactors using a zirconium-matrix cermet fuel, and (2) Develop enabling technologies required for the economic application of this new fuel form. Spray drying is a physical process of granulating fine powders that is used widely in the chemical, pharmaceutical, ceramic, and food industries. It is generally used to produce flowable fine powders. Occasionally it is used to fabricate sintered bodies like cemented carbides, but it has not, heretofore, been used to produce sintered microspheres. As a physical process, it can be adapted to many powder types and mixtures and thus, has appeal for nuclear fuels and waste forms of various compositions. It also permits easy recycling of process ''wastes'' and minimal chemical waste streams that can arise in chemical sol/gel processing. On the other hand, for radioactive powders, it presents safety challenges for processing these materials in powder form and in achieving microspheres of high density and perfection.

  20. SP-100 design, safety, and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.L.; Cox, C.M.; Mahaffey, M.K.

    1990-07-01

    The SP-100 Program is developing a nuclear reactor power system that can enhance and/or enable future civilian and military space missions. The program is directed to develop space reactor technology to provide electrical power in the range of tens to hundreds of kilowatts. The major nuclear assembly test is to be conducted at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and is designed to validate the performance of the 2.4-MWt nuclear and heat transport assembly. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Edison SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetekofEcogeoEdipower Jump to:Edison SpA

  2. Enel SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of theClimateElgin,Wind UK Jump to: navigation,Enel SpA

  3. Metalco SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,Mereg GmbH Jump to: navigation, searchMetalco SpA Jump to:

  4. Almeco SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5All Home > AllOhioClimateAlltronic TechAlmeco SpA

  5. RADIO OBSERVATRIO DO ITAPETINGA, ATIBAIA, SP ZONA DE SILNCIO ELTRICO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RADIO OBSERVATÓRIO DO ITAPETINGA, ATIBAIA, SP ZONA DE SILÊNCIO ELÉTRICO. PROTEÇÃO DO RÁDIO uma Radio Conferência Mundial (World Adminstrative Radio Conference, WARC) patrocinada pela União

  6. PySP: Modeling and Solving Stochastic Programs in Python

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-09-07

    Sep 6, 2010 ... Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor). PySP: Modeling and Solving Stochastic Programs in. Python. Jean-Paul Watson · David ...

  7. Development of a carcass sanitizing spray system for small and very small slaughterhouses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Jose Gabriel

    2007-04-25

    sanitizer spraying system (sanitizing halo system) was designed and assembled. The sanitizing halo system was tested at the Rosenthal Meat Science and Technology Center, Texas A&M University. Thirteen carcasses were split in halves. Thirteen halves were...

  8. Purchasing Water-Efficient Faucets, Pre-Rinse Spray Valves, Showerheads, Toilets, and Urinals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal agencies are required to purchase U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) WaterSense-labeled products where applicable. Faucets, pre-rinse spray valves, showerheads, toilets, and urinals are covered under the WaterSense program.

  9. Spray drying and attrition behavior of iron catalysts for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreto Vazquez, Victor Hugo

    2004-11-15

    This thesis describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating attrition resistant iron catalysts prepared by spray drying technique. These catalysts are intended for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor...

  10. Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies Preservative Spray Treatment Maintains Cooling Tower 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reidenback, R.

    1991-01-01

    Several problems common to most industrial wood framed cooling towers can be easily controlled with annual preservative spray treatment applications to the plenum area framework and drift eliminators. It eliminates the expensive periodic repairs due...

  11. Development of a uniform-droplet spray apparatus for high melting temperature metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joumaa, Hady K

    2005-01-01

    The building and operation of a high-temperature uniform droplet spraying (UDS) apparatus extend the performance and capabilities of powder based manufacturing processes. Although the main concepts of operation of the ...

  12. Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.H. Kim; C.T. Lee; C.B. Lee; R.S. Fielding; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-10-01

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 degrees C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 degrees C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U–20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

  13. Heat transfer of R-134a in single-tube spray evaporation including lubricant effects and enhanced surface results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeykens, S.A.; Huebsch, W.W.; Pate, M.B.

    1995-08-01

    Single-tube spray evaporation experimental tests were conducted in order to evaluate the average wall heat transfer coefficients for seven different commercially available tubes. Liquid film supply rates were held constant in order to evaluate the effects of the enhancement on shell-side heat transfer under similar conditions. Because the spray evaporation phenomenon is so different from pool boiling, both condensation-type and evaporation-type enhanced surfaces were evaluated. A comparison of the results for all of the tubes showed that the enhanced condensation surfaces performed better than the enhanced boiling surfaces. In addition, the 26-fpi surface tested marginally better than the 40-fpi surface. Small concentrations of a polyol-ester lubricant cause a foaming effect that increases the heat transfer performance. This tendency was seen with both 32-cs and 68-cs polyol-ester oils. The 68-cs lubricant was tested at concentrations of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 with the W-40 fpi and Tu-Cii surfaces. Results with this lubricant show the performance continues to increase through the 3% concentration for most of the heat flux range tested At the upper end of the range tested, the 1.0% mass fraction yielded the best performance. The 32-cs lubricant generated trends similar to those of the 68-cs lubricant. Lubricant concentrations of 1.0%, 2.0%, and 3.0% were evaluated with plain, W-40 fpi, and Tu-Cii surfaces. The 2.0% concentration, not the 1.0 %, generated the best performance at the highest heat flux tested. This difference must be attributed to the difference in the lubricant viscosity.

  14. Ductile phase toughening of molybdenum disilicide by low pressure plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, R.G.; Rollett, A.D.; Stanek, P.W. ); Smith, R.W. . Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    The low fracture toughness of MoSi{sub 2} at ambient temperature has prompted investigations into new processing methods in order to impart some degree of fracture toughness into this inherently brittle material. In the following investigation, low pressure plasma spraying was employed as a fabricating technique to produce spray-formed deposits of MoSi{sub 2} and ductile reinforced MoSi{sub 2} composites containing approximately 10 and 20 volume percent of a discontinuous tantalum lamelli reinforcement. Fracture toughness (K{sub 1C}) measurements of MoSi{sub 2} and the MoSi{sub 2}/Ta composites were done using a chevron notched 4-point bend fracture toughness test in both the as-sprayed condition and after hot isostatic pressing at 1200{degrees}C/206 MPa for 1 hour. Results from the ductile reinforced MoSi{sub 2}/Ta composites have shown fracture toughness increases on the order of 200% over the as-sprayed MoSi{sub 2}. In addition, a marked anisotropy in fracture toughness was observed in the spray-formed deposits due to the layered splat structure produced by the low pressure plasma spray process.

  15. Ductile phase toughening of molybdenum disilicide by low pressure plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, R.G.; Rollett, A.D.; Stanek, P.W.; Smith, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    The low fracture toughness of MoSi{sub 2} at ambient temperature has prompted investigations into new processing methods in order to impart some degree of fracture toughness into this inherently brittle material. In the following investigation, low pressure plasma spraying was employed as a fabricating technique to produce spray-formed deposits of MoSi{sub 2} and ductile reinforced MoSi{sub 2} composites containing approximately 10 and 20 volume percent of a discontinuous tantalum lamelli reinforcement. Fracture toughness (K{sub 1C}) measurements of MoSi{sub 2} and the MoSi{sub 2}/Ta composites were done using a chevron notched 4-point bend fracture toughness test in both the as-sprayed condition and after hot isostatic pressing at 1200{degrees}C/206 MPa for 1 hour. Results from the ductile reinforced MoSi{sub 2}/Ta composites have shown fracture toughness increases on the order of 200% over the as-sprayed MoSi{sub 2}. In addition, a marked anisotropy in fracture toughness was observed in the spray-formed deposits due to the layered splat structure produced by the low pressure plasma spray process.

  16. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate),more »and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.« less

  17. Fungal Diversity Chrysoporthe doradensis sp. nov. pathogenic to Eucalyptus in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fungal Diversity Chrysoporthe doradensis sp. nov. pathogenic to Eucalyptus in Ecuador Marieka. and Wingfield, M.J. (2005). Chrysoporthe doradensis sp. nov. pathogenic to Eucalyptus in Ecuador. Fungal Eucalyptus in various South American countries. This disease has not previously been recorded from Ecuador

  18. Solar Physics & Space Plasma Research Center (SP2RC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Physics & Space Plasma Research Center (SP2RC) University of SheffieldSTFC SSP Intro Summer & Statistics, The University of Sheffield (UK) http://robertus.staff.shef.ac.uk #12;Solar Physics & Space]solitons, applications) ·Conclusions #12;Solar Physics & Space Plasma Research Center (SP2RC) http

  19. Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping Reservoir Flow and Permeability Spectral SP: A New Approach to Mapping...

  20. Public Information about the 2014 FESAC Strategic Planning (SP) Panel: Presentation Guidance (Revised 17 May 2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Information about the 2014 FESAC Strategic Planning (SP) Panel%20FESAC%20Strategic%20Planning%20Panel The FESAC Strategic Planning (SP) Panel invites FESAC Strategic Planning (SP) Panel: White-Paper Guidance". Each white

  1. Analysis of SP-100 critical experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sapir, J.L.; Brandon, D.I.; Collins, P.J.; Cowan, C.L.; Porter, C.A.; Andre, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the SP-100 space nuclear power source program, preliminary critical benchmark experiments were performed at the ZPPR facility at ANL-W. These configurations are representative of small, fast-spectrum, BeO-reflected, liquid metal-cooled space reactor designs at a 300-kWe power level. Analyses were performed using MCNP (Monte Carlo) and TWODANT (discrete ordinates) transport codes to calculate system criticality, control worth, and power distribution. Both methods calculated eigenvalues within 0.5% of the experimental results. Internal-poison-rod worth was underpredicted and radial reflector worth was overpredicted by both codes by up to 20%. MCNP-calculated control drum worths were underestimated by approximately 8%. Good agreement with experimental values was observed for /sup 235/U fission and for /sup 238/U fission and capture rates with the best agreement occurring in the fuel region and slightly poorer predictions apparent near BeO moderator. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Quantum Moduli Space of the Cascading Sp(p+M) x Sp(p) Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fumikazu Koyama; Futoshi Yagi

    2006-12-27

    We extend the detailed analysis of the quantum moduli space of the cascading SU(p+M) x SU(p) gauge theory in the recent paper of Dymarsky, Klebanov, and Seiberg for the Sp(p+M) x Sp(p) cascading gauge theory, which lives on the world volume of p D3-branes and M fractional D3-branes at the tip of the orientifolded conifold. As in their paper, we also find in this case that the ratio of the deformation parameters of the quantum constraint on the different branches in the gauge theory can be reproduced by the ratio of the deformation parameters of the conifold with different numbers of mobile D3-branes.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell processing using plasma arc spray deposition techniques. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, E.R.; Spengler, C.J.; Herman, H.

    1991-07-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in conjunction with the Thermal Spray Laboratory of the State University of New York, Stony Brook, investigated the fabrication of a gas-tight interconnect layer on a tubular solid oxide fuel cell with plasma arc spray deposition. The principal objective was to determine the process variables for the plasma spray deposition of an interconnect with adequate electrical conductivity and other desired properties. Plasma arc spray deposition is a process where the coating material in powder form is heated to or above its melting temperature, while being accelerated by a carrier gas stream through a high power electric arc. The molten powder particles are directed at the substrate, and on impact, form a coating consisting of many layers of overlapping, thin, lenticular particles or splats. The variables investigated were gun power, spray distance, powder feed rate, plasma gas flow rates, number of gun passes, powder size distribution, injection angle of powder into the plasma plume, vacuum or atmospheric plasma spraying, and substrate heating. Typically, coatings produced by both systems showed bands of lanthanum rich material and cracking with the coating. Preheating the substrate reduced but did not eliminate internal coating cracking. A uniformly thick, dense, adherent interconnect of the desired chemistry was finally achieved with sufficient gas- tightness to allow fabrication of cells and samples for measurement of physical and electrical properties. A cell was tested successfully at 1000{degree}C for over 1,000 hours demonstrating the mechanical, electrical, and chemical stability of a plasma-arc sprayed interconnect layer.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell processing using plasma arc spray deposition techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, E.R.; Spengler, C.J.; Herman, H.

    1991-07-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in conjunction with the Thermal Spray Laboratory of the State University of New York, Stony Brook, investigated the fabrication of a gas-tight interconnect layer on a tubular solid oxide fuel cell with plasma arc spray deposition. The principal objective was to determine the process variables for the plasma spray deposition of an interconnect with adequate electrical conductivity and other desired properties. Plasma arc spray deposition is a process where the coating material in powder form is heated to or above its melting temperature, while being accelerated by a carrier gas stream through a high power electric arc. The molten powder particles are directed at the substrate, and on impact, form a coating consisting of many layers of overlapping, thin, lenticular particles or splats. The variables investigated were gun power, spray distance, powder feed rate, plasma gas flow rates, number of gun passes, powder size distribution, injection angle of powder into the plasma plume, vacuum or atmospheric plasma spraying, and substrate heating. Typically, coatings produced by both systems showed bands of lanthanum rich material and cracking with the coating. Preheating the substrate reduced but did not eliminate internal coating cracking. A uniformly thick, dense, adherent interconnect of the desired chemistry was finally achieved with sufficient gas- tightness to allow fabrication of cells and samples for measurement of physical and electrical properties. A cell was tested successfully at 1000{degree}C for over 1,000 hours demonstrating the mechanical, electrical, and chemical stability of a plasma-arc sprayed interconnect layer.

  5. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin, A.; Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. The incidents related to rainwater leakage and condensation concerns. Condensation concerns have been extensively studied by others and are not further discussed in this report. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  6. Calculation notes in support of TWRS FSAR spray leak accident analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, B.W.

    1996-09-25

    This document contains the detailed calculations that support the spray leak accident analysis in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The consequence analyses in this document form the basis for the selection of controls to mitigate or prevent spray leaks throughout TWRS. Pressurized spray leaks can occur due to a breach in containment barriers along transfer routes, during waste transfers. Spray leaks are of particular safety concern because, depending on leak dimensions, and waste pressure, they can be relatively efficient generators of dispersible sized aerosols that can transport downwind to onsite and offsite receptors. Waste is transferred between storage tanks and between processing facilities and storage tanks in TWRS through a system of buried transfer lines. Pumps for transferring waste and jumpers and valves for rerouting waste are located inside below grade pits and structures that are normally covered. Pressurized spray leaks can emanate to the atmosphere due to breaches in waste transfer associated equipment inside these structures should the structures be uncovered at the time of the leak. Pressurized spray leaks can develop through holes or cracks in transfer piping, valve bodies or pump casings caused by such mechanisms as corrosion, erosion, thermal stress, or water hammer. Leaks through degraded valve packing, jumper gaskets, or pump seals can also result in pressurized spray releases. Mechanisms that can degrade seals, packing and gaskets include aging, radiation hardening, thermal stress, etc. An1782other common cause for spray leaks inside transfer enclosures are misaligned jumpers caused by human error. A spray leak inside a DST valve pit during a transfer of aging waste was selected as the bounding, representative accident for detailed analysis. Sections 2 through 5 below develop this representative accident using the DOE- STD-3009 format. Sections 2 describes the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios evaluated to determine the need for safety class SSCs or TSR controls. Section 3 develops the source terms associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios. Section 4 estimates the radiological and toxicological consequences for the unmitigated and mitigated scenarios. Section 5 compares the radiological and toxicological consequences against the TWRS evaluation guidelines. Section 6 extrapolates from the representative accident case to other represented spray leak sites to assess the conservatism in using the representative case to define controls for other postulated spray leak sites throughout TWRS. Section 7 discusses the sensitivities of the consequence analyses to the key parameters and assumptions used in the analyses. Conclusions are drawn in Section 8. The analyses herein pertain to spray leaks initiated due to internal mechanisms (e.g., corrosion, erosion, thermal stress, etc). External initiators of spray leaks (e.g., excavation accidents), and natural phenomena initiators (e.g., seismic events) are to be covered in separate accident analyses.

  7. Sprays and Spraying 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paddock, F.B. (Floyd B.)

    1916-01-01

    of Agriculture. Page .............................................. lsses of Insects 6 Biting Ineeets .......................................... 6 ......................................... Sucking Insects 7 ......................................... Boring... Insects 8 ......................... Insects Attacking Stored Products 8 iecticidee ................................................ 9 ................................................. Poisons 9 ...................................... mite Arsenic 9...

  8. Influence of Cooling Rate on Phase Formationin Spray-Formed H13 Tool Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. M. Mchugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia

    2006-04-01

    Spray forming is an effective way to process many tool steels into near-net-shape molds, dies and related tooling. The general approach involves depositing atomized droplets onto a refractory pattern in order to image the pattern’s features. The pattern is removed and the die is fitted into a standard holding fixture. This approach results in significant cost and lead-time savings compared to conventional machining, Spray-formed dies perform well in many industrial forming operations, oftentimes exhibiting extended die life over conventional dies. Care must be exercised when spray forming tool steel dies to minimize porosity and control the nature and distribution of phases and residual stresses. Selection of post-deposition heat treatment is important to tailor the die’s properties (hardness, strength, impact energy, etc.) for a particular application. This paper examines how the cooling rate and other processing parameters during spray processing and heat treatment of H13 tool steel influence phase formation. Results of case studies on spray-formed die performance in forging, extrusion and die casting, conducted by industry during production runs, will be described.

  9. Method and closing pores in a thermally sprayed doped lanthanum chromite interconnection layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an air electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles doped with an element or elements selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by thermal spraying doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles, either by plasma arc spraying or flame spraying; (C) depositing a mixture of CaO and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 on the surface of the thermally sprayed layer; and (D) heating the doped LaCrO.sub.3 layer coated with CaO and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 surface deposit at from about 1000.degree. C. to 1200.degree. C. to substantially close the pores, at least at a surface, of the thermally sprayed doped LaCrO.sub.3 layer. The result is a dense, substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the nonselected portion of the air electrode. A fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell, for example for generation of electrical power.

  10. Method and closing pores in a thermally sprayed doped lanthanum chromite interconnection layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.

    1995-02-14

    A dense, substantially gas-tight electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an air electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles doped with an element or elements selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by thermal spraying doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles, either by plasma arc spraying or flame spraying; (C) depositing a mixture of CaO and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the surface of the thermally sprayed layer; and (D) heating the doped LaCrO{sub 3} layer coated with CaO and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface deposit at from about 1,000 C to 1,200 C to substantially close the pores, at least at a surface, of the thermally sprayed doped LaCrO{sub 3} layer. The result is a dense, substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the nonselected portion of the air electrode. A fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell, for example for generation of electrical power. 5 figs.

  11. Distribution of arsenic and mercury in lime spray dryer ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panuwat Taerakul; Ping Sun; Danold W. Golightly; Harold W. Walker; Linda K. Weavers

    2006-08-15

    The partitioning of As and Hg in various components of lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples from a coal-fired boiler was characterized to better understand the form and fate of these elements in flue gas desulfurization byproducts. LSD ash samples, collected from the McCracken Power Plant on the Ohio State University campus, were separated by a 140-mesh (106 {mu}m) sieve into two fractions: a fly-ash-/unburned-carbon-enriched fraction (> 106 {mu}m) and a calcium-enriched fraction (< 106 {mu}m). Unburned carbon and fly ash in the material > 106 {mu}m were subsequently separated by density using a lithium heteropolytungstate solution. The concentrations of As and Hg were significant in all fractions. The level of As was consistently greater in the calcium-enriched fraction, while Hg was evenly distributed in all components of LSD ash. Specific surface area was an important factor controlling the distribution of Hg in the different components of LSD ash, but not for As. Comparing the LSD ash data to samples collected from the economizer suggests that As was effectively captured by fly ash at 600{sup o}C, while Hg was not. Leaching tests demonstrated that As and Hg were more stable in the calcium-enriched fraction than in the fly-ash- or carbon-enriched fractions, potentially because of the greater pH of the leachate and subsequently greater stability of small amounts of calcium solids containing trace elements in these fractions. 37 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Evaluation of a Heat Flux Sensor for Spray Cooling for the Die Casting Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Wu, Zhuoxi

    2007-02-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. In this paper, a new technique for measuring the heat flux during lubricant application is evaluated. Data from experiments conducted using water spray are first presented. Water spray experiments were conducted for different initial plate temperatures. Measurements were conducted for the application of two different lubricants, of dilution ratios of 1/15 and 1/50 of lubricant in water. The measurement uncertainties were documented. The results show that the surface temperature decreases initially very fast. Numerical simulation results confirmed that the abrupt temperature drop is not an artifact but illustrates the thermal shock experienced by the dies during the initial stages of lubricant application. The lubricant experiments show that the sensor can be successfully used for testing die lubricants with typical dilution ratios encountered in the die casting process.

  13. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality By Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Mi; G. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-08-10

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with various surface preparation conditions or spray process parameters. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that different surface preparation conditions and varied process parameters can be successfully differentiated by the impedance value observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. This non-contact, nondestructive, easy-to-use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  14. The effect of processing parameters on plasma sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Jacobson, L.A.; Cowgill, D.F.; Snead, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    Plasma spraying is being investigated as a potential coating technique for applying thin (0.1--5mm) layers of beryllium on plasma facing surfaces of blanket modules in ITER and also as an in-situ repair technique for repairing eroded beryllium surfaces in high heat flux divertor regions. High density spray deposits (>98% of theoretical density) of beryllium will be required in order to maximize the thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. A preliminary investigation was done to determine the effect of various processing parameters (particle size, particle morphology, secondary gas additions and reduced chamber pressure) on the as-deposited density of beryllium. The deposits were made using spherical beryllium feedstock powder which was produced by centrifugal atomization at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Improvements in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the beryllium spray deposits will be discussed along with the corresponding thermal conductivity and outgassing behavior of these deposits.

  15. Carbon Powders Prepared by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis of Substituted Alkali Benzoates Sara E. Skrabalak and Kenneth S. Suslick*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Carbon Powders Prepared by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis of Substituted Alkali Benzoates Sara E Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) has been used to prepare carbon spheres from aqueous solutions direct hydro- carbon pyrolysis methods.15-18 While the former methods are potentially cost and scale

  16. EVALUATION OF SUB-ZERO AND RESIDENCE TIMES AFTER CONTINUOUS VERSUS MULTIPLE INTERMITTENT CRYOGEN SPRAY COOLING EXPOSURE ON HUMAN SKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    ; (2) high heat transfer rates as cryogen is deposited onto the skin and evaporates at the sprayed SPRAY COOLING EXPOSURE ON HUMAN SKIN PHANTOM Julio C. Ramirez-San-Juan Beckman Laser Institute Guillermo Aguilar Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California Riverside ABSTRACT Cryogen

  17. ICLASS 2009, 11th Triennial International Annual Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems, Vail, Colorado USA, July 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    ICLASS 2009, 11th Triennial International Annual Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems. The results provide insight into the processes occurring during spray cool- ing. Introduction Liquid cryogen containers, inducing sudden flash evaporation and subsequent impact of liquid droplets onto solid sur- faces

  18. In Situ Observation of Crack Behavior in Compressively Loaded Plasma-Sprayed 7-wt%-Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trice, Rodney W.

    -stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is commonly used as a thermal barrier coating (TBC) in gas-turbine appli- cations. These low-sprayed coating. Another characteristic feature of plasma- sprayed materials is loading/unloading hysteresis%-Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Jonathan P. Levin, Graeme R. Dickinson,* and Rodney W. Trice* School of Materials Engineering

  19. Spray coating as a simple method to prepare catalyst for growth of diameter-tunable single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Spray coating as a simple method to prepare catalyst for growth of diameter-tunable single in simplicity and scalability -- have been recently reported. Dip-coating,[7] drop-casting,[8] and spin-coating quality SWCNTs from catalyst prepared by a spray coating technique, which had previously only been able

  20. ISSUANCE 2015-11-05: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves: Availability of Provisional Analysis Tools, Notice of Data Availability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves: Availability of Provisional Analysis Tools, Notice of Data Availability

  1. Dual acceptor doping and aging effect of p-ZnO:(Na, N) nanorod thin films by spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swapna, R., E-mail: swapna.ramella@yahoo.com, E-mail: santhoshmc@nitt.edu; Amiruddin, R., E-mail: swapna.ramella@yahoo.com, E-mail: santhoshmc@nitt.edu; Santhosh Kumar, M. C., E-mail: swapna.ramella@yahoo.com, E-mail: santhoshmc@nitt.edu [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli-620 015 (India)

    2014-01-28

    An attempt has been made to realize p-type ZnO by dual acceptor doping (Na-N) into ZnO thin films. Na and N doped ZnO thin films of different concentrations (0 to 8 at.%) have been grown by spray pyrolysis at 623 K. The grown films on glass substrate have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Hall measurement, UV-Vis spectrophotometer, Photoluminescence (PL) and Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to validate the p-type conduction. The surface morphology and roughness of the ZnO:(Na, N) films are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Hall measurement shows that all the films exhibit p-type conductivity except for 0 at.% Na-N doped ZnO film. The obtained resistivity (5.60×10{sup ?2} ? cm) and hole concentration (3.15×10{sup 18} cm{sup ?3}) for the best dual acceptor doped film is 6 at.%. It has been predicted that (Na{sub Zn}?N{sub O}) acceptor complex is responsible for the p-type conduction. The p-type conductivity of the ZnO:(Na, N) films is stable even after 6 months. The crystallinity of the films has been studied by XRD. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) confirms the presence of Na and N in 6 at.% ZnO:(Na, N) film. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ZnO:(Na, N) films show NBE and deep level emissions in the UV and visible regions, respectively. The ZnO:(Na, N) films exhibit a high transmittance about 90% in the visible region.

  2. A Systematic and Developmental Analysis of Arthropitys deltoides Sp. Nov.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cichan, Michael A.; Taylor, Thomas N.

    1983-06-01

    Arthropitys deltoides sp. nov. is described from Pennsvlvanian sediments of southeastern Kentucky. The axes are characterized by parenchymatous interfascicular rays that broaden conspicuously toward the periphery of the wood and secondary tracheids...

  3. Shewanella loihica sp. nov., isolated from iron-rich microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    loihica sp. nov., isolated from iron-rich microbial mats in the Pacific Ocean A novel marine bacterial strain, PV-4T, isolated from a microbial mat located at a hydrothermal vent...

  4. Chemically modified thermal-spray zinc anodes for galvanic cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Holcomb, G.R.; Russell, J.H.; Cramer, S.D.; Bennett, J.E.; Laylor, H.M.

    1999-12-01

    Humectants, substances that promote the retention of moisture, were applied to new and previously aged thermal-sprayed Zn anodes to improve the performance of galvanic cathodic protection systems. Anodes on steel-reinforced concrete were treated with aqueous solutions of the humectants lithium nitrate (LiNO{sub 3}) and lithium bromide (LiBr). LiBr was the most beneficial humectant, increasing the average galvanic current density of new thermal-sprayed Zn anodes by as much as a factor of six.

  5. Oxidation and degradation of a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coating (TBC) specimens consisting of single-crystal superalloy substrates, vacuum plasma-sprayed Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and air plasma-sprayed 7.5 wt.% yttria stabilized zirconia top coatings was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis at 1150{degrees}C for up to 200 hours. Coating durability was assessed by furnace cycling at 1150{degrees}C. Coatings and reaction products were identified by x-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  6. Effects of primary breakup modeling on spray and combustion characteristics of compression ignition engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Som, S.; Aggarwal, S.K. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Injector flow dynamics and primary breakup processes are known to play a pivotal role in determining combustion and emissions in diesel engines. In the present study, we examine the effects of primary breakup modeling on the spray and combustion characteristics under diesel engine conditions. The commonly used KH model, which considers the aerodynamically induced breakup based on the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, is modified to include the effects of cavitation and turbulence generated inside the injector. The KH model and the new (KH-ACT) model are extensively evaluated by performing 3-D time-dependent simulations with detailed chemistry under diesel engine conditions. Results indicate that the inclusion of cavitation and turbulence enhances primary breakup, leading to smaller droplet sizes, decrease in liquid penetration, and increase in the radial dispersion of spray. Predictions are compared with measurements for non-evaporating and evaporating sprays, as well as with flame measurements. While both the models are able to reproduce the experimentally observed global spray and combustion characteristics, predictions using the KH-ACT model exhibit closer agreement with measurements in terms of liquid penetration, cone angle, spray axial velocity, and liquid mass distribution for non-evaporating sprays. Similarly, the KH-ACT model leads to better agreement with respect to the liquid length and vapor penetration distance for evaporating sprays, and with respect to the flame lift-off location for combusting sprays. The improved agreement is attributed to the ability of the new model to account for the effects of turbulence and cavitation generated inside the injector, which enhance the primary breakup. Results further indicate that the combustion under diesel engine conditions is characterized by a double-flame structure with a rich premixed reaction zone near the flame stabilization region and a non-premixed reaction zone further downstream. This flame structure is consistent with the Dec's model for diesel engine combustion (Dec, 1997), and well captured by a newly developed flame index based on the scalar product of CO and O{sub 2} mass fraction gradients. (author)

  7. Numerical simulation of alumina spraying in argon-helium plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    A new numerical model is described for simulating thermal plasmas containing entrained particles, with emphasis on plasma spraying applications. The plasma is represented as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting ideal gas, while the particles are tracked as discrete Lagrangian entities coupled to the plasma. Computational results are presented from a transient simulation of alumina spraying in a turbulent argon-helium plasma jet in air environment, including torch geometry, substrate, and multiple species with chemical reactions. Particle-plasma interactions including turbulent dispersion have been modeled in a fully self-consistent manner. Interactions between the plasma and the torch and substrate walls are modeled using wall functions. (15 refs.)

  8. Numerical simulation of alumina spraying in argon-helium plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C.H.

    1992-08-01

    A new numerical model is described for simulating thermal plasmas containing entrained particles, with emphasis on plasma spraying applications. The plasma is represented as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting ideal gas, while the particles are tracked as discrete Lagrangian entities coupled to the plasma. Computational results are presented from a transient simulation of alumina spraying in a turbulent argon-helium plasma jet in air environment, including torch geometry, substrate, and multiple species with chemical reactions. Particle-plasma interactions including turbulent dispersion have been modeled in a fully self-consistent manner. Interactions between the plasma and the torch and substrate walls are modeled using wall functions. (15 refs.)

  9. Isolation and identification of a toxic metabolite of Phomopsis sp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samples, Daniel Robert

    1982-01-01

    ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF A TOXIC MEl'ABOLITE OF PHOMOPSIS SP. A Thesis by DANIEL ROBERT SAMPLES Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&B University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... MAY 1982 Major Subject~ Veterinary Toxicology ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF A TOXIC METABOLITE OF PHOMOPSIS SP. A Thesis by DANIEL ROBERT SAMPLES Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Membe (Mem ) (Head of Departme t...

  10. BiVO4 as a Visible-Light Photocatalyst Prepared by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis Scott S. Dunkle, Richard J. Helmich, and Kenneth S. Suslick*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    BiVO4 as a Visible-Light Photocatalyst Prepared by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis Scott S. Dunkle spray pyrolysis (USP). Gases created from the evaporation of solvent and the decomposition of precursor to complete the overall water splitting reaction.28,29 Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP)30-32 is a powerful

  11. UNCORRECTEDPROOF Please cite this article in press as: M. Grujicic et al., Selection of the spraying technologies for over-coating of metal-stampings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    of the spraying technologies for over-coating of metal-stampings with thermo-plastics for use in direct) xxx­xxx Selection of the spraying technologies for over-coating of metal-stampings with thermo The suitability of various polymer-powder spraying technologies for coating of metal-stampings used in polymer

  12. Minimal Spray Strategy for Frosted Apple Trees Nikki Rothwell, District Fruit IPM Educator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Minimal Spray Strategy for Frosted Apple Trees Nikki Rothwell, District Fruit IPM Educator Amy morning frost of Saturday, May 6th , many apples in the northwest region were affected. Based on some preliminary observations, we have found most apples in 'cherry sites' fared pretty well, although some trees

  13. 2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnello, Arthur M.

    2 SPRAY OILS--BEYOND 2000 Abstract Modern use of petroleum-derived oils as agricultural crop,buttheseweretoophytotoxic.Eventually, researchersconcentratedondistillatesintherangebetween kerosene and lubricating oils.Three basic classes of carbon structures present in petroleum oils (aromatics and other un- saturated components) in oils that were removable with sulfuric acid; the remainder

  14. 2007-01-0472 Particulate and Hydrocarbon Emissions from a Spray Guided

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2007-01-0472 Particulate and Hydrocarbon Emissions from a Spray Guided Direct Injection Spark-out emissions. In this work, the effect of blending methanol and ethanol with gasoline on unburned hydrocarbon number concentration and size distribution were measured using a Cambustion DMS500. These data

  15. Atomization and Sprays, 21 (5): 391410 (2011) COMPARISON OF WATER-IN-OIL EMULSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heydari, Payam

    2011-01-01

    CHARACTERISTICS FOR LOW- AND HIGH-CAPACITY PRESSURE-SWIRL NOZZLES Adrian A. Narvaez, Christopher D. Bolszo with surfactants through a low-flow-capacity pressure-swirl injector. These results were compared to past resultsAtomization and Sprays, 21 (5): 391­410 (2011) COMPARISON OF WATER-IN-OIL EMULSION ATOMIZATION

  16. Four dimensional visualization of highly transient fuel sprays by microsecond quantitative x-ray tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    -resolved quantitative fuel distribution allowed a realistic numerical fluid dynamic simulation with initial conditions- timal for probing the fuel, a blend of a calibration fluid and a cerium-containing fuel additiveFour dimensional visualization of highly transient fuel sprays by microsecond quantitative x

  17. Field performance of sprayed zinc anodes in controlling corrosion of steel reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinnea, J.

    1998-12-31

    The deterioration of concrete structures often results from the corrosion of their steel reinforcement. Cathodic protection (CP) is a proven means to stop rebar corrosion. One anode material gaining acceptance in the infrastructure corrosion fight is zinc thermal spray coating. This paper discusses an investigation of such CP systems.

  18. Numerical modeling of spray cooling-assisted dermatologic laser surgery for treatment of port wine stains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    . The objectives of this paper are: to improve the thermal modeling of skin undergoing CSC-assisted DLS for PWS that incorporate all the complexity of the problem are a valuable and fundamental research tool. Keywords: Spray Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 bBeckman Laser Institute Medical Clinic, University

  19. Large-Eddy Simulation of Evaporating Spray in a Coaxial Combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    Large-Eddy Simulation of Evaporating Spray in a Coaxial Combustor Sourabh V. Apte School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 Krishnan Mahesh Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455

  20. Enhancement of Heat Transfer with Pool and Spray Impingement Boiling on Microporous and Nanowire Surface Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiagarajan, S. J.; Wang, W.; Yang, R.; Narumanchi, S.; King, C.

    2010-09-01

    The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is leading a national effort to develop next-generation cooling technologies for hybrid vehicle electronics. The goal is to reduce the size, weight, and cost of power electronic modules that convert direct current from batteries to alternating current for the motor, and vice versa. Aggressive thermal management techniques help to increase power density and reduce weight and volume, while keeping chip temperatures within acceptable limits. The viability of aggressive cooling schemes such as spray and jet impingement in conjunction with enhanced surfaces is being explored. Here, we present results from a series of experiments with pool and spray boiling on enhanced surfaces, such as a microporous layer of copper and copper nanowires, using HFE-7100 as the working fluid. Spray impingement on the microporous coated surface showed an enhancement of 100%-300% in the heat transfer coefficient at a given wall superheat with respect to spray impingement on a plain surface under similar operating conditions. Critical heat flux also increased by 7%-20%, depending on flow rates.

  1. Flow analysis and nozzle-shape optimization for the cold-gas dynamic-spray process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    coatings to parts and to repair worn-out parts (e.g. large-diameter shafts in turbines and pumps). In these processes, the coating material is heated to temperatures high enough to induce melting. Consequently of deposited material. Cold spray as a coating technology was initially developed in the mid-1980s

  2. Microstructures of Metallic NiCrBSi Coatings Manufactured via Hybrid Plasma Spray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    due to the high temperature of the small irradiated area (Ref 6). In this study, atmospheric plasma of plasma spraying and a continuous wave (CW) CO2 laser irradiation (Ref 7). However, generally and in situ melting with a diode laser could result in very good mechanical properties. The increase

  3. Grain-Boundary Grooving of Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trice, Rodney W.

    Grain-Boundary Grooving of Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings as t0 -ZrO2.8,9 Non-transform- able zirconia is a non-equilibrium phase as the concentration of yttrium cations in the zirconia lattice is greater than the con- centration predicted by the ZrO2­Y2O3 phase

  4. Investigation of two-fluid methods for Large Eddy Simulation of spray combustion in Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigation of two-fluid methods for Large Eddy Simulation of spray combustion in Gas Turbines the EL method well suited for gas turbine computations, but RANS with the EE approach may also be found and coupled with the LES solver of the gas phase. The equations used for each phase and the coupling terms

  5. JET BREAKUP and SPRAY FORMATION in a DIESEL ENGINE James Glimm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    JET BREAKUP and SPRAY FORMATION in a DIESEL ENGINE James Glimm Department of Applied Mathematics 11973-5000, USA Constantine Tzanos Reactor Analysis and Engineering, Argonne National Laboratory of a fuel eÆcient, nonpollut- ing diesel engine. We report preliminary progress on the numerical simulation

  6. Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6 April 21, 1998 1 Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6 April 21, 1998 1 Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6 Theory For CRiSP.1.6 new equations have been implemented for gas production from spill. As a part of the US Army Corps' Gas Abatement study, Waterways Experiment Station (WES) has developed these new

  7. Beyond-Design-Basis-Accidents Passive Containment-Cooling Spray System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karameldin, Aly; Temraz, Hassan M. Elsawy; Ibrahim, Nady Attia [Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt)

    2001-10-15

    The proposed safety feature considered in this study aims to increase the safety margins of nuclear power plants by proposed water tanks located inside or outside the upper zone of the containment to be utilized for (a) residual heat removal of the reactor in case of station blackout or in case of normal reactor shutdown and (b) beyond-design-basis accidents, in which core melt and debris-concrete interaction take place, associated with accumulative containment pressure increase and partial loss of the active systems. The proposed passive containment system can be implemented by a special mechanism, which can allow the pressurization of the water in the tanks and therefore can enable an additional spray system to start in case of increasing the containment pressure over a certain value just below the design pressure. A conservative case study is that of a Westinghouse 3411-MW(thermal) power station, where the proposed passive containment cooling spray system (PCCSS) will start at a pressure of 6 bars and terminate at a pressure of 3 bars. A one-dimensional lumped model is postulated to describe the thermal and hydraulic process behavior inside the containment after a beyond-design-basis accident. The considered parameters are the spray mass flow rate, the initial droplet diameters, fuel-cooling time, and the ultimate containment pressure. The overall heat and mass balance inside the containment are carried out, during both the containment depressurization (by the spraying system) and pressurization (by the residual energies). The results show that the design of the PCCSS is viable and has a capability to maintain the containment below the design pressure passively for the required grace period of 72 h. Design curves of the proposed PCCSS indicate the effect of the spray flow rate and cooling time on the total sprayed volume during the grace period of 72 h. From these curves it can be concluded that for the grace period of 72 h, the required tank volumes are 3800 and 4700 m{sup 3}, corresponding to fuel-cooling times (time after shutdown) of two weeks and one week, respectively. This large quantity of water serves as an ultimate heat sink available for the residual heat removal in the case of station blackout. The optimal spraying droplet diameter, travel, and mass flow rate are 3 mm, 30 m, and 100 to 125 kg/s, respectively.

  8. Thermonuclear 42Ti(p,gamma)43V rate in type I X-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. J. He; A. Parikh; B. A. Brown; T. Rauscher; S. Q. Hou; Y. H. Zhang; X. H. Zhou; H. S. Xu

    2014-03-10

    The thermonuclear rate of the $^{42}$Ti($p$,$\\gamma$)$^{43}$V reaction has been reevaluated based on a recent precise proton separation energy measurement of $S_p$($^{43}$V)=83$\\pm$43 keV. The astrophysical impact of our new rates has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing type I x-ray burst calculations. It shows that the new experimental value of $S_p$ significantly affects the yields of species between A$\\approx$40--45. As well, the precision of the recent experimental $S_p$ value constrains these yields to better than a factor of three.

  9. Thermal spray vitrification process for the removal of lead oxide contained in organic paints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karthikeyan, J.; Chen, J.; Bancke, G.A.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Breslin, V.T.

    1995-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) regulations have necessitated the removal and containment of toxic lead from lead oxide containing paints. The Thermal Spray Vitrification Process (TSVP) is a novel technique in which a glass powder of appropriate composition is flame sprayed onto the painted surface to achieve removal and vitrification of the lead. Two different glass systems, i.e., alkali silicate and ferrous silicate, were chosen for detailed study. Appropriate amounts of raw materials were mixed, fused, quenched, ground and sieved to obtain the spray quality powders. Grit blasted mild steel coupons were used as test substrates for the spray parameter optimization studies; while those coupons with lead oxide containing organic paint were used for the lead removal experiments. The powders and deposits were investigated using Microtrac particle size analysis (for powders), optical microscopy, XRD and SEM. The remnant lead in the panel was measured using a specially prepared X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) system. The lead leach rate was recorded as per US-EPA approved Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The results of this study have shown that lead oxide can be successfully removed form the paint by flame spraying a maximum of three layers of glass onto the painted surface. It is possible to obtain much higher lead removal rate with ferrous silicate glass as compared to alkali silicate glass is much higher than the ferrous silicate glass. The in situ vitrification has not been completely optimized; however, the lead containing glass coating can be remelted in situ or on site to enhance the vitrification of the lead which had been absorbed in the glass coating.

  10. Flame structure of wall-impinging diesel fuel sprays injected by group-hole nozzles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Jian; Moon, Seoksu; Nishida, Keiya; Matsumoto, Yuhei [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, University of Hiroshima, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8527 (Japan); Zhang, Yuyin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Tokyo, 101-8457 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    This paper describes an investigation of the flame structure of wall-impinging diesel sprays injected by group-hole nozzles in a constant-volume combustion vessel at experimental conditions typical of a diesel engine. The particular emphasis was on the effect of the included angle between two orifices (0-15 deg. in current study) on the flame structure and combustion characteristics under various simulated engine load conditions. The laser absorption scattering (LAS) technique was applied to analyze the spray and mixture properties. Direct flame imaging and OH chemiluminescence imaging were utilized to quantify the ignition delay, flame geometrical parameters, and OH chemiluminescence intensity. The images show that the asymmetric flame structure emerges in wall-impinging group-hole nozzle sprays as larger included angle and higher engine load conditions are applied, which is consistent with the spray shape observed by LAS. Compared to the base nozzle, group-hole nozzles with large included angles yield higher overall OH chemiluminescence intensity, wider flame area, and greater proportion of high OH intensity, implying the better fuel/air mixing and improved combustion characteristics. The advantages of group-hole nozzle are more pronounced under high load conditions. Based on the results, the feasibility of group-hole nozzle for practical direct injection diesel engines is also discussed. It is concluded that the asymmetric flame structure of a group-hole nozzle spray is favorable to reduce soot formation over wide engine loads. However, the hole configuration of the group-hole nozzle should be carefully considered so as to achieve proper air utilization in the combustion chamber. Stoichiometric diesel combustion is another promising application of group-hole nozzle. (author)

  11. Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas [NCSU] [NCSU

    2013-10-21

    The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

  12. A study of the spray injection Reynolds number effects on gasoline yields of an FCC riser reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, B. J.; Zhou, C. Q.; Chang, S. L.; Lottes, S. A.

    2000-04-03

    A computational analysis of the combined effects of feed oil injection parameters in a commercial-scale fluidized catalytic cracking riser reactor was performed using a three-phase, multiple species kinetic cracking computer code. The analysis showed that the injection operating parameters (droplet diameter and injection velocity) had strong impacts on the gasoline yields of the FCC unit. A spray injection Reynolds number combining the two parameters was defined. A correlation between the spray injection Reynolds number and the gasoline product yields for various feed injection conditions was developed. A range of spray injection Reynolds number for the maximum gasoline yield was identified.

  13. Blood Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-03-14

    Sox spent a hundred mil to acquire pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka; they probably weren't even aware that he is a Type O and that they make the best bankers, politicians and... you guessed it... professional baseball players. #ceas #hacker #japan #tsutsuien...

  14. High electron mobility thin-film transistors based on Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} grown by atmospheric ultrasonic spray pyrolysis at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Stuart R. E-mail: thomas.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk; Lin, Yen-Hung; Faber, Hendrik; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. E-mail: thomas.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk; Adamopoulos, George; Sygellou, Labrini; Stratakis, Emmanuel; Pliatsikas, Nikos; Patsalas, Panos A.

    2014-09-01

    We report on thin-film transistors based on Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis in ambient atmosphere at 400–450?°C. The elemental, electronic, optical, morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the films and devices were investigated using a range of complementary characterisation techniques, whilst the effects of post deposition annealing at higher temperature (700?°C) were also investigated. Both as-grown and post-deposition annealed Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films are found to be slightly oxygen deficient, exceptionally smooth and exhibit a wide energy bandgap of ?4.9?eV. Transistors based on as-deposited Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films show n-type conductivity with the maximum electron mobility of ?2?cm{sup 2}/V s.

  15. A SPRAY REACTOR CONCEPT FOR CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF P-XYLENE TO PRODUCE HIGH-PURITY TEREPHTHALIC ACID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Meng

    2013-08-31

    Terephthalic acid (TPA), with current annual world capacity of exceeding 50 million metric tons, is a commercially important chemical used primarily in the manufacture of polyesters. A spray reactor in which the liquid phase, containing dissolved p...

  16. Optimization of ingestion of spray-applied poultry biologics by modification of environmental conditions at the time of application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Denise Y

    1999-01-01

    Spray application offers low cost and efficient rographics. application of biologics and reduced concerns regarding diverse water quality and medicator/proportioner function. Presently, we evaluated the effect of selected ...

  17. Validation of the thermal effect of roof with the Spraying and green plants in an insulated building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru; Ojima, Toshio

    2004-08-08

    In recent years, roof-spraying and rooftop lawns have proven effective on roofs with poor thermal insulation. However, the roofs of most buildings have insulating material to provide thermal insulation during the winter. The effects of insulation has not previously been quantified. In this study, the authors collected measurements of an insulated building to quantify the thermal effects of roof-spraying and rooftop lawns. Roof-spraying did not significantly reduce cooling loads and required significant amounts of water. The conclusion is that roof spraying is not suitable for buildings with well-insulated roofs. Rooftop lawns, however, significantly stabilized the indoor temperature while additionally helping to mitigate the heat island phenomenon.

  18. Phase control in the synthesis of yttrium oxide nano and micro-particles by flame spray pyrolysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Mallika

    2009-05-15

    The project synthesizes phase pure Yttria particles using flame spray pyrolysis, and to experimentally determines the effect of various process parameters like residence time, adiabatic flame temperature and precursor droplet size on the phase...

  19. Validation of Hot Water and Lactic Acid Sprays for the Reduction of Enteric Pathogens on the Surface of Beef Carcasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Kyle D.

    2011-02-22

    in eliminating or reducing enteric pathogens. The facilities selected utilized either a lactic acid spray treatment or a combination of hot water followed by a lactic acid treatment. At both facilities, mesophilic plate counts (MPC) were significantly (P < 0...

  20. Method for the assessment of airborne off-target pesticide spray concentrations due to aircraft wing-tip vortex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliva, Sergio Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to develop a method for assessing airborne concentrations caused by off-target pesticide drift. Concentrations are bounded by the worst credible circumstances within a normal aircraft pesticide spraying. It is assumed...

  1. Supporting Information Geobacter sp. SD-1 with enhanced electrochemical activity in high salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Supporting Information Geobacter sp. SD-1 with enhanced electrochemical activity in high salt title: Geobacter sp. SD-1 in high salt solutions #12;2 Fig. S1. Current generation as a function of time

  2. Forecasting the S&P 500 index using time series analysis and simulation methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Eric Glenn

    2009-01-01

    The S&P 500 represents a diverse pool of securities in addition to Large Caps. A range of audiences are interested in the S&P 500 forecasts including investors, speculators, economists, government and researchers. The ...

  3. Spraying Powder Materials by the High-Enthalpy Laminar Plasma Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khutsishvili, M.; Kikvadze, L.

    2008-03-19

    One of the most promising engineering solutions of the problem of spraying powder materials is the proposed method of plasma spraying by the laminar plasma jet. Laminar plasma flow is characterized by small jet angle divergence; the powder particles are penetrated and accelerated mainly in the axial direction. The molten powder particles are transported almost to the surface of a treated work-piece inside the laminar plasma flow in an atmosphere of the plasma-forming gas with the acceleration on the entire transfer area, which leads to an increase in the particles velocity, a decrease of their oxidability, an increase in the powder deposition efficiency, density, adhesion strength with the surface to be coated.

  4. Measurement of particle size, velocity and temperature in the plasma spray coating process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fincke, J.R.; Swank, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    The quality and uniformity of coatings fabricated by the plasma spray process is controlled by the condition of the particles on impact. In this work a measurement technique for simultaneously obtaining particle size, velocity, and temperature is used to characterize the particle spray field. Particle size and velocity are obtained from a combination laser particle sizing system and laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). The particle temperature is determined by a two-color pyrometer technique and the relative particle number density is derived from the data rate. The fraction of unheated or unprocessed particles which result from temperature and velocity fluctuations is also obtained. This fraction can approach 10% by mass of the total particle flow. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Evaluation of plasma-sprayed CoS{sub 2} cathodes for thermal batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.

    1999-12-22

    Conventional electroactive stack components in thermal batteries are constructed from pressed-powder parts. These include the anode, separator, and cathode pellets (discs). Pressing parts that are less than 0.010 inch thick is difficult. The use of plasma spray to deposit thin CoS{sub 2} cathode films onto a stainless steel substrate was examined as an alternative to pressed-powder cathodes. The plasma-sprayed electrodes were tested in single cells under isothermal conditions and constant-current discharge over a temperature range of 400 C to 550 C using standard LiSi anodes and separators based on the LiCl-KCl eutectic. Similar tests were conducted with cells built with conventional pressed-powder cathodes, which were tested under the same conditions for comparative purposes. This paper presents the results of those tests.

  6. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry: Spray Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutland, Christopher J.

    2009-04-26

    The Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion (TSTC) project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of the approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring the highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. Under this component of the TSTC program the simulation code named S3D, developed and shared with coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for turbulent liquid fuel spray dynamics. Major accomplishments include improved fundamental understanding of mixing and auto-ignition in multi-phase turbulent reactant mixtures and turbulent fuel injection spray jets.

  7. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helminiak, M. A.; Yanar, N. M.; Pettit, F. S.; Taylor, T. A.; Meier, G. H.

    2012-10-01

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs.

  8. Investigation of damage behavior of thermally sprayed coatings depending on coating thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crostack, H.A.; Beller, U.

    1995-12-31

    In order to increase the lifetime of components used for diesel engines or gas turbines surfaces are coated by ceramics. In recent years it succeeded in spraying thermal barrier coatings based on zirconia up to a thickness of a few millimeters. A comparison of the damage behavior between yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings with different thickness will be presented. The coatings are produced by atmospheric plasma spraying. The thickness is varied from 0.5 mm up to 2 mm. In order to characterize the mechanical as well as the damage processes different methods of destructive testing (tensile, bending, and loading test) are applied. Additionally, non-destructive testing methods were used to investigate the damage processes on micro structural level. The results will be discussed according to the microstructure.

  9. Leucobacter salsicius sp. nov., from a salt-fermented food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Leucobacter salsicius sp. nov., from a salt- fermented food Ji-Hyun Yun,1 Seong Woon Roh,1,2 Min, Daejeon 305-806, Republic of Korea Strain M1-8T was isolated from jeotgal, a Korean salt-fermented food contained 2,4-diaminobutyric acid, glutamic acid, alanine, glycine and c-aminobutyric acid. The major

  10. Agromyces atrinae sp. nov., isolated from fermented seafood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Agromyces atrinae sp. nov., isolated from fermented seafood Eun-Jin Park,1 Min-Soo Kim,1,2 Mi, designated P27T , was isolated from a traditional fermented seafood. The isolate grew optimally with 0, alanine, glutamic acid and glycine. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol

  11. Leucobacter celer sp. nov., isolated from Korean fermented seafood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Leucobacter celer sp. nov., isolated from Korean fermented seafood Na-Ri Shin, Min-Soo Kim, Mi, designated NAL101T , was isolated from gajami-sikhae, a traditional Korean fermented seafood made of flatfish, glycine, threonine and glutamic acid and the major fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C16 : 0

  12. Corynebacterium nuruki sp. nov., isolated from an alcohol fermentation starter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Corynebacterium nuruki sp. nov., isolated from an alcohol fermentation starter Na-Ri Shin, Mi , was isolated from a Korean alcohol fermentation starter. Optimal growth occurred at 37 6C, at pH 8 and in 1 were meso-diaminopimelic acid, alanine, glycine and glutamic acid. The strain contained mycolic acids

  13. WHAT'S GRAPHENE? Mono or few layers of sp2 bonded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    WHAT'S GRAPHENE? · Mono or few layers of sp2 bonded carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice 105cm2/Vs at RT. 1 Due to its unique transport properties, graphene is suitable for implementation sampling (EOS) timeresolved spectroscopy to optically pump and THz probe exfoliated graphene ribbons (GR

  14. ECE/TIM/SP/23 Timber Section, Geneva, Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , timber, wood industry, pulp and paper industry, wood fuels, certification, wood products, tropical timber#12;#12;ECE/TIM/SP/23 Timber Section, Geneva, Switzerland Geneva Timber and Forest Study Paper 23 the Geneva Timber and Forest Study Paper series, which started in 2006. ABSTRACT The UNECE/FAO Forest

  15. Oceanisphaera sediminis sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Oceanisphaera sediminis sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment Na-Ri Shin,1 3 Tae Woong Whon,1 3 isolated from marine sediment collected from the south coast of Korea. Cells of both strains were Gram composition of sediment collected from an ark clam farm during a mass mortality event was determined using

  16. Paenibacillus oceanisediminis sp. nov. isolated from marine sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Paenibacillus oceanisediminis sp. nov. isolated from marine sediment Jina Lee,1 Na-Ri Shin,1 Mi from marine sediment collected from the South Korean coast. The organism grew optimally under. Strain L10T was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from a cage-cultured ark clam farm

  17. Tropicimonas sediminicola sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Tropicimonas sediminicola sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment Na-Ri Shin,1 Seong Woon Roh,1 Min-motile, rod-shaped bacterium, strain M97T , was isolated from marine sediment of a cage-cultured ark clam farm of bacteria, a marine sediment sample collected from a cage-cultured ark clam farm was serially diluted

  18. Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov., isolated from black beach sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov., isolated from black beach sand Kyoung-Ho Kim,1 Seong Woon Roh,1 , was isolated from black sand collected from Soesoggak, Jeju Island, Korea. Cells grew at 4­37 6C, at pH 5 beach sand, a bacterium was isolated and subjected to taxonomic characterization. On the basis

  19. SUPPORTING INFORMATION Synthesis of Highly Crystalline sp2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex

    1 SUPPORTING INFORMATION Synthesis of Highly Crystalline sp2 -Bonded Boron Nitride Aerogels Michael characterization (XRD and nitrogen adsorption isotherms) of the BN aerogels discussed in the text, as well as a schematic detailing the crucible in which the synthesis of the aerogels is performed. #12;2 Figure S1

  20. Synthesis of mesoporous NiO doped TiO{sub 2} submicrosphere via spray hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahadur, J.; Sen, D.; Prakash, J.; Singh, Ripandeep; Paul, B.; Mazumder, S.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    2012-06-05

    NiO doped TiO{sub 2} submicrosphere have been prepared via spray hydrolysis. The doping concentration has been varied form 2 wt% to 15 wt%. Morphology of the submicrospheres has been investigated using small-angle neutron scattering and scanning electron microscopy. Elemental analysis has been carried out by energy dispersive X-ray analysis which confirms the doping concentrations. The mesopores in submicrospheres possess cylindrical morphology.

  1. The effectiveness of a foliar spray of kaolinite clay in reducing transpiration of cotton plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMichael, Bobbie Lee

    1967-01-01

    in light and to keep them from closing in darkness. Lower temperatures tended to cause the reverse. Culm (8) reported that leaf temperatures are usually higher than the surround- ing air temperatures and that transpiration accounts for a cooling effect...THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A FOLIAR SPRAY OI" KAOLINITE CLAY IN REDUCING TRANSPIRATION OF COTTON PLANTS A Thesis Bobble L. McMichael Submitted to the Graduate Col]ege cf the Texas A&I University ir, Partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  2. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

    1993-09-20

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested.

  3. A model for residual stress evolution in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, B. G.; Singh, J. P.; Grimsditch, M.

    2000-02-28

    Ruby fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that residual stress in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings is a function of the local interface geometry. The stress profile of a simulated rough interface characterized by ``peaks'' and ``valleys'' was modeled with a finite-element approach that accounted for thermal mismatch, oxide scale growth, and top coat sintering. Dependence of the stress profile on interface geometry and microstructure was investigated, and the results were compared with measured stresses.

  4. COMPARISON OF THERMAL PROPERTIES OF THERMAL BARRIER COATING DEPOSITED ON IN738 USING STANDARD AIR PLASMA SPRAY WITH 100HE PLASMA SPRAY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uppu, N.; Mensah, P.F.; Ofori, D.

    2006-07-01

    A typical blade material is made of Nickel super alloy and can bear temperatures up to 950°C. But the operating temperature of a gas turbine is above the melting point of super alloy nearly at 1500°C. This could lead to hot corrosions, high temperature oxidation, creep, thermal fatigue may takes place on the blade material. Though the turbine has an internal cooling system, the cooling is not adequate to reduce the temperature of the blade substrate. Therefore to protect the blade material as well as increase the efficiency of the turbine, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be used. A TBC coating of 250 ?m thick can reduce the temperature by up to 200° C. Air Plasma Spray Process (APS) and High Enthalpy Plasma Spray Process (100HE) were the processes used for coating the blades with the TBCs. Because thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperature, it is desired that these processes yield very low thermal conductivities at high temperatures in order not to damage the blade. An experiment was carried out using Flash line 5000 apparatus to compare the thermal conductivity of both processes.The apparatus could also be used to determine the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of the TBCs. 75 to 2800 K was the temperature range used in the experimentation. It was found out that though 100HE has high deposition efficiency, the thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperatures whiles APS yielded low thermal conductivities.

  5. Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter high-level waste solidification technical manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, D.E. (ed.)

    1980-09-01

    This technical manual summarizes process and equipment technology developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory over the last 20 years for vitrification of high-level liquid waste by the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process. Pacific Northwest Laboratory experience includes process development and demonstration in laboratory-, pilot-, and full-scale equipment using nonradioactive synthetic wastes. Also, laboratory- and pilot-scale process demonstrations have been conducted using actual high-level radioactive wastes. In the course of process development, more than 26 tonnes of borosilicate glass have been produced in 75 canisters. Four of these canisters contained radioactive waste glass. The associated process and glass chemistry is discussed. Technology areas described include calciner feed treatment and techniques, calcination, vitrification, off-gas treatment, glass containment (the canister), and waste glass chemistry. Areas of optimization and site-specific development that would be needed to adapt this base technology for specific plant application are indicated. A conceptual Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system design and analyses are provided in the manual to assist prospective users in evaluating the process for plant application, to provide equipment design information, and to supply information for safety analyses and environmental reports. The base (generic) technology for the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process has been developed to a point at which it is ready for plant application.

  6. Comparison of diesel spray combustion in different high-temperature, high-pressure facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Hermant, Laurent; Malbec, Louis-Marie; Bruneaux, Gilles; Genzale, Caroline L.; Pickett, Lyle M.; Schramm, Jesper

    2010-05-01

    Diesel spray experiments at controlled high-temperature and high-pressure conditions offer the potential for an improved understanding of diesel combustion, and for the development of more accurate CFD models that will ultimately be used to improve engine design. Several spray chamber facilities capable of high-temperature, high-pressure conditions typical of engine combustion have been developed, but uncertainties about their operation exist because of the uniqueness of each facility. For the IMEM meeting, we describe results from comparative studies using constant-volume vessels at Sandia National Laboratories and IFP. Targeting the same ambient gas conditions (900 K, 60 bar, 22.8 kg/m{sup 3}, 15% oxygen) and sharing the same injector (common rail, 1500 bar, KS1.5/86 nozzle, 0.090 mm orifice diameter, n-dodecane, 363 K), we describe detailed measurements of the temperature and pressure boundary conditions at each facility, followed by observations of spray penetration, ignition, and combustion using high-speed imaging. Performing experiments at the same high-temperature, high-pressure operating conditions is an objective of the Engine Combustion Network (http://www.ca.sandia.gov/ECN/), which seeks to leverage the research capabilities and advanced diagnostics of all participants in the ECN. We expect that this effort will generate a high-quality dataset to be used for advanced computational model development at engine conditions.

  7. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality by Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.Mi; X. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-05-26

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with different surface preparation conditions before applying the coating, e.g., grit-blasted surface, wire-brush cleaned surface, and a dirty surface. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that the three surface preparation conditions can be successfully differentiated by looking into the impedance difference observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. More specimens are also prepared with variations of process parameters, such as spray angle, stand-off distance, and application of corrosion protective sealant, etc. They are blindly tested to evaluate the reliability of the eddy current system. Quantitative relations between the coating bond strength and the eddy current response are also established with the support of destructive testing. This non-contact, non-destructive, easy to use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  8. Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schilke, Peter W. (4 Hempshire Ct., Scotia, NY 12302); Muth, Myron C. (R.D. #3, Western Ave., Amsterdam, NY 12010); Schilling, William F. (301 Garnsey Rd., Rexford, NY 12148); Rairden, III, John R. (6 Coronet Ct., Schenectady, NY 12309)

    1983-01-01

    In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

  9. On characterisation of wire-arc-plasma-sprayed Ni on alumina substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laik, A.; Chakravarthy, D.P.; Kale, G.B. . E-mail: gbkale@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    2005-08-15

    A study was carried out on metal-ceramic bonding produced by the technique of wire-arc-plasma spraying of Ni on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. The Ni layer and the Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface were characterised using optical and electro-optic techniques. The plasma-deposited Ni layer shows a uniform lamellar microstructure throughout the cross-section. The metal-ceramic interface was found to be well bonded with no pores, flaws or cracks in the as-sprayed condition. The optical metallography and concentration profiles established with the help of an electron probe microanalyser confirmed the absence of any intermediate phase at the interface. An annealing treatment at 1273 K for 24 h on the plasma-coated samples did not result in formation of any intermetallic compound or spinel at the Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. This indicates that the oxygen picked up by Ni during the spraying operation is less than the threshold value required to form the spinel NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  10. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over alternative insulation methods because they provide air sealing in complex assemblies, particularly roofs. Spray foam can provide the thermal, air, and vapor control layers in both new and retrofit construction. Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell SPF insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990s to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated incidents of failures (either sheathing rot or SPF delamination) that raise some general concerns about the hygrothermal performance and durability of these systems. The primary risks for roof systems are rainwater leaks, condensation from diffusion and air leakage, and built-in construction moisture. This project directly investigated rain and indirectly investigated built-in construction moisture and vapor drives. Research involved both hygrothermal modeling of a range of rain water leakage scenarios and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs. Other variables considered were climate zone, orientation, interior relative humidity, and the vapor permeance of the coating applied to the interior face of open cell SPF.

  11. Derived Types What Are Derived Types?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Derived Types #12;What Are Derived Types? As usual, a hybrid of two, unrelated concepts C++, Python orientation comes in #12;Simple Derived Types TYPE Wheel INTEGER :: spokes REAL :: diameter, width CHARACTER(LEN=15) :: material END TYPE Wheel That defines a derived type Wheel Using derived types needs a special

  12. Derived Types What Are Derived Types?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Derived Types #12;What Are Derived Types? As usual, a hybrid of two, unrelated concepts C object orientation comes in This course will only describe the former. #12;Simple Derived Types TYPE That defines a derived type Wheel Using derived types needs a special syntax TYPE(Wheel) :: w1 #12;More

  13. Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using CRiSP 1 Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using CRiSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using CRiSP 1 Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using of Engineers began the Gas Abatement Study in order to address the problem of gas and its effects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. One important question is how much gas reductions caused by structural changes at a few

  14. Type: Renewal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy TwoEvent at the Pu Facility,Type IV COPV1

  15. ISSUANCE 2015-11-16: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves: Availability of Provisional Analysis Tools;Notice of data availability (NODA); withdrawal and republication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves: Availability of Provisional Analysis Tools;Notice of data availability (NODA); withdrawal and republication

  16. NSS5/SP-STM2 Joint International Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saw-Wai Hla

    2009-05-03

    The NSS5/SP-STM2 conference was held in Athens, Ohio July 15-19, 2008. The conference brought together a prestigious group of scientists from all over the globe to focus for 3 ½ days on a variety of nanoscience topics, particularly on nanoscale spectroscopy and spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy. The conference was attended by many young scientists as well as senior scientists. Attendees to the conference were drawn from more than 10 countries and included 28 invited speakers, who are the leading scientists in their respective research areas. Included among the invited speakers were 4 plenary speakers - eminent scientists in their fields. The conference was divided into two parallel sessions – the NSS5 session and the SP-STM2 session.

  17. The transputer based GA. SP data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colombo, D.; Avano, B.; DePoli, M.; Maron, G. ); Negro, A.; Parlati, G. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, the new data acquisition for the GA.SP detector is presented. It is a distributed system based on a network of 40 T800 and T222 transputers linked to a VME system used for histogram storage. A 100 MBit/s FDDI ring connects the system to UNIX workstations used for the experiment control, histogram display and second level data analysis.

  18. Characterization of the liquid sodium spray generated by a pipework hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torsello, G.; Parozzi, F.; Nericcio, L.; Araneo, L.; Cozzi, F.; Carcassi, M.; Mattei, N.

    2012-07-01

    Due to its advantageous thermodynamic characteristics at high temperature (550 deg. C), liquid sodium is the main candidate to be the cooling fluid for Generation TV nuclear reactors SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors). Now, sodium reacts very violently, both with the water and the oxygen of the air. Only few data were known about the liquid sodium behaviour when spread in the environment through micro defects. These are often present in a cooling circuit in welded or sealed joints and more rarely in the pipes. Micro defects, on the other hand, can be also generated in a cooling circuit because of the vibrations always present in a circuit into which a fluid runs. A new set-up, named LISOF, was built for testing high temperature liquid sodium when passing through micro defects and generating sprays or jets. Sprays and jets were generated by means of nozzles embedding sub milli-metric holes the diameter of which was: 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.5 mm. Tests were performed by pressurizing liquid sodium (550 deg. C) at: 3, 6 and 9 barg. Normal and high speed cinematography were used for the direct observation of the liquid sodium sprays while Phase Doppler Interferometry was used for the measurement of the droplets characteristics and velocity. Tests concerning the behaviour of the high temperature liquid sodium firing in air or in contact with the cement cover applied to a scaled down core catcher simulacrum were also performed. The paper presents the built set-up and the collected results. (authors)

  19. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes for cathodic protection of steel-reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; McGill, Galen E.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are being used in Oregon in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for reinforced concrete bridges. The U.S. Department of Energy, Albany Research Center, is collaborating with the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to evaluate the long-term performance and service life of these anodes. Laboratory studies were conducted on concrete slabs coated with 0.5 mm (20 mil) thick, thermal-sprayed zinc anodes. The slabs were electrochemically aged at an accelerated rate using an anode current density of 0.032 A/m2 (3mA/ft2). Half the slabs were preheated before thermal-spraying with zinc; the other half were unheated. Electrochemical aging resulted in the formation at the zinc-concrete interface of a thin, low pH zone (relative to cement paste) consisting primarily of ZnO and Zn(OH)2, and in a second zone of calcium and zinc aluminates and silicates formed by secondary mineralization. Both zones contained elevated concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. The original bond strength of the zinc coating decreased due to the loss of mechanical bond to the concrete with the initial passage of electrical charge (aging). Additional charge led to an increase in bond strength to a maximum as the result of secondary mineralization of zinc dissolution products with the cement paste. Further charge led to a decrease in bond strength and ultimately coating disbondment as the interfacial reaction zones continued to thicken. This occurred at an effective service life of 27 years at the 0.0022 A/m2 (0.2 mA/ft2) current density typically used by ODOT in ICCP systems for coastal bridges. Zinc coating failure under tensile stress was primarily cohesive within the thickening reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. There was no difference between the bond strength of zinc coatings on preheated and unheated concrete surfaces after long service times.

  20. Plasma Sprayed Pour Tubes and Other Melt Handling Components for Use in Gas Atomization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrd, David; Rieken, Joel; Heidloff, Andy; Besser, Matthew; Anderson, Iver

    2011-04-01

    Ames Laboratory has successfully used plasma sprayed ceramic components made from yttria stabilized zirconia as melt pouring tubes for gas atomization for many years. These tubes have proven to be strong, thermal shock resistant and versatile. Various configurations are possible both internally and externally. Accurate dimensions are achieved internally with a machined fugitive graphite mandrel and externally by diamond grinding. The previous study of the effect of spray parameters on density was extended to determine the effect of the resulting density on the thermal shock characteristics on down-quenching and up-quenching. Encouraging results also prompted investigation of the use of plasma spraying as a method to construct a melt pour exit stopper that is mechanically robust, thermal shock resistant, and not susceptible to attack by reactive melt additions. The Ames Laboratory operates two close-coupled high pressure gas atomizers. These two atomizers are designed to produce fine and coarse spherical metal powders (5{mu} to 500{mu} diameter) of many different metals and alloys. The systems vary in size, but generally the smaller atomizer can produce up to 5 kg of powder whereas the larger can produce up to 25 kg depending on the charge form and density. In order to make powders of such varying compositions, it is necessary to have melt systems capable of heating and containing the liquid charge to the desired superheat temperature prior to pouring through the atomization nozzle. For some metals and alloys this is not a problem; however for some more reactive and/or high melting materials this can pose unique challenges. Figure 1 is a schematic that illustrates the atomization system and its components.

  1. Focused analyte spray emission apparatus and process for mass spectrometric analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roach, Patrick J. (Kennewick, WA); Laskin, Julia (Richland, WA); Laskin, Alexander (Richland, WA)

    2012-01-17

    An apparatus and process are disclosed that deliver an analyte deposited on a substrate to a mass spectrometer that provides for trace analysis of complex organic analytes. Analytes are probed using a small droplet of solvent that is formed at the junction between two capillaries. A supply capillary maintains the droplet of solvent on the substrate; a collection capillary collects analyte desorbed from the surface and emits analyte ions as a focused spray to the inlet of a mass spectrometer for analysis. The invention enables efficient separation of desorption and ionization events, providing enhanced control over transport and ionization of the analyte.

  2. Ageing effect in spray pyrolysed B:SnO{sub 2} thin films for LPG sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skariah, Benoy E-mail: dr.boben1@gmail.com; Thomas, Boben E-mail: dr.boben1@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    For LPG sensing, boron doped (0.2 to 0.8 wt. %) polycrystalline tin oxide thin films are deposited by spray pyrolysis in the temperature range 325 - 430 °C. Sensor response of 56 % is achieved for 1000 ppm of LPG, at an operating temperature of 350 °C. The effects of ageing under ambient conditions on the sensor response are investigated for a storage period of six years. Ageing increases the film resistance but the gas response is lowered. XRD, SEM, FESEM, FTIR and XPS are utilized for structural, morphological and compositional charaterisations.

  3. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D; Blue, Craig A; Rivard, John D.K.; Aprigliano, Louis F; Kohler, Leslie K; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J

    2013-09-03

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  4. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Ji, Xiaoyan (Jane); Day, Sumner D.; Blue, Craig A.; Rivard, John D. K.; Aprigliano, Louis F.; Kohler, Leslie K.; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J.; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2013-07-09

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  5. Damage evolution and residual stresses in plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, J. P.

    1999-02-03

    Air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings were subjected to thermal cycling and residual stress evolution in thermally grown oxide scale was studied by micro- and macro-ruby fluorescence spectroscopy. The macro approach reveals that compressive stress in the oxide scale increases with increasing number of thermal cycles (and thus increasing scale thickness), reaching a value of 1.8 GPa at a scale thickness of 3-4 {micro}m (80 cycles). Micro-ruby fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that protrusions of the zirconia top coat into the bond coat act as localized areas of high stress concentration, leading to damage initiation during thermal cycling.

  6. Nonlinear optical characterization of ZnS thin film synthesized by chemical spray pyrolysis method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G, Sreeja V; Anila, E. I., E-mail: anilaei@gmail.com; R, Reshmi, E-mail: anilaei@gmail.com; John, Manu Punnan, E-mail: anilaei@gmail.com [Optolectronic and Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Union Christian College, Aluva-683 102, Kerala (India); V, Sabitha P; Radhakrishnan, P. [International School of Photonics, CUSAT, Cochin-22 (India)

    2014-10-15

    ZnS thin film was prepared by Chemical Spray Pyrolysis (CSP) method. The sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction method and Z scan technique. XRD pattern showed that ZnS thin film has hexagonal structure with an average size of about 5.6nm. The nonlinear optical properties of ZnS thin film was studied by open aperture Z-Scan technique using Q-switched Nd-Yag Laser at 532nm. The Z-scan plot showed that the investigated ZnS thin film has saturable absorption behavior. The nonlinear absorption coefficient and saturation intensity were also estimated.

  7. Polyurethane spray coating of aluminum wire bonds to prevent corrosion and suppress resonant oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izen, Joseph; The ATLAS collaboration; Kurth, Matthew Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Unencapsulated aluminum wedge wire bonds are common in particle-physics pixel and strip detectors. Industry-favored bulk encapsulation is eschewed due to the range of operating temperatures and radiation. Wire bond failures are a persistent, source of tracking detector failure Unencapsulated bonds are vulnerable to condensation-induced corrosion, particularly when halides are present. Oscillations from periodic Lorenz forces are documented as another source of wire bond failure. Spray application of polyurethane coatings, performance of polyurethane-coated wire bonds after climate chamber exposure, and resonant properties of PU-coated wire bonds and their resistance to periodic Lorenz forces will be described.

  8. STUDY TYPES What is a "Study Type"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorf, Martin E.

    #12;STUDY TYPES What is a "Study Type"? A Study Type is a defined business process. Study Types work together to streamline workflow, track data & keep users informed. There are 2 Study Types in eCOMS: COMS and IACUC. The COMS Study: The COMS Study is an online form that a Principal Investigator fills

  9. The use of a macroscopic formulation describing the effects of dynamic compaction and porosity on plasma sprayed copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arrigoni, M.; Boustie, M. [Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique (LCD UPR CNRS 9028), ENSMA, BP 40109, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Bolis, C.; Berthe, L. [Laboratoire d'Application des Lasers de Puissance (LALP UPR CNRS 1576), 16 bis Av Prieur de la Cote d'Or, 94114 Arcueil Cedex (France); Barradas, S.; Jeandin, M. [Ecole des Mines de Paris/C2P-Centre de Projection Plasma, BP 87, 91003 Evry Cedex (France)

    2008-04-15

    Coatings processed by thermal deposition techniques involve porosity. The Laser adhesion test developed for testing bond strength of a coating on its substrate requires a good knowledge of shock wave propagation in such media. Experiments carried out on plasma sprayed copper samples, about 14% porous, with velocity interferometer system for any reflector measurements display the discrepancy of previously used models. Hence, a one-dimensional formulation of the compaction process, based on a simple P-{alpha} model, is proposed to improve the correlation between experimental and computed data signals obtained on a plasma sprayed copper under dynamic loading. Besides, this improvement allows the estimation of the bond strength of a plasma sprayed copper on aluminum substrate.

  10. Lab safety aerosols / sprays / fog machines 1. http://www.eliminatorlightingdirect.com/EF_400_400_Watt_Mini_Fog_Machine_p/ef-400.htm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Lab safety ­ aerosols / sprays / fog machines 1 1. http://www.eliminatorlightingdirect.com/EF_400_400_Watt_Mini_Fog_Machine_p/ef-400.htm 2. Vitz, E., Lyle, K. S., J. Chem. Educ., 2008, 85(10), 1385 3. http with surface area (Video of a fog machine in operation) #12;Lab safety ­ aerosols / sprays / fog machines 2 1

  11. soluble fish proteins obtained by enzymatic treatment of fresh fish offals dried according to the Hatmaker or Spray methods. Six artificial milks were made by dry pelleting of either cow skim-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to the Hatmaker or Spray methods. Six artificial milks were made by dry pelleting of either cow skim- milk powder

  12. Method of forming a plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spengler, Charles J. (Murrysville, PA); Folser, George R. (Lower Burrell, PA); Vora, Shailesh D. (Monroeville, PA); Kuo, Lewis (Monroeville, PA); Richards, Von L. (Anyola, IN)

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles doped with an element selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by plasma spraying doped LaCrO.sub.3 powder, preferably compensated with chromium as Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 and/or dopant element, preferably by plasma arc spraying; and, (C) heating the doped and compensated LaCrO.sub.3 layer to about 1100.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. to provide a dense, substantially gas-tight, substantially hydration-free, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell.

  13. Method of forming a plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spengler, C.J.; Folser, G.R.; Vora, S.D.; Kuo, L.; Richards, V.L.

    1995-06-20

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles doped with an element selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by plasma spraying doped LaCrO{sub 3} powder, preferably compensated with chromium as Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and/or dopant element, preferably by plasma arc spraying; and, (C) heating the doped and compensated LaCrO{sub 3} layer to about 1100 C to 1300 C to provide a dense, substantially gas-tight, substantially hydration-free, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell. 6 figs.

  14. Argonne's SpEC Module | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal8823Laboratory works with marine industrySpEC

  15. Fintel Energy Group SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpA JumpGmbHFerrisFillmore CityGlobalFinley,

  16. Foraminifera of the Ellis Group, Jurassic, at the Type Locality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lalicker, Cecil G.

    1950-02-24

    Eoguttulina pila, n. sp Marginulina sarpa, n. sp. 14 Eoguttulina vaga, n. sp. 19 Marginulina sicula, n. sp. 14 Eoguttulina axilla, n. sp. 19 Marginulina virga, n. sp. 14 Genus Guttu/inct D'OFtBIGNY, 1839 19 Marginulina rica, n. sp. 14 Guttulina... Faleopolymorphina gemma Ammodiscus orbis Dentalina ansa Nodosaria linea Nodosaria orbita Frondicularia forma Pseudopolymorphina pera Ellisina spatula Eoguttulina pila Guttulina fraga Guttulina stilla Patellina crista Eoguttulina axilla , .... ... --, ...... f•.» 0...

  17. Translating Water Spray Cooling of a Steel Bar Sand Casting Thomas J. Williams, Daniel Galles, and Christoph Beckermann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Translating Water Spray Cooling of a Steel Bar Sand Casting Thomas J. Williams, Daniel Galles, IA 52242 Abstract Ablation casting is a recently introduced process in which the sand mold is ablated, i.e., washed away, from the casting during solidification. The method uses a water-soluble binder

  18. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D.; Nagaraj, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  19. Coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically controlled accumulator fuel injection system: Break-up distances and times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caton, J.A.; Payne, S.E.; Terracina, D.P.; Kihm, K.D.

    1993-12-31

    Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system of a diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, fuel pressures and needle lifts were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base conditions (50% (by man) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m{sup 3}), the break-up time was 0.30 ms. An empirical correlation for spray tip penetration, break-up time and initial jet velocity was developed. For the conditions of this study, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal-water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Results of this study and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry and are not general for other coal-water slurry fuels.

  20. Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY February 2013 Academic Writing Guide Part 2 ­ Assignment Types: This section outlines the basic types of written assignments, providing structural elements and examples. #12;2 II. Assignment Types 1. Essay Writing

  1. Study on multiphase flow and mixing in semidry flue gas desulfurization with a multifluid alkaline spray generator using particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Y.G.; Wang, D.F.; Zhang, M.C. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2009-06-15

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique was used to measure the velocity fields of gas-droplet-solid multiphase flow in the experimental setup of a novel semidry flue gas desulfurization process with a multifluid alkaline spray generator. The flow structure, mixing characteristic, and interphase interaction of gas-droplet-solid multiphase flow were investigated both in the confined alkaline spray generator and in the duct bent pipe section. The results show that sorbent particles in the confined alkaline spray generator are entrained into the spray core zone by a high-speed spray jet and most of the sorbent particles can be effectively humidified by spray water fine droplets to form aqueous lime slurry droplets. Moreover, a minimum amount of air stream in the generator is necessary to achieve higher collision humidification efficiency between sorbent particles and spray water droplets and to prevent the possible deposition of fine droplets on the wall. The appropriate penetration length of the slurry droplets from the generator can make uniform mixing between the formed slurry droplets and main air stream in the duct bent pipe section, which is beneficial to improving sulfur dioxide removal efficiency and to preventing the deposition of droplets on the wall.

  2. Method of forming a leak proof plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuo, Lewis J. H. (Monroeville, PA); Vora, Shailesh D. (Monroeville, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by: (A) providing an electrode structure; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, an interconnection layer having the general formula La.sub.1-x M.sub.x Cr.sub.1-y N.sub.y O.sub.3, where M is a dopant selected from the group of Ca, Sr, Ba, and mixtures thereof, and where N is a dopant selected from the group of Mg, Co, Ni, Al, and mixtures thereof, and where x and y are each independently about 0.075-0.25, by thermally spraying, preferably plasma arc spraying, a flux added interconnection spray powder, preferably agglomerated, the flux added powder comprising flux particles, preferably including dopant, preferably (CaO).sub.12. (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3).sub.7 flux particles including Ca and Al dopant, and LaCrO.sub.3 interconnection particles, preferably undoped LaCrO.sub.3, to form a dense and substantially gas-tight interconnection material bonded to the electrode structure by a single plasma spraying step; and, (C) heat treating the interconnection layer at from about 1200.degree. to 1350.degree. C. to further densify and heal the micro-cracks and macro-cracks of the thermally sprayed interconnection layer. The result is a substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode structure. The electrode structure can be an air electrode, and a solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and further a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell for generation of electrical power.

  3. Method of forming a leak proof plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Vora, S.D.

    1995-02-21

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by: (A) providing an electrode structure; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, an interconnection layer having the general formula La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Cr{sub 1{minus}y}N{sub y}O{sub 3}, where M is a dopant selected from the group of Ca, Sr, Ba, and mixtures thereof, and where N is a dopant selected from the group of Mg, Co, Ni, Al, and mixtures thereof, and where x and y are each independently about 0.075--0.25, by thermally spraying, preferably plasma arc spraying, a flux added interconnection spray powder, preferably agglomerated, the flux added powder comprising flux particles, preferably including dopant, preferably (CaO){sub 12}(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 7} flux particles including Ca and Al dopant, and LaCrO{sub 3} interconnection particles, preferably undoped LaCrO{sub 3}, to form a dense and substantially gas-tight interconnection material bonded to the electrode structure by a single plasma spraying step; and (C) heat treating the interconnection layer at from about 1,200 to 1,350 C to further densify and heal the micro-cracks and macro-cracks of the thermally sprayed interconnection layer. The result is a substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode structure. The electrode structure can be an air electrode, and a solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and further a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell for generation of electrical power. 4 figs.

  4. Effect of molarity on properties of spray pyrolysed SnO{sub 2}:F thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deepu, D. R., E-mail: kpv@cusat.ac.in; Kartha, C. Sudha, E-mail: kpv@cusat.ac.in; Vijayakumar, K. P., E-mail: kpv@cusat.ac.in [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin - 682022 (India)

    2014-01-28

    Fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) thin films were prepared by using automated Chemical Spray Pyrolysis (CSP) machine and the effect of concentration of the precursors on the conductivity and transmittance of the films were studied. The resistivity (?) and mobility (?) are in the range of 10{sup ?3}–10{sup ?4} ?-cm and 8.2–13.5 cm{sup 2}V{sup ?1}s{sup ?1} respectively. The electron density lies between 3.4 × 10{sup 20} and 6.6×10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3}. The film transmittance varies between 70 to 80% and the films shows very good reflectivity in the IR-NIR region. Prepared films can be used as transparent electrodes in photo voltaic and optoelectronic devices.

  5. Observations of soot in combustion of methanol/toluene spray flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avedisian, C.T. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering); Presser, C.; Semerjian, H.G. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Chemical Science and Technology Lab.); Gupta, A.K. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    The influence of composition on soot formation in spray flames was investigated using, a light scattering/dissymmetry ratio technique to provide information on soot mean size and concentration. The study was carried out using binary mixtures of a sooting (i.e., toluene) and nonsooting (i.e., methanol) liquid. The ranage of mixtures included methanol volume fractions, [alpha], of 0 (i.e., pure toluene), 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 0.85, 0.90, 0.95, 0.99, and 1.0 (pure methanol). The flames were generated with an air-assist atomizer under the same operating conditions to isolate the effect of liquid composition.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and physical properties of Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline plasma sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, S.

    1995-11-09

    Our lab has been working with plasma spraying of both high pressure gas atomized (HPGA) and cast and crushed quasicrystal powders. A major component of this research includes comparative studies of PAS coatings formed with starting powders prepared by both techniques. In addition, a thorough investigation of the effects of starting powder particle size on coating microstructure is included. During the course of the overall research, an interest developed in forming Al-Cu-Fe materials with finer grain sizes. Therefore, a brief study was performed to characterize the effect of adding boron to Al-Cu-Fe materials prepared by different techniques. In addition to characterizing the microstructural features of the above materials, oxidation and wear behavior was also examined.

  7. Polyurethane spray coating of aluminum wire bonds to prevent corrosion and suppress resonant oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph M. Izen; Matthew Kurth; Rusty Boyd

    2016-01-04

    Unencapsulated aluminum wedge wire bonds are common in particle physics pixel and strip detectors. Industry-favored bulk encapsulation is eschewed due to the range of operating temperatures and radiation. Wire bond failures are a persistent source of tracking-detector failure. Unencapsulated bonds are vulnerable to condensation-induced corrosion, particularly when halides are present. Oscillations from periodic Lorentz forces are documented as another source of wire bond failure. Spray application of polyurethane coatings, performance of polyurethane-coated wire bonds after climate chamber exposure, and resonant properties of polyurethane-coated wire bonds and their resistance to periodic Lorentz forces are under study for use in a future High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider detector such as the ATLAS Inner Tracker upgrade.

  8. Polyurethane spray coating of aluminum wire bonds to prevent corrosion and suppress resonant oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izen, Joseph M; Boyd, Rusty

    2015-01-01

    Unencapsulated aluminum wedge wire bonds are common in particle physics pixel and strip detectors. Industry-favored bulk encapsulation is eschewed due to the range of operating temperatures and radiation. Wire bond failures are a persistent source of tracking-detector failure. Unencapsulated bonds are vulnerable to condensation-induced corrosion, particularly when halides are present. Oscillations from periodic Lorentz forces are documented as another source of wire bond failure. Spray application of polyurethane coatings, performance of polyurethane-coated wire bonds after climate chamber exposure, and resonant properties of polyurethane-coated wire bonds and their resistance to periodic Lorentz forces are under study for use in a future High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider detector such as the ATLAS Inner Tracker upgrade.

  9. Numerical analysis of the plasma-produced region in a plasma spraying system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuo, T.; Sakata, N.; Kato, S.; Nagayama, T.; Fujita, K.

    1999-07-01

    For this study, the Arcjet Plasmodynamic Analysis Code (APAC) developed by Fujita has been significantly modified in order to investigate the physical phenomena of the plasma-produced region in a plasma spraying system. For self-consistent determination of the heating process of working gas, plasma flow, which contains complicated physical phenomena, is obtained by interconnecting flow field analysis with electric field analysis. The main conclusions obtained are summarized as follows: (1) Discharge voltage decreased with discharge current significantly. On the other hand, it increases slightly with hydrogen flow rate. (2) Current density distribution governs physical phenomena in plasma flow. (3) Temperature and velocity distribution at the nozzle exit depend on the discharge current.

  10. SP3X : a six-degree of freedom device for natural model creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitney, Richard Henry, III

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents a novel input device, called SP3X, for the creation of digital models in a semi-immersive environment. The goal of SP3X is to enable novice users to construct geometrically complex three-dimensional ...

  11. 1 Estimating aquifer hydraulic properties from the inversion of surface 2 Streaming Potential (SP) anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sailhac, Pascal

    1 Estimating aquifer hydraulic properties from the inversion of surface 2 Streaming Potential (SP with the geometry of the water table. It follows that 11 SP measurements can be used to estimate aquifer hydraulic and found that we 14 are able to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and the depth 15 and the thickness

  12. Identification of novel regulatory mechanisms controlling heterocyst development in Anabaena Sp. strain PCC 7120 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldea, Maria Ramona

    2009-05-15

    The regulatory mechanisms that govern heterocyst development in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 have been continuously refined over the last two decades. In this work, we show that three of the sigma factor genes present in the Anabaena sp. strain PCC...

  13. Graphene-on-Diamond Devices with Increased Current-Carrying Capacity: Carbon sp2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graphene-on-Diamond Devices with Increased Current-Carrying Capacity: Carbon sp2 -on-sp3 Technology Laboratory, Illinois 60439, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Graphene demonstrated potential for practical applications owing to its excellent electronic and thermal properties. Typical graphene field

  14. Characterization of a novel angular dioxygenase from fluorene-degrading1 Sphingomonas sp. strain LB1262

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Characterization of a novel angular dioxygenase from fluorene-degrading1 Sphingomonas sp. strain;2 ABSTRACT26 In this study, the genes involved in the initial attack on fluorene by Sphingomonas sp. LB12627 for the angular oxidation of fluorene, fluorenol, fluorenone,31 dibenzofuran and dibenzo-p-dioxin. Moreover, FlnA1

  15. A Typed Operational Semantics for Type Theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goguen, Healfdene

    Untyped reduction provides a natural operational semantics for type theory. Normalization results say that such a semantics is sound. However, this reduction does not take type information into account and gives no information ...

  16. PAH bioconcentration in Mytilus sp from Sinclair Inlet, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, J.; Young, D.; Ozretich, R.; Echols, S.

    1995-12-31

    Approximately 20 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were measured by GC/MS in seawater and whole soft tissues of the intertidal mussel Mytilus sp. collected in July 1991 within and around Puget Sound`s Sinclair Inlet. Low variability was observed in the water concentrations collected over three days at control sites, yielding reliable values for the exposure levels experienced by this bioindicator mollusk. Mean water concentrations of acenaphthene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene in the control region were 2.7 {+-} 0.8, 2.8 {+-} 0.8, and 3.1 {+-} 0.7 ng/liter, respectively. Levels measured near sites of vessel activity were higher but much more variable; this reduced the reliability of the tissue/water bioconcentration factors (BCF) obtained from these samples. An empirical model relating values of Log BCF and Log Kow for the control zone samples supports the utility of this estuarine bioindicator for monitoring general levels of PAH in nearshore surface waters.

  17. Public Information about the 2014 FESAC Strategic Planning (SP) Panel: White-Paper Guidance (Revised 17 May 2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Information about the 2014 FESAC Strategic Planning (SP) Panel://www.burningplasma.org/activities/?article=2014%20FESAC%20Strategic%20Planning%20Panel The FESAC Strategic Planning (SP) Panel document "Public information about the 2014 FESAC Strategic Planning (SP) Panel

  18. Direct Visualization of Spray and Combustion Inside a DI-SI Engine and Its Implications to Flex-Fuel VVT Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fuel, injection timing, and valve deactivation in a DI optical accessible engine with side-mounted, multi-hole injector are investigated using CFD and high-speed imaging of sprays and combustion.

  19. Estimating the Annual Water and Energy Savings in Texas A & M University Cafeterias using Low Flow Pre-Rinse Spray Valves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebello, Harsh Varun

    2011-08-08

    Improving the efficiency of a Pre- Rinse Spray Valve (PRSV) is one of the most cost effective water conservation methods in the Food Services Industry. A significant contributor to this cost efficiency is the reduction ...

  20. Users guide for the conversion of Navy paint-spray-booth particulate emission-control systems from wet to dry operation. Final report, January-September 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayer, J.; Tate, D.

    1990-03-01

    The report is a guide for converting U.S. Navy paint-spray-booth particulate emission control systems from wet to dry operation. The use of water curtains for air-pollution-control of paint-spray booths is considered a major source of water and solid-waste pollution from industrial painting operations. It is possible, however, to eliminate this water-pollution problem and significantly reduce the solid-waste load by converting the booth to utilize a dry-filter pollution-control system. The conversion, however, requires extensive planning prior to actual facility modification. The report describes requirements to facilitate the planning and preparation for conversion of typical spray booths. Although the report addresses modifications of Navy spray booths, the basic engineering requirements discussed apply also to other Department of Defense installations and to commercial industrial facilities.

  1. Types of Commissioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several commissioning types exist to address the specific needs of equipment and systems across both new and existing buildings. The following commissioning types provide a good overview.

  2. Postdoc Appointment Types

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Appointment Types Postdoc Appointment Types Most postdocs will be offered a postdoctoral research associate appointment. Each year, approximately 30 Postdoctoral Fellow...

  3. Effects of Variations in Salt-Spray Conditions on the Corrosion Mechanisms of an AE44 Magnesium Alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martin, Holly J.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Wang, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of how corrosion affects magnesium alloys is of utmost importance as the automotive and aerospace industries have become interested in the use of these lightweight alloys. However, the standardized salt-spray test does not produce adequate corrosion results when compared with field data, due to the lack of multiple exposure environments. This research explored four test combinations through three sets of cycles to determine how the corrosion mechanisms of pitting, intergranular corrosion, and general corrosion were affected by the environment. Of the four test combinations, Humidity-Drying was the least corrosive, while the most corrosive test condition was Salt Spray-Humidity-Drying.more »The differences in corrosivity of the test conditions are due to the various reactions needed to cause corrosion, including the presence of chloride ions to cause pit nucleation, the presence of humidity to cause galvanic corrosion, and the drying phase which trapped chloride ions beneath the corrosion by-products.« less

  4. Thermal spray removal of lead-based paint from the viaduct bridge at Rock Island Arsenal, IL. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boy, J.H.; Weber, R.A.; Kumar, A.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents a field demonstration at the Rock Island Arsenal, IL, that validated the thermal spray vitrification (TSV) process as a safe and effective technique for removing lead-based paint from a steel bridge. Specially formulated glass was applied in a molten state to painted steel using a conventional thermal spray application system. The molten glass reacts with the paint, and encapsulates the lead. The cooled glass readily cracks and falls off, removing the paint. After onsite remelting of the glass waste to complete the encapsulation process, the final waste product is chemically inert and may be disposed of in a regular landfill. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, Division of Air Pollution Control determined that the glass remelt process could be considered a paint-removal operation for which no air quality permit was required.

  5. Co-Doping of Air Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-and Ceria-Stabilized Zirconia for Thermal Barrier Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trice, Rodney W.

    Co-Doping of Air Plasma-Sprayed Yttria- and Ceria-Stabilized Zirconia for Thermal Barrier typically consists of two layers, e.g., a B200 mm thick zirconia-based topcoat and a B100 mm me- tallic bond coat (MCrAlY, where M can be Co, Ni, or Fe).1 The zirconia layer is most often stabilized with Y2O3

  6. Temperature dependence of dynamic Young's modulus and internal friction in three plasma sprayed NiCrAlY coating alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Lloyd Steven

    1989-01-01

    for internal friction 6. 3 The corstant C TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) CONCLUSIONS Page 17 REFERENCES VITA 00 LIST OF TABLES Table l. Alloy Compositions . 2. Measured Densities of Specimens 3. Polynomials for CTE Data 4. Dynamic Young's Modulus... in failure, the mechanical properties of coatings have not been a subject of much concern. Recently, however, plasma sprayed NiCrA1Y coatings have been used as "bond coats", intermediate between an insulating top coat and the protected structural member...

  7. Combustion-aided suspension plasma spraying of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles: Synthesis and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, X. L.; Tok, A. I. Y.; Lim, S. L.; Boey, F. Y. C.; Kang, C. W.; Ng, H. W.

    2008-02-01

    Combustion-aided suspension plasma spraying (SPS) was developed for the synthesis of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Numerical models for Ar, Ar/O{sub 2}, and combustion-aided plasma fields were built using FLUENT V6.3.2(c) to compare their different plasma thermophysical properties. Modeling and experimental results both indicate that the plasma field was substantially altered by combustion-aided SPS. The plasma exhibited an elevated volume average temperature and reduced velocity as well as a broadened plasma plume, which resulted in an enhanced vapor supersaturation degree and a faster quenching rate in the radial direction. These can be attributed to the dual effects of oxygen dissociation/recombination and acetone solvent combustion. Consequently, productivity of the obtained nanoparticles increased remarkably and the particles' morphology was improved, with a smaller mean particle size and a narrower size distribution in comparison with those of powder feeding spraying. Furthermore, plasma-induced cubic{yields}monoclinic phase transformation in the as-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles was restrained by combustion-aided SPS to some extent.

  8. Oxidation Behavior of In-Flight Molten Aluminum Droplets in the Twin-Wire Electric Arc Thermal Spray Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen; Brian G. Williams

    2005-05-01

    This paper examines the in-flight oxidation of molten aluminum sprayed in air using the twin-wire electric arc (TWEA) thermal spray process. The oxidation reaction of aluminum in air is highly exothermic and is represented by a heat generation term in the energy balance. Aerodynamic shear at the droplet surface enhances the amount of in-flight oxidation by: (1) promoting entrainment and mixing of the surface oxides within the droplet, and (2) causing a continuous heat generation effect that increases droplet temperature over that of a droplet without internal circulation. This continual source of heat input keeps the droplets in a liquid state during flight. A linear rate law based on the Mott-Cabrera theory was used to estimate the growth of the surface oxide layer formed during droplet flight. The calculated oxide volume fraction of an average droplet at impact agrees well with the experimentally determined oxide content for a typical TWEA-sprayed aluminum coating, which ranges from 3.3 to 12.7%. An explanation is provided for the elevated, nearly constant surface temperature (~ 2000 oC) of the droplets during flight to the substrate and shows that the majority of oxide content in the coating is produced during flight, rather than after deposition.

  9. High-solids paint overspray aerosols in a spray painting booth: particle size analysis and scrubber efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, T.L.; D'arcy, J.B.; Schreck, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    Particle size distributions of high-solids acrylic-enamel paint overspray aerosols were determined isokinetically in a typical downdraft spray painting booth in which a 7-stage cascade impactor was used. Three different industrial paint atomizers were used, and the paint aerosols were characterized before and after a paint both scrubber. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of a metallic basecoat and an acrylic clearcoat paint aerosol from air-atomized spray guns ranged from 4-12 ..mu..m and was dependent on atomization pressure. When the paint booth was operated under controlled conditions simulating those in a plant, the collection efficiency of paint overspray aerosols by a paint scrubber was found to be size dependent and decreased sharply for particles smaller than 2 ..mu..m to as low as 64% for clearcoat paint particles of 0.6 ..mu..m. Improvement in the overall particulate removal efficiency can be achieved by optimizing the spray painting operations so as to produce the least amount of fine overspray paint aerosols less than 2 ..mu..m. Maintaining a higher static pressure drop across the paint both scrubber also will improve scrubber performance.

  10. Stratification of particulate and VOC pollutants in horizontal-flow-paint spray booths. Report for September 1988-October 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darvin, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses stratification of particulate and volatile organic compound (VOC) pollutants in horizontal flow paint spray booths, as part of a joint U.S. Air Force/EPA research and development program on emissions from paint spray booths. The test program discussed in the paper was designed to characterize the pollutants both within and exiting a typical back-draw booth for which emissions control strategies are being developed. The results of one series of tests indicate that the pollutants, both particulate and VOC, fall to the lower level of the booth or stratify at the level at which they were generated. This might be expected since the densities of typical pollutants found in spray booths are greater than air. The results showed, however, that the concentration of pollutants in the lower level prior to exiting the booth was significantly greater than expected. Data indicated that, for the 16 ft (4.9 m) high booth tested, the concentration at the exit of the booth below the 8 ft (2.4 m) level was 5-25 times greater than the concentration above that level. The importance of these findings is that it might be possible to partition a booth's air flow into two zones, one lean and the other concentrated. The concentrated zone could be directed to a proportionally smaller VOC control system of significantly less capital and operating cost.

  11. Types of Lights Types of Lights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Types of Lights Types of Lights q So far we have studied point lights ­ Radiate in all direc7ons q Other lights ­ Direc7onal lights (posi7on-independent) ­ Spotlights #12;2 Direc1onal Lights q Shine in a single, uniform direc7on q All rays

  12. Simulations of spray autoignition and flame establishment with two-dimensional CMC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Y.M.; Boulouchos, K. [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Technology Laboratory, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); De Paola, G.; Mastorakos, E. [Hopkinson Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-01

    The unsteady two-dimensional conditional moment closure (CMC) model with first-order closure of the chemistry and supplied with standard models for the conditional convection and turbulent diffusion terms has been interfaced with a commercial engine CFD code and analyzed with two numerical methods, an 'exact' calculation with the method of lines and a faster fractional-step method. The aim was to examine the sensitivity of the predictions to the operator splitting errors and to identify the extent to which spatial transport terms are important for spray autoignition problems. Despite the underlying simplifications, solution of the full CMC equations allows a single model to be used for the autoignition, flame propagation ('premixed mode'), and diffusion flame mode of diesel combustion, which makes CMC a good candidate model for practical engine calculations. It was found that (i) the conditional averages have significant spatial gradients before ignition and during the premixed mode and (ii) that the inclusion of physical-space transport affects the calculation of the autoignition delay time, both of which suggest that volume-averaged CMC approaches may be inappropriate for diesel-like problems. A balance of terms in the CMC equation before and after autoignition shows the relative magnitude of spatial transport and allows conjectures on the structure of the premixed phase of diesel combustion. Very good agreement with available experimental data is found concerning ignition delays and the effect of background air turbulence on them.

  13. Method for minimizing decarburization and other high temperature oxygen reactions in a plasma sprayed material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenling, William J. (Madison, WI); Henfling, Joseph A. (Bosque Farms, NM); Smith, Mark F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-06-08

    A method is disclosed for spray coating material which employs a plasma gun that has a cathode, an anode, an arc gas inlet, a first powder injection port, and a second powder injection port. A suitable arc gas is introduced through the arc gas inlet, and ionization of the arc gas between the cathode and the anode forms a plasma. The plasma is directed to emenate from an open-ended chamber defined by the boundary of the anode. A coating is deposited upon a base metal part by suspending a binder powder within a carrier gas that is fed into the plasma through the first powder injection port; a material subject to degradation by high temperature oxygen reactions is suspended within a carrier gas that is fed into the plasma through the second injection port. The material fed through the second injection port experiences a cooler portion of the plasma and has a shorter dwell time within the plasma to minimize high temperature oxygen reactions. The material of the first port and the material of the second port intermingle within the plasma to form a uniform coating having constituent percentages related to the powder-feed rates of the materials through the respective ports.

  14. Characterization of grain boundary conductivity of spin-sprayed ferrites using scanning microwave microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, J.; Nicodemus, T.; Zhuang, Y., E-mail: yan.zhuang@wright.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States); Watanabe, T.; Matsushita, N. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Yamaguchi, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    Grain boundary electrical conductivity of ferrite materials has been characterized using scanning microwave microscope. Structural, electrical, and magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} spin-sprayed thin films onto glass substrates for different length of growth times were investigated using a scanning microwave microscope, an atomic force microscope, a four-point probe measurement, and a made in house transmission line based magnetic permeameter. The real part of the magnetic permeability shows almost constant between 10 and 300?MHz. As the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} film thickness increases, the grain size becomes larger, leading to a higher DC conductivity. However, the loss in the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films at high frequency does not increase correspondingly. By measuring the reflection coefficient s{sub 11} from the scanning microwave microscope, it turns out that the grain boundaries of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films exhibit higher electric conductivity than the grains, which contributes loss at radio frequencies. This result will provide guidance for further improvement of low loss ferrite materials for high frequency applications.

  15. Metal Catalyzed sp2 Bonded Carbon - Large-scale Graphene Synthesis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal Catalyzed sp2 Bonded Carbon - Large-scale Graphene Synthesis and Beyond December 1, 2009 at 3pm36-428 Peter Sutter Center for Functional Nanomaterials sutter abstract:...

  16. Palladium(0)-Catalyzed Intermolecular Amination of Unactivated C[3 over sp]-H Bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Jun

    Filling out the space: The title reaction of unactivated C[3 over sp]-H bonds using aryl amines as the nitrogen source is disclosed (see scheme; dba=dibenzylideneacetone, Tf=trifluoromethanesulfonyl). Either the C-N ...

  17. Taxonomy, phylogeny, and paleoecology of Eoseira wilsonii gen. et sp. nov., a Middle Eocene diatom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    Taxonomy, phylogeny, and paleoecology of Eoseira wilsonii gen. et sp. nov., a Middle Eocene diatom in western North America. Fur- thermore, paleoecological inferences based on Eoseira life strategy pertain

  18. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  19. Theoretical Studies of the sp2 C-H Bond Activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Kieron

    -picoline C-H activation chemistry is proceeded by -bond metathesis for both the thorium and uranium (C5Me5Theoretical Studies of the sp2 versus sp3 C-H Bond Activation Chemistry of 2-Picoline by (C5Me5)2An activation chemistry of (C5Me5)2Th(CH3)2 and (C5Me5)2U(CH3)2 with 2-picoline (2- methylpyridine) is examined

  20. Types of Reuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

  1. Description of Rhodanobacter denitrificans sp. nov., isolated from nitrate-rich zones of a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, Om [Florida State University; Green, Stefan [Florida State University; Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University; Overholt, Will [Florida State University; Canion, Andy [Florida State University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 were isolated from the subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site where sediments are co-contaminated with large amounts of acidity, nitrate, metal radionuclides and other heavy metals. A combination of physiological and genetic assays indicated that these strains represent the first members of the Rhodanobacter genus shown to be capable of complete denitrification. Cells of strain 2APBS1T and 116-2 were Gram negative, non-spore-forming, rods, 3-5 micro;m long and 0.25-0.5 m in diameter. The isolates were facultative anaerobes, and had temperature and pH optima for growth at 30 C and pH 6.5, respectively, and could tolerate up to 2.0 % NaCl, though growth improved in its absence. Strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 contained fatty acid profiles and 100 % Q-8 ubiquinone, that are characteristic features of the genus Rhodanobacter. Although strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 share high SSU rRNA gene sequence similarity to R. thiooxydans (>99%), DNA-DNA hybridization values were substantially below the 70% threshold used to designate novel species. Thus, based on genotypic, phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and physiological differences, strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhodanobacter, for which the name Rhodanobacter denitrificans sp. nov is proposed. The type strain is 2APBS1T (=DSM 23569T =JCM 17641T). Strain 116-2 (=DSM 24678 = JCM 17642) is a reference strain.

  2. Performance of a 3D Spectral code on the Cray T3D and IBM SP2 parallel supercomputers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brummell, Nic

    Performance of a 3D Spectral code on the Cray T3D and IBM SP2 parallel supercomputers Clive F of the new generation of distributed memory supercomputers, in particular the Cray T3D and IBM SP2, we of 256 3 and 512 3 . The first two tables are for the Cray T3D and the other two for the IBM SP2

  3. TYPES OF NONIMMIGRANT VISAS Type Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for pleasure and cannot receive any type of payments. C-1*, Aliens in travel status while travelling directly through the C-2*, United States. C-3* D-1 Alien crewman on shore leave or transferring to another vessel is grounds for deportation. E-1 Aliens who conduct trade or inventories between the United States

  4. High-Performance Organic Field-Effect Transistors with Dielectric and Active Layers Printed Sequentially by Ultrasonic Spraying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Ming [ORNL; Sanjib, Das [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, Jihua [ORNL; Keum, Jong Kahk [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Gu, Gong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    High-performance, flexible organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are reported with PVP dielectric and TIPS-PEN active layers sequentially deposited by ultrasonic spray-coating on plastic substrate. OFETs fabricated in ambient air with a bottom-gate/top-contact geometry are shown to achieve on/off ratios of >104 and mobilities as high as 0.35 cm2/Vs. These rival the characteristics of the best solution-processible small molecule FETs fabricated by other fabrication methods such as drop casting and ink-jet printing.

  5. Effectiveness of two spraying systems for bollworm suppression, canopy penetration, and drift reduction in the Rolling Plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, John Robert Calvert

    1986-01-01

    for small droplets to drift (Wodageneh and Matthews 1981). ~AA' y. ' f CDA ~tt 1 . ft f' t CDA y y developed in Great Britain in the early 1950s by E. J. Bals (Freed 1982). Various hand held models have been successfully used in tropical countries... Effectiveness of Two Spraying Systems for Bollworm Suppression, Canopy Penetration, and Drift Reduction in the Rolling Plains of Texas (May 1986) John Robert Calvert Robinson, B. S. , Texas ARM University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: J. E. Slosser J. K...

  6. Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton Wu; Paul Yuran

    2006-12-31

    Universal Aggregates LLC (UA) was awarded a cost sharing Co-operative Agreement from the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Power Plant Improvement Initiative Program (PPII) to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia in October 2001. The Agreement was signed in November 2002. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the UA share is $12.3 million (63%). The original project team consists of UA, SynAggs, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc. and P. J. Dick, Inc. Using 115,000 ton per year of spray dryer ash (SDA), a dry FGD by-product from the power station, UA will produce 167,000 tons of manufactured lightweight aggregate for use in production of concrete masonry units (CMU). Manufacturing aggregate from FGD by-products can provide an economical high-volume use and substantially expand market for FGD by-products. Most of the FGD by-products are currently disposed of in landfills. Construction of the Birchwood Aggregate Facility was completed in March 2004. Operation startup was begun in April 2004. Plant Integration was initiated in December 2004. Integration includes mixing, extrusion, curing, crushing and screening. Lightweight aggregates with proper size gradation and bulk density were produced from the manufacturing aggregate plant and loaded on a stockpile for shipment. The shipped aggregates were used in a commercial block plant for CMU production. However, most of the production was made at low capacity factors and for a relatively short time in 2005. Several areas were identified as important factors to improve plant capacity and availability. Equipment and process control modifications and curing vessel clean up were made to improve plant operation in the first half of 2006. About 3,000 tons of crushed aggregate was produced in August 2006. UA is continuing to work to improve plant availability and throughput capacity and to produce quality lightweight aggregate for use in commercial applications.

  7. Computational analysis of a three-dimensional High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, B.; Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    An analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three-dimensional CFD results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire torch, but wire feed is not simulated. To the authors` knowledge, these are the first published 3-D results of a thermal spray device. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Argon is injected through the center of the nozzle. Pre-mixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled assuming instantaneous chemistry. A standard, two-equation, K-{var_epsilon} turbulence model is employed for the turbulent flow field. An implicit, iterative, finite volume numerical technique is used to solve the coupled conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the gas in a sequential manner. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and discussed.

  8. Effect of lubricant on spray evaporation heat transfer performance of R-134a and R-22 in tube bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeykens, S.A.; Pate, M.B.

    1996-11-01

    This study evaluates the effects of lubricant on spray evaporation heat transfer performance. Tests were conducted with refrigerant R-134a and triangular-pitch tube bundles made from enhanced-condensation, enhanced-boiling, low-finned, and plain-surface tubes. A 340-SUS polyol-ester (POE) oil was used for the R-134a testing because this lubricant is being integrated into industry for use with this refrigerant. Refrigerant was sprayed onto the tube bundles with low-pressure-drop, wide-angle nozzles located directly above the bundle. Collector testing was conducted with both R-134a and R-22 to determine the percentage of refrigerant contacting the tue bundle. It was found that small concentrations of the polyol-ester lubricant yielded significant improvement in the heat transfer performance of R-134a. The shell-side heat transfer coefficient was more dependent on lubricant concentration than on film-feed supply rate within the range of the respective parameters evaluated in this study. As expected, pure R-22 results show higher heat transfer coefficients than those obtained with pure R-134a at the same saturation temperature of 2.0 C (35.6 F).

  9. Typed Self-Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Matt

    2013-01-01

    type T y[O]. The operator IsIs is self-applicative, in thatargument t is any of Is[O] or IsIs, and otherwise behavesproof constant introduced by IsIs proves that the type of t

  10. The Suppression and Extinction of Class A Fires Using Water Sprays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, G. B.; Drysdale, Dougal D.

    1997-01-01

    Water has long been the agent of choice for fighting Class' A' fires In fact the thermal characteristics of water make it ideally suitable as an extinguishing agent for most types of fire, whether it is used to extract ...

  11. SP-100 Program: space reactor system and subsystem investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, R.B.

    1983-09-30

    For a space reactor power system, a comprehensive safety program will be required to assure that no undue risk is present. This report summarizes the nuclear safety review/approval process that will be required for a space reactor system. The documentation requirements are presented along with a summary of the required contents of key documents. Finally, the aerospace safety program conducted for the SNAP-10A reactor system is summarized. The results of this program are presented to show the type of program that can be expected and to provide information that could be usable in future programs.

  12. Complete genome sequence of the marine, cellulose and xylan degrading bacterium Glaciecola sp. 4H-3-7+YE-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klippel, Dr Barbara [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Shunsheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wiebusch, Sigrid [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology); Basner, Alexander [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology); Abe, Fumiyoshi [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC); Horikoshi, Koki [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC); Antranikian, Garabed [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology)

    2011-01-01

    Glaciecola sp. 4H-3-7+YE-5 was isolated from deep sea sediments at Suruga Bay in Japan and is capable of efficiently hydrolyzing cellulose and xylan. The complete genome sequence of Glaciecola sp. 4H-3-7+YE-5 revealed several genes encoding putatively novel glycoside hydrolases associated with plant biomass degradation.

  13. Synchronized droplet size measurements of intermittent coal-water slurry diesel sprays from an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terracina, Dwayne Paul

    1993-01-01

    .6 mm, four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm downstream of the nozzle tip were studied. Measurements were made for both pressurized (2.07 MPa, 300 psig) and unpressurized (ambient, 0 gage) chamber conditions. The spray tip SMD showed...

  14. Electrostatically charged spraying of a plant-an industrial and environmental flow problem (choice of flow process, design of device, dispersion in the environment, and impaction on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    Electrostatically charged spraying of a plant-an industrial and environmental flow problem (choice of flow process, design of device, dispersion in the environment, and impaction on the plant surface). wwwReviews Inc. All rights reserved INDUSTRIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL FLUID MECHANICS J. C. R. Hunt Department

  15. 438 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, VOL. 8, NO. 2, APRIL 2011 Optimal Paint Gun Orientation in Spray Paint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    Paint Gun Orientation in Spray Paint Applications--Experimental Results Pål Johan From, Member, IEEE of tasks where the robot is to hold a pointing device, such as a painting gun or a heating device, we show the paint gun orthogonal to the surface. The method proposed is to implement a slightly different planning

  16. Cai, Powell, Yue, Narayanan, Wang, Tate, Renzi, Ercan, Fontes & Gruner. Quantitative analysis of highly transient fuel sprays by time-resolved x-radiography. Appl. Phys. Lett.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    . Grunere),f) Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 Received 25 March 2003; accepted 6 June 2003, but perturb the spray and have limited spatial and temporal resolution.6 X-radiography is an alternative Energy Synchrotron Source CHESS .10 The prototype commercial GDI injection system tested was designed

  17. Spray-on polyvinyl alcohol separators and impact on power production in air-cathode microbial fuel cells with different solution conductivities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spray-on polyvinyl alcohol separators and impact on power production in air-cathode microbial fuel hydroxide ions (Popat et al., 2012) at the air cathode. Power production can be increased in MFCs by using-on and cast methods. PVA separators increased power with closely spaced electrodes versus spaced electrodes

  18. Stress Relaxation of Compression Loaded Plasma-Sprayed 7 Wt% Y2O3ZrO2 Stand-Alone Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trice, Rodney W.

    -temperature environments such as gas-turbine engines.1­4 TBCs typically consist of a metallic substrate coated with an B100Stress Relaxation of Compression Loaded Plasma-Sprayed 7 Wt% Y2O3­ZrO2 Stand-Alone Coatings Graeme R. Dickinson, Chris Petorak, Keith Bowman, and Rodney W. Tricew School of Materials Engineering

  19. Stress-Relaxation and Creep Behavior of Heat-Treated Stand-Alone Plasma-Sprayed 7 wt.% Y2O3-ZrO2 Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trice, Rodney W.

    to 10, 50 and 100-hr heat- treatments at 1200o C, followed by mechanical testing in compression at 25o C as compared to an as-sprayed sample. As heat- treatment time increased, the YSZ stand- alone coating C. The steady-state creep rate was observed to decrease with increasing heat-treatment time prior

  20. Hybrid type checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanagan, C

    2006-01-01

    O’Callahan and J. -D. Choi. Hybrid dynamic data race detec-subtyping is sound, the hybrid compilation algorithmHybrid Type Checking Cormac Flanagan Department of Computer

  1. Fejer-type inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitroi, F C

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present some new Fejer-type results for convex functions. Improvements of Young's inequality (the arithmetic-geometric mean inequality) and other applications to special means are pointed as well.

  2. Xylochloris irregularis gen. et sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel subaerial coccoid green alga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    green alga JIR I´ NEUSTUPA 1 *, MAREK ELIA´ S1 , PAVEL SKALOUD 1 , YVONNE NE MCOVA´ 1 AND LENKA irregularis gen. et sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel subaerial coccoid green alga. Phycologia 50: 57­66. DOI: 10.2216/08-64.1 The phylogenetic diversity of subaerial coccoid green algae remains

  3. Hylodesmus singaporensis gen. et sp. nov., a new autosporic subaerial green alga (Scenedesmaceae,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hylodesmus singaporensis gen. et sp. nov., a new autosporic subaerial green alga (Scenedesmaceae characterization of an autosporic coccoid green alga isolated from decaying wood in a natural forest in Singapore. Depending on culture conditions, this alga formed globular to irregularly oval solitary cells

  4. In vitro culture and developmental cycle of the parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium sp. from the blue crab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the blue crab Callinectes sapidus CAIWEN LI, TERRENCE L. MILLER, HAMISH J. SMALL and JEFFREY D. SHIELDS significant mortalities in marine crustacean fisheries worldwide. A species of Hematodinium infects the blue in blue crabs is unknown. We established several continuous in vitro cultures of Hematodinium sp. isolated

  5. Fungal Diversity Ceratocystis manginecans sp. nov., causal agent of a destructive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disease in Oman and Pakistan Marelize van Wyk1* , Ali O. Al Adawi2 , Iqrar A. Khan3 , Michael L. Deadman4 and Biology (NIAB), P.O. Box 128, Jhang Road, Faisalabad, Pakistan 4 Department of Crop Sciences, P.O. Box 34). Ceratocystis manginecans sp. nov., causal agent of a destructive mango wilt disease in Oman and Pakistan

  6. Aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism by Rhodococcus sp. I24 : computational, biochemical and transcriptional analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Jefferson A. (Jefferson Alexander), 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. 124 is a Gram-positive soil bacterium being developed for the manufacture of (-)cis-(1S,2R)-1-aminoindan-2-ol, a key precursor in the production of the HIV-1 protease inhibitor CrixivanTM, from the aromatic ...

  7. NASA/SP-2013-605 An Analysis and a Historical Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    NASA/SP-2013-605 An Analysis and a Historical Review of the Apollo Program Lunar Module Touchdown Dynamics George A. Zupp, PhD Engineering Directorate, Retired Structural Engineering Division NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 January 2013 #12;NASA STI Program ... in Profile Since its founding

  8. Vibrio litoralis sp. nov., isolated from a Yellow Sea tidal flat in Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Vibrio litoralis sp. nov., isolated from a Yellow Sea tidal flat in Korea Young-Do Nam,1,2 Ho-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacterial strains, MANO22DT and MANO22P, were isolated from a tidal flat area of Dae and energy sources. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the strains belong

  9. Overview of the 1985 NASA Lewis Research Center SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaby, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the 1985 (NASA) Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities in support of the SP-100 Program is presented. The SP-100 program is being conducted in support of the Department of Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. This effort is keyed on the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of a 25 kW(e) Stirling space-power technology-feasibility demonstrator engine. Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of a 9000-h goal endurance test conducted on a 2 kW(e) free-piston Stirling/linear alternator system employing hydrostatic gas bearings. Dynamic balancing of the RE-1000 engine (a 1 kW(e) free-piston Stirling engine) using a passive dynamic absorber is discussed, along with the results of a parametric study showing the relationships of Stirling power converter specific weight and efficiency as functions of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Planned tests are described covering a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept for potential SP-100 application.

  10. Seasonal Prevalence of Hematodinium sp. Infections of Blue Crabs in Three South Carolina (USA) Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, Michael J.

    Seasonal Prevalence of Hematodinium sp. Infections of Blue Crabs in Three South Carolina (USA at an alarming rate. In South Carolina, these declines are significantly correlated with years of decreased (Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission 2004). In South Carolina, annual fishery landings of blue crabs

  11. Genome Sequence of Amycolatopsis sp Strain ATCC 39116, a Plant Biomass-Degrading Actinomycete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Jennifer R.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Shunsheng; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Mikhailova, Natalia; Land, Miriam L; Sello, Jason K.

    2012-01-01

    We announce the availability of a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain 39116, one of few bacterial species that are known to consume the lignin component of plant biomass. This genome sequence will further ongoing efforts to use microorganisms for the conversion of plant biomass into fuels and high-value chemicals.

  12. Cryptometrion aestuescens gen. sp. nov. (Cryphonectriaceae) pathogenic to Eucalyptus in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cryptometrion aestuescens gen. sp. nov. (Cryphonectriaceae) pathogenic to Eucalyptus in Indonesia M, Indonesia. C Corresponding author. Email: Marieka.Gryzenhout@fabi.up.ac.za Abstract. The recently described on Eucalyptus. A recent investigation of dying Eucalyptus grandis clonal hedges in northern Sumatra, Indonesia

  13. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  14. Operon prediction by comparative genomics: an application to the Synechococcus sp. WH8102

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xin

    Operon prediction by comparative genomics: an application to the Synechococcus sp. WH8102 genome X genomics approach. A group of consecutive genes is considered as a candidate operon if both their gene sequences and functions are conserved across several phylo- genetically related genomes. In addition

  15. Fungal Diversity Ceratocystis neglecta sp. nov., infecting Eucalyptus trees in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fungal Diversity 73 Ceratocystis neglecta sp. nov., infecting Eucalyptus trees in Colombia Rodas, C Eucalyptus trees in Colombia. Fungal Diversity 28: 73-84. Commercial plantation forestry utilising species of non-native Eucalyptus trees forms an important industry in Colombia. These trees are, however

  16. DISTRIBUTION OF SAND LANCE, AlVIMODYTES SP., LARVAE ON THE CONTINENTAL SHELF FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISTRIBUTION OF SAND LANCE, AlVIMODYTES SP., LARVAE ON THE CONTINENTAL SHELF FROM CAPE COD TO CAPE of one species of sand lance, which rasembled AlIllllodytes lIlarillUS exactly, were collected along abundance of sand lance larval' occurred in winter off the mouths of the principal estuaries (southern New

  17. Marinomonas basaltis sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from black sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Marinomonas basaltis sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from black sand Ho-Won Chang,1 Seong black sand in Soesoggak, Jeju island, Korea. The strain, designated J63T , was oxidase- and catalase- negative, rod-shaped bacterial strain, J63T , was isolated recently from black sand from Soesoggak, Jeju

  18. Vibrio areninigrae sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from black sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Vibrio areninigrae sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from black sand Ho-Won Chang,1 Seong Woon strain was isolated from black sand collected from Soesoggak, Jeju island, Korea. The strain, designated , was recently isolated from black sand collected from Soesoggak, Jeju island, Korea. In the present study

  19. Carnobacterium jeotgali sp. nov., isolated from a Korean traditional fermented food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Carnobacterium jeotgali sp. nov., isolated from a Korean traditional fermented food Min-Soo Kim,1 food made with freshwater shrimp. Strain MS3T was able to grow at 4­37 6C, at pH 5 (Franzmann et al., 1991). They are found in vacuum-packed meat and are capable of growing in products stored

  20. ELSEVIER Physica A 245 (1997) 441445 Volatility distribution in the S&P500 stock index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01

    Cizeau a, Yanhui Liu a, Martin Meyer a, C.-K. Peng b,a, H. Eugene Stanley a,. aCenter Jbr Polymer Studies Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA Received 15 August 1997 Abstract We study the volatility; Volatility; S&P500; Multiplicative processes The volatility is a measure of the mean fluctuation of a market

  1. Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus sp. Strain NK55a.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolyar, Sergey; Liu, Zhenfeng; Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Pinel, Nicolas; Nelson, William C.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Romine, Margaret F.; Haruta, Shin; Schuster, Stephan C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-01-02

    The genome of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus sp. strain NK55a, isolated from Nakabusa hot spring, comprises a single, circular, 2.5-Mb chromosome. The genome is predicted to encode 2358 protein coding genes, including genes for all typical cyanobacterial photosynthetic and metabolic functions. No genes encoding hydrogenases or nitrogenase were identified.

  2. A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

    2014-12-19

    The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.

  3. Sede: Av. dos Astronautas, 1758, 12227-010 So Jos dos Campos (SP) Brasil tel + 55-12-32086000 Inscries aceitas para o Concurso Pblico para provimento

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sede: Av. dos Astronautas, 1758, 12227-010 São José dos Campos (SP) Brasil tel + 55 Astronautas, 1758, 12227-010 São José dos Campos (SP) Brasil tel + 55-12-32086000 CÓDIGO DA VAGA: PQ04 dos Campos (SP) Brasil tel + 55-12-32086000 CLAUDIA MARIA NICOLI CANDIDO ESFHAN ALAM KHERANI IGO

  4. Optical, electrical and surface properties of annealed CdO:Mg thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karakaya, Seniye E-mail: oozbas@ogu.edu.tr; Ozbas, Omer E-mail: oozbas@ogu.edu.tr

    2013-12-16

    The use of transparent conducting oxides in optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices has encouraged research on this field in recent years. Especially, cadmium oxide is a promising material for solar cell application but also for photodiodes and gas sensors. Mg doped CdO (CdO:Mg) films have been prepared on glass substrates by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) technique. After the production, the films have been annealed in air atmosphere at 475°C and half hour. Results on surface, optical and electrical properties of the films as a function of the thermal annealing have been reported. Thicknesses of the films have been determined by the filmetrics thin film measurement system. Transmission and absorbance spectra have been taken by UV-vis spectrophotometer. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis indicates that the roughness of the surface decreases upon increasing Mg concentration. The minimum resistivity value of the films was 2×10{sup ?3} ? cm.

  5. Effect of annealing on the properties of Sb doped ZnO thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N. Sadananda; Bangera, Kasturi V.; Shivakumar, G. K. [Thin Films Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Karnataka,Surathkal - 575025, Mangalore (India)

    2014-01-28

    Sb doped ZnO thin films have been deposited on glass substrate at 450°C using spray pyrolysis technique. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the as deposited films are polycrystalline in nature with (100) preferred orientation. Whereas the films annealed at 450° C for 6h show a preferential orientation along (101) direction. Crystallites size varies from 15.7 nm to 34.95 nm with annealing duration. The Scanning electron microscopic analysis shows the plane and smooth surface of the films. The optical properties of annealed films have shown a variation in the band gap between 3.37 eV and 3.19 eV. Transparency of as grown and annealed films decreases from 78 % to 65% respectively in the visible region. The electrical conductivity of the as grown film shows an increase in the electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude with increase in the annealing duration.

  6. High mobility organic field-effect transistor based on water-soluble deoxyribonucleic acid via spray coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Wei; Han, Shijiao; Huang, Wei; Yu, Junsheng

    2015-01-26

    High mobility organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) by inserting water-soluble deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) buffer layer between electrodes and pentacene film through spray coating process were fabricated. Compared with the OFETs incorporated with DNA in the conventional organic solvents of ethanol and methanol: water mixture, the water-soluble DNA based OFET exhibited an over four folds enhancement of field-effect mobility from 0.035 to 0.153?cm{sup 2}/Vs. By characterizing the surface morphology and the crystalline structure of pentacene active layer through atomic force microscope and X-ray diffraction, it was found that the adoption of water solvent in DNA solution, which played a key role in enhancing the field-effect mobility, was ascribed to both the elimination of the irreversible organic solvent-induced bulk-like phase transition of pentacene film and the diminution of a majority of charge trapping at interfaces in OFETs.

  7. Timber Management: Basal Spray for Woody Control http://tfsweb.tamu.edu Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    harvest- ing, or they can be left to provide various types of wild- life habitat such as perches, dens to water bodies, age of target vegetation, sensitivity of surrounding areas to damage from herbicides stands to increase growth prior to a harvest. Deadening of un- wanted vegetation can increase the growth

  8. Type Ia Supernovae

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two Electron Holes in HematiteType Ia Supernovae Type Ia

  9. Agreement Type Union

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReporteeo | National Nucleara min [Type the abstract of theType

  10. Special Publication No. 6, Subject: Nematoda and Nematode Diseases, Part 5: Supergenera, Genera, Species, and Subspecies: Sp-Z. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Mildred A.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Shaw, Judith H.; Kirby, Margie D.

    1985-01-01

    Spectatus [sp.] Travassos, L.P.; and Teixeira de Freitas, J.F., 1943 a, 412 Myletes sp.: Estrada de Ferro Noroeste do Brasil Spectatus spectatus n.g., n. sp. (tod) Travassos, L.P., 1923 ?, 29-30, figs. 1-4 Piaractus brachypomus: Rio Chijaba, Porto de... Sao Joao, Brasil Spectatus spectatus Travassos, 1923 Baylis, H.A.; and Daubney, R., 1926 a, 20 Spectatus spectatus Teixeira de Freitas, J.F.; and Lent, ?., 1941 a, 32-33 Piaractus brachypomus: Brasil Spectatus spectatus Travassos, L.P., 1945 a...

  11. Basics, types Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crenshaw, Michael

    to nuclear fusion. · Novae radiate primarily in the UV to X-ray region. · Types: ­ Classical Novae: only one is hot enough for explosive fusion. For classical novae, this happens on a time scale of 103 ­ 105 years. · Thermonuclear runaway (TNR): capture of protons by heavy elements (CNO cycle), happens in seconds #12;5 Novae

  12. Energy.gov Page Types

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about the standard page types available in the Energy.gov Drupal content management system. For information about other available page types, or to request a new kind of page type, contact...

  13. Practical pluggable types for Java

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papi, Matthew M

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the Checker Framework, which supports adding pluggable type systems to the Java language in a backward-compatible way. A type system designer defines type qualifiers and their semantics, and a compiler ...

  14. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    aluminum or vinyl cladding reduces maintenance requirements. Types of Window Glazing or Glass In addition to choosing a frame type, you will need to consider what type of glazing...

  15. Texas Instruments TPS7H1101-SP Fast Neutron Irradiation Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Texas Instruments’s TPS7H1101-SP is an ultra low drop-out voltage regulator that operates under a wide range of input voltages - 1.5 to 7V. It can operate under a load of at most 3A and is radiation qualified by Texas Instruments for Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects and Single Event Effects (SEE). For the application of the TPS7H1101-SP on the Front End Boards (FEBs) of the New Small Wheel (NSW) of the ATLAS detector, we study its susceptibility to a third kind of radiation effect -displacement damage- and present its performance in fast neutrons up to a dose of 6 x 10$^{14}$ 1MeVNE/cm$^{2}$.

  16. Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space. 73 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Complete Genome Sequences of Krokinobacter sp. 4H-3-7-5 and Lacinutrix sp. 5H-3-7-4, polysaccharide-degrading members of the family Flavobacteriaceae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klippel, Dr Barbara [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Shunsheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Walston Davenport, Karen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wiebusch, Sigrid [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology); Basner, Alexander [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology); Abe, Fumiyoshi [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC); Horikoshi, Koki [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC); Antranikian, Garabed [Technische Universitat Hamburg-Harburg (Hamburg University of Technology)

    2011-01-01

    Two members of the family Flavobacteriaceae were isolated from deep sea sediments in Japan using artificial seawater and cellulose, xylan and chitin as sole carbon and energy source. Here, we present the finished genome sequence of Krokinobacter sp. 4H-3-7-5 and Lacinutrix sp. 5H-3-7-4 which both encode for putatively novel enzymes involved in cellulose, hemicellulose and chitin degradation.

  18. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-09-24

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications.

  19. Formation of sporangia and zoospores by a Labyrinthomyxa sp. parasitic in Macoma Balthica Linne 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valiulis, George Arvidas

    1968-01-01

    in sea water. Cells isolated from the host by the Waring blender isolation method. 1125X 35 FORMATION OF SPORANGIA AND ZOOSPORES BY A LABYRINTHOMYXA SP. PARASITIC IN MACOMA BALTHICA LINNE INTRODUCTION A technique for diagnosing oysters infected... with the fungal pathogen Labyrinthomyza marina was developed by Ray (1952), This method consisted of placing sections of oyster tissue in Fluid Thioglycollate Medium (F. T. M. ) for 48 hrs then staining with Lugol's iodine. This caused the fungal cells...

  20. Genome sequence of the methanotrophic Alphaproteobacterium, Methylocystis sp. Rockwell (ATCC 49242)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Lisa Y. [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; Bringel, Francoise O. [University of Strasbourg; DiSpiritto, Alan A. [University of Iowa; Han, Sukkyun [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; Jetten, MSM [Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G. [University of Washington, Seattle; Kits, K. Dimitri [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; Klotz, Martin G [University of Louisville, Louisville; Op den Camp, HJM [Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Semrau, Jeremy D. [University of Michigan; Vuilleumier, Stephane [University of Strasbourg; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Lajus, Aurelie [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Medigue, Claudine [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Methylocystis sp. strain Rockwell (ATCC 49242) is an aerobic methane-oxidizing Alphaproteobacterium isolated from an aquifer in southern California. Unlike most methanotrophs in the Methylocystaceae family, this strain has a single pmo operon encoding particulate methane monooxygenase and no evidence of the genes encoding soluble methane monooxygenase. This is the first reported genome sequence of a member of the Methylocystis species of the Methylocystaceae family in the order Rhizobiales.

  1. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-01-01

    Dust around Type Ia supernovae Lifan Wang 1,2 LawrenceIa. Subject headings: Supernovae: General, Dust, Extinctionline) bands for Type Ia supernovae. (a), upper panel, shows

  2. The role of post-transcriptional regulators in pathogenesis and secondary metabolite production in Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilf, Nabil

    2011-07-12

    Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 (S39006) is a Gram-negative bacterium that is virulent in plant (potato) and animal (Caenorhabditis elegans) models. It produces two secondary metabolite antibiotics, prodigiosin and a carbapenem, and the plant cell wall...

  3. Overview of free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaby, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities are being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of an endurance test. Dynamic balancing of the SPDE engine will be discussed along with a summary covering the parametric results of a study showing the relationship between power-converter specific weight and efficiency both as a function of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Design parameters and conceptual design features will be presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. And finally, a description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept will be presented.

  4. Gas production and behavior in the coolant of the SP-100 Space Nuclear Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGhee, J.M.

    1989-08-01

    The radiologic generation and subsequent behavior of helium gas in the lithium coolant of SP-100 class space nuclear power reactors was investigated analytically in a two part study. Part One of the study consisted of a calculation of coolant radiologic helium gas production rates in a SP-100 class reactor using the discrete ordinates code TWODANT. Cross sections were developed from ENDF/B-V data via the MATXS6s master cross section library. Cross sections were self shielded assuming one homogeneous core region, and doppler broadened to 1300 K using the cross section preparation code TRANSX. Calculations were performed using an S{sub 4}/P{sub 1} approximation and 80 neutron energy groups. Part Two of the study consisted of a theoretical investigation into the behavior of helium gas in the primary loop of lithium cooled space reactors. The SP-100 space power system was used as a representative of such a system. Topics investigated included: (1) heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation; (2) bubble growth/collapse by diffusion, mechanical temperature/pressure effects, and coalescence; and, (3) the effects on bubble distribution of microgravity, magnetic fields, and inertially induced buoyancy. 104 refs., 78 figs., 28 tabs.

  5. Ballistic Imaging of High-Pressure Fuel Sprays using Incoherent, Ultra- short Pulsed Illumination with an Ultrafast OKE-based Time Gating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purwar, Harsh; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard

    2015-01-01

    We present an optical Kerr effect based time-gate with the collinear incidence of the pump and probe beams at the Kerr medium, liquid carbon disulfide, for ballistic imaging of the high-pressure fuel sprays. The probe pulse used to illuminate the object under study is extracted from the supercontinuum generated by tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses inside water, thereby destroying their coherence. The optical imaging spatial resolution and gate timings are investigated and compared with a similar setup without supercontinuum generation, where the probe is still coherent. And finally, a few ballistic images of the fuel sprays using coherent and incoherent illumination with the proposed time-gate are presented and compared qualitatively.

  6. Elastic properties, sp³ fraction, and Raman scattering in low and high pressure synthesized diamond-like boron rich carbides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Burgess, Katherine; Jia, Ruth; Sharma, Shiv; Ming, Li-Chung; Liu, Yongsheng; Ciston, Jim; Hong, Shiming

    2014-10-07

    Dense BC{sub x} phases with high boron concentration are predicted to be metastable, superhard, and conductors or superconductors depending on boron concentration. However, up to this point, diamond-like boron rich carbides BC{sub x} (dl-BC{sub x}) phases have been thought obtainable only through high pressure and high temperature treatment, necessitating small specimen volume. Here, we use electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, surface Brillouin scattering, laser ultrasonics (LU) technique, and analysis of elastic properties to demonstrate that low pressure synthesis (chemical vapor deposition) of BC{sub x} phases may also lead to the creation of diamond-like boron rich carbides. The elastic properties of the dl-BC{sub x} phases depend on the carbon sp²versus sp³ content, which decreases with increasing boron concentration, while the boron bonds determine the shape of the Raman spectra of the dl-BC{sub x} after high pressure-high temperature treatment. Using the estimation of the density value based on the sp³ fraction, the shear modulus ? of dl-BC?, containing 10% carbon atoms with sp³ bonds, and dl-B?C?, containing 38% carbon atoms with sp³ bonds, were found to be ? = 19.3 GPa and ? = 170 GPa, respectively. The presented experimental data also imply that boron atoms lead to a creation of sp³ bonds during the deposition processes.

  7. Surface modification, organometallic and polyaryl polymer coatings, and flame spray technologies for preventing corrosion of metals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.

    1995-07-01

    To improve adherent properties of electrogalvanized steel (EGS) to polymeric topcoats, the surfaces of EGS were modified by polyelectrolyte-modified zinc phosphating solution. The electrochemical reaction between phosphating solution and EGS led to the complete coverage with fully grown hopeite crystals after only 5 sec treatment, thereby improving adhesion to topcoating and providing protection of EGS against corrosion. To evaluate the ability of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) polyaryl thermoplastic coatings to protect zinc phosphate (Zn{center_dot}Ph)treated steels from corrosion in a wet, harsh environment ( 1.0 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, 3.0 wt % NaCl and 96.0 wt % water at temperatures from 25{degrees} to 200{degree}C), we exposed them in an autoclave to attempt heating-cooling cyclic fatigue tests (1 cycle = 12 hr at 200{degrees}C + 12 hr at 25{degrees}C) up to 90 times. The major chemical reaction at the interface between the PPS and Zn in the Zn-Ph layer during cycling led to the formation of ZnS reaction product, which enhanced the Zn-Ph-to-PPS adhesive bond; correspondingly, there were no signs of peeling and separation of the coating after 90 cycles. organometallosiloxane polymer (OMSP) was synthesized through the hydrolysis-condensation reaction of the mixed precursor solutions of the N-[3-(triethoxysily)propyl]-4,5,-dihydroimidazole and {Beta}-trimethoxysilylethyl-2-pyridine sols in liquor medium and the metal alkoxides and metallocene dichloride dissolved in water or tetrahydrofurane. The OMSP films (thickness, 0. 5 to 1. 0 {mu}m) deposited by simple dip-withdrawing coating methods to aluminum alloys displayed the impedance of > 10{sup 6} ohm-cm {sup 2} after exposure for 40 days in 0.5 N NaCl solution at 25{degrees}C and the 3000 hr-salt spray resistance. Using a flame spray coating process, the methacrylic acid-modified polyethylene copolymer was overlaid onto cold rolled steel surfaces.

  8. Cermet composite thermal spray coatings for erosion and corrosion protection in combustion environments of advanced coal-fired boilers. Semiannual technical report, January 14, 1997--August 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schorr, B.S.; Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1997-08-31

    Research is presently being conducted to determine the optimum ceramic/metal combination in thermally sprayed metal matrix composite coatings for erosion and corrosion resistance in new coal-fired boilers. The research will be accomplished by producing model cermet composites using powder metallurgy and electrodeposition methods in which the effect of ceramic/metal combination for the erosion and corrosion resistance will be determined. These results will provide the basis for determining the optimum hard phase constituent size and volume percent in thermal spray coatings. Thermal spray coatings will be applied by our industrial sponsor and tested in our erosion and corrosion laboratories. Bulk powder processed Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were produced at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The composite samples contained 0, 21, 27, 37, and 45 volume percent Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with an average particle size of 12 um. Also, to deposit model Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings, an electrodeposition technique was developed and coatings with various volume fractions (0-35%) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were produced. The powder and electrodeposition processing of Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Composites provide the ability to produce two phase microstructure without changing the microstructure of the matrix material. Therefore, the effect of hard second phase particles size and volume fraction on erosion resistance could be analyzed.

  9. Measurement of Heat Flux and Heat Transfer Coefficient Due to Spray Application for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant spray application experiments were conducted for the die casting process. The heat flux was measured in situ using a differential thermopile sensor for three application techniques. First, the lubricant was applied under a constant flowrate while the nozzle was held in the same position. Second, the lubricant was applied in a pulsed, static manner, in which the nozzle was held over the same surface while it was turned on and off several times. Third, the lubricant was applied in a sweeping manner, in which the nozzle was moved along the die surface while it was held open. The experiments were conducted at several die temperatures and at sweep speeds of 20, 23, and 68 cm/s. The heat flux data, which were obtained with a sensor that was located in the centre of the test plate, were presented and discussed. The sensor can be used to evaluate lubricants, monitor the consistency of die lubrication process, and obtain useful process data, such as surface temperature, heat flux, and heat transfer coefficients. The heat removed from the die surface during lubricant application is necessary for (a) designing the cooling channels in the die, i.e. their size and placement, and (b) performing accurate numerical simulations of the die casting process.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wire-feed, high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch are analyzed using computational and experimental techniques. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire (DJRW) torch. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Premixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step finite-rate chemistry model with a total of 9 gas species which includes dissociation of combustion products. A continually-fed steel wire passes through the center of the nozzle and melting occurs at a conical tip near the exit of the aircap. Wire melting is simulated computationally by injecting liquid steel particles into the flow field near the tip of the wire. Experimental particle velocity measurements during wire feed were also taken using a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter system. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and particle velocity predictions are compared with experimental measurements outside of the aircap.

  11. Stratification of particulate and VOC pollutants in paint spray booths, June 1990. Report for April 1988-April 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darvin, C.H.; Ayer, J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses flow management as part of a joint EPA/U.S. Air Force program on emissions from paint spray booths. The goal of the program is to identify and develop efficient and economical emissions control concepts for this source. Flow management is one potential solution that reduces the volume of gases that must be processed in a control system. Although it will not itself control pollution, it can influence the economic and technical viability of subsequent control systems. The test program discussed here was designed to characterize the pollutants both within and exiting a typical back-draw booth for which emissions control and flow management strategies are being developed. Study results indicate that both particulate and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) fall to the lower level of the booth or, at most, stratify at the level at which they were generated. Results indicate that the concentration at the lower level of the booth near the exhaust was from 5 to 25 times greater than that at the upper level. The importance of these findings is that it might be possible to partition a booth's air flow into two zones, one lean and the other concentrated. The enriched lower zone could then be directed to a proportionately smaller VOC control system, of lower capital and operating costs.

  12. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Stanley, James T. (Beaverton, OR)

    1994-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

  13. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

    1994-09-13

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

  14. Pluggable type-checking for custom type qualifiers in Java

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papi, Matthew M.

    2007-09-17

    We have created a framework for adding custom type qualifiers to the Javalanguage in a backward-compatible way. The type system designer definesthe qualifiers and creates a compiler plug-in that enforces theirsemantics. ...

  15. Collection efficiency of the Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-05-26

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore »used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of two. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  16. Collection efficiency of the soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-12-18

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore »used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of 2. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  17. PICTURE GROUPS OF FINITE TYPE AND COHOMOLOGY IN TYPE An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igusa, Kiyoshi

    PICTURE GROUPS OF FINITE TYPE AND COHOMOLOGY IN TYPE An KIYOSHI IGUSA, KENT ORR, GORDANA TODOROV a picture group. We construct a finite CW complex which is shown in another paper [10] to be a K(, 1) for this picture group. In [5] another independent proof was given for this fact in the special case of type

  18. Abstract Data Types 5 Algebraic Theory of Abstract Data Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Ulrich

    stack top: stack elts The following is an algebra for the signature STACK. Algebra SeqN Carriers N, N43 Part II Abstract Data Types #12;44 5 Algebraic Theory of Abstract Data Types An Abstract Data Type (ADT) is a collection of objects and functions, that is, an algebra, where one ignores how

  19. Salix sp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh D. Wilson

    2011-08-10

    for the treatment and utilization of milking parlor wastewater and open lot runoff. Wastewater and runoff were routed through settling basins and anaerobic treatment lagoons before irrigation onto cropland. Specific objectives of the study were to integrate a...

  20. Lemna sp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh D. Wilson

    2011-08-10

    expensive. To avoid monoclonal antibody (mAb) modification or fouling of chromatography resins, removal of phenolics from plant extracts is desirable. Removal of major phenolics in Lemna extracts was evaluated by adsorption to PVPP, XAD-4, IRA-402 and Q...

  1. Cucurbita sp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh D. Wilson

    2011-08-10

    and oxy- gen gas, which give the appearance of fuel solution boiling. The constant changing of both the local density and the shape of the critical mass due to bubble evolution at the surface of the fuel can cause oscillations in the reactivity and hence... to corrosion such as zirconium and titanium alloys. Zircaloy-4 in par- ticular has been shown to have a corrosion rate of less than 0.1 mm per year when in contact with uranyl sulfate at 250 °C. [14] Recent designs have limited the corrosion by limiting...

  2. Genome Sequence of the Ethene- and Vinyl Chloride-Oxidizing Actinomycete Nocardioides sp Strain JS614

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Nicholas V [University of Sydney, Australia; Wilson, Neil L [University of Sydney, Australia; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Shunsheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Israni, Sanjay [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kim, Edwin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Thompson, Sue [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Spain, Jim C [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gossett, James G [Cornell University; Mattes, Timothy E [University of Iowa

    2011-01-01

    Nocardioides sp. strain JS614 grows on ethene and vinyl chloride (VC) as sole carbon and energy sources and is of interest for bioremediation and biocatalysis. Sequencing of the complete genome of JS614 provides insight into the genetic basis of alkene oxidation, supports ongoing research into the physiology and biochemistry of growth on ethene and VC, and provides biomarkers to facilitate detection of VC/ethene oxidizers in the environment. This is the first genome sequence from the genus Nocardioides and the first genome of a VC/ethene-oxidizing bacterium.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. AT1b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kathariou, Sophia [North Carolina State University; Ramaley, Robert F. [University of Nebraska Medical Center; Rodrigues, Debora F. [University of Houston, Houston; Hendrix, Christie [Yellowstone National Park; Richardson, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2011-01-01

    Here we present the genome of strain Exiguobacterium sp. AT1b, a thermophilic member of the genus Exiguobacterium whose representatives were isolated from various environments along a thermal and physico-chemical gradient. This genome was sequenced to be a comparative resource for study of thermal adaptation with a psychroactive representative of the genus, Exiguobacterium sibiricum strain 255-15, that was previously sequenced by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) (http://genome.ornl.gov/microbial/exig/).

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic Bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. AT1b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L [ORNL; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kathariou, Sophia [North Carolina State University; Ramaley, Robert F. [University of Nebraska Medical Center; Rodrigues, Debora F. [University of Houston, Houston; Hendrix, Christie [Yellowstone National Park; Richardson, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2011-01-01

    Here we present the genome of strain Exiguobacterium sp. AT1b, a thermophilic member of the genus Exiguobacterium whose representatives were isolated from various environments along a thermal and physicochemical gradient. This genome was sequenced to be a comparative resource for the study of thermal adaptation with a psychroactive representative of the genus, Exiguobacterium sibiricum strain 255-15, that was previously sequenced by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) (http://genome.ornl.gov/microbial/exig/).

  5. ErgyCapital SpA formerly Greenergy Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,Power Corp Jump to:SIBR JVInvestment JumpErdosEnergySpA

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - Colorado: SP2 Deployment at StormVEx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22,Microphysical PropertiesgovCampaignsCloudSP2 Deployment

  7. Energia Servizi Engineering SpA E S Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop, Inc JumpElko,Servizi Engineering SpA E S

  8. Tornado type wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Cheng-Ting (Ames, IA)

    1984-01-01

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  9. Annotated Type Systems Program Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palsberg, Jens

    Danish Summary xi 1 Introduction 1 1.1 The Standard Type System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.1.3 The Conjunction Type System . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.2 The Power of tAnnotated Type Systems for Program Analysis Kirsten Lackner Solberg Computer Science Department

  10. PROGRAMMING WITH TYPES A Dissertation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weirich, Stephanie

    WITH TYPES Stephanie Claudene Weirich, Ph.D. Cornell University 2002 Run-time type analysis, facilities to support type analysis often require complicated language semantics that allow little freedom to list. Steve's parents Arthur and Deborah Zdancewic have encouraged me as long as I have known them. I

  11. Genomes of three facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strainsreflect host plant biogeography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S.; Gogarten, J.Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A.; Berry,Alison; Bickhart, Derek M.; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, M. Pilar; Ggoltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga; Labarre,Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez,Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E.; Mullin, Beth; Niemann, James; Pujic,Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt,Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P.; Vallenet, David; Valverde,Claudio; Wall, Luis; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R.

    2006-02-01

    Filamentous actinobacteria from the genus Frankia anddiverse woody trees and shrubs together form N2-fixing actinorhizal rootnodule symbioses that are a major source of new soil nitrogen in widelydiverse biomes 1. Three major clades of Frankia sp. strains are defined;each clade is associated with a defined subset of plants from among theeight actinorhizal plant families 2,3. The evolution arytrajectoriesfollowed by the ancestors of both symbionts leading to current patternsof symbiont compatibility are unknown. Here we show that the competingprocesses of genome expansion and contraction have operated in differentgroups of Frankia strains in a manner that can be related to thespeciation of the plant hosts and their geographic distribution. Wesequenced and compared the genomes from three Frankia sp. strains havingdifferent host plant specificities. The sizes of their genomes variedfrom 5.38 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (HFPCcI3) to 7.50Mbp for amedium host range strain (ACN14a) to 9.08 Mbp for a broad host rangestrain (EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported forsuch closely related bacteria. Since the order of divergence of thestrains is known, the extent of gene deletion, duplication andacquisition could be estimated and was found to be inconcert with thebiogeographic history of the symbioses. Host plant isolation favoredgenome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genomeexpansion. The results support the idea that major genome reductions aswell as expansions can occur in facultatively symbiotic soil bacteria asthey respond to new environments in the context of theirsymbioses.

  12. Department of Health application for approval of construction SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The following Application For Approval of Construction is being submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office, for the SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site, which will provide a new source of radioactive emissions to the atmosphere. The US Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the US Department of Defense have entered into an agreement to jointly develop space nuclear reactor power system technology. A ground test of a reactor is necessary to demonstrate technology readiness of this major subsystem before proceeding with the flight system development and demonstration. It is proposed that the SP-100 test reactor be tested in the existing decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor containment building (309 Building). The reactor will be operated for at least three months and up to 2 yr. Following the test, the 309 Building will be decontaminated for potential use in other programs. It is projected this new source of emissions will contribute approximately 0.05 mrem/yr dose to the maximally exposed offsite individual. This application is being submitted in response to those projected emissions that would provide the described offsite dose. 28 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. University of Alberta SafeType: Detecting Type Violations for Type-Based Alias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaral, José Nelson

    University of Alberta SafeType: Detecting Type Violations for Type-Based Alias Analysis of C Edmonton, Alberta Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other

  14. TYPE OF OPERATION R Research & Development T& Facility Type

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -- R Research & Development T& Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Pilat scale Y-. Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Productian 0 Disposal...

  15. Heun equation, Teukolsky equation, and type-D metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Batic; H. Schmid

    2007-01-15

    Starting with the whole class of type-D vacuum backgrounds with cosmological constant we show that the separated Teukolsky equation for zero rest-mass fields with spin $s=\\pm 2$ (gravitational waves), $s=\\pm 1$ (electromagnetic waves) and $s=\\pm 1/2$ (neutrinos) is an Heun equation in disguise.

  16. Maintenance Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    requirements of any physical asset within its operating context. Chapter 5 of the Federal Energy Management Program's O&M Best Practices Guide outlines these maintenance types in...

  17. Portfolio Manager Space Type Discussion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP), provides a discussion about space/type in regards to the Portfolio Manager Initiative.

  18. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    its U-factor. There are advantages and disadvantages to all types of frame materials, but vinyl, wood, fiberglass, and some composite frame materials provide greater...

  19. Portfolio Manager Space Type Discussion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides a discussion about space/type in regards to the Portfolio Manager Initiative.

  20. A reliability and mass perspective of SP-100 Stirling cycle lunar-base powerplant designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1991-06-01

    The purpose was to obtain reliability and mass perspectives on selection of space power system conceptual designs based on SP-100 reactor and Stirling cycle power-generation subsystems. The approach taken was to: (1) develop a criterion for an acceptable overall reliability risk as a function of the expected range of emerging technology subsystem unit reliabilities; (2) conduct reliability and mass analyses for a diverse matrix of 800-kWe lunar-base design configurations employing single and multiple powerplants with both full and partial subsystem redundancy combinations; and (3) derive reliability and mass perspectives on selection of conceptual design configurations that meet an acceptable reliability criterion with the minimum system mass increase relative to reference powerplant design. The developed perspectives provided valuable insight into the considerations required to identify and characterize high-reliability and low-mass lunar-base powerplant conceptual design.

  1. Evaluation of innovative volatile organic compound and hazardous air-pollutant-control technologies for U. S. Air Force paint spray booths. Final report, Aug 88-Aug 89

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritts, D.H.; Garretson, C.; Hyde, C.; Lorelli, J.; Wolbach, C.D.

    1990-10-01

    Significant quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants are released into the atmosphere during USAF maintenance operations. Painting operations conducted in paint spray booths are major sources of these pollutants. Solvent based epoxy primers and solvent-based polyurethane coatings are typically used by the Air Force for painting aircraft and associated equipment. Solvents used in these paints include methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), toluene, lacquer thinner, and other solvents involved in painting and component cleaning. In this report, carbon paper adsorption/catalytic incineration (CPACI) and fluidized-bed catalytic incineration (FBCI) were evaluated as control technologies to destroy VOC emissions from paint spray booths. Simultaneous testing of pilot-scale units was performed to evaluate the technical performance of both technologies. Results showed that each technology maintained greater than 99 percent Destruction and Removal Efficiencies (DREs). Particulate emissions from both pilot-scale units were less than 0.08 grains/dry standard cubic foot. Emissions of the criteria pollutants--sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide--were also below general regulatory standards for incinerators. Economic evaluations were based on a compilation of manufacturer-supplied data and energy consuption data gathered during the pilot scale testing. CPACM and FBCI technologies are less expensive than standard VOC control technologies when net present costs for a 15-year equipment life are compared.

  2. Prevention of significant deterioration application for approval to construct SP-100 Ground Engineering System Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The following application is being submitted by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, P.O. Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352, pursuant to WAC 173-403-080, and in compliance with the Department of Ecology Guide to Processing a Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit'' for a new source of airborne radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The new source, the SP-100 Ground Engineering System (GES) Test Site, will be located in the 309 Building of the 300 Area. The US Department of Energy (DOE), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the US Department of Defense (DOD) have entered into an agreement to jointly develop space nuclear reactor power system technology. The DOE has primary responsibility for developing and ground testing the nuclear subsystem. A ground test of a reactor is necessary to demonstrate technology readiness of this major subsystem before proceeding with the flight system development and demonstration. The SP-100 GES Test Site will provide a location for the operation and testing of a prototype space-based, liquid metal-cooled, fast flux nuclear reactor in an environment closely simulating the vacuum and temperature conditions of space operations. The purpose of the GES is to develop safe, compact, light-weight and durable space reactor power system technology. This technology will be used to provide electric power, in the range of tens to hundreds of kilowatts, for a variety of potential future civilian and military space missions requiring long-term, high-power level sources of energy. 20 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Draft genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES, reconstructed from the metagenome of a microbial electrosynthesis system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ross, Daniel E.; Marshall, Christopher W.; May, Harold D.; Norman, R. Sean

    2015-01-15

    A draft genome of Sulfurospirillum sp. strain MES was isolated through taxonomic binning of a metagenome sequenced from a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) actively producing acetate and hydrogen. The genome contains the nosZDFLY genes, which are involved in nitrous oxide reduction, suggesting the potential role of this strain in denitrification.

  4. Geological Society, London, Special Publications Online First October 24, 2013; doi 10.1144/SP395.6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnosky, Anthony D.

    Geological Society, London, Special Publications Online First October 24, 2013; doi 10.1144/SP395.6 , first publishedGeological Society, London, Special Publications Anthony D. Barnosky Anthropocene Subscribe Collection London, Special Publications or the Lyell to subscribe to Geological Society

  5. Additive synthesis with DIASS-M4C on Argonne National Laboratory`s IBM POWERparallel System (SP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaper, H.; Ralley, D.; Restrepo, J.; Tiepei, S.

    1995-12-31

    DIASS-M4C, a digital additive instrument was implemented on the Argonne National Laboratory`s IBM POWER parallel System (SP). This paper discusses the need for a massively parallel supercomputer and shows how the code was parallelized. The resulting sounds and the degree of control the user can have justify the effort and the use of such a large computer.

  6. http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.SP.800-165 NIST Special Publication 800-165

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Security .......................................................23 Smart Grid Cybersecurity Security Division 2012 Annual Report Patrick O'Reilly, Editor Computer Security Division Information for Standards and Technology and Director http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.SP.800-165 #12;ii Computer Security

  7. Parallel File Systems for the IBM SP Peter F. Corbett, Dror G. Feitelson, Jean-Pierre Prost,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    Parallel File Systems for the IBM SP Computers Peter F. Corbett, Dror G. Feitelson, Jean, and Marc Snir IBM T. J. Watson Research Center P. O. Box 218 Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 Maurice Chi, Robert Colao, Brian Herr, Joseph Kavaky, Thomas R. Morgan, and Anthony Zlotek IBM Power Parallel Systems

  8. NIST Computer Security Division csrc.nist.gov Summary of NIST SP 800-53 Revision 4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the Intelligence Community, the Committee on National Security Systems, the Department of Homeland Security, and UNIST Computer Security Division csrc.nist.gov Summary of NIST SP 800-53 Revision 4, Security and Privacy Controls for Federal Information Systems and Organizations Kelley Dempsey Computer Security

  9. Chemistry Major's Guide FA12/SP13 (Revised 5/14/12) 7 Recommended Academic Plan Synthetic/Biological Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, G. Jogesh

    Chemistry Major's Guide FA12/SP13 (Revised 5/14/12) 7 Recommended Academic Plan ­ Synthetic/Biological Concentration Semester 1 Credits Semester 2 Credits PSU 16 Freshman Seminar in Chemistry 1 CHEM 112(H) Chemical Principles II (GN) 3 CHEM 110(H) Chemical Principles I (GN) 3 CHEM 113 Experimental Chemistry II

  10. Chemistry Major's Guide FA12/SP13 (Revised 5/14/12) 5 Recommended Academic Plan -Analytical Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, G. Jogesh

    Chemistry Major's Guide FA12/SP13 (Revised 5/14/12) 5 Recommended Academic Plan - Analytical Concentration Semester 1 Credits Semester 2 Credits PSU 16 Freshman Seminar in Chemistry 1 CHEM 112(H) Chemical Principles II (GN) 3 CHEM 110(H) Chemical Principles I (GN) 3 CHEM 113 Experimental Chemistry II

  11. Chemistry Major's Guide FA12/SP13 (Revised 5/14/12) 6 Recommended Academic Plan -Physical Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, G. Jogesh

    Chemistry Major's Guide FA12/SP13 (Revised 5/14/12) 6 Recommended Academic Plan - Physical Concentration Semester 1 Credits Semester 2 Credits PSU 16 Freshman Seminar in Chemistry 1 CHEM 112(H) Chemical Principles II (GN) 3 CHEM 110(H) Chemical Principles I (GN) 3 CHEM 113 Experimental Chemistry II

  12. Even-Parity S_(N) Adjoint Method Including SP_(N) Model Error and Iterative Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yunhuang

    2014-08-10

    In this Dissertation, we analyze an adjoint-based approach for assessing the model error of SP_(N) equations (low fidelity model) by comparing it against S_(N) equations (high fidelity model). Three model error estimation methods, namely, direct...

  13. The oncoprotein HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote the proliferation of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yingyi; Zhao, Yu; Li, Leilei; Shen, Yu; Cai, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •HBXIP is able to upregulate the expression of PDGFB in breast cancer cells. •HBXIP serves as a coactivator of activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP stimulates the PDGFB promoter via activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP promotes the proliferation of breast cancer cell via upregulating PDGFB. -- Abstract: We have reported that the oncoprotein hepatitis B virus X-interacting protein (HBXIP) acts as a novel transcriptional coactivator to promote proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Previously, we showed that HBXIP was able to activate nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) in breast cancer cells. As an oncogene, the platelet-derived growth factor beta polypeptide (PDGFB) plays crucial roles in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we found that both HBXIP and PDGFB were highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to increase transcriptional activity of NF-?B through PDGFB, suggesting that HBXIP is associated with PDGFB in the cells. Moreover, HBXIP was able to upregulate PDGFB at the levels of mRNA, protein and promoter in the cells. Then, we identified that HBXIP stimulated the promoter of PDGFB through activating transcription factor Sp1. In function, HBXIP enhanced the proliferation of breast cancer cells through PDGFB in vitro. Thus, we conclude that HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  14. Nominalization, Predication and Type Containment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamareddine, Fairouz

    of Eindhoven, for their nancial support and hospitality during the academic year 1991{92. yKlein's work has by the uk Economic and Social Research Council. 1 #12;Abstract In an attempt to accommodate natural language, by assigning each expression a family of types. Another line of work has moved in the direction of type

  15. Archived Reference Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  16. Archived Reference Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  17. Please cite this article in press as: Lima L, et al. Evolutionary Insights from Bat Trypanosomes: Morphological, Develop-mental and Phylogenetic Evidence of a New Species, Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) erneyi sp. nov., in African Bats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler, Charles

    , Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, 05508-900, Brazil bCentro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Eduardo

  18. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

    2007-01-01

    runaway in Type Ia supernovae: How to run away? oIgnition in Type Ia Supernovae. II. A Three- dimensionalnumber modeling of type Ia supernovae. I. hydrodynamics.

  19. P-type gallium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Montara, CA); Fu, Tracy (Berkeley, CA); Ross, Jennifer (Pleasanton, CA); Chan, James (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  20. P-type gallium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  1. Spot-spraying Johnsongrass. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rea, H. E.

    1958-01-01

    -56, hack off the stems and treat 8-inch stubs of grass in the bloom stage. Use 3 gallons of HCA (90 percent hexachloroace- tone) in 100 gallons of kerosene or other suitable oils for combined contact and residual effectiveness in con- trolling...

  2. Evaluate Thermal Spray Coatings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop a pressure seal alternative to conventional elastomerand metal C-rings.

  3. Sprayed skin turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  4. Sandia Energy - Spray Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel Magnetization and Laser(TSPEARSolar

  5. Issues in Type IIA Uplifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renata Kallosh; Masoud Soroush

    2007-06-09

    Moduli stabilization in the type IIA massive string theory so far was achieved only in the AdS vacua. The uplifting to dS vacua has not been performed as yet: neither the analogs of type IIB anti-D3 brane at the tip of the conifold, nor the appropriate D-terms have been identified. The hope was recently expressed that the F-term uplifting may work. We investigate this possibility in the context of a simplified version of the type IIA model developed in hep-th/0505160 and find that the F-term does not uplift the AdS vacua to dS vacua with positive CC. Thus it remains a challenging task to find phenomenologically acceptable vacua in the type IIA string theory.

  6. Using a flame ionization detector (FID) to continuously measure toxic organic vapors in a paint spray booth. Rept. for Jul 91-Jan 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, J.K.; Howe, G.B.; Pate, B.A.; Wander, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports the demonstration of linear and similar responses of a Ratfisch RS-55CA flame ionization detector (FID) to a solvent mixture identical to the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the coating and catalyst (NSN 8010-01-336-3036) and to the calibrating gas (propane) used in field calibrations of the FID. Sensitivity and linearity have been shown to extend from 715 to 45 mg/cu m, which brackets the calculated short-term exposure limit (STEL) and lower action thresholds. Monitoring is maintained constantly and, under field conditions, equilibration occurs rapidly (analysis and output transpire in milliseconds). As a trigger for fail-safe conversion from recirculation mode to a straight-through paint spray booth configuration, the FID may confidently be expected to initiate a corrective response before a transient elevation of VOC concentrations overexposes area personnel.

  7. Effect of the substrate temperature on the physical properties of molybdenum tri-oxide thin films obtained through the spray pyrolysis technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, H.M.; Torres, J.; Lopez Carreno, L.D.; Rodriguez-Garcia, M.E.

    2013-01-15

    Polycrystalline molybdenum tri-oxide thin films were prepared using the spray pyrolysis technique; a 0.1 M solution of ammonium molybdate tetra-hydrated was used as a precursor. The samples were prepared on Corning glass substrates maintained at temperatures ranging between 423 and 673 K. The samples were characterized through micro Raman, X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance and DC electrical conductivity. The species MoO{sub 3} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} was found in the sample prepared at a substrate temperature of 423 K. As the substrate temperature rises, the water disappears and the samples crystallize into {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. The optical gap diminishes as the substrate temperature rises. Two electrical transport mechanisms were found: hopping under 200 K and intrinsic conduction over 200 K. The MoO{sub 3} films' sensitivity was analyzed for CO and H{sub 2}O in the temperature range 160 to 360 K; the results indicate that CO and H{sub 2}O have a reduction character. In all cases, it was found that the sensitivity to CO is lower than that to H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low cost technique is used which produces good material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films are prepared using ammonium molybdate tetra hydrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the physical properties of the samples could be done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A calculation method is proposed to determine the material optical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MoO{sub 3} thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis could be used as gas sensor.

  8. Study of metallic powder behavior in very low pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS) — Application to the manufacturing of titanium–aluminum coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vautherin, B.; Planche, M.-P.; Montavon, G.; Lapostolle, F.; Quet, A.; Bianchi, L.

    2015-08-28

    In this study, metallic materials made of aluminum and titanium were manufactured implementing very low pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS). Aluminum was selected at first as a demonstrative material due to its rather low vaporization enthalpy (i.e., 381.9 kJ·mol?¹). Developments were then carried out with titanium which exhibits a higher vaporization enthalpy (i.e., 563.6 kJ·mol?¹). Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was implemented to analyze the behavior of each solid precursor (metallic powders) when it is injected into the plasma jet under very low pressure (i.e., in the 150 Pa range). Besides, aluminum, titanium and titanium–aluminum coatings were deposited in the same conditions implementing a stick-cathode plasma torch operated at 50 kW, maximum power. Coating phase compositions were identified by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Coating elementary compositions were quantified by Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analyses. The coating structures were observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The coating void content was determined by Ultra-Small Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS). The coatings exhibit a two-scale structure corresponding to condensed vapors (smaller scale) and solidified areas (larger scale). Titanium–aluminum sprayed coatings, with various Ti/Al atomic ratios, are constituted of three phases: metastable ?-Ti, Al and metastable ??-Ti?Al. This latter is formed at elevated temperature in the plasma flow, before being condensed. Its rather small fraction, impeded by the rather small amount of vaporized Ti, does not allow modifying however the coating hardness.

  9. Depth-dependent global properties of a sunspot observed by Hinode (SOT/SP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K; Solanki, Sami K; Lagg, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The 3D structure of sunspots has been extensively studied for the last two decades. A recent advancement of the Stokes inversion technique prompts us to revisit the problem. We investigate the global depth-dependent thermal, velocity and magnetic properties of a sunspot, as well as the interconnection between various local properties. High quality Stokes profiles of a disk centered, regular sunspot acquired by the SOT/SP (Hinode) are analyzed. To obtain the depth-dependent stratification of the physical parameters, we use the spatially coupled version of the SPINOR code. The vertical temperature gradient in the lower to mid-photosphere is smallest in the umbra, it is considerably larger in the penumbra and still somewhat larger in the spot's surroundings. The azimuthally averaged field becomes more horizontal with radial distance from the center of the spot, but more vertical with height. At tau=1, the LOS velocity shows an average upflow of 300 ms-1 in the inner penumbra and an average downflow of 1300 ms-1 ...

  10. Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, R.B.; Durand, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    An integration study was performed by Rocketdyne under contract to NASA-LeRC. The study was concerned with coupling an SP-0100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion system. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one stand-by unit. Integration design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion systems could be integrated with the PS-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to off-set the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9 percent mass advantage, and the Stirling had a 50 percent radiator advantage.

  11. Type Checking Type Classes Tobias Nipkow and Christian Prehofer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The judgement : fC1 ::: Cng is a compact form of the conjunction : C1 ^ ::: ^ : Cn. Alternatively we may think of fC1 ::: Cng as a notation for C1 \\ :::\\ Cn, the intersection of the types belonging to the classes C

  12. Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

    2000-06-21

    Because calibrated light curves of Type Ia supernovae have become a major tool to determine the local expansion rate of the Universe and also its geometrical structure, considerable attention has been given to models of these events over the past couple of years. There are good reasons to believe that perhaps most Type Ia supernovae are the explosions of white dwarfs that have approached the Chandrasekhar mass, M_ch ~ 1.39 M_sun, and are disrupted by thermonuclear fusion of carbon and oxygen. However, the mechanism whereby such accreting carbon-oxygen white dwarfs explode continues to be uncertain. Recent progress in modeling Type Ia supernovae as well as several of the still open questions are addressed in this review. Although the main emphasis will be on studies of the explosion mechanism itself and on the related physical processes, including the physics of turbulent nuclear combustion in degenerate stars, we also discuss observational constraints.

  13. 46 NA iEEE SpEctrum AuguSt 2010 spectrum.ieee.org On 1 June 2009,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavi, Krishna

    to the ground by krishna m. kavi viktorkoen #12;AuguSt 2010 · iEEE SpEctrum · iNt 47spectrum.ieee.org #12;48 NA and flight- control surfaces. Such information has enabled analysts to infer the causes of most crashes and no steps to prevent similar failures in the future. The black box may be the greatest single invention

  14. Multiple Roles of Component Proteins in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases: Phenol Hydroxylase and Toluene/o-Xylene Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. OX1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinberg, Christine E.

    Phenol hydroxylase (PH) and toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas sp. OX1 require three or four protein components to activate dioxygen for the oxidation of aromatic substrates at a carboxylate-bridged ...

  15. Nomenclature of *Aulactinia* (=*Bunodactis*), with description of *Aulactinia incubans* n.sp. (Coelentera: Actiniaria), an internally brooding sea anemone from Puget Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fautin, Daphne G.; Chia, Fu-Shiang; Levine, Regina

    1980-01-01

    *Aulactinia incubans* n.sp. is an internally brooding actinian known from the San Juan Archipelago, Washington, U.S.A., and from Torch Bay, Alaska, U.S.A. Found in sheltered intertidal habitats, this sea anemone averages ...

  16. Overview of the 1986 free-piston Stirling SP-100 activities at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaby, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These activities include a free-piston Stirling space-power technology feasibility demonstration project as part of the SP-100 program being conducted in support of the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. The space-power Stirling advanced technology effort, under SP-100, addresses the status of the 25 kWe Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) including test results. Future space-power projections are presented along with a description of a study that will investigate the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power module to the 150 kW power range. Design parameters and conceptual design features will be presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. A description of a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept will be presented whereby the displacer of a 1 kWe free-piston Stirling engine is modified to demonstrate the bearing concept. And finally the goals of a conceptual design for a 25 kWe Solar Advanced Stirling Conversion System capable of delivering electric power to an electric utility grid will be discussed. The solar work is under an interagency agreement between DOE/Sandia National Laboratory and NASA Lewis.

  17. Dark fleshed varieties (Bing type) in regular type, light fleshed varieties (Rainier type) in italics Sweet Cherries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dark fleshed varieties (Bing type) in regular type, light fleshed varieties (Rainier type and Royalton. For more information about these and other varieties, visit our web site at www

  18. SpArcFiRe: Scalable automated detection of spiral galaxy arm segments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Darren R.; Hayes, Wayne B., E-mail: drdavis@uci.edu, E-mail: whayes@uci.edu [University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3435 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Given an approximately centered image of a spiral galaxy, we describe an entirely automated method that finds, centers, and sizes the galaxy (possibly masking nearby stars and other objects if necessary in order to isolate the galaxy itself) and then automatically extracts structural information about the spiral arms. For each arm segment found, we list the pixels in that segment, allowing image analysis on a per-arm-segment basis. We also perform a least-squares fit of a logarithmic spiral arc to the pixels in that segment, giving per-arc parameters, such as the pitch angle, arm segment length, location, etc. The algorithm takes about one minute per galaxies, and can easily be scaled using parallelism. We have run it on all ?644,000 Sloan objects that are larger than 40 pixels across and classified as 'galaxies'. We find a very good correlation between our quantitative description of a spiral structure and the qualitative description provided by Galaxy Zoo humans. Our objective, quantitative measures of structure demonstrate the difficulty in defining exactly what constitutes a spiral 'arm', leading us to prefer the term 'arm segment'. We find that pitch angle often varies significantly segment-to-segment in a single spiral galaxy, making it difficult to define the pitch angle for a single galaxy. We demonstrate how our new database of arm segments can be queried to find galaxies satisfying specific quantitative visual criteria. For example, even though our code does not explicitly find rings, a good surrogate is to look for galaxies having one long, low-pitch-angle arm—which is how our code views ring galaxies. SpArcFiRe is available at http://sparcfire.ics.uci.edu.

  19. Types of JavaO Types: Types A, B, C are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Börger, Egon

    .Meth(Exps) | super.Meth(Exps) Copyright c 2002 Robert F. St¨ark, Computer Science Department, ETH Z[ ] Serializable. If A B and A, B are reference types, then A[ ] B[ ]. Copyright c 2002 Robert F. St¨ark, Computer not equal (references) Copyright c 2002 Robert F. St¨ark, Computer Science Department, ETH Z

  20. Operational Semantics and Polymorphic Type Inference 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tofte, Mads

    1988-01-01

    Three languages with polymorphic type disciplines are discussed, namely the ?-calculus with Milner's polymorphic type discipline; a language with imperative features (polymorphic references); and a skeletal module language ...