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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The impact of multifamily development on single family home prices in the Greater Boston Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of large, multifamily developments on nearby single-family home prices was tested in five towns in the Greater Boston Area. Case studies that had recent multifamily developments built near transit nodes or town ...

Schuur, Arah (Arah Louise Adele)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models Building America Technical Update Meeting Eric Wilson April 30, 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Definitions Current definitions for HSP/BEopt: Single Family Attached = Townhouses, row houses, duplexes Multifamily Buildings = 5+ units; shared floors/ceilings 2 Single Family Attached - Rowhouses 3 Multifamily - Stacked Units * Enable Superinsulated Slab and Roof options in Option Manager 4 Multifamily Modeling Needs * Adiabatic shared walls, floors, and ceilings * Unit multipliers  Whole-Building Model * Corridors * Common Areas * Operating Conditions (Benchmark)

3

Building Energy Retrofit Research: Multifamily Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Retrofit Research: Multifamily Sector Title Building Energy Retrofit Research: Multifamily Sector Publication Type Report Year of Publication 1985 Authors Diamond,...

4

Efficiency Maine Multifamily Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Maine Multifamily Efficiency Program Efficiency Maine Multifamily Efficiency Program Efficiency Maine Multifamily Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Maine Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Upon approval of Energy Reduction Plan: $100 prescriptive path per apartment unit; $200 modeling path per apartment unit Upon approval of installations: $1400 all paths or 50% of installed cost (whichever is less) Efficiency Maine's Multifamily Efficiency Program offers incentives to multifamily residency building owners for improving energy efficiency. Residencies must have 5 to 20 apartment units to qualify for this rebate.

5

Monitoring of HPWH for Multifamily Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Davis Energy Group | 4/30/2013 Davis Energy Group | 4/30/2013 Monitoring of HPWH for Multifamily Applications Building America Technical Update Meeting April 30 th 2013 ‹#› Davis Energy Group | 4/30/2013 Context * Heat Pump Water Heaters have the potential for 50+% energy savings over conventional electric storage heaters * Gaps - Little data available on Multi-Family applications of HPWH - Field testing of single-family HPWHs have shown lower than rated performance due to a range of factors * Target Questions - How does the unit compare with manufacturers claim? - How well does the unit meet the loads? - How viable are HPWH's to other conventional options? ‹#› Davis Energy Group | 4/30/2013 Technical Approach * Monitoring - Installed at UC Davis West Village ZNE Community as part of

6

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Dianne Griffiths April 29, 2013 Presentation Outline * Basic Objectives * Exhaust Systems * Make-up Air Systems Two Primary Ventilation Objectives 1) Providing Fresh Air - Whole-House 2) Removing Pollutants - Local Exhaust Our goal is to find the simplest solution that satisfies both objectives while minimizing cost and energy impacts. Common Solution: Align local exhaust with fresh air requirements (Ex: 25 Bath + 25 Kitchen) Exhaust-Driven Fresh Air Design * Exhaust slightly depressurizes the units * Outside air enters through leaks, cracks, or planned inlets * Widely used in the North Multifamily Ventilation Best Practice * Step 1: Understand ventilation requirements * Step 2: Select the simplest design that can

7

Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: 85% discount on installation costs Insulation: 50% discount on installation costs Window Replacement: $3 - $5/sq. ft. Provider Seattle City Light Seattle City Light provides incentives for its multi-family housing customers to increase their energy efficiency. Rebates are offered for common area lighting and weatherization measures including the installation

8

Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies  

SciTech Connect

In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.; Bergey, D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Multifamily Home Energy Solutions Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Multifamily Home Energy Solutions Program Multifamily Home Energy Solutions Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Public Benefit Fund State Oregon Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Windows: $2-$3/sq ft, depending on U-value, glazing and type of heating Heat Pumps: $200 - $600, varies by efficiency and original heating type High-Efficiency Gas Boiler: $200 Gas Furnace: $150 Insulation: $0.30-$4 per square foot Exterior Doors: $25

10

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) Program California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 10,000 for fully subsidized systems No maximum stated for partially subsidized systems Program Info Start Date 7/1/2009 Expiration Date 12/31/2015 State California Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies depending on participant's income level and California Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) program eligibility. (see below) Provider GRID Alternatives The California Solar Initiative (CSI) provides financial incentives for installing solar technologies through a variety of smaller sub-programs. Of

11

Multifamily housing resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

12

Building Technologies Office: Hydronic Heating in Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings Expert Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings Expert Meeting on...

13

Single Family Residential Stormwater Management Guidelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stormwater general permit (permit) implements the federal Clean Water Act. The permit is administered by the Washington State Department of Ecology and requires stormwater management for new development and redevelopment projects (including Single Family

Single Family Residential

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Peoples Gas Single Family Direct Install (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Owners of single-family homes, condos, townhomes and two-flats may be eligible for a free installation of new programmable thermostats, pipe insulation, showerheads, and faucet aerators through...

15

Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Attics in Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for owners, builders, contractors, homeowners, and other stakeholders in the multifamily building industry, and focuses on challenges found in existing buildings for a variety of housing types. It explains why air sealing is desirable, explores related health and safety issues, and identifies common air leakage points in multifamily building attics. In addition, it also gives an overview of materials and techniques typically used to perform air sealing work.

Otis, C.; Maxwell, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Multifamily Energy Savings Program (Existing Buildings and New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Energy Savings Program (Existing Buildings and New Multifamily Energy Savings Program (Existing Buildings and New Construction) Multifamily Energy Savings Program (Existing Buildings and New Construction) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Prescriptive: Varies by equipment type, $200,000 per project Custom: Lesser of 50% of cost or $200,000 per project Total: $200,000 per project and $400,000 per customer tax ID per year for all Focus incentives. Program Info Funding Source Focus on Energy Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Wisconsin

17

Puget Sound Energy - Multi-Family Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Puget Sound Energy - Multi-Family Efficiency Programs Puget Sound Energy - Multi-Family Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Multi-Family Retrofit CFLs: $20/fixture or FREE LEDs: $20- $30 Windows/Sliding Glass Doors: $6 - $8/sq. ft. Insulation: $0.75/sq. ft. In-Unit Water Heater: $50/unit Clothes Washer: $50 - $100 In-Unit Refrigerator: $20 Solar Pool Heater: Not Specified

18

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Multi-Family Properties Energy Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate See rebate amounts listed above Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Common Area Efficiency''' CFL's: $1.50 Modular CFL's: $23-$26 T8 Lamps: $7-$12, depending on ballast and wattage Occupancy Sensors: $25 LED Exit Sign: $22 In-Unit Efficiency Installations: CFLs, pipe insulation and water savings

19

ConEd (Electric) - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Incentives Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Energy Efficiency Incentives Program Multifamily Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Electric) - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pumps or Air Conditioning: $50/ton Linear Fluorescent Light Fixtures: $10 - $45 Interior Metal Halide Fixtures: $25 - $50 Common Area CFLs: $3 - $4 Common Area CFLs (Pin-Based; Hardwired): $50 LED Exit Signs: $50 Bi-Level Stairwell/Hallway Fixtures: $150 Occupancy Sensors: $50/sensor Premium Efficiency Motors: $45-$120/motor VFD Motors: $60/HP

20

California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH) Program California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH) Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Track 1: Fully Subscribed Track 2: Closed '''''Track 2 was closed in 2011. Track 1 incentives have been fully subscribed for all three program administrators and waitlists have been established. Contact the appropriate program administrator for up to date information on the status of Track 1. ''''' The California Solar Initiative (CSI) provides financial incentives to customers in investor-owned utility (IOU) territories of Pacific Gas and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SCE - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs SCE - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Other Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge Start Date 1/1/2012 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount LED Pool/Spa Lighting: $75 - $100/unit Pool Pumps: $100 Energy Star Ceiling Fan (with Energy Star CFLs): $20/unit High Efficiency Clothes Washers: $50 - $100/unit Energy Star Refrigerators: $50/unit Dual Pane Windows: $0.75/sq. ft.

22

Austin Energy - Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Austin Energy - Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Austin Energy - Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Austin Energy - Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $200,000 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Split System Air Conditioning: $200 - $550 Packaged Unit Air Conditioning: $300 - $500 Split System Heat Pumps: $250 - $600 Packaged Unit Heat Pumps: $350 - $550 Solar Screens/Solar Film: $1.00 - $1.25/sq. ft. Low E Window Replacement: $2.00/sq. ft.

23

Burlington Electric Department - Multi-Family Rental Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-Family Rental Energy Multi-Family Rental Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Burlington Electric Department - Multi-Family Rental Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Rebates totaling over 2,500 must be pre-approved by BED More than 15 free CFL's per apartment or 100 free CFL's per building requires pre-approval Program Info State Vermont Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFLs: Free Ventilation Systems: $110/unit Boilers: $2/MBh Furnaces: $2/MBh Electronically Commutated Motor: $100 Refrigerators: $150/unit Lighting: In-store discounts Provider Burlington Electric Department Burlington Electric Department offers an innovative rebate program geared

24

APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Lighting in Dwellings: Free Energy Design Incentive: 50% of study cost, up to $5,000 Energy Assessments: Free T8 and T5 Fluorescents: $5-$12/unit Delamping: $5 - $10 LED Exit Signs/Traffic Signals: $25/unit LED Lamps: $10 - $15 LED Signage: $3/ln ft Refrigerated Case LED Lamps: $25 - $30 Occupancy Sensors: $0.12/connected watt Daylighting Controls: $0.30/connected watt

25

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) Program California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) Program Eligibility...

26

Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2011 , 2011 Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-324-9601; Pass code: 5551971 Download the presentation at: www.buildingamerica.gov/meetings.html Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Building America: Introduction November 1, 2011 Cheryn Engebrecht Cheryn.engebrecht@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved * Accelerate adoption of high performance technologies

27

PG&E (Gas) - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PG&E (Gas) - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates PG&E (Gas) - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates PG&E (Gas) - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers (In-Unit): $50 Clothes Washers (Common Area): $150 Central System Water/Space Heating: $1,500/Unit Storage Water Heater: $200/Unit Boilers: $500/Unit Furnace: $150 - $300/Unit Provider Residential Programs Through the Rebates for Multi-Family Properties Program, PG&E offers prescriptive rebates for owners and managers of multi-family properties of

28

Be SMART Multi-Family Efficiency Loan Program (Maryland) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-Family Efficiency Loan Program (Maryland) Multi-Family Efficiency Loan Program (Maryland) Be SMART Multi-Family Efficiency Loan Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Not specified Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA); State Energy Program State Maryland Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount Varies Provider Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Note: The eligible technologies listed above are only examples of some

29

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Title Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Zimring, Mark, Merrian Borgeson, Ian M. Hoffman, Charles A. Goldman, Elizabeth Stuart, Annika Todd, and Megan A. Billingsley Pagination 102 Date Published 12/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The question posed in this report is: How can programs motivate these middle income single family households to seek out more comprehensive energy upgrades, and empower them to do so? Research methods included interviews with more than 35 program administrators, policy makers, researchers, and other experts; case studies of programs, based on interviews with staff and a review of program materials and data; and analysis of relevant data sources and existing research on demographics, the financial status of Americans, and the characteristics of middle income American households. While there is no 'silver bullet' to help these households overcome the range of barriers they face, this report describes outreach strategies, innovative program designs, and financing tools that show promise in increasing the attractiveness and accessibility of energy efficiency for this group. These strategies and tools should be seen as models that are currently being honed to build our knowledge and capacity to deliver energy improvements to middle income households. However, the strategies described in this report are probably not sufficient, in the absence of robust policy frameworks, to deliver these improvements at scale. Instead, these strategies must be paired with enabling and complementary policies to reach their full potential.

30

ENERGY STAR Success Story: TIAA-CREF Multifamily Housing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Success Story: TIAA-CREF Multifamily Housing Success Story: TIAA-CREF Multifamily Housing TIAA-CREF is one of the largest institutional real estate investors in the nation, with investments in approximately 12,000 multifamily units, 45 million square feet of Class A office space, more than 20 million square feet of retail properties, and significant investments in other real estate asset types. Since partnering with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ENERGY STAR program in 2002, TIAA- CREF has made energy efficiency a top priority in its Global Real Estate portfolio, and is a multiple-year ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year and Sustained Excellence award winner-the first financial services organization to receive this distinction. An Organizational Commitment to Energy Management

31

Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apartment temperature data have been collected from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. The data have been analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating. This research attempts to answer the question, 'What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?' This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort. Apartment temperature data were analyzed for deviation from a 70 degrees F desired setpoint and for variation by heating system type, apartment floor level and ambient conditions. The data shows that overheating is significant in these multifamily buildings with both hot water and steam heating systems.

Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

SoCalGas - Multi-Family Residential Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-Family Residential Rebate Program Multi-Family Residential Rebate Program SoCalGas - Multi-Family Residential Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Construction Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Dishwashers: $30 Insulation: 25% Natural Gas Storage Water Heaters: $30 Tankless Water Heaters: $300 Central Furnaces: $200 Central System Water Heaters: $500 Central System Boilers: $1,500 Central Demand Hot Water Controllers: $700 or $1400 Provider Southern California Gas Company Southern California Gas Company provides incentives to encourage the owners and managers of multi-family residential buildings to increase their energy

33

Persistence of savings in multifamily public housing  

SciTech Connect

In a previous study of 43 retrofit cases in multifamily public housing, it was found that initial energy savings did not always persist into the second and third post-retrofit years in the cases where there were at least two years of post-retrofit data. In this study, we revisit the topic of persistence of savings in low-income multifamily buildings by collecting additional energy consumption data from many of the 43 retrofit cases analyzed in the previous work. These new data, in most cases, cover the second through fourth years of post-retrofit energy performance, weather variations, and occupancy patterns. We include only those retrofit cases where there has been no new installation of conservation measures. A utility bill analysis was conducted using the Princeton Scorekeeping Method (PRISM). The analysis considered climate variation, type of building and occupant, type of conservation measure, and pre-retrofit energy use. We found that the extent to which savings persist depended on the type of conservation measure installed. Generally, energy savings from equipment measures (i.e., heating controls, new boilers, solar hot water systems, etc.) that require ongoing maintenance were less likely to persist beyond the first post-retrofit year. Shell measures (including window replacements), on the other hand, maintained their savings over several post-retrofit years.

Ritschard, R.; McAllister, A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet), Guidelines For Home Energy Professionals, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Work Specifications Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numer- ous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high- quality residential energy upgrades. The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades is the first of three documents that will be published in 2012 and 2013 as part of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project. Specifications for manufactured housing and multifamily homes will also be available. DOE, NREL, and industry developed the Standard Work Specifications under the Weatherization Assistance Program, building on more than 30 years of experience

35

Monitoring conservative retrofits in single family buildings  

SciTech Connect

This study has provided detailed before-and-after information on the ambient and comfort conditions in nine single family buildings, and on the energy consumption of those buildings, for one or more energy conservation retrofits. The data were recorded in such a manner that as well as being able to determine the savings from the retrofits and the influence these retrofits have on the comfort conditions of the residence, the effects of the retrofits on time-of-day usage are also determinable. The following are included in appendices: a table of participant's names, site addresses and retrofit; significant dates and appropriate comments; a day of data and an annotated data set; pre-retrofit and post-retrofit audit data sheets; and usage history.

Richardson, C.S.

1992-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Multifamily Heat Pump Water Heater Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Although heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have gained significant attention in recent years as a high efficiency electric water heating solution for single family homes, central HPWHs for commercial or multi-family applications are not as well documented in terms of measured performance and cost effectiveness. To evaluate this technology, the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team monitored the performance of a 10.5 ton central HPWH installed on a student apartment building at the West Village Zero Net Energy Community in Davis, California. Monitoring data collected over a 16 month period were then used to validate a TRNSYS simulation model. The TRNSYS model was then used to project performance in different climates using local electric rates. Results of the study indicate that after some initial commissioning issues, the HPWH operated reliably with an annual average efficiency of 2.12 (Coefficient of Performance). The observed efficiency was lower than the unit's rated efficiency, primarily due to the fact that the system rarely operated under steady-state conditions. Changes in the system configuration, storage tank sizing, and control settings would likely improve the observed field efficiency. Modeling results suggest significant energy savings relative to electric storage water heating systems (typical annual efficiencies around 0.90) providing for typical simple paybacks of six to ten years without any incentives. The economics versus gas water heating are currently much more challenging given the current low natural gas prices in much of the country. Increased market size for this technology would benefit cost effectiveness and spur greater technology innovation.

Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Closing Gaps in Modeling Multifamily Retrofits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building America Technical Update Meeting Denver, Colorado April 30, 2013 Jordan Dentz, The Levy Partnership., Inc. Closing Gaps in Modeling Multifamily Retrofits Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Overview * Multifamily modeling inputs (BA House Simulation Protocols) * Important multifamily measures * Other MF gaps Vital to meet 50% goals and therefore important to include in Building America's multifamily modeling capabilities Model Inputs * Heating set point * Cooling set point * Behavior assumptions 3 Heating Set Point - Central Systems * House simulation protocol assumes 71°F * Overheating is common * Approach: adjust modeled heating set point - how much? * Average heating season indoor temperature was 76°F in a sample of 18 buildings (ARIES 2013a)

38

Retrofit of a Multifamily Mass Masonry Building in New England  

SciTech Connect

Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) has partnered with Building Science Corporation to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing brick building (a former convent) into condominiums. The research performed for this project provides information regarding advanced retrofit packages for multi-family masonry buildings in Cold climates. In particular, this project demonstrates safe, durable, and cost-effective solutions that will potentially benefit millions of multi-family brick buildings throughout the East Coast and Midwest (Cold climates). The retrofit packages provide insight on the opportunities for and constraints on retrofitting multifamily buildings with ambitious energy performance goals but a limited budget. The condominium conversion project will contribute to several areas of research on enclosures, space conditioning, and water heating. Enclosure items include insulation of mass masonry building on the interior, airtightness of these types of retrofits, multi-unit building compartmentalization, window selection, and roof insulation strategies. Mechanical system items include combined hydronic and space heating systems with hydronic distribution in small (low load) units, and ventilation system retrofits for multifamily buildings.

Ueno, K.; Kerrigan, P.; Wytrykowska, H.; Van Straaten, R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH) Program California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH) Program < Back...

40

SDG&E (Electric) - Multi-Family Residential Efficiency Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-Family Residential Efficiency Program Multi-Family Residential Efficiency Program SDG&E (Electric) - Multi-Family Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers: $75-$150 Room Air Conditioner: $50 Central Heat Pumps: $100 Insulation: $0.15/sq. ft. CFLs: $4-$10 Ceiling Fans with CFLs: $20 Interior Hardwired Fluorescent Fixtures: $32-$45 Exterior Hardwired Fluorescent Fixtures: $30 T12 De-lamping: $6/lamp Water Heaters: $30 Occupancy Sensors: $10 LED Exit Signs: $35 Photocells: $10/unit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ConEd (Gas) - Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ConEd (Gas) - Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Gas) - Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Gas) - Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Steam Boiler: $2500 Energy Management System: 70% of total cost Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2015 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Hot Water Gas Boilers (85%-89% TE): $1000-$3500/boiler Hot Water Gas Condensing Boilers (90%+ TE): $2000-$15,000/boiler Gas Steam Boilers: $700/boiler (300 MBH) Heating System Clean and Tune: $225/boiler

42

PG&E - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PG&E - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates PG&E - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates PG&E - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Expiration Date 03/01/2013 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq. ft. Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Clothes Washers: $50 - $150/Unit Refrigerator: $75/unit High Performance Dual Pane Windows: $0.75/sq. ft. Refrigerator, Freezer and Room AC Recycling: $25 - $35

43

Challenges and Solutions for Multifamily Modeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenges and Solutions for Multifamily Modeling IMPROVING THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT Srikanth Puttagunta, P.E. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. © 2013 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Overview  Multifamily modeling in BEopt  BA HSP for multifamily?  Benchmark Definition (based on IECC and Federal minimum appliance standards)  Use Profiles  Infiltration measurements  New metric for existing? © 2013 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Apartment vs. Whole-Building  Currently only can model apartments in BEopt  Can not distinguish common areas from living areas  5 bedroom max  Can only specify single components (mechanicals and appliances)  Benchmark source energy home size adjuster

44

North Shore Gas Single Family Direct Install (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Owners of single-family homes, condos, townhomes and two-flats may be eligible for a free installation of new programmable thermostats, pipe insulation, showerheads, and faucet aerators through...

45

The multifamily building evaluation project  

SciTech Connect

In 1991 the New York State Energy Office embarked on a comprehensive multi-year study of multifamily housing in New York City. The principal objective of the evaluation was to determine the degree to which new windows and boiler/burner retrofits installed in 22 multifamily buildings located in the New York City region save energy and whether the savings persist over a minimum of two years. Window and boiler retrofits were selected because they are popular measures and are frequently implemented with assistance from government and utility energy programs. Approaches prospectively, energy consumption monitoring and a series of on-site inspections helped explain why energy savings exceeded or fell short of expectations. In 1993, the scope of the evaluation expanded to include the monitoring of domestic hot water (DHW) consumption in order to better understand the sizing of combined heating/DHW boilers and water consumption patterns. The evaluation was one of ten proposals selected from over 100 candidates in a nationwide competition for a US Department of Energy Building Efficiency Program Grant. The Energy Office managed the project, analyzed the data and prepared the reports, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory served as technical advisor, and EME Group (New York City) installed meters and dataloggers, collected data, and inspected the retrofits. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority collaborated with the Energy Office on the DHW monitoring component. Results did not always follow predictable patterns. Some buildings far exceeded energy saving estimates while others experienced an increase in consumption. Persistence patterns were mixed. Some buildings showed a steady decline in energy savings while others demonstrated a continual improvement. A clear advantage of the research design was a frequent ability to explain results.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Chicagoland Single-Family Housing Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, the PARR team identifies housing characteristics and energy use for fifteen housing types (groups) in the Chicagoland (Cook County, Illinois) region and specifies measure packages that provide an optimum level of energy savings based on a BEopt analysis. The analysis is based on assessor data and actual energy consumption data on 432,605 houses representing approximately 30% of the population.

Spanier, J.; Scheu, R.; Brand, L.; Yang, J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Burlington Electric Department - Multi-Family Rental Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting...

48

Multifamily Housing: Looking for Energy Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operating operating costs, increase resident satisfaction, and enhance the value of your properties. Turn to an ENERGY STAR ® Service and Product Provider Partner ENERGY STAR Service and Product Providers (SPPs) have the experience and tools to implement energy-efficient strategies that are right for you. Following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidelines for Energy Management, a proven strategy developed from ENERGY STAR partner successes, SPPs can help your organization gain control of energy consumption and costs. Energy Efficiency Benefits the Multifamily Housing Industry, Your Tenants, and the Environment ENERGY STAR SPPs can help multifamily housing owners and managers reap the financial and environmental benefits of superior energy

49

Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies Title Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4830E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Lutz, James D., Renaldi, Alexander B. Lekov, Yining Qin, and Moya Melody Document Number LBNL-4830E Pagination 26 Date Published 05/2011 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This report describes data regarding hot water draw patterns that Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory obtained from 10 studies. The report describes our purposes in collecting the data; the ways in which we managed, cleaned, and analyzed the data; and the results of our data analysis. We found that daily hot water use is highly variable both among residences and within the same residence. We also found that the distributions of daily hot water use are not symmetrical normal distributions. Thus we used median, not average, values to characterize typical daily hot water use. This report presents summary information that illustrates the results of our data collection and some initial analysis.

50

The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A Simplified Asset Rating for Single Family  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A Simplified Asset Rating for Single Family The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A Simplified Asset Rating for Single Family Homes Title The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A Simplified Asset Rating for Single Family Homes Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-5714E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Bourassa, Norman, Leo I. Rainer, Evan Mills, and Joan Glickman Conference Name 2012 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 05/2012 Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA, USA Abstract In 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) initiated development of a new web-based computer tool and method for providing an energy asset rating of single-family homes. The resulting Home Energy Scoring Tool (http://homeenergyscore.lbl.gov) is a key component of the DOE's Home Energy Score Program (http://www.homeenergyscore.gov) for residential building energy labeling, a voluntary national asset rating method that uses a simplified and standardized energy assessment process. The Scoring Tool component of the program has been designed to support the existing energy analysis marketplace by providing a substantially lower-cost entry-level assessment method. This paper presents technical details of the Home Energy Scoring Tool itself, including the Scoring Tool's relationship to the Home Energy Saver building simulation engine, the Home Energy Score calculation methodology, and the web services feature that allows any qualified third-party software developer to integrate the Home Energy Score method into their own webbased applications and market delivery strategy.

51

Byggmeister Test Home: Cold Climate Multifamily Masonry Building Condition Assessment and Retrofit Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a retrofit project undertaken by Building Science Corporation and partner Byggmeister on a multifamily brick row house located in Jamaica Plain, MA. This project studied the row house to determine the right combination of energy efficiency measures that are feasible, affordable, and suitable for this type of construction and acceptable to homeowners.

Wytrykowska, H.; Ueno, K.; Van Straaten, R.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Obama Administration Expands Better Buildings Challenge to Multifamily...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Expands Better Buildings Challenge to Multifamily Housing, Launches New Programs to Boost U.S. Energy Efficiency Obama Administration Expands Better Buildings...

53

Austin Energy - Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - 4bulb Hardwire Retrofits: 9 Fixture Replacement 9 - 12 High Performance Ballast: 6 - 11 Occupancy Sensors: 5 - 32 The Austin Energy Multi-Family Program provides...

54

Monitoring conservative retrofits in single family buildings. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This study has provided detailed before-and-after information on the ambient and comfort conditions in nine single family buildings, and on the energy consumption of those buildings, for one or more energy conservation retrofits. The data were recorded in such a manner that as well as being able to determine the savings from the retrofits and the influence these retrofits have on the comfort conditions of the residence, the effects of the retrofits on time-of-day usage are also determinable. The following are included in appendices: a table of participant`s names, site addresses and retrofit; significant dates and appropriate comments; a day of data and an annotated data set; pre-retrofit and post-retrofit audit data sheets; and usage history.

Richardson, C.S.

1992-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

55

ARRA Proposed Award: The Affordable Multifamily Retrofit Initiative (the Initiative)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but not limited to: attic, wall and floor insulation; building envelope sealing; duct sealing and repair; Energy,993,029 Leverage Funding: $6,120,000 Retrofit Target: 26 Multifamily Buildings / 1600 Multifamily Units; radiant barriers; EnergyStar window replacement; domestic hot water replacement, insulation

56

DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF FLEXIBLE, MULTIZONE MULTIFAMILY BUILDING SIMULATION MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Since 2011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a multifamily building energy audit tool sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Weatherization program. Although weatherization of multifamily buildings is gaining increased attention in the U.S, available energy audit tools for multifamily buildings were found to need desirable improvements. On the wish list of field experts was the basic ability to model multizone buildings (i.e., one thermal zone per dwelling unit) with simplified user inputs, which allows a better analysis of decentralized and centralized HVAC and domestic hot water systems of multifamily buildings without having to create detailed building models. This paper describes detailed procedure of evaluation of the tool to perform an energy analysis in an existing multifamily building.

Im, Piljae [ORNL; Malhotra, Mini [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Individual Heating Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems Lawrence, Massachusetts PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Retrofit Type: Multifamily, affordable Builder: Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) www.merrimackvalleyhabitat.org Size: 840 to 1,170 ft 2 units Price Range: $125,000-$130,000 Date completed: Slated for 2014 Climate Zone: Cold (5A) PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index Range: 48 to 63 Projected annual energy cost savings: $1,797 Incremental cost of energy efficiency measures: $3,747 Incremental annual mortgage: $346 Annual cash flow: $1,451 Billing data: Not available The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley

58

Strategy Guideline: Energy Retrofits for Low-Rise Multifamily Buildings in Cold Climates  

SciTech Connect

This Strategy Guideline explains the benefits of evaluating and identifying energy efficiency retrofit measures that could be made during renovation and maintenance of multifamily buildings. It focuses on low-rise multifamily structures (three or fewer stories) in a cold climate. These benefits lie primarily in reduced energy use, lower operating and maintenance costs, improved durability of the structure, and increased occupant comfort. This guideline focuses on retrofit measures for roof repair or replacement, exterior wall repair or gut rehab, and eating system maintenance. All buildings are assumed to have a flat ceiling and a trussed roof, wood- or steel-framed exterior walls, and one or more single or staged boilers. Estimated energy savings realized from the retrofits will vary, depending on the size and condition of the building, the extent of efficiency improvements, the efficiency of the heating equipment, the cost and type of fuel, and the climate location.

Frozyna, K.; Badger, L.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

ConEd (Electric)- Multifamily Energy Efficiency Incentives Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Con Edison offers New York Multifamily electric customers a rebate program for energy efficient cooling and lighting equipment in 5-75 unit buildings in the eligible service area. All equipment...

60

DEVELOPMENT OF A FLEXIBLE, MULTIZONE, MULTIFAMILY BUILDING SIMULATION MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Weatherization of multifamily buildings is gaining increased attention in the U.S. Available energy audit tools for multifamily buildings were found to need desirable improvements. On the wish list of field experts for enhanced features was the basic ability to model multizone buildings (i.e., one thermal zone per dwelling unit) with simplified user inputs, which allows a better analysis of decentralized and centralized HVAC and domestic hot water systems of multifamily buildings without having to create detailed building models. To address the desired capabilities, development of an enhanced energy audit tool was begun in 2011. The tool is a strategically structured, flexible, one-zone-per-unit, DOE-2.1e model coupled with a simplified user interface to model small to large multifamily buildings with decentralized or centralized systems and associated energy measures. This paper describes the modeling concept and its implementation.

Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; Im, Piljae [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Construction Home Options Builder Option Package 1: $50 (single family), $50 (multifamily) Builder Option Package 2: $100 (single family), $100 (multifamily) Energy Star 3.0: $300 (single family), $200 (multifamily) High Performance Home: $500 (single family), $300 (multifamily)

62

Energy-efficient rehabilitation of multifamily buildings in the Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the opportunities available to make multifamily housing more affordable by using energy efficiency practices in housing rehabilitation. Use of the energy conservation measures discussed in this report enables developers of multifamily housing to substantially reduce annual energy costs. The reduction in natural gas usage was found to be approximately 10 Btu per square foot per heating degree-day. The study focuses on a number of Chicago multifamily buildings. The buildings were examined to compare energy efficiency measures that are commonly found in multifamily building rehabilitation with the high-energy-efficiency (HE) techniques that are currently available to community developers but are often unused. The HE measures include R-43 insulation in attics, R-19 insulation in exterior walls, low-emissivity coatings on windows, air infiltration sealing, and HE heating systems. The report describes the HE features and their potential benefits for making housing more affordable. It also describes the factors influencing acceptance. This report makes recommendations for expanding cost-effective energy conservation in the multifamily building sector. Among the recommendations are: expand HE rehab and retrofit techniques to multifamily building rehabs in which demolition of the interior structures is not required (moderate rehabs) or buildings are not vacant (e.g., weatherization upgrades); and expand research into the special opportunities for incorporating energy conservation in low-income communities.

Katrakis, J.T.; Knight, P.A.; Cavallo, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Policy and Economic Analysis Group

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A comparative study of condominium and single family house price appreciation in the Salt Lake Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines whether the form of ownership affects the appreciation rate of housing units. The specific test conducted is whether condominiums and single family homes in the Salt Lake Valley have appreciated at the ...

Billings, John D. (John David), 1971-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A sub-systems approach to small lot single-family housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The trends and preferences explored in this work indicate that the "American Dream" of a single-family detached house is still the preferred housing model. In-order to achieve this goal most home buyers will have to accept ...

Khn, Heinrich, 1951-

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Analysis of advanced conceptual designs for single-family-size absorption chillers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research study is the development of radically new fluid systems, specifically tailored to the needs and requirements of solar-absorption cooling for single-family-size residences. Progress is reported.

Macriss, R.A.; Zawacki, T.S.; Kouo, M.T.; Sneed, D.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Obama Administration Expands Better Buildings Challenge to Multifamily  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Expands Better Buildings Challenge to Obama Administration Expands Better Buildings Challenge to Multifamily Housing, Launches New Programs to Boost U.S. Energy Efficiency Obama Administration Expands Better Buildings Challenge to Multifamily Housing, Launches New Programs to Boost U.S. Energy Efficiency December 3, 2013 - 9:45am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on $2 billion in financing commitments from the private sector for energy efficiency updates to commercial buildings under the President's Better Buildings Challenge, the U.S. Departments of Energy and Housing and Urban Development today expanded the Challenge to multifamily housing such as apartments and condominiums and launched the Better Buildings Accelerators to support state- and local government-led

67

Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Multifamily Job Task Analyses Needs Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the efforts carried out to determine whether there is a need to develop separate, multifamily-specific JTAs for the four proposed job categories. The multifamily SWS market committee considered these job designations to be the best candidates for developing JTAs and certification blueprints, as well as having the greatest potential for promoting job growth in the multifamily home performance industry.

Dirr, N.; Hepinstall, D.; Douglas, M.; Buck, S.; Larney, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

National Energy Audit Tool for Multifamily Buildings Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) enables low-income families to reduce their energy costs by providing funds to make their homes more energy efficient. In addition, the program funds Weatherization Training and Technical Assistance (T and TA) activities to support a range of program operations. These activities include measuring and documenting performance, monitoring programs, promoting advanced techniques and collaborations to further improve program effectiveness, and training, including developing tools and information resources. The T and TA plan outlines the tasks, activities, and milestones to support the weatherization network with the program implementation ramp up efforts. Weatherization of multifamily buildings has been recognized as an effective way to ramp up weatherization efforts. To support this effort, the 2009 National Weatherization T and TA plan includes the task of expanding the functionality of the Weatherization Assistant, a DOE-sponsored family of energy audit computer programs, to perform audits for large and small multifamily buildings This report describes the planning effort for a new multifamily energy audit tool for DOE's WAP. The functionality of the Weatherization Assistant is being expanded to also perform energy audits of small multifamily and large multifamily buildings. The process covers an assessment of needs that includes input from national experts during two national Web conferences. The assessment of needs is then translated into capability and performance descriptions for the proposed new multifamily energy audit, with some description of what might or should be provided in the new tool. The assessment of needs is combined with our best judgment to lay out a strategy for development of the multifamily tool that proceeds in stages, with features of an initial tool (version 1) and a more capable version 2 handled with currently available resources. Additional development in the future is expected to be needed if more capabilities are to be added. A rough schedule for development of the version 1 tool is presented. The components and capabilities described in this plan will serve as the starting point for development of the proposed new multifamily energy audit tool for WAP.

Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; MacDonald, Michael [Sentech, Inc.; Accawi, Gina K [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Im, Piljae [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Energy measurements of attic radiant barriers installed in single-family houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing was conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the energy savings attributable to radiant barriers installed in attics of unoccupied single-family houses. Three levels of fiberglass attic insulation (R-11 ,R-19, and R-30) were tested with two types of barrier installation (horizontal and truss). The results showed that horizontally installed radiant barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing heating and cooling loads. Measured cooling load reductions ranged form 0 to 22% (compared to same attic insulation insulation R-value with no radiant barrier) and heating load changes from /plus/4% to /minus/10% were measured (compared to same attic insulation R-value with no radiant barrier). Radiant barriers appeared to decrease the heating and cooling loads more when lesser amounts of insulation (R-11 and R-19) were present in an attic. Minimal changes were measured when R-30 was present in an attic. Long-term effects of dust on the performance of radiant barriers as well as the effects of moisture condensing on the surface of a radiant barrier during cold winter temperatures remain unanswered.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Code manual for passive solar design single family residential construction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General information is presented on types of passive solar techniques and a method for estimating passive solar performance. Important codes and standards are described, each description listing the items in the code which could have a potential impact on a passive solar design and analyzing the effect of the code on the use of such techniques. State and local codes and code agencies are summarized. The local summary contains the name of a contact in the enforcement agency to whom specific questions may be addressed. The requirements to file for a building permit are given briefly. (LEW)

None

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Critical Question #7: What are the Best Practices for Single-Family  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: What are the Best Practices for Single-Family 7: What are the Best Practices for Single-Family Ventilation in All Climate Regions? Critical Question #7: What are the Best Practices for Single-Family Ventilation in All Climate Regions? Why ventilate? What are the ultimate goals of ventilation requirements in codes and standards? What are the characteristics of an effective ventilation system in new vs. existing construction? What are the risks and solutions associated with ventilation in hot-humid climates? cq7_kitchen_ventilation_singer.pdf cq7_ventilation_lab_houses_rudd.pdf cq7_ventilation_hothumid_parker.pdf More Documents & Publications Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes Track C - Market-Driven Research Solutions Critical Question #8: When are Heat Pump Water Heaters the Best Solution?

72

Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Multifamily Market: Size, Characteristics, and Decision Making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As of 1996, the multi-family housing segment comprised 27 million units of the 99 million housing units in the United States and used 192 TWhs, approximately 18 percent of total residential electricity consumption. The segment's energy expenditures totaled $26 billion. This large and growing market segment presents many opportunities for energy providers, especially in the large-scale apartment subsegment where relatively few players make or influence decisions for large groups of properties and resident...

1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

74

High Performance Homes and Buildings: State-of-the-Art Review of Multifamily Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multifamily households constitute a quarter of the U.S. households, including a majority of low-income households. However, energy performance of multifamily buildings has been hindered due to both technical and market barriers. This report investigates a comprehensive whole-building approach to reduce energy use in multifamily buildings, with a discussion of market barriers such as lack of energy knowledge, lack of motivation, and shortage of skilled workforce for deep energy upgrades in ...

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

Multifamily Housing: Looking for Energy Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency relative to buildings in your portfolio, and help you to receive an energy use intensity metric for all commercial building types. > Set Energy Performance Goals. SPPs...

76

Recommendations for 15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the recommendations for achieving 15% above-code energy performance for single-family residences. The analysis was performed using a simulation model of an International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)- compliant, single family residence in Houston, Texas. To accomplish the 15% annual energy use reductions, twelve measures were considered, which include: tankless water heater, solar domestic hot water system, gas water heater without the standing pilot light, ducts in the conditioned space, improved duct sealing, increased air tightness, window shading and redistribution, improved window performance, improved heating and cooling system efficiency. After the total annual energy use was determined for each measure, they were then grouped to accomplish a 15% total annual energy use reduction.

Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Liu, J. B.; Yazdani, B.; Malhotra, M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The earth-coupled heat pump: Utilizing innovative technology in single family rehabilitation strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study examines the feasibility of incorporating the use of earth-coupled heat pump technology in single-family housing rehabilitation projects, based on energy conservation attributes and financial considerations. Following evaluation of a theoretical model which indicated that installations of the heat pumps were feasible, the heat pumps were tested under actual conditions in five single family housing units which were part of the Urban Homesteading Program, and were matched with comparable units which did not receive special treatment. Energy consumption information was collected for all units for twelve months. Variables were identified, and the data was analyzed for individual housing units and compared with the results predicted by the theoretical model to determine the practicality of incorporating such technology in large scale rehabilitation projects. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Solar energy heating system design package for a single-family residence at New Castle, Pennsylvania  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of a solar heating and hot water system for the New Castle Redevelopment Authority's single-family dwelling located at New Castle, Pennsylvania is described. Documentation submitted by the contractor for Government review of plans, specifications, cost trade studies and verification status for approval to commit the system to fabrication is presented. Also included are system integration drawings, major subsystems drawings, and architect's specifications and plans.

Not Available

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numerous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high-quality residential energy upgrades. Today, the Standard Work Specifications provide a unique source for defining high-quality home energy upgrades, establishing clear expectations for homeowners, contractors, trainers, workers, program administrators, and organizations that provide financing for energy upgrades.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Identifying Inefficient Single-Family Homes With Utility Bill Analysis: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differentiating between energy-efficient and inefficient single-family homes on a community scale helps identify and prioritize candidates for energy-efficiency upgrades. Prescreening diagnostic procedures can further retrofit efforts by providing efficiency information before a site-visit is conducted. We applied the prescreening diagnostic to a simulated community of homes in Boulder, Colorado and analyzed energy consumption data to identify energy-inefficient homes.

Casey, S.; Krarti, M.; Bianchi, M.; Roberts, D.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Innovative Control of Electric Heat in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of web-based wireless technology for control of electric heating in a large multifamily housing complex. The control system architecture and components are described. A web-based application enables remote monitoring of temperature, electric usage and control of peak demand through a temperature-based duty-cycling algorithm developed specifically for the application. Installed costs and energy savings are discussed. A 16% energy-use reduction was confirmed through the first heating season of operation. The response of occupants and management to changes in temperature regime has been a critical aspect of system start-up and commissioning.

Lempereur, D.; Bobker, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Short-Term Test Results: Multifamily Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit  

SciTech Connect

Multifamily deep energy retrofits (DERs) represent great potential for energy savings, while also providing valuable insights on research-generated efficiency measures, cost-effectiveness metrics, and risk factor strategies for the multifamily housing industry. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a base scope retrofit with a goal of achieving 30% savings (relative to pre-retrofit), and a DER scope with a goal of 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit). The base scope has been applied to the entire complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. Findings from the implementation, commissioning, and short-term testing at Bay Ridge include air infiltration reductions of greater than 60% in the DER building; a hybrid heat pump system with a Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) > 1 (relative to a high efficiency furnace) which also provides the resident with added incentive for energy savings; and duct leakage reductions of > 60% using an aerosolized duct sealing approach. Despite being a moderate rehab instead of a gut rehab, the Bay Ridge DER is currently projected to achieve energy savings ? 50% compared to pre-retrofit, and the short-term testing supports this estimate.

Lyons, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Building America Expert Meeting Report: Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The topic of this expert meeting was cost-effective controls and distribution retrofit options for hot water and steam space heating systems in multi-family buildings with the goals of reducing energy waste and improving occupant comfort. The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program develops technologies with the goal of reducing energy use by 30% to 50% in residential buildings. Toward this goal, the program sponsors 'Expert Meetings' focused on specific building technology topics. The meetings are intended to sharpen Building America research priorities, create a forum for sharing information among industry leaders and build partnerships with professionals and others that can help support the program's research needs and objectives. The topic of this expert meeting was cost-effective controls and distribution retrofit options for hot water and steam space heating systems in multifamily buildings with the goals of reducing energy waste and improving occupant comfort. The objectives of the meeting were to: (1) Share knowledge and experience on new and existing solutions: what works, what doesn't and why, and what's new; (2) Understand the market barriers to currently offered solutions: what disconnects exist in the market and what is needed to overcome or bridge these gaps; and (3) Identify research needs.

Dentz, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Building America Expert Meeting Report: Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The topic of this expert meeting was cost-effective controls and distribution retrofit options for hot water and steam space heating systems in multi-family buildings with the goals of reducing energy waste and improving occupant comfort. The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program develops technologies with the goal of reducing energy use by 30% to 50% in residential buildings. Toward this goal, the program sponsors 'Expert Meetings' focused on specific building technology topics. The meetings are intended to sharpen Building America research priorities, create a forum for sharing information among industry leaders and build partnerships with professionals and others that can help support the program's research needs and objectives. The topic of this expert meeting was cost-effective controls and distribution retrofit options for hot water and steam space heating systems in multifamily buildings with the goals of reducing energy waste and improving occupant comfort. The objectives of the meeting were to: (1) Share knowledge and experience on new and existing solutions: what works, what doesn't and why, and what's new; (2) Understand the market barriers to currently offered solutions: what disconnects exist in the market and what is needed to overcome or bridge these gaps; and (3) Identify research needs.

Dentz, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Incremental densification auctions : A politically viable method of producing infill housing in existing single-family neighborhoods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the problem of convincing homeowners to accept new housing density in their neighborhoods. This paper proposes that densification that places additional housing units in preexisting single-family ...

Baker, Karl Phillip

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes  

SciTech Connect

Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certification. Consumers, installers, and builders who make decisions about installing space and water heating equipment generally do not perform an analysis to assess the economic impacts of different combinations and efficiencies of space and water heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential life-cycle economic and energy savings of installing space and water heating equipment combinations. Drawing on previous and current analysis conducted for the United States Department of Energy rulemaking on amended standards for furnaces and water heaters, this paper evaluates the extent to which condensing equipment can provide life-cycle cost-effectiveness in a representative sample of single family American homes. The economic analyses indicate that significant energy savings and consumer benefits may result from large-scale introduction of condensing water heaters combined with condensing furnaces in U.S. residential single-family housing, particularly in the Northern region. The analyses also shows that important benefits may be overlooked when policy analysts evaluate the impact of space and water heating equipment separately.

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

Estimates of Energy Cost Savings Achieved from 2009 IECC Code-Compliant, Single Family Residences in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of the energy cost savings to be achieved from 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) code-compliant, single-family residences in Texas compared to the pre-2009 IECC codes, including: the 2001 IECC, the 2006 IECC, and the 2006 IECC w/ Houston amendments (w/ HA). A series of simulations were performed using an ESL simulation model (BDL version 4.01.07 of IC3) based on the DOE-2.1e simulation and the appropriate TMY2 weather files for three counties representing three 2009 IECC Climate Zones across Texas: Harris County for Climate Zone 2, Tarrant County for Climate Zone 3, and Potter County for Climate Zone 4. Two options based on the choice of heating fuel type were considered: (a) an electric/gas house (gas-fired furnace for space heating, and gas water heater for domestic water heating), and (b) a heat pump house (heat pump for space heating, and electric water heater for domestic water heating). The base-case building was assumed to be a 2,325 sq. ft., square-shape, one story, single-family, detached house with a floor-to-ceiling height of 8 feet. The house has an attic with a roof pitched at 23 degrees. The base-case building envelope and system characteristics were determined from the general characteristics and the climate-specific characteristics as specified in the 2001 IECC, the 2006 IECC, the 2006 IECC w/HA, and the 2009 IECC. In addition, to facilitate a better comparison with the 2009 code, several modifications were applied to the pre-2009 IECC codes. As a result, the estimated annual energy cost savings per house associated with the 2009 IECC compared to the 2001 and 2006 IECC are: (a) an electric/gas house: $462/year and $206/year for Harris County, $432/year and $216/year for Tarrant County, and $576/year and $153/year for Potter County and (b) a heat pump house: $490/year and $203/year for Harris County, $487/year and $226/year for Tarrant County, and $680/year and $155/year for Potter County. The corresponding % savings of total energy cost of a 2009 IECC code-compliant house are: (a) an electric/gas house: 22.7% and 10.1% for Harris County, 21.8% and 10.9% for Tarrant County, and 28.9% and 7.7% for Potter County and (b) a heat pump house: 21.6% and 8.9% for Harris County, 20.9% and 9.7% for Tarrant County, and 25.7% and 5.8% for Potter County.

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

An analysis of International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)-compliant single-family residential energy use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2001, the Texas State Senate passed Senate Bill 5 to reduce ozone levels by encouraging the reduction of emissions of NOx that were not regulated by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, including point sources (power plants), area sources (such as residential emissions), road mobile sources, and non-road mobile sources. For the building energy section, the Texas State Legislature adopted the 2000/2001 International Energy Conservation Code, as modified by the 2001 Supplement, as the state's building energy code. The 2000/2001 IECC is a comprehensive energy conservation code that establishes a standard for the insulation levels, glazing and cooling and heating system efficiencies through the use of prescriptive and performance-based provisions. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to improve the accuracy of a 2000/2001 IECCcompliant performance simulation using the DOE-2.1e simulation program to investigate the energy performance of a typical single-family house. To achieve this purpose, several objectives had to be accomplished, including: 1) the development of an IECC-compliant simulation model, 2) the development and testing of specific improvements to the existing code-traceable model, 3) the calibration and installation of sensors in a case-study house, 4) the validation of the improved simulation model with measured data from the case-study house, and 5) use the validated model to simulate the energy-conserving features of single-family residences that cannot be simulated with existing versions of the DOE-2.1e program. In order to create the code-traceable IECC-compliant simulation model, a base-case house simulation was created and the results calibrated with measured energy and environmental data from the case-study house. This was done in order to obtain an improved simulation model that would more accurately represent the case-study building. The calibrated model was then used to verify the accuracy of the improved simulation methods against previous models and measured data. After validation of the new simulation methodologies, the IECC simulation model was used to simulate different energy-conserving features for a single-family residence that could not be simulated with the previous version of the DOE-2 input file. Finally, areas for future work were identified in an effort to continue to improve the model.

Kim, Seongchan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

ConEd (Gas)- Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Con Edison is offering a Multifamily Natural Gas Heating Rebate Program. Through this program, incentives are offered on energy efficient heating equipment for 5-75 unit buildings in the eligible...

91

Study of Multifamily Energy Retrofit Using Flexible Multizone Building Simulation Model  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study of Multifamily Study of Multifamily Energy Retrofit using Flexible, Multizone Building Simulation Model Piljae Im, Ph.D. Mini Malhotra, Ph.D. R&D Staff Oak Ridge National Laboratory Presented at Building America Technical Update Meeting April 29-30, 2013 Outline * Multifamily Energy Audit Tool - Background - Needs for MF Audit Tool - Existing MF Tools - Modeling Approach - Development Status * Case Study - Background - Pre/Post Retrofit Building characteristics - Whole Building Energy Analysis * Summary Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Study of Multifamily Energy Retrofit using Flexible, Multizone Building Simulation Model 2 Background * New MF Building Energy Audit Tool sponsored by U.S. DOE * Collaboration of ORNL and LBNL * National web-based

92

Front/back/side : design of outdoor spaces for multi-family residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis begins with the critique of the current situation of detached, privately owned, multi-family residences and seeks alternative solutions at both the broad scale of the block, and at the scale of the spaces ...

Darden, Gwynne

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

No- and Low-Cost Energy-Saving Tips for Multifamily Housing Common...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No- and Low-Cost Energy-Saving Tips for Multifamily Housing Common Areas Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing...

94

Piecing together modular : understanding the benefits and limitations of modular construction methods for multifamily development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this thesis is to explain the benefits and limitations of modular construction as it pertains to primarily wood-frame, multifamily housing in the United States. This thesis attempts to educate the ...

Cameron, Peter J. (Peter Jay)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Guidelines for Home Energy Upgrade Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Multifamily Energy Upgrades (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides essential information about the 2011 publication of the Workforce Guidelines for Multifamily Home Energy Upgrades, including their origin, their development with the help of industry leaders to create the standard work specifications for retrofit work.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Detailed Analysis of the Thermal Mass Credits in a Code-Traceable DOE-2 Simulation of the 2001 IECC for a Single-Family Residence in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a study that investigates the thermal mass credits in the 2001 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) (ICC 1999, 2001) for a single-family residence in Texas using the DOE-2 building energy simulation program. In this analysis seven different wall types were simulated, and each wall type was matched to the recommended overall U-value of a lightweight wall that meets the prescriptive specifications of the 2001 IECC. This paper presents an analysis of the total annual cooling and heating energy use for wall types with varying thermal mass, and thermostat settings, as well as recommendations concerning the most energy-efficient wall type, and includes input specification methods using the DOE-2 program

Kim, S.; Haberl, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Multifamily Retrofit Project Manager Job/Task Analysis and Report: September 2013  

SciTech Connect

The development of job/task analyses (JTAs) is one of three components of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project and will allow industry to develop training resources, quality assurance protocols, accredited training programs, and professional certifications. The Multifamily Retrofit Project Manager JTA identifies and catalogs all of the tasks performed by multifamily retrofit project managers, as well as the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) needed to perform the identified tasks.

Owens, C. M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Multifamily Building Operator Job/Task Analysis and Report: September 2013  

SciTech Connect

The development of job/task analyses (JTAs) is one of three components of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project and will allow industry to develop training resources, quality assurance protocols, accredited training programs, and professional certifications. The Multifamily Building Operator JTA identifies and catalogs all of the tasks performed by multifamily building operators, as well as the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) needed to perform the identified tasks.

Owens, C. M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Multifamily Quality Control Inspector Job/Task Analysis and Report: September 2013  

SciTech Connect

The development of job/task analyses (JTAs) is one of three components of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project and will allow industry to develop training resources, quality assurance protocols, accredited training programs, and professional certifications. The Multifamily Quality Control Inspector JTA identifies and catalogs all of the tasks performed by multifamily quality control inspectors, as well as the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) needed to perform the identified tasks.

Owens, C. M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Multifamily Energy Auditor Job/Task Analysis and Report: September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of job/task analyses (JTAs) is one of three components of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project and will allow industry to develop training resources, quality assurance protocols, accredited training programs, and professional certifications. The Multifamily Energy Auditor JTA identifies and catalogs all of the tasks performed by multifamily energy auditors, as well as the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) needed to perform the identified tasks.

Owens, C. M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Test for Modeling Windows in DOE 2.1E for Comparing the Window Library with the Shading Coefficient Method for a Single-Family Residence in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the difference of the window simulation test between the Shading Coefficient (SC) and the Window Library (WL) Methods on DOE 2.1E of the 2000 IECC (International Energy Conservation Code) for single-family residences in Texas. The window simulation tests are performed using single-pane, double-pane, and low-e glass on two standard DOE 2.1E single-family house models: 1) the model which has the R-value for wall, roof and floor according to 2000 IECC (Quick Wall), and 2) the model which has the real wood frame wall and has the same R-value as the first one (Thermal Wall). The analysis showed different results according to the types of the glass, simulation method (Shading Coefficient or Window Library), and types of wall (quick wall and thermal wall). The saving of daily peak heating (kBtu/day) from single-pane to low-e glass on thermal mass and quick wall shows the most variation.

Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

102

Selected cost considerations for geothermal district heating in existing single-family residential areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past, district heating (geothermal or conventionally fueled) has not been widely applied to the single-family residential sector. Low-heat load density is the commonly cited reason for this. Although it`s true that load density in these areas is much lower than for downtown business districts, other frequently overlooked factors may compensate for load density. In particular, costs for distribution system installation can be substantially lower in some residential areas due to a variety of factors. This reduced development cost may partially compensate for the reduced revenue resulting from low-load density. This report examines cost associated with the overall design of the system (direct or indirect system design), distribution piping installation, and customer branch lines. It concludes with a comparison of the costs for system development and the revenue from an example residential area.

Rafferty, K.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Installation guidelines for Solar Heating System, single-family residence at New Castle, Pennsylvania  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Heating System installer guidelines are provided for each subsystem and includes testing and filling the system. This single-family residential heating system is a solar-assisted, hydronic-to-warm-air system with solar-assisted domestic water heating. It is composed of the following major components: liquid cooled flat plate collectors; water storage tank; passive solar-fired domestic water preheater; electric hot water heater; heat pump with electric backup; solar hot water coil unit; tube-and-shell heat exchanger, three pumps, and associated pipes and valving in an energy transport module; control system; and air-cooled heat purge unit. Information is also provided on the operating procedures, controls, caution requirements, and routine and schedule maintenance. Information consists of written procedures, schematics, detail drawings, pictures and manufacturer's component data.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Passive heating and cooling strategies for single family housing in Fresno, California: a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the integration of passive heating, cooling, and ventilating techniques for detached single family housing in Fresno, California. The energy use and patterns of energy use were simulated for a typical tract house in Fresno, and serves as a case study, to which energy saving strategies were applied and evaluated using Ener-Win software. The effectiveness of each strategy was assessed based on the annual savings, the initial cost, and a life-cycle cost analysis. Specific areas of evaluation include: shading, improving the R-value and infiltration rate of the building envelope, thermal mass, natural ventilation, and evaporative cooling. The optimum strategies selected utilize only traditional building techniques. Evaporative cooling used in conjunction with an air conditioner was the most effective energy reducing strategy, but a combination of purely passive strategies yield competitive results. Although the typical Fresno home is already energy efficient, small alterations provide energy savings up to 75% for space conditioning.

Winchester, Nathan James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Measured energy savings and economics of retrofitting existing single-family homes: An update of the BECA-B database  

SciTech Connect

The energy bill for US single-family households was over $77 billion in 1987 (excluding auto fuel purchases), accounting for approximately 20% of national energy expenditures. Large sums are spent on residential retrofits by individual homeowners, government agencies, and utilities. As of late 1987, over 21 million households indicated that they had added at least one energy-saving measure in the previous two years, while a recent Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) study estimated that nearly 15 million residential customers have participated in some kind of demand-side management (DSM) program. Given the level of continuing investments in residential energy efficiency, accurate estimates of savings from various conservation measures are increasingly necessary, especially as new technologies become more sophisticated and incremental efficiency gains more difficult to achieve. This report provides a comparative analysis of measured data on the performance and cost-effectiveness of energy-saving measures in existing single-family homes, based on information in the Buildings Energy-Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) data base. The initial BECA report on measured data for single-family retrofits was completed seven years ago. In updating the single-family database, we have added 135 data points, representing over 33,000 houses, to the original database of 145 retrofit projects. The report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1 provides a summary of energy savings and costs of individual retrofit measures and strategies and results from federal/state low-income and utility weatherization programs. we also discuss measurement issues, predicted versus actual savings, trends in single-family retrofit programs, and implications for the next generation'' of cost-effective single-family retrofits. Volume 2 contains a written summary of each retrofit project and complete data tables. 87 refs., 20 figs., 16 tabs.

Cohen, S.D.; Goldman, C.A.; Harris, J.P.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Analysis of fuel savings associated with fuel computers in multifamily buildings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This research was undertaken to quantify the energy savings associated with the installation of a direct monitoring control system (DMC) on steam heating plants in multi-family buildings located in the New York City metropolitan area. The primary objective was to determine whether fuel consumption was lower in buildings employing a DMC relative to those using the more common indirect monitoring control system (IMC) and if so, to what extent. The analysis compares the fuel consumption of 442 buildings over 12 months. The type of control system installed in these buildings was either a Heat-Timer (identified as IMC equipment) or a computer-based unit (identified as DMC equipment). IMC provides control by running the boiler for longer or shorter periods depending on outdoor temperature. This system is termed indirect because there is no feedback from indoor (apartment) temperatures to the control. DMC provides control by sensing apartment temperatures. In a typical multifamily building, sensors are hard wired to between 5 and 10 apartments sensors. The annual savings and simple payback were computed for the DMC buildings by comparing annual fuel consumption among the building groupings. The comparison is based on mean BTUs per degree day consumed annually and normalized for building characteristics, such as, equipment maintenance and boiler steady state efficiency as well as weather conditions. The average annual energy consumption for the DMC buildings was 14.1 percent less than the annual energy consumption for the IMC buildings. This represents 3,826 gallons of No. 6 fuel oil or $2,295 at a price of $0.60 per gallon. A base DMC system costs from $8,400 to $10,000 installed depending on the number of sensors and complexity of the system. The standard IMC system costs from $2,000 to $3,000 installed. Based on this analysis the average simple payback is 2.9 or 4.0 years depending on either an upgrade from IMC to DMC (4.0 years) or a new installation (2.9) years.

McNamara, M.; Anderson, J.; Huggins, E. [EME Group, New York, NY (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent). The original ventilation design for the project was provided by a local engineer and consisted of a single large heat recovery ventilator (HRV) located in a mechanical room in the basement with a centralized duct system providing supply air to the main living space and exhausting stale air from the single bathroom in each apartment. This design was deemed to be far too costly to install and operate for several reasons: the large central HRV was oversized and the specified flows to each apartment were much higher than the ASHRAE 62.2 rate; an extensive system of ductwork, smoke and fire dampers, and duct chases were specified; ductwork required a significant area of dropped ceilings; and the system lacked individual ventilation control in the apartments

Metzger, C.; Ueno, K.; Kerrigan, P.; Wytrykowska, H.; Van Straaten, R.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Energy Savings Resulting from Shading Devices on Single-Family Residences in Austin, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential annual energy savings resulting from window shading devices on three prototypical Austin, Texas, single-family residences were computed in this study. Savings were calculated for interior (shades, blinds, draperies, window film, and tinted windows) and exterior (solar screens, awnings, overhangs, and the effects of recessed windows and vegetation) shading devices. The analysis was conducted with the DOE-2 building energy analysis computer program. Nominal baseline cases (single glazing, gas heating, and nominal shading from eaves and neighboring buildings) were run for each prototype. Selected baseline variants (double glazing, all electric, and no eaves or neighbor shading) were run to test parameter sensitivity. Results are reported in terms of the annual heating and cooling energy use and energy cost, with each device in place, as compared to the baseline cases. The devices are ranked in term of energy savings and energy coat savings. Another significant result is the multiple-regression correlation of annual heating and cooling energy savings with Shading Coefficient and U-value that generalizes the performance of the shading devices.

Pletzer, R. K.; Jones, J. W.; Hunn, B. D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Solar project description for Florida gas company's single family residence, Winter Springs, Florida  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Florida Gas Company solar energy system is installed in a 1548 square-foot, three bedroom single family dwelling located in Winter Springs, Florida. The system is designed to provide solar energy for space heating, space cooling, and domestic hot water heating. Solar energy is collected by two banks of double glazed flat plate collectors with a gross area of 714 square feet. Solar energy is transferred from the collector array to a 1350 gallon underground storage tank. Water is used as the heat collection, transfer and storage medium. Freeze protection is provided by means of circulation of hot water from storage through the collectors. No anti-freeze additive is required. A 3-ton solar energy powered absorption cycle Water Chiller provides chilled water for circulation through the same air distribution system. A gas fired boiler provides supplemental thermal energy to the chiller when sufficient thermal energy is not available from storage. Original cost estimates for provisioning and installation of the Solar System are given.

Not Available

1979-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

Measured energy savings and economics of retrofitting existing single- family homes: An update of the BECA-B database  

SciTech Connect

These appendices are the companion volume to report number LBL--28147 Vol.1, with the same title. The summary data tables include physical characteristics, energy consumption, savings, and the retrofit measures installed and their costs for each retrofit project. Each existing single family residential building'' retrofit project in the BECA-B database is described. 99 refs. (BM)

Cohen, S.D.; Goldman, C.A.; Harris, J.P.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Analysis of photovoltaic total energy systems for single family residential applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance and cost-effectiveness of three photovoltaic total energy system concepts designed to meet the thermal and electrical demands of a typical single family house are compared. The three photovoltaic total energy system concepts considered are: (1) All-photovoltaic systems. Passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels provide electricity to meet both electrical and thermal demands. (2) Separate-panel systems. Solar thermal panels provide thermal energy, while passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels serve the purely electric demand. (3) Combined thermal/electric panel systems. Water-cooled photovoltaic panels provide both thermal energy (transported by cooling water) and electrical energy to meet the separate thermal and electrical demands. Additional passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels are added, as required, to meet the electrical demand. The thermal demand is assumed to consist of the energy required for domestic hot water and space heating, while the electrical demand includes the energy required for baseload power (lights, appliances, etc.) plus air conditioning. An analysis procedure has been developed that permits definition of the panel area, electrical and/or thermal storage capacity, and utility backup energy level that, in combination, provide the lowest annual energy cost to the homeowner for each system concept for specified assumptions about costs and system operations. The procedure appears capable of being used to approximately any size system using solar collectors, as well as in any application where the thermal and/or electrical demand is being provided by solar energy, with utility or other conventional backup. This procedure has been used to provide results for homes located in Phoenix, Arizona, and Madison, Wisconsin, and to evaluate the effects of array and backup power costs and the desirability of selling excess electrical energy back to the utility. (WHK)

Chobotov, V.; Siegel, B.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Cooling-energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test is a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The purpose of the radiant barrier is to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. The radiant barrier works as a system in conjunction with an air space and can theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses that are operated by ORNL. Two variations on the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two different methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption were 17% and 9%, respectively. The electrical consumption data and the cooling load data indicate that the most effective way of installing the foil is to lay it on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barriers reduced the measured peak ceiling heat fluxes by 39% for the case where the barrier was laid on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barrier reduced the integrated heat flows from the attic to the house by approximately 30 to 35% over a 7-day time period.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Solar heating system design package for a single-family residence at William O'Brien State Park, Minnesota  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell, Inc. has undertaken the design, fabrication, installation, and monitoring of a prototype solar heating and hot water system for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' single-family dwelling located at O'Brien State Park, 30 miles east of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Documentation submitted by Honeywell for government review of plans, specifications, cost trade studies and verification status in order to provide the contractor with approval to commit the system to fabrication are included.

Not Available

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Making It Happen: Achieving Energy Efficiency in Multi-Family Buildings Housing Low-Income Tenants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saving energy in multi-family buildings is a comparatively easy task to accomplish in theory: engineering science has shown us how to reduce heatloss and air infiltration, how to balance systems and improve heating plant efficiency, and how to capture warmth from the air, the earth and the sea. But getting this knowledge into multi-family buildings and making them energy efficient in fact is very difficult, especially if those buildings house low-income and elderly tenants, the people for whom saving energy is most urgent. Energy practitioners have found that multifamily building owners are not buying energy efficiency because it is not being marketed intelligently; affordable financing is very difficult to obtain, and energy education tailored to the needs of owners, occupants and maintenance crews is practically unknown. This paper discusses how four non-profit energy companies, located in major cities, overcame these obstacles. It explains how they market energy conservation improvements, how they finance them, and how they involve tenants in energy education; i.e., how they make energy efficiency happen in multifamily buildings.

Haun, C. R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bay Ridge Gardens-Mixed Bay Ridge Gardens-Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit Annapolis, Maryland PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Existing Type: Apartment building: Bay Ridge Gardens Annapolis, MD www.bayridgegardens.com Size: 12 apartment units, 713 ft 2 and 909 ft 2 each Year of construction: 1970s Date completed: 2013 Climate Zone: Mixed-humid PERFORMANCE DATA Pre-retrofit annual energy use (normalized): 28.4 kilowatt-hour per square foot (kWh/ft 2 ) Post-retrofit annual energy use (normalized): 16.3 kWh/ft 2 Percent energy savings: 43% Incremental cost of energy efficiency measures: $85,996 Monetized annual energy savings: $6,900 Savings to Investment Ratio: 1.1 Significant energy savings-43% in this case-are possible in older multifamily

116

Table HC2.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Million U.S. Housing Units Table HC2.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units

117

Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Apartments in Buildings Housing With--Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit ... Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated ...

118

Delaware Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delaware Delaware Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Delaware Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Delaware homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Delaware homeowners will save $10,409 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

119

Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

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Alabama Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Alabama homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Alabama homeowners will save $2,117 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,182 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

120

Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

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Tennessee Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Tennessee homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Tennessee homeowners will save $1,809 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,102 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wisconsin Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WISCONSIN UNIFORM DWELLING CODE WISCONSIN UNIFORM DWELLING CODE Wisconsin Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE WISCONSIN UNIFORM DWELLING CODE Figure 1. Wisconsin Climate Zones Wisconsin Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Wisconsin homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the current Wisconsin state code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Wisconsin homeowners will save $2,484 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $10,733

122

Texas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

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IECC IECC Texas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Texas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Texas homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Texas homeowners will save $3,456 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

123

Alaska Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska Alaska Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Alaska Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Alaska homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Alaska homeowners will save $14,819 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

124

Kentucky Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Kentucky Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Kentucky Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Kentucky homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Kentucky homeowners will save $5,321 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

125

Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Montana Construction Code BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the DC Energy Conservation Code The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Montana homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current Montana Construction Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Montana homeowners will save $4,105 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

126

Indiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indiana Indiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Indiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Indiana homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from Chapter 11 of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Indiana homeowners will save $4,966 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed

127

Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should

128

Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Colorado homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Colorado homeowners will save $1,528 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,435 under the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

129

Measure Guideline: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report was written as a resource for professionals involved in multifamily audits, retrofit delivery, and program design, as well as for building owners and contractors. It is intended to serve as a guide for those looking to evaluate and improve the efficiency and operation of one-pipe steam heating systems. In centrally heated multifamily buildings with steam or hydronic systems, the cost of heat for tenants is typically absorbed into the owner's operating costs. Highly variable and rising energy costs have placed a heavy burden on landlords. In the absence of well-designed and relevant efficiency efforts, increased operating costs would be passed on to tenants who often cannot afford those increases. Misinvestment is a common problem with older heating systems -- multiple contractors may inadequately or inappropriately upgrade parts of systems and reduce system functionality and efficiency, or the system has not been properly maintained.

Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Kansas homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Kansas homeowners will save $2,556 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $8,828 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

131

Oklahoma Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IRC IRC Oklahoma Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IRC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IRC Oklahoma Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IRC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Oklahoma homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from Chapter 11 of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Oklahoma homeowners will save $5,786 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed

132

South Carolina Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

South South Carolina Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC South Carolina Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for South Carolina homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, South Carolina homeowners will save $4,366 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should

133

Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Arizona homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Arizona homeowners will save $3,245 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,550 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

134

Ohio Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ohio Ohio Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Ohio Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Ohio homeowners. . Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Ohio homeowners will save $5,151 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

135

North Dakota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North North Dakota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC North Dakota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for North Dakota homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, North Dakota homeowners will save $2,353 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $8,719 under the 2012 IECC. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed

136

District of Columbia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DC ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE DC ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE District of Columbia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the DC Energy Conservation Code BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE DC ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE District of Columbia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the DC Energy Conservation Code The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for District of Columbia homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current DC Energy Conservation Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, District of Columbia homeowners will save $3,196 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly

137

New Jersey Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jersey Jersey Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC New Jersey Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for New Jersey homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, New Jersey homeowners will save $8,393 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

138

New Mexico Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico Mexico Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC New Mexico Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for New Mexico homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, New Mexico homeowners will save $4,015 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction in energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

139

Connecticut Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

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Connecticut Connecticut Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Connecticut Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Connecticut homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Connecticut homeowners will save $9,903 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should

140

Georgia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

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12 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 GEORGIA ENERGY CODE 12 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 GEORGIA ENERGY CODE Georgia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Georgia Energy Code BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 GEORGIA ENERGY CODE Georgia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Georgia Energy Code The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Georgia homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current Georgia Energy Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Georgia homeowners will save $3,973 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Iowa Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iowa Iowa Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Iowa Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Iowa homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Iowa homeowners will save $7,573 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

142

Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississippi Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Mississippi homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Mississippi homeowners will save $2,022 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,400 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

143

Nevada Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nevada Nevada Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Nevada Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Nevada homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Nevada homeowners will save $4,736 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

144

National Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: A Comparison of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 Editions of the IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 A COMPARISON OF THE 2006, 2009, AND 2012 EDITIONS OF THE IECC National Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: A Comparison of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 Editions of the IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for U.S. homeowners and significant energy savings for the nation. Moving from a baseline of the 2006 IECC to the 2009 IECC reduces average annual energy costs by 10.8%, while moving from the same baseline to the 2012 IECC reduces them by 32.1%. 1 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 7 Marine (C) Dry (B) Moist (A)

145

New Hampshire Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hampshire Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC New Hampshire Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for New Hampshire homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, New Hampshire homeowners will save $10,635 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction in energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should

146

Hawaii Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hawaii Hawaii Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Hawaii Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Hawaii homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Hawaii homeowners will save $8,860 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

147

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam System Balancing Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Location: Chicago, IL Partners: Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Steam heating distribution system and controls Application: Retrofit; Multifamily Year Tested: 2011-2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold humid continental PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $9,000 on average Projected Energy Savings: 10.2% heating savings Chicago's older multifamily housing stock is primarily heated by centrally metered steam or hydronic systems. Often, significant temperature differentials

148

Assessment of National Benefits from Retrofitting Existing Single-Family Homes with Ground Source Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential national benefits of retrofitting U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GSHP systems at various penetration rates. The benefits considered include energy savings, reduced summer electrical peak demand, consumer utility bill savings, and reduced carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The assessment relies heavily on energy consumption and other data obtained from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy s Energy Information Administration. It also considers relative differences in energy consumption between a state-of-the-art GSHP system and existing residential space-heating, space-cooling, and water-heating (SH SC WH) systems, which were determined with a well-established energy analysis program for residential SH SC WH systems. The impacts of various climate and geological conditions, as well as the efficiency and market share of existing residential SH SC WH systems, have been taken into account in the assessment.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the statewide electricity and electric demand savings achieved from the adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for single-family residences in Texas and includes the corresponding increase in construction costs over the eight-year period from 2002 through 2009. Using the Energy Systems Laboratory's International Code Compliance Calculator (IC3) simulation tool, the annual statewide electricity savings in 2009 are estimated to be $161 million. The statewide peak electric demand reductions in 2009 are estimated to be 694 MW for the summer and 766 MW for the winter periods. Since 2002, the cumulative statewide electricity and electric demand savings over the eight year period from 2002 to 2009 are $1,803 million ($776 million from electricity savings and $1,027 million from electric demand savings) while the total increased costs are estimated to be $670 million.

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Solar Energy System Performance Evaluation: May-August 1978. Florida Gas Company, Single Family Residence, Winter Springs, Florida  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief description of the system, which provides thermal energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water heating for a one story single family dwelling, is given. A performance evaluation of the cooling subsystem is presented for the period May through August, 1978. A comparison of measured climatic data with long term average conditions for the vicinity is made. Subsystem performance, including collector array, storage, and space cooling systems, is discussed and design modifications that would improve the system's overall economic performance are considered. Space cooling is provided by an Arkla Model WF-35, 3-ton absorption cycle chiller. A comparison of the present system configuration with a vapor compression air conditioner is presented showing that net savings are realized when the present system is operated solely with solar supplied energy.

Lee, T.D.; McCumber, W.H.; Murphy, L.J.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Preliminary market potential indexing study of the United States for direct gain in new single-family residential construction  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of the market potential for passive solar designs in residential new construction offers an attractive counterpart to the numerous market penetration assessments that have been performed over the last four years. Market penetration analyses have generally concerned themselves with the long run adoption of solar energy technologies, while Market Potential Indexing (MPI) addressed here examines the near-term attractiveness of solar. The MPI method is briefly reviewed, followed by specification of six attributes that may characterize the residential single-family new construction market. Raw attribute data for each of the six is presented for 220 regions within the United States. Attribute weighting functions are constructed from the perspective of consumers, producers or home builders, and the federal government. Preliminary results from these three perspectives are portrayed for a fixed sized direct gain design.

Robson, W.M.; Roach, F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A comparison of central and individual systems for space conditioning and domestic hot water in new multifamily buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report compares the energy performance and life-cycle cost of central and individual heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems as well as domestic hot water (DHW) systems in new multifamily buildings. The different systems were analyzed by using DOE-2.1C to model prototypical apartment buildings in Chicago and Atlanta with Weather Year for Energy Calculation weather data. The building is equipped with either a central chiller and gas-fired boiler, which supply four-pipe fan coils in each apartment, or is conditioned by individual packaged terminal air conditioners in each apartment. The building with central HVAC also has a central, gas-fired domestic hot water system; the building with individual units has electric water heaters in each apartment. The individual systems were modeled with and without a setback thermostat. The use of natural gas for space and water heating and the more efficient central chiller resulted in an annual energy cost savings for the central system in both cities. A life-cycle cost comparison of system types shows that apartment buildings with as few as five units in Chicago and as few as 30 units in Atlanta should be designed with central HVAC and DHW systems.

Byrne, S.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (US)); Fay, J.M. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Rocky Mountain Power - New Homes Program for Builders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Power - New Homes Program for Builders Rocky Mountain Power - New Homes Program for Builders Rocky Mountain Power - New Homes Program for Builders < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''New Construction Whole Home Options''' Home Performance ENERGY STAR Version 3 Certified Home: $500 (Single Family); $200 (Multifamily) ENERGY STAR Version 3 Certified Home: $250 (Single Family); $150 (Multifamily)

154

Energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiant barriers were tested in attics of three unoccupied research houses which are located near Knoxville, Tennessee. The prime purpose of the testing was to determine the interaction, if any, between two types of radiant barriers, horizontal (barrier laid on top of attic insulation) and truss (barrier attached to underside of roof trusses), and three levels of fiberglass-batt attic insulation, R-11, R-19, and R-30. Testing of radiant barriers with R-19 fiberglass-batt attic insulation was done at the houses in the summer of 1985 and in the winter of 1985-86. The R-11 and R-30 testing was done in the summer of 1986. These results showed that horizontal barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing house cooling and heating loads. The summer of 1986 testing showed that increasing the attic insulation from R-11 to R-30 reduced the house cooling load (Btu) by approximately 16%. Adding a horizontal barrier to R-11 also reduced the cooling load compared to R-11 with no barrier by about 16%, while a truss barrier reduced it by 11%. A horizontal barrier with R-30 only reduced the cooling load by 2% compared to R-30 with no barrier, while an increase in the cooling load of 0.7% was measured with a truss barrier and R-30. Radiant barriers were not effective in reducing house cooling loads when R-30 attic insulation was present. The results from the summer of 1985 were integrated into the latest work through the use of a modeling effort using the building load simulation program, DOE-2.1B. This showed that R-19 insulation in conjunction with a horizontal barrier was (for Knoxville) the most effective barrier/insulation combination and could reduce the house cooling load by 25.1% compared to R-11 with no barrier.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Results from Development of Model Specifications for Multifamily Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect

Specifications, modeled after CSI MasterFormat, provide the trade contractors and builders with requirements and recommendations on specific building materials, components and industry practices that comply with the expectations and intent of the requirements within the various funding programs associated with a project. The goal is to create a greater level of consistency in execution of energy efficiency retrofits measures across the multiple regions a developer may work. IBACOS and Mercy Housing developed sample model specifications based on a common building construction type that Mercy Housing encounters.

Brozyna, K.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Building America Expert Meeting Final Report: Multifamily Hydronic and Steam Heating Controls and Distribution Retrofits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydronic Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings Jordan Dentz The ARIES Collaborative October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

157

Evaluation and demonstration of decentralized space and water heating versus centralized services for new and rehabilitated multifamily buildings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The general objective of this research was aimed at developing sufficient technical and economic know-how to convince the building and design communities of the appropriateness and energy advantages of decentralized space and water heating for multifamily buildings. Two main goals were established to guide this research. First, the research sought to determine the cost-benefit advantages of decentralized space and water heating versus centralized systems for multifamily applications based on innovative gas piping and appliance technologies. The second goal was to ensure that this information is made available to the design community.

Belkus, P. [Foster-Miller, Inc., Waltham, MA (US); Tuluca, A. [Steven Winter Associates, Inc., Norwalk, CT (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

SIMULATED BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF SINGLE-FAMILY DETACHED RESIDENCES DESIGNED FOR OFF-GRID, OFF-PIPE OPERATION  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the analysis of energy performance of single-family detached homes in three U.S. climates, in order to determine energy-efficiency measures for minimizing the loads and sizing requirements of renewable energy systems that are essential for its offgrid, off-pipe (i.e., utility-independent) operation. The analysis used a DOE-2.1e simulation model of a 2000/2001 IECC (International Energy Conservation Code) standard house as a base case in three climate locations: Minneapolis, MN, Atlanta, GA, and Phoenix, AZ. This selection of measures and determination of loads for renewable energy systems were accomplished by analyzing the energy use using DOE-2.1e simulations and heating/cooling load components using the Manual J Average Load Procedure. The analysis showed several aspects of building energy performance during different times of the year in terms of available energy resources that are critical for the sizing, utilization, and cost effectiveness of renewable energy systems.

Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; Haberl, Dr. Jeff S. [Texas A& M University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed-Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit  

SciTech Connect

Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost-effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place DER at the Bay Ridge multifamily (MF) development in Annapolis, Maryland. The design and construction phase of the Bay Ridge project was completed in August 2012. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a 'base scope' retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a 'DER scope' which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. The base scope was applied to the entire apartment complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

Lyons, J.; Moore, M.; Thompson, M.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Missouri Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Missouri Missouri Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Missouri homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Missouri homeowners will save $2,229 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $7,826 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Best Way to Meet ASHRAE 62.2 in Multifamily Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BEST WAY TO MEET BEST WAY TO MEET ASHRAE 62.2 IN MULTIFAMILY BUILDINGS Iain Walker (LBNL) Building America Meeting 2013 ASHRAE 62.2 - 2013  Replaced previous 62-89 to be specifically for low-rise (under four story) residential  Under continuous revision  Current version is 2013  Has new section 8 for multi- family  A building = a unit  Applies to all units Local Exhaust  Local exhaust fans must be installed in bathrooms and kitchens  Must exhaust to outside  Bathrooms  50 CFM on-demand, or  20 CFM continuous.  Kitchen  100 CFM on-demand, or  5 ACH continuous, based on kitchen volume. Exception for existing units  Increase whole unit ventilation if lacking kitchen and bathroom exhausts  Missing exhausts are a "deficit"

162

Louisiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Louisiana Louisiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Louisiana homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Louisiana homeowners will save $1,663 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $4,107 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

163

Wyoming Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Wyoming homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Wyoming homeowners will save $1,809 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,441 under the 2012 IECC. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2009 and 2 years with the 2012 IECC. Average

164

Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied. Because there is a lack of empirical evidence documenting the performance of these systems, this paper uses electric consumption data collected from buildings before and after retrofits were performed, and analyzes the cost and consumption savings achieved through installation of Bi-Level Lighting systems. The results of this report demonstrate that common areas that are currently not making use of Bi-Level lighting systems would achieve significant financial and environmental benefits from Bi-Level focused retrofits. This project concludes that building codes should be updated to reflect improvements in Bi-Level Lighting technologies, and that government-sponsored energy efficiency programs should explicitly encourage or mandate Bi-Level Lighting installation components of subsidized retrofit projects.

Ackley, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Efficient Multifamily Homes in a Hot-Humid Climate by Atlantic Housing Partners  

SciTech Connect

With assistance from the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) and its Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Atlantic Housing Partners (AHP) has implemented a high performance, systems engineered package of measures. This report demonstrates how the initiative achieves Building America (BA) goals of 30%-50% energy savings. Specifically, the goals are documented as being achieved in the new construction multifamily housing sector in the hot humid climate. Results from energy modeling of the high performance package are presented. The role of utility allowance calculations, used as part of the low-income housing tax credit process, to value those energy savings is discussed, as is customer satisfaction with heat pump water heaters.

Chasar, D.; Martin, E.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Recommendations for 15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures on Implementing Houston Amendments to Single-Family Buildings in Houston Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents detailed information about the analysis that was performed to calculate the energy saving potential for residential buildings in Houston. In this analysis the energy efficient measures were proposed by the building officials of the City of Houston. Along with the options proposed by the officials, additional measures were selected from the previously-conducted 15% above code energy analysis conducted by the Energy Systems Laboratory for residential houses across the State of Texas. A total of thirty measures were selected based on the energy savings above the base case. These measures were categorized into five groups: Renewable Power Options, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Fenestration, Envelope and Lighting and Domestic Hot Water (DHW) options. The analysis was performed using a simulation model of an International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)-compliant, single family residence in Houston, Texas. Four sets of simulations were considered based on the choice of heating fuel type and thermostat setback: a) natural gas (i.e., gas-fired furnace for space heating, and gas water heater for domestic water heating) with thermostat setback, b) electricity (i.e., heat pump for space heating, and electric water heater for domestic water heating) with thermostat setback, c) natural gas (i.e., gas-fired furnace for space heating, and gas water heater for domestic water heating) without thermostat setback, and d) electricity (i.e., heat pump for space heating, and electric water heater for domestic water heating) without thermostat setback. Individual measures were then categorized into four groups: 2 to 5%, 5 to 10%, and 10 to 15% and above 15% energy savings above base case. Ten grouped measures were then simulated from combining individual measures from the four categories whose combined savings are more than 15% above the base case. The cost of implementation of the individual as well as grouped measures was also calculated along with a simple payback period. The photovoltaic options presented the maximum savings in the approximate range of 15-40% for all base-case houses. The solar thermal option for domestic water heating presented energy savings above 15-20% for all of the base-case houses.

Liu, Z.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Malhotra, M.; Kota, S.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy Conservation Loan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation Loan Conservation Loan Energy Conservation Loan < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate Single family homes (1-4 family units): $25,000 Multi-family (5 or more units): $100,000 Program Info Funding Source Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) State Connecticut Program Type State Loan Program Provider Connecticut Housing Investment Fund Energy Conservation Loans for single families are available through the Connecticut Housing Investment Fund, Inc. (CHIF) to owners of one- to

168

Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5, Boulder, Colorado (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of a Multifamily Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5 Boulder, Colorado PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Evaluation of a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, CO Location: Boulder, CO Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings www.carb-swa.com Building Component: Building envelope, lighting, appliances, water conservation Application: Retrofit Years Tested: 2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold, very cold PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $3,300-$6,100 per unit with total complex cost estimate of ~$150,000 Projected Energy Savings: 27%-41% depending on unit location/orientation Projected Energy Cost Savings: $154-$304 utility savings per year In 2009, a 37-unit apartment complex located in Boulder, Colorado, underwent

169

City of Palo Alto Utilities - Solar Water Heating Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Water Heating Program Solar Water Heating Program City of Palo Alto Utilities - Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-family residential gas-displacing systems: $2,719 Single-family residential electricity or propane-displacing systems: $1,834 Commercial/Industrial/Multi-family: $100,000 One contractor can have no more than $150,000 in incentive reservations at any given time. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Single-family residential gas-displacing systems: $18.59 per therm displaced Single-family residential electricity or propane-displacing systems: $$0.54 per kWh displaced Multi-family and commercial gas-displacing systems: $14.53 per therm

170

In Proc. 1996 ACEEE Summer Study, August 1996, Asilomar, CA. Energy Effectiveness of Duct Sealing and Insulation in Two Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Duct Sealing and Insulation in Two Multifamily Buildings Iain S. Walker, Mark P. Modera, Adrian Tuluca forced air distribution systems have a significant impact on the energy efficiency of buildings. Little work has been done to quantify these losses in apartment buildings. In this paper we will discuss field

171

Design, development and testing of a solar-powered multi-family residential-size prototype turbocompressor heat pump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental program was conducted to further define, improve and demonstrate the performance characteristics and operational features of an existing 18-ton solar-powered prototype heat pump. The prototype heat pump is nominally sized for multi-family residential applications and provides both space heating and cooling. It incorporates a turbocompressor specially designed to operate at peak temperatures consistent with medium concentration collectors. The major efforts in this program phase included modification and improvement of the instrumentation sensors, the laboratory simulation equipment and selected heat pump components. After implementing these modifications, performance testing was conducted for a total operating time of approximately 250 hours. Experimental test results compared favorably with performance data calculated using the UTRC computer prediction program for the same boundary conditions. A series of tests was conducted continuously over a 12-h period to simulate operation (in the cooling mode) of the prototype heat pump under conditions typical of an actual installation. The test demonstrated that the heat pump could match the cooling load profile of a multi-family residential building. During the system performance testing, sufficient data were taken to identify the performance of each of the major components (e.g. turbine, compressor, heat exchangers, R11 pump). Component performance is compared with that calculated using the UTRC computer predict program and with data supplied by their manufacturers. The performance capabilities of the prototype heat pump system have been documented and recommendations are made for further design improvements which could be included in a MOD-2 configuration. The MOD-2 configuration would incorporate features that would improve system performance, reduce capital cost and most importantly improve system reliability.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Monitoring and evaluation of replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency air conditioners in single-family detached houses in Austin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE initiated this project to evaluate the performance of an air conditioner retrofit program in Austin, Texas. The City's Austin's Resource Management Department pursued this project to quantify the retrofit effect of replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency air conditioners in single-family detached homes. If successfully implemented, this retrofit program could help defer construction of a new power plant which is a major goal of this department. The project compares data collected from 12 houses during two cooling seasons under pre-retrofit and then post-retrofit air conditioner units. The existing low-efficiency air conditioners were monitored during the 1987 cooling season, replaced during the 1987--88 heating season with new, smaller sized, high-efficiency units, and then monitored again during the 1988 cooling season. Results indicated that the air conditioner retrofits reduce the annual air conditioner electric consumption and peak electric demand by an average of 38%. When normalized to the nominal capacity of the air conditioner, average demand savings were 1.12 W/ft{sup 2} and estimated annual energy savings were 1.419 kWh/ft{sup 2}. Individual air conditioner power requirements were found to be a well defined function of outdoor temperature as expected. In the absence of detailed data, estimates of the peak demand reductions of new air conditioners can be made from the manufacturer's specifications. Air conditioner energy consumption proved to be strongly linear as a function of the outdoor temperature as expected when taken as an aggregate. No noticeable differences in the diversity factor of the air conditioner usage were found. Analysis of the retrofit effect using PRISM yields estimates of the reduction in normalized annual consumption (NAC) and annual cooling consumption of 12% and 30%. 2 refs., 11 figs., 17 tabs.

Burns, R.; Hough, R.E. (Fleming (W.S.) and Associates, Inc., Syracuse, NY (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Detailed Analysis of Thermal Mass Effects in a Code-Traceable DOE-2 Simulation of the 2000 IECC for a Single-Family Residence in Texas: A Project for Texas' Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Nonattainment and Affected Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the thermal mass effects in a code-traceable DOE-2 simulation of the 2000 IECC (International Energy Conservation Code) for a single-family residence in Texas. This report is composed of two major simulations: 1) the simulation according to the location of the insulation of IECC2000, and 2) the simulation according to the types of real brick and block walls which are practically used at the residential house. In this study, the 2000 IECC was used to develop the base case simulation model in Houston, Texas. The DOE-2 energy simulation program was used to analyze changes to the annual energy use caused by changing various building materials. The best energy conservative material layout was then chosen that contained reduced annual energy use, peak cooling and heating loads, and peak day electricity use.

Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

174

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Exterior Wall Insulation: $350 (single family), $150 (multifamily) Windows: $2.50/sq. ft. Gas Furnace: $200 - $400 Gas Storage Water Heater: $50-$100 Gas Condensing Water Heater: $350 Gas Boiler: $400 -$600 Tankless Gas Water Heater: $350 Single Family Homes (New Construction): $50 - $500 Multifamily Homes (New Construction): $50 - $300/unit

175

California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program California Solar Initiative - Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-Family Low-Income: $3,750 Multi-Family Low-Income: $500,000 Program Info Funding Source Ratepayer Funds Start Date 3/29/2012 State California Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Step 1 Incentive Rates (contact utility to determine current incentive levels): Single-Family Low-Income: $25.64 per therm displaced Multi-Family Low-Income: $19.23 per therm displaced The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) voted in October 2011 to

176

Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

single-family, multi-family and manufactured homes, with the exception of heat pump and air sealing rebates, which are not offered to multi-family homes. Some measures vary by...

177

South River EMC - Energy Star Homes Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South River EMC - Energy Star Homes Rebate Program South River EMC - Energy Star Homes Rebate Program South River EMC - Energy Star Homes Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Single-Family Homes New Energy Star Home (Builder): $400 New Energy Star Home (Resident): $350 - $750 Multi-Family Homes New Energy Star Multi-Family Apartments (Builder): $375/unit New Energy Star Multi-Family Condominiums (Builder): $200/unit New Energy Star Multi-Family Condominiums (Owner): $175/unit Manufactured Homes New Energy Star Manufactured Home (Owner): $400 Provider South River EMC South River EMC offers incentives to home buyers and builders who purchase

178

Energy Efficiency Report: Chapter 3: Residential Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. The Residential Sector Introduction. More than 90 million single-family, multifamily, and mobile home households encompass the residential sector.

179

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Grant Recipient Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Single family & Multifamily), Commercial (small and large), Agriculture Residential (SF & MF), Commercial (small food service) Leverage 5:1 target 10:1 target Building Energy...

180

Four Most Populous States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Number of households: 7 million Portion of all U.S. households: 7% Single-family homes: 75% Multifamily dwellings: 21% Mobile homes: 4% Owner-occupied ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy and Ventilation Research in Highrise Apartments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the percent of household income spent for energy-is several times higher for these households than for single-family households. Historically, multifamily buildings have been the...

182

Questar Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programs (Idaho) Programs (Idaho) Questar Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Limit of one rebate per appliance type Duct Sealing/Insulation: $450 (Single Family); $250 (Multifamily) Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $200-$400 Solar Assisted Water Heater: $750 Storage Water Heater: $50-$100 Gas Condensing/Hybrid Water Heater: $350 Tankless Water Heater: $300-$350 Boiler: $400 - $600 Solar Hot Water Heater: $750 Gas Clothes Washer: $50

183

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) June 28, 2013 1 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this environmental assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings". The Final Rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 433 to the latest private sector standard based on cost-effectiveness and DOE's determination that energy efficiency has

184

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) June 28, 2013 1 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this environmental assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings". The Final Rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 433 to the latest private sector standard based on cost-effectiveness and DOE's determination that energy efficiency has

185

Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit: Annapolis, Maryland. Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost-effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place DER at the Bay Ridge multifamily (MF) development in Annapolis, Maryland. The design and construction phase of the Bay Ridge project was completed in August 2012. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a "base scope" retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a "DER scope" which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. The base scope was applied to the entire apartment complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

Not Available

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Murfreesboro Electric Department - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Murfreesboro Electric Department - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Murfreesboro Electric Department - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Murfreesboro Electric Department - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Single-Family Homes: $1,500 Multi-Family Homes: Up to $100 per unit Water Heater: $25 - $100 Provider Murfreesboro Electric Department Murfreesboro Electric Department, in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers incentives to home builders and homeowners for the

187

Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization: $2,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Weatherization - Single Family: 75% of cost Weatherization - Multi-Family: 50% of cost Weatherization - Low-Income: 100% of cost Furnaces: $500 - $800 Boilers: $1,000 - $1,500 Combined Boiler/Water Heater: $1,200

188

City of Tallahassee Utilities - Energy Star Certified New Homes Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tallahassee Utilities - Energy Star Certified New Homes Tallahassee Utilities - Energy Star Certified New Homes Rebate Program City of Tallahassee Utilities - Energy Star Certified New Homes Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate $2,000 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1 per square foot Provider City of Tallahassee Utilities The City of Tallahassee Utilities offers a rebate of $1 per square foot (up to $2,000) for ENERGY STAR qualified new homes. Qualifying housing types include single-family detached, single-family attached, low-rise multifamily, and existing-home renovations. To earn the ENERGY STAR, a home

189

ENERGY STAR Homes Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENERGY STAR Homes Program ENERGY STAR Homes Program ENERGY STAR Homes Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate Single-Family: $26,000 per unit Multiple Single-Family (townhomes): $17,000 per unit Multi-Family Buildings: $12,000 per unit Program Info Funding Source New Jersey Societal Benefits Charge (public benefits fund) State New Jersey Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by efficiency level and type of residence Provider New Jersey Clean Energy Program : Note: The Smart Growth requirement for incentive eligibility has been removed in areas affected by Hurricane Sandy, for projects enrolled from

190

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-family unit: $2,000 Two- to three-family units: $4,000 Multi-family units (four or more): $10,000 Businesses: $25,000 Program Info Start Date 03/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% of costs Provider Minnesota Power Minnesota Power offers a 25% rebate for qualifying solar thermal water heating systems. The maximum award for single-family customers is $2,000 per customer; $4,000 for 2-3 family unit buildings; $10,000 for buildings

191

Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficient New Homes Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficient New Homes Program Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficient New Homes Program Cumberland EMC - Energy Efficient New Homes Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Single Family Home greater than 1,500 square feet: $500 Single Family Home less than 1,500 square feet: $200 Multi-Family Home: $100 Provider Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (CEMC), in collaboration with [http://www.tva.gov/ The Tennessee Valley Authority] provides a financial incentive for its customers to build new energy efficient homes through the

192

Made in Minnesota Solar Thermal Rebate | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Made in Minnesota Solar Thermal Rebate Made in Minnesota Solar Thermal Rebate Made in Minnesota Solar Thermal Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Buying & Making Electricity Commercial Heating & Cooling Maximum Rebate Single-Family Residential: $2,500 Multi-Family Residential: $5,000 Commercial: $25,000 Program Info Start Date 1/1/2014 Expiration Date 12/31/2023 State Minnesota Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% Provider Minnesota Department of Commerce Beginning in 2014, the Department of Commerce will offer a Made in Minnesota Solar Thermal Rebate program. Rebates are 25% of installed costs, with a $2,500 maximum for residential systems, $5,000 maximum for multi-family residential systems, and $25,000 for commercial systems.

193

Energy Smart Multifamily Performance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Note: The eligible technologies listed above are only examples of some improvements/installations that may supported under the program. For any given project, the supported measures will vary based...

194

SDG&E- New Construction Advanced Homes Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

SDG&E offers an incentive for home builders to build homes which exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new construction projects. A...

195

--No Title--  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 2010 New Homes CompletedPlaced, by Census Region (Thousand Units and Percent of Total Units) Region Single-Family Multi-Family Mobile Homes Total Northeast 54 11% 26 17% 4 8% 84...

196

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Heating; Preliminary Release Date: ... Total Square Footage of Single-Family Homes (HC10.6) XLS: Total Square Footage of Multi-Family Homes (HC10.7) XLS:

197

Comparative analysis of energy consumption trends in cohousing and alternate housing arrangements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sizes of both single-family and multifamily homes have grown steadily in the United States over the last fifty years. During this time, despite more efficient production processes, energy consumption in the country ...

Brown, Jason R. (Jason Robert), 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Data:D579708f-3772-4ac9-a56e-43c0cd2b1e3c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use in single-family dwellings and individually metered multi-family dwellings. If annual energy usage exceeds 15,000 kWh, the customer may elect to be served under the Residential...

199

--No Title--  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 Characteristics of U.S. Housing by Vintage, as of 2005 Share of Average Home Size (square feet) (1) Vintage US Housing Stock Single Family Multi-Family Mobile Home Prior to 1950...

200

Columbia Rural Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ductless Heat Pump (with Zonal Electric): 1,000 Geothermal Heat Pump: 1,500 Attic Insulation (Single Family): 0.05 - 0.85sq. ft. Attic Insulation (Multi-Family): 0.11 -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Modesto Irrigation District - New Home Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modesto Irrigation District - New Home Energy Efficiency Rebate Modesto Irrigation District - New Home Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Modesto Irrigation District - New Home Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Single-Family Dwelling: $500 Multi-Family Dwelling: $250 Provider Energy Management Department Modesto Irrigation District's MPower New Home Program provides incentives to builders and homeowners for designing and building energy-efficient homes. Eligible homes must meet the guidelines for California Energy Star Qualified New Homes, listed on the program application. Each qualified new

202

Renewable Energy Systems Exemption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Exemption Systems Exemption Renewable Energy Systems Exemption < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Home Weatherization Water Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate Based on investment of $20,000 for single family, and on investment of $100,000 for multi-family, non-residential. Program Info State Montana Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% for 10 years. Provider Montana Department of Revenue Montana's property tax exemption for recognized non-fossil forms of energy generation or low emission wood or biomass combustion devices may be

203

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Eagle County In an effort to reduce county-wide energy consumption and improve the environment, Eagle County established their own efficient building code (ECO-Green Build) which applies to all new construction and renovations/additions over 50% of the existing floor area of single-family and multifamily residences, and commercial buildings.

204

Property:Distributed Generation/Site Description | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation/Site Description Generation/Site Description Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. The allowed values for this property are: Agricultural Commercial-Hotel Commercial-Ice Arena Commercial-High Rise Office Commercial-Low Rise Office Commercial-Refrigerated Warehouse Commercial-Restaurant Commercial-Retail Store Commercial-Supermarket Commercial-Theater Commercial-Other Institutional-Hospital/Health Care Institutional-Nursing Home Institutional-School/University Institutional-Other Residential-Multifamily-Single Building Residential-Multifamily-Multibuilding Residential-Single Family Industrial-Food Processing Industrial-Plastics Processing Industrial-Wood Products Industrial-Other Testing Laboratory Water Utility Other Utility Other Pages using the property "Distributed Generation/Site Description"

205

City of Madison - Green Madison Residential Revolving Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Madison - Green Madison Residential Revolving Loan Program City of Madison - Green Madison Residential Revolving Loan Program City of Madison - Green Madison Residential Revolving Loan Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Other Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $15,000 Program Info Start Date 2011 State Wisconsin Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000-$15,000 Provider City of Madison Green Madison is a revolving loan program for residential energy efficiency improvements. Loans are available for owner-occupied single family residences or owner-occupied multi-family residences of up to three units. Property must be located within the City of Madison. To sign up for the program, interested residents should use the sign up form on the program

206

Electric Power Board of Chattanooga - Energy Efficient New Homes Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Power Board of Chattanooga - Energy Efficient New Homes Electric Power Board of Chattanooga - Energy Efficient New Homes Program for Builders and Developers Electric Power Board of Chattanooga - Energy Efficient New Homes Program for Builders and Developers < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Utility Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to $1,900 Provider Electric Power Board of Chattanooga The Electric Power Board of Chattanooga, in collaboration with the [http://www.tva.gov Tennessee Valley Authority], offers an incentive to builders and developers of single-family and multi-family homes to build

207

Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Program Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate Single family, duplex, or triplex: $960 per unit Multi-family dwelling (four or more units): $480 per unit. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Weatherization: 80% of the cost Do-It-Yourself Weatherization: 70% of the cost Provider Alameda Municipal Power Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) offers a grant to help its residential customers who have electric heat weatherize homes to increase efficiency.

208

City of Milwaukee Energy Efficiency (Me2) - Revolving Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milwaukee Energy Efficiency (Me2) - Revolving Loan Program Milwaukee Energy Efficiency (Me2) - Revolving Loan Program City of Milwaukee Energy Efficiency (Me2) - Revolving Loan Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Other Maximum Rebate $15,000 Program Info Funding Source The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) of 2009; State Energy Program Start Date 2011 State Wisconsin Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000-$15,000 Provider City of Milwaukee Milwaukee Energy Efficiency is a revolving loan program for residential energy efficiency improvements. Loans are available for owner-occupied single family residences or owner-occupied multi-family residences of up to three units. Property must be located within the City of Milwaukee. To sign up for the program, interested residents should use the sign up form on the

209

Residential Enhanced Rewards Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Enhanced Rewards Program Residential Enhanced Rewards Program Residential Enhanced Rewards Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Program Info Funding Source Focus on Energy Expiration Date 05/31/2013 State Wisconsin Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Furnace: $475 Furnace with ECM (natural gas, propane, or oil-fired): $850 Hot-Water Boiler ( Natural Gas Furnace with AC: $1,500 Provider Focus on Energy Focus on Energy offers incentives for income-qualifying customers for the purchase of high efficiency heating equipment. Owner-occupied single-family and multifamily residences of 3 units or less are eligible for the incentives. Applicants must be able to document a gross household income of

210

Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Design & Remodeling Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Home Energy Survey: Free A/C and Heat Pump: $140 - $1930, depending on system size and efficiency rating Reflective Roof (Metal or Tile): $325 Duct Test: Discounted Single Family Duct System Repair: up to $154 Multi-family and Manufactured Home Duct System Repair: $60/account Ceiling and Roof Insulation: varies based upon existing insulation levels

211

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

212

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

213

California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Maximum Rebate Step 1 Incentive Limits (contact utility to determine current incentive limits): Single-family residential systems that displace natural gas: $2,719 Single-family residential systems that displace electricity or propane: $1,834 Commercial and multifamily residential systems that displace natural gas: $500,000 Commercial and multifamily residential systems that displace electricity or propane: $250,000

214

Solar heating and cooling system design and development (status summay through December 1977)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program scope is to develop, fabricate, install, and monitor the operation of prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Application studies have been completed for three application categories: single-family residential, multi-family residential, and commercial. The program currently consists of development of heating and cooling euipment for single-family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling). Four are single-family residences and four are commercial buildings.

Not Available

1978-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

215

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home Energy Management DIY Do-It-Yourself HERS Homeare completed. Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Improvements. About oneand financial incentives for DIY improvements. Flexible

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AHPwES - Assisted Home Performance with ENERGY STAR AMI - Area Median Income APS - Arizona Public Service ARRA - American Reinvestment and Recovery Act ASEC - Annual Social and...

217

HECM Single Family Portfolio Snapshot | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the lender up to the maximum claim amount. The loan amount is based on borrower age, home value, and current interest rates. The HECM data files provide loan-level records...

218

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New...

219

Modeling contaminant exposure in a single-family house  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New, stricter building codes for energy conservation mandates tighter building construction, which directly reduces the amount of available fresh air from infiltration. This decrease in fresh air is a subject of intensive ...

Huang, Jeffrey M., 1977-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC replacement, air sealing, duct sealing, additionaltoday for example, air sealing and climate-appropriatesome combination of air sealing, insulation, lighting

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/COB_rebates_8.2.11.PDS/rentalhousing/Energy_Efficiency_Project/SmartRegs_Final_s residential energy efficiency loan program November 2010-

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

in the U.S. Single Family Residential Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in the Internal Revenue Code create and remove tax-induced trading constraints on homeowners. For example, the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 replaced a one-time, post-55 capital gain exclusion with a larger gain exclusion option that could be exercised every two years. We develop a simple demand-based model of housing turnover and use it to determine whether the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 led to changes in the percentage of the existing housing stock that was sold in the U.S. and the four geographic regions defined by the U.S. Census Bureau (Northeast, Midwest, South and West). Preliminary results indicate that national and regional turnover measures began to rise immediately after the passage of the 1997 legislation. Given that housing supply is relatively inelastic, at least in the short-run, and that increased demand must drive up prices when supply is constrained, the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 may have been one of the sources of the initial price appreciation that led to the Housing Bubble and the related Sub-Prime Mortgage Crisis. If so, the seeds of these unfortunate events were sown much earlier than is generally realized. The Impact of the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 on Housing Turnover

Andrea J. Heuson; David Ling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE), Weatherization andand Roya Stanley (DOE EERE) for their support of thisfor Humanity International DOE EERE Department of Energy

Zimring, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

California Solar Initiative - Single-Family Affordable Solar...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) program eligibility. (see below) The California Solar Initiative (CSI) provides financial incentives for installing solar technologies...

225

Projecting market demand for residential heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

Primarily because of technological improvements and sharp increases in energy prices after the 1970s energy crises, the sale of residential electric heat pumps rose ninefold from 1970 to 1983. This report describes current and future market demand for heat pumps used for space heating and cooling. A three-step approach was followed. In the first step, the historical growth of residential electric heat pumps was analyzed, and factors that may have affected market growth were examined. Also examined were installation trends of heat pumps in new single-family and multifamily homes. A market segmentation analysis was used to estimate market size by categories. In the second step, several methods for forecasting future market demand were reviewed and evaluated to select the most suitable one for this study. The discrete-choice approach was chosen. In the third step, a market penetration model based on selected discrete-choice methods was developed to project heat pump demand in key market segments such as home type (single-family or multifamily), new or existing construction, and race-ethnic origin of household (black, Hispanic, or white).

Teotia, A.P.S.; Raju, P.S.; Karvelas, D.; Anderson, J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

New and retrofit solar hot water installations in Florida, January--June 1977  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to ascertain the number of solar hot water installations in new buildings versus the number retrofitted to existing buildings in Florida during the January to June period of 1977. The methodology was to survey all installations started, in progress, or completed during that period. A by-product of the survey is a comprehensive list of manufacturers and another of distributors and installers in Florida. The survey excludes space heating and cooling and pool heating applications. However, the latter is being considered for a separate survey. Installations included are in the single-family and multi-family residential, commercial, industrial and public sectors. In the single-family residential sector, care has been taken to determine a new or retrofit breakdown, average square footage of collector per installation, average cost per square foot of collector in Florida, and subsequently, using F-CHART and system sizing programs developed at the Center, the fraction of load supplied by solar and its equivalent barrels of oil saved per year. In the multi-family residential, commercial, industrial and public sectors, specific information on each installation has been provided. This information includes new or retrofit, ownership, type of collector and manufacturer, square footage of installation, design percentage energy by solar, suxiliary fuel, system cost, and federal grants, if any.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Home Performance with Energy Star Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Program Loan Program Rebate Amount Energy Savings From 10% - 19.99%: $2,000 and 0% loan up to $5,000 where utility loans are not available (single-family); $500/unit (multi-family) Energy Savings From 20% - 24.99%: $4,000 and 0% loan up to $10,000 where utility loans are not available (single-family); $1,000 per unit (multi-family) Energy Savings Greater than 25%: $5,000 and 0% interest loan up to $10,000 where utility loans are not available (single family); $1,500 per unit (multi-family) Provider c/o Honeywell The New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (NJ BPU) offers a Home Performance with Energy Star Program for residents that want to improve the energy efficiency of their homes. The program is set up to provide incentives that lower the ultimate cost to consumers for the installation of energy

228

Home Performance with Energy Star Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Program Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Savings From 10% - 19.99%: $2,000 and 0% loan up to $5,000 where utility loans are not available (single-family); $500/unit (multi-family) Energy Savings From 20% - 24.99%: $4,000 and 0% loan up to $10,000 where utility loans are not available (single-family); $1,000 per unit (multi-family) Energy Savings Greater than 25%: $5,000 and 0% interest loan up to $10,000 where utility loans are not available (single family); $1,500 per unit (multi-family) Provider c/o Honeywell The New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (NJ BPU) offers a Home Performance with Energy Star Program for residents that want to improve the energy efficiency of their homes. The program is set up to provide incentives that lower the ultimate cost to consumers for the installation of energy

229

Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily Buildings Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Foundation Retrofits Foundation Retrofits Building America Webinar November 30, 2011 Kohta Ueno Hybrid Foundation Retrofits 2 Background Hybrid Foundation Retrofits 3 Background  Space conditioning energy use for basements  Known moisture-safe solutions (previous research)  Persistent bulk water (leakage) issues  Retrofits of existing foundations  Especially uneven wall (rubble stone) foundations  "Hybrid" insulation and bulk water control assemblies Hybrid Foundation Retrofits 4 Foundations w. bulk water issues  Severe and rapid damage to interior insulation and finishes due to bulk water intrusion Hybrid Foundation Retrofits 5 Insulation Location Choices * Retrofits: interior insulation is often the only

230

APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program (Arizona) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CustomOthers pending approval, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Refrigerators, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

231

Multifamily Apartment Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Amount Refrigerators: 250 per refrigerator Ventilation Systems: 110 per fan Boilers: 2 per MBh Furnaces: 2 per MBh Free Products: CFLs and Low-flow Shower Heads and...

232

Efficiency Maine Multifamily Efficiency Program (Maine) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeasuresWhole Building Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Amount Upon approval of Energy Reduction...

233

Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily Buildings Webinar...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Slides from the Building America webinar on November 30, 2011. webinarhybridinsulation20111130.pdf...

234

Table HC2.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Type of Housing ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas ... Home Appliances Characteristics Detached Attached 2 to 4 Units Mobile Homes Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings

235

Award Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Awards Team (505) 667-7824 Email Types of Awards The Awards...

236

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

237

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

238

Mixed strategies for energy conservation and alternative energy utilization (solar) in buildings. Final report. Volume III. Appendixes. [10 appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix summarizes building characteristics used to determine heating and cooling loads for each of the five building types in each of the four regions. For the selected five buildings, the following data are attached: new and existing construction characteristics; new and existing construction thermal resistance; floor plan and elevation; people load schedule; lighting load schedule; appliance load schedule; ventilation schedule; and hot water use schedule. For the five building types (single family, apartment buildings, commercial buildings, office buildings, and schools), data are compiled in 10 appendices. These are Building Characteristics; Alternate Energy Sources and Energy Conservation Techniques Description, Costs, Fuel Price Scenarios; Life Cycle Cost Model; Simulation Models; Solar Heating/Cooling System; Condensed Weather; Single and Multi-Family Dwelling Characteristics and Energy Conservation Techniques; Mixed Strategies for Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy Utilization in Buildings. An extensive bibliography is given in the final appendix. (MCW)

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Melanin Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melanin Types Melanin Types Name: Irfan Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are different types of melanins? And what are the functions of these types? Replies: Hi Irfan! Melanin is a dark compound or better a photoprotective pigment. Its major role in the skin is to absorb the ultraviolet (UV) light that comes from the sun so the skin is not damaged. Sun exposure usually produces a tan at the skin that represents an increase of melanin pigment in the skin. Melanin is important also in other areas of the body, as the eye and the brain., but it is not completely understood what the melanin pigment does in these areas. Melanin forms a special cell called melanocyte. This cell is found in the skin, in the hair follicle, and in the iris and retina of the eye.

240

Type systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of type systems has emerged as one of the most active areas of research in programming languages, with applications in software engineering, language design, high-performance compiler implementation, and security. This chapter discusses the ...

Benjamin C. Pierce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SoCalGas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Programs Rebate Programs SoCalGas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Program Info Start Date 1/1/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $35 Dishwasher: $30 Storage Water Heater: $30 or $75 (.62 EF) Gas Furnace: $200 Attic and Wall Insulation: $0.15/sq. ft. Tankless Water Heater: $300 or $400 Provider Southern California Gas Company The Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) Home Energy Efficiency Rebate Program offers cash rebates on qualifying energy-efficiency upgrades or improvements made to single family homes, multi-family apartments, or

242

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

243

City of San Francisco - Residential Efficiency Rebates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Francisco - Residential Efficiency Rebates Francisco - Residential Efficiency Rebates City of San Francisco - Residential Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Maximum Rebate $5,000 Program Info Funding Source PG&E, ARRA State California Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Upgrade: 15% energy reduction: $1,500 20% energy reduction: $2,000 25% energy reduction: $2,500 30% energy reduction: $3,000 35% energy reduction: $3,500 40% energy reduction: $4,000 Lower Income Households: Bonus $1,000 Single family homeowners in San Francisco's PG&E territory can receive

244

Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Home Energy Assessment/Weatherization: $2,000 Income Eligible Weatherization Measures: $2,000 - $3,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Assessment/Weatherization: 75% Single Family Energy Star Home: $750 - $8,000 Multi-Family Energy Star Home: $350 - $4,000/unit Income Eligible Weatherization Measures: 100% of cost

245

Sustainable Energy Utility - D.C. Home Performance (District of Columbia) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D.C. Home Performance (District of D.C. Home Performance (District of Columbia) Sustainable Energy Utility - D.C. Home Performance (District of Columbia) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Other Program Info Start Date 06/14/2012 State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $500 The District of Columbia Sustainable Energy Utility currently offers the D.C. Home Performance program (DCHP). DCHP provides a $500 incentive to properties which successfully complete qualifying home energy upgrades. This incentive is available to D.C. residents living in single-family homes, rowhomes (each unit is ground to sky) or converted (1 to 4 unit) apartments and rowhomes. Both owner-occupied homes and rental properties with the property owners' authorization are eligible to participate.

246

National Energy Audit (NEAT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Energy Audit (NEAT) National Energy Audit (NEAT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National Energy Audit Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/tools_directory/software.cfm/ID=304/pa Cost: Free Language: English References: http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/tools_directory/software.cfm/ID=304/pagename=alpha_list Logo: National Energy Audit The computer program is designed for use by State agencies and utilities to determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for single-family and small multi-family site-built homes to increase the energy efficiency and

247

Assisted Home Performance Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assisted Home Performance Grants Assisted Home Performance Grants Assisted Home Performance Grants < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Commercial Lighting Lighting Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-family: $5,000 Multi-family (2-4 units): $10,000 per building Program Info Funding Source Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) State New York Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount 50% of costs Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority The Assisted Home Performance Program provides grants to low-income home owners in 1-4 family buildings for up to 50% of costs for energy efficient

248

Missouri Gas Energy (MGE) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Gas Energy (MGE) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Missouri Gas Energy (MGE) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Missouri Gas Energy (MGE) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Maximum Rebate Total Incentives: $600 ($1200 with KCP&L rebate) Wall Insulation: $600 Floor Insulation: $400 Attic Insulation: $500 Air Sealing: $400 Duct Sealing: $200 Window or Door: $400 Program Info Funding Source MGE State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Single Family Energy Assessment: $400/unit Multi Family Energy Assessment: $200/unit Attic Insulation: $0.01-$0.02 x R-Value Added x sq. ft.

249

Kansas City Power and Light - ENERGY STAR New Homes Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas City Power and Light - ENERGY STAR New Homes Rebate Program Kansas City Power and Light - ENERGY STAR New Homes Rebate Program Kansas City Power and Light - ENERGY STAR New Homes Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Maximum Rebate KCP&L ENERGY STAR New Construction: $600 MGE ENERGY STAR New Construction: $600 Insulation: $400-$600 Air Sealing: $400 Duct Sealing: $200 Program Info Funding Source KCP&L and MGE State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Upgrade to a High-Efficiency Cooling System: $850 Single Family Energy Assessment: $400/unit

250

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Rehab Advisor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rehab Advisor Rehab Advisor Rehab Advisor logo. Designed to help homeowners, contractors, architects, housing authorities, development agencies, facility managers and others to improve energy efficiency in existing residences during renovation and remodeling. In six clicks the Rehab Advisor provides recommendations for cost-effectively increasing the energy efficiency of a typical renovation project in single-family or multifamily housing. These recommendations are based on the building type, location, and specific project � and they are free. Rehab Advisor is the simplest tool available for estimating the costs and savings of incorporating cost-effective energy efficiency improvements into remodeling projects. The user does not have to do any computer modeling or other calculations. And, unlike any other user-friendly tool, the Rehab

251

"Table HC2.1 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, By Housing Unit Type, 2009"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, By Housing Unit Type, 2009" Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, By Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,,,"2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" ,,"Detached","Attached" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.8,10.9,1.8,3.1,4.4,0.5 "New England",5.5,3.1,0.3,1,1,0.1 "Middle Atlantic",15.3,7.8,1.5,2.1,3.4,0.4 "Midwest",25.9,18,1.2,1.9,3.7,1.1

252

Solar heating and cooling systems design and development. Quarterly report, 9 October 1976-9 January 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell is to develop twelve prototype solar heating/cooling systems. Six of these are to be heating and six are to be heating/cooling systems, two each for single family, multi-family, and commercial applications. Schedules and technical discussions are given, along with illustrations on the progress made from October 9, 1976 through January 9, 1977.

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Residential Building Stockg Assessment (RBSA)for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/4/2013 1 Residential Building Stockg Assessment (RBSA)for Multi-Family Housing Tom Eckman Objectives Characterize Residential Sector Building Stock ­ Single Family (Four-plex and below) l if il ( i Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey (PNWRES92)Survey (PNWRES92) NEEA Survey of Baseline

254

Life-cycle cost analysis project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to demonstrate the impact of life-cycle costing in Ohio's residential building sector. Typical single-family, townhouse, and multifamily housing units were modeled using sophisticated computer programs to predict annual energy comsumption. Energy conservation techniques were applied to the typical units and the resulting utility savings were computed. Installed costs were estimated for each energy conservation technique.

Davies, G.R.; Temming, S.J.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.9 Low-Income Housing  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Level and Weatherization Eligibility (Millions) Single-Family Multi-Family Unit Mobile Home 2005 Household Income Own Rent Own Rent Own Rent Less than 15,000 6.1 2.4 0.3 7.1 1.6...

256

Type: Renewal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 INCITE Awards 1 INCITE Awards Type: Renewal Title: -Ab Initio Dynamical Simulations for the Prediction of Bulk Properties‖ Principal Investigator: Theresa Windus, Iowa State University Co-Investigators: Brett Bode, Iowa State University Graham Fletcher, Argonne National Laboratory Mark Gordon, Iowa State University Monica Lamm, Iowa State University Michael Schmidt, Iowa State University Scientific Discipline: Chemistry: Physical INCITE Allocation: 10,000,000 processor hours Site: Argonne National Laboratory Machine (Allocation): IBM Blue Gene/P (10,000,000 processor hours) Research Summary: This project uses high-quality electronic structure theory, statistical mechanical methods, and

257

Bacteria Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria Types Bacteria Types Name: Evelyn Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What is the significance of S. marcescens,M.luteus, S.epidermidis, and E. Coli? Which of these are gram-positive and gram-negative, and where can these be found? Also, what problems can they cause? When we culture these bacteria, we used four methods: plates, broth, slants, and pour plates. The media was made of TSB, TSA, NAP, and NAD. What is significant about these culturing methods? Replies: I could give you the answer to that question but it is more informative, and fun, to find out yourself. Start with the NCBI library online (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) and do a query with the species name, and 'virulence' if you want to know what they're doing to us. Have a look at the taxonomy devision to see how they are related. To find out if they're gram-pos or neg you should do a gram stain if you can. Otherwise you'll find that information in any bacteriology determination guide. Your question about the media is not specific enough so I can't answer it.

258

Facility Type!  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ITY: ITY: --&L~ ----------- srct-r~ -----------~------~------- if yee, date contacted ------------- cl Facility Type! i I 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis ] Production 1 Diepasal/Storage 'YPE OF CONTRACT .--------------- 1 Prime J Subcontract&- 1 Purchase Order rl i '1 ! Other information (i.e., ---------~---~--~-------- :ontrait/Pirchaee Order # , I C -qXlJ- --~-------~~-------~~~~~~ I I ~~~---~~~~~~~T~~~ FONTRACTING PERIODi IWNERSHIP: ,I 1 AECIMED AECMED GOVT GOUT &NTtiAC+OR GUN-I OWNED ----- LEEE!? M!s LE!Ps2 -LdJG?- ---L .ANDS ILJILDINGS X2UIPilENT IRE OR RAW HA-I-L :INAL PRODUCT IASTE Z. RESIDUE I I kility l pt I ,-- 7- ,+- &!d,, ' IN&"E~:EW AT SITE -' ---------------- , . Control 0 AEC/tlED managed operations

259

1981 Active-Solar-Installations Survey  

SciTech Connect

The survey gathered data on active residential and commercial solar systems installed during calendar year 1981 and a listing of firms involved in various aspects of the industry. The mail and telephone followup survey results are presented in 21 tables for combined national and state data. The total number of installations reported nationwide during 1981 was 122,907. Almost 95% of all reported installations were made in the single-family residential sector. The fewest quantity of installations (1.2%) was reported in the commercial sector. The remaining 4% was reported in the multifamily residential sector. Water heaters represented the largest number of systems installed in single-family, multifamily, and commercial buildings. The average size of water-heating systems in single-family homes was 61 square feet with an average cost of $3,235. Pool heaters represented the second largest number of systems installed in single-family and multifamily homes and represented 16.4% of the total installations. The average size of pool heaters in single-family homes was 376 square feet with an average cost of $3,455.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Number: 1894 Type: factoid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... type> Type: factoid Description: How high is the pitcher's mound? ... 2047 Type: factoid Description: How close is Mercury to ...

2003-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mosaic neurofibromatosis type 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) with microdeletionsM, Huson S. Mosaic (segmental) neurofibromatosis type 1and type 2: no longer neurofibromatosis type 5. Am J Med

Liang, Christine; Schaffer, Julie V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Table HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.0 0.9 3.0 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 28.7 9.2 6.5 12.1 0.9 7.5 Personal Computers 1 ................... 14.3 5.3 2.9 5.9 0.3 10.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 11.0 4.0 2.4 4.4 0.3 11.4 2 or more .................................... 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.7 Q 30.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

263

Residential heating and cooling energy cost implications associated with window type: Revision  

SciTech Connect

We present a comparative study in which residential heating and cooling energy costs are analyzed as a function of window glazing type, with a particular emphasis on the performance of windows having low-emittance coatings. The DOE-2.1B energy analysis simulation program was used to generate a data base of the heating and cooling energy requirements of a prototypical single-family ranch-style house. Algebraic expressions derived by multiple regression techniques permitted a direct comparison of those parameters that characterize window performance: orientation, size, conductance, and solar transmission properties. We use these equations to discuss the energy implications of conventional double- and triple-pane window designs and newer designs in which number and type of substrate, low-emittance coating type and location and gas fill are varied. Results are presented for the heating-dominated climate of Madison, WI, and cooling-dominated locations of Lake Charles, LA, and Phoenix, AZ. The analysis shows the potential for substantial savings but suggests that both heating and cooling energy should be examined when evaluating the performance of different fenestration systems. Coating and substrate properties and the location of the coating in the glazing system are shown to have moderate effects as a function of orientation and climate. In addition, with the low-conductance glazing units, the window frame becomes a contributor to overall residential energy efficiency. 4 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Residential heating and cooling energy cost implications associated with window type  

SciTech Connect

A comparative study is presented in which residential heating and cooling energy costs are analyzed as a function of window glazing type, with a particular emphasis on the performance of windows having low-emittance coatings. The DOE-2.1B energy analysis simulation program was used to generate a data base of the heating and cooling energy requirements of a prototypical single-family ranch-style house. Algebraic expressions derived by multiple regression techniques permitted a direct comparison of those parameters that characterize window performance: orientation, size, conductance, and solar transmission properties. These equations are used to discuss the energy implications of conventional double- and triple-pane window designs and newer designs in which number and type of substrate, low-emittance coating type and location and gas fill are varied. Results are presented for the heating-dominated climate of Madison, WI, and cooling-dominated locations of Lake Charles, LA, and Phoenix, AZ. The analysis shows the potential for substantial savings but suggests that both heating and cooling energy should be examined when evaluating the performance of different fenestration systems. Coating and substrate properties and the location of the coating in the glazing system are shown to have moderate effects as a function of orientation and climate. In addition, with the low-conductance glazing units, the window frame becomes a contributor to overall residential energy efficiency.

Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Type checking and normalisation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is about Martin-Lf's intuitionistic theory of types (type theory). Type theory is at the same time a formal system for mathematical proof and (more)

Chapman, James Maitland

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hybrid type checking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase distinctions in type theory. Manuscript, 1988. [10]Typechecking dependent types and subtypes. In Lecture notesF. Pfenning. Intersection types and computational effects.

Flanagan, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Type 2 segmental glomangiomas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

skin disorders: different types of severitiy reflectevidence for dichotomous types of severitiy. Arch Dermatol9. Happle R, Knig A. Type 2 segmental manifestation of

Hoekzema, Rick; Zonneveld, Ingrid M; Wal, Allard C van der

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.9 On-Site Power  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Building Type and Prime Mover (kW) Combustion Reciprocating Turbine Engine Fuel Cell Microturbine Multifamily Buildings CollegesUniv Restaurants HospitalsHealthcare...

269

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.9 On-Site Power  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Building Type and Prime Mover (MW) Combustion Reciprocating Turbine Engine Fuel Cell Microturbine Multifamily Buildings CollegesUniv Restaurants HospitalsHealthcare...

270

NorthWestern Energy - Custom Business Efficiency Program (Montana...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Program (Montana) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Other Program Information Montana Program Type Utility...

271

City of Palo Alto - Green Building Requirement (California) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place California Name City of Palo Alto - Green Building Requirement Incentive Type Building Energy Code Applicable Sector Commercial, Multi-Family Residential, Residential...

272

City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program (Colorado) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado Name City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program Incentive Type Building Energy Code Applicable Sector Commercial, Construction, Multi-Family Residential, Residential...

273

Writing with Complex Type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

29] Middendorp, J. 2004. Dutch type. 010 Publishers. [30]A. Hyland. 1992. Twentieth-century type. Laurence King. [7]Robertson. 2005. From Movable Type to Moving Type-Evolution

Lewis, Jason; Nadeau, Bruno

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

abstract data type  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Definition of abstract data type, possibly with links to more information and implementations. NIST. abstract data type. (definition). ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

275

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

276

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

277

Single family heating and cooling requirements: Assumptions, methods, and summary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research has created a data base of hourly building loads using a state-of-the-art building simulation code (DOE-2.ID) for 8 prototypes, representing pre-1940s to 1990s building practices, in 16 US climates. The report describes the assumed modeling inputs and building operations, defines the building prototypes and selection of base cities, compares the simulation results to both surveyed and measured data sources, and discusses the results. The full data base with hourly space conditioning, water heating, and non-HVAC electricity consumption is available from GRI. In addition, the estimated loads on a per square foot basis are included as well as the peak heating and cooling loads.

Ritschard, R.L.; Hanford, J.W.; Sezgen, A.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market research on solar water heaters. National Renewablespace heaters, and solar water heaters, as well as other

Lekov, Alex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for purchase and installation. for purchase and installation. Building America's research is aimed at the goal of constructing high- performance homes and many of the Building America research teams have worked directly with builders to construct zero energy or zero energy-ready homes. Here are just a few examples. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, operated by Steven Winter Associates, worked with Preferred Builders, Inc., on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, CT. Technologies and strategies used in the "Performance House" were not cutting-edge, but simply "best practices practiced." Closed-cell spray foam insulated the unvented attic and the interior of the foundation wall and wrapped the underside and sides of the slab while 1.5 inches of rigid foam sheathing covered the

280

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to purchase and install. to purchase and install. Much of Building America's research is aimed directly at the goal of constructing high-performance homes and many of the Building America research teams have been directly involved with builders who are constructing zero energy or zero energy-ready homes. Here are just a few examples. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, operated by Steven Winter Associates, worked with Preferred Builders, Inc., on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, CT. Technologies and strategies used in the "Performance House" were not cutting-edge, but simply "best practices practiced." Closed-cell spray foam insulated the unvented attic and the interior of the foundation wall and wrapped the underside and sides of the slab while 1.5 inches of rigid foam sheathing covered the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Icon + expectation : exploring the evolution of the American single family home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To propose a new conceptualization of "home", it is necessary to explore the mechanisms that have created this revered icon. Since the industrial revolution, the commercial packaging of the home has continually reinforced ...

Wilcox, Michael E. (Michael Eaves), 1975-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Experimental Evaluation of Ventilation Systems in a Single-Family Dwelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The French regulation on residential building ventilation relies on an overall and continuous air renewal. The fresh air should enter the building through the "habitable rooms" while the polluted air is extracted in the service rooms. In this way, internal air is drained from the lowest polluted rooms to the highest polluted ones. However, internal pressure equilibrium and air movements in buildings result from the combined effects ventilation system and parameters such as wind, temperature difference or doors opening. This paper aims to analyse the influence of these parameters on pollutant transfer within buildings. In so doing, experiments are carried out using tracer gas release for representing pollution sources in an experimental house. Mechanical exhaust, balanced and natural ventilation systems are thus tested. Results show the followings: - For all cases, internal doors' opening causes the most important pollutant spread. - When doors are closed, the best performances are obtained with balanced venti...

Koffi, Juslin; Akoua, Jean-Jacques

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Analysis of advanced conceptual designs for single-family-sized absorption chillers. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the research reported is to develop and analyze new concepts for absorption cycles to improve the performance or reduce the cost of a 3-ton absorption chiller that can be used with solar collected heat. New refrigerant-absorbent pairs are investigated, as are additives to currently used refrigerant-absorbent pairs. Results are given of a literature search on those topics. An initial screening is reported to check the values of the heats of mixing of candidate refrigerants and adsorbents, and also to screen several candidate absorbents against water as a refrigerant. A modified apparatus and procedures for measurement of refrigerant-absorbent solubilities are described. Pressure-temperature-composition data for the R-22/E-181 pair were measured. Based on theory and the information found in the literature, a set of criteria and guidelines was developed that gives the desirable properties of the refrigerants, absorbents, and pairs. (LEW)

Not Available

1978-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

284

Wind-induced Ground-surface Pressures Around a Single-Family House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

numerical simulation value minus wind tunnel value, equationfor publication in The Journal of Wind Engineering andIndustrial Aerodynamics Wind-Induced Ground-Surface

Riley, W.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Analysis of advanced conceptual designs for single-family-sized absorption chillers. Semi-annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the research program is to develop and analyze new concepts for absorption cycles to improve the performance or reduce the cost (or both) of a 3-ton absorption chiller that can be used with solar-collected heat. New refrigerant-absorbent pairs, additives to currently used refrigerant-absorbent pairs, and modifications to the cycle are being investigated. For the initial analyses the use of a fluid at 160 to 230/sup 0/F from a solar collector as a heating source is assumed. In the initial analyses the chiller is to provide chilled water at 45/sup 0/F at full load; alternatively, if a new refrigerant-absorbent pair appears to be amenable for direct cooling of the occupied space, the temperature of the evaporator is to be 45/sup 0/F. Both water cooling and air cooling of the absorber and the condenser are being studied. The use of ambient air at 95/sup 0/F dry bulb and 75/sup 0/F wet bulb temperatures is assumed. With the water-cooled cycles, the initial and operating costs of a properly sized cooling tower will be included. The research consists of five principal tasks: (a) acquisition of information for analysis, (b) definition of criteria for selection of promising refrigerant-absorbent pairs, additives for currently used pairs, or cycle modifications, (c) preparation and analysis of conceptual designs, (d) comparison and selection of the promising new systems that warrant further study, and (e) recommendations for further research for each promising new system. Progress on each of these tasks is described. (WHK)

None

1978-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

286

Residential building design : comprehensive comparative guidelines for building single-family dwellings in Hawaii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy shortages, earthquakes, and hurricanes are environmental factors that challenge the home designers of Hawaii. The depletion of renewable natural resources and global warming trends foreshadow energy shortage and the ...

Nagata, Rochelle Morie

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Comparison of actual and predicted energy savings in Minnesota gas-heated single-family homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data available from a recent evaluation of a home energy audit program in Minnesota are sufficient to allow analysis of the actual energy savings achieved in audited homes and of the relationship between actual and predicted savings. The program, operated by Northern States Power in much of the southern half of the state, is part of Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service. NSP conducted almost 12 thousand RCS audits between April 1981 (when the progam began) and the end of 1982. The data analyzed here, available for 346 homes that obtained an NSP energy audit, include monthly natural gas bills from October 1980 through April 1983; heating degree day data matched to the gas bills; energy audit reports; and information on household demographics, structure characteristics, and recent conservation actions from mail and telephone surveys. The actual reduction in weather-adjusted natural gas use between years 1 and 3 averaged 19 MBtu across these homes (11% of preprogram consumption); the median value of the saving was 16 MBtu/year. The variation in actual saving is quite large: gas consumption increased in almost 20% of the homes, while gas consumption decreased by more than 50 MBtu/year in more than 10% of the homes. These households reported an average expenditure of almost $1600 for the retrofit measures installed in their homes; the variation in retrofit cost, while large, was not as great as the variation in actual natural gas savings.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seds.html. USDOE. 2009. Residential Energy ConsumptionUSEPA) 2008. Energy Star Residential Water Heaters: FinalExperiences of residential consumers and utilities. Oak

Lekov, Alex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Appropriate Conservation Measures for Single-Family Buildings in Hot, Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effectiveness of a number of energy conservation measures for homes located in hot, humid climates was analyzed using the DOE-2.1B building simulation model. Measures having the greatest benefits to the homeowner are predicted to be the addition of ceiling insulation only if the house is not already insulated, weatherization, and reduction of the wall outer surface solar absorptance. The weatherization and solar absorptance reduction measures should be do-it-yourself installations to be cost-effective Replacement of an air-conditioning unit with a new high-efficiency unit was very effective in reducing peak demand and annual cooling energy. Unless the energy efficiency ratio of the existing unit is low (< 6), replacement is generally not cost-effective. The measures were predicted to result in slightly increased indoor humidities, but their effect on human comfort was predicted to be small. However, this conclusion should be considered preliminary since the simulation models used for these predictions have limitations. The amount of energy that can be saved by these measures is very dependent on the occupant's lifestyle, such as the degree to which the occupants will alter clothing to achieve comfort.

McLain, H. A.; MacDonald, J. M.; Goldenberg, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Micro-level return and volatility drivers in Boston's single family home market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developers and investors commonly target neighborhoods close to the urban core and with low median incomes as potential growth markets. Investments in these areas however are often perceived by private sector capital as ...

Valenta, Jay, 1969-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Wind-induced Ground-surface Pressures Around a Single-Family House  

SciTech Connect

Wind induces a ground-surface pressure field around a building that can substantially affect the flow of soil gas and thereby the entry of radon and other soil-gas contaminants into the building. To quantify the effect of the wind-induced groundsurface pressure field on contaminant entry rates, the mean ground-surface pressure field was experimentally measured in a wind tunnel for several incidence angles of the wind, two atmospheric boundary layers, and two house geometries. The experimentally measured ground-surface pressure fields are compared with those predicted by a k-e turbulence model. Despite the fundamental limitations in applying a k-e model to a system with flow separation, predictions from the numerical simulations were good for the two wind incidence angles tested.

Riley, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Development of an ASHRAE 152-2004 Duct Model for the Single-Family Residential House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the development of the duct model based on ASHRAE standard 152-2004 (ASHRAE, 2004) using the DOE-2.1e building energy simulation program. To accomplish this, FUNCTION commands for DOE-2 were used to develop the duct model and provide the improved predictions of the duct heat loss or gain from the unconditioned space as well as supply or return duct leakage. After applying the duct model to the DOE-2 base-case simulation model, simulation results were compared with the measurement from the case-study house for verification.

Kim, S.; Haberl, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Measured data on energy consumption in single family detached homes across the US  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Services Administration (CSA) sponsored, with the technical assistance of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), a national demonstration on energy conservation. Two hundred and twenty houses were selected in 14 cities across the country to be weatherized and evaluated. Infiltration rates, mechanical efficiencies, building dimensions, solar data and energy consumption data before and after weatherization were collected on each of these houses. The before weatherization data on 33 houses at Charleston, SC, Colorado Springs, CO, and Fargo, ND, are presented. Modified steady-state heat balance calculations which include solar data are also compared to the utility data of each of these houses.

Crenshaw, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water also is used by dishwashers and clothes washers. Hotand water efficient dishwashers and clothes washers. Thepeople clotheswasher dishwasher showers city state bathubs

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Qualification test procedures and results for Honeywell solar collector subsystem, single-family residence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test procedures and results are described in qualifying the Honeywell solar collector subsystem. Testing began in mid-August 1976, and was concluded in late February 1977. Testing was done in the following areas: pressure, service loads, hail, solar degradation, pollutants, thermal degradation, and outgassing. Results from these tests are summarized.

Not Available

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Damn the city, dam the suburbs : redefining the single family home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today, we no longer realize public perception of home ownership in the United States is primarily shaped by government sponsored programs. In the 1940's, however, it was these programs that created a change in the options ...

Desmond, Marissa Grace

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Heating energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the heating energy savings achieved by installing attic radiant barriers. The radiant barriers used for the test consist of a material with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses operated by ORNL. Two variations in the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house, the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with a kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The winter test with the radiant barrier showed that the horizontal barrier was able to save space-heating electical energy in both the resistance and heat pump modes amounting to 10.1% and 8.5%, respectively. The roof truss radiant barrier increased consumption by 2.6% in the resistance mode and 4.0% in the heat pump mode. The horizontal orientation of the radiant barrier is the more energy-effective method of installation.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Passive-solar-heating project for a single-family residence. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was a passive home heating system utilizing solar collectors that are part of the roof structure of a 15' x 30' greenhouse. The design utilized solar air collectors constructed on site that are actually part of the roof of the greenhouse. The flow of air is from the storage to the collectors then back to the storage. The storage bin consists of a 5' x 19' concrete insulated bin built into the floor of the greenhouse. The storage mass was gallon plastic jugs. The plastic jugs did not work properly, so they are being replaced by salt rods. This replacement will be an after the fact project by the owner. The concrete storage bin was insulated with 2'' plastic foam insulation, applied to the 8'' concrete wall. The ducts entering and leaving the storage bin have low voltage (12 volt) electric dampers. A cross flow system was used. The heated air circulates from the collectors to storage via ducts in the walls of the lean-to design. The removal of heat from the storage bin was from end to end via the ducts to the central air system for the house. In addition, the greenhouse is connected to the house with a doorway that can be opened to circulate air into the house, a shuttled exhaust fan 1/3H.P. motor has aided in the circulation of air from the storage bin to the collectors and back.

Starkey, V.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Type systems for dummies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We extend Pure Type Systems with a function turning each term M of type A into a dummy |M| of the same type (|.| is not an identity, in that M ? |M|). Intuitively, a dummy represents an unknown, canonical object of the given type: dummies are opaque ... Keywords: canonical element, proof irrelevance, pure type system

Andrea Asperti; Ferruccio Guidi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ARM - Measurement - Cloud type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

type ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud type Cloud type such as...

302

Table HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.3 2.1 3.0 1.6 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 67.5 59.0 2.0 1.7 4.8 7.0 Personal Computers 1 ................... 45.7 41.1 1.3 0.9 2.4 8.6 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 34.1 30.5 1.0 0.7 1.9 9.7 2 or more .................................... 7.4 7.0 Q Q 0.2 18.4 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

303

Table HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.8 2.1 1.4 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 13.0 10.8 1.1 0.5 0.6 11.4 New England .............................. 3.5 3.1 0.2 Q 0.1 16.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 9.5 7.7 0.9 0.4 0.4 13.4 Midwest ......................................... 17.5 16.0 0.3 Q 1.0 10.3 East North Central ......................

304

Type-checking injective pure type systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injective pure type systems form a large class of pure type systems for which one can compute by purely syntactic means two sorts elmt(?∣M) and sort(?∣M), where ? is a pseudo-context and M is a pseudo-term, ...

Gilles Barthe

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boilers, Central Air conditioners, DuctAir sealing, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Programmable Thermostats Active Incentive...

306

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate See rebate...

307

California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New...

308

Engaging as Partners in Energy Efficiency: Multifamily Housing and Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CNT) has been a leader in promoting urban sustainabilitythe more effective use of existing resources and community assets to improve the health of natural systems and the wealth of people, today and in the future. CNT Energy combines rigorous research with effective solutions to help consumers and communities control energy costs and become more energy efficient. CNT Energy helps reduce energy costs in households, buildings and communities. CNT Energy invented and now administers the largest residential real-time pricing program, helping households in Illinois control energy costs by providing them tools, information, and pricing programs that reduce peak energy load and energy costs for everyone. CNT Energy helps reduce operating costs and preserve affordable housing by providing a one-stop energy efficiency shop that combines technical and financial assistance to make it easy for building owners to retrofit their buildings. CNT Energy also coordinates Energy Impact Illinois, an alliance of utilities, local government, and others, with the mission of removing barriers and unleashing demand for energy efficiency in Northern Illinois. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE)

Anne Mckibbin; Anne Evens; Cnt Energy; Steven Nadel; Eric Mackres; Aceee Cnt Energy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

ENERGY STAR Success Story: TIAA-CREF Multifamily Housing | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing...

310

Focus on Energy - Incentives for Existing Multi-Family Buildings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat pumps, Heat recovery, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Geothermal...

311

Steam Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings in Chicagoland  

SciTech Connect

Older heating systems often suffer from mis-investment--multiple contractors upgrading parts of systems in inadequate or inappropriate ways that reduce system functionality and efficiency--or from a lack of proper maintenance. This technical report addresses these barriers to information, contractor resources, and cost-savings. Building off of previous research, CNT Energy conducted a study to identify best practices for the methodology, typical costs, and energy savings associated with steam; system balancing.

Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Minnesota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 0.833therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.103kWh for space heating and 0.108kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 23.7MBtu. Energy...

313

Michigan Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 0.971therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.123kWh for space heating and 0.131kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 23.7MBtu. Energy...

314

Maine Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 1.353therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.158kWh for space heating and 0.155kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 22.21MBtu. Energy...

315

Nebraska Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 0.762therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.079kWh for space heating and 0.102kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices are 23.7MBtu. Energy prices are...

316

Vermont Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 1.433therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.158kWh for space heating and 0.155kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 23.13MBtu. Energy...

317

Pennsylvania Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 1.101therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.125kWh for space heating and 0.133kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 23.41MBtu. Energy...

318

Virginia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 1.077therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.098kWh for space heating and 0.108kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 23.7MBtu. Energy...

319

Massachusetts Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 1.405therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.148kWh for space heating and 0.149kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 24.06MBtu. Energy...

320

Idaho Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 0.869therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.078kWh for space heating and 0.084kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 23.7MBtu. Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Utah Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

prices were set to 0.843therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.0825kWh for space heating and 0.0941kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices are 23.7MBtu. Energy prices are...

322

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sensors: 25 LED Exit Sign: 22 In-Unit Efficiency Installations: CFLs, pipe insulation and water savings free '''Major Measures:''' AirDuct Sealing: 0.50CFM, up to...

323

Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: 85% discount on installation costs Insulation: 50% discount on installation costs Window Replacement: 3 - 5sq. ft. Seattle City...

324

California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

administrator for up to date information on the status of Track 1. ''''' The California Solar Initiative (CSI) provides financial incentives to customers in investor-owned...

325

Typing constraint logic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a prescriptive type system with parametric polymorphism and subtyping for constraint logic programs. The aim of this type system is to detect programming errors statically. It introduces a type discipline for constraint logic programs and ... Keywords: Constraint logic programming, Metaprogramming, Prolog, subtyping, type systems

Franois Fages; Emmanuel Coquery

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

California | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCE - New Construction Advanced Homes Incentives SCE - New Construction Advanced Homes Incentives Southern California Edison offers an incentive for home builders to build homes which exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new construction projects. A performance based approach is designed to encourage builders to construct single-family and multi-family dwellings that use at least 15% less energy than Title 24 standards. The incentive payments are based on the final 2008 T-24 reports created and signed by a Certified Energy Plans Examiners (CEPE) and verified by a third party HERS Rater. October 16, 2013 Roseville Electric - Solar Rebate Program '''''Note: Incentive amounts offered through this program will step down over time based on participation rates. See website above for the most

327

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Construction Statistics of New Homes Completed/Placed Year Thousand Units Average SF Thousand Units Average SF 1980 234 1981 229 1982 234 1983 278 1984 288 1985 283 1986 256 1987 239 1988 224 1989 203 1990 195 1991 174 1992 212 1993 243 1994 291 1995 319 1996 338 1997 336 1998 374 1999 338 2000 281 2001 196 2002 174 2003 140 2004 124 2005 123 2006 112 2007 95 2008 81 2009 55 2010 50 Source(s): 496 2,392 155 1,172 701 DOC, 2010 Characteristics of New Housing, 2010, "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in New Single-Family Houses Completed by Location", "Presence of Air-Conditioning in New Single Family Houses", "Number of Multifamily Units Completed by Number of Units Per Building", "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in Units in New Multifamily Buildings Completed", "Placements of New Manufactured Homes by Region and Size of Home, 1980-

328

California | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PG&E - California Advanced Homes Incentives PG&E - California Advanced Homes Incentives Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) offers an incentive for home builders to build homes which exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new construction projects. A performance based approach is designed to encourage builders to construct single-family and multi-family dwellings that use at least 15% less energy than Title 24 standards. The incentive payments are based on the final 2008 T-24 reports created and signed by a Certified Energy Plans Examiners (CEPE) and verified by a third party HERS Rater. October 16, 2013 PG&E (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) offers rebates for residential gas

329

Technical support document for proposed revision of the model energy code thermal envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the council of American Building Officials` (CABO) 1993 supplement to the 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC) (referred to as the 1993 MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. The goal of this analysis was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determined the most cost-effective (least total life-cycle cost [LCC]) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for residences in different locations. The ECMs with the lowest LCC were used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U{sub o}-value (thermal transmittance) curves in the MEC format. The changes proposed here affect the requirements for ``group R`` residences. The group R residences are detached one- and two-family dwellings (referred to as single-family) and all other residential buildings three stories or less (referred to as multifamily).

Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Technical support document for proposed revision of the model energy code thermal envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the council of American Building Officials' (CABO) 1993 supplement to the 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC) (referred to as the 1993 MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. The goal of this analysis was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determined the most cost-effective (least total life-cycle cost [LCC]) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for residences in different locations. The ECMs with the lowest LCC were used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U[sub o]-value (thermal transmittance) curves in the MEC format. The changes proposed here affect the requirements for group R'' residences. The group R residences are detached one- and two-family dwellings (referred to as single-family) and all other residential buildings three stories or less (referred to as multifamily).

Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Regular Object Types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regular expression types have been proposed as a foundation for statically typed processing of XML and similar forms of tree-structured data. To date, however, regular expression types have been explored in special-purpose languages (e.g., XDuce, CDuce, and XQuery) with type systems designed around regular expression types "from the ground up." The goal of the Xtatic language is to bring regular expression types to a broad audience by offering them as a lightweight extension of a popular object-oriented language, C#. We develop...

Vladimir Gapeyev; Benjamin C. Pierce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

NYSEG (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NYSEG (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program NYSEG (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program NYSEG (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge Start Date 5/1/2011 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Recycling: $50 rebate and free removal Multifamily Dwelling Units: 6 free CFLS and smart power strips Multifamily Common Area Ligting: 50% off custom lighting upgrades Provider NYSEG/RG&E NYSEG is offering residential electric customers rebates for recycling refrigerators, and its multifamily customers free CFLs, smart power strips and 50% off common area lighting equipment. All equipment requirements must

333

Types of Radiation Exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation...

334

ENERGY STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07) National Program Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07) STAR Certified Homes, Version 3 (Rev. 07) National Program Requirements Effective for homes permitted 14 starting 8/01/2013 Revised 6/01/2013 Page 1 of 6 Certifying Homes The following homes are eligible to earn the ENERGY STAR:  Detached dwelling units 1 (e.g. single family homes); OR  Dwelling units 1 in any multifamily building with 4 units or fewer; OR  Dwelling units 1 in multifamily buildings with 3 stories or fewer above-grade 2,3 ; OR  Dwelling units 1 in multifamily buildings with 4 or 5 stories above-grade 2,3 that have their own heating, cooling, and hot water systems 4 , separate from other units, and where dwelling units occupy 80% or more of the occupiable 3 square footage of the building 5 . When evaluating mixed-use buildings for eligibility, exclude commercial / retail space when assessing whether the

335

Case Study of a Micro-CHP System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) involves the simultaneous generation of power and usable heat in a single process or appliance. CHP systems for large multi-family housing properties can reduce energy expenses, minimize environmental emissions and improve the reliability of the electricity supply. With the emergence of new micro-combined heat and power (Micro-CHP) systems, single family and multi- residences can now potentially realize the benefits of personal power. However as with any emerging technology...

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

336

Type B Drum packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Type B Drum package is a container in which a single drum containing Type B quantities of radioactive material will be packaged for shipment. The Type B Drum containers are being developed to fill a void in the packaging and transportation capabilities of the US Department of Energy (DOE), as no double containment packaging for single drums of Type B radioactive material is currently available. Several multiple-drum containers and shielded casks presently exist. However, the size and weight of these containers present multiple operational challenges for single-drum shipments. The Type B Drum containers will offer one unshielded version and, if needed, two shielded versions, and will provide for the option of either single or double containment. The primary users of the Type B Drum container will be any organization with a need to ship single drums of Type B radioactive material. Those users include laboratories, waste retrieval facilities, emergency response teams, and small facilities.

Edwards, W.S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

TYPE OF UPERATICIN  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Production 0 DisposalStorage a Facility Type 0 Manufacturing q University, a Research Organizatiori 0 Government Sponsored...

338

TYPES OF FIELD TESTING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TYPES OF FIELD TESTING Convincing proof of energy savings and performance in a specific building and occupant context If direct proof of savings is desired, the only feasible...

339

Discriminative sum types locate the source of type errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a type system for locating the source of type errors in an applied lambda calculus with ML-style polymorphism. The system is based on discriminative sum types---known from work on soft typing---with annotation subtyping and recursive types. ... Keywords: polymorphism, type errors, type inference

Matthias Neubauer; Peter Thiemann

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

An Improved Type Reduction Algorithm for Type-2 Fuzzy Sets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Type reduction does the work of computing the centroid of a type-2 fuzzy set. The result is a type-1 fuzzy set from which a corresponding (more)

Su, Yao-Lung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Manufacturers, Screw Type Ac Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Screw Type Ac Air Compressor, Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Manufacturers & Suppliers Directory - Find here Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Traders, ...

342

Pityriasis rubra pilaris, type IV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pityriasis rubra pilaris, type IV Jennifer Bragg MD,rubra pilaris (PRP), type IV (circumscribed juvenile).Type IV PRP develops in prepubertal children, is typically

Bragg, Jennifer; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka; Orlow, Seth J; Schaffer, Julie V

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Pityriasis rubra pilaris, type 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pityriasis rubra pilaris, type 1 Alexandria V Booth MD andhemorrhages [ 1 ]. Five types of pityriasis rubra pilarisand prognosis. The five types include the classic adult and

Booth, Alexandria V; Ma, Linglei

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Type (1) Single-Family: 55.4 106.6 39.4 80.5% Detached 55.0 108.4 39.8 73.9% Attached 60.5 89.3 36.1 6.6% Multi-Family: 78.3 64.1 29.7 14.9% 2 to 4 units 94.3 85.0 35.2 6.3% 5 or more units 69.8 54.4 26.7 8.6% Mobile Homes 74.6 70.4 28.5 4.6% All Housing Types 58.7 95.0 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Housing Type

345

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

346

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

347

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

348

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

349

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

350

Types of Thermocouples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Properties of standard thermocouples...Table 1 Properties of standard thermocouples Type Thermoelements Base composition Melting point, °C Resisivity nΩ · m Recommended

351

Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 5.5 Ahr Rated Power: Not Available Nominal Pack Voltage: 158.4 VDC Nominal Cell...

352

Type I Tanks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I Tanks I Tanks * 12 Type I tanks were built between 1951-53 * 750,000 gallon capacity; 75 feet in diameter by 24 ½ feet high * Partial secondary containment with leak detection * Contain approximately 10 percent of the waste volume * 7 Type I tanks have leaked waste into the tank annulus; the amount of waste stored in these tanks is kept below the known leak sites that have appeared over the decades of

353

TYPE OF OPERATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3!NEEi_S1 3!NEEi_S1 past: -~~~-~~~~~-~~~---------- current: ------------_------------- Owner contacted q yes g no; if ye=, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION --~~__--~-~~~---- 5 Research & Development 5 Facility Type 0 Production scale testing c1 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process z Theareti cal Studi es Sample Sr Analysis 0 Production D Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT ---------------- 0 Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Clrganization B Government Cpanaored Faci 1 i ty 0 Other ~~---~~---_--~~-----_ a Prime 13 Subcontract& D PurcSase Order 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time & material, +z) ----_----------------------- Cantract/Purchaae Order #-d-z=&-/) -2_7~-------------Is_------------ PERIOD: CONTRACTING I%~(?) - 1465

354

The Napier Type System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Persistent programming is concerned with the construction of large and long lived systems of data. In designing and building persistent object systems, we are attempting to regularise the activities that are performed on data by programming languages, operating systems, database management systems and file systems. We have identified the following areas of research which we are investigating in the context of persistent systems. They are: controlling complexity, protection of data, orthogonal persistence, controlled system evolution and concurrent computation. In this paper, we describe the data modelling facilities of the Napier type system. We also demonstrate the flexible and incremental nature of the type checking mechanism that is required for persistent programming. The type system is central to the nature of the Napier language and we will demonstrate how it has been designed to solve problems in the five areas identified above.

R. Morrison; A.L. Brown; R. Carrick; R.C.H. Connor; A. Dearle; M.P. Atkinson

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Building Type Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Single-Family 38.4 44.9 102.7 106.2 38.5 35.5 Detached 37.9 44.7 104.5 107.8 38.8 35.4 Attached 43.8 55.5 86.9 85.1 34.2 37.6 Multi-Family 63.8 58.7 58.3 49.2 27.2 24.3 2 to 4 units 69.0 55.1 70.7 59.4 29.5 25.0 5 or more units 61.5 59.6 53.6 47.2 26.3 24.2 Mobile Homes 82.4 57.1 69.6 74.5 29.7 25.2 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Per Square Foot (thousand Btu) (1) Per Household (million Btu) Per Household Member (million Btu) 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average

356

Data:2e22511b-ced7-4080-b8b6-13a0d8050666 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e22511b-ced7-4080-b8b6-13a0d8050666 e22511b-ced7-4080-b8b6-13a0d8050666 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Turlock Irrigation District Effective date: 2012/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule DE Domestic and Farm Service Sector: Commercial Description: Applicability This schedule applies to: (1) Domestic service use including lighting, heating, air conditioning, cooking and appliances where a single meter serves a single family dwelling; (2) apartments and multifamily dwelling units where each unit is individually metered by the District; (3) noncommercial or farm uses (except dairy milk barns, poultry houses, and similar type farm uses) with a total connected load of 20 kW or less, where such service is provided in conjunction with a residence on the same property; and (4) where a single meter serves noncommercial or farm uses (except dairy milk barns, poultry houses, and similar type farm uses) on the same property as the residence with a total connected load of 20 kW or less.

357

Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report. [In Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to determine the energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept. Three different classes of building are investigated, namely: single-family residence; multi-family residence; and commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in three different climatic regions: Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. Computer programs - ACESIM for the residences and CACESS for the office building - were used, each comprised of four modules: loads; design; simulation; and economic. For each building type in each geographic location, the economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of a number of conventional systems. The results of this analysis indicate that the economic viability of the ACES is very sensitive to the assumed value of the property tax, maintenace cost, and fuel-escalation rates, while it is relatively insensitive to the assumed values of other parameters. Fortunately, any conceivable change in the fuel-escalation rates would tend to increase the viability of the ACES concept. An increase in the assumed value of the maintenance cost or property tax would tend to make the ACES concept less viable; a decrease in either would tend to make the ACES concept more viable. The detailed results of this analysis are given in Section 5.4 of Volume II. 2 figures, 21 tables.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Types of quantum information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum, in contrast to classical, information theory, allows for different incompatible types (or species) of information which cannot be combined with each other. Distinguishing these incompatible types is useful in understanding the role of the two classical bits in teleportation (or one bit in one-bit teleportation), for discussing decoherence in information-theoretic terms, and for giving a proper definition, in quantum terms, of ``classical information.'' Various examples (some updating earlier work) are given of theorems which relate different incompatible kinds of information, and thus have no counterparts in classical information theory.

Robert B. Griffiths

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

Conditional belief types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study type spaces where a players type at a state is a conditional probability on the space. We axiomatize these type spaces using conditional belief operators, and examine three additional axioms of increasing strength. First, introspection, which requires the agent to be unconditionally certain of her beliefs. Second, echo, according to which the unconditional beliefs implied by the condition must be held given the condition. Third, determination, which says that the conditional beliefs are the unconditional beliefs that are conditionally certain. The echo axiom implies that conditioning on an event is the same as conditioning on the event being certain, which formalizes the standard informal interpretation of conditioning in probability theory. The echo axiom also implies that the conditional probability given an event is a prior of the unconditional probability. The game-theoretic application of our model, which we treat in the context of an example, sheds light on a number of basic issues in the analysis of extensive form games. Type spaces are closely related to the sphere models of counterfactual conditionals and to models of hypothetical knowledge, and we discuss these relationships in detail.

Alfredo Di; Tillio Joseph; Y. Halpern; Dov Samet

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Spray type wet scrubber  

SciTech Connect

A spray type wet scrubber includes a plurality of spray nozzles installed in parallel banks across the path of gas stream within the scrubber body, and partition walls held upright in grating fashion to divide the path of gas stream into a plurality of passages, each of which accommodates one of the spray nozzles.

Atsukawa, M.; Tatani, A.

1978-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Types of Multinet System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A limiting factor in research on combining classifiers is a lack of awareness of the full range of available modular structures. One reason for this is that there is as yet little agreement on a means of describing and classifying types of multiple classifier ...

Amanda J. C. Sharkey

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Scripting the type inference process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the quality of type error messages in functional programming languages,we propose four techniques which influence the behaviour of constraint-based type inference processes. These techniques take the form of externally supplied type inference ... Keywords: constraints, directives, domain-specific programming, type errors, type inference

Bastiaan Heeren; Jurriaan Hage; S. Doaitse Swierstra

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

TYPE OF OPERATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~~__--------_____ ~~__--------_____ q Research & Development q Production scale testing Cl Pilat Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies a Sample & Analysis c] Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT ~~__-------_--__ 0 Prime 0 Subcontractor 0 Purchase Order a d//F- a Faci 1 i ty Type a tlanuf acturi ng 0 University q Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility a other --------------__----- Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time & material, qtr) ------- -1------------------_L______ Contract/Purchase Order # CONTRACTING PE?IOD- 42 --------------L---- --------- ----------------_---______ OWNERSHIP: AEC/MED AEC/tlED OWNED ----- LE_A_sEE GOUT GO' JT CONTRACTOR E!!!!E!z LEASED - ----_ ---_OW_E!L LANDS BUILDINGS

364

TYPE OF OPERATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Owner c:ontacted Owner c:ontacted TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------_ jJ Research & Development 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis B Production 0 Disposal/Storage $r Prime 0 Subcontract& 0 Purchase Order 0 Facility Type 0 Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Organization a Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fern, unit price,' time & mate ~r~~-r~~tf~-_~_-_~-~f-~~J~ d ial, etc)_kl/Jlfits ---- -7---- -- Contract/Purchase Order # w?@7-e?-b $ 6, i;,_~~~~~----------------- - ----- C_O!!IF!KXYE-PEELEg: -lTlL-/L?~J --------------------------- OWNERSHXP: AEWHEC AEC/HED' GOVT GB' JT SiXiRACTOR CONiRkCiGR WEE LEAs_EE a!!!%? IEEE!? --------_ ..---LEASED ._ OWNED LANDS BUILDINGS EQUIPMENT

365

TYPE OF OPERATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OWNEF? (S) OWNEF? (S) Current: ____ LcrcJksLG! _________ Owner contacted n yes WI-IO; if yes, date contacted-- TYPE OF OPERATION ----_-------_---- m Research & Development Cl Pilot Scale Cl Disposal/Storaqe TYPE OF CDNTRACT ---__------__--- q Prime 0 Subcnntractor Cl Purchase Order 0 Other infcrmation (i.e., cnst + fixed fee, unit price, time 84 materi+, e.tc) v-7Y07-&G-W ---------------------------- Contract/Pur&aae Order # 0 -?+7- FJc-(CL --___--------~----_______________ CONTRACTING PEXIOD: fl& ,&I;'"'-?;': (&e-?)_-- ' ------------------ OWNERSHIP: AEC/MED GEC/MED SOVT GOVT CONTRACTOR CCNTRACTOR OWNE3 LEASE3 OWNE3 LEASED OWNE3 ----- ------ ----- ------ -__------- LE.352 LANDS u u q BUILDINGS EQUIPMENT 0 FINAL PRODUCT WASTE G RESIDUE a

366

Solar-type Variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rich acoustic oscillation spectrum in solar-type variables make these stars particularly interesting for studying fluid-dynamical aspects of the stellar interior. I present a summary of the properties of solar-like oscillations, how they are excited and damped and discuss some of the recent progress in using asteroseismic diagnostic techniques for analysing low-degree acoustic modes. Also the effects of stellar-cycle variations in low-mass main-sequence stars are addressed.

Houdek, Gunter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Practical pluggable types for Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces the Checker Framework, which supports adding pluggable type systems to the Java language in a backward-compatible way. A type system designer defines type qualifiers and their semantics, and a compiler ...

Papi, Matthew M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Practical pluggable types for Java.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper introduces the Checker Framework, which supports adding pluggable type systems to the Java language in a backward-compatible way. A type system designer defines (more)

Papi, Matthew M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Type inference for datalog with complex type hierarchies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Type inference for Datalog can be understood as the problem of mapping programs to a sublanguage for which containment is decidable. To wit, given a program in Datalog, a schema describing the types of extensional relations, and a user-supplied set of ... Keywords: datalog, type inference, type system

Max Schfer; Oege de Moor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Property:Incentive/Amt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Amt Amt Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/Amt Property Type Text Description Amount. Pages using the property "Incentive/Amt" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2003 Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy-Down Program (Federal) + varies 3 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) + 30% for property commissioned before 09/01/2011 for C-corporations (that file a Vermont corporate return). A AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) + $150/peak kW AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) + Residential Standard Offer Program: $242/kW and $0.08/kWh Residential Standard Offer Program Underserved Measures (HVAC, Insulation): $269/kW and $0.09/kWh Residential Standard Offer Program Underserved Counties: $296/kW and $0.10/kWh TCC ENERGY STAR Homes: Custom for builders Hard to Reach Standard Offer Program (Single Family): $360/kW and $0.11/kWh Hard to Reach Standard Offer Program (Multifamily): $325/kW and $0.10/kWh Hard to Reach Standard Offer Program (Underserved Counties): $440/kW and $0.15/kWh

371

Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES). Volume II. Detailed results. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept are examined. ACES is studied in a variety of different applications and compared to a number of conventional systems. The different applications are studied in two groups: the class of building into which the ACES is incorporated and the climatic region in which the ACES is located. Buildings investigated include single-family and multi-family residences and a commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. The economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of conventional systems; namely, electric resistance heating, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; air-to-air heat pump and electric domestic water heating; oil-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; and gas-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and gas domestic water heating.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

TYPE OF OPERATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

_---------_-- _---------_-- Research & Development 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilat Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample SC Analysis !J Production 0 Dis.posal/Storage 0 Prime ." 0 Subcontract& 0 Purchase Order 0 Facility Type 0 Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Org&ization 0 Government Sponsored Facility Cl Other ---------_---__-____- Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time & material, gtr) Coni+act/Purchase Order # ---------------------_--_________ C!2kEE~_CIL_N_G-EE~LE~: /5J--L-,r4 53 -------------------------------------- OWNERSHIP: AEC/MED AEC/MED GOVT GOVT CONTRACTOR CONTRACTOR !w!!E? ___--- " EWNED LEASED L_EesEE OWNED LEASED ---------_ --_------ LANDS BUILDINGS ' EQUIPMENT

373

Forecast Technical Document Forecast Types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Forecast Types A document describing how different forecast types are implemented in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Forecast Types Background Different `types' of forecast are possible for a specified area

374

1996-2004 Trends in the Single-Family Housing Market: Spatial Analysis of the Residential Sector  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a detailed geographic analysis of two specific topics affecting the residential sector. First, we performed an analysis of new construction market trends using annual building permit data. We report summarized tables and national maps to help illustrate market conditions. Second, we performed a detailed geographic analysis of the housing finance market. We analyzed mortgage application data to provide citable statistics and detailed geographic summarization of the residential housing picture in the US for each year in the 1996-2004 period. The databases were linked to geographic information system tools to provide various map series detailing the results geographically. Looking at these results geographically may suggest potential new markets for TD programs addressing the residential sector that have not been considered previously. For example, we show which lenders affect which regions and which income or mortgage product classes. These results also highlight the issue of housing affordability. Energy efficiency R&D programs focused on developing new technology for the residential sector must be conscious of the costs of products resulting from research that will eventually impact the home owner or new home buyer. Results indicate that home values as a proportion of median family income in Building America communities are closely aligned with the national average of home value as a proportion of median income. Other key findings: The share of home building and home buying activity continues to rise steadily in the Hot-Dry and Hot-Humid climate zones, while the Mixed-Humid and Cold climate zone shares continue to decline. Other zones remain relatively stable in terms of share of housing activity. The proportion of home buyers having three times the median family income for their geography has been steadily increasing during the study period. Growth in the Hispanic/Latino population and to a lesser degree in the Asian population has translated into proportional increases in share of home purchasing by both groups. White home buyers continue to decline as a proportion all home buyers. Low interest rate climate resulted in lenders moving back to conventional financing, as opposed to government-backed financing, for cases that would be harder to financing in higher rate environments. Government loan products are one mechanism for affecting energy efficiency gains in the residential sector. The rate environment and concurrent deregulation of the finance industry resulted unprecedented merger and acquisition activity among financial institutions during the study period. This study conducted a thorough accounting of this merger activity to inform the market share analysis provided. The home finance industry quartiles feature 5 lenders making up the first quartile of home purchase loans, 18 lenders making up the second quartile, 111 lenders making up the third quartile, and the remaining nearly 8,000 lenders make up the fourth quartile.

Anderson, Dave M.; Elliott, Douglas B.

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Social marketing, financial, and regulatory mechanisms for adoption of water conservation and stormwater management practices by single-family households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the latter half of the nineteenth century, water delivery and stormwater removal have been managed largely by engineering staff at water utilities, municipal departments and multi-jurisdiction authorities. In recent ...

Youngerman, Zach (Zach Reuben)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Capitalization of Transit Investments into Single-Family Home Prices: A Comparative Analysis of Five California Rail Transit Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the VancouverAdvancedLight Rail Transit System on Single-Analysis of Five California Rail Transit Systems John Lanchsof Five California Rail Transit Systems John Landis Subhra

Landis, John; Guhathakurta, Subhrajit; Zhang, Ming

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Changes in single family housing prices due to the planning and construction of Interstate 476 in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been suggested in various studies that increasing accessibility to a transportation network would influence local property values and their pattern of change over time. This thesis examines the capitalization into ...

Komiyama, Noriko, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Type inference for generic Haskell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The more expressive a type system, the more type information has to be provided in a program. Having to provide a type is sometimes a pain, but lacking expressivity is often even worse. There is a continuous struggle between expressivity and (type-)verbosity. However, even very expressive type systems allow type inference for parts of a program. Generic Haskell is an extension of Haskell that supports defining generic functions. Generic Haskell assumes that the type of a generic function is explicitly specified. This is often no problem, but sometimes it is rather painful to have to specify a type in particular for generic functions with many dependencies and sometimes the specified type can be generalized. In this paper, we identify three type inference problems specific to generic functions, and present (partial) solutions to each of them. 1

Alexey Rodriguez; Johan Jeuring; Andres Lh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

TYPE OF OPERATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

______ ______ 0 Research & Development 9 Faciiity Type 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis Production Di aposal /Storage g ;E:"V',;=:;;';"" IJ Research Organization 0 Government Sponeored Facility q Other --------------------- 0 Prime q ,@ Subcontract& Other information (i.e., cost 0 Purchase Order + fixed fee, unit price, time ?8 material, etc) -------mm----+------------- Contract/Purchase Order # CONTRACTING PERIODr c&L&.& rqs-z i i -----~_--~~~_----_ -------------------------------------- OWNERSHIP8 CIEC/tlED CIEC/MED GOUT WNED LE&xU _o!!EED LANDS BUILDINGS EQUIPMENT iii E : ORE OR RAW MATL IJ : E FINCIL PRODUCT [7 WCISTE b RESIDUE q GOUT

380

TYPE OF OPERATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

----------------- ----------------- 0 Research & Development .a Production scale testing 0 Pilat Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Thearetical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis 0 Production *i DiaposalKitorage Cl Facility Tybe q Government Sponsored Facility Other R.L- 6:e 14 1 1 ---------- --------- I I I TYPE OF CONTRACT ~-__-----------_ fl Prime *I 0 Subcantractbr Other infuriation (i.e., L.t + fixed fee, kit price, 0 Purchase Order time k mat*iik, gtc) /I -~---------'-t-----------~- ----------II---------------- Contract/Purchase Order # I EP!EBEII!G-PEEI9E: ---------------------------------~---- , OWNERSHiP: : I I j ,' / 1 AEC/tlED AEC/MED GOUT GOUT E!!NE_D LEASEI! !z%!NE_D CONTTACTOR CONTf?qCTOR LEASE?? ---w!En- ---LEL3SEI! i I I I LANDS BUILDINGS EIXIIPMENT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A type system for CHR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a generic type system for the Constraint Handling Rules (CHR), a rewriting rule language for implementing constraint solvers. CHR being a high-level extension of a host language, such as Prolog or Java, this type system is parameterized by the type system of the host language. We show the consistency of the type system for CHR w.r.t. its operational semantics. We also study the case when the host language is a constraint logic programming language, typed with the prescriptive type system we developed in our previous work. In particular, we show the consistency of the resulting type system w.r.t. the extended execution model CLP+CHR. This system is implemented through an extension of our type checker TCLP for constraint logic languages. We report on experimental results about the type-checking of 12 CHR solvers and programs, including TCLP itself.

Emmanuel Coquery; Franois Fages

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Pluggable type-checking for custom type qualifiers in Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have created a framework for adding custom type qualifiers to the Javalanguage in a backward-compatible way. The type system designer definesthe qualifiers and creates a compiler plug-in that enforces theirsemantics. ...

Papi, Matthew M.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Type Driven Theory of Predication with Complex Types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates several models of the complex type which is needed to analyze copredication. Previous accounts are shown to be inadequate and a new account both of and copredication is proposed. Keywords: categorial interpretation,, coercion,, complex types,, copredication,, dot()types, lambda calculus,

Nicholas Asher

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Tornado type wind turbines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

Hsu, Cheng-Ting (Ames, IA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Generic and maximal Jordan types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2007 ... (G,k) we exhibit a generic Jordan type of M. In the very special ... specializes to the non-trivial observation that the Jordan type obtained by.

386

Evolutionary Analysis of 11beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase-Type 1, -Type 2, -Type 3 and 17beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase-Type 2 in Fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metabolized by 11 -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-type 1and type 2 andhydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-type 1 and type 2. A. 11 -HSD1

Baker, Michael E

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

TYPE OF OPERATION R Research & Development T& Facility Type  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- R Research & Development T& Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Pilat scale Y-. Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Productian 0 Disposal...

388

From Typing Constraints to Typed Constraint Systems in CHR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Typing constraint programs requires the exibility of subtyping to properly express coercions between constraint domains. The typing of constraint logic programs as done in the TCLP system for example involves solving complex subtyping constraints. In this paper we present an implementation in CHR of Pottier's algorithm for checking the satisfiability of subtype inequalities. We show that when combined with a CHR implementation of an untyped constraint system, a simple merge of both CHR programs gives rise to a new typed constraint system which enjoys nice semantical properties. This is illustrated with examples of typed unification and TCLP programs.

Emmanuel Coquery; Franois Fages; Projet Contraintes Inria-rocquencourt

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Commercial Energy Efficiency Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Multifamily and Small Business: $50,000 Large Business: $100,000 Scoping Study: $7,500 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Multifamily and Small Business: 50% of the qualified cost Large Business: 50% of the qualified cost and up to $7500 of the scoping study cost

390

Window Types | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Window Types Window Types Window Types June 18, 2012 - 8:06am Addthis A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto What does this mean for me? If you have old windows, they are likely losing large amounts of energy through the frames and glazing. By upgrading old windows, you can reduce heating and cooling costs in your home. Windows come in a number of different frame and glazing types. By combining an energy-efficient frame choice with a glazing type tailored to your climate and application, you can customize each of your home's windows. Types of Window Frames Improving the thermal resistance of the frame can contribute to a window's

391

Window Types | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Window Types Window Types Window Types June 18, 2012 - 8:06am Addthis A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto What does this mean for me? If you have old windows, they are likely losing large amounts of energy through the frames and glazing. By upgrading old windows, you can reduce heating and cooling costs in your home. Windows come in a number of different frame and glazing types. By combining an energy-efficient frame choice with a glazing type tailored to your climate and application, you can customize each of your home's windows. Types of Window Frames Improving the thermal resistance of the frame can contribute to a window's

392

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Average Annual Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Various Functions Stock Refrigerator (1) kWh - Electricity Stock Electric Water Heater kWh - Electricity Stock Gas Water Heater million Btu - Natural Gas Stock Oil Water Heater million Btu - Fuel Oil Single-Family Home million Btu Mobile Home million Btu Multi-Family Unit in Large Building million Btu Multi-Family Unit in Small Building million Btu School Building million Btu Office Building million Btu Hospital, In-Patient million Btu Stock Vehicles Passenger Car gallons - Gasoline Van, Pickup Truck, or SUV gallons - Gasoline Heavy Truck gallons - Diesel Fuel Tractor Trailer Truck gallons - Diesel Fuel Note(s): Source(s): 10,749 95.8 211,312 1) Stock refrigerator consumption is per household refrigerator consumption, not per refrigerator.

393

Residential Building Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:57pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options Residential Building Renovations Photovoltaics Daylighting Solar Water Heating Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHP) Biomass Heating In some circumstances, Federal agencies may face construction or renovation of residential units, whether single-family, multi-family, barracks, or prisons. Based on typical domestic energy needs, solar water heating and photovoltaic systems are both options, depending on the cost of offset utilities. These systems can be centralized for multi-family housing to improve system economics. Daylighting can reduce energy costs and increase livability of units. Geothermal heat pumps (GHP) are a particularly cost-effective option in

394

Type error slicing in implicitly typed higher-order languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous methods have generally identified the location of a type error as a particular program point or the program subtree rooted at that point. We present a new approach that identifies the location of a type error as a set of program points (a slice) ...

Christian Haack; J. B. Wells

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Infrastructure Failure - Types and Frequency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Infrastructure Failure - Types and Frequency. Small events that have no impact on supplies Events that require supply/demand responses Events that result in a ...

396

National Type Evaluation Technical Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... checked on an in-motion railway track scale ... Type of Test: (no change) Rail Scale Testing ... or digital), hydraulic, vibrating wire, piezoelectric, or other. ...

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting Types Lighting Types The following are the most widely used types of lighting equipment used in commercial buildings. Characteristics such as energy efficiency, light quality, and lifetime vary by lamp type. Standard Fluorescent A fluorescent lamp consists of a sealed gas-filled tube. The gas in the tube consists of a mixture of low pressure mercury vapor and an inert gas such as argon. The inner surface of the tube has a coating of phosphor powder. When an electrical current is applied to electrodes in the tube, the mercury vapor emits ultraviolet radiation which then causes the phosphor coating to emit visible light (the process is termed fluorescence). A ballast is required to regulate and control the current and voltage. Two types of ballasts are used, magnetic and electronic. Electronic ballasts

398

A type system for CHR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a generic type system for the Constraint Handling Rules (CHR), a rewriting rule language for implementing constraint solvers. CHR being a high-level extension of a host language, such as Prolog or Java, this type system is parameterized ...

Emmanuel Coquery; Franois Fages

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cost effectiveness of the 1993 model energy code in New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

This is an analysis of cost effectiveness the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family houses and multifamily housing units in New Jersey. Goal was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to the alternate allowed in the 1993 Building Officials & Code Administrators (BOCA) National Energy Conservation Code -- American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90A-1980 -- based on a comparison of the costs and benefits associated with complying with each. This comparison was performed for Camden, New Brunswick; Somerville, and Sparta. The analysis was done for two different scenarios: a ``move-up`` home buyer purchasing a single-family house and a ``first-time`` financially limited home buyer purchasing a multifamily unit. For the single-family home buyer, compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1028 to $1564, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $206 to $313 (at 20% down). The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for houses built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was from 1 to 5 years. The home buyer who paid 20% down had recovered increases in down payments and mortgage payments in energy cost savings by the end of the fifth year or sooner and thereafter will save more money each year. For the multifamily unit home buyer first costs were estimated to increase by $121 to $223, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $12 to $22 (at 10% down). The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for houses built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was 1 to 3 years.

Lucas, R.G.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Key findings of the national weatherization evaluation  

SciTech Connect

In 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation`s largest residential energy conservation program. The primary goal of the evaluation was to establish whether the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement, to reduce the heating and cooling costs for low-income families-particularly the elderly, persons with disabilities, and children by improving the energy-efficiency of their homes and ensuring their health and safety. Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed a five-part study which produced a series of documents evaluating the Program. The objective of this document is to summarize the findings of the five-part National Weatherization Evaluation. The five studies were as follows: (1) Network Study-this study characterized the weatherization network`s leveraging, capabilities, procedures, staff, technologies, and innovations; (2) Resources and Population Study-this study profiled low-income weatherization resources, the weatherized population, and the population remaining to be served; (3) Multifamily Study-this study described the nature and extent of weatherization activities in larger multifamily buildings; (4) Single-family Study-this study estimated the national savings and cost- effectiveness of weatherizing single-family and small multifamily dwellings that use natural gas or electricity for space heating; (5) Fuel-Oil Study-this study estimated the savings and cost-effectiveness of weatherizing single-family homes, located in nine northeastern states, that use fuel oil for space heating. This paper provides a brief overview of each study`s purposes, research methods and most important findings.

Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Gradual typing with unification-based inference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Static and dynamic type systems have well-known strengths and weaknesses. Gradual typing provides the benefits of both in a single language by giving the programmer control over which portions of the program are statically checked based on the ... Keywords: dynamic typing, gradual typing, simply typed lambda calculus, static typing, type inference, unification

Jeremy G. Siek; Manish Vachharajani

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Partial Type Inference with Higher-Order Types.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The language MLF is an extension of System-F that permits robust first-order partial type inference with second-order polymorphism. We propose an extension of MLF's graphical (more)

HERMS, PAOLO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

P-type gallium nitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

404

P-type gallium nitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Montara, CA); Fu, Tracy (Berkeley, CA); Ross, Jennifer (Pleasanton, CA); Chan, James (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Type Ia Supernovae Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Type Ia Supernovae Type Ia Supernovae Supernova-1.jpg Update: Recent Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences News about supernovae: read more... Key Challenges: Understanding Type Ia...

406

Property:InfographicType | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Property Name InfographicType Property Type String Description The type of document as a string. This property is used by References and...

407

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TREAT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TREAT TREAT TREAT logo. Performs hourly simulations for single family, multifamily, and mobile homes. Comprehensive analysis tool includes tools for retrofitting heating and cooling systems, building envelopes (insulation and infiltration), windows and doors, hot water, ventilation, lighting and appliances, and more. Weather normalizes utility bills for comparison to performance of model. Highly accurate calculations which consider waste heat (baseload), solar heat gain, and fully interacted energy savings calculations. Create individual energy improvements or packages of interactive improvements. Also performs load sizing. Generates XML file for upload to online database tracking systems. Complies with HERS BESTEST. Approved by the U.S. Department of Energy for use in Weatherization Assistance Programs. Screen

408

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TREAT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TREAT TREAT TREAT logo. Performs hourly simulations for single family, multifamily, and mobile homes. Comprehensive analysis tool includes tools for retrofitting heating and cooling systems, building envelopes (insulation and infiltration), windows and doors, hot water, ventilation, lighting and appliances, and more. Weather normalizes utility bills for comparison to performance of model. Highly accurate calculations which consider waste heat (baseload), solar heat gain, and fully interacted energy savings calculations. Create individual energy improvements or packages of interactive improvements. Also performs load sizing. Generates XML file for upload to online database tracking systems. Complies with HERS BESTEST. Approved by the U.S. Department of Energy for use in Weatherization Assistance Programs. Screen

409

2013 Buiulding Technologies Office Program Peer Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo Credits Photo Credits (top to bottom) 1. Multifamily apartment building; photo courtesy of istock.com. 2. Zero-energy single family home; photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, images.nrel.gov, image 6310910. 3. Office building; photo courtesy of istock.com. 4. View of researcher using Linked-View Parallel Coordinate Plot Renderer software to analyze DOE's Roof Savings Calculator data on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Exploratory Visual Environment for Research in Science and Technology (EVEREST): photo courtesy of ORNL. 5. Sandia Cooler; photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

410

2013 Buiulding Technologies Office Program Peer Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo Credits Photo Credits (top to bottom) 1. Multifamily apartment building; photo courtesy of istock.com. 2. Zero-energy single family home; photo courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, images.nrel.gov, image 6310910. 3. Office building; photo courtesy of istock.com. 4. View of researcher using Linked-View Parallel Coordinate Plot Renderer software to analyze DOE's Roof Savings Calculator data on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Exploratory Visual Environment for Research in Science and Technology (EVEREST): photo courtesy of ORNL. 5. Sandia Cooler; photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

411

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Delaware  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delaware Delaware September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Delaware Summary Delaware recently adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The code becomes effective July 1, 2010. Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above-

412

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New Hampshire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hampshire Hampshire September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New Hampshire Summary New Hampshire has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The code becomes effective October 1, 2009. Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above-

413

The Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in the State of Missouri (OAS-RA-11-11)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Missouri OAS-RA-11-12 August 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 22, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ACTING ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM: George W. Collard Assistant Inspector General for Audits Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in the State of Missouri" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's (Department) Weatherization Assistance Program (Weatherization Program) received $5 billion under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to improve the energy efficiency of single family, multi-family, and mobile

414

Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is given of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating systems. The analysis was made without site specific ata other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items in this report include systeem candidates, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and coolin systems for installation and operational test. Two-heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for Single Family Residences (SFR), Multi-Family Residences (MFR) and commercial applications.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume II, energy requirements. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project analyzed the application of solar total energy systems to appropriate segments of the residential sector and determined their market penetration potential. This volume covers the work done on energy requirements definition and includes the following: (1) identification of the single-family and multi-family market segments; (2) regionalization of the United States; (3) electrical and thermal load requirements, including time-dependent profiles; (4) effect of conservation measures on energy requirements; and (5) verification of simulated load data with real data.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

An Overview of the Building Energy Retrofit Research Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A relatively new program of the U.S. Department of Energy has been established to focus on the technical, financial, and behavioral barriers to improving the energy efficiency of existing buildings through retrofit. The program is organized by the three building sectors (single-family, multi-family, and commercial) and is implemented with expertise from four national laboratories, Princeton University, and the Alliance to Save Energy in cooperation with a large number of state, utility, and local agencies. This paper summarizes the objectives, approach, and accomplishments of the program.

Mixon, W. R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Technical Support Document for Version 2.4, Release 1 of the COMcheck-EZ Software  

SciTech Connect

COMcheck EZ provides an optional way to demonstrate compliance with commercial and high-rise residential building energy codes. Commercial buildings include all use groups except single family and multifamily not over three stories in height. COMcheck EZ was originally based on ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (Standard 90.1-1989) requirements and is intended for use with various codes based on Standard 90.1, including the Codification of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (90.1-1989 Code) (ASHRAE 1989a, 1993b) and ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 (Standard 90.1-1999).

Briggs, Robert S.; Conover, David R.; Connell, Linda M.; Gowri, Krishnan; Halverson, Mark A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Lucas, R G.; Madison, Kevin; Makela, Eric J.; Richman, Eric E.; Schultz, R; Winiarski, David W.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Typed MSR: Syntax and Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many design flaws and incorrect analyses of cryptographic protocols can be traced to inadequate specification languages for message components, environment assumptions, and goals. In this paper, we present MSR, a strongly typed specification language ...

Iliano Cervesato

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Adding dynamic types to C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developers using statically typed languages such as C? and Java are increasingly having to interoperate with APIs and object models defined in dynamic languages. This impedance mismatch results in code that is difficult to understand, awkward to ...

Gavin Bierman; Erik Meijer; Mads Torgersen

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

NREL: Technology Deployment - Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Now Available Via Online Tool April 1, 2013 After several years of development and industry review, NREL and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are pleased to announce that the Standard Work Specifications (SWS) for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades are now available via a user-friendly online tool, with specifications for manufactured housing and multifamily homes to follow. SWS define the outcomes of quality work within the home energy upgrade industry, setting uniform expectations that can be leveraged in energy audits, scopes of work, quality control efforts, and training. The SWS reflect a whole-house approach to installing energy-efficiency measures and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Generativity and dynamic opacity for abstract types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard formalism for explaining abstract types is existential quantification. While it provides a sufficient model for type abstraction in entirely statically typed languages, it proves to be too weak for languages enriched with forms of dynamic ... Keywords: abstract types, dynamic typing, encapsulation, existential types, generativity, opacity

Andreas Rossberg

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Superspace Type II 4D Supergravity from Type II Superstring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the equations of motion of type II 4D supergravity in superspace. This is achieved by coupling the Type II Berkovits' hybrid superstring to an N=2 curved background and requiring that the sigma-model has N=(2,2) superconformal invariance at one loop. We show that there are no anomalies in the fermionic OPE's and the complete set of compensator's equations is derived from the energy-momentum tensor. The equations of motion describe a hypertensorial and vectorial multiplet coupled to a U(1)\\times U(1) N=2 Poincar\\`e Supergravity.

Daniel L. Nedel

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

423

Types of Reuse | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Property » Property Reuse » Types of Reuse Services » Property » Property Reuse » Types of Reuse Types of Reuse Types of Reuse Types of Reuse Types of Reuse Types of Reuse Types of Reuse Types of Reuse Types of Reuse Types of Reuse Types of Reuse Types of Reuse The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below. Agriculture Many of the LM lands in the west are surrounded by open rangeland administered by the Bureau of Land Management or large ranches that are primarily used for grazing. LM promotes agricultural uses of lands that are surrounded by existing agricultural operations. Agricultural uses, such as cultivation of crops, could be combined with habitat improvements or

424

Description of CBECS Building Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Description of Building Types Description of Building Types Description of CBECS Building Types In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace at the time of the interview. Thus, a building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a portion of its space or at some time during the year. In the 1999 CBECS, respondents were asked to place their building into a sub-category that was a more specific activity than has been collected in prior surveys. This was done to ensure the quality of the data; after data collection, the subcategories were combined into these more general building categories, which are consistent with prior CBECS surveys.

425

Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maintenance Types Maintenance Types to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Maintenance Types on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management Commissioning Metering Computerized Maintenance Management Systems Maintenance Types Reactive Preventive Predictive Reliability-Centered Major Equipment Types Resources Contacts

426

RG&E - Residential Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Residential Efficiency Program - Residential Efficiency Program RG&E - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source PSC-mandated System Benefits Charge (SBC) State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Recycling: $50 rebate and free removal Multifamily Dwelling Units: 6 free CFLS and smart power strips Multifamily Common Area Ligting: 50% off custom lighting upgrades RG&E is offering residential electric customers rebates for recycling refrigerators, and its multifamily customers free CFLs, smart power strips and 50% off common area lighting equipment. All equipment requirements must be met in order to receive rebates. See the program website for details.

427

Hadamard type operations for qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain the most general ensemble of qubits, for which it is possible to design a universal Hadamard gate. These states when geometrically represented on the Bloch sphere, give a new trajectory. We further consider some Hadamard `type' of operations and find ensembles of states for which such transformations hold. Unequal superposition of a qubit and its orthogonal complement is also investigated.

Arpita Maitra; Preeti Parashar

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating andcooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

SciTech Connect

A recently completed project for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Building Equipment combined DOE-2 results for a large set of prototypical commercial and residential buildings with data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) residential and commercial energy consumption surveys (RECS, CBECS) to estimate the total heating and cooling loads in U.S. buildings attributable to different shell components such as windows, roofs, walls, etc., internal processes, and space-conditioning systems. This information is useful for estimating the national conservation potentials for DOE's research and market transformation activities in building energy efficiency. The prototypical building descriptions and DOE-2 input files were developed from 1986 to 1992 to provide benchmark hourly building loads for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and include 112 single-family, 66 multi-family, and 481 commercial building prototypes. The DOE study consisted of two distinct tasks : (1) perform DOE-2 simulations for the prototypical buildings and develop methods to extract the heating and cooling loads attributable to the different building components; and (2) estimate the number of buildings or floor area represented by each prototypical building based on EIA survey information. These building stock data were then multiplied by the simulated component loads to derive aggregated totals by region, vintage, and building type. The heating and cooling energy consumption of the national building stock estimated by this bottom-up engineering approach was found to agree reasonably well with estimates from other sources, although significant differences were found for certain end-uses. The main added value from this study, however, is the insight it provides about the contributing factors behind this energy consumption, and what energy savings can be expected from efficiency improvements for different building components by region, vintage, and building type.

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Description of CBECS Building Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Description of Building Types Description of CBECS Building Types In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace at the time of the interview. Thus, a building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a portion of its space or at some time during the year. In the 1999 and 2003 CBECS, respondents were asked to place their building into a sub-category that was a more specific activity than has been collected in prior surveys. This was done to ensure the quality of the data; after data collection, the subcategories were combined into these more general building categories, which are consistent with prior CBECS surveys.

430

Type I vs type II spiral ganglion neurons exhibit differential survival and neuritogenesis during cochlear development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GD: Membrane properties of type II spiral ganglion neuronesJP, Ryan AF, Housley GD: Type III intermediate filamentinhibits neuritogenesis in type II spiral ganglion neurons

Barclay, Meagan; Ryan, Allen F; Housley, Gary D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Microsoft Word - LBNL Multifamily retrofits paper submitted_2nd revision_final_no track changes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments Federico Noris 1 , William W. Delp 1 , Kimberly Vermeer 2 , Gary Adamkiewicz 3 , Brett C. Singer 1 and William J. Fisk 1 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Group Berkeley, CA, USA 2 Urban Habitat Initiatives Inc. Boston, MA, USA 3 Department of Environmental Health Harvard School of Public Health Boston, MA, USA June 18, 2012 Funding was provided by the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research Program, Energy Related Environmental Research Program, through contract 500-09-022 and by the Assistant

432

Specification and cost manual for energy retrofits on small commercial and multifamily buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This specification/cost manual was prepared as part of DOE's technical assistance to the states, utilities and other groups participating in the Commercial and Apartment Conservation Service (CACS) program. The intention is to provide a set of standardized specifications and cost information for the CACS program measures. The material was designed to be used primarily by contractors and others in preparing cost estimates at the request of CACS utilities. This information can also be used by CACS participants in preparing state plans, analyzing which measures are best-suited for their particular climates, computing paybacks, and carrying out audits. In addition, this publication may be of interest to the wider audience involved in the energy retrofit field, ranging from architects and engineers to energy auditors and building inspectors. Each specification contains several categories of information: title; description; recommendations; materials; installation; maintenance; cost information; material cost variables, installation cost variables, regional variables, and safety/hazard issues. The document is divided into six sections: building envelope and service insulation measures; HVAC measures: simple systems; HVAC measures: complex systems; lighting system measures; active solar system measures; and passive solar system measures.

Bircher, C.; Carlisle, N.; Hunter, K.; MacDonald, M.; Shapira, H.; Vineyard, T.A.; Kolb, J.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Passive solar in the city : an energy conscious design for subsidized multi-family housing development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Until now, passive solar energy has been overlooked as a viable alternative for home heating in urban subsidized housing. Rather ironically, in housing whose residents could most benefit from the use of solar energy, such ...

Duncan, Karen M

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings in Chicagoland - Second Year of Data Collection  

SciTech Connect

Steam heated buildings often suffer from uneven heating as a result of poor control of the amount of steam entering each radiator. In order to satisfy the heating load to the coldest units, other units are overheated. As a result, some tenants complain of being too hot and open their windows in the middle of winter, while others complain of being too cold and are compelled to use supplemental heat sources. Building on previous research, CNT Energy identified 10 test buildings in Chicago and conducted a study to identify best practices for the methodology, typical costs, and energy savings associated with steam system balancing. A package of common steam balancing measures was assembled and data were collected on the buildings before and after these retrofits were installed to investigate the process, challenges, and the cost effectiveness of improving steam systems through improved venting and control systems. The test buildings that received venting upgrades and new control systems showed 10.2% savings on their natural gas heating load, with a simple payback of 5.1 years. The methodologies for and findings from this study are presented in detail in this report. This report has been updated from a version published in August 2012 to include natural gas usage information from the 2012 heating season and updated natural gas savings calculations.

Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Retrofit wall system for insulation and lead encasement in older multi-family housing.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach to modernization or rehabilitation of buildings with uninsulated masonry walls that have lead-based paint hazards or deteriorated plaster walls. The approach provides a solution to lead contamination on the walls, increased energy efficiency and comfort improvements associated with better insulated building envelopes. The system sheaths or replaces damaged or contaminated walls with a tight, well-insulated, durable interior surface. The costs of this system are estimated to be less than those of other insulated wall systems. Modeling of the impact of this system shows significant improvement in energy performance. The energy savings over the life of this durable system contribute to significantly offset the often-times sizeable cost of lead hazard remediation.

Wendt, R. L.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

436

Hydronic Heating Retrofits for Low-Rise Multifamily Buildings: Boiler Control Replacement and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. of Cambridge, Massachusetts, to implement and study improvements to the central hydronic heating system in one of the nonprofit's housing developments. The heating control systems in the three-building, 42-unit Columbia Cambridge Alliance for Spanish Tenants housing development were upgraded.

Dentz, J.; Henderson, H.; Varshney, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Hydronic Heating Retrofits for Low-Rise Multifamily Buildings - Phase 1: Boiler Control Replacement and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The ARIES Collaborative, a Department of Energy Building America research team, partnered with NeighborWorks America affiliate Homeowners' Rehab Inc. (HRI) of Cambridge, MA to implement and study improvements to the heating system in one of the non-profit's housing developments. The heating control systems in the 42-unit Columbia CAST housing development were upgraded in an effort projected to reduce heating costs by 15 to 25 percent.

Dentz, J.; Henderson, H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

ConEd (Gas) - Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Boilers, Building Insulation, CaulkingWeather-stripping, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Programmable...

439

Leveraging Limited Scope for Maximum Benefit in Occupied Renovation of Uninsulated Cold Climate Multifamily Housing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project examines a large-scale renovation project within a 500 unit, 1960's era subsidized urban housing community. This research focuses on the airflow control and window replacement measures implemented as part of the renovations to the low-rise apartment buildings. The window replacement reduced the nominal conductive loss of the apartment enclosure by approximately 15%; air sealing measures reduced measured air leakage by approximately 40% on average.

Neuhauser, K.; Bergey, D.; Osser, R.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Decreasing Energy Use by 50% in Swedish Multifamily buildings by 2050 - Obstacles and Opportunities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Building sector in Sweden constitutes a major part of the overall energy consumption, making up for around 40% of the total energy use. During (more)

Shafqat, Omar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Best Way to Meet ASHRAE 62.2 in Multifamily Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado.

442

Analysis of Energy Efficiency Measures in Rehabilitation of Multifamily Housing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An apartment building in Austin, Texas, and one in Boston, Massachusetts, were analyzed to determine the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency measures. To determine expected energy and cost savings resulting from a set of proposed retrofit measures, hour-by-hour simulations were conducted using the DOE-2.1C building energy analysis computer program. Based on detailed audit data, supplemented by field-measurements in the case of the Austin apartment building, the simulations were run for base case (preretrofit) conditions for each building. Metered electricity and gas consumption was used to calibrate the input data. A series of proposed retrofit measures was run for each building using the calibrated preretrofit model as the reference. Annual energy and cost savings were calculated separately for each measure and for the combined set of measures. For the Austin building the combined set of 11 measures yielded expected savings of $3,710/year, a 42% savings in site energy. The combination of the 7 measures considered for the Boston building yielded expected savings of $1.292/year, and annual energy savings of nearly 75%. Measured in situ air conditioner performance for two of the Austin apartments showed EERs of 5.70 and 5.55, indicating an efficiency degradation of 22% and 24%, respectively, after 16 years of operation.

Hunn, B. D.; Silver, S. C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A passive cooling design for multifamily residences [sic] in hot, humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

People living in hot, humid climates suffer either from extremely uncomfortable weather conditions or from the great cost of air-conditioning systems for maintaining comfort. Most of the available passive cooling techniques ...

Tang, Joseph C

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

South Carolina Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 1.018therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.107kWh for space heating and 0.106kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices are 23.7MBtu. Energy prices are...

445

West Virginia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 0.988therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.088kWh for space heating and 0.089kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 23.7MBtu. Energy...

446

New Hampshire Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 1.299therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.164kWh for space heating and 0.163kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 22.47MBtu. Energy...

447

South Dakota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 0.749therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.083kWh for space heating and 0.097kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 23.7MBtu. Energy...

448

ArkansasEnergy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table A.11 shows the estimated annual energy costs, including heating, cooling, water heating, and lighting per home that result from meeting the requirements in the 2006,...

449

New York Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel prices were set to 1.177therm. Electricity prices were set to 0.175kWh for space heating and 0.192kWh for air conditioning. Oil prices were set to 23.87MBtu. Energy...

450

Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5, Boulder, Colorado (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, a 37-unit apartment complex located in Boulder, Colorado, underwent an energy retrofit to comply with Boulder SmartRegs Ordinance, a mandate that requires all rental properties to meet certain energy efficiency standards by 2018. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, worked with city planners and building owners to evaluate this program and recently completed a case study evaluating the effectiveness of a collection of retrofit measures.

Metzger, C.; Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Federal Energy Management Program: Types of Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Commissioning to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Types of Commissioning on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Types of...

452

JOM: Author Tools - Types of Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HOME > Author Tools > Types of Papers. Types of Papers ... Explores materials usage and development throughout history. These articles must contain new...

453

Type IIB Orientifolds, F-theory, Type I Strings on Orbifolds and Type I - Heterotic Duality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider six and four dimensional ${\\cal N}=1$ supersymmetric orientifolds of Type IIB compactified on orbifolds. We give the conditions under which the perturbative world-sheet orientifold approach is adequate, and list the four dimensional ${\\cal N}=1$ orientifolds (which are rather constrained) that satisfy these conditions. We argue that in most cases orientifolds contain non-perturbative sectors that are missing in the world-sheet approach. These non-perturbative sectors can be thought of as arising from D-branes wrapping various collapsed 2-cycles in the orbifold. Using these observations, we explain certain ``puzzles'' in the literature on four dimensional orientifolds. In particular, in some four dimensional orientifolds the ``naive'' tadpole cancellation conditions have no solution. However, these tadpole cancellation conditions are derived using the world-sheet approach which we argue to be inadequate in these cases due to appearance of additional non-perturbative sectors. The main tools in our analyses are the map between F-theory and orientifold vacua and Type I-heterotic duality. Utilizing the consistency conditions we have found in this paper, we discuss consistent four dimensional chiral ${\\cal N}=1$ Type I vacua which are non-perturbative from the heterotic viewpoint.

Zurab Kakushadze; Gary Shiu; S. -H. Henry Tye

1998-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

454

Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load.

Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load.

Barclay, J.A.

1982-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

456

Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load. 7 figs.

Barclay, J.A.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

457

Improving MPI communication via data type fission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Message Passing Interface (MPI) messages are centered around transmitting instances of MPI data types. The data types represented in MPI terms are usually modeled after data types native to the application. If a user does not want to transmit a field ... Keywords: MPI, communication, data type fission, static transformation

Ben Perry; Martin Swany

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Explaining ML type errors by data flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel approach to explaining ML type errors: Since the type system inhibits data flows that would abort the program at run-time, our type checker identifies as explanations those data flows that violate the typing rules. It also detects ...

Holger Gast

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Property:ProjectType | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProjectType ProjectType Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ProjectType Property Type Page Description A descriptive type for a project. This property uses pages as for its values, each of which should describe the type in detail. Pages using the property "ProjectType" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Akutan Geothermal Project + Hydrothermal System + Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project + Hydrothermal System + Alum Geothermal Project + Hydrothermal System + Aurora Geothermal Project + Hydrothermal System + B Bald Mountain Geothermal Project + Hydrothermal System + Baltazor Springs Geothermal Project + Hydrothermal System + Barren Hills Geothermal Project + Hydrothermal System + Black Rock I Geothermal Project + Hydrothermal System +

460

Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Control Lighting Control Types to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories Product Designation Process Low Standby Power Energy & Cost Savings Calculators Model Acquisitions Language Working Group Resources Technology Deployment Renewable Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Toeplitz CAR flows and type I factorizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toeplitz CAR flows are a class of E_0-semigroups including the first type III example constructed by R. T. Powers. We show that the Toeplitz CAR flows contain uncountably many mutually non cocycle conjugate E_0-semigroups of type III. We also generalize the type III criterion for Toeplitz CAR flows employed by Powers (and later refined by W. Arveson), and show that Toeplitz CAR flows are always either of type I or type III.

Izumi, Masaki

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hydrogen in Type Ic Supernovae?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By definition, a Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) does not have conspicuous lines of hydrogen or helium in its optical spectrum. SNe Ic usually are modelled in terms of the gravitational collapse of bare carbon-oxygen cores. We consider the possibility that the spectra of ordinary (SN 1994I-like) SNe Ic have been misinterpreted, and that SNe Ic eject hydrogen. An absorption feature usually attributed to a blend of Si II 6355 and C II 6580 may be produced by H-alpha. If SN 1994I-like SNe Ic eject hydrogen, the possibility that hypernova (SN 1998bw-like) SNe Ic, some of which are associated with gamma-ray bursts, also eject hydrogen should be considered. The implications of hydrogen for SN Ic progenitors and explosion models are briefly discussed.

David Branch; David J. Jeffery; Timothy R. Young; E. Baron

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

463

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in...

464

Type C: Caldera Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

C: Caldera Resource C: Caldera Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type C: Caldera Resource Dictionary.png Type C: Caldera Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources. Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Caldera resources may be found in many tectonic settings but are defined by their caldera structures which control the flow of the fluids in the system.

465

What is the fastest type of energy?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is the fastest type of energy? Since almost all forms of radiation move at the speed of light, we can determine that there are SEVERAL types of energies that are equally fast....

466

Fuel Ethanol Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Stock Type: Download Series History: Definitions, Sources & Notes: Show Data By: Product: Stock Type: Area: Feb-13 Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 View History; U ...

467

Vehicle Specifications Battery Type: Li-Ion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

267 V Rated Capacity (C3): 80 Ah Cooling Method: Glycol Water mix heat exchanger Powertrain Motor Type: 3 Phase Permanent Magnet Number of Motors: One Motor Cooling Type: Oil to...

468

Crystal of GTP Cyclohydrolase Type IB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention relates to a novel, bacterial GTP Cyclohydrolase Type IB enzyme, and the crystal structure thereof.

Swairjo, Manal A.; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; de Crecy-Lagard, Valerie

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

469

Lighting Type at Home and at Work  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Information on what types of lights are used at home and at work (data from 1995 CBECS and 1993 RECS).

Information Center

1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Search by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Type Select Year... 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000...

471

Faking it Simulating dependent types in Haskell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dependent types reflect the fact that validity of data is often a relative notion by allowing prior data to affect the types of subsequent data. Not only does this make for a precise type system, but also a highly generic one: both ...

Conor McBride

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Filter type rotor for multistation photometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A filter type rotor for a multistation photometer is provided. The rotor design combines the principle of cross-flow filtration with centrifugal sedimentation so that these occur simultaneously as a first stage of processing for suspension type fluids in an analytical type instrument. The rotor is particularly useful in whole-blood analysis.

Shumate, II, Starling E. (Knoxville, TN)

1977-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

473

Hot Water Electric Energy Use in Single-Family Residences in the Pacific Northwest : Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP).  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration carriers out generation and conservation resource planning. The analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption is carried out by the office's End-Use Research Section. The End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side conservation planning, load forecasting, and conservation program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program, commonly known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was recently renamed the Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP) to reflect an emphasis on metering rather than analytical activities. REMP is designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings in the residential and commercial sectors and is conducted for Bonneville by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle). The detailed summary information in this report is on energy used for water heaters in the residential sector and is based on data collected from September 1985 through December 1990 for 336 of the 499 REMP metered homes. Specific information is provided on annual loads averaged over the years and their variation across residences. Descriptions are given of use as associated with demographic and energy-related characteristics. Summaries are also provided for electricity use by each year, month, and daytype, as well as at peak hot water load and peak system times. This is the second residential report. This report focuses on a specific end use and adds detail to the first report. Subsequent reports are planned on other individual end uses or sets of end uses. 15 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

Taylor, Megan E., Ritland, Keith G., Pratt, R.G.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Optimum utilization of site energy sources for all-season thermal comfort in new residential construction for single-family attached (rowhouse/townhouse) designs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proposed design analysis is presented of a passive solar energy efficient system for a typical three-level, three bedroom, two story, garage-under townhouse. The design incorporates the best, most performance-proven and cost effective products, materials, processes, technologies, and sub-systems which are available today. Seven distinct categories recognized for analysis are identified as: the exterior environment; the interior environment; conservation of energy; natural energy utilization; auxiliary energy utilization; control and distribution systems; and occupant adaptation. Preliminary design features, fenestration sysems, the plenum-supply system, the thermal-storage party-fire walls, direct gain storage, the radiant comfort system, and direct passive cooling systems are briefly described. Features of the design under analysis and on which conclusions have not yet been formulated are: the energy reclamation system, auxiliary energy back-up systems, the distribution system and operating modes, the control systems, and non-comfort energy systems and inputs. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

475

Development of a single-family absorption chiller for use in a solar heating and cooling system. Phase III, final report. Volume II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The appendices provide supporting information on: properties of a chemical system for solar fired, air-cooled absorption equipment, air-side performance of a one-inch tube, absorber plate-fin coil, listings of the programs used for simulation and data reduction, and evaluation of the Carrier 3-ton chiller in an integrated heating and cooling system. (LEW)

Reimann, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Development of a single-family absorption chiller for use in a solar heating and cooling system. Phase III, final report. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a hardware oriented project to demonstrate the feasibility of the solar fired, air cooled, absorption cooling of residential and commercial buildings. Beginning with design accuracy property data on a new chemical system applicable to air cooled absorption equipment, a breadboard machine was constructed in order to gain experience with system dynamics, chemical stability and overall performance. Employing heat transfer data and operating characteristics obtained from the breadboard an attempt was made to design and build a first generation prototype. A problem with the first heat transfer additive used caused the absorber to operate unsatisfactorily. A second, more refined, prototype was designed, constructed and tested incorporating the previous experience and heat transfer data as well as a new heat transfer additive. Although this prototype did not quite meet design capacity (85%), it surpassed design COP (0.75 vs 0.72) and performed stably without the signs of chemical degradation present in the previous prototype. Two more identical machines are being operated during field test in actual solar systems. After the successful operation of the 10 kW machine, it was decided to design and construct a larger scaled-up prototype for use in commercial applications. An appropriate size seemed to be about 70 kW. After considerable design effort a satisfactory size and design was achieved and constructed. In general, the 70 kW machine behaved much like the 10 kW, again producing about 80% of capacity but with varying COP's (probably due to the transient nature of the testing).

Reimann, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Heating energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers in combustion with R-11 and R-30 ceiling insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the heating energy performance of two levels of fiberglass-batt attic insulation (R-11 and R-30) in combination with truss and horizontally installed radiant barriers. The tests, a continuation of work started in the summer of 1985, were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, during the winter of 1986-87. The measured results of the heating tests showed that a horizontal radiant barrier used with R-11 attic insulation reduced the house heating load by 9.3% compared with R-11 with no radiant barrier, while a truss barrier showed essentially no change in the heating load. Horizontal and truss barriers each reduced the heating load by 3.5% when added to R-30 attic insulation. Moisture condensed on the bottom of the horizontal barrier during cold early morning weather but usually dissipated in the warmer afternoon hours at Karns and left no accumulation in the insulation. Depending on the level of attic insulation, an annual heating and cooling HVAC savings ranging from $5 to $65 is estimated to be attainable when a radiant barrier is installed in the attic at Karns. 8 refs., 64 figs., 18 tabs.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Field Test Evaluation of Conservation Retrofits of Low-Income, Single-Family Buildings in Wisconsin: Audit Field Test Implementation and Results  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the field test of a retrofit audit. The field test was performed during the winter of 1985-86 in four South Central Wisconsin counties. The purpose of the field test was to measure the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the audit-directed retrofit program for optimizing the programs benefit-to-cost ratio. The audit-directed retrofit program is described briefly in this report and in more detail by another report in this series (ORNL/CON-228/P3). The purpose of this report is to describe the methods and results of the field test. Average energy savings of the 20 retrofitted houses are likely (0.90 probability) to lie between 152 and 262 therms/year/house. The most likely value of the average savings is 207 therms/year/house. These savings are significantly (p < .05) smaller than the audit-predicted savings (286 therms/year/house). Measured savings of individual houses were significantly different than predicted savings for half of the houses. Each house received at least one retrofit. Thirteen of the 20 retrofitted houses received a new condensing furnace or blown-in wall insulation; all but two of the houses received one or more minor retrofits. The seven houses which received condensing furnaces saved, on average, about as much as predicted, but three of the seven houses had significantly more or less savings than predicted. The six houses which received wall insulation saved, on average, about half as much as predicted. The remaining houses which received only minor retrofits saved, on average, less than predicted, but the difference was not significant. Actual retrofit costs were close to expected costs. Overall measured energy savings averaged 15 therms/year per hundred retrofit dollars invested. Houses which received wall insulation or a condensing furnace did slightly better, and the houses which received only minor retrofits did poorly. When estimated program costs were included, average savings dropped to about 13 therms/year/per hundred dollars. The uncertainty associated with the energy savings means that these comparisons of savings and costs also have large uncertainties.

McCold, L.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Types of Commissioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Types of Commissioning Types of Commissioning Types of Commissioning October 7, 2013 - 9:17am Addthis Several commissioning types exist to address the specific needs of equipment and systems across both new and existing buildings. The following commissioning types provide a good overview. New Building Commissioning New building commissioning happens during the design and construction of new facilities. The process ensures that systems and equipment in new buildings operate properly. This is done through design reviews, functional testing, system documentation, and operator training. Federal agencies should consider new building commissioning when building new facilities or undergoing major facility renovations. The process is best implemented through all phases of construction.

480

Property:Water Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Water Type Property Type String Pages using the property "Water Type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Freshwater + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + A Alden Large Flume + Freshwater + Alden Small Flume + Freshwater + Alden Tow Tank + Freshwater + Alden Wave Basin + Freshwater + B Breakwater Research Facility + Freshwater + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Freshwater + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Freshwater +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type single-family multifamily" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Property:Document type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Document type Document type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Document type Property Type String Description The type of document as a string. This property is used by a variety of concepts including Reference Materials and may contain document types appropriate for multiple concepts. Allows Values Book;Book Review;Book Section;Conference Paper;Conference Proceedings;General;Info Graphic/Map/Chart;Journal Article;Legal;Memorandum;Periodical;Personal Communication;Poster;Report;Thesis/Dissertation;Web Site Pages using the property "Document type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth + Journal Article + 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits + Journal Article +

482

Property Types, Definitions, and Use Detail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Types, Definitions, and Use Details Types, Definitions, and Use Details The property types listed on pages 1 through 7 are eligible to receive the 1-100 ENERGY STAR score. The Use Details marked with an asterisk are required in order to receive a score. Portfolio Manager now contains more than 80 property types to choose from when setting up your property, in order to best identify the primary use of your property. Although the building types for which the 1-100 ENERGY STAR score is currently available will not change, the expanded list of property types that can be selected will offer users more specific and accurate categorization for comparison. See below for the full list of property types available in Portfolio Manager, along with their definitions and the property use details that you will need to enter.

483

Property:Incentive/Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/Type Property Type Page Description Incentive Type. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: I Filter:Incentives By Type Pages using the property "Incentive/Type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2003 Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy-Down Program (Federal) + Federal Grant Program + 3 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) + Corporate Tax Credit + 4 401 Certification (Vermont) + Environmental Regulations + A AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) + Utility Rebate Program + AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) + Utility Rebate Program + AEP (Central and SWEPCO) - Coolsaver A/C Tune Up (Texas) + Utility Rebate Program +

484

n-Linear Algebra of type II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This book is a continuation of the book n-linear algebra of type I and its applications. Most of the properties that could not be derived or defined for n-linear algebra of type I is made possible in this new structure: n-linear algebra of type II which is introduced in this book. In case of n-linear algebra of type II we are in a position to define linear functionals which is one of the marked difference between the n-vector spaces of type I and II. However all the applications mentioned in n-linear algebras of type I can be appropriately extended to n-linear algebras of type II. Another use of n-linear algebra (n-vector spaces) of type II is that when this structure is used in coding theory we can have different types of codes built over different finite fields whereas this is not possible in the case of n-vector spaces of type I. Finally in the case of n-vector spaces of type II, we can obtain n-eigen values from distinct fields; hence, the n-characteristic polynomials formed in them are in distinct different fields. An attractive feature of this book is that the authors have suggested 120 problems for the reader to pursue in order to understand this new notion. This book has three chapters. In the first chapter the notion of n-vector spaces of type II are introduced. This chapter gives over 50 theorems. Chapter two introduces the notion of n-inner product vector spaces of type II, n-bilinear forms and n-linear functionals. The final chapter suggests over a hundred problems. It is important that the reader is well-versed not only with linear algebra but also n-linear algebra of type I.

W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Entergy Texas - Energy Star Homes Program for Builders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Entergy Texas - Energy Star Homes Program for Builders Entergy Texas - Energy Star Homes Program for Builders Entergy Texas - Energy Star Homes Program for Builders < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Single-Family Homes - Tier I (ENERGY STAR V-2.0): $150 per home Single-Family Homes - Tier II (ENERGY STAR V-2.5): $300 per home Attached Homes: 50% of single-family incentive per housing unit Advanced Lighting Package: $50 per single-family home ENERGY STAR V-3.0 HVAC Check Lists: $150 per single-family home Provider Entergy Texas Entergy Texas offers an incentive to builders in its service territory for

486

Property:TypeOf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TypeOf TypeOf Jump to: navigation, search Property Name TypeOf Property Type Page Description Similar to Property:PartOf, this property identifies pages that represent a less specific concept or idea than the subject page. For example, CSP is a TypeOf Solar Power Generation. Pages using the property "TypeOf" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe Survey + Data Collection and Mapping + A Acoustic Logs + Well Log Techniques + Active Seismic Techniques + Seismic Techniques + Active Sensors + Remote Sensing Techniques + Aerial Photography + Passive Sensors + Aeromagnetic Survey + Magnetic Techniques + Airborne Electromagnetic Survey + Electromagnetic Techniques + Airborne Gravity Survey + Gravity Techniques + Analytical Modeling + Modeling Techniques +

487

Candidate Biomarkers for Type 2 Diabetes - Available ...  

The current gold standard for diagnosing pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), which is used to determine ...

488

Appendix E National Type Evaluation Technical Committee ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... type evaluation criteria relating to the taking of tare ... scales) may semi automatically (pushbutton) take tare values ... automatic tare may be taken to ...

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

489

Property:Geothermal/Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Type Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "Geothermal/Type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Pool and Spa + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Aquaculture + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Space Heating + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Pool and Spa + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Aquaculture + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Agricultural Drying + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + Pool and Spa +

490