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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

" by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity and Steam" 3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity and Steam" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ,," Electricity",," Steam" ,," (kWh)",," (million Btu)" ,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors"

2

Table 3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational History  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational History" "Plant Name","Generator ID","Type","Reactor Supplier and Model","Construction Start","Grid Connection","Commercial...

3

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Supplier Propane Supplier Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Propane Supplier Requirements A retail supplier may only distribute liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane) if the supplier holds a license from the Wisconsin Department of

4

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor " "PlantReactor Name","Generator ID","State","Type","2009 Summer Capacity"," 2010 Annual...

5

High voltage dry-type air-core shunt reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry-type air-core shunt reactors are now being ... systems to limit overvoltages. Recently, high voltage dry-type air-core shunt reactors have been designed, ... transient overvoltages and electrical and magnetic...

Klaus Papp; Michael R. Sharp…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Prime Supplier Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Report September 2013 Prime Supplier Report Released: November 26, 2013 Next Update: December 23, 2013 Legend: Petroleum Data Tables Petroleum Data Tables HTML File HTML File PDF File PDF File The Prime Supplier Report presents data collected on Form EIA-782C, "Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local Consumption." These data measure primary petroleum product deliveries into the States where they are locally marketed and consumed. Petroleum Data Tables HTML File PDF File --- Prime Supplier Sales Volumes in Petroleum Navigator, HTML, and PDF formats. Previous --- Previous reports are available on the historical page. The EIA-782C respondent frame is comprised of approximately 195 prime suppliers representing producers, importers, and inter-State resellers and

7

Supplier Management Responsibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supplier management, at the organization level, has two basic responsibilities: (1) to ensure that the engineering environment is based on a defined engineering process, with engineers trained to work within that...

Raymond Kehoe; Alka Jarvis

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fuel assembly transfer basket for pool type nuclear reactor vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel assembly transfer basket for a pool type, liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a side access loading and unloading port for receiving and relinquishing fuel assemblies during transfer.

Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Ramsour, Nicholas L. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

" of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Electricity and Steam by Type" Quantity of Purchased Electricity and Steam by Type" " of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics" " of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ," Electricity",," Steam" ," (million kWh)",," (billion Btu)" ,,,,,"RSE" " ","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors"

10

Adequate NQA-1 Suppliers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 J U N 2 2 2069 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: DAE Y. CHUNG DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR SAFETY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS ENVIRONlMENTAL MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: Issuance of the Office of Environmental Management Nuclear Supplier Alert System The Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board has developed a Nuclear Supplier Alert System as part of its EMIEFCOG QA Improvement Project Plan. This Corporate Board deliverable was approved by the voting members in the last meeting held on March 19,2009. This system is critical to mitigating past weaknesses in supplier qualification and oversight that have resulted in: I ) project cost overages; 2) schedule

11

Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana) Electricity Suppliers&#039; Service Area Assignments (Indiana) Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Utility Regulatory Commission To promote efficiency and avoid waste and duplication, rural and

12

Proposal of DC shield reactor type superconducting fault current limiter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Saturated DC reactor type superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) had been proposed two years ago. It was classified to rectifier type SFCL. The changing inductance value with the operating mode has superior characteristics to reduce voltage sag during step increase of the load current. But it has the disadvantage of its weight. In this paper, rectifier type SFCL with shielded reactor has been proposed. The reactor which has superconducting ring or tube inside its winding is substituted to the DC link of the rectifier. The configuration looks like an air core transformer with secondary short winding. When the current through the bulk shield-ring reaches to a certain level, the flux penetrates to the shield body and finite impedance appears in the primary winding. In other words, when the surface flux density exceeds its critical flux density, the flux penetrates into the bulk superconductor, and increases equivalent inductance. The equivalent transient resistance of the shield was represented as a function of exponential of the time. Using this equivalent transient resistance, the transient impedance was expressed. The transient wave analysis using EMTDC (electro-magnetic transients in DC systems) has been described. Simulated waveforms are shown considering the source inductance, the leakage inductance, the coupling coefficient and the forward voltage drop of the semiconductor. And voltage sag was also investigated with 50% step load increase. Preliminary design was also performed. The coil size and number of turns are designed to obtain adequate inductance for the current limitation, and the central magnetic field of the coils are calculated. There is optimal aspect ratio to minimize the magnetic field with restriction in outer diameter of the coil.

Itsuya Muta; Tsutomu Hoshino; Khosru Mohammad Salim; Akio Kawasaki; Taketsune Nakamura; Masato Yamada

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Formation of a nuclear reactor’s molten core bath in a crucible-type corium catcher for a nuclear power station equipped with VVER reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results from a calculation study on analyzing the formation of a melt bath in a crucible-type catcher for the conditions of a severe accident at a nuclear power station equipped with VVER-1000 reactors are presen...

S. V. Beshta; S. A. Vitol’; V. S. Granovskii; E. K. Kalyago…

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Design of chemical reactors of the heat exchanger type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating Profile - Example I 23 , 53 Heat Rate Comparison - Example I Operating Profile - Example 2 Operating Profile - Example 3 Operating Profile - Example 4 Equations (113) and (114) at 790 Reactor Profile - Exan piss 5 and 6 Heat of Reaction.... simple inathematical function of time. While his work was a step forward, it is not directly applicable to the problem of reactor design. Hougen and Watsor. (3), and recently Fair and Rase (4), illustra- ted an exact non-machine method of reactor...

McBeth, Lloyd Theodore

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

15

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Prime Supplier Report...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, November 2014 1 U.S. Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, November 2014 1 Prime Supplier sales volumes of petroleum...

16

Item # Item Description Unit Size Supplier # Supplier Name Price Busch Stockroom Product List  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Item # Item Description Unit Size Supplier # Supplier Name Price Qty On Hand Last Price Update;Item # Item Description Unit Size Supplier # Supplier Name Price Qty On Hand Last Price Update BuschGas 1.00 3,559 03/20/2014 797 Oil Vacuum Pump - 1 Liter S41455 Fisher 9.48 0 03/27/2008 796 Oil Vacuum

Garfunkel, Eric

17

Controlled Fusion and Reactors of the Tokamak Type  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research on fusion reactor problems has increased dramatically as the plasma physics of magnetic confinement continues to make substantial progress. As part of this research several studies (1–6) have been comple...

Robert W. Conn

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

Ehud Greenspan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

UK mining invests, suppliers profit  

SciTech Connect

In the midst of a major economic crisis in the United Kingdom, equipment suppliers have been reporting a number of considerable purchases by British coal mining companies. In December 2008, Liebherr-Great Britain delivered the first two of four Rq350 Litronic hydraulic excavators for use at the Broken Cross opencast coal site in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Ten Terex TR100 rigid haulers were delivered to the site in late 2008. Hatfield Colliery at Stainforth, South Yorkshire, has been reopened by PowerFuel. The main equipment for two longwall faces was supplied by Joy Mining Machinery UK Ltd. 2 photos.

NONE

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Choosing suppliers in North-West Russia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of the study was to determine how to choose suppliers in North-West Russia. The aim was to find out whether textbook theories of… (more)

Malaki, Mirva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fast spectrum space reactor sizing code for calandria-type cores (CORSCO Code). [Li  

SciTech Connect

The CORSCO code rapidly sizes reactor cores that have calandria-type geometry. The fuel configuration modeled is a large ceramic zone that contains numerous small cylindrical coolant channels spaced apart with a triangular pitch. A minimum reactor weight is obtained for a fixed set of constraints (peak fuel temperature, peak coolant velocity, etc.) by obtaining a unique solution to a set of five thermal/hydraulic equations, as well as a required excess reactivity which is specified by a core size dependent one-group criticality expression. Typical results are shown for a W-Re/UN cermet-fueled, lithium-cooled space reactor over a power range of 25 to 100 MWt. Reactor sensitivity coefficients are also shown for changes in reactor weight and number of coolant channels due to changes in core thermal/hydraulic constraints.

Specht, E.R.; Villalobos, A. (Rockwell International, Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, HB23, Canoga Park, California (USA))

1991-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Dismantling of Loop-Type Channel Equipment of MR Reactor in NRC 'Kurchatov Institute' - 13040  

SciTech Connect

In 2009 the project of decommissioning of MR and RTF reactors was developed and approved by the Expert Authority of the Russian Federation (Gosexpertiza). The main objective of the decommissioning works identified in this project: - complete dismantling of reactor equipment and systems; - decontamination of reactor premises and site in accordance with the established sanitary and hygienic standards. At the preparatory stage (2008-2010) of the project the following works were executed: loop-type channels' dismantling in the storage pool; experimental fuel assemblies' removal from spent fuel repositories in the central hall; spent fuel assembly removal from the liquid-metal-cooled loop-type channel of the reactor core and its placement into the SNF repository; and reconstruction of engineering support systems to the extent necessary for reactor decommissioning. The project assumes three main phases of dismantling and decontamination: - dismantling of equipment/pipelines of cooling circuits and loop-type channels, and auxiliary reactor equipment (2011-2012); - dismantling of equipment in underground reactor premises and of both MR and RTF in-vessel devices (2013-2014); - decontamination of reactor premises; rehabilitation of the reactor site; final radiation survey of reactor premises, loop-type channels and site; and issuance of the regulatory authorities' de-registration statement (2015). In 2011 the decommissioning license for the two reactors was received and direct MR decommissioning activities started. MR primary pipelines and loop-type facilities situated in the underground reactor hall were dismantled. Works were also launched to dismantle the loop-type channels' equipment in underground reactor premises; reactor buildings were reconstructed to allow removal of dismantled equipment; and the MR/RTF decommissioning sequence was identified. In autumn 2011 - spring 2012 results of dismantling activities performed are: - equipment from underground rooms (No. 66, 66A, 66B, 72, 64, 63) - as well as from water and gas loop corridors - was dismantled, with the total radwaste weight of 53 tons and the total removed activity of 5,0 x 10{sup 10} Bq; - loop-type channel equipment from underground reactor hall premises was dismantled; - 93 loop-type channels were characterized, chopped and removed, with radwaste of 2.6 x 10{sup 13} Bq ({sup 60}Co) and 1.5 x 10{sup 13} Bq ({sup 137}Cs) total activity removed from the reactor pool, fragmented and packaged. Some of this waste was placed into the high-level waste (HLW) repository of the Center. Dismantling works were executed with application of remotely operated mechanisms, which promoted decrease of radiation impact on the personnel. The average individual dose for the personnel was 1.9 mSv/year in 2011, and the collective dose is estimated as 0.0605 man x Sv/year. (authors)

Volkov, Victor; Danilovich, Alexey; Zverkov, Yuri; Ivanov, Oleg; Kolyadin, Vyacheslav; Lemus, Alexey; Pavlenko, Vitaly; Semenov, Sergey; Fadin, Sergey; Shisha, Anatoly; Chesnokov, Alexander [National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)] [National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables Release date: November 22, 2011 Next release date: November 2012 See also: Table 1. Capacity and Generation, Table 2. Ownership Data Table 3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational History PDF XLS Plant Name Generator ID Type Reactor Supplier and Model Construction Start Grid Connection Original Expiration Date License Renewal Application License Renewal Issued Extended Expiration Arkansas Nuclear One 1 PWR Babcock&Wilcox, Lower Loop 10/1/1968 8/17/1974 5/20/2014 2/1/2000 6/20/2001 5/20/2034 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 PWR Combustion Eng. 7/1/1971 12/26/1978 7/17/2018 10/15/2003 6/30/2005 7/17/2038

24

ORNL Supplier Database- Stay in Touch!  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Small business owners seeking to do business with the U.S. Department of Energy may already be aware of the Oak Ridge Supplier Database. The Small Business Programs Office at Oak Ridge National...

25

Risk management framework for evaluating suppliers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sikorsky Aircraft Co. currently finds itself in a critical growth period, in terms of both sales contracts and supplier agreements. Popular supply chain strategies preach reduction and simplification of the supply base, ...

Croce, Steven A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Sandia National Laboratories: Working with Sandia: Current Suppliers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Suppliers Current Suppliers Opportunities Potential Suppliers Current Suppliers Accounts Payable Contract Audit Contractor/Bidder Information Construction and Facilities Staff Augmentation What Does Sandia Buy? Enterprise IT Services Working with Sandia Current Suppliers Accounts Payable Provides the information you need to properly submit invoices and has other useful guidelines and tips. Contract Audit Sandia National Laboratories has designated the Contract Audit Department as an independent appraisal function. The department is responsible for the audit of supplier contracts and subcontracts that support the Laboratories' mission. Contract Audit also provides accounting and financial services in connection with the negotiation, administration, and settlement of costs for contracts placed by Sandia Procurement.

27

SUPPLIERS WITHIN AN ECOLOGICALLY AWARE AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 SUPPLIERS WITHIN AN ECOLOGICALLY AWARE AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR 1 Overview on the theme It is clear, materials recyclers and shredders, as represented in figure 1. Figure 1 - Automobile life cycle and the hulk are sent to shredders. The shredder reduces the hulk to small pieces, with around 10 cm each

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

28

Fault Current Limit (FCL) Technology (Magnetic Valve Controlled Reactor-Type Fault Current Limiter Principle and Simulation)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summarized the FCL practical research which faces to the key technical problems, briefly introduces the study of magnetic valve controllable reactor type fault current limiter principle, and the simulation result...

Chunzhe Shi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Radiotoxicity and decay heat power of spent nuclear fuel of VVER type reactors at long-term storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......a controllable storage facility for cooling...transferred for long-term storage. The storage...adequately handle waste radiation characteristics...type reactors at long-term storage. | Radiotoxicity...of radioactive waste (radwaste) determines......

B. R. Bergelson; A. S. Gerasimov; G. V. Tikhomirov

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

31

Customer-Specific Taste Parameters and Mixed Logit: Households' Choice of Electricity Supplier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M a y 2000 Keywords: energy suppliers, mixed logit, tastecustomers' choice among energy suppliers in conjoint-typecustomers' choice o f energy supplier and estimate the value

Revelt, David; Train, Kenneth

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Energy Information Administration/Prime Supplier Report, 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prime Supplier Report, 1 Prime Supplier Report, 1 October 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 4,100 4,400 4,700 5,000 5,300 5,600 5,900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '11 to Oct '11: 2.9% Oct '10 to Oct '11: 2.4% YTD '10 to YTD '11: 0.3% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '11 to Oct '11: 11.7% Oct '10 to Oct '11: -1.7% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -12.6% 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates*

34

Two stroke homogenous charge compression ignition engine with pulsed air supplier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two stroke homogenous charge compression ignition engine includes a volume pulsed air supplier, such as a piston driven pump, for efficient scavenging. The usage of a homogenous charge tends to decrease emissions. The use of a volume pulsed air supplier in conjunction with conventional poppet type intake and exhaust valves results in a relatively efficient scavenging mode for the engine. The engine preferably includes features that permit valving event timing, air pulse event timing and injection event timing to be varied relative to engine crankshaft angle. The principle use of the invention lies in improving diesel engines.

Clarke, John M. (Chillicothe, IL)

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

35

A computer model for the transient analysis of compact research reactors with plate type fuel  

SciTech Connect

A coupled neutronics and core thermal-hydraulic performance model has been developed for the analysis of plate type U-Al fueled high-flux research reactor transients. The model includes point neutron kinetics, one-dimensional, non-homogeneous, equilibrium two-phase flow and beat transfer with provision for subcooled boiling, and spatially averaged one-dimensional beat conduction. The feedback from core regions other than the fuel elements is included by employing a lumped parameter approach. Partial differential equations are discretized in space and the combined equation set representing the model is converted to an initial value problem. A variable-order, variable-time-step time advancement scheme is used to solve these ordinary differential equations. The model is verified through comparisons with two other computer code results and partially validated against SPERT-II tests. It is also used to analyze a series of HFIR reactivity transients.

Sofu, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dodds, H.L. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Recovery time of superconducting non-inductive reactor type fault current limiter  

SciTech Connect

A superconducting fault current limiting device for electric power systems has been investigated to find out its feasibility. Non-inductive reactor type fault current limiter has been constructed using metal superconductor. Two bifilar wound solenoids were connected in antiparallel or antiseries. On each connection, the fault current limiting test was performed by short-circuiting a resistive load suddenly. The recovery (normal-to-superconductive state transition) time after the current limiting mode has been studied using small scale model of fault current limiter for the low voltage distribution line. The results reveal that the current limiter could be operated under repetitive fault current accident which was removed within a few cycle of the limiting mode. The recovery time is a function of the dissipated energy under current limiting mode. Test results are presented.

Hoshino, T.; Muta, I.; Tsukiji, H. [Saga Univ., Honjo, Saga (Japan)] [Saga Univ., Honjo, Saga (Japan); Ohkubo, K.; Etoh, M. [Kyushu Electric Power Co., Kono-Higashi, Saga (Japan)] [Kyushu Electric Power Co., Kono-Higashi, Saga (Japan)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

38

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

On the better performance of the coarse-mesh finite-difference method for CANDU-type reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent assessment results indicate that the coarse-mesh finite-difference method (FDM) gives consistently smaller percent differences in channel powers than the fine-mesh FDM when compared to the reference MCNP solution for CANDU-type reactors. However, there is an impression that the fine-mesh FDM should always give more accurate results than the coarse-mesh FDM in theory. To answer the question if the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors was just a coincidence (cancelation of error) or caused by the use of heavy water or the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the cluster fuel geometry in the diffusion calculation, three benchmark problems with three different fuel lattices (CANDU, HWR and PWR) were designed with the reference solution provided by the Monte-Carlo code SERPENT in this paper. The analysis of these benchmark problems confirm that the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors is mainly caused by the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the sub-meshes of the cluster fuel geometry in the core-diffusion calculation. When lattice-homogenized cross sections are used in the core-diffusion calculation, it is appropriate to use the fine-mesh FDM for reactors (such as PWR) with uniformly-distributed fuel pins; however, it is inappropriate to use the fine-mesh FDM to analyze CANDU-type reactors with the cluster fuel geometry because the lattice-homogenized cross sections assigned to each sub-mesh are not physically meaningful. It is recommended to use the coarse-mesh (2 × 2 meshes per lattice) to analyze CANDU-type reactors when lattice-homogenized cross sections are used in the core-diffusion calculation.

W. Shen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

See footnotes at end of table. 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State 386 Energy Information...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marketing Annual 1999 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

42

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marketing Annual 1995 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

43

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Marketing Annual 1998 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

44

SUPPLIER SUSTAINABILITY EVALUATION UTILIZING MULTI ATTRIBUTE UTILITY MODELING.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Conventionally, the focus during supplier evaluation has been to assess cost, quality and delivery effectiveness due to their impact on profitability. In recent years, there… (more)

Ladd, Scott E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eec.ucdavis.eduACEEE2010datapapers2178.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentenergy-supplier-obligations-and-white Language: English Policies:...

46

Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Petroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

47

Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

48

Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Petroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

49

Generation resource improvement through partnership with suppliers  

SciTech Connect

Deregulation has had a dramatic impact on how electrical power utilities are conducting business in today`s competitive market. There are five vital components that industry has focused on to be key concerns: increase equipment reliability; reduce cost of production; satisfy environmental needs; meet process safety requirements; and reduce inventory costs. Suppliers must become more proactive in supplying not only products, but also value-added services to complement their product mix. For the first time, plants are pooling their resources of expertise in maintenance, operations, engineering, procurement and environmental safety to ensure that not only the products, but the programs they implement, are focused toward reducing costs and increasing operating efficiency. The power industry is focused on convergence of a few key vendors who will concentrate on standardization of system approaches to increase mean time between equipment failure and decrease life cycle costs.

Sanderson, R.W. [A.W. Chesterton Co., Stoneham, MA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

NAPTH: Neutronics analysis code system for the fusion–fission hybrid reactor with pressure tube type blanket  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fusion–fission hybrid reactor is considered as a potential path to the early application of fusion energy. A new concept with pressure tube type blanket has recently been proposed for a feasible hybrid reactor. In this paper, a code system for the neutronics analysis of the pressure tube type hybrid reactor is developed based on the two-step calculation scheme: the few-group homogeneous constant calculation and the full blanket calculation. The few-group homogeneous constants are calculated using the lattice code DRAGON4. The blanket transport calculation is performed by the multigroup Monte Carlo code. A link procedure for fitting the cross sections is developed between these two steps. An additional procedure is developed to calculate the burnup, power distribution, energy multiplication factor, tritium breeding ratio and neutron multiplication factor. From some numerical results, it is found that the code system NAPTH is reliable and exhibits good calculation efficiency. It can be used for the conceptual design of the pressure tube type hybrid reactor with precise geometry.

Tiejun Zu; Hongchun Wu; Youqi Zheng; Liangzhi Cao; Chao Yang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Comment to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers Comment to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers Comment by Cameco Resources On Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (July 27, 2010), Section 934 Rule Making. As discussed below, Cameco believes that producers and providers of uranium concentrates and UF6 conversion services, whether directly or as an intermediary, should be excluded from the definition of nuclear supplier. In this regard, Cameco generally agrees with the comments submitted by the Nuclear Energy Institute ("NEI") on behalf of its members; however, Cameco disagrees with the implication of NEl's comments that producers of uranium concentrates and providers of conversion services should be included in the

52

NREL: Education Programs - Kit and Component Supplier List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kit and Component Supplier List Kit and Component Supplier List Learn about available kits and component suppliers for NREL's Car Competitions, a classroom-based, hands-on educational program for 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students. Please contact suppliers for pricing. Junior Solar Sprint Suppliers Products Solar Made 2807 North Prospect Colorado Springs, CO 80907 Tel: 1-800-246-7012 Fax: 719-635-5398 E-mail: Sales@SolarMade.com Web Site: Solar Made JSS Kit Includes solar electric panel (3 Volts @ 3 watts), electric motor with lead wires, motor mounting bracket with screws, gears for motor shaft in three sizes, and 2 alligator clips JSS-P Solar electric panel JSS-M Electric motor JSS-B/G Mounting bracket/screws and gears only JSS-ACC Accessory bag contains 2 axle shafts, 4 wheels/tires, 3 spur gear sizes

53

Risk analysis for the supplier selection problem using failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While seeking for global suppliers is a general trend for lower cost and better quality, it is not trivial for a company to assess the corresponding risks in supplier selection. This paper proposes the supplier s...

Simon Li; Wei Zeng

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

58,921.8 56,922.5 55,453.9 54,959.2 53,458.9 54,523.8 1983-2012 58,921.8 56,922.5 55,453.9 54,959.2 53,458.9 54,523.8 1983-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 15,392.8 16,081.8 15,898.2 15,821.2 15,588.0 15,512.9 1983-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 1,279.6 1,525.1 1,132.7 1,146.9 1,177.7 1,153.8 1983-2012 Connecticut 204.6 192.9 153.5 157.1 W 181.0 1983-2012 Maine 175.6 141.7 134.2 161.7 132.7 125.2 1983-2012 Massachusetts 819.4 1,118 676.6 675.6 720.1 710.2 1983-2012 New Hampshire 15.1 15.4 W 62.0 64.1 38.8 1983-2012 Rhode Island 33.3 30.3 75.7 67.2 W W 1983-2012 Vermont 31.6 26.9 W 23.4 23.8 W 1983-2012 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 7,527.2 7,614.5 7,315.1 7,397.0 7,311.6 7,228.9 1983-2012 Delaware 11.2 11.9 8.7 10.1 10.0 14.1 1983-2012 District of Columbia - - - - - - 1983-2012

55

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

58,386.8 57,380.8 57,511.7 61,022.4 59,252.0 55,062.2 1983-2013 58,386.8 57,380.8 57,511.7 61,022.4 59,252.0 55,062.2 1983-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 18,284.2 16,437.1 16,943.8 16,884.2 16,412.3 14,287.5 1983-2013 New England (PADD 1A) 1,211.3 1,172.2 1,228.4 1,207.8 1,432.6 1,121.1 1983-2013 Connecticut 212.1 202.7 207.0 164.4 246.4 169.3 1983-2013 Maine 115.8 127.2 131.1 141.6 144.0 137.8 1983-2013 Massachusetts 738.4 705.5 738.7 743.0 863.8 670.3 1983-2013 New Hampshire 37.4 29.5 35.2 41.8 50.6 44.1 1983-2013 Rhode Island 88.5 W 89.9 89.9 99.2 76.9 1983-2013 Vermont 19.1 W 26.5 27.0 28.7 22.7 1983-2013 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 9,320.4 7,996.8 8,594.9 8,104.5 8,284.9 7,114.1 1983-2013 Delaware W W W W W W 1983-2013 District of Columbia W W W W W W 1983-2013

56

Microsoft Word - 20.1 Special Study Reactor Type Comparison_VS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Source NRC Nuclear Regulatory Commission PBMR Pebble Bed Modular Reactor PHP Process Heat Plant PLOFC Pressurized Loss of Forced Cooling QA Quality Assurance R&D Research and...

57

The technique and preliminary results of LEU U-Mo full-size IRT type fuel testing in the MIR reactor  

SciTech Connect

In March 2007 in-pile testing of LEU U-Mo full-size IRT type fuel elements was started in the MIR reactor. Four prototype fuel elements for Uzbekistan WWR SM reactor are being tested simultaneously - two of tube type design and two of pin type design. The dismountable irradiation devices were constructed for intermediate reloading and inspection of fuel elements during reactor testing. The objective of the test is to obtain the experimental results for determination of more reliable design and licensing fuel elements for conversion of the WWR SM reactor. The heat power of fuel elements is measured on-line by thermal balance method. The distribution of fission density and burn-up of uranium in the volume of elements are calculated by using the MIR reactor MCU code (Monte-Carlo) model. In this paper the design of fuel elements, the technique, main parameters and preliminary results are described. (author)

Izhutov, A.L.; Starkov, V.A.; Pimenov, V.V.; Fedoseev, V.Ye. [Research Reactor Complex, RIAR, 433510, Dimitrovgrad-10, Ulyanovsk Region (Russian Federation); Dobrikova, I.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Suprun, V.B. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, P. O. Box 369, 123060, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kartashov, Ye.F.; Lukichev, V.A. [Research and Development Institute of Nuclear Energy and Industry, P. O. Box 788, 107014, Moscow (Russian Federation); Troyanov, V.M.; Enin, A.A.; Tkachev, A.A. [OAO 'TVEL' 119017, ul. B. Ordinka 24/26, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative Analysis of Results in the European Union Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative Analysis of Results in the European Union Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: eec.ucdavis.edu/ACEEE/2010/data/papers/2178.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-supplier-obligations-and-white Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Mandates/Targets This paper examines the ways different European Union (EU) member states,

59

Roadmap for Building Lean Supplier Networks (Roadmap Tool)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This tool represents a "how-to" implementation guide that lays out a structured process for evolving lean supply chain management capabilities in order to build lean supplier networks. The Roadmap Tool is linked to the ...

Bozdogan, Kirk

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

466.1 466.1 See footnotes at end of table. 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

532.1 532.1 See footnotes at end of table. 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration...

62

Conceptual design of the bimodal nuclear power system based on the ‘‘Romashka’’ type reactor with thermionic energy conversion system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents conceptual design of the bimodal space nuclear power system (NPS) based on the high?temperature reactor of ROMASHKA type with thermoninic energy conversion system. At the heart of the design is an employment of close?spaced thermionic diodes operating in a quasi?vacuum mode. The paper gives preliminary estimates of the NPS neutron?physical electric thermophysical and mass?dimensional parameters for the reactor electric power of 25 kW and propulsive thrust of about 80 N. Discussed are peculiarities of the combined mode wherein electric power is generated along with propulsive thrust. The paper contains results of the design studies performed by the Small Business ‘‘NP Energotech’’ under the Agreement with Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division and according to the Rocketdyne Division provided Design Requirements. Involved in the work was the team of specialists of RRC ‘‘Kurchatov Institute’’ ‘‘Red Star’’ State Enterprise and Research Institute of SPA ‘‘Luch’’

Nikolai N. Ponmarev?Stepnoi; Veniamin A. Usov; Yuri V. Nikolaev; Stanislav A. Yeriemin; Yevgeny Ye. Zhabotinski; Anatoly Ya. Galkin; Yevgeny D. Avdoshyn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nuclear reactor with internal thimble-type delayed neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention teaches improved apparatus for the method of detecting a breach in cladded fuel used in a nuclear reactor. The detector apparatus is located in the primary heat exchanger which conveys part of the reactor coolant past at least three separate delayed-neutron detectors mounted in this heat exchanger. The detectors are spaced apart such that the coolant flow time from the core to each detector is different, and these differences are known. The delayed-neutron activity at the detectors is a function of the delay time after the reaction in the fuel until the coolant carrying the delayed-neutron emitter passes the respective detector. This time delay is broken down into separate components including an isotopic holdup time required for the emitter to move through the fuel from the reaction to the coolant at the breach, and two transit times required for the emitter now in the coolant to flow from the breach to the detector loop and then via the loop to the detector. At least two of these time components are determined during calibrated operation of the reactor. Thereafter during normal reactor operation, repeated comparisons are made by the method of regression approximation of the third time component for the best-fit line correlating measured delayed-neutron activity against activity that is approximated according to specific equations. The equations use these time-delay components and known parameter values of the fuel and of the part and emitting daughter isotopes.

Gross, Kenny C. (Lemont, IL); Poloncsik, John (Downers Grove, IL); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Magnetic saturable reactor type HTS fault current limiter for electrical application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An electrical fault current limiter (FCL) developed based on the principle of a magnetic saturable reactor requires a high current ampere-turn coil as its dc bias, and this coil is necessary to use a high temperature superconducting (HTS) winding. This HTS FCL has been studied, and identified with several advantages compared to other HTS FCLs, and therefore is further considered for its practical industry application.

J.X. Jin; S.X. Dou; C. Cook; C. Grantham; M. Apperley; T. Beales

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman July 30, 2010 - 10:51am Addthis Joshua DeLung Matthew Coapman sat behind a computer for six years after college, selling advertising space across the country for major brands. When his company starting shutting down, he wasn't defeated - he saw an opportunity to reinvent himself and help his community as well. Changing Charlotte "I realized the biggest need in our community was energy conservation in the places we live and work," says Coapman, now two years into starting his business - Energy Tight. "I knew it would take getting dirty to do it, but having an experience with customers where we can give them a combination of comfort and value in their homes makes it worth it."

66

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman July 30, 2010 - 10:51am Addthis Joshua DeLung Matthew Coapman sat behind a computer for six years after college, selling advertising space across the country for major brands. When his company starting shutting down, he wasn't defeated - he saw an opportunity to reinvent himself and help his community as well. Changing Charlotte "I realized the biggest need in our community was energy conservation in the places we live and work," says Coapman, now two years into starting his business - Energy Tight. "I knew it would take getting dirty to do it, but having an experience with customers where we can give them a combination of comfort and value in their homes makes it worth it."

67

Effect of Fuel Type on the Attainable Power of the Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) is a small liquid metal cooled fast reactor that features uniform composition core, at least 20 effective full power years of operation without refueling, nearly zero burnup reactivity swing and heat removal by natural circulation. A number of cores have been designed over the last few years to provide the first three of the above features. The objective of this work is to find to what extent use of nitride fuel, with either natural or enriched nitrogen, affects the attainable power as compared to the reference metallic fueled core. All the compared cores use the same fuel rod diameter, D, and length but differ in the lattice pitch, P, and Pu weight percent. Whereas when using Pb-Bi eutectic for both primary and intermediate coolants the P/D of the metallic fueled core is 1.36, P/D for the nitride cores are, respectively, 1.21 for natural nitrogen and 1.45 for enriched nitrogen. A simple one-dimensional thermal hydraulic model has been developed for the ENHS reactor. Applying this model to the different designs it was found that when the IHX length is at its reference value of 10.4 m, the power that can be removed by natural circulation using nitride fuel with natural nitrogen is 65% of the reference power of 125 MWth that is attainable using metallic fuel. However, using enriched nitrogen the attainable power is 110% of the reference. To get 125 MWth the effective IHX length need be 8.7 m and 30.5 m for, respectively, enriched and natural nitrogen nitride fuel designs. (authors)

Okawa, Tsuyoshi; Greenspan, Ehud [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Customer Order-Driven BOCR-Based Supplier Selection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper develops a novel approach to selecting the best supplier for meeting a specific customer order with regard to the benefits, opportunities, costs and risks (BOCR) dimensions. The impact of the customer order attributes on the BOCR dimensions ... Keywords: Customer Order, Benefits, Opportunities, Costs and Risks (BOCR), Dimension Weighting, Multicriteria Decision Making (MCDM)

Chang Joo Yun; Chung-Hsing Yeh; Susan Bedingfield

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Investigation of cascade-type falling liquid-film along first wall of laser-fusion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To protect the first wall of an inertia fusion reactor from extremely high heat flux, X-rays, alpha particles and fuel debris caused by a nuclear fusion reaction, a “cascade-type” falling liquid-film flow is proposed as a “liquid-wall” concept. The flow visualization experiment to investigate the feasibility of this liquid-wall concept has been conducted. The preliminary numerical simulation results suggest that the current cascade structure design should be improved because less thermal-mixing is expected. The cascade-type structure has, therefore, been redesigned. This new cascade-type first wall consists of a liquid reservoir which has a free-surface to maintain a constant water head in the rear, and connects to a slit composed of two plates, i.e., the first wall is connected to a slit which is partially made up of the first wall to begin with it. The numerical simulations were performed on the new cascade-type first wall and they show the stable liquid-film flow on it. Moreover, the POP (proof-of-principle) flow visualization experiments, which satisfy the Weber number coincident condition, are carried out using water as the working fluid. By comparing the numerical and experimental results, it was found that the liquid-film flow with 3–5 mm thickness could be stably established. According to these results for the new cascade-type first wall concept, it was confirmed that the coolant flow rate and the thickness of the liquid-film could be controlled if the Weber number coincident condition was satisfied.

T. Kunugi; T. Nakai; Z. Kawara; T. Norimatsu; Y. Kozaki

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Bellows-Type Accumulators for Liquid Metal Loops of Space Reactor Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

In many space nuclear power systems, the primary and/or secondary loops use liquid metal working fluids, and require accumulators to accommodate the change in the liquid metal volume and maintain sufficient subcooling to avoid boiling. This paper developed redundant and light-weight bellows-type accumulators with and without a mechanical spring, and compared the operating condition and mass of the accumulators for different types of liquid metal working fluids and operating temperatures: potassium, NaK-78, sodium and lithium loops of a total capacity of 50 liters and nominal operating temperatures of 840 K, 860 K, 950 K and 1340 K, respectively. The effects of using a mechanical spring and different structural materials on the design, operation and mass of the accumulators are also investigated. The structure materials considered include SS-316, Hastelloy-X, C-103 and Mo-14Re. The accumulator without a mechanical spring weighs 23 kg and 40 kg for a coolant subcooling of 50 K and 100 K, respectively, following a loss of the fill gas. The addition of a mechanical spring comes with a mass penalty, in favor of higher redundancy and maintaining a higher liquid metal subcooling.

Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

Pellet fuelling requirements to allow self-burning on a helical-type fusion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pellet refuelling conditions to sustain a self-burning plasma have been investigated by extrapolating the confinement property of the LHD plasma, which appears to be governed by a gyro-Bohm-type confinement property. The power balance of the burning plasma is calculated taking into account the profile change with pellet deposition and subsequent density relaxation. A self-burning plasma is achieved within the scope of conventional pellet injection technology. However, a very small burn-up rate of 0.18% is predicted. Higher velocity pellet injection is effective in improving the burn-up rate by deepening particle deposition, whereas deep fuelling leads to undesirable fluctuation of the fusion output.

R. Sakamoto; J. Miyazawa; H. Yamada; S. Masuzaki; A. Sagara; the FFHR Design Group

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Portfolio for fast reactor collaboration  

SciTech Connect

The development of the LMFBR type reactor in the United Kingdom is reviewed. Design characteristics of a commercial demonstration fast reactor are presented and compared with the Super Phenix reactor.

Rippon, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Colliding Beam Fusion Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recirculating power for virtually all types of fusion reactors has previously been calculated [1] with the Fokker–Planck equation. The reactors involve non-Maxwellian plasmas. The calculations are ... the rec...

Norman Rostoker; Artan Qerushi; Michl Binderbauer

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Sandia National Laboratories Supplier Quality Requirements for Build to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supplier Quality Requirements for Build to Supplier Quality Requirements for Build to Print Hardware Purchases Subject: First Release:SNL-5-2002, Issue A, 05/16/02 Revised this 18th day'ofNovember, 2004 as F-42(QP-28)04* . Revised By: 11)' I(.~ 't:t' AntOnIO J. ~ora, 14133 14133 Manager ~ c-. m I ~~ <.:-, lL 10252 Manager? \"\\_- - II - 2.3 - 0 'i ~e~7 1 025 8 Manager$::~ R (/.tff7 J Frank A. Villareal Approved By: * The revision of the document in effect at tlte tinre of award of Purchase Order of Subcontract unless otherwise noted on the Procurement Document. F-42(QP-28)O4 Quality Assurance Supplement to Sandia Contracts and Purchase Orders (- rr -°1 I 11/18/04 1.0 Scope: The scope of this document is designed to establish a level of quality for purchases and hardware procured in the form of built to print items,

75

Suspect/Counterfeit Items Information Guide for Subcontractors/Suppliers  

SciTech Connect

Counterfeiting of industrial and commercial grade items is an international problem that places worker safety, program objectives, expensive equipment, and security at risk. In order to prevent the introduction of Suspect/Counterfeit Items (S/CI), this information sheet is being made available as a guide to assist in the implementation of S/CI awareness and controls, in conjunction with subcontractor's/supplier's quality assurance programs. When it comes to counterfeit goods, including industrial materials, items, and equipment, no market is immune. Some manufactures have been known to misrepresent their products and intentionally use inferior materials and processes to manufacture substandard items, whose properties can significantly cart from established standards and specifications. These substandard items termed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as S/CI, pose immediate and potential threats to the safety of DOE and contractor workers, the public, and the environment. Failure of certain systems and processes caused by an S/CI could also have national security implications at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Nuclear Safety Rules (federal Laws), DOE Orders, and other regulations set forth requirements for DOE contractors to implement effective controls to assure that items and services meet specified requirements. This includes techniques to implement and thereby minimizing the potential threat of entry of S/CI to LANL. As a qualified supplier of goods or services to the LANL, your company will be required to establish and maintain effective controls to prevent the introduction of S/CI to LANL. This will require that your company warrant that all items (including their subassemblies, components, and parts) sold to LANL are genuine (i.e. not counterfeit), new, and unused, and conform to the requirements of the LANL purchase orders/contracts unless otherwise approved in writing to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) contract administrator/procurements specialist.

Tessmar, Nancy D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Michael J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

Your're Invited: Join Our Supplier Outreach Event on August 19th |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your're Invited: Join Our Supplier Outreach Event on August 19th Your're Invited: Join Our Supplier Outreach Event on August 19th Your're Invited: Join Our Supplier Outreach Event on August 19th July 27, 2011 - 6:00pm Addthis On August 19, 2011, the Department of Energy will be co-sponsoring a suppliers outreach event for suppliers who wish to provide services to Service Disabled Veteran Owned Businesses. This event, Showcase Expo and MatchMaker, will be held in Washington D.C., and is co-sponsored by GovConectx. This outreach event is an excellent opportunity for companies interested in working with us to gain insights into the current and future markets for products, services, and requirements to enter or to continue to work on projects with us. Participants will also have the opportunity to interact directly with outreach and procurement personnel working for the Department

77

TYPE A VERIFICATION REPORT FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR STACK AND GROUNDS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-08-0  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA).

Evan Harpenau

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Nuclear Reactor (atomic reactor)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor splits Uranium or Plutonium nuclei, and the...235 is fissionable but more than 99% of the naturally occurring Uranium is U238 that makes enrichment mandatory. In some reactors U238 and Thorium23...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Type A verification report for the high flux beam reactor stack and grounds, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA). The HFBR Stack and Grounds surveys began in June 2011 and were completed in September 2011. Survey activities by BSA included gamma walkover scans and sampling of the as-left soils in accordance with the BSA Work Procedure (BNL 2010a). The Field Sampling Plan - Stack and Remaining HFBR Outside Areas (FSP) stated that gamma walk-over surveys would be conducted with a bare sodium iodide (NaI) detector, and a collimated detector would be used to check areas with elevated count rates to locate the source of the high readings (BNL 2010b). BSA used the Mult- Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) principles for determining the classifications of each survey unit. Therefore, SUs 6 and 7 were identified as Class 1 and SU 8 was deemed Class 2 (BNL 2010b). Gamma walkover surveys of SUs 6, 7, and 8 were completed using a 2?2 NaI detector coupled to a data-logger with a global positioning system (GPS). The 100% scan surveys conducted prior to the final status survey (FSS) sampling identified two general soil areas and two isolated soil locations with elevated radioactivity. The general areas of elevated activity identified were investigated further with a collimated NaI detector. The uncollimated average gamma count rate was less than 15,000 counts per minute (cpm) for the SU 6, 7, and 8 composite area (BNL 2011a). Elevated count rates were observed in portions of each survey unit. The general areas of elevated counts near the Building 801 ventilation and operations and the entry to the Stack were determined to be directly related to the radioactive processes in those structures. To compensate for this radioactive shine, a collimated or shielded detector was used to lower the background count rate (BNL 2011b and c). This allowed the surveyor(s) to distinguish between background and actual radioactive contamination. Collimated gamma survey count rates in these shine affected areas were below 9,000 cpm (BNL 2011a). The average background count rate of 7,500 cpm was reported by BSA for uncollimated NaI detectors (BNL 2011d). The average collimated background ranged from 4,500-6,500 cpm in the westernmost part of SU 8 and from 2,000-3,500 cpm in all other areas (BNL 2011e). Based on these data, no further investigations were necessary for these general areas. SU 8 was the only survey unit that exhibited verified elevated radioactivity levels. The first of two isolated locations of elevated radioactivity had an uncollimated direct measurement of 50,000 cpm with an area background of 7,500 cpm (BNL 2011f). The second small area exhibiting elevated radiation levels was identified at a depth of 6 inches from the surface. The maximum reported count rate of 28,000 cpm was observed during scanning (BNL 2011g). The affected areas were remediated, and the contaminated soils were placed in an intermodal container for disposal. BSA's post-remediation walkover surveys were expanded to include a 10-foot radius around the excavated locations, and it was determined that further investigation was not required for these areas (BNL 2011 f and g). The post-remediation soil samples were collected and analyzed with onsite gamma spectroscopy equipment. These samples were also included with the FSS s

Harpenau, Evan M.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Verification Calculation Results to Validate the Procedures and Codes for Pin-by-Pin Power Computation in VVER Type Reactors with MOX Fuel Loading  

SciTech Connect

One of the important problems for ensuring the VVER type reactor safety when the reactor is partially loaded with MOX fuel is the choice of appropriate physical zoning to achieve the maximum flattening of pin-by-pin power distribution. When uranium fuel is replaced by MOX one provided that the reactivity due to fuel assemblies is kept constant, the fuel enrichment slightly decreases. However, the average neutron spectrum fission microscopic cross-section for {sup 239}Pu is approximately twice that for {sup 235}U. Therefore power peaks occur in the peripheral fuel assemblies containing MOX fuel which are aggravated by the interassembly water. Physical zoning has to be applied to flatten the power peaks in fuel assemblies containing MOX fuel. Moreover, physical zoning cannot be confined to one row of fuel elements as is the case with a uniform lattice of uranium fuel assemblies. Both the water gap and the jump in neutron absorption macroscopic cross-sections which occurs at the interface of fuel assemblies with different fuels make the problem of calculating space-energy neutron flux distribution more complicated since it increases nondiffusibility effects. To solve this problem it is necessary to update the current codes, to develop new codes and to verify all the codes including nuclear-physical constants libraries employed. In so doing it is important to develop and validate codes of different levels--from design codes to benchmark ones. This paper presents the results of the burnup calculation for a multiassembly structure, consisting of MOX fuel assemblies surrounded by uranium dioxide fuel assemblies. The structure concerned can be assumed to model a fuel assembly lattice symmetry element of the VVER-1000 type reactor in which 1/4 of all fuel assemblies contains MOX fuel.

Chizhikova, Z.N.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Kapranova, E.N.; Korobitsyn, V.E.; Manturov, G.N.; Tsiboulia, A.A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A new type of Neutrino Detector for Sterile Neutrino Search at Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a new detector, called NuLat, to study electron anti-neutrinos a few meters from a nuclear reactor, and search for anomalous neutrino oscillations. Such oscillations could be caused by sterile neutrinos, and might explain the "Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly". NuLat, is made possible by a natural synergy between the miniTimeCube and mini-LENS programs described in this paper. It features a "Raghavan Optical Lattice" (ROL) consisting of 3375 boron or $^6$Li loaded plastic scintillator cubical cells 6.3\\,cm (2.500") on a side. Cell boundaries have a 0.127\\,mm (0.005") air gap, resulting in total internal reflection guiding most of the light down the 3 cardinal directions. The ROL detector technology for NuLat gives excellent spatial and energy resolution and allows for in-depth event topology studies. These features allow us to discern inverse beta decay (IBD) signals and the putative oscillation pattern, even in the presence of other backgrounds. We discuss here test venues, efficiency, sensitivity an...

Lane, C; Blackmon, J; Rasco, C; Mumm, H P; Markoff, D; Jocher, G R; Dorrill, R; Duvall, M; Learned, J G; Li, V; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Milincic, R; Negrashov, S; Sakai, M; Rosen, M; Varner, G; Huber, P; Pitt, M L; Rountree, S D; Vogelaar, R B; Wright, T; Yokley, Z

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Utilization of Refractory Metals and Alloys in Fusion Reactor Structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In design of fusion reactors, structural material selection is very crucial to improve reactor’s performance. Different types of materials have been proposed for use in fusion reactor structures. Among these mate...

Mustafa Übeyli; ?enay Yalç?n

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Microsoft Word - Managing Your iSupplier Profile Job Aid R12 05092012.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Contents of Contents Summary of Your iSupplier Profile...........................................................................................................................2 Accessing Your Account for the First Time.............................................................................................................2 Navigating to Your Profile.........................................................................................................................................3 Company Information (a.k.a. Profile Management)............................................................................................4 Organization...............................................................................................................................................................5

84

Managing multi-tiered suppliers in the high-tech industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a roadmap for companies to follow as they manage multi-tiered suppliers in the high-tech industry. Our research covered a host of sources including interviews and publications from various companies, ...

Frantz, Charles E. (Charles Evan)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Functional reliability evaluation of an MTR-pool type research reactor core using the load–capacity interference model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the functional reliability evaluation of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) core in normal operation. The concept of functional reliability, borrowed from reliability physics, uses the well-known resistance–stress or load–capacity interference model that is used in the structural reliability framework. To use the load–capacity interference model, uncertainties of significant parameters in system performance are propagated into system dynamics modeled with RELAP5/Mod 3.2 using Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) method and exceedance probability (EP) model is used as quantification method. The proposed method in this paper solves a common problem in reliability analysis, i.e., lack of sufficient failure data in specific operating conditions. Although defining failure criteria in normal operation are difficult, this paper focuses on the application of multiple states criteria to determine the status of a system. The status of the reactor core in normal operation is considered multiple states regarding to a performance representative parameter that is temperature in this work. Outlet temperatures of fuel hot and average channels were selected to be performance indicators in normal operation. Consulting with TRR engineers and operators as well as safety analysis report, two failure states were considered exceeding 65.1 °C and 58.9 °C for the hot channel and 50.4 °C and 45.6 °C for the average channel as upper and lower limits respectively. The calculated reliability was 9.1e?01 with 95% of confidence interval, which is in good agreement with experimental results. Using sensitivity analysis in input parameters, it was concluded that the value of the heat transfer coefficient parameter in fuel has the most significant effect on the results.

Ramin Barati; Saeed Setayeshi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr '11 to May '11: -1.7% Apr '11 to May '11: -1.7% May '10 to May '11: -0.8% YTD '10 to YTD '11: +0.7% 1,800 1,900 2,000 allons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales Adjusted Growth Rates* 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '11 to May '11: -0.1% May '10 to May '11: -5.1% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -3.0% Prime Supplier Report May 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '11 to May '11: -2.5% May '10 to May '11: -19.2% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -11.1% 1,400

87

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May '11 to Jun '11: +5.1% May '11 to Jun '11: +5.1% Jun '10 to Jun '11: -0.7% YTD '10 to YTD '11: +0.4% 1,800 1,900 2,000 Gallons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales Adjusted Growth Rates* 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '11 to Jun '11: +2.9% Jun '10 to Jun '11: -4.3% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -3.2% Prime Supplier Report June 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '11 to Jun '11: +8.4% Jun '10 to Jun '11: -8.1% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -10.7% 1,400

88

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul '11 to Aug '11: 8.4% Jul '11 to Aug '11: 8.4% Aug '10 to Aug '11: 2.4% YTD '10 to YTD '11: 0.2% 1 700 1,800 1,900 2,000 f Gallons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales Adjusted Growth Rates* J l '11 t A '11 1 9% 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '11 to Aug '11: 2.9% Aug '10 to Aug '11: -2.5% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -3.5% Prime Supplier Report August 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '11 to Aug '11: -13.9% Aug '10 to Aug '11: -26.9% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -13.7%

89

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun '11 to Jul '11: -6.9% Jun '11 to Jul '11: -6.9% Jul '10 to Jul '11: -3.0% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -0.0% 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 of Gallons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '11 to Jul '11: -2.2% 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '11 to Jul '11: -1.1% Jul '10 to Jul '11: -5.6% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -3.6% Prime Supplier Report July 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '11 to Jul '11: -11.8% Jul '10 to Jul '11: -19.8%

90

Towards a desalination initiative using cogeneration with an advanced reactor type and uranium recovered from Moroccan phosphoric acid production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Morocco is known to be among the first few countries to produce phosphate and phosphoric acid. Moroccan phosphate contains substantial amounts of uranium. This uranium can be recovered from the phosphate ore as a by-product during the production of phosphoric acid. Uranium extraction processes linked with phosphoric acid fabrication have been used industrially in some countries. This is done mainly by solvent extraction. Although, the present price of uranium is low in the international market, such uranium recovery could be considered as a side product of phosphoric acid production. The price of uranium has a very small impact on the cost of nuclear energy obtained from it. This paper focuses on the extraction of uranium salt from phosphate rock. If uranium is recovered in Morocco in the proposed manner, it could serve as feed for a number of nuclear power plants. The natural uranium product would have to be either enriched or blended as mixed-oxide fuel to manufacture adequate nuclear fuel. Part of this fuel would feed a desalination initiative using a high temperature reactor of the new generation, chosen for its intrinsic safety, sturdiness, ease of maintenance, thermodynamic characteristics and long fuel life between reloads, that is, good economy. ?n international cooperation based on commercial contract schemes would concern: the general project and uranium extraction; uranium enrichment and fuel fabrication services; the nuclear power plant; and the desalination plant. This paper presents the overall feasibility of the general project with some quantitative preliminary figures and cost estimates.

Michel Lung; Abdelaali Kossir; Driss Msatef

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Environmental Stewardship: How Semiconductor Suppliers Help to Meet Energy-Efficiency Regulations and Voluntary Specifications in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How Semiconductor Suppliers Help to Meet Energy-EfficiencyCorrection (PFC) controllers helps to regulate current tofurther be achieved to help to meet some of the stringent

Aizhen, Li; Fanara, Andrew; Fridley, David; Merriman, Louise; Ju, Jeff

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

93

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov Nov '03 to Dec '03: +1.5% Dec '02 to Dec '03: +1.5% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.2% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '03 to Dec '03: +8.0% Dec '02 to Dec '03: +3.4% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +3.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '03 to Dec '03: +2.8% Dec '02 to Dec '03: -6.0% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -8.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '03 to Dec '03: +38.3% Dec '02 to Dec '03: -0.5% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report December 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800

94

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct Oct '02 to Nov '02: -2.3% Nov '01 to Nov '02: +0.8% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +2.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '02 to Nov '02: -3.8% Nov '01 to Nov '02: -1.6% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -4.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '02 to Nov '02: -2.4% Nov '01 to Nov '02: -1.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -2.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '02 to Nov '02: +7.2% Nov '01 to Nov '02: +2.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -4.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report November 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

95

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dec Dec '01 to Jan '02: -3.2% Jan '01 to Jan '02: +5.0% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +5.0% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '01 to Jan '02: +9.3% Jan '01 to Jan '02: -10.4% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -10.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '01 to Jan '02: -5.2% Jan '01 to Jan '02: -7.9% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -7.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '01 to Jan '02: +9.6% Jan '01 to Jan '02: -11.0% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -11.0% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report January 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

96

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug Aug '02 to Sep '02: -6.8% Sep '01 to Sep '02: +1.9% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +2.8% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '02 to Sep '02: -2.0% Sep '01 to Sep '02: -3.2% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '02 to Sep '02: -0.5% Sep '01 to Sep '02: +10.8% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '02 to Sep '02: +5.0% Sep '01 to Sep '02: -14.9% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.8% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report September 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

97

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov Nov '01 to Dec '01: -0.8% Dec '00 to Dec '01: +0.2% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '01 to Dec '01: -4.5% Dec '00 to Dec '01: -11.7% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +2.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '01 to Dec '01: -2.9% Dec '00 to Dec '01: -6.7% YTD '00 to YTD '01: -0.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '01 to Dec '01: +16.7% Dec '00 to Dec '01: -19.1% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report December 2001 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

98

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar Mar '05 to Apr '05: +0.2% Apr '04 to Apr '05: +1.8% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +2.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ar '05 to Apr '05: -9.6% Apr '04 to Apr '05: -3.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -0.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '05 to Apr '05: +1.4% Apr '04 to Apr '05: -0.5% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +1.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '05 to Apr '05: -32.2% Apr '04 to Apr '05: -6.5% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -5.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report April 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

99

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul Jul '03 to Aug '03: +0.3% Aug '02 to Aug '03: +0.3% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.9% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '03 to Aug '03: -2.2% Aug '02 to Aug '03: -1.3% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +3.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '03 to Aug '03: +0.8% Aug '02 to Aug '03: -7.7% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -7.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '03 to Aug '03: +3.7% Aug '02 to Aug '03: -3.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.6% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report August 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

100

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr Apr '03 to May '03: +4.2% May '02 to May '03: -0.9% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -1.9% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '03 to M ay '03: -5.5% M ay '02 to M ay '03: -1.6% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +4.5% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '03 to May '03: +0.2% May '02 to May '03: -9.1% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -7.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '03 to May '03: -21.5% May '02 to May '03: -15.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.5% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report May 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug Aug '03 to Sep '03: -4.1% Sep '02 to Sep '03: +3.4% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '03 to Sep '03: +6.6% Sep '02 to Sep '03: +7.6% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +4.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '03 to Sep '03: +0.9% Sep '02 to Sep '03: -6.1% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -7.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '03 to Sep '03: +19.6% Sep '02 to Sep '03: +10.6% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +0.5% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report September 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700

102

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun Jun '01 to Jul '01: -0.5% Jul '00 to Jul '01: +1.8% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '01 to Jul '01: -2.5% Jul '00 to Jul '01: +2.9% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +5.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '01 to Jul '01: +2.0% Jul '00 to Jul '01: +1.5% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +3.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '01 to Jul '01: +10.3% Jul '00 to Jul '01: +15.7% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +7.5% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report July 2001 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

103

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct Oct '03 to Nov '03: -4.5% Nov '02 to Nov '03: -1.0% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.3% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '03 to Nov '03: -10.0% Nov '02 to Nov '03: -3.4% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +3.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '03 to Nov '03: -3.0% Nov '02 to Nov '03: -10.9% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -8.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '03 to Nov '03: -1.7% Nov '02 to Nov '03: -10.3% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report November 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700

104

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May May '05 to Jun '05: +2.2% Jun '04 to Jun '05: +3.8% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +3.2% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ay '05 to Jun '05: +1.8% Jun '04 to Jun '05: +1.6% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +0.5% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '05 to Jun '05: +5.7% Jun '04 to Jun '05: +2.5% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +1.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '05 to Jun '05: +7.2% Jun '04 to Jun '05: -10.0% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -6.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report June 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

105

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dec Dec '04 to Jan '05: -8.2% Jan '04 to Jan '05: +1.1% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +1.1% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '04 to Jan '05: -1.7% Jan '04 to Jan '05: -5.2% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -5.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '04 to Jan '05: -5.1% Jan '04 to Jan '05: -0.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -0.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '04 to Jan '05: -3.1% Jan '04 to Jan '05: -12.1% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -12.1% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report January 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700

106

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul Jul '04 to Aug '04: -0.1% Aug '03 to Aug '04: -1.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '04 to Aug '04: +2.3% Aug '03 to Aug '04: +5.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '04 to Aug '04: +3.8% Aug '03 to Aug '04: +9.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '04 to Aug '04: +4.7% Aug '03 to Aug '04: +3.8% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +5.5% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report August 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

107

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug Aug '01 to Sep '01: -6.7% Sep '00 to Sep '01: +0.0% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '01 to Sep '01: -2.0% Sep '00 to Sep '01: -0.7% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +4.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '01 to Sep '01: -18.2% Sep '00 to Sep '01: -14.5% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '01 to Sep '01: +9.2% Sep '00 to Sep '01: +1.9% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +5.8% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report September 2001 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

108

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar Mar '02 to Apr '02: +3.1% Apr '01 to Apr '02: +3.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +3.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ar '02 to Apr '02: +2.0% Apr '01 to Apr '02: -4.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -8.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '02 to Apr '02: -1.9% Apr '01 to Apr '02: -0.2% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -2.8% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '02 to Apr '02: -22.3% Apr '01 to Apr '02: +9.9% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.0% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report April 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

109

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jan Jan '03 to Feb '03: +1.1% Feb '02 to Feb '03: -2.8% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -1.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '03 to Feb '03: -2.9% Feb '02 to Feb '03: +7.1% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +7.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '03 to Feb '03: +4.6% Feb '02 to Feb '03: -3.8% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -2.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '03 to Feb '03: -10.7% Feb '02 to Feb '03: +16.0% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +10.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report February 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700

110

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun Jun '04 to Jul '04: +0.6% Jul '03 to Jul '04: -0.9% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '04 to Jul '04: -4.8% Jul '03 to Jul '04: +0.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '04 to Jul '04: -3.1% Jul '03 to Jul '04: +6.5% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.6% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '04 to Jul '04: +0.6% Jul '03 to Jul '04: +3.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +5.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report July 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900

111

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr Apr '02 to May '02: +1.9% May '01 to May '02: +4.9% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +3.9% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '02 to M ay '02: -2.2% M ay '01 to M ay '02: -0.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -6.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '02 to May '02: -3.6% May '01 to May '02: -7.7% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '02 to May '02: -8.3% May '01 to May '02: +5.8% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.5% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report May 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100

112

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov Nov '04 to Dec '04: +3.0% Dec '03 to Dec '04: +3.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '04 to Dec '04: +4.3% Dec '03 to Dec '04: +3.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '04 to Dec '04: -0.9% Dec '03 to Dec '04: +4.1% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '04 to Dec '04: +24.2% Dec '03 to Dec '04: +4.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +5.1% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report December 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700

113

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep Sep '01 to Oct '01: +3.2% Oct '00 to Oct '01: +3.1% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '01 to Oct '01: +8.7% Oct '00 to Oct '01: +2.6% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +4.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '01 to Oct '01: -1.9% Oct '00 to Oct '01: -12.0% YTD '00 to YTD '01: -0.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '01 to Oct '01: +16.2% Oct '00 to Oct '01: +9.7% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +6.2% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report October 2001 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

114

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar Mar '04 to Apr '04: +1.7% Apr '03 to Apr '04: +3.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.2% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ar '04 to Apr '04: -2.0% Apr '03 to Apr '04: +5.5% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '04 to Apr '04: +5.2% Apr '03 to Apr '04: +15.0% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +5.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '04 to Apr '04: -22.8% Apr '03 to Apr '04: -0.7% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +3.1% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report April 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

115

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May May '02 to Jun '02: +0.0% Jun '01 to Jun '02: +2.4% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +3.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ay '02 to Jun '02: -4.0% Jun '01 to Jun '02: -2.1% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -6.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '02 to Jun '02: +3.6% Jun '01 to Jun '02: -5.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -4.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '02 to Jun '02: +6.6% Jun '01 to Jun '02: +8.0% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -2.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report June 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100

116

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb Feb '03 to Mar '03: +0.7% Mar '02 to Mar '03: -2.0% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -1.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '03 to M ar '03: -8.4% M ar '02 to M ar '03: +6.3% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +7.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '03 to Mar '03: -1.8% Mar '02 to Mar '03: -10.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -5.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '03 to Mar '03: -30.2% Mar '02 to Mar '03: -12.1% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +3.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report March 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800

117

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul Jul '02 to Aug '02: +1.2% Aug '01 to Aug '02: +1.6% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +2.9% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '02 to Aug '02: +1.8% Aug '01 to Aug '02: -4.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '02 to Aug '02: -4.6% Aug '01 to Aug '02: -9.4% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.0% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '02 to Aug '02: +8.7% Aug '01 to Aug '02: -12.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -4.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report August 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

118

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May May '03 to Jun '03: +1.2% Jun '02 to Jun '03: -0.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -1.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ay '03 to Jun '03: +0.6% Jun '02 to Jun '03: +2.7% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +4.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '03 to Jun '03: +5.1% Jun '02 to Jun '03: -6.7% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -7.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '03 to Jun '03: +11.9% Jun '02 to Jun '03: -12.7% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -2.3% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report June 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

119

X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep Sep '05 to Oct '05: +0.3% Oct '04 to Oct '05: +0.4% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +2.3% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '05 to Oct '05: -1.9% Oct '04 to Oct '05: +0.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +1.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '05 to Oct '05: -4.4% Oct '04 to Oct '05: +0.9% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +3.8% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '05 to Oct '05: +7.5% Oct '04 to Oct '05: -5.9% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -4.8% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report October 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

120

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb Feb '05 to Mar '05: +2.8% Mar '04 to Mar '05: +3.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +3.0% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '05 to M ar '05: +3.2% M ar '04 to M ar '05: +4.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -0.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '05 to Mar '05: +0.6% Mar '04 to Mar '05: +3.2% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +2.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '05 to Mar '05: -14.9% Mar '04 to Mar '05: +5.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -5.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report March 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct Oct '01 to Nov '01: -1.5% Nov '00 to Nov '01: +2.0% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '01 to Nov '01: -3.4% Nov '00 to Nov '01: +0.8% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +3.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '01 to Nov '01: +11.1% Nov '00 to Nov '01: -2.9% YTD '00 to YTD '01: -0.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '01 to Nov '01: -0.8% Nov '00 to Nov '01: -4.5% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +5.1% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report November 2001 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

122

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr Apr '04 to May '04: +0.5% May '03 to May '04: -0.5% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '04 to M ay '04: -7.9% M ay '03 to M ay '04: +2.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '04 to May '04: -5.1% May '03 to May '04: +8.1% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +6.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '04 to May '04: -13.3% May '03 to May '04: +10.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +4.0% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report May 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

123

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar Mar '03 to Apr '03: +2.8% Apr '02 to Apr '03: -3.0% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -2.1% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ar '03 to Apr '03: -1.6% Apr '02 to Apr '03: +1.5% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +6.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '03 to Apr '03: -4.0% Apr '02 to Apr '03: -11.6% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -6.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '03 to Apr '03: -17.0% Apr '02 to Apr '03: -6.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +1.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report April 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

124

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun Jun '02 to Jul '02: +0.2% Jul '01 to Jul '02: +3.7% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +3.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '02 to Jul '02: -0.1% Jul '01 to Jul '02: +1.0% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '02 to Jul '02: +6.6% Jul '01 to Jul '02: -1.0% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '02 to Jul '02: -9.8% Jul '01 to Jul '02: -11.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.8% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report July 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

125

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb Feb '04 to Mar '04: +4.1% Mar '03 to Mar '04: +4.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.8% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '04 to M ar '04: -0.4% M ar '03 to M ar '04: +5.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '04 to Mar '04: +1.9% Mar '03 to Mar '04: +4.0% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '04 to Mar '04: -23.5% Mar '03 to Mar '04: +10.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +4.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report March 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

126

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jan Jan '04 to Feb '04: +2.2% Feb '03 to Feb '04: +1.1% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '04 to Feb '04: -3.4% Feb '03 to Feb '04: -3.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: -1.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '04 to Feb '04: +2.1% Feb '03 to Feb '04: +1.0% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '04 to Feb '04: -12.1% Feb '03 to Feb '04: +2.8% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +3.4% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report February 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800

127

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct Oct '04 to Nov '04: -0.6% Nov '03 to Nov '04: +1.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.3% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '04 to Nov '04: -0.7% Nov '03 to Nov '04: +6.7% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '04 to Nov '04: -0.1% Nov '03 to Nov '04: +7.1% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.6% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '04 to Nov '04: +14.7% Nov '03 to Nov '04: +16.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +5.3% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report November 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700

128

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb Feb '02 to Mar '02: +0.2% Mar '01 to Mar '02: +2.1% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +3.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '02 to M ar '02: -5.3% M ar '01 to M ar '02: -11.1% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -9.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '02 to Mar '02: +5.0% Mar '01 to Mar '02: -0.7% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '02 to Mar '02: -8.2% Mar '01 to Mar '02: -4.4% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -7.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report March 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

129

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep Sep '03 to Oct '03: +1.3% Oct '02 to Oct '03: +1.4% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.3% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '03 to Oct '03: +6.3% Oct '02 to Oct '03: +3.8% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +4.0% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '03 to Oct '03: -5.5% Oct '02 to Oct '03: -11.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -8.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '03 to Oct '03: +13.3% Oct '02 to Oct '03: -2.3% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +0.2% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report October 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800

130

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov Nov '02 to Dec '02: -0.8% Dec '01 to Dec '02: +0.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +2.4% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '02 to Dec '02: +1.8% Dec '01 to Dec '02: +5.4% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '02 to Dec '02: -3.6% Dec '01 to Dec '02: -2.2% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -2.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '02 to Dec '02: +24.7% Dec '01 to Dec '02: +9.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.4% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report December 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

131

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep Sep '04 to Oct '04: -0.8% Oct '03 to Oct '04: -1.9% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.2% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '04 to Oct '04: +0.4% Oct '03 to Oct '04: -3.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '04 to Oct '04: -2.0% Oct '03 to Oct '04: +8.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '04 to Oct '04: +15.4% Oct '03 to Oct '04: -0.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +4.1% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report October 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700

132

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jan Jan '02 to Feb '02: +4.0% Feb '01 to Feb '02: +4.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +4.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '02 to Feb '02: -1.8% Feb '01 to Feb '02: -5.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -8.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '02 to Feb '02: +7.3% Feb '01 to Feb '02: -2.6% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '02 to Feb '02: -17.6% Feb '01 to Feb '02: -6.6% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -9.2% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report February 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

133

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dec Dec '03 to Jan '04: -6.2% Jan '03 to Jan '04: -0.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: -0.4% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '03 to Jan '04: +6.2% Jan '03 to Jan '04: -1.5% YTD '03 to YTD '04: -1.5% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '03 to Jan '04: -1.8% Jan '03 to Jan '04: +0.9% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '03 to Jan '04: +11.2% Jan '03 to Jan '04: +1.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.2% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report January 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800

134

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dec Dec '02 to Jan '03: -3.6% Jan '02 to Jan '03: +0.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +0.2% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '02 to Jan '03: +11.4% Jan '02 to Jan '03: +7.9% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +7.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '02 to Jan '03: -5.3% Jan '02 to Jan '03: -1.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -1.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '02 to Jan '03: +6.5% Jan '02 to Jan '03: +3.6% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +3.6% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report January 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

135

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug Aug '04 to Sep '04: -2.5% Sep '03 to Sep '04: +0.0% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.4% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '04 to Sep '04: +4.5% Sep '03 to Sep '04: +2.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '04 to Sep '04: -2.4% Sep '03 to Sep '04: +5.7% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.6% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '04 to Sep '04: +7.4% Sep '03 to Sep '04: -6.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +4.2% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report September 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700

136

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr Apr '05 to May '05: +1.8% May '04 to May '05: +3.4% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +2.8% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '05 to M ay '05: -0.3% M ay '04 to M ay '05: +5.7% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +0.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '05 to May '05: -1.0% May '04 to May '05: +3.7% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +1.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '05 to May '05: -13.7% May '04 to May '05: -7.7% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -6.3% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report May 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900

137

,"U.S. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products" Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Motor Gasoline by Grade and Formulation",13,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 2","Motor Gasoline by Formulation",3,"Monthly","9/2013","10/15/1993" ,"Data 3","Other Products",17,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","11/26/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_prim_dcu_nus_m.xls"

138

Fuzzy multiple goal programming applied to TFT-LCD supplier selection by downstream manufacturers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In today's highly competitive environment, a good supply chain relationship is essential for a company to survive and to acquire reasonable profit. While a few large companies may be able to vertically integrate from the design stage to the final distribution ... Keywords: Fuzzy analytic hierarchy process, Fuzzy multiple goal programming, Performance, Supplier selection, TFT-LCD

Amy H. I. Lee; He-Yau Kang; Ching-Ter Chang

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

New fast-reactor approach. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

The design parameters for a 1000 MW LMFBR type reactor are presented. The design requires the multiple primary coolant pumps and heat exchangers to be located around the core within the reactor vessel.

Folkrod, J.R.; Kann, W.J.; Klocksieben, R.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Microsoft Word - power_reactors_briggs.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Most common - Boiling Water and Pressurized Most common - Boiling Water and Pressurized Water Reactors About 80% of the world's nuclear reactors used for generating electricity are either boiling water reactors or pressurized water reactors. Of these, about 30% are boiling water reactors and 70% are pressurized water reactors. All power reactors currently in use in the United States are of these two types. Both types of reactors have been very successfully used for reliable, on-demand, emissions-free electricity generation for decades. How does a boiling water reactor work? Water flows from the bottom of the fuel to the top of the fuel, and as it moves past the fuel, it carries away the heat produced by the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NUCLEAR REACTORS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nuclear reactors are devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain… (more)

Belachew, Dessalegn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Prime Supplier Report, March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration/Prime Supplier Report, March 2013 Administration/Prime Supplier Report, March 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 4,100 4,400 4,700 5,000 5,300 5,600 5,900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '13 to Jul '13: 0.2% Jul '12 to Jul '13: 1.9% YTD '12 to YTD '13: 2.0% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '13 to Jul '13: 8.3% Jul '12 to Jul '13: -10.2% YTD '12 to YTD '13: -8.6% 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

143

naval reactors  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

After operating for 34 years and training over 14,000 sailors, the Department of Energy S1C Prototype Reactor Site in Windsor, Connecticut, was returned to "green field"...

144

LIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIMITED POWER BURSTS IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS M. V. Bazhenov and E. F. Sabaev UDC employed for analyzing reactor dynamics. Equations of this type are used for analyzing the stability of the reactor power, etc. Among these problems the question of the boundedness of reactor power bursts

Bazhenov, Maxim

145

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE BROOKHAVEN GRAPHITE RESEARCH REACTOR ENGINEERED CAP, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-07-0  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Engineered Cap at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) have completed removal of affected soils and performed as-left surveys by BSA associated with the BGRR Engineered Cap. Sample results have been submitted, as required, to demonstrate that remediation efforts comply with the cleanup goal of {approx}15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years (BNL 2011a).

Evan Harpenau

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects  

SciTech Connect

To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

None

1981-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

Temperature effects on chemical reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we had to study some characteristics of the chemical reactors from which we can understand the reactor operation in different circumstances; from these and the most important factor that has a great effect on the reactor operation is the temperature it is a mathematical processing of a chemical problem that was already studied but it may be developed by introducing new strategies of control; in our case we deal with the analysis of a liquid?gas reactor which can make the flotation of the benzene to produce the ethylene; this type of reactors can be used in vast domains of the chemical industry especially in refinery plants where we find the oil separation and its extractions whether they are gases or liquids which become necessary for industrial technology especially in our century.

M. Azzouzi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report, May 8, 2004, Exothermic Metal Reactor Event During Sodium Transfer Activities, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board (Board) appointed by Gerald Boyd, Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy. The Board was appointed to perform a Type B investigation of the accident and prepare an investigation report in accordance with DOE O 225.1A, Accident Investigations.

149

Light Water Reactor Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

150

Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for a sodium cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The sodium cooled nuclear reactor is of the type having a reactor vessel liner separating the reactor hot pool on the upstream side of an intermediate heat exchanger and the reactor cold pool on the downstream side of the intermediate heat exchanger. The improvement includes a flow path across the reactor vessel liner flow gap which dissipates core heat across the reactor vessel and containment vessel responsive to a casualty including the loss of normal heat removal paths and associated shutdown of the main coolant liquid sodium pumps. In normal operation, the reactor vessel cold pool is inlet to the suction side of coolant liquid sodium pumps, these pumps being of the electromagnetic variety. The pumps discharge through the core into the reactor hot pool and then through an intermediate heat exchanger where the heat generated in the reactor core is discharged. Upon outlet from the heat exchanger, the sodium is returned to the reactor cold pool. The improvement includes placing a jet pump across the reactor vessel liner flow gap, pumping a small flow of liquid sodium from the lower pressure cold pool into the hot pool. The jet pump has a small high pressure driving stream diverted from the high pressure side of the reactor pumps. During normal operation, the jet pumps supplement the normal reactor pressure differential from the lower pressure cold pool to the hot pool. Upon the occurrence of a casualty involving loss of coolant pump pressure, and immediate cooling circuit is established by the back flow of sodium through the jet pumps from the reactor vessel hot pool to the reactor vessel cold pool. The cooling circuit includes flow into the reactor vessel liner flow gap immediate the reactor vessel wall and containment vessel where optimum and immediate discharge of residual reactor heat occurs.

Hunsbedt, Anstein N. (Los Gatos, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories pulse nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has designed, constructed and operated bare metal Godiva-type and pool-type pulse reactors since 1961. The reactor facilities were designed to support a wide spectrum of research, development, and testing activities associated with weapon and reactor systems.

Schmidt, T.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reuscher, J.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors  

SciTech Connect

The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Physics of nuclear reactor safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Provides a concise review of the physical aspects of safety of nuclear fission reactors. It covers the developments of roughly the last decade. The introductory chapter contains an analysis of the changes in safety philosophy that are characteristic of the last decade and that have given rise to an increased importance of physical aspects because of the emphasis on passive or natural safety. The second chapter focuses on the basics of reactor safety, identifying the main risk sources and the main principles for a safe design. The third chapter concerns a systematic treatment of the physical processes that are fundamental for the properties of fission chain reacting processes and the control of those processes. Because of the rather specialized nature of the field of reactor physics, each paragraph contains a very concise description of the theory of the phenomenon under consideration, before presenting a review of the developments. Chapter 4 contains a short review of the thermal aspects of reactor safety, restricted to those aspects that are characteristic of the nuclear reactor field, because thermal hydraulics of fission reactors is not principally different from that of other physical systems. In chapter 5 the consequences of the physics treated in the preceding chapters for the dynamics and safety of actual reactors are reviewed. The systematics of the treatment is mainly based on a division of reactors into three categories according to the type of coolant, which to a large extent determines the safety properties of the reactors. The last chapter contains a physical analysis of the Chernobyl accident that occurred in 1986. The reason for an attempt to give a review of this accident, as complete as possible within the space limits set by the editors, is twofold: the Chernobyl accident is the most severe accident in history and physical properties of the reactor played a decisive role, thereby serving as an illustration of the material of the preceding chapters.

H van Dam

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Zircaloy performance in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect

Zircaloy has been successfully used as the primary light water reactor (LWR) core structural material since its introduction in the early days of the US naval nuclear program. Its unique combination of low neutron absorption cross section, fabricability, mechanical strength, and corrosion resistance in water and steam near 300{degrees}C has resulted in remarkable reliability of operation of pressurized and boiling water reactor (PWR, BWR) fuel through the years. At present time, BWRs use Zircaloy-2 and PWRs use Zircaloy-4 for fuel cladding. In BWRs, both Zircaloy-2 and -4 have been successfully used for spacer grids and channels, and in PWRs Zircaloy-4 is used for spacer grids and control rod guide tubes. Performance of fuel rods has been excellent thus far. The current trend for utilities worldwide is to expect both higher fuel reliability in the future. Fuel suppliers have already achieved extended exposures in lead use assemblies, and have demonstrated excellent performance in all areas; therefore unsuspected problems are not likely to arise. However, as exposure and expectations continue to increase, Zircaloy is being taken toward the limits of its known capabilities. This paper reviews Zircaloy performance capabilities in areas related to environmentally affected microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and dimensional stability. The effects of radiation and reactor environment on each property is illustrated with data, micrographs, and analysis.

Adamson, R.B.; Cheng, B.C.; Kruger, R.M. [GE Nuclear Energy, Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

157

A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

Chang, Y.I.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

Chang, Y.I.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Photocatalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photocatalytic reactor is described for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane. 4 figs.

Bischoff, B.L.; Fain, D.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

160

A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling  

SciTech Connect

Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ordered bed modular reactor design proposal  

SciTech Connect

The Ordered Bed Modular Reactor (OBMR) is a design as an advanced modular HTGR in which the annular reactor core is filled with an ordered bed of fuel spheres. This arrangement allows fuel elements to be poured into the core cavity which is shaped so that an ordered bed is formed and to be discharged from the core through the opening holes in the reactor top. These operations can be performed in a shutdown shorter time. The OBMR has the most of advantages from both the pebble bed reactor and block type reactor. Its core has great structural flexibility and stability, which allow increasing reactor output power and outlet gas temperature as well as decreasing core pressure drop. This paper introduces ordered packing bed characteristics, unloading and loading technique of the fuel spheres and predicted design features of the OBMR. (authors)

Tian, J. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing 100084 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Huntington Beach, CA); Sahimi, Muhammad (Altadena, CA); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Richmond, CA); Harale, Aadesh (Los Angeles, CA); Park, Byoung-Gi (Yeosu, KR); Liu, Paul K. T. (Lafayette Hill, PA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables Release date: November 22, 2011 Next release date: November 2012 See also: Table 2. Ownership Data, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History Table 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor PDF XLS Plant/Reactor Name Generator ID State Type 2009 Summer Capacity Net MW(e)1 2010 Annual Generation Net MWh2 Capacity Factor Percent3 Arkansas Nuclear One 1 AR PWR 842 6,607,090 90 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 AR PWR 993 8,415,588 97 Beaver Valley 1 PA PWR 892 7,119,413 91 Beaver Valley 2 PA PWR 885 7,874,151 102 Braidwood Generation Station 1 IL PWR 1,178 9,196,689 89

164

GEN-IV Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generation-IV reactors are a set of nuclear reactors currently being developed under international collaborations targeting ... economics, proliferation resistance, and physical protection of nuclear energy. Nuclear

Taek K. Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Netherlands Reactor Centre  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Two illustrated brochures in English have recently J. been issued by the Netherlands Reactor Centre ( ... Centre (Reactor Centrum Nederland). The first* gives a general survey of the ...

S. WEINTROUB

1964-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

166

The little reactor that could AECLs flexible, versatile CANDU  

SciTech Connect

There are 34 CANDU-type power reactors in service around the world, with at least four more scheduled to come on-line with in the next three years. These reactors have an unparalled safety record and offer customers the benefit of generating nuclear power without having to manufacture or import enriched uranium fuel. This paper presents a discussion on the CANDU reactor, construction and reactor maintenance, fuel cycle, and market.

Nixon, R.; Morden, R.; Kugler, G.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Photoneutron effects on pulse reactor kinetics for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR).  

SciTech Connect

The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is a swimming-pool type pulsed reactor that maintains an epithermal neutron flux and a nine-inch diameter central dry cavity. One of its uses is neutron and gamma-ray irradiation damage studies on electronic components under transient reactor power conditions. In analyzing the experimental results, careful attention must be paid to the kinetics associated with the reactor to ensure that the transient behavior of the electronic device is understood. Since the ACRR fuel maintains a substantial amount of beryllium, copious quantities of photoneutrons are produced that can significantly alter the expected behavior of the reactor power, especially following a reactor pulse. In order to understand these photoneutron effects on the reactor kinetics, the KIFLE transient reactor-analysis code was modified to include the photoneutron groups associated with the beryllium. The time-dependent behavior of the reactor power was analyzed for small and large pulses, assuming several initial conditions including following several pulses during the day, and following a long steady-state power run. The results indicate that, for these types of initial conditions, the photoneutron contribution to the reactor pulse energy can have a few to tens of percent effect.

Parma, Edward J., Jr.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

169

SRS Small Modular Reactors  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

None

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

170

Table A23. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" 3. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" " of Supplier, Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,," (Million kWh)",," (Billion Btu)",," (Billion cu ft)" ,," -------------------------",," -------------------------",," ---------------------------------------",,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Transmission","Other","Row"

171

Table A27. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" " of Supplier, Census Region, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ," (Million (kWh)",," (Billion Btu)",," (Billion cu ft)" ," -----------------------",," -----------------------",," ------------------------------------",,,"RSE" ,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Transmission","Other","Row"

172

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity","Electricity",,,"Natural Gas","Natural Gas",,,"Steam","Steam" " "," ",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both"," ",," "

173

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

174

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

Bollinger, L.R.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

175

Supplier Relations and Adoption of New Technology: Results of Survey Research in the Auto Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an original data source, this paper investigates the circumstances under which fmns adopt computer numerical control (cNC), an important type of flexible automation which can significantly increase production

Helper, Susan

2002-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

Attrition reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

Elementary Reactor Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THERE are few subjects which have developed at the rate at which reactor physics and ... physics and reactor theory have done. This, of course, is largely due to the circumstances in ...

J. F. HILL

1962-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

Prospects for spheromak fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reactor study of Hagenson and Krakowski demonstrated the attractiveness of the spheromak as a compact fusion reactor, based on...

T. K. Fowler; D. D. Hua

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Argonaut Reactor - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne Reactors > Training Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

183

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. RADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

184

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

185

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Sandia Pulsed Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia scientist John Ford places fuel rods in the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) test reactor - a reactor stripped down to its simplest form. The Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) provides a flexible, shielded location for performing critical experiments that employ different reactor core configurations and fuel types. The facility is also available for hands-on nuclear criticality safety training. Research and other activities The 7% series, an evaluation of various core characteristics for higher commercial-fuel enrichment, is currently under way at the SPRF/CX. Past critical experiments at the SPRF/CX have included the Burnup Credit

186

A Methodology for the Neutronics Design of Space Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A methodology for the neutronics design of space power reactors is presented. This methodology involves balancing the competing requirements of having sufficient excess reactivity for the desired lifetime, keeping the reactor subcritical at launch and during submersion accidents, and providing sufficient control over the lifetime of the reactor. These requirements are addressed by three reactivity values for a given reactor design: the excess reactivity at beginning of mission, the negative reactivity at shutdown, and the negative reactivity margin in submersion accidents. These reactivity values define the control worth and the safety worth in submersion accidents, used for evaluating the merit of a proposed reactor type and design. The Heat Pipe-Segmented Thermoelectric Module Converters space reactor core design is evaluated and modified based on the proposed methodology. The final reactor core design has sufficient excess reactivity for 10 years of nominal operation at 1.82 MW of fission power and is subcritical at launch and in all water submersion accidents.

King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Reactor vessel support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Design of a 25-kWe Surface Reactor System Based on SNAP Reactor Technologies  

SciTech Connect

A Hastelloy-X clad, sodium-potassium (NaK-78) cooled, moderated spectrum reactor using uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH) fuel based on the SNAP program reactors is a promising design for use in surface power systems. This paper presents a 98 kWth reactor for a power system the uses multiple Stirling engines to produce 25 kWe-net for 5 years. The design utilizes a pin type geometry containing UZrHx fuel clad with Hastelloy-X and NaK-78 flowing around the pins as coolant. A compelling feature of this design is its use of 49.9% enriched U, allowing it to be classified as a category III-D attractiveness and reducing facility costs relative to highly-enriched space reactor concepts. Presented below are both the design and an analysis of this reactor's criticality under various safety and operations scenarios.

Dixon, David D. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Hiatt, Matthew T. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Antineutrino reactor safeguards - a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Antineutrinos have been proposed as a means of reactor safeguards for more than 30 years and there has been impressive experimental progress in neutrino detection. In this paper we conduct, for the first time, a case study of the application of antineutrino safeguards to a real-world scenario - the North Korean nuclear crisis in 1994. We derive detection limits to a partial or full core discharge in 1989 based on actual IAEA safeguards access and find that two independent methods would have yielded positive evidence for a second core with very high confidence. To generalize our results, we provide detailed estimates for the sensitivity to the plutonium content of various types of reactors, including most types of plutonium production reactors, based on detailed reactor simulations. A key finding of this study is that a wide class of reactors with a thermal power of less than 0.1-1 GWth can be safeguarded achieving IAEA goals for quantitative sensitivity and timeliness with detectors right outside the reactor ...

Christensen, Eric; Jaffke, Patrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Examining influencing factors of post-adoption usage of mobile internet: Focus on the user perception of supplier-side attributes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Key supplier-side factors that affect the usage level of mobile Internet were identified and the procedural mechanism among the independent and dependent variables was investigated. For this, a research model was introduced to describe associations among ... Keywords: Mobile data services, Mobile internet, Mobile internet services, Post-adoption usage, Technology acceptance

Young Mee Shin; Seung Chang Lee; Bongsik Shin; Ho Geun Lee

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

195

Power Reactor Progress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Argonne kicks off EBWR; Allis-Chalmers plans power reactor using both nuclear and conventional fuels ... NUCLEAR POWER took two giant steps last week. ... Just as the first nuclear power system in the U. S. designed and built solely for the generation of electric power went into full operation at Argonne, Allis-Chalmers came up with a new twist in power reactors—a controlled recirculation boiling reactor (CRBR) using both nuclear and conventional fuels (C&EN, Feb. 18, page 7). ...

1957-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

196

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

197

AEC Pushes Fusion Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AEC Pushes Fusion Reactors ... Project Sherwood, as the study program is called, began in 1951-52 soon after the first successful thermonuclear explosion in the Pacific. ...

1955-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

198

Tokamak reactor first wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

Advanced Nuclear Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report describes technical modifications implemented by INVAP to improve the safety of the Research Reactors the company designs and builds.

Lolich, J.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

200

Diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors  

SciTech Connect

This study deals with diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors -- specifically, MTR fuel; pool- or tank-type research reactors with light-water moderator; and water, beryllium, or graphite reflectors, and which have a power level of 25 MW(t) or more. The objective is to provide assistance to the IAEA in documentation of criteria and inspection observables related to undeclared plutonium production in the reactors described above, including: criteria for undeclared plutonium production, necessary design information for implementation of these criteria, verification guidelines including neutron physics and heat transfer, and safeguards measures to facilitate the detection of undeclared plutonium production at large research reactors.

Binford, F.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,100 4,100 4,400 4,700 5,000 5,300 5,600 5,900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 2009 2001 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '11 to Mar '11: -1.4% Mar '10 to Mar '11: +1.0% YTD '10 to YTD '11: +2.4% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2001 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '11 to Mar '11: +0.8% Mar '10 to Mar '11: -1.7% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -7.3% 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 2009 2001 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '11 to Mar '11: +7.0% Mar '10 to Mar '11: -0.7% YTD '10 to YTD '11: +0.5% 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov

202

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb '08 to Mar '08: -4.4% Feb '08 to Mar '08: -4.4% Mar '07 to Mar '08: -7.3% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -5.2% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '08 to Mar '08: -10.3% Mar '07 to Mar '08 -24.3% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -21.0% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '08 to Mar '08: -0.4% Mar '07 to Mar '08: -3.1% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -2.5% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '08 to Mar '08: +0.2% Mar '07 to Mar '08: -3.5% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -2.9%

203

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May '99 to June '99: +5.7% May '99 to June '99: +5.7% June '98 to June '99: +5.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.8% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '99 to June '99: +3.3% June '98 to June '99: +0.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '99 to June '99: +2.7% June '98 to June '99: -0.6% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.5% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '99 to June '99: +7.9% June '98 to June '99: +4.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.8%

204

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul '09 to Aug '09: -1.8% Jul '09 to Aug '09: -1.8% Aug '08 to Aug '09: -9.7% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -10.2% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '09 to Aug '09: -8.4% Aug '08 to Aug '09: -4.5% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -5.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '09 to Aug '09: -1.9% Aug '08 to Aug '09: -2.4% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -6.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '09 to Aug '09: -1.1% Aug '08 to Aug '09: +1.3% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -0.2%

205

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dec '06 to Jan '07: +9.7% Dec '06 to Jan '07: +9.7% Jan '06 to Jan '07: +2.1% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.1% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '06 to Jan '07: +18.7% Jan '06 to Jan '07: -1.4% YTD '06 to YTD '07: -1.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '06 to Jan '07: -2.7% Jan '06 to Jan '07: +0.9% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.9% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '06 to Jan '07: -3.8% Jan '06 to Jan '07: +2.6% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.6%

206

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr '06 to May '06: +1.5% Apr '06 to May '06: +1.5% May '05 to May '06: +1.4% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -0.3% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '06 to May '06: +7.0% May '05 to May '06: +2.8% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -12.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '06 to May '06: -0.4% May '05 to May '06: -3.9% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -2.6% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '06 to May '06: +0.8% May '05 to May '06: -2.3% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -0.8%

207

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar '08 to Apr '08: +3.7% Mar '08 to Apr '08: +3.7% Apr '07 to Apr '08: +1.8% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -3.5% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '08 to Apr '08: +6.7% Apr '07 to Apr '08 -22.4% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -21.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '08 to Apr '08: +4.8% Apr '07 to Apr '08: -0.5% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -2.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '08 to Apr '08: +2.1% Apr '07 to Apr '08: -1.0% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -2.4%

208

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May '06 to Jun '06: -0.6% May '06 to Jun '06: -0.6% Jun '05 to Jun '06: -0.7% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -0.3% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '06 to Jun '06: -9.0% Jun '05 to Jun '06: -22.8% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -13.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '06 to Jun '06: +5.1% Jun '05 to Jun '06: -4.7% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -3.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '06 to Jun '06: +2.5% Jun '05 to Jun '06: -2.0% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -1.1%

209

X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May '08 to Jun '08: -1.7% May '08 to Jun '08: -1.7% Jun '07 to Jun '08: -3.0% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -3.6% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '08 to Jun '08: +3.9% Jun '07 to Jun '08 -16.6% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -21.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '08 to Jun '08: +5.0% Jun '07 to Jun '08: -1.4% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -1.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '08 to Jun '08: -0.8% Jun '07 to Jun '08: -6.6% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -3.5%

210

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar. '99 to Apr. '99: -10.2% Mar. '99 to Apr. '99: -10.2% Apr. '98 to Apr. '99: +9.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.8% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar. '99 to Apr. '99: +1.9% Apr. '98 to Apr. '99: +1.9% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar. '99 to Apr. '99: +2.7% Apr. '98 to Apr. '99: +0.9% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar. '99 to Apr. '99: -25.6% Apr. '98 to Apr. '99: +6.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.5%

211

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct '07 to Nov '07: -3.0% Oct '07 to Nov '07: -3.0% Nov '06 to Nov '07: +3.1% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.4% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '07 to Nov '07: +5.2% Nov '06 to Nov '07 -1.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +5.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '07 to Nov '07: -2.6% Nov '06 to Nov '07: +4.6% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.2% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '07 to Nov '07: -2.5% Nov '06 to Nov '07: -1.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.2%

212

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug '09 to Sep '09: +6.3% Aug '09 to Sep '09: +6.3% Sep '08 to Sep '09: -5.4% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -9.7% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '09 to Sep '09: -2.0% Sep '08 to Sep '09: -4.1% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -5.5% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '09 to Sep '09: -1.3% Sep '08 to Sep '09: +3.5% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -5.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '09 to Sep '09: -2.0% Sep '08 to Sep '09: +4.1% YTD '08 to YTD '09: +0.2%

213

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr. '99 to May '99: -2.9% Apr. '99 to May '99: -2.9% May '98 to May '99: +8.6% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.4% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr. '99 to May '99: +1.0% May '98 to May '99: +1.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.5% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr. '99 to May '99: +2.7% May '98 to May '99: +0.9% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr. '99 to May '99: -18.0% May '98 to May '99: +5.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.2%

214

SPERT Destructive Test - I on Aluminum, Highly Enriched Plate Type Core  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

SPERT - Special Power Excursion Reactor Tests Destructive Test number 1 On Aluminum, Highly Enriched Plate Type Core. A test studying the behavior of the reactor under destructive conditions on a light water moderated pool-type reactor with a plate-type core.

None

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

Proceedings of the 1990 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The global effort to reduce, and possibly, eliminate the international traffic in highly-enriched uranium caused by its use in research reactors requires extensive cooperation and free exchange of information among all participants. To foster this free exchange of information, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the thirteenth of a series which began in 1978. The common effort brought together, past, a large number of specialists from many countries. On hundred twenty-three participants from 26 countries, including scientists, reactor operators, and personnel from commercial fuel suppliers, research centers, and government organizations, convened in Newport, Rhode Island to discuss their results, their activities, and their plans relative to converting research reactors to low-enriched fuels. As more and more reactors convert to the use of low-enriched uranium, the emphasis of our effort has begun to shift from research and development to tasks more directly related to implementation of the new fuels and technologies that have been developed, and to refinements of those fuels and technologies. It is appropriate, for this reason, that the emphasis of this meeting was placed on safety and on conversion experiences. This individual papers in this report have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

Li, Qing, 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A TEN MEGAWATT BOILING HETEROGENEOUS PACKAGE POWER REACTOR. Reactor...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A TEN MEGAWATT BOILING HETEROGENEOUS PACKAGE POWER REACTOR. Reactor Design and Feasibility Problem Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Rosen, M. A.; Coburn, D. B.; Flynn, T....

218

Micro -Thermonuclear AB-Reactors for Aerospace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author offers several innovations that he first suggested publicly early in 1983 for the AB multi-reflex engine, space propulsion, getting energy from plasma, etc. (see: A. Bolonkin, Non-Rocket Space Launch and Flight, Elsevier, London, 2006, Chapters 12, 3A). It is the micro-thermonuclear AB-Reactors. That is new micro-thermonuclear reactor with very small fuel pellet that uses plasma confinement generated by multi-reflection of laser beam or its own magnetic field. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The author also suggests a new method of heating the power-making fuel pellet by outer electric current as well as new direct method of transformation of ion kinetic energy into harvestable electricity. These offered innovations dramatically decrease the size, weight and cost of thermonuclear reactor, installation, propulsion system and electric generator. Non-industrial countries can produce these researches and constructions. Currently, the author is researching the efficiency of these innovations for two types of the micro-thermonuclear reactors: multi-reflection reactor (ICF) and self-magnetic reactor (MCF).

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

Modeling of membrane reactor for steam methane reforming: From granular to structured catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different types and operating modes of a tubular membrane reactor for steam methane reforming with a production rate of 0.6...

A. B. Shigarov; V. A. Kirillov

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report This report documents the establishment of a technical review process and the findings of the Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) Technical Review Panel (TRP).1 The intent of the process is to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. A goal of the process is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. The process involved establishing evaluation criteria, conducting a pilot review, soliciting concept inputs from industry entities, reviewing the concepts by TRP members and compiling the results. The eight concepts received from industry spanned a range of reactor types

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

222

Handbook of Reactor Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THIS handbook is one volume in a series sponsored by the United States Atomic Energy Commission with ... data and reference information in the field of reactors. The volume is devoted to reactor physics and radiation shielding, the latter subject occupying approximately a quarter of the book.

PETER W. MUMMERY

1956-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

Fast reactor safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SIR, - In his article on fast reactor safety (26 July, page 270) Norman Dombey claims to introduce to non-specialists ... , page 270) Norman Dombey claims to introduce to non-specialists some features of fast reactors that are not available outside the technical literature. The non-specialist would do well ...

R.D. SMITH

1979-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

Instrumentation of Nuclear Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... s Lecture Theatre on January 8, a symposium of papers on the instrumentation of nuclear reactors was organized, at which about five hundred members and visitors attended, including guests from ... the Institution, took the chair and introduced Sir John Cockcroft, whose lecture on "Nuclear Reactors and their Applications" provided a general background for the three specialized papers which followed. ...

1953-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nuclear Research Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... their countries for the advent of nuclear power. A few countries had built large research reactors for the production of isotopes and to study the behaviour of nuclear fuel, but ... production of isotopes and to study the behaviour of nuclear fuel, but the small training reactor had not been developed. Since then, research ...

T. E. ALLIBONE

1963-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Canadian university research reactors  

SciTech Connect

In Canada there are seven university research reactors: one medium-power (2-MW) swimming pool reactor at McMaster University and six low-power (20-kW) SLOWPOKE reactors at Dalhousie University, Ecole Polytechnique, the Royal Military College, the University of Toronto, the University of Saskatchewan, and the University of Alberta. This paper describes primarily the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR), which operates on a wider scale than the SLOWPOKE reactors. The MNR has over a hundred user groups and is a very broad-based tool. The main applications are in the following areas: (1) neutron activation analysis (NAA); (2) isotope production; (3) neutron beam research; (4) nuclear engineering; (5) neutron radiography; and (6) nuclear physics.

Ernst, P.C.; Collins, M.F.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Science Home | Science & Discovery | Nuclear Science | Publications and Reports | Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications SHARE Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications...

228

Relap5-3d model validation and benchmark exercises for advanced gas cooled reactor application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HTTR High Temperature engineering Test Reactor INET Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology LWR Light Water Reactor OKBM Test Design Bureau for Machine Building ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory RCCS Reactor Cavity Cooling System... to be at right angles to each other, ignoring an angular distribution of radiant heat.7 MORECA, used by ORNL, simulates accident scenarios for certain gas-cooled reactor types.7 INET conducts their analysis using Thermix, which performs two...

Moore, Eugene James Thomas

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

229

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report, May 8, 2004, Exothermic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report, May 8, 2004, Exothermic Metal Reactor Event During Sodium Transfer Activities, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Type B Accident Investigation Board...

230

Nuclear reactor control column  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Reactor Safety Research Programs  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

2/21/2014 Downsizing Wind Energyfor Your Phone | Glacial EnergyBlog -Commercial Electric Savings, Electric Provider, Electric Supplier http://blog.glacialenergy.com/2014/02/19/downsizing-wind-energy-for-your-phone/ 1/2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suppliers selling electricity and natural gas to residential, commercial, industrial, and institutional Energy Saving Tips Events General Electricity green roof Household Tips Life Tips Natural Gas New Announcements Community Electrical Safety Electricity Energy Energy Efficiency Energy Innovations Energy News

Chiao, Jung-Chih

234

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,515.4 1,515.4 24,168.6 49,958.8 205,642.8 21,325.8 3,583.5 13,512.4 38,421.7 February ................................. 150,955.0 13,660.5 51,987.1 216,602.6 25,038.0 1,397.6 14,426.9 40,862.5 March ...................................... 163,625.6 5,783.8 52,023.6 221,433.1 26,758.2 374.3 14,421.6 41,554.1 April ........................................ 168,026.4 2,480.7 51,915.9 222,423.1 27,004.8 215.3 14,404.6 41,624.7 May ......................................... 176,606.8 2,535.4 54,024.9 233,167.2 27,876.2 223.5 14,812.1 42,911.8 June ........................................ 183,750.5 2,633.2 56,295.9 242,679.6 28,544.1 231.4 15,275.8 44,051.2 July ......................................... 178,005.9 2,548.4 53,761.7 234,316.0 28,345.2 228.4 15,005.0 43,578.6 August ....................................

235

Supplier Selection Management Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Vendor Selection and Management Process Document Number: ADMP-002 Rev. 11_0203 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): ADMF-009 Vendor Audit Plan, ADMF-010 Vendor Audit Checklist, ADMF-011 Vendor Audit Report, ADMF-015 Vendor Evaluation Record, ADMP-001 Procurement Process, ADMF-016 EOTA Vendor List, REG-003 Record Register ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 2 of 9 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_1110 Added verbiage and reference for ADMF-016, EOTA Vendor List to process.

236

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Oxygenated Reformulated Total Conventional Oxygenated Reformulated Total United States January ................................... 145,473.9 12,853.1 71,584.0 229,911.0 21,437.8 2,118.5 14,630.3 38,186.5 February ................................. 152,443.6 12,574.1 74,038.8 239,056.4 21,643.8 2,053.6 14,806.9 38,504.4 March ...................................... 159,368.9 9,240.4 75,709.6 244,318.9 22,934.3 1,391.4 14,926.4 39,252.1 April ........................................ 166,869.6 7,329.4 77,383.5 251,582.4 23,130.1 1,079.9 14,885.7 39,095.8 May ......................................... 168,973.6 7,229.8 77,450.7 253,654.2 23,375.0 1,046.4 15,162.5 39,583.9 June ........................................ 176,397.4 7,802.8 78,867.3 263,067.5 24,193.9 1,133.7 15,555.5 40,883.1

237

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

47,959.1 47,959.1 11,050.9 67,812.0 226,822.0 21,260.7 1,818.7 15,161.7 38,241.1 February ................................. 154,899.9 10,617.6 70,698.9 236,216.5 22,197.4 1,690.4 15,506.0 39,393.8 March ...................................... 162,738.2 6,536.2 71,600.9 240,875.3 23,091.5 984.2 15,507.0 39,582.7 April ........................................ 169,900.0 3,421.2 73,432.6 246,753.8 24,144.7 484.4 15,580.3 40,209.3 May ......................................... 170,818.8 4,569.6 73,375.3 248,763.8 24,330.4 617.2 15,767.0 40,714.6 June ........................................ 171,972.1 4,606.4 73,655.1 250,233.6 24,625.0 679.7 16,013.5 41,318.2 July ......................................... 178,120.4 4,586.2 75,480.7 258,187.3 26,160.7 674.2 16,449.8 43,284.8 August ....................................

238

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

43,846.3 43,846.3 12,393.4 68,635.1 224,874.7 21,109.7 1,971.5 13,674.3 36,755.5 February ................................. 156,170.6 13,007.4 73,407.9 242,585.9 22,564.3 1,908.0 14,502.1 38,974.4 March ...................................... 165,609.8 10,734.4 75,581.8 251,926.0 23,380.4 1,710.6 14,702.1 39,793.1 April ........................................ 177,434.0 7,401.2 78,075.3 262,910.4 23,176.8 1,110.5 13,692.0 37,979.3 May ......................................... 174,708.3 7,068.3 80,019.0 261,795.6 23,132.0 1,104.4 14,390.1 38,626.5 June ........................................ 180,115.7 7,743.1 82,880.6 270,739.4 23,655.7 1,206.1 14,792.7 39,654.5 July ......................................... 180,612.4 7,571.9 82,769.1 270,953.3 23,780.4 1,164.4 14,979.1 39,923.9 August ....................................

239

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Oxygenated Reformulated Total Conventional Oxygenated Reformulated Total United States January ................................... 146,590.5 11,788.1 73,965.0 232,343.6 17,670.2 1,837.6 12,128.0 31,635.9 February ................................. 165,557.6 12,617.2 81,634.7 259,809.5 19,814.7 1,826.9 13,320.1 34,961.7 March ...................................... 174,538.0 10,254.9 86,250.1 271,043.0 18,683.5 1,353.6 12,352.3 32,389.4 April ........................................ 175,968.6 8,437.6 86,667.7 271,073.9 18,586.7 1,233.1 12,289.6 32,109.4 May ......................................... 186,155.2 8,456.3 87,548.4 282,159.9 19,801.8 1,235.1 12,873.4 33,910.2 June ........................................ 191,350.9 8,838.3 90,774.7 290,963.9 19,221.5 1,211.3 12,915.6 33,348.4

240

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

61,490.1 61,490.1 12,691.6 83,592.9 257,774.6 16,699.1 1,879.7 11,386.7 29,965.5 February ................................. 169,479.2 12,905.4 87,740.9 270,125.5 17,936.4 1,875.0 11,803.9 31,615.3 March ...................................... 176,634.0 9,994.4 88,685.4 275,313.7 18,499.9 1,406.0 11,830.5 31,736.4 April ........................................ 184,544.5 8,586.9 89,782.2 282,913.6 18,291.7 1,170.0 11,750.9 31,212.6 May ......................................... 190,405.7 8,372.2 92,647.4 291,425.3 17,928.5 1,121.5 11,450.6 30,500.7 June ........................................ 195,590.0 8,653.2 94,413.2 298,656.4 18,322.7 1,200.9 11,366.3 30,889.9 July ......................................... 193,054.1 8,392.8 92,267.7 293,714.6 18,077.0 1,311.4 11,188.0 30,576.5 August ....................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ASI Supplier Evaluation Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 1 of 4 5 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 1 of 4 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Vendor Evaluation Record Document Number: ADMF-015 Rev. 11_0203 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ADMP-002, Vendor Selection and Management Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A ADMF-015 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 2 of 4 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_1016 Added section for vendors that will not be used due to non-conformance of material delivered. 08_1110 Removed section for vendors that will not be used due to non-conformance of material delivered. Do Not Use section will be placed on ADMF-016, Vendor List.

242

Prime Supplier Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Measures primary petroleum product deliveries into the states where they are locally marketed and consumed.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

180,335.4 13,486.4 92,914.4 286,736.2 17,582.5 2,006.0 10,845.9 30,434.4 December ... 177,570.8 13,440.0 92,306.2 283,317.0 17,319.1...

244

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

173,059.8 13,759.1 87,302.3 274,121.3 18,107.4 2,022.5 12,137.1 32,267.0 December ... 172,429.5 14,624.6 88,622.2 275,676.3 18,322.5...

245

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

168,286.2 12,993.4 79,830.4 261,110.0 20,869.6 1,997.4 13,951.7 36,818.8 December ... 177,468.1 14,403.3 85,758.4 277,629.8 22,223.3...

246

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

155,714.7 11,914.3 74,469.0 242,098.0 22,148.7 2,050.3 15,286.8 39,485.9 December ... 159,566.4 12,448.0 76,618.1 248,632.5 23,064.0...

247

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

157,828.4 12,688.5 73,999.9 244,516.7 22,268.8 1,965.4 14,792.0 39,026.2 December ... 161,211.5 13,086.6 75,465.3 249,763.5 22,897.6...

248

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 178,365.2 14,185.2 89,313.0 281,863.4 16,731.4 2,008.1 10,909.6 29,649.1 December ... 175,777.4 14,246.4 89,727.4 279,751.2...

249

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

159,940.7 11,664.1 71,459.2 243,064.0 22,727.4 1,939.3 16,196.6 40,863.2 December ... 157,395.8 12,036.5 71,758.0 241,190.4 22,277.0...

250

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

148,074.6 23,511.7 53,102.1 224,688.4 24,264.4 5,180.3 14,712.4 44,157.1 December ... 144,481.1 23,807.5 52,756.2 221,044.7 23,870.9...

251

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

252

Reactor hot spot analysis  

SciTech Connect

The principle methods for performing reactor hot spot analysis are reviewed and examined for potential use in the Applied Physics Division. The semistatistical horizontal method is recommended for future work and is now available as an option in the SE2-ANL core thermal hydraulic code. The semistatistical horizontal method is applied to a small LMR to illustrate the calculation of cladding midwall and fuel centerline hot spot temperatures. The example includes a listing of uncertainties, estimates for their magnitudes, computation of hot spot subfactor values and calculation of two sigma temperatures. A review of the uncertainties that affect liquid metal fast reactors is also presented. It was found that hot spot subfactor magnitudes are strongly dependent on the reactor design and therefore reactor specific details must be carefully studied. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Vilim, R.B.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Molten metal reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

F Reactor Inspection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

255

F Reactor Inspection  

SciTech Connect

Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

257

Software: Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis > Analysis > Software Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Software Bookmark and Share An extensive powerful suite of computer codes developed and validated by the NE Division and its predecessor divisions at Argonne supports the development of fast reactors; many of these codes are also applicable to other reactor types. A brief description of these codes follows. Contact

258

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

259

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

260

REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

P. Delmolino

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

262

B Reactor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » B Reactor B Reactor B Reactor Completed in September 1944, the B Reactor was the world's first large-scale plutonium production reactor. As at Oak Ridge, the need for labor turned Hanford into an atomic boomtown, with the population reaching 50,000 by summer 1944. Similar to the X-10 Graphite Reactor at Oak Ridge in terms of loading and unloading fuel, the B Reactor was built on a much larger scale and used water rather than air as a coolant. Whereas the X-10 had an initial design output of 1,000 kilowatts, the B Reactor was designed to operate at 250,000 kilowatts. Consisting of a 28- by 36-foot, 1,200-ton graphite cylinder lying on its side, the reactor was penetrated through its

263

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from

264

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations, which govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants, require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including

265

Large Scale Weather Control Using Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is pointed out that controlled release of thermal energy from fission type nuclear reactors can be used to alter weather patterns over significantly large geographical regions. (1) Nuclear heat creates a low pressure region, which can be used to draw moist air from oceans, onto deserts. (2) Creation of low pressure zones over oceans using Nuclear heat can lead to Controlled Cyclone Creation (CCC).(3) Nuclear heat can also be used to melt glaciers and control water flow in rivers.

Moninder Singh Modgil

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

Reactor for exothermic reactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

267

Thermionic Reactor Design Studies  

SciTech Connect

Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their (thermionic reactor) performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling.

Schock, Alfred

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Mossbauer Spectroscopic Study of Gamma Irradiation on the Structural Properties of Hematite, Magnetite and Limonite Concrete for Nuclear Reactor Shielding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on a heavy type of concrete, constructed for nuclear reactor shield. The effect of gamma irradiation was...

N.A. Eissa; M.S.I. Kany; A.S. Mohamed; A.A. Sallam; M.H. El Fouly

269

Diagnostics for hybrid reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

Orsitto, Francesco Paolo [ENEA Unita' Tecnica Fusione , Associazione ENEA-EURATOM sulla Fusione C R Frascati v E Fermi 45 00044 Frascati (Italy)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

Export possibilities for small nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

The worldwide deployment of peaceful nuclear technology is predicated on conformance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1972. Under this international treaty, countries have traded away pursuit of nuclear weapons in exchange for access to commercial nuclear technology that could help them grow economically. Realistically, however, most nuclear technology has been beyond the capacity of the NPT developing countries to afford. Even if the capital cost of the plant is managed, the costs of the infrastructure and the operational complexity of most nuclear technology have taken it out of the hands of the nations who need it the most. Now, a new class of small sodium cooled reactors has been specifically designed to meet the electrical power, water, hydrogen and heat needs of small and remote users. These reactors feature small size, long refueling interval, no onsite fuel storage, and simplified operations. Sized in the 10 MW(e) to 50 MW(e) range these reactors are modularized for factory production and for rapid site assembly. The fuel would be <20% U-235 uranium fuel with a 30-year core life. This new reactor type more appropriately fills the needs of countries for lower power distributed systems that can fill the gap between large developed infrastructure and primitive distributed energy systems. Looking at UN Resolution 1540 and the impact of other agreements, there is a need to address the issues of nuclear security, fuel, waste, and economic/legal/political-stakeholder concerns. This paper describes the design features of this new reactor type that specifically address these issues in a manner that increases the availability of commercial nuclear technology to the developing nations of the world. (authors)

Campagna, M.S.; Hess, C.; Moor, P. [Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States); Sawruk, W. [ABSG Consulting, Inc., Shillington, PA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The development and demonstration of a thermal neutron radiography facility utilizing the TAMU NSC TRIGA reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the beam port door and exposing detector at low reactor power. In order to permit operation 26 continously with minimal disruption of normal reactor operations and minimal radiation exposure to operating personnel, an object- detector holding apparatus... exposure except from the gamma rays in the beam. Righ quality radiographs were 29 obtained using Type R film with exposures of 20-30 minutes at a reactor power of 1 MW. Type M2/RP and Type AA films were used when speed was desired. Type AA...

Lorenz, Robert Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

Structural materials for fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fusion Reactors will require specially engineered structural materials, which ... on safety considerations. The fundamental differences between fusion and other nuclear reactors arise due to the 14MeV neutronics ...

P. M. Raole; S. P. Deshpande

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Reactor Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits Crosscutting Technology Development Reactor Materials Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment Advanced Methods for Manufacturing...

274

Reactor operation safety information document  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fossil fuel furnace reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

Parkinson, William J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Transport reactor development status  

SciTech Connect

This project is part of METC`s Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located at Wilsonville, Alabama. The primary objective of the Advanced Gasifier module is to produce vitiated gases for intermediate-term testing of Particulate Control Devices (PCDs). The Transport reactor potentially allows particle size distribution, solids loading, and particulate characteristics in the off-gas stream to be varied in a number of ways. Particulates in the hot gases from the Transport reactor will be removed in the PCDs. Two PCDs will be initially installed in the module; one a ceramic candle filter, the other a granular bed filter. After testing of the initial PCDs they will be removed and replaced with PCDs supplied by other vendors. A secondary objective is to verify the performance of a Transport reactor for use in advanced Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IG-FC), and Pressurized Combustion Combined Cycle (PCCC) power generation units. This paper discusses the development of the Transport reactor design from bench-scale testing through pilot-scale testing to design of the Process Development Unit (PDU-scale) facility at Wilsonville.

Rush, R.E.; Fankhanel, M.O.; Campbell, W.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Thermal Reactor Safety  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

None

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

279

Blood Types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Broadcast Transcript: According to the Japanese, you can tell a lot about a person by their blood type: Type A is the farmer, calm and responsible; Type B is the hunter, independent and creative; Type AB is humanistic, ...

Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

280

Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Development of pyro-processing technology for thorium-fuelled molten salt reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is classified as the non-classical nuclear reactor type based on the specific features coming out from the use of liquid fuel circulating in the MSR primary circuit. Other uniqueness of the reactor type is based on the fact that the primary circuit of the reactor is directly connected with the on-line reprocessing technology, necessary for keeping the reactor in operation for a long run. MSR is the only reactor system, which can be effectively operated within the {sup 232}Th- {sup 233}U fuel cycle as thorium breeder with the breeding factor significantly higher than one. The fuel cycle technologies proposed as ford the fresh thorium fuel processing as for the primary circuit fuel reprocessing are pyrochemical and mainly fluoride. Although these pyrochemical processes were never previously fully verified, the present-day development anticipates an assumption for the successful future deployment of the thorium-fuelled MSR technology. (authors)

Uhlir, J.; Straka, M.; Szatmary, L. [Nuclear Research Inst. ReZ Plc, ReZ 130, Husinec - CZ-250 68 (Czech Republic)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fusion reactor systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this review we consider deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactors based on four different plasma-confinement and heating approaches: the tokamak, the theta-pinch, the magnetic-mirror, and the laser-pellet system. We begin with a discussion of the dynamics of reacting plasmas and basic considerations of reactor power balance. The essential plasma physical aspects of each system are summarized, and the main characteristics of the corresponding conceptual power plants are described. In tokamak reactors the plasma densities are about 1020 m-3, and the ? values (ratio of plasma pressure to confining magnetic pressure) are approximately 5%. Plasma burning times are of the order of 100-1000 sec. Large superconducting dc magnets furnish the toroidal magnetic field, and 2-m thick blankets and shields prevent heat deposition in the superconductor. Radially diffusing plasma is diverted away from the first wall by means of null singularities in the poloidal (or transverse) component of the confining magnetic field. The toroidal theta-pinch reactor has a much smaller minor diameter and a much larger major diameter, and operates on a 10-sec cycle with 0.1-sec burning pulses. It utilizes shock heating from high-voltage sources and adabatic-compression heating powered by low-voltage, pulsed cryogenic magnetic or inertial energy stores, outside the reactor core. The plasma has a density of about 1022 m-3 and ? values of nearly unity. In the power balance of the reactor, direct-conversion energy obtained by expansion of the burning high-? plasma against the containing magnetic field is an important factor. No divertor is necessary since neutral-gas flow cools and replaces the "spent" plasma between pulses. The open-ended mirror reactor uses both thermal conversion of neutron energy and direct conversion of end-loss plasma energy to dc electrical power. A fraction of this direct-convertor power is then fed back to the ioninjection system to sustain the reaction and maintain the plasma. The average ion energy is 600 keV, plasma diameter 6 m, and the plasma beta 85%. The power levels of the three magnetic-confinement devices are in the 500-2000 MWe range, with the exception of the mirror reactor, for which the output is approximately 200 MWe. In Laser-Pellet reactors, frozen D-T pellets are ignited in a cavity which absorbs the electromagnetic, charged particle, and neutron energy from the fusion reaction. The confinement is "inertial," since the fusion reaction occurs during the disassembly of the heated pellet. A pellet-cavity unit would produce about 200 MWt in pulses with a repetition rate of the order of 10 sec-1. Such units could be clustered to give power plants with outputs in the range of 1000 MWe.

F. L. Ribe

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Heat exchanger for reactor core and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact bayonet tube type heat exchanger which finds particular application as an auxiliary heat exchanger for transfer of heat from a reactor gas coolant to a secondary fluid medium. The heat exchanger is supported within a vertical cavity in a reactor vessel intersected by a reactor coolant passage at its upper end and having a reactor coolant return duct spaced below the inlet passage. The heat exchanger includes a plurality of relatively short length bayonet type heat exchange tube assemblies adapted to pass a secondary fluid medium therethrough and supported by primary and secondary tube sheets which are releasibly supported in a manner to facilitate removal and inspection of the bayonet tube assemblies from an access area below the heat exchanger. Inner and outer shrouds extend circumferentially of the tube assemblies and cause the reactor coolant to flow downwardly internally of the shrouds over the tube bundle and exit through the lower end of the inner shroud for passage to the return duct in the reactor vessel.

Kaufman, Jay S. (Del Mar, CA); Kissinger, John A. (Del Mar, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nuclear divisional reactor  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear divisional reactor including a reactor core having side and top walls, a heat exchanger substantially surrounding the core, the heat exchanger including a plurality of separate fluid holding and circulating chambers each in contact with a portion of the core, control rod means associated with the core and external of the heat exchanger including control rods and means for moving said control rods, each of the chambers having separate means for delivering and removing fluid therefrom, separate means associated with each of the delivering and removing means for producing useable energy external of the chambers, each of the means for producing useable energy having separate variable capacity energy outputs thereby making available a plurality of individual sources of useable energy of varying degrees.

Administratrix, A.P.; Rugh, J.L.

1982-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fusion reactor pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

Jassby, D.L.

1987-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

288

Using the three-way catalyst monolith reactor for reducing exhaust emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The monolith reactor was developed for the cleaning of exhaust gases from combustion processes both in cars and large power plants. Nowadays monolith reactors are increasingly being used developed evaluated in automotive and stationary emission control reactors such as power plants and new reactor applications such as chemical and refining processes catalytic combustion ozone abatement and others. Monolith catalysts mainstays in gas-phase automotive and environmental process applications have found new potential in replacing three-phase slurry reactors for the production of specialty chemicals especially when their advantages are fully utilized in recirculation loop approaches. This paper gives a general overview about monolith reactors’ benefits fabrication characteristics and typical use in automotive industry. Several commercial product applications and new developments for use of monolith reactors in automotive stationary and chemical industry have been discussed. Different types of monolith reactor systems manufacturing modeling and application areas are specified with their advantages and disadvantages. Some experimental studies have been attached to compare monolith reactor types with conventional reactors.

Burak Gokalp

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

290

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

291

CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

292

A future for nuclear energy: pebble bed reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pebble Bed Reactors could allow nuclear plants to support the goal of reducing global climate change in an energy hungry world. They are small, modular, inherently safe, use a demonstrated nuclear technology and can be competitive with fossil fuels. Pebble bed reactors are helium cooled reactors that use small tennis ball size fuel balls consisting of only 9 grams of uranium per pebble to provide a low power density reactor. The low power density and large graphite core provide inherent safety features such that the peak temperature reached even under the complete loss of coolant accident without any active emergency core cooling system is significantly below the temperature that the fuel melts. This feature should enhance public confidence in this nuclear technology. With advanced modularity principles, it is expected that this type of design and assembly could lower the cost of new nuclear plants removing a major impediment to deployment.

Andrew C. Kadak

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Neutron damage reduction in a traveling wave reactor  

SciTech Connect

Traveling wave reactors are envisioned to run on depleted or natural uranium with no need for enrichment or reprocessing, and in a manner which requires little to no operator intervention. If feasible, this type of reactor has significant advantages over conventional nuclear power systems. However, a practical implementation of this concept is challenging as neutron irradiation levels many times greater than those in conventional reactors appear to be required for a fission wave to propagate. Radiation damage to the fuel and cladding materials presents a significant obstacle to a practical design. One possibility for reducing damage is to soften the neutron energy spectrum. Here we show that using a uranium oxide fuel form will allow a shift in the neutron spectrum that can result in at least a three fold decrease in dpa levels for fuel cladding and structural steels within the reactor compared with the dpa levels expected when using a uranium metal fuel. (authors)

Osborne, A. G.; Deinert, M. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who  

SciTech Connect

The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Thermionic Reactor Design Studies  

SciTech Connect

During the 1960's and early 70's the author performed extensive design studies, analyses, and tests aimed at thermionic reactor concepts that differed significantly from those pursued by other investigators. Those studies, like most others under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC and DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsorship, were terminated in the early 1970's. Some of this work was previously published, but much of it was never made available in the open literature. U.S. interest in thermionic reactors resumed in the early 80's, and was greatly intensified by reports about Soviet ground and flight tests in the late 80's. This recent interest resulted in renewed U.S. thermionic reactor development programs, primarily under Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. Since most current investigators have not had an opportunity to study all of the author's previous work, a review of the highlights of that work may be of value to them. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling. Where the author's concepts differed from the later Topaz-2 design was in the relative location of the emitter and the collector. Placing the fueled emitter on the outside of the cylindrical diodes permits much higher axial conductances to reduce ohmic losses in the electrodes of full-core-height diodes. Moreover, placing the fuel on the outside of the diode makes possible reactors with much higher fuel volume fractions, which enable power-flattened fast reactors scalable to very low power levels without the need for life-limiting hydride moderators or the use of efficiency-limiting driver fuel. In addition, with the fuel on the outside its swelling does not increase the emitter diameter or reduce the interelectrode gap. This should permit long lifetimes even with closer spacings, which can significantly improve the system efficiences. This was confirmed by coupled neutronic, thermal, thermionic, and electrical system analyses - some of which are presented in this paper - and by subsequent experiments. A companion paper presented next describes the fabrication and testing of full-scale converter elements, both fueled and unfueled, and summarizes the test results obtained. There is a duplicate copy in the file.

Schock, Alfred

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Refueling Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The liquid-salt-cooled very high-temperature reactor (LS-VHTR), also called the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR), is a new reactor concept that combines in a novel way four established technologies: (1) coated-particle graphite-matrix nuclear fuels, (2) Brayton power cycles, (3) passive safety systems and plant designs previously developed for liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors, and (4) low-pressure liquid-salt coolants. Depending upon goals, the peak coolant operating temperatures are between 700 and 1000 deg. C, with reactor outputs between 2400 and 4000 MW(t). Several fluoride salt coolants that are being evaluated have melting points between 350 and 500 deg. C, values that imply minimum refueling temperatures between 400 and 550 deg. C. At operating conditions, the liquid salts are transparent and have physical properties similar to those of water. A series of refueling studies have been initiated to (1) confirm the viability of refueling, (2) define methods for safe rapid refueling, and (3) aid the selection of the preferred AHTR design. Three reactor cores with different fuel element designs (prismatic, pebble bed, and pin-type fuel assembly) are being evaluated. Each is a liquid-salt-cooled variant of a graphite-moderated high-temperature reactor. The refueling studies examined applicable refueling experience from high-temperature reactors (similar fuel element designs) and sodium-cooled fast reactors (similar plant design with liquid coolant, high temperatures, and low pressures). The findings indicate that refueling is viable, and several approaches have been identified. The study results are described in this paper. (authors)

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Peterson, Per F. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California at Berkeley, 6124a Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cahalan, James E. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Enneking, Jeffrey A. [Areva NP (United States); Phil MacDonald [Consultant, Cedar Hill, TX (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements  

SciTech Connect

The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford's 300 Area Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed...

299

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We perform experiments simulating reactor core melt phenomena in which molten core debris ("corium") erodes the concrete floor of a containment building. This occurred during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident though the extent of concrete damage is yet unknown. This video shows the top view of a churning molten pool of uranium oxide at 2000°C (3600°F) seen during an experiment at Argonne. Corium behaves much like lava.

300

Nuclear Reactor Materials and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor materials and fuels can be classified into six categories: Nuclear fuel materials Nuclear clad materials Nuclear coolant materials Nuclear poison materials Nuclear moderator materials

Dr. James S. Tulenko

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical project. The main point of preference for the offered reactor is its likely cheapness as a power source. Key words: Micro-thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, Self-magnetic AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

302

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydraulics software RELAP-7 (which is under development in the Light Water Reactor Sustainability LWRS Program). A novel interaction between the probabilistic part (i.e., RAVEN)...

303

General features of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

The concept of direct-cycle, supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors is developed. Breeding is possible in the tight lattice core. The power output can be maximized in the fast converter reactor. The gross thermal efficiency of the high temperature reactor adopting Inconel as fuel cladding is expected to be 44.8%. The plant system is similar to the supercritical-fossil-fired power plant which adopts once-through type coolant circulation system. The volume and height of the containment are approximately half of the BWR. The basic safety principles follows those of LWRs. The reactor will solve the economic problems of LWR and LMFBR.

Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors. ISPO C-50 Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

This study deals with diversion assumptions for high-powered research reactors -- specifically, MTR fuel; pool- or tank-type research reactors with light-water moderator; and water, beryllium, or graphite reflectors, and which have a power level of 25 MW(t) or more. The objective is to provide assistance to the IAEA in documentation of criteria and inspection observables related to undeclared plutonium production in the reactors described above, including: criteria for undeclared plutonium production, necessary design information for implementation of these criteria, verification guidelines including neutron physics and heat transfer, and safeguards measures to facilitate the detection of undeclared plutonium production at large research reactors.

Binford, F.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Reactor coolant pump flywheel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flywheel for a pump, and in particular a flywheel having a number of high density segments for use in a nuclear reactor coolant pump. The flywheel includes an inner member and an outer member. A number of high density segments are provided between the inner and outer members. The high density segments may be formed from a tungsten based alloy. A preselected gap is provided between each of the number of high density segments. The gap accommodates thermal expansion of each of the number of segments and resists the hoop stress effect/keystoning of the segments.

Finegan, John Raymond; Kreke, Francis Joseph; Casamassa, John Joseph

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

306

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed reactor system is described which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nuclear reactor control apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor High Temperature Gas Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor High Temperature Gas Reactor Andrew C Kadak Massachusetts Institute For 1150 MW Combined Heat and Power Station Oil Refinery Hydrogen Production Desalinization Plant VHTR/Graphite Discrimination system Damaged Sphere ContainerGraphiteReturn FuelReturn Fresh Fuel Container Spent Fuel Tank #12

310

Proliferation resistance of small modular reactors fuels  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the proliferation resistance of different types of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) has been examined and classified with criteria available in the literature. In the first part of the study, the level of proliferation attractiveness of traditional low-enriched UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels to be used in SMRs based on pressurized water technology has been analyzed. On the basis of numerical simulations both cores show significant proliferation risks. Although the MOX core is less proliferation prone in comparison to the UO{sub 2} core, it still can be highly attractive for diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material. In the second part of the paper, calculations to assess the proliferation attractiveness of fuel in typical small sodium cooled fast reactor show that proliferation risks from spent fuel cannot be neglected. The core contains a highly attractive plutonium composition during the whole life cycle. Despite some aspects of the design like the sealed core that enables easy detection of unauthorized withdrawal of fissile material and enhances proliferation resistance, in case of open Non-Proliferation Treaty break-out, weapon-grade plutonium in sufficient quantities could be extracted from the reactor core.

Polidoro, F.; Parozzi, F. [RSE - Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico,Via Rubattino 54, 20134, Milano (Italy); Fassnacht, F.; Kuett, M.; Englert, M. [IANUS, Darmstadt University of Technology, Alexanderstr. 35, D-64283 Darmstadt (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations that govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In the irradiated condition, however, the fracture toughness of the RPV may be severely

312

Heat Transfer Simulation of Reactor Cavity Cooling System Experimental Facility using RELAP5-3D and Generation of View Factors using MCNP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As one of the most attractive reactor types, The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is designed to be passively safe with the incorporation of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). In this paper, a RELAP5-3D simulation model is set up based...

Wu, Huali

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

313

Power Flattening in ARIES-RS Fusion Breeder Reactor Using Mixed Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents the possibility of the power flattening in the ARIES-RS breeder reactor using mixed (Th,U)C or (Th,U)N fuels. Two different types of mixing, namely, homogeneous mixing (HM) and linear mixin...

Mustafa Übeyli

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Large Core Code Evaluation Working Group benchmark problem four: neutronics and burnup benchmark analyses of a large heterogeneous fast reactor. Part II. Individual contributions. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts are presented for each of the seven papers presented concerning the burnup and neutronic characteristics of large-core LMFBR type reactors.

Cowan, C.L.; Protsik, R.; Lewellen, J.W. (eds.)

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

Nick A. Altic

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

316

DOE Drops Plan to Restart Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...longer in flux. Hanford research reactor...decision to scrap the Hanford reactor, which...research. At public meetings, however...decision to scrap the Hanford reactor, which...research. At public meetings, however, FFTF...

Robert F. Service

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics NASSAR H. S. HAIDAR...analytically for a multiregional nuclear reactor whose subregions are of arbitrary...Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics NASSAU H. S. HAIDAR......

NASSAR H. S. HAIDAR

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Solvent refined coal reactor quench system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream. 1 fig.

Thorogood, R.M.

1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

319

Safety of power transformers, power supplies, reactors and similar products - Part 1: General requirements and tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This International Standard deals with safety aspects of power transformers, power supplies, reactors and similar products such as electrical, thermal and mechanical safety. This standard covers the following types of dry-type transformers, power supplies, including switch mode power supplies, and reactors, the windings of which may be encapsulated or non-encapsulated. It has the status of a group safety publication in accordance with IEC Guide 104.

International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Cyclic Mode of Transmutation of Minor Actinides in Heavy-Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of process of transmutation of americium and curium from spent nuclear fuel in heavy-water reactor during first 10 lifetimes and at transition to equilibrium mode are calculated. During transmutation, dangerous nuclides, first of all, {sup 244}Cm and {sup 238}Pu are accumulated. They cause an increase of radiotoxicity. At first 10 cycles of a transmutation, the radiotoxicity is increased by 11 times in comparison with initial load of transmuted actinides. Heavy-water reactor with thermal power of 1000 MW can transmute americium and curium extracted from 7-8 VVER-1000 type reactors. It means that the required power of transmutation reactor makes about 4 % of thermal power of VVER-1000 type reactors. (authors)

Gerasimov, Aleksander S.; Kiselev, Gennady V.; Myrtsymova, Lidia A.; Zaritskaya, Tamara S. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, SSC RF ITEP, Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya, 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

THE MATERIALS OF FAST BREEDER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) concern the behavior ofmetal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Despite the simplicityinduced by irradiation. LMFBR funding is the largest single

Olander, Donald R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nuclear reactors in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors in the United States ... A chart listing the operating and planned nuclear reactors in the United States. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

Hubert N. Alyea

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

324

LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM: INTRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM: INTRODUCTION The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1...

325

MOOSE simulating nuclear reactor CRUD buildup  

SciTech Connect

This simulation uses multiple physical models to show how the buildup of boron deposits on reactor fuel can affect performance and the reactor's power profile.

None

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

326

Advanced Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies The Office of Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) sponsors research, development and deployment (RD&D) activities through its Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), and Advanced Small Modular Reactor (aSMR) programs to promote safety, technical, economical, and environmental advancements of innovative Generation IV nuclear energy technologies. The Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) will pursue these advancements through RD&D activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories and U.S. universities, as well as through collaboration with industry and international partners. These activities will focus on advancing scientific

327

Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pebble bed reactor,” Nuclear Engineering and Design, vol.the AVR reactor,” Nuclear Engineering and Design, vol. 121,Operating Experience,” Nuclear Engineering and Design, vol.

Laufer, Michael Robert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

F Reactor Inspection | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inspection F Reactor Inspection Addthis Description Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor last week before...

329

Type Fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fusion is an indispensable tool in the arsenal ... Less well-known, but equally valuable is type fusion, which states conditions for fusing an application ... algebra. We provide a novel proof of type fusion base...

Ralf Hinze

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

13 - Generation IV reactor designs, operation and fuel cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter looks at Generation IV nuclear reactors, such as the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR), the supercritical water reactor (SCWR), the molten salt reactor (MSR), the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), the lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) and the gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR). Reactor designs and fuel cycles are also described.

N. Cerullo; G. Lomonaco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Human Reliability Analysis for Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Because no human reliability analysis (HRA) method was specifically developed for small modular reactors (SMRs), the application of any current HRA method to SMRs represents tradeoffs. A first- generation HRA method like THERP provides clearly defined activity types, but these activity types do not map to the human-system interface or concept of operations confronting SMR operators. A second- generation HRA method like ATHEANA is flexible enough to be used for SMR applications, but there is currently insufficient guidance for the analyst, requiring considerably more first-of-a-kind analyses and extensive SMR expertise in order to complete a quality HRA. Although no current HRA method is optimized to SMRs, it is possible to use existing HRA methods to identify errors, incorporate them as human failure events in the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), and quantify them. In this paper, we provided preliminary guidance to assist the human reliability analyst and reviewer in understanding how to apply current HRA methods to the domain of SMRs. While it is possible to perform a satisfactory HRA using existing HRA methods, ultimately it is desirable to formally incorporate SMR considerations into the methods. This may require the development of new HRA methods. More practicably, existing methods need to be adapted to incorporate SMRs. Such adaptations may take the form of guidance on the complex mapping between conventional light water reactors and small modular reactors. While many behaviors and activities are shared between current plants and SMRs, the methods must adapt if they are to perform a valid and accurate analysis of plant personnel performance in SMRs.

Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified.

Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

334

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar '07 to Apr '07: -5.5% Mar '07 to Apr '07: -5.5% Apr '06 to Apr '07: +7.6% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +7.6% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '07 to Apr '07: +2.4% Apr '06 to Apr '07: +34.5% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +16.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '07 to Apr '07: +2.2% Apr '06 to Apr '07: +3.1% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +1.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '07 to Apr '07: -0.4% Apr '06 to Apr '07: -0.8% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.7%

335

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May '07 to Jun '07: -2.9% May '07 to Jun '07: -2.9% Jun '06 to Jun '07: +3.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +6.7% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '07 to Jun '07: -7.4% Jun '06 to Jun '07: +8.5% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +16.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '07 to Jun '07: +6.4% Jun '06 to Jun '07: +3.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +1.6% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '07 to Jun '07: +1.2% Jun '06 to Jun '07: +0.1% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.7%

336

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr '07 to May '07: +0.3% Apr '07 to May '07: +0.3% May '06 to May '07: +6.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +7.3% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '07 to May '07: -6.7% May '06 to May '07: +17.6% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +16.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '07 to May '07: -1.0% May '06 to May '07: +2.5% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +1.3% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '07 to May '07: +2.8% May '06 to May '07: +1.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.8%

337

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul '07 to Aug '07: +8.9% Jul '07 to Aug '07: +8.9% Aug '06 to Aug '07: +1.6% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.2% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '07 to Aug '07: +3.9% Aug '06 to Aug '07 -3.7% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +8.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '07 to Aug '07: +3.8% Aug '06 to Aug '07: +2.9% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '07 to Aug '07: +2.5% Aug '06 to Aug '07: -0.1% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.4%

338

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug '07 to Sep '07: -4.5% Aug '07 to Sep '07: -4.5% Sep '06 to Sep '07: +1.0% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.1% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '07 to Sep '07: -6.6% Sep '06 to Sep '07 -0.9% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +7.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '07 to Sep '07: -6.4% Sep '06 to Sep '07: +0.0% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +1.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '07 to Sep '07: -4.2% Sep '06 to Sep '07: -0.3%

339

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun '07 to Jul '07: -4.6% Jun '07 to Jul '07: -4.6% Jul '06 to Jul '07: -0.2% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.3% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '07 to Jul '07: +0.4% Jul '06 to Jul '07: -1.5% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +10.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '07 to Jul '07: -2.8% Jul '06 to Jul '07: +2.8% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +1.8% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '07 to Jul '07: -2.1% Jul '06 to Jul '07: -0.6%

340

Assessment of torsatrons as reactors  

SciTech Connect

Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R[sub 0] = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B[sup 0] = 4.8-7.5 T, B[sub max] (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions.

Lyon, J.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)) [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Painter, S.L. (Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)) [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Assessment of torsatrons as reactors  

SciTech Connect

Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R{sub 0} = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B{sup 0} = 4.8-7.5 T, B{sub max} (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions.

Lyon, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Painter, S.L. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

ORIGEN-ARP Cross-Section Libraries for Magnox, Advanced Gas-Cooled, and VVER Reactor Designs  

SciTech Connect

Cross-section libraries for the ORIGEN-ARP system were extended to include four non-U.S. reactor types: the Magnox reactor, the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor, the VVER-440, and the VVER-1000. Typical design and operational parameters for these four reactor types were determined by an examination of a variety of published information sources. Burnup simulation models of the reactors were then developed using the SAS2H sequence from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory SCALE code system. In turn, these models were used to prepare the burnup-dependent cross-section libraries suitable for use with ORIGEN-ARP. The reactor designs together with the development of the SAS2H models are described, and a small number of validation results using spent-fuel assay data are reported.

Murphy, BD

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

343

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from 40y to 80y implies a doubling of the neutron exposure for the RPV. Thus,

344

Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

Gilmore, Charles B. (Greensburg, PA); Altman, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE  

SciTech Connect

The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

John D. Bess

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Removable check valve for use in a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A removable check valve for interconnecting the discharge duct of a pump and an inlet coolant duct of a reactor core in a pool-type nuclear reactor. A manifold assembly is provided having an outer periphery affixed to and in fluid communication with the discharge duct of the pump and has an inner periphery having at least one opening therethrough. A housing containing a check valve is located within the inner periphery of the manifold. The upper end of the housing has an opening in alignment with the opening in the manifold assembly, and seals are provided above and below the openings. The lower end of the housing is adapted for fluid communication with the inlet duct of the reactor core.

Dunn, Charlton (Calabasas, CA); Gutzmann, Edward A. (Simi Valley, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect

The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

Douglas Morrell

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Tritium diagnostics in a fusion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods for controlling tritium in a fusion reactor are reviewed. The characteristic features of the...

A. I. Markin; N. I. Syromyatnikov; A. M. Belov

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Combustion synthesis continuous flow reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a reactor for combustion synthesis of inorganic powders. The reactor includes a reaction vessel having a length and a first end and a second end. The reaction vessel further has a solution inlet and a carrier gas inlet. The reactor further has a heater for heating both the solution and the carrier gas. In a preferred embodiment, the reaction vessel is heated and the solution is in contact with the heated reaction vessel. It is further preferred that the reaction vessel be cylindrical and that the carrier gas is introduced tangentially into the reaction vessel so that the solution flows helically along the interior wall of the reaction vessel. As the solution evaporates and combustion produces inorganic material powder, the carrier gas entrains the powder and carries it out of the reactor.

Maupin, Gary D. (Richland, WA); Chick, Lawrence A. (West Richland, WA); Kurosky, Randal P. (Maple Valley, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Interfacial effects in fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of increased resonance capture rates near zone interfaces in fast reactor media has been examined both theoretically and experimentally. An interface traversing assembly was designed, constructed and employed ...

Saidi, Mohammad Said

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Unique features of space reactors  

SciTech Connect

Space reactors are designed to meet a unique set of requirements; they must be sufficiently compact to be launched in a rocket to their operational location, operate for many years without maintenance and servicing, operate in extreme environments, and reject heat by radiation to space. To meet these restrictions, operating temperatures are much greater than in terrestrial power plants, and the reactors tend to have a fast neutron spectrum. Currently, a new generation of space reactor power plants is being developed. The major effort is in the SP-100 program, where the power plant is being designed for seven years of full power, and no maintenance operation at a reactor outlet operating temperature of 1350 K. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Buden, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Reactor physics project final report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the final report in an experimental and theoretical program to develop and apply single- and few-element methods for the determination of reactor lattice parameters. The period covered by the report is January 1, ...

Driscoll, Michael J.

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Environmentally assisted cracking of light-water reactor materials  

SciTech Connect

Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of lightwater reactor (LWR) materials has affected nuclear reactors from the very introduction of the technology. Corrosion problems have afflicted steam generators from the very introduction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Shippingport, the first commercial PWR operated in the United States, developed leaking cracks in two Type 304 stainless steel (SS) steam generator tubes as early as 1957, after only 150 h of operation. Stress corrosion cracks were observed in the heat-affected zones of welds in austenitic SS piping and associated components in boiling-water reactors (BRWs) as early as 1965. The degradation of steam generator tubing in PWRs and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic SS piping in BWRs have been the most visible and most expensive examples of EAC in LWRs, and the repair and replacement of steam generators and recirculation piping has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. However, other problems associated with the effects of the environment on reactor structures and components am important concerns in operating plants and for extended reactor lifetimes. Cast duplex austenitic-ferritic SSs are used extensively in the nuclear industry to fabricate pump casings and valve bodies for LWRs and primary coolant piping in many PWRs. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase in cast duplex SS may occur after 10 to 20 years at reactor operating temperatures, which could influence the mechanical response and integrity of pressure boundary components during high strain-rate loading (e.g., seismic events). The problem is of most concern in PWRs where slightly higher temperatures are typical and cast SS piping is widely used.

Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Alternate-fuel reactor studies  

SciTech Connect

A number of studies related to improvements and/or greater understanding of alternate-fueled reactors is presented. These studies cover the areas of non-Maxwellian distributions, materials and lifetime analysis, a /sup 3/He-breeding blanket, tritium-rich startup effects, high field magnet support, and reactor operation spanning the range from full D-T operation to operation with no tritium breeding.

Evans, K. Jr.; Ehst, D.A.; Gohar, Y.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Turner, L.R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Solar solids reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar powered kiln is provided, that is of relatively simple design and which efficiently uses solar energy. The kiln or solids reactor includes a stationary chamber with a rearward end which receives solid material to be reacted and a forward end through which reacted material is disposed of, and a screw conveyor extending along the bottom of the chamber for slowly advancing the material between the chamber ends. Concentrated solar energy is directed to an aperture at the forward end of the chamber to heat the solid material moving along the bottom of the chamber. The solar energy can be reflected from a mirror facing at an upward incline, through the aperture and against a heat-absorbing material near the top of the chamber, which moves towards the rear of the chamber to distribute heat throughout the chamber. Pumps at the forward and rearward ends of the chamber pump heated sweep gas through the length of the chamber, while minimizing the flow of gas through an open aperture through which concentrated sunlight is received.

Yudow, Bernard D. (Chicago, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Solar solids reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar powered kiln is provided, that is of relatively simple design and which efficiently uses solar energy. The kiln or solids reactor includes a stationary chamber with a rearward end which receives solid material to be reacted and a forward end through which reacted material is disposed of, and a screw conveyor extending along the bottom of the chamber for slowly advancing the material between the chamber ends. Concentrated solar energy is directed to an aperture at the forward end of the chamber to heat the solid material moving along the bottom of the chamber. The solar energy can be reflected from a mirror facing at an upward incline, through the aperture and against a heat-absorbing material near the top of the chamber, which moves towards the rear of the chamber to distribute heat throughout the chamber. Pumps at the forward and rearward ends of the chamber pump heated sweep gas through the length of the chamber, while minimizing the flow of gas through an open aperture through which concentrated sunlight is received.

Yudow, B.D.

1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

358

Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors  

SciTech Connect

There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

Stuart Nemser, PhD

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Hanging core support system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For holding the reactor core in the confining reactor vessel, a support is disclosed that is structurally independent of the vessel, that is dimensionally accurate and stable, and that comprises tandem tension linkages that act redundantly of one another to maintain stabilized core support even in the unlikely event of the complete failure of one of the linkages. The core support has a mounting platform for the reactor core, and unitary structure including a flange overlying the top edge of the reactor vessels, and a skirt and box beams between the flange and platform for establishing one of the linkages. A plurality of tension rods connect between the deck closing the reactor vessel and the platform for establishing the redundant linkage. Loaded Belleville springs flexibly hold the tension rods at the deck and separable bayonet-type connections hold the tension rods at the platform. Motion or radiation sensing detectors can be provide at the lower ends of the tension rods for obtaining pertinent readings proximate the core.

Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Kann, William J. (Park Ridge, IL); Pan, Yen-Cheng (Naperville, IL); Saiveau, James G. (Hickory Hills, IL); Seidensticker, Ralph W. (Wheaton, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Evaluation of Torsatrons as reactors  

SciTech Connect

Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors. This scoping study, which uses an integrated cost-minimization code that incorporates costing and reactor component models self-consistently with a 1-D energy transport calculation, shows that a torsatron reactor could also be economically competitive with a tokamak reactor. The projected cost of electricity (COE) estimated using the Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Studies (ARIES) costing algorithms is 65.6 mill/kW(e)h in constant 1992 dollars for a reference 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor case. The COE is relatively insensitive (<10% variation) over a wide range of assumptions, including variations in the maximum field allowed on the coils, the coil elongation, the shape of the density profile, the beta limit, the confinement multiplier, and the presence of a large loss region for alpha particles. The largest variations in the COE occur for variations in the electrical power output demanded and the plasma-coil separation ratio.

Lyon, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gulec, K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Miller, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); El-Guebaly, L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

When Do Commercial Reactors Permanently Shut Down?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

For those wishing to obtain current data, the following resources are available: U.S. reactors, go to the Energy Information Administration's nuclear reactor shutdown list. (Note: As of April 30, 2010, the last U.S. reactor to permanently shut down was Big Rock Point in 1997.) Foreign Reactors, go to the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) on the International Atomic Energy Agency's website.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment.

T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

(Liquid metal reactor/fast breeder reactor research and development)  

SciTech Connect

The second meeting of the UJCC was held in Japan on June 6--8, 1990. The first day was devoted to presentations of the status of the US and Japanese Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) programs and the status of specific areas of cooperative work. Briefly, the Japanese are following the FBR development program which has been in place since the 1970s. This program includes an FBR test reactor (JOYO), a pilot-scale reactor (MONJU), a demonstration-scale plant, and commercial-scale plants by about 2020. The US program has been redirected toward an actinide recycle mission using metal fuel and pyroprocessing of spent fuel to recovery both Pu and the higher actinides for return to the Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR). The second day was spent traveling from Tokyo to Tsuruga for a tour of the MONJU reactor. The tour was especially interesting. The third day was spent writing the minutes of the meeting and the return trip to Tokyo.

Homan, F.J.

1990-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Detecting a Nuclear Fission Reactor at the Center of the Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural nuclear fission reactor with a power output of 3- 10 terawatt at the center of the earth has been proposed as the energy source of the earth's magnetic field. The proposal can be directly tested by a massive liquid scintillation detector that can detect the signature spectrum of antineutrinos from the geo-reactor as well as the direction of the antineutrino source. Such detectors are now in operation or under construction in Japan/Europe. However, the clarity of both types of measurements may be limited by background from antineutrinos from surface power reactors. Future U. S. detectors, relatively more remote from power reactors, may be more suitable for achieving unambiguous spectral and directional evidence for a 3TW geo-reactor.

R. S. Raghavan

2002-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Behavior of Suppliers in Supplier-Customer Relationships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this development are electronics and automotive industry. hal-01055845,version1-13Aug2014 Author manuscript of Japanese electronics and automotive companies which are accomplished within Keiretsu structures

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

366

Melanin Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melanin Types Melanin Types Name: Irfan Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are different types of melanins? And what are the functions of these types? Replies: Hi Irfan! Melanin is a dark compound or better a photoprotective pigment. Its major role in the skin is to absorb the ultraviolet (UV) light that comes from the sun so the skin is not damaged. Sun exposure usually produces a tan at the skin that represents an increase of melanin pigment in the skin. Melanin is important also in other areas of the body, as the eye and the brain., but it is not completely understood what the melanin pigment does in these areas. Melanin forms a special cell called melanocyte. This cell is found in the skin, in the hair follicle, and in the iris and retina of the eye.

367

Advanced Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Nuclear Advanced Nuclear Reactors Advanced Nuclear Reactors Turbulent Flow of Coolant in an Advanced Nuclear Reactor Visualizing Coolant Flow in Sodium Reactor Subassemblies Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) Coolant Flow At the heart of a nuclear power plant is the reactor. The fuel assembly is placed inside a reactor vessel where all the nuclear reactions occur to produce the heat and steam used for power generation. Nonetheless, an entire power plant consists of many other support components and key structures like coolant pipes; pumps and tanks including their surrounding steel framing; and concrete containment and support structures. The Reactors Product Line within NEAMS is concerned with modeling the reactor vessel as well as those components of a complete power plant that

368

Advanced Reactor Technology Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Advanced Reactor Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Advanced Reactor Technologies » Advanced Reactor Technology Documents Advanced Reactor Technology Documents January 30, 2013 Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report This report documents the establishment of a technical review process and the findings of the Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) Technical Review Panel (TRP).1 The intent of the process is to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. A goal of the process is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. The process involved establishing evaluation criteria, conducting a pilot review, soliciting concept inputs from industry entities, reviewing the concepts by TRP members and compiling the

369

Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers issued prior to 1986. Reference dosimetry is developed for the unshielded HPRR as well as for the reactor with each of five different shield types and configurations. The reference dosimetry is presented in terms of three different dose and six different dose equivalent reporting conventions. These reporting conventions cover most of those in current use by dosimetrists worldwide. In addition to the reference neutron dosimetry, this document contains other useful dosimetry-related data for the HPRR in its new configuration. These data include dose-distance measurements and calculations, gamma dose measurements, neutron-to-gamma ratios, ''9-to-3 inch'' ratios, threshold detector unit measurements, 56-group neutron energy spectra, sulfur fluence measurements, and details concerning HPRR shields. 26 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs.

Sims, C.S.; Ragan, G.E.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Nuclear Archeology for CANDU Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this work is the development of so-called 'nuclear archeology' techniques to predict the irradiation history of both fuel-related and non-fuel-related materials irradiated in the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) family of nuclear reactors. In this application to CANDU-type reactors, two different scenarios for the collection of the appropriate data for use in these procedures will be assumed: the first scenario is the removal of the pressure tubes, calandria tubes, or fuel cladding and destructive analysis of the activation products contained in these structural materials; the second scenario is the nondestructive analysis (NDA) of the same hardware items via high-resolution gamma ray scans. There are obvious advantages and disadvantages for each approach; however, the NDA approach is the central focus of this work because of its simplicity and lack of invasiveness. The use of these techniques along with a previously developed inverse capability is expected to allow for the prediction of average flux levels and irradiation time, and the total fluence for samples where the values of selected isotopes can be measured.

Broadhead, Bryan L [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor...

372

Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model; 3-D; Monolith; Reactor; Optimization Introduction TheAngeles Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and KineticGlobal Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic

ALHUSSEINI, ZAYNA ISHAQ

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study  

SciTech Connect

The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D-{sup 3}He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Rapid starting methanol reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

Chludzinski, Paul J. (38 Berkshire St., Swampscott, MA 01907); Dantowitz, Philip (39 Nancy Ave., Peabody, MA 01960); McElroy, James F. (12 Old Cart Rd., Hamilton, MA 01936)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect

Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (“burners”) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (“breeders”) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is “attractive” for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Experimental Criticality Benchmarks for SNAP 10A/2 Reactor Cores  

SciTech Connect

This report describes computational benchmark models for nuclear criticality derived from descriptions of the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Critical Assembly (SCA)-4B experimental criticality program conducted by Atomics International during the early 1960's. The selected experimental configurations consist of fueled SNAP 10A/2-type reactor cores subject to varied conditions of water immersion and reflection under experimental control to measure neutron multiplication. SNAP 10A/2-type reactor cores are compact volumes fueled and moderated with the hydride of highly enriched uranium-zirconium alloy. Specifications for the materials and geometry needed to describe a given experimental configuration for a model using MCNP5 are provided. The material and geometry specifications are adequate to permit user development of input for alternative nuclear safety codes, such as KENO. A total of 73 distinct experimental configurations are described.

Krass, A.W.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

Guidelines for Supplier, Vendor Shows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Park Square Los Alamos, NM 87544 505-662-8105 http:www.losalamoschamber.com Advertising your event You will need to conduct your own advertising for your event. LANL...

378

N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning Project Now Complete N Reactor Placed In Interim Safe Storage: Largest Hanford Reactor Cocooning Project Now Complete June 14, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 Mark McKenna mmckenna@wch-rcc.com 509-372-9032 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has completed placing N Reactor in interim safe storage, a process also known as "cocooning." N Reactor was the last of nine plutonium production reactors to be shut down at DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state. It was Hanford's longest-running reactor, operating from 1963 to 1987. "In the 1960's, N Reactor represented the future of energy in America.

379

Neutron scattering instrumentation at reactor based installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the past decade neutron scattering techniques have been applied to an increasingly wide range of scientific problems. Concurrently a number of substantial improvements of neutron scattering instrumentation have occurred to stimulate this trend. In this article several such developments which have occurred at reactor?based installations are described. Individual spectrometer components which are discussed in some detail include: neutron?optical devices such as guide tubes supermirrors and multilayer systems; neutronmonochromators with optimum reflectivity mosaic and focusing characteristics; position?sensitive detectors of several types; and equipment required for neutronpolarizationanalysis. Several novel spectrometers which have enhanced the role of neutron scattering during the past ten years are also described. These include spectrometers for small?angle scattering backscattering and neutron spin echo. An extensive bibliography is included which covers both early and more recent developments.

Roger Pynn

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Development and transfer of fuel fabrication and utilization technology for research reactors  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 300 research reactors supplied with US-enriched uranium are currently in operation in about 40 countries, with a variety of types, sizes, experiment capabilities and applications. Despite the usefulness and popularity of research reactors, relatively few innovations in their core design have been made in the last fifteen years. The main reason can be better understood by reviewing briefly the history of research reactor fuel technology and enrichment levels. Stringent requirements on the enrichment of the uranium to be used in research reactors were considered and a program was launched to assist research reactors in continuing their operation with the new requirements and with minimum penalties. The goal of the new program, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, is to develop the technical means to utilize LEU instead of HEU in research reactors without significant penalties in experiment performance, operating costs, reactor modifications, and safety characteristics. This paper reviews briefly the RERTR Program activities with special emphasis on the technology transfer aspects of interest to this conference.

Travelli, A.; Domagala, R.F.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advantages and applications of megawatt-sized heat-pipe reactors  

SciTech Connect

Recently, worldwide interest in nuclear energy has focused on small reactors (10 to 300 MWe) to address emerging energy needs in remote locations. These designs are new to varying degrees but share similar approaches and common weaknesses with regard to primary heat rejection that differ little from reactor designs of the late 1950's. Here, an innovative concept, heat-pipe reactors, is discussed. The concept is unique in its simplicity and potential for safe, affordable, and reliable energy. Given the potential for reactors to meet worldwide energy needs and the pivotal role of heat rejection in overall reactor safety, the potential societal impact of this type of innovation is substantial. Heat-pipe-cooled, fast-spectrum reactors have been proposed for government applications requiring a robust, reliable, remotely controlled system with capacity much less than 1 MWe; however, they have not been designed for power ranges greater than 1 MWe. Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a study to design heat-pipe-cooled, fast-fission reactors and to generate a point design of a > 10-MWe-class machine suitable for next-generation compact reactors at remote locations. (authors)

McClure, P. R.; Reid, R. S.; Dixon, D. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS C921, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Mo-99 production at the Annular Core Research Reactor - recent calculative results  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress has been made over the past year in understanding the chemistry and processing challenges associated with {sup 99}Mo production using Cintichem type targets. Targets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been successfully irradiated in fuel element locations at the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and processed at the Sandia Hot Cell Facility. The next goal for the project is to remove the central cavity experiment tube from the reactor core, allowing for the irradiation of up to 37 targets. After the in-core work is complete, the reactor will be capable of producing significant quantities of {sup 99}Mo.

Parma, E.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Graphite Reactor | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphite Reactor Graphite Reactor 'In the early, desperate days of World War II, the United States launched the top-secret, top-priority Manhattan Project...' In the early, desperate days of U.S. involvement in World War II, American scientists began to fear that the German discovery of uranium fission in 1939 might enable the Nazis to develop a super bomb. Afraid of losing this crucial race, the United States launched the top-secret, top-priority Manhattan Project. The plan was to create two atomic weapons-one fueled by plutonium, the other by enriched uranium. Hanford, Washington, was selected as the site for plutonium production, but before large reactors could be built there, a pilot plant was necessary to prove the feasibility of scaling up from laboratory experiments. A secluded, rural area near Clinton, Tennessee, was

384

Business Opportunities for Small Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the market potential and identifies a number of potential paths for developing the small nuclear reactor business. There are several potential opportunities identified and evaluated. Selecting a specific approach for the business development requires additional information related to a specific market and sources of capital to support the investment. If and how a market for small nuclear plants may develop is difficult to predict because of the complexity of the economic and institutional factors that will influence such development. Key factors are; economics, safety, proliferation resistance and investment risk. The economic and political interest of any of the identified markets is also dependent on successful demonstration of the safety and reliability of small nuclear reactor. Obtaining a US-NRC Standard Design approval would be an important development step toward establishing a market for small reactors. (authors)

Minato, Akio; Nishimura, Satoshi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry - CRIEPI, 2-11-1 Iwado-Kita, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Brown, Neil W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - LLNL, PO Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Specific Mass Estimates for A Vapor Core Reactor With MHD  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated the development of a system concept for space power generation and nuclear electric propulsion based on a vapor core reactor (VCR) with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power conversion system, coupled to a magnetoplasma-dynamic (MPD) thruster. The VCR is a liquid-vapor core reactor concept operating with metallic uranium or uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) vapor as the fissioning fuel and alkali metals or their fluorides as working fluid in a closed Rankine cycle with MHD energy conversion. Gaseous and liquid-vapor core reactors can potentially provide the highest reactor and cycle temperature among all existing or proposed fission reactor designs. This unique feature makes this reactor concept a very natural and attractive candidate for very high power (10 to 1000 MWe) and low specific mass (0.4 to 5 kg/kWe) nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) applications since the MHD output could be coupled with minimal power conditioning to MPD thrusters or other types of thruster for producing thrust at very high specific impulse (I{sub sp} 1500 to 10,000 s). The exceptional specific mass performance of an optimized VCRMHD- NEP system could lead to a dramatic reduction in the cost and duration of manned or robotic interplanetary as well as interstellar missions. The VCR-MHD-NEP system could enable very efficient Mars cargo transfers or short (<8 month) Mars round trips with less initial mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO). The system could also enable highly efficient lunar cargo transfer and rapid missions to other destinations throughout the solar system. (authors)

Knight, Travis; Smith, Blair; Anghaie, Samim [Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPI), PO Box 116502, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6502 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Deployment of a three-dimensional array of micro-pocket fission detector triads (MPFD[superscript]3) for real-time, in-core neutron flux measurements in the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark-II Nuclear Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A Micro-Pocket Fission Detector (MPFD) is a miniaturized type of fission chamber developed for use inside a nuclear reactor. Their unique design allows them to… (more)

Ohmes, Martin Francis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

BNL | Our History: Reactors as Research Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

> See also: Accelerators > See also: Accelerators Brookhaven History: Using Reactors as Research Tools BGRR Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the Laboratory's first big machine and the first peace-time reactor built in the United States following World War II. The reactor's primary mission was to produce neutrons for scientific experimentation and to refine reactor technology. At the time, the BGRR could accommodate more simultaneous experiments than any other reactor. Scientists and engineers from every corner of the U.S. came to use the reactor, which was not only a source of neutrons for experiments, but also an excellent training facility. Researchers used the BGRR's neutrons as tools for studying atomic nuclei and the structure of solids, and to investigate many physical, chemical and

389

Reactor accelerator coupling experiments: a feasability study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) are a set of neutron source driven subcritical experiments under temperature feedback conditions. These experiments will involve coupling an accelerator driven neutron source to a TRIGA reactor...

Woddi Venkat Krishna, Taraknath

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

390

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

Bollinger, Lawrence R. (Schenectady, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Inherent safety concepts in nuclear power reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different inherent safety concepts being considered in fast and thermal reactors are presented after outlining the basic goals of nuclear reactor safety, the ‘defence in depth’ philosophy to achieve these goal...

O M Pal Singh; R Shankar Singh

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Choice of coils for a fusion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...configurations. The most ambitious is the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, a large tokamak planned for construction...configuration has features in common with the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiment. Mathematical Model We...

Romeo Alexander; Paul R. Garabedian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Computational Analysis of Fluid Flow in Pebble Bed Modular Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a Generation IV reactor under consideration by Department of Energy and in the nuclear industry. There are two categories of HTGRs, namely, Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and Prismatic reactor. Pebble...

Gandhir, Akshay

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

The development of structural materials for fusion reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...severely exposed parts of future fusion reactors and pose key problems...successful implementation of fusion reactors as an efficient source...conditions in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER...environmental attractiveness of fusion reactors. In this paper...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state.

Colley, Robert W. (Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state.

Colley, R.W.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Login Instructions go here. User ID: Password: Log In Forgot your password?...

399

Tag: Naval Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/all en "Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 9/all en "Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 years http://www.y12.doe.gov/employees-retirees/y-12-times/cooking-y-12-70-years

type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden prose">
We have an enduring mission. Y-12 plays a key role in it. And a nuclear deterrent remains the ultimate insurance policy for America.

High-Fidelity Light Water Reactor Analysis with the Numerical Nuclear Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Mathematics and Computation, Supercomputing, Reactor Physics and Nuclear and Biological Applications

David P. Weber; Tanju Sofu; Won Sik Yang; Thomas J. Downar; Justin W. Thomas; Zhaopeng Zhong; Jin Young Cho; Kang Seog Kim; Tae Hyun Chun; Han Gyu Joo; Chang Hyo Kim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

How far is a Fusion Power Reactor from an Experimental Reactor?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be able to move directly and safely to a "first of a kind" reactor. The main conditions to be satisfied / experimental evidence. To assess the reactor relevance of ITER, rather than a comparison between ITER and one1 How far is a Fusion Power Reactor from an Experimental Reactor? R. Toschi(1) , P. Barabaschi(2

402

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics Optimization of Breed and Burn Fast Reactor Systems.reactors: Fabrication and properties and their optimization.

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

DOSE RATES FROM NEUTRON ACTIVATION OF FUSION REACTOR COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEUTRON ACTIVATION OF FUSION REACTOR C01WONENTS LawrenceNeutron Activation of Fusion Reactor Components Lawrence

Ruby, Lawrence

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Nuclear Reactor Safety Design Criteria  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes nuclear safety criteria applicable to the design, fabrication, construction, testing, and performance requirements of nuclear reactor facilities and safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) within these facilities. Cancels paragraphs 8a and 8b of DOE 5480.6. Cancels DOE O 5480.6 in part. Certified 11-18-10.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

405

Computer aided nuclear reactor modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor modeling is an important activity that lets us analyze existing as well as proposed systems for safety, correct operation, etc. The quality of a analysis is directly proportional to the quality of the model used. In this work we look...

Warraich, Khalid Sarwar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor (LEFR) is a modular, lab scale, single-user reactor for the study of catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP). This system can be employed to study a variety of reactor conditions for both in situ and ex situ CFP.

Not Available

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

International Journal of Chemical Reactor Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Journal of Chemical Reactor Engineering Volume 3 2005 Article A17 Optimal Operation, a single re- action takes place in the reactor and the operational objective is to compute the optimal feed is illustrated via simulation of two semi-batch reactor applications. KEYWORDS: Dynamic Optimization, Batch

Palanki, Srinivas

410

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) - Reactors designed/built by Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integral Fast Reactor Integral Fast Reactor About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

411

Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be far above those of any known chemical source. Even by the most conservative assumptions as to the errors in the measurements, the result is still one order of magnitude greater than conventional energy sources.

Giuseppe Levi; Evelyn Foschi; Torbjörn Hartman; Bo Höistad; Roland Pettersson; Lars Tegnér; Hanno Essén

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

412

Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be fa...

Levi, Giuseppe; Hartman, Torbjörn; Höistad, Bo; Pettersson, Roland; Tegnér, Lars; Essén, Hanno

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Heterogeneous Recycling in Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Current sodium fast reactor (SFR) designs have avoided the use of depleted uranium blankets over concerns of creating weapons grade plutonium. While reducing proliferation risks, this restrains the reactor design space considerably. This project will analyze various blanket and transmutation target configurations that could broaden the design space while still addressing the non-proliferation issues. The blanket designs will be assessed based on the transmutation efficiency of key minor actinide (MA) isotopes and also on mitigation of associated proliferation risks. This study will also evaluate SFR core performance under different scenarios in which depleted uranium blankets are modified to include minor actinides with or without moderators (e.g. BeO, MgO, B4C, and hydrides). This will be done in an effort to increase the sustainability of the reactor and increase its power density while still offering a proliferation resistant design with the capability of burning MA waste produced from light water reactors (LWRs). Researchers will also analyze the use of recycled (as opposed to depleted) uranium in the blankets. The various designs will compare MA transmutation efficiency, plutonium breeding characteristics, proliferation risk, shutdown margins and reactivity coefficients with a current reference sodium fast reactor design employing homogeneous recycling. The team will also evaluate the out-of-core accumulation and/or burn-down rates of MAs and plutonium isotopes on a cycle-by-cycle basis. This cycle-by-cycle information will be produced in a format readily usable by the fuel cycle systems analysis code, VISION, for assessment of the sustainability of the deployment scenarios.

Dr. Benoit Forget; Michael Pope; Piet, Steven J.; Michael Driscoll

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

An integrated approach for the verification of fresh mixed oxide fuel (MOX) assemblies at light water reactor MOX recycle reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an integrated approach for the verification of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to their being loaded into the reactor. There is a coupling of the verification approach that starts at the fuel fabrication plant and stops with the transfer of the assemblies into the thermal reactor. The key measurement points are at the output of the fuel fabrication plant, the receipt at the reactor site, and the storage in the water pool as fresh fuel. The IAEA currently has the capability to measure the MOX fuel assemblies at the output of the fuel fabrication plants using a passive neutron coincidence counting systems of the passive neutron collar (PNCL) type. Also. at the MOX reactor pool, the underwater coincidence counter (UWCC) has been developed to measure the MOX assemblies in the water. The UWCC measurement requires that the fuel assembly be lifted about two meters up in the storage rack to avoid interference from the fuel that is stored in the rack. This paper presents a new method to verify the MOX fuel assemblies that are in the storage rack without the necessity of moving the fuel. The detector system is called the Underwater MOX Verification System (UMVS). The integration and relationship of the three measurements systems is described.

Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sang - Yoon [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RNSD Home RNSD Home Research Groups Advanced Reactor Systems & Safety Nuclear Data & Criticality Safety Nuclear Security Modeling Radiation Safety Information Computational Center Radiation Transport Reactor Physics Thermal Hydraulics & Irradiation Engineering Used Fuel Systems Staff Details (CV/Bios) Publications Org Chart Contact Us ORNL Staff Only Research Groups Advanced Reactor Systems & Safety Nuclear Data & Criticality Safety Nuclear Security Modeling Radiation Safety Information Computational Center Radiation Transport Reactor Physics Thermal Hydraulics & Irradiation Engineering Used Fuel Systems Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division News Highlights U.S. Rep. Fleischmann touts ORNL as national energy treasure Martin Peng wins Fusion Power Associates Leadership Award

416

Shutdown system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultimate shutdown system is provided for termination of neutronic activity in a nuclear reactor. The shutdown system includes bead chains comprising spherical containers suspended on a flexible cable. The containers are comprised of mating hemispherical shells which provide a ruggedized enclosure for reactor poison material. The bead chains, normally suspended above the reactor core on storage spools, are released for downward travel upon command from an external reactor monitor. The chains are capable of horizontal movement, so as to flow around obstructions in the reactor during their downward motion.

Groh, Edward F. (Naperville, IL); Olson, Arne P. (Western Springs, IL); Wade, David C. (Naperville, IL); Robinson, Bryan W. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reactor monitoring and safeguards using antineutrino detectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors have served as the antineutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Measurements made with antineutrino detectors could therefore orer an alternative means for verifying the power history and fissile inventory of a reactors, as part of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and other reactor safeguards regimes. Several erorts to develop this monitoring technique are underway across the globe.

N S Bowden

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Self isolating high frequency saturable reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention discloses a saturable reactor and a method for decoupling the interwinding capacitance from the frequency limitations of the reactor so that the equivalent electrical circuit of the saturable reactor comprises a variable inductor. The saturable reactor comprises a plurality of physically symmetrical magnetic cores with closed loop magnetic paths and a novel method of wiring a control winding and a RF winding. The present invention additionally discloses a matching network and method for matching the impedances of a RF generator to a load. The matching network comprises a matching transformer and a saturable reactor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN)

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

Kotlyar, Oleg M. (Idaho Falls, ID); West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Research Program of a Super Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Research program of a supercritical-pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) in December 2005 as one of the research programs of Japanese NERI (Nuclear Energy Research Initiative). It consists of three programs. (1) development of Super Fast Reactor concept; (2) thermal-hydraulic experiments; (3) material developments. The purpose of the concept development is to pursue the advantage of high power density of fast reactor over thermal reactors to achieve economic competitiveness of fast reactor for its deployment without waiting for exhausting uranium resources. Design goal is not breeding, but maximizing reactor power by using plutonium from spent LWR fuel. MOX will be the fuel of the Super Fast Reactor. Thermal-hydraulic experiments will be conducted with HCFC22 (Hydro chlorofluorocarbons) heat transfer loop of Kyushu University and supercritical water loop at JAEA. Heat transfer data including effect of grid spacers will be taken. The critical flow and condensation of supercritical fluid will be studied. The materials research includes the development and testing of austenitic stainless steel cladding from the experience of PNC1520 for LMFBR. Material for thermal insulation will be tested. SCWR (Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor) of GIF (Generation-4 International Forum) includes both thermal and fast reactors. The research of the Super Fast Reactor will enhance SCWR research and the data base. The research period will be until March 2010. (authors)

Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu, Jie; Terai, Takayuki; Nagasaki, Shinya; Muroya, Yusa; Abe, Hiroaki [Nuclear Professional School / Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokaimura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1188 (Japan); Mori, Hideo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University (Japan); Akiba, Masato; Akimoto, Hajime; Okumura, Keisuke; Akasaka, Naoaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); GOTO, Shoji [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Type: Renewal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 INCITE Awards 1 INCITE Awards Type: Renewal Title: -Ab Initio Dynamical Simulations for the Prediction of Bulk Properties‖ Principal Investigator: Theresa Windus, Iowa State University Co-Investigators: Brett Bode, Iowa State University Graham Fletcher, Argonne National Laboratory Mark Gordon, Iowa State University Monica Lamm, Iowa State University Michael Schmidt, Iowa State University Scientific Discipline: Chemistry: Physical INCITE Allocation: 10,000,000 processor hours Site: Argonne National Laboratory Machine (Allocation): IBM Blue Gene/P (10,000,000 processor hours) Research Summary: This project uses high-quality electronic structure theory, statistical mechanical methods, and

422

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven Brookhaven National Laboratory has three nuclear reactors on its site that were used for scientific research. The reactors are all shut down, and the Laboratory is addressing environmental issues associated with their operations. photo of BGRR Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - Beginning operations in 1950, the graphite reactor was used for research in medicine, biology, chemistry, physics and nuclear engineering. One of the most significant achievements at this facility was the development of technetium-99m, a radiopharmaceutical widely used to image almost any organ in the body. The graphite reactor was shut down in 1969. Parts of it have been decommissioned, with the remainder to be addressed by 2011. More history

424

The neutronics studies of fusion fission hybrid power reactor  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a series of neutronics analysis of hybrid power reactor is proposed. The ideas of loading different fuels in a modular-type fission blanket is analyzed, fitting different level of fusion developments, i.e., the current experimental power output, the level can be obtained in the coming future and the high-power fusion reactor like ITER. The energy multiplication of fission blankets and tritium breeding ratio are evaluated as the criterion of design. The analysis is implemented based on the D-type simplified model, aiming to find a feasible 1000MWe hybrid power reactor for 5 years' lifetime. Three patterns are analyzed: 1) for the low fusion power, the reprocessed fuel is chosen. The fuel with high plutonium content is loaded to achieve large energy multiplication. 2) For the middle fusion power, the spent fuel from PWRs can be used to realize about 30 times energy multiplication. 3) For the high fusion power, the natural uranium can be directly used and about 10 times energy multiplication can be achieved.

Zheng Youqi; Wu Hongchun; Zu Tiejun; Yang Chao; Cao Liangzhi [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710049 (China)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels have been investigated. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-sulfur-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor water, and in air. Analytical studies focused on the behavior of carbon steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. Crack-growth rates of composite fracture-mechanics specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B steel were determined under small-amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with {approx}300 pbb dissolved oxygen. Radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence also have been investigated. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289{degrees}C.

Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Bacteria Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria Types Bacteria Types Name: Evelyn Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What is the significance of S. marcescens,M.luteus, S.epidermidis, and E. Coli? Which of these are gram-positive and gram-negative, and where can these be found? Also, what problems can they cause? When we culture these bacteria, we used four methods: plates, broth, slants, and pour plates. The media was made of TSB, TSA, NAP, and NAD. What is significant about these culturing methods? Replies: I could give you the answer to that question but it is more informative, and fun, to find out yourself. Start with the NCBI library online (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) and do a query with the species name, and 'virulence' if you want to know what they're doing to us. Have a look at the taxonomy devision to see how they are related. To find out if they're gram-pos or neg you should do a gram stain if you can. Otherwise you'll find that information in any bacteriology determination guide. Your question about the media is not specific enough so I can't answer it.

427

Microsoft Word - NEGTN02-#214732-v2-FY_2013_NEUP_REACTOR_UPGRADE_FOA_.DOCX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FUNDING OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT U. S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office Nuclear Energy University Programs - Reactor Upgrades Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000815 Announcement Type: Initial CFDA Number: 81.121 Issue Date: December 13, 2012 Letter of Intent Due Date: Not Applicable Pre-Application Due Date: Not Applicable Application Due Date: May 20, 2013 Nuclear Energy University Programs - Reactor Upgrades DE-FOA-0000815 i Section I - FUNDING OPPORTUNITY DESCRIPTION ............................................ 1 Section II - AWARD INFORMATION .......................................................................... 2 A. TYPE OF AWARD INSTRUMENT ....................................................................

428

Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

Parallel Monte Carlo reactor neutronics  

SciTech Connect

The issues affecting implementation of parallel algorithms for large-scale engineering Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations are discussed. For nuclear reactor calculations, these include load balancing, recoding effort, reproducibility, domain decomposition techniques, I/O minimization, and strategies for different parallel architectures. Two codes were parallelized and tested for performance. The architectures employed include SIMD, MIMD-distributed memory, and workstation network with uneven interactive load. Speedups linear with the number of nodes were achieved.

Blomquist, R.N.; Brown, F.B.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation.

GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

431

Key Thermal Fluid Phenomena In Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Several types of gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been suggested as part of the international Generation IV initiative with the proposed NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) as one of the main concepts [MacDonald et al., 2003]. Meaningful studies for these designs will require accurate, reliable predictions of material temperatures to evaluate the material capabilities; these temperatures depend on the thermal convection in the core and in other important components. Some of these reactors feature complex geometries and wide ranges of temperatures, leading to significant variations of the gas thermodynamic and transport properties plus possible effects of buoyancy during normal and reduced power operations and loss-of-flow (LOFA) and loss-of-coolant scenarios. Potential issues identified to date include ''hot streaking'' in the lower plenum evolving from ''hot channels'' in prismatic cores. In order to predict thermal hydraulic behavior of proposed designs effectively and efficiently, it is useful to identify the dominant phenomena occurring.

D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery; P. D. Bayless; T. D. Marshall

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Optimizing Neutron Thermal Scattering Effects in very High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This project aims to develop a holistic understanding of the phenomenon of neutron thermalization in the VHTR. Neutron thermaliation is dependent on the type and structure of the moderating material. The fact that the moderator (and reflector) in the VHTR is a solid material will introduce new and interesting considerations that do not apply in other (e.g. light water) reactors. The moderator structure is expected to undergo radiation induced changes as the irradiation (or burnup) history progresses. In this case, the induced changes in structure will have a direct impact on many properties including the neutronic behavior. This can be easily anticipated if one recognizes the dependence of neutron thermalization on the scattering law of the moderator. For the pebble bed reactor, it is anticipated that the moderating behavior can be tailored, e.g. using moderators that consist of composite materials, which could allow improved optimization of the moderator-to-fuel ratio.

Hawari, Ayman; Ougouag, Abderrafi

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

433

The ARIES tokamak reactor study  

SciTech Connect

The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D{sup 3}He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Facility Type!  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ITY: ITY: --&L~ ----------- srct-r~ -----------~------~------- if yee, date contacted ------------- cl Facility Type! i I 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis ] Production 1 Diepasal/Storage 'YPE OF CONTRACT .--------------- 1 Prime J Subcontract&- 1 Purchase Order rl i '1 ! Other information (i.e., ---------~---~--~-------- :ontrait/Pirchaee Order # , I C -qXlJ- --~-------~~-------~~~~~~ I I ~~~---~~~~~~~T~~~ FONTRACTING PERIODi IWNERSHIP: ,I 1 AECIMED AECMED GOVT GOUT &NTtiAC+OR GUN-I OWNED ----- LEEE!? M!s LE!Ps2 -LdJG?- ---L .ANDS ILJILDINGS X2UIPilENT IRE OR RAW HA-I-L :INAL PRODUCT IASTE Z. RESIDUE I I kility l pt I ,-- 7- ,+- &!d,, ' IN&"E~:EW AT SITE -' ---------------- , . Control 0 AEC/tlED managed operations

435

Nuclear power reactor education and training at the Ford nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect

Since 1977, staff members of the University of Michigan's Ford nuclear reactor have provided courses and reactor laboratory training programs for reactor operators, engineers, and technicians from seven electric utilities, including Cleveland Electric Illuminating, Consumers Power, Detroit Edison, Indiana and Michigan Electric, Nebraska Public Power, Texas Utilities Generating Company, and Toledo Edison. Reactor laboratories, instrument technician training, and reactor physics courses have been conducted at the university. Courses conducted at plant sites include reactor physics, thermal sciences, materials sciences, and health physics and radiation protection.

Burn, R.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Using reactor operating experience to improve the design of a new Broad Application Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Increasing regulatory demands and effects of plant aging are limiting the operation of existing test reactors. Additionally, these reactors have limited capacities and capabilities for supporting future testing missions. A multidisciplinary team of experts developed sets of preliminary safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor design concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). Anticipated missions for the new reactor include fuels and materials irradiation testing, isotope production, space testing, medical research, fusion testing, intense positron research, and transmutation doping. The early BATR design decisions have benefited from operating experiences with existing reactors. This paper discusses these experiences and highlights their significance for the design of a new BATR.

Fletcher, C.D.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Drexler, R.L.; Leyse, C.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

German concept and status of the disposal of spent fuel elements from German research reactors  

SciTech Connect

Eight research reactors with a power {>=} 100 kW are currently being operated in the Federal Republic of Germany. These comprise three TRIGA-type reactors (power 100 kW to 250 kW), four swimming-pool reactors (power 1 MW to 10 MW) and one DIDO type reactor (power 23 MW). The German research reactors are used for neutron scattering for basic research in the field of solid state research, neutron metrology, for the fabrication of isotopes and for neutron activation analysis for medicine and biology, for investigating the influence of radiation on materials and for nuclear fuel behavior. It will be vital to continue current investigations in the future. Further operation of the German research reactors is therefore indispensable. Safe, regular disposal of the irradiated fuel elements arising now and in future operation is of primary importance. Furthermore, there are several plants with considerable quantities of spent fuel, the safe disposal of which is a matter of urgency. These include above all the VKTA facilities in Rossendorf and also the TRIGA reactors, where disposal will only be necessary upon decommissioning. The present paper report is concerned with the disposal of fuel from the German research reactors. It briefly deals with the situation in the USA since the end of 1988, describes interim solutions for current disposal requirements and then mainly concentrates on the German disposal concept currently being prepared. This concept initially envisages the long-term (25--50 years) dry interim storage of fuel elements in special containers in a central German interim store with subsequent direct final disposal without reprocessing of the irradiated fuel.

Komorowski, K. [Bundesministerium fuer Bildung Wissenschaft, Bonn (Germany); Storch, S.; Thamm, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors  

SciTech Connect

The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of {sup 239}Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

Osborne, A.G.; Smith, T.A.; Deinert, M.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Evaluation of in-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling for integral reactor  

SciTech Connect

In-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) for a small integral reactor has been evaluated to determine the thermal margin for the prevention of a reactor vessel failure. A thermal load analysis from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel wall in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel has been performed to determine the heat flux distribution. The critical heat flux (CHF) on the outer reactor vessel wall has been determined to fix the maximum heat removal rate through the external coolant between the outer reactor vessel and the insulation of the reactor vessel. Finally, the thermal margin has been evaluated by comparison of the thermal load with the maximum heat removal rate of the CHF on the outer reactor vessel wall. The maximum heat flux from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel is estimated at approximately 0.25 MW/m{sup 2} in the metallic layer because of the focusing effect. The CHF of the outer reactor vessel is approximately 1.1 MW/m{sup 2} because of a two phase natural circulation mass flow. Since the thermal margin for the IVR-ERVC is sufficient, the reactor vessel integrity is maintained during a severe accident of a small integral reactor. (authors)

Park, R. J.; Lee, J. R.; Kim, S. B.; Jin, Y.; Kim, H. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne fast source reactor Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Omega Reactor Facility, Summary: fission. The benefits of a fast reactor over the water boiler reactor were a high intensity source offast... Reactors at Other Locations...

442

X-10 Graphite Reactor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-10 Graphite Reactor X-10 Graphite Reactor X-10 Graphite Reactor X-10 Graphite Reactor When President Roosevelt in December 1942 authorized the Manhattan Project, the Oak Ridge site in eastern Tennessee had already been obtained and plans laid for an air-cooled experimental pile, a pilot chemical separation plant, and support facilities. The X-10 Graphite Reactor, designed and built in ten months, went into operation on November 4, 1943. The X-10 used neutrons emitted in the fission of uranium-235 to convert uranium-238 into a new element, plutonium-239. The reactor consists of a huge block of graphite, measuring 24 feet on each side, surrounded by several feet of high-density concrete as a radiation shield. The block is pierced by 1,248 horizontal diamond-shaped channels in

443

Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Technologies Reactor Technologies Nuclear Reactor Technologies TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority TVA Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant | Photo courtesy of Tennessee Valley Authority Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Small Modular Reactor Technologies Small modular reactors can also be made in factories and transported to sites where they would be ready to "plug and play" upon arrival, reducing both capital costs and construction times. The smaller size also makes these reactors ideal for small electric grids and for locations that

444

Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy - Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Legacy > Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

445

Achievements: Nuclear Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne National Laboratory Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

446

Ignition reactor and pump pulse parameters in a reactor–laser system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The experience gained in operating a demonstration nuclear-pumped laser in stand B (Physics and Power- Engineering Institute (FEI)) with a pulsed ignition reactor based on the 235U BARS-6 reactor is analyzed. It ...

P. P. D’yachenko; G. N. Fokin

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Argonne step closer to safer nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Argonne step closer to safer nuclear reactor ... "A key technological link" toward development of meltdown-immune nuclear reactors is now in the demonstration phase at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago. ... The technique is part of Argonne's continuing interest in the sodium-cooled integral fast reactor (IFR), whose immunity to meltdown derives from molten sodium's function as a heat sink and the use of metallic fuel that conducts heat better than conventional oxide fuels. ...

WARD WORTHY

1988-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Small Reactor for Deep Space Exploration  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This is the first demonstration of a space nuclear reactor system to produce electricity in the United States since 1965, and an experiment demonstrated the first use of a heat pipe to cool a small nuclear reactor and then harvest the heat to power a Stirling engine at the Nevada National Security Site's Device Assembly Facility confirms basic nuclear reactor physics and heat transfer for a simple, reliable space power system.

None

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Fuel handling apparatus for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel handling apparatus for transporting fuel elements into and out of a nuclear reactor and transporting them within the reactor vessel extends through a penetration in the side of the reactor vessel. A lateral transport device carries the fuel elements laterally within the vessel and through the opening in the side of the vessel, and a reversible lifting device raises and lowers the fuel elements. In the preferred embodiment, the lifting device is supported by a pair of pivot arms.

Hawke, Basil C. (Solana Beach, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Small Reactor for Deep Space Exploration  

SciTech Connect

This is the first demonstration of a space nuclear reactor system to produce electricity in the United States since 1965, and an experiment demonstrated the first use of a heat pipe to cool a small nuclear reactor and then harvest the heat to power a Stirling engine at the Nevada National Security Site's Device Assembly Facility confirms basic nuclear reactor physics and heat transfer for a simple, reliable space power system.

None

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

452

Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials Award Recipient Estimated Award Amount* Award Location Supporting Organizations Project Description University of Nebraska $979,978 Lincoln, NE Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA), Texas A&M (College Station, TX) Project will explore the development of advanced metal/ceramic composites. These improvements could lead to more efficient production of electricity in advanced reactors. Oak Ridge National Laboratory $849,000 Oak Ridge, TN University of Wisconsin-Madison (Madison, WI) Project will develop novel high-temperature high-strength steels with the help of computational modeling, which could lead to increased efficiency in advanced reactors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

454

Accelerators for Subcritical Molten-Salt Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator parameters for subcritical reactors have usually been based on using solid nuclear fuel much like that used in all operating critical reactors as well as the thorium burning accelerator-driven energy amplifier proposed by Rubbia et al. An attractive alternative reactor design that used molten salt fuel was experimentally studied at ORNL in the 1960s, where a critical molten salt reactor was successfully operated using enriched U235 or U233 tetrafluoride fuels. These experiments give confidence that an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt reactor will work better than conventional reactors, having better efficiency due to their higher operating temperature, having the inherent safety of subcritical operation, and having constant purging of volatile radioactive elements to eliminate their accumulation and potential accidental release in dangerous amounts. Moreover, the requirements to drive a molten salt reactor can be considerably relaxed compared to a solid fuel reactor, especially regarding accelerator reliability and spallation neutron targetry, to the point that much of the required technology exists today. It is proposed that Project-X be developed into a prototype commercial machine to produce energy for the world by, for example, burning thorium in India and nuclear waste from conventional reactors in the USA.

Johnson, Roland (Muons, Inc.) [Muons, Inc.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

455

Subcritical Fission Reactor Based on Linear Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beams of Linear Collider after main collision can be utilized to build an accelerator--driven sub--critical reactor.

I. F. Ginzburg

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

456

Italian hybrid and fission reactors scenario analysis  

SciTech Connect

Italy is a country where a long tradition of studies both in the fission and fusion field is consolidated; nevertheless a strong public opinion concerned with the destination of the Spent Nuclear Fuel hinders the development of nuclear power. The possibility to a severe reduction of the NSF mass generated from a fleet of nuclear reactors employing an hypothetical fusionfission hybrid reactor has been investigated in the Italian framework. The possibility to produce nuclear fuel for the fission nuclear reactors with the hybrid reactor was analyzed too.

Ciotti, M.; Manzano, J.; Sepielli, M. [ENEA CR Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi, 45, 00044, Frascati, Roma (Italy); ENEA CR casaccia, Via Anguillarese, 301, 00123, Santa Maria di Galeria, Roma (Italy)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

Nuclear reactor multiphysics via bond graph formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work proposes a simple and effective approach to modeling nuclear reactor multiphysics problems using bond graphs. Conventional multiphysics simulation paradigms normally use operator splitting, which treats the ...

Sosnovsky, Eugeny

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

Cody, Tom

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

459

Computational evaluation of two reactor benchmark problems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A neutronic evaluation of two reactor benchmark problems was performed. The benchmark problems describe typical PWR uranium and plutonium (mixed oxide) fueled lattices. WIMSd4m, a… (more)

Cowan, James Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

Gluekler, Emil L. (San Jose, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Fact Sheet  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Program. Objectives for the reactor were fulfilled by 1966, and the Nebraska Public Power District decommissioned and dismantled the facility between 1967 and 1969. Facility...

462

Tanden Mirror Reactor Systems Code (TMRSC)  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a computer code developed to model a tandem mirror reactor. This is the first tandem mirror reactor model to couple the highly linked physics, magnetics, and neutronic analysis into a single code. Results from this code for two sensitivity studies are included in this paper. These studies are designed (1) to determine the impact of center cell plasma radius, length, and ion temperature on reactor cost and performance at constant fusion power and (2) to determine the impact of reactor power level on cost.

Reid, R.L.; Rothe, K.E.; Barrett, R.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Contact Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Organization LWRS Program Management Richard Reister Federal Project Director Light Water Reactor Deployment Office of Nuclear Energy U.S. Department of Energy...

464

Thermal stabilization of chemical reactors. I The mathematical description of the Endex reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...efficiently by steam generation. Conversely...of fossil or nuclear fuels, which...limits of the reactor. The physico...wasted. The Endex reactor can be thought...conventional steam generation that is currently...Rates of heat generation by reaction...functions of reactor temperature...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

NEW OPTIMIZATION-BASED APPROACH TO CHEMICAL REACTOR SYNTHESIS TOWARDS THE FULL INTEGRATION OF REACTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEW OPTIMIZATION-BASED APPROACH TO CHEMICAL REACTOR SYNTHESIS ­ TOWARDS THE FULL INTEGRATION solutions. However, it does not provide optimal reactor design from both economical and environmental and methods for reactor design. It also explores the possibilities for actuation improvement for the optimal

Van den Hof, Paul

466

Scaling analysis for a reactor vessel mixing test  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse AP600 advanced pressurized water reactor design uses a gravity-forced safety injection system with two nozzles in the reactor vessel downcomer. In the event of a severe overcooling transient such as a steam-line break, this system delivers boron to the core to offset positive reactivity introduced by the negative moderator defect. To determine if the system design is capable of successfully terminating this type of reactivity transient, a test of the system has been initiated. The test will utilize a 1:9 scale model of the reactor vessel and cold legs. The coolant will be modeled with air, while the safety injection fluid will be simulated with a dense gas. To determine the necessary parameters for this model, a scaling analysis was performed. The continuity, diffusion, and axial Navier-Stokes equations for the injected fluid were converted into dimensionless form. A Boussinesq formulation for turbulent viscosity was applied in these equations. This procedure identified the Richardson, mixing Reynolds, diffusion Fourier, and Euler numbers as dimensionless groups of interest. Order-of-magnitude evaluation was used to determine that the Richardson and mixing Reynolds numbers were the most significant parameters to match for a similar experiment.

Radcliff, T.D.; Parsons, J.R.; Johnson, W.S. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Ekeroth, D.E. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Synergistic smart fuel for in-pile nuclear reactor measurements  

SciTech Connect

The thermo-acoustic fuel rod sensor developed in this research has demonstrated a novel technique for monitoring the temperature within the core of a nuclear reactor or the temperature of the surrounding heat-transfer fluid. It uses the heat from the nuclear fuel to generate sustained acoustic oscillations whose frequency will be indicative of the temperature. Converting a nuclear fuel rod into this type of thermo-acoustic sensor simply requires the insertion of a porous material (stack). This sensor has demonstrated a synergy with the elevated temperatures that exist within the nuclear reactor using materials that have only minimal susceptibility to high-energy particle fluxes. When the sensor is in operation, the sound waves radiated from the fuel rod resonator will propagate through the surrounding cooling fluid. The frequency of these oscillations is directly correlated with an effective temperature within the fuel rod resonator. This device is self-powered and is operational even in case of total loss of power of the reactor.

Smith, J.A.; Kotter, D.K. [Idaho National Laboratories, Idaho Falls (United States); Ali, R.A.; Garrett, S.L. [Penn State University, University Park, State College, PA 16801 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

Nuclear reactor spacer grid and ductless core component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a nuclear reactor spacer grid member for use in a liquid cooled nuclear reactor and to a ductless core component employing a plurality of these spacer grid members. The spacer grid member is of the egg-shell type and is constructed so that the walls of the cell members of the grid member are formed of a single thickness of metal to avoid tolerance problems. Within each cell member is a hydraulic spring which laterally constrains the nuclear material bearing rod which passes through each cell member against a hardstop in response to coolant flow through the cell member. This hydraulic spring is also suitable for use in a water cooled nuclear reactor. A core component constructed of, among other components, a plurality of these spacer grid members, avoids the use of a full length duct by providing spacer sleeves about the sodium tubes passing through the spacer grid members at locations between the grid members, thereby maintaining a predetermined space between adjacent grid members.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

Sease, J.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, P.R.; McLennan, G.A.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, Paul R. (Western Springs, IL); McLennan, George A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Enhanced in-pile instrumentation at the advanced test reactor  

SciTech Connect

Many of the sensors deployed at materials and test reactors cannot withstand the high flux/high temperature test conditions often requested by users at U.S. test reactors, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. To address this issue, an instrumentation development effort was initiated as part of the ATR National Scientific User Facility in 2007 to support the development and deployment of enhanced in-pile sensors. This paper reports results from this effort. Specifically, this paper identifies the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to ATR users. Accomplishments from new sensor technology deployment efforts are highlighted by describing new temperature and thermal conductivity sensors now available to ATR users. Efforts to deploy enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and realtime flux detectors are also reported, and recently-initiated research to evaluate the viability of advanced technologies to provide enhanced accuracy for measuring key parameters during irradiation testing are noted. (authors)

Rempe, J. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Daw, J. E.; Unruh, T.; Chase, B. M.; Palmer, J.; Condie, K. G.; Davis, K. L. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 3840, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

System reliability: An example of nuclear reactor system analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the three reliability investigations of a 900 \\{MWe\\} reactor residual heat removal system. Following a description of the system and its functions, the main procedures used in operational reliability analysis, based on the analysis of occurence records, are covered. The second part of the investigations covers predicted reliability, involving the use of the Markov method. It will be noted that the two types of analysis are in good agreement, the probability of system loss after two months' operation being of the order of 10?1. Additional investigation data are also given.

R. Coudray; J.M. Mattei

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Standard for the determination of steady-state neutron reaction-rate distributions and reactivity of nuclear power reactors  

SciTech Connect

American National Standard ANSI/ANS*-19.3-2005 [1] covers 'The Determination of Steady-State Neutron Reaction-Rate Distributions and Reactivity of Nuclear Power Reactors'. The 2005 version is a new revision of this Standard, which had previously been issued in 1995. In this revision, the sections on the various types of power reactors have been updated to cover the latest methodologies of calculation in current use, and a section on HWR [CANDU{sup R}] reactors has been added. Also, the sections on verification and validation were revised to more fully define, discuss, and distinguish between these topics, and describe actions related to them. (authors)

Rouben, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ont. L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Radiation safety assessment of a system of small reactors for distributed energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......inventory (t) 19.8 Fuel Outer diameterpitch...in UO2 No. of fuel assembles 69 Control...3014.0 Reactor vessel Inner diameterheight...of the energy consumption area, aiming...For design of a fuel exchange facility...of the energy consumption area because no...Development of in-vessel type control rod......

N. Odano; T. Ishida

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

478

Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......during their short/long term-storage is investigated in...radio-toxicity of radioactive waste is widely regarded...exchangers of the spent fuel storage bay. The decay power...VVER type reactors at long-term storage. Radiat. Prot. Dosim......

S. Anand; K. D. S. Singh; V. K. Sharma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Light-water breeder reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume III  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning prebreeder and breeder reactors based on light-water-breeder (LWBR) Type 1 modules; light-water backfit prebreeder supplying advanced breeder; light-water backfit prebreeder/seed-blanket breeder system; and light-water backfit low-gain converter using medium-enrichment uranium, supplying a light-water backfit high-gain converter.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Conversion and upgrade of the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, an agency of the state of Rhode Island, has operated a 2-MW swimming pool research reactor at the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) since 1964. The reactor, which utilizes plate-type materials test reactor fuel elements, is used primarily by facility and research scientists from the University of Rhode Island for neutron scattering, using the beam tubes and activation analysis programs that use irradiation facilities both inside and adjacent to the core. Along with most other university research reactors, the RINSC reactor is now required, pursuant to 10CFR50.64, to convert from the use of high-enrichment uranium fuel elements to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel elements. It is apparent that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission mandate to convert the RINSC reactor to the use of LEU will result in a new core, designed to use the standard fuel plate and at the same time enhance the available neutron flux and spectrum for research using neutron scattering and activation analysis.

DiMeglio, A.F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

Berta, V.T.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

482

Compound cryopump for fusion reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We reconsider an old idea: a three-stage compound cryopump for use in fusion reactors such as DEMO. The helium "ash" is adsorbed on a 4.5 K charcoal-coated surface, while deuterium and tritium are adsorbed at 15-22 K on a second charcoal-coated surface. The helium is released by raising the first surface to ~30 K. In a separate regeneration step, deuterium and tritium are released at ~110 K. In this way, the helium can be pre-separated from other species. In the simplest design, all three stages are in the same vessel, with a single valve to close the pump off from the tokamak during regeneration. In an alternative design, the three stages are in separate vessels, connected by valves, allowing the stages to regenerate without interfering with each other. The inclusion of the intermediate stage would not affect the overall pumping speed significantly. The downstream exhaust processing system could be scaled down, as much of the deuterium and tritium could be returned directly to the reactor. This could reduce ...

Kovari, M; Shephard, T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the KBR transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 2800 hours of operation on 11 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air-blown and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 95% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher-reactivity (low-rank) coals appear to perform better in a transport reactor than the less reactive bituminous coals. Factors that affect TRDU product gas quality appear to be coal type, temperature, and air/coal ratios. Testing with a higher-ash, high-moisture, low-rank coal from the Red Hills Mine of the Mississippi Lignite Mining Company has recently been completed. Testing with the lignite coal generated a fuel gas with acceptable heating value and a high carbon conversion, although some drying of the high-moisture lignite was required before coal-feeding problems were resolved. No ash deposition or bed material agglomeration issues were encountered with this fuel. In order to better understand the coal devolatilization and cracking chemistry occurring in the riser of the transport reactor, gas and solid sampling directly from the riser and the filter outlet has been accomplished. This was done using a baseline Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the Peabody Energy North Antelope Rochelle Mine near Gillette, Wyoming.

Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

484

A probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear research reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). Available...System for Research Reactor (IRSRR). Available...76. 7 Manual on reliability data collection for research reactor PSAs. (1992) IAEA...probabilistic safety analysis of incidents in nuclear......

Valdir Maciel Lopes; Gian Maria Agostinho Angelo Sordi; Mauricio Moralles; Tufic Madi Filho

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Metal fires and their implications for advanced reactors.  

SciTech Connect

This report details the primary results of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project (LDRD 08-0857) Metal Fires and Their Implications for Advance Reactors. Advanced reactors may employ liquid metal coolants, typically sodium, because of their many desirable qualities. This project addressed some of the significant challenges associated with the use of liquid metal coolants, primary among these being the extremely rapid oxidation (combustion) that occurs at the high operating temperatures in reactors. The project has identified a number of areas for which gaps existed in knowledge pertinent to reactor safety analyses. Experimental and analysis capabilities were developed in these areas to varying degrees. In conjunction with team participation in a DOE gap analysis panel, focus was on the oxidation of spilled sodium on thermally massive surfaces. These are spills onto surfaces that substantially cool the sodium during the oxidation process, and they are relevant because standard risk mitigation procedures seek to move spill environments into this regime through rapid draining of spilled sodium. While the spilled sodium is not quenched, the burning mode is different in that there is a transition to a smoldering mode that has not been comprehensively described previously. Prior work has described spilled sodium as a pool fire, but there is a crucial, experimentally-observed transition to a smoldering mode of oxidation. A series of experimental measurements have comprehensively described the thermal evolution of this type of sodium fire for the first time. A new physics-based model has been developed that also predicts the thermal evolution of this type of sodium fire for the first time. The model introduces smoldering oxidation through porous oxide layers to go beyond traditional pool fire analyses that have been carried out previously in order to predict experimentally observed trends. Combined, these developments add significantly to the safety analysis capabilities of the advanced-reactor community for directly relevant scenarios. Beyond the focus on the thermally-interacting and smoldering sodium pool fires, experimental and analysis capabilities for sodium spray fires have also been developed in this project.

Nowlen, Steven Patrick; Figueroa, Victor G.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Hewson, John C.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production  

SciTech Connect

The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a sim