Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

" by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity and Steam" 3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity and Steam" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Dollars per Physical Units)" ,," Electricity",," Steam" ,," (kWh)",," (million Btu)" ,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors"

2

Japanese suppliers in transition from domestic nuclear reactor vendors to international suppliers  

SciTech Connect

Japan is emerging as a major leader and exporter of nuclear power technology. In the 1990s, Japan has the largest and strongest nuclear power supply industry worldwide as a result of the largest domestic nuclear power plant construction program. The Japanese nuclear power supply industry has moved from dependence on foreign technology to developing, design, building, and operating its own power plants. This report describes the Japanese nuclear power supply industry and examines one supplier--the Mitsubishi group--to develop an understanding of the supply industry and its relationship to the utilities, government, and other organizations.

Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.; Rowan, W.J.

1994-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier (Thousand Gallons per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1983: 30,535.1 ...

4

Supplier Scouting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... network of manufacturers and suppliers to help ... grew out of MEP's supplier scouting program ... departments of Transportation, Energy, and Defense ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

5

Supplier Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sustained. Benefits: Focus on implementation and results for the supplier; Co-investment by all parties-everyone has a stake in it; ...

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

6

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Supplier Propane Supplier Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Supplier Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Propane Supplier Requirements A retail supplier may only distribute liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane) if the supplier holds a license from the Wisconsin Department of

7

Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and thermophysical properties of the fuel and their compatibility with the reactor coolant, with corresponding differences in the challenges presented to the reactor developers. Accident phenomena are discussed for the sodium-cooled fast reactor based on the mechanistic progression of conditions from accident initiation to accident termination, whether a benign state is achieved or more severe consequences are expected. General principles connecting accident phenomena and fuel properties are developed from the oxide and metal fuel safety analyses, providing guidelines that can be used as part of the evaluation for selection of fuel type for the sodium-cooled fast reactor.

R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

On reactor type comparisons for the next generation of reactors  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present a broad comparison of studies for a selected set of parameters for different nuclear reactor types including the next generation. This serves as an overview of key parameters which provide a semi-quantitative decision basis for selecting nuclear strategies. Out of a number of advanced reactor designs of the LWR type, gas cooled type, and FBR type, currently on the drawing board, the Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR) seem to have some edge over other types of the next generation of reactors for the near-term application. This is based on a number of attributes related to the benefit of the vast operating experience with LWRs coupled with an estimated low risk profile, economics of scale, degree of utilization of passive systems, simplification in the plant design and layout, modular fabrication and manufacturing. 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Alesso, H.P.; Majumdar, K.C.

1991-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

Reactor closure design for a pool-type fast reactor  

SciTech Connect

The reactor closure is the topmost structural part of a reactor module. For a pool-type fast reactor it is an especially important structure because it provides the interface between the primary coolant system and the main access area above the closure. The reactor closure comprises a stationary deck, a rotatable plug, the boundary elements of primary system and containment penetrations for equipment and auxiliary systems. This paper evaluates two different reactor closure design concepts, referred to as ''warm'' deck and ''hot'' deck, for a pool-type fast reactor with respect to their design features, technical merits, and economic benefits. The evaluation also includes functional, structural, and thermal analyses of the two deck design concepts. Issues related to their fabrication and shipping to the plant site are also addressed. The warm deck is a thick solid steel plate with under-the-deck insulation consisting of many layers of steel plates. The hot deck is a box-type structure consisting of a bottom plate reinforced with vertical ribs and cylinders. For insulation and radiation shielding, the region of the hot deck above the bottom plate is filled with steel balls. Conventional insulation is added on the top to further reduce heat loss into area above the deck. The design choice of the closure deck is strongly dependent on design features of the reactor; especially on the reactor module support. While the warm deck is preferable with the top support, the hot deck is better suited for the bottom support design of the module.

Chung, H.; Seidensticker, R.W.; Kann, W.J.; Bump, T.R.; Schatmeier, C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Prime Supplier Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Report September 2013 Prime Supplier Report Released: November 26, 2013 Next Update: December 23, 2013 Legend: Petroleum Data Tables Petroleum Data Tables HTML File HTML File PDF File PDF File The Prime Supplier Report presents data collected on Form EIA-782C, "Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local Consumption." These data measure primary petroleum product deliveries into the States where they are locally marketed and consumed. Petroleum Data Tables HTML File PDF File --- Prime Supplier Sales Volumes in Petroleum Navigator, HTML, and PDF formats. Previous --- Previous reports are available on the historical page. The EIA-782C respondent frame is comprised of approximately 195 prime suppliers representing producers, importers, and inter-State resellers and

11

TABLE 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, ... Quad Cities Generating Station River Bend San Onofre Seabrook Sequoyah South Texas Project St Lucie ...

12

Variable Screw Compressor, Variable Screw Compressor Suppliers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Variable Screw Compressor Suppliers & air compressor Manufacturers Directory. Source Top Quality Variable Screw Compressor Suppliers, air ...

13

Adequate NQA-1 Suppliers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 J U N 2 2 2069 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: DAE Y. CHUNG DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR SAFETY MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS ENVIRONlMENTAL MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: Issuance of the Office of Environmental Management Nuclear Supplier Alert System The Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board has developed a Nuclear Supplier Alert System as part of its EMIEFCOG QA Improvement Project Plan. This Corporate Board deliverable was approved by the voting members in the last meeting held on March 19,2009. This system is critical to mitigating past weaknesses in supplier qualification and oversight that have resulted in: I ) project cost overages; 2) schedule

14

" of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Electricity and Steam by Type" Quantity of Purchased Electricity and Steam by Type" " of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics" " of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ," Electricity",," Steam" ," (million kWh)",," (billion Btu)" ,,,,,"RSE" " ","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Factors"

15

An Assessment of Reactor Types for Thermochemical Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear energy has been proposed as a heat source for producing hydrogen from water using a sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle. This document presents an assessment of the suitability of various reactor types for this application. The basic requirement for the reactor is the delivery of 900 C heat to a process interface heat exchanger. Ideally, the reactor heat source should not in itself present any significant design, safety, operational, or economic issues. This study found that Pressurized and Boiling Water Reactors, Organic-Cooled Reactors, and Gas-Core Reactors were unsuitable for the intended application. Although Alkali Metal-Cooled and Liquid-Core Reactors are possible candidates, they present significant development risks for the required conditions. Heavy Metal-Cooled Reactors and Molten Salt-Cooled Reactors have the potential to meet requirements, however, the cost and time required for their development may be appreciable. Gas-Cooled Reactors (GCRs) have been successfully operated in the required 900 C coolant temperature range, and do not present any obvious design, safety, operational, or economic issues. Altogether, the GCRs approach appears to be very well suited as a heat source for the intended application, and no major development work is identified. This study recommends using the Gas-Cooled Reactor as the baseline reactor concept for a sulfur-iodine cycle for hydrogen generation.

MARSHALL, ALBERT C.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Fuel assembly transfer basket for pool type nuclear reactor vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel assembly transfer basket for a pool type, liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a side access loading and unloading port for receiving and relinquishing fuel assemblies during transfer.

Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Ramsour, Nicholas L. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana) Electricity Suppliers&#039; Service Area Assignments (Indiana) Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Utility Regulatory Commission To promote efficiency and avoid waste and duplication, rural and

18

CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM. PART III. CORE-PARAMETER STUDIES FOR SELECTED REACTOR TYPES  

SciTech Connect

A report is presented to provide a tool for evaluating the relative economic incentives for changing reactor core parameters. The cost relations are shown in terms of differential cost in lieu of total cost. A total cost for each reactor described is included so that power costs for a specified set of parameters can be obtained. A description is also included concerning 5 reactor types considered along with a discussion of the effects on power costs of varying the significant core parameters. A listing of basic references is given. (J.R.D.)

Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, D.C.; Jackson and Moreland, Inc., Boston

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Adequate NQA-1 Suppliers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Adequate NQA-1 Suppliers Adequate NQA-1 Suppliers Scope of Project Milestone Task 2.6: Request the procedures used for qualifying nuclear grade suppliers from each major EM...

20

FABRICATION OF TUBE TYPE FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating a nuclear reactor fuel element is given. It consists essentially of fixing two tubes in concentric relationship with respect to one another to provide an annulus therebetween, filling the annulus with a fissionablematerial-containing powder, compacting the powder material within the annulus and closing the ends thereof. The powder material is further compacted by swaging the inner surface of the inner tube to increase its diameter while maintaining the original size of the outer tube. This process results in reduced fabrication costs of powdered fissionable material type fuel elements and a substantial reduction in the peak core temperatures while materially enhancing the heat removal characteristics.

Loeb, E.; Nicklas, J.H.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Refinery suppliers face tough times  

SciTech Connect

Despite a handful of bright spots in hydroprocessing and petrochemical sectors, economic woes plague much of the refinery and petrochemical catalysts business, as suppliers are feeling the impact of mature markets and refiners` ongoing cost cutting. Industry experts say the doldrums could spur further restructuring in the catalyst business, with suppliers scrambling for market share and jockeying for position in growing sectors. Expect further consolidation over the next several years, says Pierre Bonnifay, president of IFP Enterprises (New York). {open_quotes}There are still too many players for the mature [refinery catalyst] markets.{close_quotes} Others agree. {open_quotes}Only about seven [or] eight major suppliers will survive,{close_quotes} says Robert Allsmiller, v.p./refinery and petrochemical catalysts at United Catalysts Inc. (UCI; Louisville, KY). {open_quotes}Who they [will be] is still up in the air.{close_quotes}

Rotman, D.; Walsh, K.

1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

22

Overall plant concept for a tank-type fast reactor  

SciTech Connect

Japanese nuclear industries are expressing interest in the merits of the tank-type FBR as a large plant (demonstration) after JOYO (experimental, in operation) and MONJU (prototype, under construction). In response to this growing interest in a tank-type FBR demonstration plant, Hitachi has initiated a conceptual study of a 1000 MWe tank plant concept in collaboration with GE and Bechtel. Key objectives of this study have been: to select reliable and competitive tank plant concepts, with emphases on a seismic-resistant and compact tank reactor system;to select reliable shutdown heat removal system;and to identify R and D items needed for early 1990s construction. Design goals were defined as follows: capital costs must be less than twice, and as close as practical to 1.5 those of equivalent LWR plants;earthquake resistant structures to meet stringent Japanese seismic conditions must be as simple and reliable as practical;safety must be maintained at LWR-equivalent risks;and R and D needs must be limited to minimum cost for the limited time allowed. This paper summarizes the overall plant concepts with some selected topics, whereas detailed descriptions of the reactor assembly and the layout design are found in separate papers.

Yamaki, Hideo; Davies, S.M.; Goodman, L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Optimization Online - Recruiting Suppliers for Reverse Production ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2007 ... Recruiting Suppliers for Reverse Production Systems: an MDP Heuristics Approach. Wuthichai Wongthatsanekorn(wwongtha ***at*** ...

24

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF REPLACEMENT CORES FOR SM AND PM TYPE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

An economic analysis is presented for the fabrication of replacement cores for SM and PM type reactors, including analysis of various core types and core fabrication technologies. The analysis indicates that major savings are possible by utilizing Type 3 cores (40-mil plates, 25 wt% UO/sub 2/, welded assembly) in all SM and PM type reactors, and that significant savings are possible by multiple core procurement and reprocessing, and relaxation of cobalt and tantalum requirements in Type 347 stainless steel. (auth)

Wilder, A.S.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Seismic responses of a pool-type fast reactor with different core support designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In designing the core support system for a pool-type fast reactor, there are many issues which must be considered in order to achieve an optimum and balanced design. These issues include safety, reliability, as well as costs. Several design options are possible to support the reactor core. Different core support options yield different frequency ranges and responses. Seismic responses of a large pool-type fast reactor incorporated with different core support designs have been investigated. 4 refs., 3 figs.

Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

UK mining invests, suppliers profit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the midst of a major economic crisis in the United Kingdom, equipment suppliers have been reporting a number of considerable purchases by British coal mining companies. In December 2008, Liebherr-Great Britain delivered the first two of four Rq350 Litronic hydraulic excavators for use at the Broken Cross opencast coal site in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Ten Terex TR100 rigid haulers were delivered to the site in late 2008. Hatfield Colliery at Stainforth, South Yorkshire, has been reopened by PowerFuel. The main equipment for two longwall faces was supplied by Joy Mining Machinery UK Ltd. 2 photos.

NONE

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

Ehud Greenspan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

Design guide for Category III reactors: pool type reactors. [US DOE  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) in the ERDA Manual requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirement of Category III reactor structures, components, and systems.

Brynda, W J; Lobner, P R; Powell, R W; Straker, E A

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Window Manufacturer Sees Business Surge As Weatherization Supplier...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Window Manufacturer Sees Business Surge As Weatherization Supplier Window Manufacturer Sees Business Surge As Weatherization Supplier July 29, 2010 - 4:33pm Addthis Joshua DeLung...

30

Prime Supplier Report Historical - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Prime Supplier Report Historical. Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local Consumption. These data measure primary petroleum ...

31

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON THE KINETIC BEHAVIOR OF WATER BOILER TYPE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The KEWB Program is devoted to the study of the dynamic behavior of homogeneous type research reactors. The objectives of this program include studies to develop better and more complete understanding of phenomena which contribute to the kinetic behavior and the inherent safety of the water boiler reactor. The approach to the objectives has heen to construct a prototype 50 kw homogeneous reactor with the necessary auxiliary apparatus and to study the transient behavior of the system as a function of the more significant parameters which affect this behavior. These include the amount of reactivity release, rate of reactivity release, initial core pressure, initial core temperature, initial reactor power, and void volume above the core. Data are plotted. (auth)

Remley, M.E.; Flora, J.W.; Hetrick, D.L.; Muller, D.R.; Gardner, E.L.; Wimmer, R.E.; Stitt, R.K.; Gamble, D.P.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables Release date: November 22, 2011 Next release date: November 2012 See also: Table 1. Capacity and Generation, Table 2. Ownership Data Table 3. Nuclear Reactor Characteristics and Operational History PDF XLS Plant Name Generator ID Type Reactor Supplier and Model Construction Start Grid Connection Original Expiration Date License Renewal Application License Renewal Issued Extended Expiration Arkansas Nuclear One 1 PWR Babcock&Wilcox, Lower Loop 10/1/1968 8/17/1974 5/20/2014 2/1/2000 6/20/2001 5/20/2034 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 PWR Combustion Eng. 7/1/1971 12/26/1978 7/17/2018 10/15/2003 6/30/2005 7/17/2038

33

Conceptual design for a re-entrant type fuel channel for supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current CANDU-type nuclear reactors use a once-through fuel-channel with an annulus gas insulating it from the moderator. The current reference design for a CANDU-type SuperCritical… (more)

Samuel, Jeffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Sandia National Laboratories: Working with Sandia: Current Suppliers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Suppliers Current Suppliers Opportunities Potential Suppliers Current Suppliers Accounts Payable Contract Audit Contractor/Bidder Information Construction and Facilities Staff Augmentation What Does Sandia Buy? Enterprise IT Services Working with Sandia Current Suppliers Accounts Payable Provides the information you need to properly submit invoices and has other useful guidelines and tips. Contract Audit Sandia National Laboratories has designated the Contract Audit Department as an independent appraisal function. The department is responsible for the audit of supplier contracts and subcontracts that support the Laboratories' mission. Contract Audit also provides accounting and financial services in connection with the negotiation, administration, and settlement of costs for contracts placed by Sandia Procurement.

35

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Prime Supplier Report...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1.0% Jul '12 to Jul '13: 5.4% YTD '12 to YTD '13: 21.2% Prime Supplier Report July 2013 2 U.S. Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, July 2013 Measurement of...

36

Energy Information Administration/Prime Supplier Report, 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct '10 to Oct '11: 13.8% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -1.1% Prime Supplier Report October 2011 Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, 2 October 2011 Energy Information...

37

Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Manufacturers, Screw Type Ac Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Screw Type Ac Air Compressor, Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Manufacturers & Suppliers Directory - Find here Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Traders, ...

38

DEVELOPMENT OF A FAST-RELEASE ELECTRO-MAGNET FOR POOL-TYPE RESEARCH REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data and observations of the design parameters and physical configurations which lead to faster-release cylindrical flat-faced electromagnets are given. Detailed drawings and operating characteristics are presented for an electromagnet suited to the requirements of a pool-type research reactor using either gravity drop or additional accelerating force. This electromagnet embodies the experimentally developed techniques for attaining fast release. (auth)

Michelson, C.

1958-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

A Study of the Energy Efficiency of Hadronic Reactors of Molecular Type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce an estimate of the "commercial efficiency" of Santilli's hadronic reactors of molecular type (Patented and International Patents Pending) which convert a liquid feedstock (such as automotive antifreeze and oil waste, city or farm liquid waste, crude oil, etc.) into the clean burning magnegas plus heat acquired by the liquid feedstock. The "commercial efficiency" is defined as the ratio between the total energy output (energy in magnegas plus heat) and the electric energy used for its production, while the "scientific efficiency" is the usual ratio between the total energy output and the total energy input (the sum of the electric energy plus the energy in the liquid feedstock as well as that in the carbon electrodes). A primary purpose of this paper is to show that conventional thermochemistry does indeed predict a commercial efficiency bigger than one, although their values is considerably smaller than the actual efficiency measured in the reactors, thus indicating the applicabili...

Aringazin, A K

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Information Administration/Prime Supplier Report, 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prime Supplier Report, 1 Prime Supplier Report, 1 October 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 4,100 4,400 4,700 5,000 5,300 5,600 5,900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '11 to Oct '11: 2.9% Oct '10 to Oct '11: 2.4% YTD '10 to YTD '11: 0.3% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '11 to Oct '11: 11.7% Oct '10 to Oct '11: -1.7% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -12.6% 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates*

42

REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

Roman, W.G.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

43

Two stroke homogenous charge compression ignition engine with pulsed air supplier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two stroke homogenous charge compression ignition engine includes a volume pulsed air supplier, such as a piston driven pump, for efficient scavenging. The usage of a homogenous charge tends to decrease emissions. The use of a volume pulsed air supplier in conjunction with conventional poppet type intake and exhaust valves results in a relatively efficient scavenging mode for the engine. The engine preferably includes features that permit valving event timing, air pulse event timing and injection event timing to be varied relative to engine crankshaft angle. The principle use of the invention lies in improving diesel engines.

Clarke, John M. (Chillicothe, IL)

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

44

Table 45. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 45. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) — Continued

45

Table 45. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly February 2012 136 Table 45. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation,

46

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products June 1998 July 1998 August 1998 September 1998...

47

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Marketing Annual 1998 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

48

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Marketing Annual 1999 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

49

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

See footnotes at end of table. 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State 386 Energy Information...

50

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area

51

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Marketing Annual 1995 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

52

The emerging nuclear suppliers: some guidelines for policy (U)  

SciTech Connect

Lewis A. Dunn, a former Assistant Director of the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and now a senior analyst with Science Applications International Corporation, looks to the future to offer "The Emerging Nuclear Suppliers: Some Guidelines for Policy ." Mr. Dunn notes that although most emerging suppliers are cautious, many are not party to existing nonproliferation treaties. He calls upon the nonproliferation community to continue the present policy of not supporting unsafeguarded nuclear activities. He suggests that the nonproliferation community work within existing standards and infrastructures of nuclear suppliers to convince emerging supplier nations of the merits of nuclear export control.

Dunn, Lewis A.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

buy vsd air compressor - high quality Manufacturers,Suppliers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

vsd air compressor trade offers directory and vsd air compressor business offers list. Trade leads from vsd air compressor Suppliers and vsd air ...

54

A Study of the Energy Efficiency of Hadronic Reactors of Molecular Type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce an estimate of the "commercial efficiency" of Santilli's hadronic reactors of molecular type (Patented and International Patents Pending) which convert a liquid feedstock (such as automotive antifreeze and oil waste, city or farm liquid waste, crude oil, etc.) into the clean burning magnegas plus heat acquired by the liquid feedstock. The "commercial efficiency" is defined as the ratio between the total energy output (energy in magnegas plus heat) and the electric energy used for its production, while the "scientific efficiency" is the usual ratio between the total energy output and the total energy input (the sum of the electric energy plus the energy in the liquid feedstock as well as that in the carbon electrodes). A primary purpose of this paper is to show that conventional thermochemistry does indeed predict a commercial efficiency bigger than one, although their values is considerably smaller than the actual efficiency measured in the reactors, thus indicating the applicability of the covering hadronic chemistry from which the reactors have received their name. We reach an upper limit of the commercial efficiency of 3.11 for the use of pure water as feedstock, and of 3.11 to 7.5 for a mixture of ethyleneglicole and water. The study of the heat produced by the reactions leads to large divergencies between the thermochemical predictions and experimental data of at least a factor of three. Such divergencies can only be explained with deviations from quantum chemistry in favor of the covering hadronic chemistry. In particular, the indicated large divergencies can only be explained with the assumption that the produced combustible gas has the new non-valence chemical structure of Santilli magnecules.

A. K. Aringazin; R. M. Santilli

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

55

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Long-Term Contracts Under the Threat of Supplier Default  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contracting with suppliers prone to default is an increasingly common problem in some industries, particularly automotive manufacturing. We model this phenomenon as a two-period contracting game with two identical suppliers, a single buyer, deterministic ... Keywords: contracting, financial default, game theory, supply chain management

Robert Swinney; Serguei Netessine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A fuzzy-Bayesian model for supplier selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selection supplier problem has received a lot of attention from academics in recent years. Several models were developed in the literature, combining consolidated operations research and artificial intelligence methods and techniques. However, the ... Keywords: Bayesian networks, Fuzzy, Influence diagrams, Supplier selection, Supply chain

Luciano Ferreira; Denis Borenstein

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A STUDY OF THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF HADRONIC REACTORS OF MOLECULAR TYPE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce an estimate of the ”commercial efficiency” of Santilli’s hadronic reactors TM of molecular type [1] (Patented and International Patents Pending) which convert a liquid feedstock (such as automotive antifree and oil waste, city or farm liquid waste, crude oil, etc.) into the clean burning magnegas TM plus heat acquired by the liquid feedstock. The conversion is done via a new process based on a certain flow of the liquid feedstock through a submerged electric arc between carbon-base electrodes and other features. The ”commercial efficiency ” is defined as the ratio between the total energy output (energy in magnegas plus heat) and the electric energy used for its production, while the ”scientific efficiency ” is the usual ratio between the total energy output and the total energy input (the sum of the electric energy plus the energy in the liquid feedstock as well as that in the carbon electrodes). Needless to say, the scientific

A. K. Aringazin; R. M. Santilli

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Comment to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers Comment to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers Comment by Cameco Resources On Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (July 27, 2010), Section 934 Rule Making. As discussed below, Cameco believes that producers and providers of uranium concentrates and UF6 conversion services, whether directly or as an intermediary, should be excluded from the definition of nuclear supplier. In this regard, Cameco generally agrees with the comments submitted by the Nuclear Energy Institute ("NEI") on behalf of its members; however, Cameco disagrees with the implication of NEl's comments that producers of uranium concentrates and providers of conversion services should be included in the

60

NREL: Education Programs - Kit and Component Supplier List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kit and Component Supplier List Kit and Component Supplier List Learn about available kits and component suppliers for NREL's Car Competitions, a classroom-based, hands-on educational program for 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students. Please contact suppliers for pricing. Junior Solar Sprint Suppliers Products Solar Made 2807 North Prospect Colorado Springs, CO 80907 Tel: 1-800-246-7012 Fax: 719-635-5398 E-mail: Sales@SolarMade.com Web Site: Solar Made JSS Kit Includes solar electric panel (3 Volts @ 3 watts), electric motor with lead wires, motor mounting bracket with screws, gears for motor shaft in three sizes, and 2 alligator clips JSS-P Solar electric panel JSS-M Electric motor JSS-B/G Mounting bracket/screws and gears only JSS-ACC Accessory bag contains 2 axle shafts, 4 wheels/tires, 3 spur gear sizes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

62

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

58,921.8 56,922.5 55,453.9 54,959.2 53,458.9 54,523.8 1983-2012 58,921.8 56,922.5 55,453.9 54,959.2 53,458.9 54,523.8 1983-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 15,392.8 16,081.8 15,898.2 15,821.2 15,588.0 15,512.9 1983-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 1,279.6 1,525.1 1,132.7 1,146.9 1,177.7 1,153.8 1983-2012 Connecticut 204.6 192.9 153.5 157.1 W 181.0 1983-2012 Maine 175.6 141.7 134.2 161.7 132.7 125.2 1983-2012 Massachusetts 819.4 1,118 676.6 675.6 720.1 710.2 1983-2012 New Hampshire 15.1 15.4 W 62.0 64.1 38.8 1983-2012 Rhode Island 33.3 30.3 75.7 67.2 W W 1983-2012 Vermont 31.6 26.9 W 23.4 23.8 W 1983-2012 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 7,527.2 7,614.5 7,315.1 7,397.0 7,311.6 7,228.9 1983-2012 Delaware 11.2 11.9 8.7 10.1 10.0 14.1 1983-2012 District of Columbia - - - - - - 1983-2012

64

Prime Supplier Sales of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Retail prices and Prime ...

65

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Naphtha-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values shown for the ...

66

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

58,386.8 57,380.8 57,511.7 61,022.4 59,252.0 55,062.2 1983-2013 58,386.8 57,380.8 57,511.7 61,022.4 59,252.0 55,062.2 1983-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 18,284.2 16,437.1 16,943.8 16,884.2 16,412.3 14,287.5 1983-2013 New England (PADD 1A) 1,211.3 1,172.2 1,228.4 1,207.8 1,432.6 1,121.1 1983-2013 Connecticut 212.1 202.7 207.0 164.4 246.4 169.3 1983-2013 Maine 115.8 127.2 131.1 141.6 144.0 137.8 1983-2013 Massachusetts 738.4 705.5 738.7 743.0 863.8 670.3 1983-2013 New Hampshire 37.4 29.5 35.2 41.8 50.6 44.1 1983-2013 Rhode Island 88.5 W 89.9 89.9 99.2 76.9 1983-2013 Vermont 19.1 W 26.5 27.0 28.7 22.7 1983-2013 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 9,320.4 7,996.8 8,594.9 8,104.5 8,284.9 7,114.1 1983-2013 Delaware W W W W W W 1983-2013 District of Columbia W W W W W W 1983-2013

67

Comparison of shell-and-tube with frame-and-plate-type heat exchangers for the MIT research reactor upgrade  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses a comparison of shell-and-tube with frame-and-plate-type heat exchangers for the proposed upgrade of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology research reactor (MITR). The comparison is based on the following considerations: thermal-hydraulic performance, maintenance, personnel dose rate, and pricing.

Ser, Yorick, Hu, Lin-Wen [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

DISPERSIONS OF URANIUM CARBIDES IN ALUMINUM PLATE-TYPE RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of employing uranium carbide aluminun dispersions in aluminum-base research reactor fuel elements was investigated This study was motivated by the need to obtain higher uranium loadings in these fuel elements. Although toe MTR-type unit, containing a 13 18 wt% U-Al alloy is a proven reactor component, fabrication problems of considerable magnitude arise when attempts are made to increase the uranium investment in the alloy to more than 25 wt.%. Au approach to these fabrication difficulties is to select a compound with significantly higher density tban UAl/sub 4/ or UAl/sub 3/ compounds of the alloy system which when dispersed in aluminum powder, will reduce the volume occupied by the brittle, fissile phase. The uranium carbides, with densities ranging from 11.68 to 13.63 g/cm/sup 3/), appear to be suited for this application and were selected for development as a fuel material for aluminum-base dispersions. Studies were conducted at 580 to 620 deg C to determine the chemical compatibility of carbides with aluminum in sub-size cold- pressed comparts as well as in full-size fabricated fuel plates. Procedures were also developed to prepare uranium carbides, homogernously disperse the compounds in aluminum, roll clad the dispersions to form composite plates, and braze the plates into fuel assemblies. Corrosion tests of the fuel material were conducted in 20 and 60 deg C water to determine the integrity of the fuel material in the event of sin inadventent cladding failure. In addition, specimens were prepared to evaluate penformance under extensive irradiation Prior to studying the uranium carbide-aluminum system, methods for preparing the carbides were investigated. Are melting uranium and carnon was satisfactory for obtaining small quantities of various carbides. Later, reaction of graphite with UO/sub 2/ was successfully employed in the preparation of large quantities of UC/sub 2/, Studies of the chemical compatibility of cold-pressed compacts containing 50 wt% uranium carbide dispersed in aluminum revealed a marked trend toward stebifity as the carbon content of the uranium carbide increased from 446 to 9.20% C. Severe volume increases occurred in monocarbide dispersions with attendant formation of large quantities of the uranium-allumnim inter-metallic compounds. Dicarbide dispersions, on the other band, exhibited negligible reaction with aluminum after extended periods at 580 and 620 deg C. However, it was demonstrated that hydrogen can promote a reaction in UC/sub 2/-Al compacts. The hydrogen appears to reduce the UC/sub 2/ to UC which can subsequently react with aluminum producing the previously noted deleterious effects. A growth study at 605 deg C of composite fuel plates containing 59 wt.% UC/sub 2/ revealed insignificant changes within processing periods envisioned for fuel element processing. However, plate elongations as high as 2.5% were observed after 100 hr at this temperature. Severe blistering which occurred on fuel plates fabricated in the initial stages of the investigation was attributed to gaseous hydrocarbons, and the condition was ellminated by vacuum degasification of cold-pressed compacts. With the exception of the degasification requirement, procedures for manufacturing UC- bearing fuel elements were identical to those specified for the Geneva Conference Reactor fuel elements. Dispersions of uranium dicarbide corroded catastrophically in 20 and 60 deg C water, thus limiting the application of this material However, spocimens were prepared and insented in the MTR to evaluate the irradiation behavior of this fuel because of its potential application in onganic- cooled reactors. (auth)

Thurber, W.C.; Beaver, R.J.

1959-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

O:\\Data_Publication\\Prime Supplier Report\\current\\ventura\\c007...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

YTD '09: -8.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report September 2009 Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, September 2009 2 Measurement of...

70

Can I choose the electricity supplier where I live? - FAQ - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Can I choose the electricity supplier where I live? Some electric utility customers have the option to choose an alternate supplier of electricity.

71

U.S. Total Gasoline All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Total Gasoline All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier (Thousand Gallons per Day) ... Prime Supplier Sales of Motor Gasoline ; U.S. Prices, ...

72

Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative Analysis of Results in the European Union Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Supplier Obligations and White Certificate Schemes: Comparative Analysis of Results in the European Union Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: eec.ucdavis.edu/ACEEE/2010/data/papers/2178.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-supplier-obligations-and-white Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Mandates/Targets This paper examines the ways different European Union (EU) member states,

73

Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- - 532.1 532.1 See footnotes at end of table. 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information...

74

Building a framework for determining the optimal supplier shipping performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most companies aim for perfect on-time delivery from suppliers, since late deliveries can cause supply disruptions and raise the cost of inventory, transportation and coordination. But this assumes that companies do not ...

Hurd, Maximilian L. (Maximilian Lawrence)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Improved supplier selection and cost management for globalized automotive production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For many manufacturing and automotive companies, traditional sourcing decisions rely on total landed cost models to determine the cheapest supplier. Total landed cost models calculate the cost to purchase a part plus all ...

Franken, Joseph P., II (Joseph Philip)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

California Total Gasoline All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Total Gasoline All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier (Thousand Gallons per Day) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9;

77

Texas Total Gasoline All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Total Gasoline All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier (Thousand Gallons per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1983: 26,179.1: 26,695.0 ...

78

Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Kerosene No. 1 Distillate No. 2...

79

Outsourcing: Pressure on Suppliers to Expand Services and Lower ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the trend for original-equipment manufacturers (OEMs) is to outsource as many ... The demand for expanded (and lower cost) service from suppliers is ... cut lost-time accidents, speed throughput and deliveries, save on energy costs, and so ...

80

Colorado Total Gasoline All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Total Gasoline All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier (Thousand Gallons per Day) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Supplier selection and performance evaluation in just-in-time production environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to aid just-in-time (JIT) manufacturers in selecting the most appropriate suppliers and in evaluating supplier performance. Many manufacturers employ the JIT philosophy in order to be more competitive in today's global market. ... Keywords: Just-in-time production, Neural network, Supplier performance evaluation, Supplier selection

Asl? Aksoy; Nursel Öztürk

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman July 30, 2010 - 10:51am Addthis Joshua DeLung Matthew Coapman sat behind a computer for six years after college, selling advertising space across the country for major brands. When his company starting shutting down, he wasn't defeated - he saw an opportunity to reinvent himself and help his community as well. Changing Charlotte "I realized the biggest need in our community was energy conservation in the places we live and work," says Coapman, now two years into starting his business - Energy Tight. "I knew it would take getting dirty to do it, but having an experience with customers where we can give them a combination of comfort and value in their homes makes it worth it."

83

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman Local Suppliers, Local Jobs: Sitting Down with Matthew Coapman July 30, 2010 - 10:51am Addthis Joshua DeLung Matthew Coapman sat behind a computer for six years after college, selling advertising space across the country for major brands. When his company starting shutting down, he wasn't defeated - he saw an opportunity to reinvent himself and help his community as well. Changing Charlotte "I realized the biggest need in our community was energy conservation in the places we live and work," says Coapman, now two years into starting his business - Energy Tight. "I knew it would take getting dirty to do it, but having an experience with customers where we can give them a combination of comfort and value in their homes makes it worth it."

84

Evaluating Offshore IT Outsourcing in India: Supplier and Customer Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the findings from an ongoing research study on offshore IT outsourcing. Field work was carried out in India and in the UK to evaluate the scale and scope of outsourcing activities. CEOs and CIOs were interviewed in fifteen supplier firms in India and two customer firms in UK, about strategic positioning in the offshore outsourcing market; benefits and risks from outsourcing; and other demand and supply-side issues. The findings suggest that, though offshore outsourcing offers new business opportunities for IT suppliers, much of the outsourced work continues to be low risk and low value. The challenge for outsourcing suppliers is therefore to devise strategies to move from body-shopping work to low cost, high value contracts, without incurring additional risk. 1.

Naureen Khan; Wendy L. Currie; Vishanth Weerakkody; Bhavini Desai

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

South Carolina Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Carolina Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier (Thousand Gallons per Day)

86

Supplier selection and order lot sizing modeling: A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With globalization and the emergence of the extended enterprise of interdependent organizations, there has been a steady increase in the outsourcing of parts and services. This has led firms to give more importance to the purchasing function and its ... Keywords: Auctions, Decision models, Order sizing, Outsourcing, Purchasing, Supplier selection

Najla Aissaoui; Mohamed Haouari; Elkafi Hassini

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Guidelines for Performance-Based Supplier Audits (NCIG-16)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance-based audits offer utilities a means of increasing confidence in supplier controls and ensuring that products received will perform their intended functions. This document, the sixteenth in a series cosponsored with NCIG, provides guidelines for undertaking performance-based audits.

1990-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fluid-Structure Interaction for Coolant Flow in Research-type Nuclear Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is scheduled to undergo a conversion of the fuel used and this proposed change requires an extensive analysis of the flow through the reactor core. The core consists of 540 very thin and long fuel plates through which the coolant (water) flows at a very high rate. Therefore, the design and the flow conditions make the plates prone to dynamic and static deflections, which may result in flow blockage and structural failure which in turn may cause core damage. To investigate the coolant flow between fuel plates and associated structural deflections, the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) module in COMSOL will be used. Flow induced flutter and static deflections will be examined. To verify the FSI module, a test case of a cylinder in crossflow, with vortex induced vibrations was performed and validated.

Curtis, Franklin G [ORNL; Ekici, Kivanc [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Supplier relationship management best practices applied to the manufacture of a helicopter airframe in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sikorsky's recently begun program to manufacture the S-76 helicopter airframe at a supplier in China is examined as a case study of supplier relationship management. Best practices and key principles from the literature ...

King, R. Jon (Ralph Jon)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

O:\\Data_Publication\\Prime Supplier Report\\current\\ventura\\c007...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to YTD '09: -10.6% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report August 2009 Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, August 2009 2 Measurement of...

91

O:\\Data_Publication\\Prime Supplier Report\\current\\ventura\\c007...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to YTD '09: -11.4% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report July 2009 Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, July 2009 2 Measurement of Petroleum...

92

O:\\Data_Publication\\Prime Supplier Report\\current\\ventura\\c007...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

'08 to YTD '09: -14.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report May 2009 Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, May 2009 2 Measurement of Petroleum...

93

O:\\Data_Publication\\Prime Supplier Report\\current\\ventura\\c007...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Supplier Report, March 2011 2 Measurement of Petroleum Product Sales Volumes on the EIA-782C Data for the Prime Supplier Report are collected on Form EIA-782C, "Monthly...

94

Nuclear Desalination Complex with VK-300 Boiling-Type Reactor Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With regard to the global-scale development of desalination technologies and the stable growth demand for them, Russia also takes an active part in the development of these technologies. Two major aspects play a special role here: they are providing the desalination process with power and introducing new materials capable of making the production of fresh water cheaper and of raising the technical reliability of desalination units. In achieving these tasks, the focus is on the most knowledge-intensive issues, to which Russia is capable of making its contribution based both on the experience of developing national nuclear power and the experience of developing, manufacturing and operating desalination units, including the use of nuclear power (the experience of BN-350 in Aktau (formerly Shevchenko), Kazakhstan). In terms of design, the Nuclear Desalination Complex (NDC) with a VK-300 reactor facility is a modification of a nuclear power unit with a VK-300 reactor developed for application at Russian nuclear cogeneration plants. A power unit

B. A. Gabaraev; Yu. N. Kuznetzov; A. A. Romenkov; Yu. A. Mishanina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Multi-period lot-sizing with supplier selection using achievement scalarizing functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an integration of Analytic Network Process (ANP) and achievement scalarizing functions is proposed to choose the best suppliers and define the optimum quantities among the selected suppliers by considering tangible-intangible criteria ... Keywords: Achievement scalarizing functions, Analytic network process, Goal programming, Lot-sizing with supplier selection, Multi-criteria decision making

Ozden Ustun; Ezgi Aktar Demirtas

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Group decision making process for supplier selection with VIKOR under fuzzy environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During recent years, how to determine suitable suppliers in the supply chain has become a key strategic consideration. However, the nature of supplier selection is a complex multi-criteria problem including both quantitative and qualitative factors which ... Keywords: Fuzzy set, Supplier selection, VIKOR

Amir Sanayei; S. Farid Mousavi; A. Yazdankhah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Root-cause analysis of the better performance of the coarse-mesh finite-difference method for CANDU-type reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent assessment results indicate that the coarse-mesh finite-difference method (FDM) gives consistently smaller percent differences in channel powers than the fine-mesh FDM when compared to the reference MCNP solution for CANDU-type reactors. However, there is an impression that the fine-mesh FDM should always give more accurate results than the coarse-mesh FDM in theory. To answer the question if the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors was just a coincidence (cancellation of errors) or caused by the use of heavy water or the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the cluster fuel geometry in the diffusion calculation, three benchmark problems were set up with three different fuel lattices: CANDU, HWR and PWR. These benchmark problems were then used to analyze the root cause of the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors. The analyses confirm that the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors is mainly caused by the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the sub-meshes of the cluster fuel geometry in the diffusion calculation. Based on the analyses, it is recommended to use 2 x 2 coarse-mesh FDM to analyze CANDU-type reactors when lattice-homogenized cross sections are used in the core analysis. (authors)

Shen, W. [Candu Energy Inc., 2285 Speakman Dr., Mississauga, ON L5B 1K (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nuclear Maintenance Application Center: Dry Type Transformer and Reactor Application and Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is focused on dry-type transformers used in unit secondary substations of nuclear power plants for power delivery purposes. This report does not cover instrument transformers, nor is it specifically for transformers used in grounding circuits, although these usages are addressed in Section 3.The primary purpose of this report is to inform the engineer or technician who has been assigned responsibility for secondary unit substation transformers in a nuclear station’s ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

99

Improved VIKOR Algorithm Based on AHP and Shannon Entropy in the Selection of Thermal Power Enterprise's Coal Suppliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to select the thermal power enterprise’s coal suppliers properly, certain attributes of the suppliers should be carefully analysis. Supplier selection is a multi criteria problem which multi attributions of the suppliers should be considered. ... Keywords: thermal power, VIKOR, Shannon Entropy, AHP

Ma Lihong; Zhang Yanping; Zhao Zhiwei

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Sandia National Laboratories Supplier Quality Requirements for Build to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supplier Quality Requirements for Build to Supplier Quality Requirements for Build to Print Hardware Purchases Subject: First Release:SNL-5-2002, Issue A, 05/16/02 Revised this 18th day'ofNovember, 2004 as F-42(QP-28)04* . Revised By: 11)' I(.~ 't:t' AntOnIO J. ~ora, 14133 14133 Manager ~ c-. m I ~~ <.:-, lL 10252 Manager? \"\\_- - II - 2.3 - 0 'i ~e~7 1 025 8 Manager$::~ R (/.tff7 J Frank A. Villareal Approved By: * The revision of the document in effect at tlte tinre of award of Purchase Order of Subcontract unless otherwise noted on the Procurement Document. F-42(QP-28)O4 Quality Assurance Supplement to Sandia Contracts and Purchase Orders (- rr -°1 I 11/18/04 1.0 Scope: The scope of this document is designed to establish a level of quality for purchases and hardware procured in the form of built to print items,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A procedure has been developed for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuels. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain synthetic fuel exemption (Fuel Use Act); determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuels. Application of the screening procedure resulted in the identification of one or more candidates for supplying synthetic fuel to each of the prospective users. In this report the development of the screening procedure is described. Chapter 1 contains a detailed description of the seven screens; Chapter 2 describes the development of the hierarchical procedure for applying the screens to each synthetic fuels project; Chapter 3 describes the modification of the screening procedure for low and medium Btu gas; Chapter 4 describes the application of the procedure. Appendix A is a list of references used in developing the procedure; Appendix B is a detailed listing of proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel projects.

None

1981-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

102

Information for Use in Conducting Audits of Supplier Commercial Grade Item Dedication Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has published a series of documents pertaining to commercial grade item dedication (CGID). Each of these documents was written from a licensees perspective and was intended for use by member utilities. EPRI released six of these documents as copyrighted publications in 2007, making them available to suppliers in the nuclear generation industry. Suppliers can use these documents as guidance for implementing supplier CGID programs. Recent experience conducting N...

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

103

Concentration of U.S. crude oil imports among top five suppliers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil imports from the top five foreign suppliers to the United States—which in 2012 were Canada, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Venezuela, and Iraq, in that order ...

104

Table 46. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, No. 4 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly February 2012 144 Table 46. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, No. 4 Fuel Oil, Propane,

105

Screw Air Compressor 220v, Screw Air Compressor 220v Suppliers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source Top Quality Screw Air Compressor 220v Suppliers, screw mini air compressor 220v Companies, atlas copco screw compressor Manufacturers. Welcome. ...

106

EIA-782C MONTHLY REPORT OF PRIME SUPPLIER SALES OF PETROLEUM ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-782C, "Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local

107

Commercial-Scale Performance Predictions for High-Temperature Electrolysis Plants Coupled to Three Advanced Reactor Types  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of system analyses that have been developed to assess the hydrogen production performance of commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plants driven by three different advanced reactor – power-cycle combinations: a high-temperature helium cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle, a supercritical CO2-cooled reactor coupled to a direct recompression cycle, and a sodium-cooled fast reactor coupled to a Rankine cycle. The system analyses were performed using UniSim software. The work described in this report represents a refinement of previous analyses in that the process flow diagrams include realistic representations of the three advanced reactors directly coupled to the power cycles and integrated with the high-temperature electrolysis process loops. In addition, this report includes parametric studies in which the performance of each HTE concept is determined over a wide range of operating conditions. Results of the study indicate that overall thermal-to- hydrogen production efficiencies (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) in the 45 - 50% range can be achieved at reasonable production rates with the high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept, 42 - 44% with the supercritical CO2-cooled reactor and about 33 - 34% with the sodium-cooled reactor.

M. G. McKellar; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Suspect/Counterfeit Items Information Guide for Subcontractors/Suppliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Counterfeiting of industrial and commercial grade items is an international problem that places worker safety, program objectives, expensive equipment, and security at risk. In order to prevent the introduction of Suspect/Counterfeit Items (S/CI), this information sheet is being made available as a guide to assist in the implementation of S/CI awareness and controls, in conjunction with subcontractor's/supplier's quality assurance programs. When it comes to counterfeit goods, including industrial materials, items, and equipment, no market is immune. Some manufactures have been known to misrepresent their products and intentionally use inferior materials and processes to manufacture substandard items, whose properties can significantly cart from established standards and specifications. These substandard items termed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as S/CI, pose immediate and potential threats to the safety of DOE and contractor workers, the public, and the environment. Failure of certain systems and processes caused by an S/CI could also have national security implications at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Nuclear Safety Rules (federal Laws), DOE Orders, and other regulations set forth requirements for DOE contractors to implement effective controls to assure that items and services meet specified requirements. This includes techniques to implement and thereby minimizing the potential threat of entry of S/CI to LANL. As a qualified supplier of goods or services to the LANL, your company will be required to establish and maintain effective controls to prevent the introduction of S/CI to LANL. This will require that your company warrant that all items (including their subassemblies, components, and parts) sold to LANL are genuine (i.e. not counterfeit), new, and unused, and conform to the requirements of the LANL purchase orders/contracts unless otherwise approved in writing to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) contract administrator/procurements specialist.

Tessmar, Nancy D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Michael J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

109

A strategic model using structural equation modeling and fuzzy logic in supplier selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supplier selection attained the state of paramount importance for companies in the current scenario because of increasing global competition. Improper selection of suppliers will have an adverse impact on the overall performance of the company. The number ... Keywords: Fuzzy analytic hierarchy process, Sensitivity analysis, Structural equation modeling (SEM)

M. Punniyamoorthy; P. Mathiyalagan; P. Parthiban

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Supplier selection paradigm: An integrated hierarchical QFD methodology under multiple-criteria environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concurrent engineering approach integrating analytic hierarchy process (AHP) with quality function deployment (QFD) in combination with cost factor measure (CFM) has been delineated to rank and subsequently select candidate-suppliers under multiple, ... Keywords: CFM, Decision support, Hierarchical MCDM, Multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM), Quality function deployment (QFD), Supplier selection

Arijit Bhattacharya; John Geraghty; Paul Young

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Integrating GSS and AHP: Experiences from Benchmarking of Buyer-Supplier Relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing overall global competition forces requirements for companies to improve their business performance continuously in every sector. The utilization of external resources, including a supplier network, has become one of the most critical development ... Keywords: Benchmarking, Buyer-Supplier Relationships, GSS, AHP

S. Peltola; M. Torkkeli; J. Tuimala

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A fuzzy VIKOR method for supplier selection based on entropy measure for objective weighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, resolving the problem of evaluation and ranking the potential suppliers has become as a key strategic factor for business firms. With the development of intelligent and automated information systems in the information era, the need for more ... Keywords: Entropy measure, Fuzzy logic, GMCDM, Supplier selection, Trapezoidal fuzzy numbers, VIKOR

Ali Shemshadi; Hossein Shirazi; Mehran Toreihi; M. J. Tarokh

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Application of decision-making techniques in supplier selection: A systematic review of literature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the importance of decision-making (DM) techniques for construction of effective decision models for supplier selection, there is a lack of a systematic literature review for it. This paper provides a systematic literature review on articles published ... Keywords: Decision-making techniques, Literature review, Supplier selection, Uncertainty

Junyi Chai; James N. K. Liu; Eric W. T. Ngai

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Your're Invited: Join Our Supplier Outreach Event on August 19th |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your're Invited: Join Our Supplier Outreach Event on August 19th Your're Invited: Join Our Supplier Outreach Event on August 19th Your're Invited: Join Our Supplier Outreach Event on August 19th July 27, 2011 - 6:00pm Addthis On August 19, 2011, the Department of Energy will be co-sponsoring a suppliers outreach event for suppliers who wish to provide services to Service Disabled Veteran Owned Businesses. This event, Showcase Expo and MatchMaker, will be held in Washington D.C., and is co-sponsored by GovConectx. This outreach event is an excellent opportunity for companies interested in working with us to gain insights into the current and future markets for products, services, and requirements to enter or to continue to work on projects with us. Participants will also have the opportunity to interact directly with outreach and procurement personnel working for the Department

115

Guidebook to nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen.

Nero, A.V. Jr.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Reactor Coolant Pump/Reactor Recirculation Pump Motor Lubrication Oil Systems Maintenance G uide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RCP and RRP Motor Lubrication system issues have ranked high on NMAC maintenance Issues Surveys in recent years. Problems reported have included oil leakage at power, the need for additional reservoirs to accommodate leakage, oil degradation (foaming, particulate) as well as sludge problems due to the design of the motor and some as a result of new oil formulations and other changes made by the oil suppliers. Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP) used in Pressurized Water Reactors and Reactor Recirculation Pumps ...

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Determinants of Inter-Firm trust in Supplier-Automaker Relationships In the U.S., Japan, and Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the determinants of supplier trust in the buyer in 453supplier-automaker relationships in the U. S., Japan, and Korea. We define trust and derive a model of its determinants drawing upon (1) an ...

Chu, Wujin

1997-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

118

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Microsoft Word - Managing Your iSupplier Profile Job Aid R12 05092012.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Contents of Contents Summary of Your iSupplier Profile...........................................................................................................................2 Accessing Your Account for the First Time.............................................................................................................2 Navigating to Your Profile.........................................................................................................................................3 Company Information (a.k.a. Profile Management)............................................................................................4 Organization...............................................................................................................................................................5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

O:\\Data_Publication\\Prime Supplier Report\\current\\ventura\\c007...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul '10 to Jul '11: +1.9% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -3.4% * Calculated on a per day basis. Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, July 2011 2 Measurement of Petroleum...

122

O:\\Data_Publication\\Prime Supplier Report\\current\\ventura\\c007...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun '10 to Jun '11: +0.1% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -3.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, June 2011 2 Measurement of Petroleum...

123

O:\\Data_Publication\\Prime Supplier Report\\current\\ventura\\c007...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May '10 to May '11: +4.9% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -5.0% * Calculated on a per day basis. Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, May 2011 2 Measurement of Petroleum...

124

O:\\Data_Publication\\Prime Supplier Report\\current\\ventura\\c007...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug '10 to Aug '11: 3.2% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -2.8% * Calculated on a per day basis. Energy Information AdministrationPrime Supplier Report, August 2011 2 Measurement of...

125

Lean Aircraft Initiative Implementation Workshop #3: Customer and Supplier Integration Across the Supply Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The integration of customers and suppliers along the supply chain involves a fundamental transformation of the way business is conducted in the Aerospace industry. Lean Aerospace Initiative (LAI) members, as well as ...

Cutcher-Gershenfeld, Joel

126

Assessment of the ISO 9000 Quality Management System (QMS) Registrar Accreditation and Supplier Certification Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the assessment of key processes associated with administration and implementation of the International Organization for Standardization's (ISO's) family of standards known as ISO 9000. The results of this assessment were used to develop guidance to assist utilities when dedicating commercial-grade items procured from ISO 9000 suppliers. (The resulting guidance is published in EPRI Report 1003105, "Dedicating Commercial-Grade Items Procured From ISO 9000 Suppliers.")

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

Type B investigation of the iridium contamination event at the High Flux Isotope Reactor on September 7, 1993  

SciTech Connect

On the title date, at ORNL, area radiation alarms sounded during a routine transfer of a shielding cask (containing 60 Ci{sup 192}Ir) from the HFIR pool side to a transport truck. Small amounts of Ir were released from the cask onto the reactor bay floor. The floor was cleaned, and the cask was shipped to a hot cell at Building 3047 on Oct. 3, 1993. The event was caused by rupture of one of the Ir target rods after it was loaded into the cask for normal transport operations; the rupture was the result of steam generation in the target rod soon after it was placed in the cask (water had entered the target rod through a tiny defect in a weld while it was in the reactor under pressure). While the target rods were in the reactor and reactor pool, there was sufficient cooling to prevent steam generation; when the target rod was loaded into the dry transport cask, the temperature increased enough to result in boiling of the trapped water and produced high enough pressure to result in rupture. The escaping steam ejected some of the Ir pellets. The event was reported as Occurrence Report Number ORO--MMES-X10HFIR-1993-0030, dated Sept. 8, 1993. Analysis indicated that the following conditions were probable causes: less than adequate welding procedures, practices, or techniques, material controls, or inspection methods, or combination thereof, could have led to weld defects, affecting the integrity of target rod IR-75; less than adequate secondary containment in the cask allowed Ir pellets to escape.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr '11 to May '11: -1.7% Apr '11 to May '11: -1.7% May '10 to May '11: -0.8% YTD '10 to YTD '11: +0.7% 1,800 1,900 2,000 allons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales Adjusted Growth Rates* 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '11 to May '11: -0.1% May '10 to May '11: -5.1% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -3.0% Prime Supplier Report May 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '11 to May '11: -2.5% May '10 to May '11: -19.2% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -11.1% 1,400

129

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May '11 to Jun '11: +5.1% May '11 to Jun '11: +5.1% Jun '10 to Jun '11: -0.7% YTD '10 to YTD '11: +0.4% 1,800 1,900 2,000 Gallons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales Adjusted Growth Rates* 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '11 to Jun '11: +2.9% Jun '10 to Jun '11: -4.3% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -3.2% Prime Supplier Report June 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '11 to Jun '11: +8.4% Jun '10 to Jun '11: -8.1% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -10.7% 1,400

130

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul '11 to Aug '11: 8.4% Jul '11 to Aug '11: 8.4% Aug '10 to Aug '11: 2.4% YTD '10 to YTD '11: 0.2% 1 700 1,800 1,900 2,000 f Gallons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales Adjusted Growth Rates* J l '11 t A '11 1 9% 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '11 to Aug '11: 2.9% Aug '10 to Aug '11: -2.5% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -3.5% Prime Supplier Report August 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '11 to Aug '11: -13.9% Aug '10 to Aug '11: -26.9% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -13.7%

131

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun '11 to Jul '11: -6.9% Jun '11 to Jul '11: -6.9% Jul '10 to Jul '11: -3.0% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -0.0% 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 of Gallons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '11 to Jul '11: -2.2% 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '11 to Jul '11: -1.1% Jul '10 to Jul '11: -5.6% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -3.6% Prime Supplier Report July 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2010 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '11 to Jul '11: -11.8% Jul '10 to Jul '11: -19.8%

132

POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

Zinn, W.H.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

Christy, R.F.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The use of U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum in plate-type fuel elements for research and test reactors  

SciTech Connect

A high-density fuel based on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum has been developed and tested for use in converting plate-type research and test reactors from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low-enriched uranium. Results of preirradiation testing and the irradiation and postirradiation examination of miniature fuel plates and full-sized fuel elements are summarized. Swelling of the U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ fuel particles is a linear function of the fission density in the particle to well beyond the fission density achievable in low-enriched fuels. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ particle swelling rate is approximately the same as that of the commonly used UAl/sub x/ fuel particle. The presence of minor amounts of U/sub 3/Si or uranium solid solution in the fuel result in greater, but still acceptable, fuel swelling. Blister threshold temperatures are at least as high as those of currently used fuels. An exothermic reaction occurs near the aluminum melting temperature, but the measured energy releases were low enough not to substantially worsen the consequences of an accident. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-aluminum dispersion fuel with uranium densities up to at least 4.8 Mg/m/sup 3/ is a suitable LEU fuel for typical plate-type research and test reactors. 42 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.; Hobbs, R.W.; Senn, R.L.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

Treshow, M.

1958-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

137

,"U.S. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products" Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Motor Gasoline by Grade and Formulation",13,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 2","Motor Gasoline by Formulation",3,"Monthly","9/2013","10/15/1993" ,"Data 3","Other Products",17,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","11/26/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/23/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_prim_dcu_nus_m.xls"

138

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep Sep '01 to Oct '01: +3.2% Oct '00 to Oct '01: +3.1% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '01 to Oct '01: +8.7% Oct '00 to Oct '01: +2.6% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +4.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '01 to Oct '01: -1.9% Oct '00 to Oct '01: -12.0% YTD '00 to YTD '01: -0.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '01 to Oct '01: +16.2% Oct '00 to Oct '01: +9.7% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +6.2% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report October 2001 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

139

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar Mar '04 to Apr '04: +1.7% Apr '03 to Apr '04: +3.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.2% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ar '04 to Apr '04: -2.0% Apr '03 to Apr '04: +5.5% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '04 to Apr '04: +5.2% Apr '03 to Apr '04: +15.0% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +5.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '04 to Apr '04: -22.8% Apr '03 to Apr '04: -0.7% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +3.1% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report April 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

140

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May May '02 to Jun '02: +0.0% Jun '01 to Jun '02: +2.4% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +3.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ay '02 to Jun '02: -4.0% Jun '01 to Jun '02: -2.1% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -6.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '02 to Jun '02: +3.6% Jun '01 to Jun '02: -5.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -4.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '02 to Jun '02: +6.6% Jun '01 to Jun '02: +8.0% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -2.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report June 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb Feb '03 to Mar '03: +0.7% Mar '02 to Mar '03: -2.0% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -1.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '03 to M ar '03: -8.4% M ar '02 to M ar '03: +6.3% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +7.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '03 to Mar '03: -1.8% Mar '02 to Mar '03: -10.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -5.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '03 to Mar '03: -30.2% Mar '02 to Mar '03: -12.1% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +3.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report March 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800

142

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul Jul '02 to Aug '02: +1.2% Aug '01 to Aug '02: +1.6% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +2.9% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '02 to Aug '02: +1.8% Aug '01 to Aug '02: -4.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '02 to Aug '02: -4.6% Aug '01 to Aug '02: -9.4% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.0% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '02 to Aug '02: +8.7% Aug '01 to Aug '02: -12.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -4.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report August 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

143

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May May '03 to Jun '03: +1.2% Jun '02 to Jun '03: -0.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -1.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ay '03 to Jun '03: +0.6% Jun '02 to Jun '03: +2.7% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +4.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '03 to Jun '03: +5.1% Jun '02 to Jun '03: -6.7% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -7.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '03 to Jun '03: +11.9% Jun '02 to Jun '03: -12.7% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -2.3% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report June 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

144

X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep Sep '05 to Oct '05: +0.3% Oct '04 to Oct '05: +0.4% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +2.3% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '05 to Oct '05: -1.9% Oct '04 to Oct '05: +0.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +1.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '05 to Oct '05: -4.4% Oct '04 to Oct '05: +0.9% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +3.8% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '05 to Oct '05: +7.5% Oct '04 to Oct '05: -5.9% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -4.8% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report October 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

145

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb Feb '05 to Mar '05: +2.8% Mar '04 to Mar '05: +3.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +3.0% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '05 to M ar '05: +3.2% M ar '04 to M ar '05: +4.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -0.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '05 to Mar '05: +0.6% Mar '04 to Mar '05: +3.2% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +2.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '05 to Mar '05: -14.9% Mar '04 to Mar '05: +5.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -5.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report March 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

146

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct Oct '01 to Nov '01: -1.5% Nov '00 to Nov '01: +2.0% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '01 to Nov '01: -3.4% Nov '00 to Nov '01: +0.8% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +3.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '01 to Nov '01: +11.1% Nov '00 to Nov '01: -2.9% YTD '00 to YTD '01: -0.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '01 to Nov '01: -0.8% Nov '00 to Nov '01: -4.5% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +5.1% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report November 2001 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

147

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr Apr '04 to May '04: +0.5% May '03 to May '04: -0.5% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '04 to M ay '04: -7.9% M ay '03 to M ay '04: +2.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '04 to May '04: -5.1% May '03 to May '04: +8.1% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +6.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '04 to May '04: -13.3% May '03 to May '04: +10.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +4.0% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report May 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

148

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar Mar '03 to Apr '03: +2.8% Apr '02 to Apr '03: -3.0% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -2.1% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ar '03 to Apr '03: -1.6% Apr '02 to Apr '03: +1.5% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +6.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '03 to Apr '03: -4.0% Apr '02 to Apr '03: -11.6% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -6.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '03 to Apr '03: -17.0% Apr '02 to Apr '03: -6.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +1.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report April 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

149

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun Jun '02 to Jul '02: +0.2% Jul '01 to Jul '02: +3.7% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +3.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '02 to Jul '02: -0.1% Jul '01 to Jul '02: +1.0% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '02 to Jul '02: +6.6% Jul '01 to Jul '02: -1.0% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '02 to Jul '02: -9.8% Jul '01 to Jul '02: -11.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.8% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report July 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

150

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov Nov '03 to Dec '03: +1.5% Dec '02 to Dec '03: +1.5% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.2% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '03 to Dec '03: +8.0% Dec '02 to Dec '03: +3.4% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +3.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '03 to Dec '03: +2.8% Dec '02 to Dec '03: -6.0% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -8.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '03 to Dec '03: +38.3% Dec '02 to Dec '03: -0.5% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report December 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800

151

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct Oct '02 to Nov '02: -2.3% Nov '01 to Nov '02: +0.8% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +2.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '02 to Nov '02: -3.8% Nov '01 to Nov '02: -1.6% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -4.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '02 to Nov '02: -2.4% Nov '01 to Nov '02: -1.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -2.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '02 to Nov '02: +7.2% Nov '01 to Nov '02: +2.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -4.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report November 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

152

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dec Dec '01 to Jan '02: -3.2% Jan '01 to Jan '02: +5.0% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +5.0% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '01 to Jan '02: +9.3% Jan '01 to Jan '02: -10.4% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -10.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '01 to Jan '02: -5.2% Jan '01 to Jan '02: -7.9% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -7.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '01 to Jan '02: +9.6% Jan '01 to Jan '02: -11.0% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -11.0% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report January 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

153

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug Aug '02 to Sep '02: -6.8% Sep '01 to Sep '02: +1.9% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +2.8% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '02 to Sep '02: -2.0% Sep '01 to Sep '02: -3.2% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '02 to Sep '02: -0.5% Sep '01 to Sep '02: +10.8% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '02 to Sep '02: +5.0% Sep '01 to Sep '02: -14.9% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.8% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report September 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

154

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov Nov '01 to Dec '01: -0.8% Dec '00 to Dec '01: +0.2% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '01 to Dec '01: -4.5% Dec '00 to Dec '01: -11.7% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +2.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '01 to Dec '01: -2.9% Dec '00 to Dec '01: -6.7% YTD '00 to YTD '01: -0.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '01 to Dec '01: +16.7% Dec '00 to Dec '01: -19.1% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report December 2001 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

155

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar Mar '05 to Apr '05: +0.2% Apr '04 to Apr '05: +1.8% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +2.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ar '05 to Apr '05: -9.6% Apr '04 to Apr '05: -3.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -0.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '05 to Apr '05: +1.4% Apr '04 to Apr '05: -0.5% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +1.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '05 to Apr '05: -32.2% Apr '04 to Apr '05: -6.5% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -5.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report April 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

156

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul Jul '03 to Aug '03: +0.3% Aug '02 to Aug '03: +0.3% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.9% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '03 to Aug '03: -2.2% Aug '02 to Aug '03: -1.3% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +3.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '03 to Aug '03: +0.8% Aug '02 to Aug '03: -7.7% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -7.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '03 to Aug '03: +3.7% Aug '02 to Aug '03: -3.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.6% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report August 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

157

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr Apr '03 to May '03: +4.2% May '02 to May '03: -0.9% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -1.9% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '03 to M ay '03: -5.5% M ay '02 to M ay '03: -1.6% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +4.5% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '03 to May '03: +0.2% May '02 to May '03: -9.1% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -7.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '03 to May '03: -21.5% May '02 to May '03: -15.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.5% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report May 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

158

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug Aug '03 to Sep '03: -4.1% Sep '02 to Sep '03: +3.4% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '03 to Sep '03: +6.6% Sep '02 to Sep '03: +7.6% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +4.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '03 to Sep '03: +0.9% Sep '02 to Sep '03: -6.1% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -7.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '03 to Sep '03: +19.6% Sep '02 to Sep '03: +10.6% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +0.5% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report September 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700

159

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun Jun '01 to Jul '01: -0.5% Jul '00 to Jul '01: +1.8% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '01 to Jul '01: -2.5% Jul '00 to Jul '01: +2.9% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +5.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '01 to Jul '01: +2.0% Jul '00 to Jul '01: +1.5% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +3.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '01 to Jul '01: +10.3% Jul '00 to Jul '01: +15.7% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +7.5% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report July 2001 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

160

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct Oct '03 to Nov '03: -4.5% Nov '02 to Nov '03: -1.0% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.3% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '03 to Nov '03: -10.0% Nov '02 to Nov '03: -3.4% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +3.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '03 to Nov '03: -3.0% Nov '02 to Nov '03: -10.9% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -8.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '03 to Nov '03: -1.7% Nov '02 to Nov '03: -10.3% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report November 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May May '05 to Jun '05: +2.2% Jun '04 to Jun '05: +3.8% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +3.2% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ay '05 to Jun '05: +1.8% Jun '04 to Jun '05: +1.6% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +0.5% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '05 to Jun '05: +5.7% Jun '04 to Jun '05: +2.5% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +1.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '05 to Jun '05: +7.2% Jun '04 to Jun '05: -10.0% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -6.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report June 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

162

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dec Dec '04 to Jan '05: -8.2% Jan '04 to Jan '05: +1.1% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +1.1% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '04 to Jan '05: -1.7% Jan '04 to Jan '05: -5.2% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -5.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '04 to Jan '05: -5.1% Jan '04 to Jan '05: -0.3% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -0.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '04 to Jan '05: -3.1% Jan '04 to Jan '05: -12.1% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -12.1% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report January 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700

163

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul Jul '04 to Aug '04: -0.1% Aug '03 to Aug '04: -1.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '04 to Aug '04: +2.3% Aug '03 to Aug '04: +5.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '04 to Aug '04: +3.8% Aug '03 to Aug '04: +9.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '04 to Aug '04: +4.7% Aug '03 to Aug '04: +3.8% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +5.5% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report August 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800

164

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug Aug '01 to Sep '01: -6.7% Sep '00 to Sep '01: +0.0% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '01 to Sep '01: -2.0% Sep '00 to Sep '01: -0.7% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +4.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '01 to Sep '01: -18.2% Sep '00 to Sep '01: -14.5% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '01 to Sep '01: +9.2% Sep '00 to Sep '01: +1.9% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +5.8% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report September 2001 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

165

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar Mar '02 to Apr '02: +3.1% Apr '01 to Apr '02: +3.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +3.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* M ar '02 to Apr '02: +2.0% Apr '01 to Apr '02: -4.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -8.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '02 to Apr '02: -1.9% Apr '01 to Apr '02: -0.2% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -2.8% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '02 to Apr '02: -22.3% Apr '01 to Apr '02: +9.9% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.0% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report April 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

166

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jan Jan '03 to Feb '03: +1.1% Feb '02 to Feb '03: -2.8% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -1.5% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '03 to Feb '03: -2.9% Feb '02 to Feb '03: +7.1% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +7.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '03 to Feb '03: +4.6% Feb '02 to Feb '03: -3.8% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -2.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '03 to Feb '03: -10.7% Feb '02 to Feb '03: +16.0% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +10.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report February 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700

167

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun Jun '04 to Jul '04: +0.6% Jul '03 to Jul '04: -0.9% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '04 to Jul '04: -4.8% Jul '03 to Jul '04: +0.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '04 to Jul '04: -3.1% Jul '03 to Jul '04: +6.5% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.6% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '04 to Jul '04: +0.6% Jul '03 to Jul '04: +3.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +5.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report July 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900

168

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr Apr '02 to May '02: +1.9% May '01 to May '02: +4.9% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +3.9% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '02 to M ay '02: -2.2% M ay '01 to M ay '02: -0.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -6.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '02 to May '02: -3.6% May '01 to May '02: -7.7% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '02 to May '02: -8.3% May '01 to May '02: +5.8% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.5% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report May 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100

169

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov Nov '04 to Dec '04: +3.0% Dec '03 to Dec '04: +3.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '04 to Dec '04: +4.3% Dec '03 to Dec '04: +3.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '04 to Dec '04: -0.9% Dec '03 to Dec '04: +4.1% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '04 to Dec '04: +24.2% Dec '03 to Dec '04: +4.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +5.1% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report December 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700

170

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb Feb '04 to Mar '04: +4.1% Mar '03 to Mar '04: +4.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.8% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '04 to M ar '04: -0.4% M ar '03 to M ar '04: +5.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '04 to Mar '04: +1.9% Mar '03 to Mar '04: +4.0% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '04 to Mar '04: -23.5% Mar '03 to Mar '04: +10.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +4.7% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report March 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900

171

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jan Jan '04 to Feb '04: +2.2% Feb '03 to Feb '04: +1.1% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '04 to Feb '04: -3.4% Feb '03 to Feb '04: -3.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: -1.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '04 to Feb '04: +2.1% Feb '03 to Feb '04: +1.0% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '04 to Feb '04: -12.1% Feb '03 to Feb '04: +2.8% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +3.4% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report February 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800

172

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct Oct '04 to Nov '04: -0.6% Nov '03 to Nov '04: +1.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.3% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '04 to Nov '04: -0.7% Nov '03 to Nov '04: +6.7% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '04 to Nov '04: -0.1% Nov '03 to Nov '04: +7.1% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.6% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '04 to Nov '04: +14.7% Nov '03 to Nov '04: +16.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +5.3% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report November 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700

173

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb Feb '02 to Mar '02: +0.2% Mar '01 to Mar '02: +2.1% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +3.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '02 to M ar '02: -5.3% M ar '01 to M ar '02: -11.1% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -9.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '02 to Mar '02: +5.0% Mar '01 to Mar '02: -0.7% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '02 to Mar '02: -8.2% Mar '01 to Mar '02: -4.4% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -7.9% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report March 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

174

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep Sep '03 to Oct '03: +1.3% Oct '02 to Oct '03: +1.4% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -0.3% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '03 to Oct '03: +6.3% Oct '02 to Oct '03: +3.8% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +4.0% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '03 to Oct '03: -5.5% Oct '02 to Oct '03: -11.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -8.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '03 to Oct '03: +13.3% Oct '02 to Oct '03: -2.3% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +0.2% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report October 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800

175

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov Nov '02 to Dec '02: -0.8% Dec '01 to Dec '02: +0.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +2.4% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '02 to Dec '02: +1.8% Dec '01 to Dec '02: +5.4% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '02 to Dec '02: -3.6% Dec '01 to Dec '02: -2.2% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -2.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '02 to Dec '02: +24.7% Dec '01 to Dec '02: +9.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -3.4% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report December 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

176

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep Sep '04 to Oct '04: -0.8% Oct '03 to Oct '04: -1.9% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.2% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '04 to Oct '04: +0.4% Oct '03 to Oct '04: -3.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '04 to Oct '04: -2.0% Oct '03 to Oct '04: +8.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '04 to Oct '04: +15.4% Oct '03 to Oct '04: -0.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +4.1% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report October 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700

177

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jan Jan '02 to Feb '02: +4.0% Feb '01 to Feb '02: +4.3% YTD '01 to YTD '02: +4.6% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '02 to Feb '02: -1.8% Feb '01 to Feb '02: -5.5% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -8.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '02 to Feb '02: +7.3% Feb '01 to Feb '02: -2.6% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -5.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2000 2001 2002 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan '02 to Feb '02: -17.6% Feb '01 to Feb '02: -6.6% YTD '01 to YTD '02: -9.2% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report February 2002 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

178

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dec Dec '03 to Jan '04: -6.2% Jan '03 to Jan '04: -0.4% YTD '03 to YTD '04: -0.4% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '03 to Jan '04: +6.2% Jan '03 to Jan '04: -1.5% YTD '03 to YTD '04: -1.5% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '03 to Jan '04: -1.8% Jan '03 to Jan '04: +0.9% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '03 to Jan '04: +11.2% Jan '03 to Jan '04: +1.2% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +1.2% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report January 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800

179

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dec Dec '02 to Jan '03: -3.6% Jan '02 to Jan '03: +0.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +0.2% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '02 to Jan '03: +11.4% Jan '02 to Jan '03: +7.9% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +7.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '02 to Jan '03: -5.3% Jan '02 to Jan '03: -1.2% YTD '02 to YTD '03: -1.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2001 2002 2003 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '02 to Jan '03: +6.5% Jan '02 to Jan '03: +3.6% YTD '02 to YTD '03: +3.6% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report January 2003 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

180

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug Aug '04 to Sep '04: -2.5% Sep '03 to Sep '04: +0.0% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +0.4% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '04 to Sep '04: +4.5% Sep '03 to Sep '04: +2.3% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +2.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '04 to Sep '04: -2.4% Sep '03 to Sep '04: +5.7% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +7.6% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2002 2003 2004 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '04 to Sep '04: +7.4% Sep '03 to Sep '04: -6.6% YTD '03 to YTD '04: +4.2% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report September 2004 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr Apr '05 to May '05: +1.8% May '04 to May '05: +3.4% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +2.8% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '05 to M ay '05: -0.3% M ay '04 to M ay '05: +5.7% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +0.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '05 to May '05: -1.0% May '04 to May '05: +3.7% YTD '04 to YTD '05: +1.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2003 2004 2005 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '05 to May '05: -13.7% May '04 to May '05: -7.7% YTD '04 to YTD '05: -6.3% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report May 2005 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900

182

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750–800°C Reactor Outlet Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750–800°C reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

John Collins

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

Ruano, W.J.

1957-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

NUCLEAR REACTORS AND EARTHQUAKES  

SciTech Connect

A book is presented which supplies pertinent seismological information to engineers in the nuclear reactor field. Data are presented on the occurrence, intensity, and wave shapes. Techniques are described for evaluating the response of structures to such events. Certain reactor types and their modes of operation are described briefly. Various protection systems are considered. Earthquake experience in industrial and reactor plants is described. (D.L.C.)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Extracting performance rules of suppliers in the manufacturing industry: an empirical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance evaluation of suppliers is increasingly recognized as a critical indicator in supply chain cooperation. Traditional performance evaluation methods have the problems of a simple buy/sell relation and in one's subjective views between manufacturers ... Keywords: Data mining techniques, KPI (Key Performance Indicators), Manufacturing industry, Performance evaluation, SCM (Supply Chain Management)

You-Shyang Chen; Ching-Hsue Cheng; Chien-Jung Lai

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Equipment/product classification. [Equipment suppliers for the oil and gas industry  

SciTech Connect

This article contains information about the manufacturers and suppliers of goods for the oil and gas industry, including machines, software, services, and equipment used to build, operate, and maintain energy pipeline systems. The article represents companies around the world and are arranged by product category for ease of use.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Supplier selection using fuzzy AHP and fuzzy multi-objective linear programming for developing low carbon supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental sustainability of a supply chain depends on the purchasing strategy of the supply chain members. Most of the earlier models have focused on cost, quality, lead time, etc. issues but not given enough importance to carbon emission for supplier ... Keywords: Carbon emission, Fuzzy AHP, Fuzzy multi-objective linear programming, Green house gas, Supplier selection, Textile supply chain

Krishnendu Shaw; Ravi Shankar; Surendra S. Yadav; Lakshman S. Thakur

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

Treshow, M.

1958-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Nuclear reactors created not only large amounts of plutonium needed for the weapons programs, but a variety of other interesting and useful radioisotopes. They produced...

190

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

1985-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

191

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Supplier Quality Management for New Nuclear Plant Construction Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for new nuclear power plant construction projects on supplier quality-related risks associated with the procurement of materials, equipment, and services intended for use in a safety-related plant application. This guidance takes an in-depth look into the procurement-related challenges that new construction projects face and at measures for overcoming these challenges. A methodology is provided for identifying, managing, evaluating, and mitigating quality-related risks ...

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

Supply Side Management Kit: Service for Energy Suppliers and Process Industry Customers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Supply Side Management Kit highlights proposed EPRI's services for energy suppliers and process industries in the supply side area. With the onset of electricity deregulation, process industry customers are increasingly looking at reducing energy costs on the supply of energy. The new environment has created significant opportunities for cost-effective purchase, management, generation, utilization, and sale of energy for process industries. This kit discusses the services offered by EPRI to meet its ...

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Advanced converter reactors  

SciTech Connect

Advanced converter reactors (ACRs) of primary US interest are those which can be commercialized within about 20 years, and are: Advanced Light-Water Reactors, Spectral-Shift-Control Reactors, Heavy-Water Reactors (CANDU type), and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. These reactors can operate on uranium, thorium, or uranium-thorium fuel cycles, but have the greatest fuel utilization on thorium type cycles. The water reactors tend to operate more economically on uranium cycles, while the HTGR is more economical on thorium cycles. Thus, the HTGR had the greatest practical potential for improving fuel utilization. If the US has 3.4 to 4 million tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at reasonable costs, ACRs can make important contributions to maintaining a high nuclear power level for many decades; further, they work well with fast breeder reactors in the long term under symbiotic fueling conditions. Primary nuclear data needs of ACRs are integral measurements of reactivity coefficients and resonance absorption integrals.

Kasten, P.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A MULTIPLE-ITEM MULTIPLE-CONSTRAINT INVENTORY OPTIMIZATION AND SUPPLIER SELECTION MODEL UNDER LEAD TIME DEMAND UNCERTAINTY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to solve a multiple-item, one-retailer inventory control and supplier selection problem with multiple constraints and uncertainties. For each item,… (more)

Zhu, Rongjia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor system incorporating a reactor of the heterogeneous boiling water type is described. The reactor is comprised essentially of a core submerged adwater in the lower half of a pressure vessel and two distribution rings connected to a source of water are disposed within the pressure vessel above the reactor core, the lower distribution ring being submerged adjacent to the uppcr end of the reactor core and the other distribution ring being located adjacent to the top of the pressure vessel. A feed-water control valve, responsive to the steam demand of the load, is provided in the feedwater line to the distribution rings and regulates the amount of feed water flowing to each distribution ring, the proportion of water flowing to the submerged distribution ring being proportional to the steam demand of the load. This invention provides an automatic means exterior to the reactor to control the reactivity of the reactor over relatively long periods of time without relying upon movement of control rods or of other moving parts within the reactor structure.

Treshow, M.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

196

CONTROL FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>A control rod operating device in a nuclear reactor of the type in which the control rod is gradually withdrawn from the reactor to a position desired during stable operation is described. The apparatus is comprised essentially of a stop member movable in the direction of withdrawal of the control rod, a follower on the control rod engageable with the stop and means urging the follower against the stop in the direction of withdrawal. A means responsive to disengagement of the follower from the stop is provided for actuating the control rod to return to the reactor shut-down position.

Lichtenberger, H.V.; Cameron, R.A.

1959-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

Treshow, M.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

Daniels, F.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

200

New Jersey Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by Prime ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Jersey Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel All Sales/Deliveries by Prime Supplier (Thousand Gallons per Day) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Prime Supplier Report, March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration/Prime Supplier Report, March 2013 Administration/Prime Supplier Report, March 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 4,100 4,400 4,700 5,000 5,300 5,600 5,900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '13 to Jul '13: 0.2% Jul '12 to Jul '13: 1.9% YTD '12 to YTD '13: 2.0% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '13 to Jul '13: 8.3% Jul '12 to Jul '13: -10.2% YTD '12 to YTD '13: -8.6% 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

202

CONVECTION REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

1960-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

203

Microsoft Word - power_reactors_briggs.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Most common - Boiling Water and Pressurized Most common - Boiling Water and Pressurized Water Reactors About 80% of the world's nuclear reactors used for generating electricity are either boiling water reactors or pressurized water reactors. Of these, about 30% are boiling water reactors and 70% are pressurized water reactors. All power reactors currently in use in the United States are of these two types. Both types of reactors have been very successfully used for reliable, on-demand, emissions-free electricity generation for decades. How does a boiling water reactor work? Water flows from the bottom of the fuel to the top of the fuel, and as it moves past the fuel, it carries away the heat produced by the

204

Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

None

1981-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

206

REACTOR COOLING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

Quackenbush, C.F.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor fuel element of the capillary tube type is described. The element consists of a thin walled tube, sealed at both ends, and having an interior coatlng of a fissionable material, such as uranium enriched in U-235. The tube wall is gas tight and is constructed of titanium, zirconium, or molybdenum.

Kesselring, K.A.; Seybolt, A.U.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel plate is designed for incorporation into control rods of the type utilized in high-flux test reactors. The fuel plate is designed so that the portion nearest the poison section of the control rod contains about one-half as much fissionable material as in the rest of the plate, thereby eliminating dangerous flux peaking in that portion. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1963-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

Wigner, E.P.

1958-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mitigating the risk of information leakage in a two-level supply chain through optimal supplier selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information leakage in supply chains is drawing more and more attention in supply chain management. Unlike existing research, which usually focuses on the effect of information leakage on the supply chain's material and information flow, this paper aims ... Keywords: Inference, Information leakage, Information sharing, Optimal supplier selection, Risk mitigation

Da Yong Zhang; Xinlin Cao; Lingyu Wang; Yong Zeng

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Impact of Product, Market, and Relationship Characteristics on Interorganizational System Integration in Manufacturer-Supplier Dyads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Firms are increasingly using collaborative systems to enhance supply-chain visibility. A key emphasis of these interorganizational systems (IOS) is to improve the coordination between buyers and suppliers through electronic integration. While such IOS ... Keywords: Collaborative Systems, Electronic Integration, Interorganizational Systems, Supply Chains, Survey Research

Varun Grover; Khawaja Saeed

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Reactor thrust during boost in a low altitude trajectory  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents thrust calculations for low altitude trajectories for a Tory II-C type propulsion reactor.

Moyer, J.H.

1962-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

213

Possible fusion reactor. [Movable plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A scheme to improve performance characteristics of a tokamak-type fusion reactor is proposed. Basically, the tokamak-type plasma could be moved around so that the plasma could be heated by compression, brought to the region where the blanket surrounds the plasma, and moved so as to keep wall loading below the acceptable limit. This idea should be able to help to economize a fusion reactor.

Yoshikawa, S.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

To: University administrators responsible for code of conduct and licensing issues From: The Members of the Designated Suppliers Program (DSP) Working Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The Members of the Designated Suppliers Program (DSP) Working Group Date: September 29, 2006 Re: Revisions to the DSP The Designated Suppliers Program (DSP) Working Group has been meeting since March of this year articulated support for the DSP and expressed a commitment to work together to move the program forward

Holsinger, Kent

215

Third Party Nuclear Liability: The Case of a Supplier in the United Kingdom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The law surrounding third party nuclear liability is important to all parties in the nuclear supply chain whether they are providing decommissioning services, project management expertise or a new reactor. This paper examines third party nuclear...

Thomas, Anthony; Heffron, Raphael J.

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

216

THERMAL NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors of the graphite moderated air cooled type in which canned slugs or rods of fissile material are employed are discussed. Such a reactor may be provided with a means for detecting dust particles in the exhausted air. The means employed are lengths of dust absorbent cord suspended in vertical holes in the shielding structure above each vertical coolant flow channel to hang in the path of the cooling air issuing from the channels, and associated spindles and drive motors for hauling the cords past detectors, such as Geiger counters, for inspecting the cords periodically. This design also enables detecting the individual channel in which a fault condition may have occurred.

Fenning, F.W.; Jackson, R.F.

1957-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

217

MEANS FOR SHIELDING REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor of the heterageneous, heavy water moderated type is described. The reactor is comprised of a plurality of vertically disposed fuel element tubes extending through a tank of heavy water moderator and adapted to accommodate a flow of coolant water in contact with the fuel elements. A tank containing outgoing coolant water is disposed above the core to function is a radiation shield. Unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon is floated on top of the water in the shield tank to reduce to a minimum the possibility of the occurrence of explosive gaseous mixtures resulting from the neutron bombardment of the water in the shield tank.

Garrison, W.M.; McClinton, L.T.; Burton, M.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The reactor materials crosscut effort will enable the development of innovative and revolutionary materials and provide broad-based, modern materials science that will benefit all four DOE-NE...

220

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

Wigner, E.P.

1960-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

222

REACTOR SHIELD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

Grebe, J.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Research Reactor BMRR The last of the Lab's reactors, the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), was shut down in December 2000. The BMRR was a three megawatt...

225

Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for a sodium cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The sodium cooled nuclear reactor is of the type having a reactor vessel liner separating the reactor hot pool on the upstream side of an intermediate heat exchanger and the reactor cold pool on the downstream side of the intermediate heat exchanger. The improvement includes a flow path across the reactor vessel liner flow gap which dissipates core heat across the reactor vessel and containment vessel responsive to a casualty including the loss of normal heat removal paths and associated shutdown of the main coolant liquid sodium pumps. In normal operation, the reactor vessel cold pool is inlet to the suction side of coolant liquid sodium pumps, these pumps being of the electromagnetic variety. The pumps discharge through the core into the reactor hot pool and then through an intermediate heat exchanger where the heat generated in the reactor core is discharged. Upon outlet from the heat exchanger, the sodium is returned to the reactor cold pool. The improvement includes placing a jet pump across the reactor vessel liner flow gap, pumping a small flow of liquid sodium from the lower pressure cold pool into the hot pool. The jet pump has a small high pressure driving stream diverted from the high pressure side of the reactor pumps. During normal operation, the jet pumps supplement the normal reactor pressure differential from the lower pressure cold pool to the hot pool. Upon the occurrence of a casualty involving loss of coolant pump pressure, and immediate cooling circuit is established by the back flow of sodium through the jet pumps from the reactor vessel hot pool to the reactor vessel cold pool. The cooling circuit includes flow into the reactor vessel liner flow gap immediate the reactor vessel wall and containment vessel where optimum and immediate discharge of residual reactor heat occurs.

Hunsbedt, Anstein N. (Los Gatos, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

1962-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

Young, G.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories pulse nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has designed, constructed and operated bare metal Godiva-type and pool-type pulse reactors since 1961. The reactor facilities were designed to support a wide spectrum of research, development, and testing activities associated with weapon and reactor systems.

Schmidt, T.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reuscher, J.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Power Burst Facility (PBF) Reactor Reactor Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Decommissioning Click here to view Click here to view Reactor Decommissioning Click on an image to enlarge A crane removes the reactor vessel from the Power Burst Facility...

232

Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

Ougouag, Abderrafi M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Shelley, ID); Gougar, Hans D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor is described comprising a plurality of horizontal trays containing a solution of a fissionable material, the trays being sleeved on a vertical tube which contains a vertically-reciprocable control rod, a gas-tight chamber enclosing the trays, and means for conducting vaporized moderator from the chamber and for replacing vaporized moderator in the trays. (AEC)

Wigner, E.P.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

234

Neutronic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

Wende, Charles W. J. (West Chester, PA)

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

235

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described that includes spaced vertical fuel elements centrally disposed in a pressure vessel, a mass of graphite particles in the pressure vessel, means for fluidizing the graphite particles, and coolant tubes in the pressure vessel laterally spaced from the fuel elements. (AEC)

Post, R.G.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

Starr, C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

238

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

Anderson, H.L.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONSTRUCTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cover device is described for the fuel element receiving tube of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, water cooled type wherein said tubes are arranged in a moderator with their longitudinal axes vertical. The cover is provided with means to support a rod-type fuel element from the bottom thereof and means to lock the cover in place, the latter being adapted for remote operation. This cover device is easily removable and seals the opening in the upper end of the fuel tube against leakage of coolant.

Vernon, H.C.; Goett, J.J.

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

CRC handbook of nuclear reactors calculations. Vol. II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook breaks down the complex field of nuclear reactor calculations into major steps. Each step presents a detailed analysis of the problems to be solved, the parameters involved, and the elaborate computer programs developed to perform the calculations. This book bridges the gap between nuclear reactor theory and the implementation of that theory, including the problems to be encountered and the level of confidence that should be given to the methods described. Volume II: Monte Carlo Calculations for Nuclear Reactors. In-Core Management of Four Reactor Types. In-Core Management in CANDU-PHW Reactors. Reactor Dynamics. The Theory of Neutron Leakage in Reactor Lattices. Index.

Ronen, Y.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Advances in reactor physics education: Visualization of reactor parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern computer codes allow detailed neutron transport calculations. In combination with advanced 3D visualization software capable of treating large amounts of data in real time they form a powerful tool that can be used as a convenient modern educational tool for reactor operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for fuel management, core analysis and irradiation planning. The paper treats the visualization of neutron transport in different moderators, neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIGA type research reactor and a typical PWR). The distributions are calculated with MCNP and CORD-2 computer codes and presented using Amira software. (authors)

Snoj, L.; Kromar, M.; Zerovnik, G. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

REACTOR UNLOADING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent is related to gas cooled reactors wherein the fuel elements are disposed in vertical channels extending through the reactor core, the cooling gas passing through the channels from the bottom to the top of the core. The invention is a means for unloading the fuel elements from the core and comprises dump values in the form of flat cars mounted on wheels at the bottom of the core structure which support vertical stacks of fuel elements. When the flat cars are moved, either manually or automatically, for normal unloading purposes, or due to a rapid rise in the reproduction ratio within the core, the fuel elements are permtted to fall by gravity out of the core structure thereby reducing the reproduction ratio or stopping the reaction as desired.

Leverett, M.C.

1958-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

243

Neutronic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels.

Lewis, Warren R. (Richland, WA)

1978-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active portion assembly for a fast neutron reactor is described wherein physical distortions resulting in adverse changes in the volume-to-mass ratio are minimized. A radially expandable locking device is disposed within a cylindrical tube within each fuel subassembly within the active portion assembly, and clamping devices expandable toward the center of the active portion assembly are disposed around the periphery thereof. (AEC)

Koch, L.J.; Rice, R.E. Jr.; Denst, A.A.; Rogers, A.J.; Novick, M.

1961-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

1958-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors of the homogeneous liquid fuel type are discussed. The reactor is comprised of an elongated closed vessel, vertically oriented, having a critical region at the bottom, a lower chimney structure extending from the critical region vertically upwardly and surrounded by heat exchanger coils, to a baffle region above which is located an upper chimney structure containing a catalyst functioning to recombine radiolyticallydissociated moderator gages. In operation the liquid fuel circulates solely by convection from the critical region upwardly through the lower chimney and then downwardly through the heat exchanger to return to the critical region. The gases formed by radiolytic- dissociation of the moderator are carried upwardly with the circulating liquid fuel and past the baffle into the region of the upper chimney where they are recombined by the catalyst and condensed, thence returning through the heat exchanger to the critical region.

Hammond, R.P.; Busey, H.M.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

249

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" 8 Number of Establishments by Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity","Electricity",,,"Natural Gas","Natural Gas",,,"Steam","Steam" " "," ",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both"," ",," "

250

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA); Rowan, William J. (Monroeville, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

ELECTRONUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronuclear reactor is described in which a very high-energy particle accelerator is employed with appropriate target structure to produce an artificially produced material in commercial quantities by nuclear transformations. The principal novelty resides in the combination of an accelerator with a target for converting the accelerator beam to copious quantities of low-energy neutrons for absorption in a lattice of fertile material and moderator. The fertile material of the lattice is converted by neutron absorption reactions to an artificially produced material, e.g., plutonium, where depleted uranium is utilized as the fertile material.

Lawrence, E.O.; McMillan, E.M.; Alvarez, L.W.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

Photocatalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photocatalytic reactor for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane.

Bischoff, Brian L. (Knoxville, TN); Fain, Douglas E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stockdale, John A. D. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Table A23. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" 3. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" " of Supplier, Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,," (Million kWh)",," (Billion Btu)",," (Billion cu ft)" ,," -------------------------",," -------------------------",," ---------------------------------------",,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Transmission","Other","Row"

254

Table A27. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas by Type" " of Supplier, Census Region, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ," (Million (kWh)",," (Billion Btu)",," (Billion cu ft)" ," -----------------------",," -----------------------",," ------------------------------------",,,"RSE" ,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Transmission","Other","Row"

255

BOILER-SUPERHEATED REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear power reactor of the type in which a liquid moderator-coolant is transformed by nuclear heating into a vapor that may be used to drive a turbo- generator is described. The core of this reactor comprises a plurality of freely suspended tubular fuel elements, called fuel element trains, within which nonboiling pressurized liquid moderator-coolant is preheated and sprayed through orifices in the walls of the trains against the outer walls thereof to be converted into vapor. Passage of the vapor ovcr other unwetted portions of the outside of the fuel elements causes the steam to be superheated. The moderatorcoolant within the fuel elements remains in the liqUid state, and that between the fuel elements remains substantiaily in the vapor state. A unique liquid neutron-absorber control system is used. Advantages expected from the reactor design include reduced fuel element failure, increased stability of operation, direct response to power demand, and circulation of a minimum amount of liquid moderatorcoolant. (A.G.W.)

Heckman, T.P.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

TRIGA reactor operating experience  

SciTech Connect

The Oregon State TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) has been in operation 3 years. Last August it was upgraded from 250 kW to 1000 kW. This was accomplished with little difficulty. During the 3 years of operation no major problems have been experienced. Most of the problems have been minor in nature and easily corrected. They came from lazy susan (dry bearing), Westronics Recorder (dead spots in the range), The Reg Rod Magnet Lead-in Circuit (a new type lead-in wire that does not require the lead-in cord to coil during rod withdrawal hss been delivered, much better than the original) and other small corrections.

Anderson, T.V. [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

1970-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Physics problems of thermonuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

From topical conference on energy; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA (Nov 1973). A problem common to all controlled fusion reactors is that of the burning deuterium --tritium fuel under conditions of plasma confinement which approach the ideal limit as nearly as possible. After ignitlon, the balance between alpha- particle energy deposition and plasma losses (radiation plus thermal and particle diffusion) determines the stability or instability of the burn in toroidal systems. Tokamak systems are described both with unstable, injection-regulated burn cycles and stabilized steady-state burn conditions. In the theta-pinch reactor an unstable burn occurs, some, what regulated by high-beta plasma expansion, which is quenched by a programmed plasma decompression. The plasma expansion during the constant-pressure burn provides direct'' conversion of plasma thermonuclear heat to electrical output, in addition to the electrical power derived from the neutron energy through conventional thermal conversion equipment. The open-ended mirror reactor is characterized by a direct conversion system for recovering end-loss plasma energy and converting it to electrical energy for reinjection into the plasma. This allows a favorable reactor energy balance and an amplification factor Q (= thermonuclear energy output/injected plasma energy) which is compatible with classical collisional losses. For the three reactor types considered the ramifications of burn and confinement conditions for reactor configuration, energy balance, economy, fuel handling, materials problems, and environmentalradiological factors are considered. (auth)

Ribe, F.L.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling  

SciTech Connect

Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Relicensing of the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) is owned and operated by MIT, a nonprofit university. The current reactor, MITR-II, is a 5-MW, light water-cooled and heavy water-moderated reactor that uses materials test reactor-type fuel. Documents supporting application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for relicensing of MITR were submitted in July 1999. A power upgrade from 5 to 6 MW was also requested. The relicensed reactor (MITR-III) will be the third reactor operated by MIT. This paper describes MITR-I and MITR-II, and design options considered for MITR-III. Selected problems addressed during the relicensing studies are also described, namely core tank aging evaluation, neutronic analysis, thermal-hydraulic analysis, and step reactivity insertion analysis.

Lin-Wen Hu; John A. Bernard; Susan Tucker

2000-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

260

CONTROL MEANS FOR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor includes a tank just below the reactor, tubes extending from the tank into the reactor, and a thermally expansible liquid neutron absorbent material in the tank. The liquid in the tank is exposed to a beam of neutrons from the reactor which heats the liquid causing it to expand into the reactor when the neutron flux in the reactor rises above a predetermincd danger point. Boron triamine may be used for this purpose.

Manley, J.H.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nuclear reactor characteristics and operational history  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear > U.S. reactor operation status tables Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables Release date: November 22, 2011 Next release date: November 2012 See also: Table 2. Ownership Data, Table 3. Characteristics and Operational History Table 1. Nuclear Reactor, State, Type, Net Capacity, Generation, and Capacity Factor PDF XLS Plant/Reactor Name Generator ID State Type 2009 Summer Capacity Net MW(e)1 2010 Annual Generation Net MWh2 Capacity Factor Percent3 Arkansas Nuclear One 1 AR PWR 842 6,607,090 90 Arkansas Nuclear One 2 AR PWR 993 8,415,588 97 Beaver Valley 1 PA PWR 892 7,119,413 91 Beaver Valley 2 PA PWR 885 7,874,151 102 Braidwood Generation Station 1 IL PWR 1,178 9,196,689 89

262

Nuclear Reactor Accidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Accidents The accidents at the Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl nuclear reactors have triggered particularly intense concern about radiation hazards. The TMI accident,...

263

Principles of Reactor Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Physics M A Smith Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Engineering Division Phone: 630-252-9747, Email: masmith@anl.gov Abstract: Nuclear reactor physics deals with...

264

Type: New Title: “Advanced Reactor Thermal Hydraulic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... physical causes of resistance of plant cell walls to hydrolysis—the major technological challenge in the development of viable cellulosic bioethanol. ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

265

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power plant is described comprising a turbine and employing round cylindrical fuel rods formed of BeO and UO/sub 2/ and stacks of hexagonal moderator blocks of BeO provided with passages that loosely receive the fuel rods so that coolant may flow through the passages over the fuels to remove heat. The coolant may be helium or steam and fiows through at least one more heat exchanger for producing vapor from a body of fluid separate from the coolant, which fluid is to drive the turbine for generating electricity. By this arrangement the turbine and directly associated parts are free of particles and radiations emanating from the reactor. (AEC)

Daniels, F.

1962-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

266

NUCLEAR TRAINING REACTOR. Preliminary Report and Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Complete descriptions of the reactor, building, and site are given. Reactor operation, bazards associated with the reactor, and the maximum credible accident are discussed. The reactor is a BSR swimming pool type with a design power level of 10 kw and a maximum thermal flux in the fuel region of 2.23 x 10/ sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/-sec. (W.D.M.)

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Reactor and method of operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor having a flattened reactor activity curve across the reactor includes fuel extending over a lesser portion of the fuel channels in the central portion of the reactor than in the remainder of the reactor.

Wheeler, John A. (Princeton, NJ)

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

Reactor safety method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

Vachon, Lawrence J. (Clairton, PA)

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

269

NEUTRONIC REACTOR MANIPULATING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cable connecting a control rod in a reactor with a motor outside the reactor for moving the rod, and a helical conduit in the reactor wall, through which the cable passes are described. The helical shape of the conduit prevents the escape of certain harmful radiations from the reactor. (AEC)

Ohlinger, L.A.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Optimizing Energy Bids for a Single Supplier in a Spot Electricity Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an enhanced formulation and a new solution technique for modeling electricity market decision making. The enhanced formulation relaxes the typical assumption that the bid functions of supply and demand agents are linear. In particular, the model is extended to the class of piecewise-linear bid functions, which includes staircase functions as a special case. Such functions are much more representative of the types of bid functions used in practice, and accommodating more-realistic bid...

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

271

Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor concept.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor and hot cell facility concepts. The reactor proposed is designed to be capable of producing 100% of the U.S. demand for the medical isotope {sup 99}Mo. The concept is novel in that the fuel for the reactor and the targets for the {sup 99}Mo production are the same. There is no driver core required. The fuel pins that are in the reactor core are processed on a 7 to 21 day irradiation cycle. The fuel is low enriched uranium oxide enriched to less than 20% {sup 235}U. The fuel pins are approximately 1 cm in diameter and 30 to 40 cm in height, clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy). Approximately 90 to 150 fuel pins are arranged in the core in a water pool {approx}30 ft deep. The reactor power level is 1 to 2 MW. The reactor concept is a simple design that is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7 to 21 days. The fuel fabrication, reactor design and operation, and {sup 99}Mo production processing use well-developed technologies that minimize the technological and licensing risks. There are no impediments that prevent this type of reactor, along with its collocated hot cell facility, from being designed, fabricated, and licensed today.

Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An Engineering Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A relatively inexpensive reactor for the specific purpose of testing a sub-critical portion of another reactor under conditions that would exist during actual operation is discussed. It is concluded that an engineering tool for reactor development work that bridges the present gap between exponential and criticality experiments and the actual full scale operating reactor is feasible. An example of such a test reactor which would not entail development effort to ut into operation is depicted.

Fahrner, T.; Stoker, R.L.; Thomson, A.S.

1951-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

Economic analysis of nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

The report presents several methods for estimating the power costs of nuclear reactors. When based on a consistent set of economic assumptions, total power costs may be useful in comparing reactor alternatives. The principal items contributing to the total power costs of a nuclear power plant are: (1) capital costs, (2) fuel cycle costs, (3) operation and maintenance costs, and (4) income taxes and fixed charges. There is a large variation in capital costs and fuel expenses among different reactor types. For example, the standard once-through LWR has relatively low capital costs; however, the fuel costs may be very high if U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is expensive. In contrast, the FBR has relatively high capital costs but low fuel expenses. Thus, the distribution of expenses varies significantly between these two reactors. In order to compare power costs, expenses and revenues associated with each reactor may be spread over the lifetime of the plant. A single annual cost, often called a levelized cost, may be obtained by the methods described. Levelized power costs may then be used as a basis for economic comparisons. The paper discusses each of the power cost components. An exact expression for total levelized power costs is derived. Approximate techniques of estimating power costs will be presented.

Owen, P.S.; Parker, M.B.; Omberg, R.P.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM. PART III. BOOK I. STATUS REPORT ON FAST REACTORS AS OF 1959  

SciTech Connect

A description of fast reactor types is given and the objectives of the AEC program on fast reactors are outlined. General research and development programs completed and in process on physics, fuel and materials, heat transfer, fluid flow, coolant chemistry, reactor safety, and components and systems are discussed. Reactors completed, under design and construction, and under study are described. (W.D.M.) A general description of ship and power plant, tabulation of principle characteristics, economics, potential advances, and necessary research and development are discussed in detail. (W.D.M.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure...

277

Memorandum on Chemical Reactors and Reactor Hazards  

SciTech Connect

Two important problems in the investigation of reactor hazards are the chemical reactivity of various materials employed in reactor construction and the chracteristics of heat transfer under transient conditions, specifically heat transfer when driven by an exponentially increasing heat source (exp t/T). Although these problems are independent of each other, when studied in relation to reactor hazards they may occur in a closely coupled sequence. For example the onset of a dangerous chemical reactor may be due to structural failure of various reactor components under an exponentially rising heat source originating with a runaway nuclear reactor. For this reason, these two problems should eventually be studied together after an exploratory experimental survey has been made in which they are considered separately.

Mills, M.M.; Pearlman, H.; Ruebsamen, W.; Steele, G., Chrisney, J.

1951-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, which resulted from a contact with the United States Department of Energy, relates to a control mechanism for a nuclear reactor and, more particularly, to an assembly for selectively shifting different numbers of reactivity modifying rods into and out of the core of a nuclear reactor. It has been proposed heretofore to control the reactivity of a breeder reactor by varying the depth of insertion of control rods (e.g., rods containing a fertile material such as ThO/sub 2/) in the core of the reactor, thereby varying the amount of neutron-thermalizing coolant and the amount of neutron-capturing material in the core. This invention relates to a mechanism which can advantageously be used in this type of reactor control system.

Bollinger, L.R.

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1961  

SciTech Connect

BS>Data from examination of blade-type control rods which were used in BORAX are discussed. Operation and maintenance of EBWR is outlined. In work on Borax V, modifications for easier installation of reactor and components is outlined followed by discussion of superheat fuel element development, and fabrication of various reactor components. Borax reactor design is also reported along with information on development and testing. In research on sodiumcooled reactors, activities are summarized in the LPR III and LPR IV programs along with developmental work on EBR I and II. Studies on reactor safety are reported and activities in a program of nuclear technology and general support are outlined. (J.R.D.)

1961-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Update; Sodium advanced fast reactor (SAFR) concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the sodium advanced fast reactor (SAFR) concept developed by the team of Rockwell International, Combustion Engineering, and Bechtel during the 3-year period extending from January 1985 to December 1987 as one element in the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Program. In January 1988, the team was expanded to include Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., and the concept development was extended under DOE's Program for Improvement in Advanced Modular LMR Design. The SAFR plant concept employs a 450-MWe pool-type liquid metal cooled reactor as its basic module. The reactor assembly module is a standardized shop-fabricated unit that can be shipped to the plant site by barge for installation. Shop fabrication minimizes nuclear-grade field fabrication and reduces the plant construction schedule. Reactor modules can be used individually or in multiples at a given site to supply the needed generating capacity.

Oldenkamp, R.D.; Brunings, J.E. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (USA)); Guenther, E. (Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (US)); Hren, R. (Bechtel National Inc., San Francisco, CA (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Conceptual design study of spheromak reactors  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary design studies are carried out for a spheromak fusion reactor. Simplified circuit theory is applied to obtain characteristic relations among various parameters of the spheromak configuration for an aspect ratio A greater than or equal to 1.6. These relations are used to calculate the parameters for the conceptual designs of three types of fusion reactor: (1) DT two-component, (2) DT ignited, and, (3) catalyzed DD ignited reactors. With a total wall loading of approx. 4 MWm/sup -2/, it is found that edge magnetic fields of only approx. 4T (DT) and approx. 9T (cat. DD) are required for ignited reactors of one-meter plasma (minor) radius with output powers in the gigawatt range. Assessment of various methods of generating reactor-grade spheromak plasmas is discussed briefly.

Katsurai, M.; Yamada, M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

POWER GENERATING NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to reactor systems of the type wherein the cooiing medium is a liquid which is converted by the heat of the reaction to steam which is conveyed directly to a pnime mover such as a steam turbine driving a generatore after which it is condensed and returred to the coolant circuit. In this design, the reactor core is disposed within a tank for containing either a slurry type fuel or an aggregation of solid fuel elements such as elongated rods submerged in a liquid moderator such as heavy water. The top of the tank is provided with a nozzle which extends into an expansion chamber connected with the upper end of the tank, the coolant being maintained in the expansion chamber at a level above the nozzle and the steam being formed in the expansion chamber.

Vernon, H.C.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dec '06 to Jan '07: +9.7% Dec '06 to Jan '07: +9.7% Jan '06 to Jan '07: +2.1% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.1% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '06 to Jan '07: +18.7% Jan '06 to Jan '07: -1.4% YTD '06 to YTD '07: -1.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '06 to Jan '07: -2.7% Jan '06 to Jan '07: +0.9% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.9% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '06 to Jan '07: -3.8% Jan '06 to Jan '07: +2.6% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.6%

284

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr '06 to May '06: +1.5% Apr '06 to May '06: +1.5% May '05 to May '06: +1.4% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -0.3% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '06 to May '06: +7.0% May '05 to May '06: +2.8% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -12.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '06 to May '06: -0.4% May '05 to May '06: -3.9% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -2.6% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '06 to May '06: +0.8% May '05 to May '06: -2.3% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -0.8%

285

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar '08 to Apr '08: +3.7% Mar '08 to Apr '08: +3.7% Apr '07 to Apr '08: +1.8% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -3.5% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '08 to Apr '08: +6.7% Apr '07 to Apr '08 -22.4% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -21.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '08 to Apr '08: +4.8% Apr '07 to Apr '08: -0.5% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -2.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '08 to Apr '08: +2.1% Apr '07 to Apr '08: -1.0% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -2.4%

286

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May '06 to Jun '06: -0.6% May '06 to Jun '06: -0.6% Jun '05 to Jun '06: -0.7% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -0.3% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '06 to Jun '06: -9.0% Jun '05 to Jun '06: -22.8% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -13.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '06 to Jun '06: +5.1% Jun '05 to Jun '06: -4.7% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -3.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2004 2005 2006 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '06 to Jun '06: +2.5% Jun '05 to Jun '06: -2.0% YTD '05 to YTD '06: -1.1%

287

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,100 4,100 4,400 4,700 5,000 5,300 5,600 5,900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 2009 2001 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '11 to Mar '11: -1.4% Mar '10 to Mar '11: +1.0% YTD '10 to YTD '11: +2.4% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2009 2001 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '11 to Mar '11: +0.8% Mar '10 to Mar '11: -1.7% YTD '10 to YTD '11: -7.3% 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 2009 2001 2011 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '11 to Mar '11: +7.0% Mar '10 to Mar '11: -0.7% YTD '10 to YTD '11: +0.5% 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov

288

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb '08 to Mar '08: -4.4% Feb '08 to Mar '08: -4.4% Mar '07 to Mar '08: -7.3% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -5.2% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '08 to Mar '08: -10.3% Mar '07 to Mar '08 -24.3% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -21.0% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '08 to Mar '08: -0.4% Mar '07 to Mar '08: -3.1% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -2.5% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb '08 to Mar '08: +0.2% Mar '07 to Mar '08: -3.5% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -2.9%

289

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May '99 to June '99: +5.7% May '99 to June '99: +5.7% June '98 to June '99: +5.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.8% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '99 to June '99: +3.3% June '98 to June '99: +0.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '99 to June '99: +2.7% June '98 to June '99: -0.6% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.5% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '99 to June '99: +7.9% June '98 to June '99: +4.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.8%

290

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul '09 to Aug '09: -1.8% Jul '09 to Aug '09: -1.8% Aug '08 to Aug '09: -9.7% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -10.2% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '09 to Aug '09: -8.4% Aug '08 to Aug '09: -4.5% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -5.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '09 to Aug '09: -1.9% Aug '08 to Aug '09: -2.4% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -6.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '09 to Aug '09: -1.1% Aug '08 to Aug '09: +1.3% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -0.2%

291

X:\L6046\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May '08 to Jun '08: -1.7% May '08 to Jun '08: -1.7% Jun '07 to Jun '08: -3.0% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -3.6% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '08 to Jun '08: +3.9% Jun '07 to Jun '08 -16.6% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -21.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '08 to Jun '08: +5.0% Jun '07 to Jun '08: -1.4% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -1.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2006 2007 2008 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '08 to Jun '08: -0.8% Jun '07 to Jun '08: -6.6% YTD '07 to YTD '08: -3.5%

292

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar. '99 to Apr. '99: -10.2% Mar. '99 to Apr. '99: -10.2% Apr. '98 to Apr. '99: +9.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.8% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar. '99 to Apr. '99: +1.9% Apr. '98 to Apr. '99: +1.9% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar. '99 to Apr. '99: +2.7% Apr. '98 to Apr. '99: +0.9% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar. '99 to Apr. '99: -25.6% Apr. '98 to Apr. '99: +6.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.5%

293

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct '07 to Nov '07: -3.0% Oct '07 to Nov '07: -3.0% Nov '06 to Nov '07: +3.1% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.4% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '07 to Nov '07: +5.2% Nov '06 to Nov '07 -1.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +5.6% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '07 to Nov '07: -2.6% Nov '06 to Nov '07: +4.6% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.2% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '07 to Nov '07: -2.5% Nov '06 to Nov '07: -1.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.2%

294

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug '09 to Sep '09: +6.3% Aug '09 to Sep '09: +6.3% Sep '08 to Sep '09: -5.4% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -9.7% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '09 to Sep '09: -2.0% Sep '08 to Sep '09: -4.1% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -5.5% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '09 to Sep '09: -1.3% Sep '08 to Sep '09: +3.5% YTD '08 to YTD '09: -5.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2007 2008 2009 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '09 to Sep '09: -2.0% Sep '08 to Sep '09: +4.1% YTD '08 to YTD '09: +0.2%

295

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\current\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr. '99 to May '99: -2.9% Apr. '99 to May '99: -2.9% May '98 to May '99: +8.6% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.4% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr. '99 to May '99: +1.0% May '98 to May '99: +1.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.5% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr. '99 to May '99: +2.7% May '98 to May '99: +0.9% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr. '99 to May '99: -18.0% May '98 to May '99: +5.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.2%

296

Basic and Applied Science Research Reactors - Reactors designed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th...

297

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel-breeder fuel element was developed for a nuclear reactor wherein discrete particles of fissionable material are dispersed in a matrix of fertile breeder material. The fuel element combines the advantages of a dispersion type and a breeder-type. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1962-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

NUCLEAR REACTOR COMPENENT CLADDING MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel elements and coolant tubes used in nuclear reactors of the heterogeneous, water-cooled type are described, wherein the coolant tubes extend through the moderator and are adapted to contain the fuel elements. The invention comprises forming the coolant tubes and the fuel element cladding material from an alloy of aluminum and nickel, or an alloy of aluminum, nickel, alloys are selected to prevent intergranular corrosion of these components by water at temperatures up to 35O deg C.

Draley, J.E.; Ruther, W.E.

1959-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

299

Attrition reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxvile, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Reactor Sharing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress achieved at the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) facility through the US Department of Energy's University Reactor Sharing Program is reported for the period of 1991--1992.

Vernetson, W.G.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Attrition reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

302

Uncertainty quantification approaches for advanced reactor analyses.  

SciTech Connect

The original approach to nuclear reactor design or safety analyses was to make very conservative modeling assumptions so as to ensure meeting the required safety margins. Traditional regulation, as established by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission required conservatisms which have subsequently been shown to be excessive. The commission has therefore moved away from excessively conservative evaluations and has determined best-estimate calculations to be an acceptable alternative to conservative models, provided the best-estimate results are accompanied by an uncertainty evaluation which can demonstrate that, when a set of analysis cases which statistically account for uncertainties of all types are generated, there is a 95% probability that at least 95% of the cases meet the safety margins. To date, nearly all published work addressing uncertainty evaluations of nuclear power plant calculations has focused on light water reactors and on large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) analyses. However, there is nothing in the uncertainty evaluation methodologies that is limited to a specific type of reactor or to specific types of plant scenarios. These same methodologies can be equally well applied to analyses for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and to liquid metal reactors, and they can be applied to steady-state calculations, operational transients, or severe accident scenarios. This report reviews and compares both statistical and deterministic uncertainty evaluation approaches. Recommendations are given for selection of an uncertainty methodology and for considerations to be factored into the process of evaluating uncertainties for advanced reactor best-estimate analyses.

Briggs, L. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

303

NEUTRONIC REACTOR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a nuclear reactor power plant incorporating an air-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated, pebble bed reactor. According to the invention means are provided for circulating a flow of air through tubes in the reactor to a turbine and for directing a sidestream of the circu1ating air through the pebble bed to remove fission products therefrom as well as assist in cooling the reactor. (AEC)

Metcalf, H.E.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

304

High solids fermentation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO); Grohmann, Karel (Littleton, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO); Richard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

FAST NEUTRON REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor comprising fissionable material in concentration sufficiently high so that the average neutron enengy within the reactor is at least 25,000 ev is described. A natural uranium blanket surrounds the reactor, and a moderating reflector surrounds the blanket. The blanket is thick enough to substantially eliminate flow of neutrons from the reflector.

Soodak, H.; Wigner, E.P.

1961-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Friction pressure drop measurements and flow distribution analysis for LEU conversion study of MIT Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Nuclear Research Reactor (MITR) is the only research reactor in the United States that utilizes plate-type fuel elements with longitudinal fins to augment heat transfer. Recent studies on the conversion to low-enriched ...

Wong, Susanna Yuen-Ting

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Level 1 transient model for a molybdenum-99 producing aqueous homogeneous reactor and its applicability to the tracy reactor  

SciTech Connect

Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group (B and W) has identified aqueous homogeneous reactors (AHRs) as a technology well suited to produce the medical isotope molybdenum 99 (Mo-99). AHRs have never been specifically designed or built for this specialized purpose. However, AHRs have a proven history of being safe research reactors. In fact, in 1958, AHRs had 'a longer history of operation than any other type of research reactor using enriched fuel' and had 'experimentally demonstrated to be among the safest of all various type of research reactor now in use [1].' A 'Level 1' model representing B and W's proposed Medical Isotope Production System (MIPS) reactor has been developed. The Level 1 model couples a series of differential equations representing neutronics, temperature, and voiding. Neutronics are represented by point reactor kinetics while temperature and voiding terms are axially varying (one-dimensional). While this model was developed specifically for the MIPS reactor, its applicability to the Japanese TRACY reactor was assessed. The results from the Level 1 model were in good agreement with TRACY experimental data and found to be conservative over most of the time domains considered. The Level 1 model was used to study the MIPS reactor. An analysis showed the Level 1 model agreed well with a more complex computational model of the MIPS reactor (a FETCH model). Finally, a significant reactivity insertion was simulated with the Level 1 model to study the MIPS reactor's time-dependent response. (authors)

Nygaard, E. T. [Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group, 800 Main Street, Lynchburg, VA 24504 (United States); Williams, M. M. R. [Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Angelo, P. L. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Argonaut Reactor - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne Reactors > Training Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

310

Nuclear reactor overflow line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The overflow line for the reactor vessel of a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor includes means for establishing and maintaining a continuous bleed flow of coolant amounting to 5 to 10% of the total coolant flow through the overflow line to prevent thermal shock to the overflow line when the reactor is restarted following a trip. Preferably a tube is disposed concentrically just inside the overflow line extending from a point just inside the reactor vessel to an overflow tank and a suction line is provided opening into the body of liquid metal in the reactor vessel and into the annulus between the overflow line and the inner tube.

Severson, Wayne J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Reactor vessel support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. RADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

313

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

314

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Sandia Pulsed Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia scientist John Ford places fuel rods in the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) test reactor - a reactor stripped down to its simplest form. The Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) provides a flexible, shielded location for performing critical experiments that employ different reactor core configurations and fuel types. The facility is also available for hands-on nuclear criticality safety training. Research and other activities The 7% series, an evaluation of various core characteristics for higher commercial-fuel enrichment, is currently under way at the SPRF/CX. Past critical experiments at the SPRF/CX have included the Burnup Credit

315

NAVAL REACTORS PHYSICS HANDBOOK. VOLUME I. SELECTED BASIC TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to present the most pertinent parts of the body of physics knowledge which has been built up in the course of the Naval and Shippingport (PWR) Reactor Programs, with the aim of providing a background of understanding for those interested in nuclear core design. Volume 1 of this handbook was planned to bring together topics in the basic theoretical and experimental material which are of especially wide interest, including those common to both thermal and intermediate neutron energy reactor types. The physics design of light water-moderated and -cooled reactors is covered in Volume 2 (classified), and that of intermediate neutron-energy power reactors in Volume 3. The emphasis in Volume 1 is thus on light water reactor systems, and as many recent advances in reactor physics of the Naval and Shippingport Reactor Programs as possible have been included.

Radkowsky, A. ed.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Spinning fluids reactor  

SciTech Connect

A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fission reactors and materials  

SciTech Connect

The American-designed boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor dominate the designs currently in use and under construction worldwide. As in all energy systems, materials problems have appeared during service; these include stress-corrosion of stainless steel pipes and heat exchangers and questions regarding crack behavior in pressure vessels. To obtain the maximum potential energy from our limited uranium supplies is is essential to develop the fast breeder reactor. The materials in these reactors are subjected to higher temperatures and neutron fluxes but lower pressures than in the water reactors. The performance required of the fuel elements is more arduous in the breeder than in water reactors. Extensive materials programs are in progress in test reactors and in large test rigs to ensure that materials will be available to meet these conditions.

Frost, B.R.T.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Cao, Jun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

HEAVY WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes uranium fuel elements and a liquid coolant is described. The fuel elements are in the form of elongated tubes and are disposed within outer tubes extending through a tank containing heavy water, which acts as a moderator. The ends of the fuel tubes are connected by inlet and discharge headers, and liquid bismuth is circulated between the headers and through the fuel tubes for cooling. Helium is circulated through the annular space between the outer tubes in the tank and the fuel tubes to cool the water moderator to prevent boiling. The fuel tubes are covered with a steel lining, and suitable control means, heat exchange means, and pumping means for the coolants are provided to complete the reactor assembly.

Szilard, L.

1958-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

323

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

43,846.3 43,846.3 12,393.4 68,635.1 224,874.7 21,109.7 1,971.5 13,674.3 36,755.5 February ................................. 156,170.6 13,007.4 73,407.9 242,585.9 22,564.3 1,908.0 14,502.1 38,974.4 March ...................................... 165,609.8 10,734.4 75,581.8 251,926.0 23,380.4 1,710.6 14,702.1 39,793.1 April ........................................ 177,434.0 7,401.2 78,075.3 262,910.4 23,176.8 1,110.5 13,692.0 37,979.3 May ......................................... 174,708.3 7,068.3 80,019.0 261,795.6 23,132.0 1,104.4 14,390.1 38,626.5 June ........................................ 180,115.7 7,743.1 82,880.6 270,739.4 23,655.7 1,206.1 14,792.7 39,654.5 July ......................................... 180,612.4 7,571.9 82,769.1 270,953.3 23,780.4 1,164.4 14,979.1 39,923.9 August ....................................

324

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Oxygenated Reformulated Total Conventional Oxygenated Reformulated Total United States January ................................... 146,590.5 11,788.1 73,965.0 232,343.6 17,670.2 1,837.6 12,128.0 31,635.9 February ................................. 165,557.6 12,617.2 81,634.7 259,809.5 19,814.7 1,826.9 13,320.1 34,961.7 March ...................................... 174,538.0 10,254.9 86,250.1 271,043.0 18,683.5 1,353.6 12,352.3 32,389.4 April ........................................ 175,968.6 8,437.6 86,667.7 271,073.9 18,586.7 1,233.1 12,289.6 32,109.4 May ......................................... 186,155.2 8,456.3 87,548.4 282,159.9 19,801.8 1,235.1 12,873.4 33,910.2 June ........................................ 191,350.9 8,838.3 90,774.7 290,963.9 19,221.5 1,211.3 12,915.6 33,348.4

325

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

61,490.1 61,490.1 12,691.6 83,592.9 257,774.6 16,699.1 1,879.7 11,386.7 29,965.5 February ................................. 169,479.2 12,905.4 87,740.9 270,125.5 17,936.4 1,875.0 11,803.9 31,615.3 March ...................................... 176,634.0 9,994.4 88,685.4 275,313.7 18,499.9 1,406.0 11,830.5 31,736.4 April ........................................ 184,544.5 8,586.9 89,782.2 282,913.6 18,291.7 1,170.0 11,750.9 31,212.6 May ......................................... 190,405.7 8,372.2 92,647.4 291,425.3 17,928.5 1,121.5 11,450.6 30,500.7 June ........................................ 195,590.0 8,653.2 94,413.2 298,656.4 18,322.7 1,200.9 11,366.3 30,889.9 July ......................................... 193,054.1 8,392.8 92,267.7 293,714.6 18,077.0 1,311.4 11,188.0 30,576.5 August ....................................

326

ASI Supplier Evaluation Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 1 of 4 5 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 1 of 4 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Vendor Evaluation Record Document Number: ADMF-015 Rev. 11_0203 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ADMP-002, Vendor Selection and Management Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A ADMF-015 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 2 of 4 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_1016 Added section for vendors that will not be used due to non-conformance of material delivered. 08_1110 Removed section for vendors that will not be used due to non-conformance of material delivered. Do Not Use section will be placed on ADMF-016, Vendor List.

327

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1,233.1 12,289.6 32,109.4 May ... 186,155.2 8,456.3 87,548.4 282,159.9 19,801.8 1,235.1 12,873.4 33,910.2 June ......

328

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2,271.9 14,759.4 39,254.5 1999 Average ... 170,969.7 9,988.2 79,456.7 260,414.6 22,467.2 1,516.6 14,336.0 38,319.9 PAD District I January...

329

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,515.4 1,515.4 24,168.6 49,958.8 205,642.8 21,325.8 3,583.5 13,512.4 38,421.7 February ................................. 150,955.0 13,660.5 51,987.1 216,602.6 25,038.0 1,397.6 14,426.9 40,862.5 March ...................................... 163,625.6 5,783.8 52,023.6 221,433.1 26,758.2 374.3 14,421.6 41,554.1 April ........................................ 168,026.4 2,480.7 51,915.9 222,423.1 27,004.8 215.3 14,404.6 41,624.7 May ......................................... 176,606.8 2,535.4 54,024.9 233,167.2 27,876.2 223.5 14,812.1 42,911.8 June ........................................ 183,750.5 2,633.2 56,295.9 242,679.6 28,544.1 231.4 15,275.8 44,051.2 July ......................................... 178,005.9 2,548.4 53,761.7 234,316.0 28,345.2 228.4 15,005.0 43,578.6 August ....................................

330

Supplier Selection Management Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 1 of 9 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Vendor Selection and Management Process Document Number: ADMP-002 Rev. 11_0203 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): ADMF-009 Vendor Audit Plan, ADMF-010 Vendor Audit Checklist, ADMF-011 Vendor Audit Report, ADMF-015 Vendor Evaluation Record, ADMP-001 Procurement Process, ADMF-016 EOTA Vendor List, REG-003 Record Register ADMP-002 Vendor Selection and Management Process 11_0203 2 of 9 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_1110 Added verbiage and reference for ADMF-016, EOTA Vendor List to process.

331

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Oxygenated Reformulated Total Conventional Oxygenated Reformulated Total United States January ................................... 145,473.9 12,853.1 71,584.0 229,911.0 21,437.8 2,118.5 14,630.3 38,186.5 February ................................. 152,443.6 12,574.1 74,038.8 239,056.4 21,643.8 2,053.6 14,806.9 38,504.4 March ...................................... 159,368.9 9,240.4 75,709.6 244,318.9 22,934.3 1,391.4 14,926.4 39,252.1 April ........................................ 166,869.6 7,329.4 77,383.5 251,582.4 23,130.1 1,079.9 14,885.7 39,095.8 May ......................................... 168,973.6 7,229.8 77,450.7 253,654.2 23,375.0 1,046.4 15,162.5 39,583.9 June ........................................ 176,397.4 7,802.8 78,867.3 263,067.5 24,193.9 1,133.7 15,555.5 40,883.1

332

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

47,959.1 47,959.1 11,050.9 67,812.0 226,822.0 21,260.7 1,818.7 15,161.7 38,241.1 February ................................. 154,899.9 10,617.6 70,698.9 236,216.5 22,197.4 1,690.4 15,506.0 39,393.8 March ...................................... 162,738.2 6,536.2 71,600.9 240,875.3 23,091.5 984.2 15,507.0 39,582.7 April ........................................ 169,900.0 3,421.2 73,432.6 246,753.8 24,144.7 484.4 15,580.3 40,209.3 May ......................................... 170,818.8 4,569.6 73,375.3 248,763.8 24,330.4 617.2 15,767.0 40,714.6 June ........................................ 171,972.1 4,606.4 73,655.1 250,233.6 24,625.0 679.7 16,013.5 41,318.2 July ......................................... 178,120.4 4,586.2 75,480.7 258,187.3 26,160.7 674.2 16,449.8 43,284.8 August ....................................

333

Prime Supplier Report Historical  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1998 1999 January PDF January PDF February PDF February PDF March PDF March PDF April PDF April PDF May PDF May PDF June PDF June PDF July PDF July PDF August PDF August PDF...

334

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

229.8 - - 229.8 1,367.1 - - 1,367.1 October ... 241.1 - - 241.1 1,407.1 - - 1,407.1 November ... 238.4 - - 238.4...

335

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

13,621.8 279.0 14,394.5 1996 Average ... 321.0 6.9 7,031.4 2,531.9 241.1 2,772.9 9,804.4 200.0 10,332.3 Connecticut January ......

336

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 15,344.6 - 13,358.4 28,703.0 77,240.7 - 52,000.4 129,241.1 August ... 15,201.5 - 13,221.9 28,423.4 76,061.8 -...

337

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

47,959.1 11,050.9 67,812.0 226,822.0 21,260.7 1,818.7 15,161.7 38,241.1 February ... 154,899.9 10,617.6 70,698.9 236,216.5 22,197.4 1,690.4 15,506.0...

338

Prime Supplier Sales Volumes  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

203.8 97.9 - 301.7 1,770.6 698.9 - 2,469.5 2001 Average ... 241.1 36.7 - 277.8 2,168.5 307.0 - 2,475.5 Texas January ......

339

Prime Supplier Report Historical  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2013 January HTML PDF January HTML PDF February HTML PDF February HTML PDF March HTML PDF March HTML PDF April HTML PDF April HTML PDF May HTML PDF May HTML PDF June HTML PDF...

340

Supplier, Vendor Forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research and development laboratory, LANL seeks to do business with qualified companies that offer value and high quality products and services. Contact Small Business...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Economic analysis of nuclear power reactor dissemination to less developed nations with implications for nuclear proliferation  

SciTech Connect

An economic model is applied to the transfer of nuclear-power reactors from industrialized nations to the less developed nations. The model includes demand and supply factors and predicts the success of US nonproliferation positions and policies. It is concluded that economic forces dominate the transfer of power reactors to less developed nations. Our study shows that attempts to either restrict or promote the spread of nuclear-power technology by ignoring natural economic incentives would have only limited effect. If US policy is too restrictive, less developed nations will seek other suppliers and thereby lower US Influence substantially. Allowing less developed nations to develop nuclear-power technology as dictated by economic forces will result in a modest rate of transfer that should comply with nuclear-proliferation objectives.

Gustavson, R.L.; Howard, J.S. II

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Present Status Of Research Reactor Decommissioning Program In Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, Indonesia has 3 research reactors: MTR-type multipurpose reactor of 30 MW at Serpong site, TRIGA-type research reactor of 1 MW at Bandung site, and small TRIGA - type reactor of 100 kW at Yogyakarta Research Center. The oldest one is the TRIGA reactor at Bandung site, which went critical at 250 kW in 1964, then was operated at maximum of 1000 kW by 1971. The reactor has operated for a total of 35 years. There is no decision for decommissioning this reactor; however, slowly but surely, it will be an object for a near-future decommissioning program. Anticipation of the situation is necessary. For the Indonesian case, early decommissioning strategy for a research reactor and restricted use of the site for another nuclear installation is favorable under high land pricing, availability of radwaste repository, and cost analysis. Graphite from Triga reactor reflector is recommended for direct disposal after conditioning, without volume reduction treatment. Development of human ...

Mulyanto And Gunandjar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS  

SciTech Connect

Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

344

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

345

THERMAL NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel thermal reactor was designed in which a first reflector formed from a high atomic weight, nonmoderating material is disposed immediately adjacent to the reactor core. A second reflector composed of a moderating material is disposed outwardly of the first reflector. The advantage of this novel reflector arrangement is that the first reflector provides a high slow neutron flux in the second reflector, where irradiation experiments may be conducted with a small effect on reactor reactivity.

Spinrad, B.I.

1960-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

346

Improved vortex reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

347

Advanced Nuclear Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report describes technical modifications implemented by INVAP to improve the safety of the Research Reactors the company designs and builds.

Lolich, J.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

348

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

Isaksson, Juhani (Karhula, FI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

Isaksson, J.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Tokamak reactor first wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

351

HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

King, L.D.P.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Quick release latch for reactor scram  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple, reliable, and fast-acting means for releasing a control element and allowing it to be inserted rapidly into the core region of a nuclear reactor for scram purposes. A latch mechanism grips a coupling head on a nuclear control element to connect the control element to the control drive assembly. The latch mechanism is closed by tensioning a cable or rod with an actuator. The control element is released by de-energizing the actuator, providing fail-safe, rapid release of the control element to effect reactor shutdown. A sensing rod provides indication that the control element is properly positioned in the latch. Two embodiments are illustrated, one involving a collet-type latch mechanism, the other a pliers-type latch mechanism with the actuator located inside the reactor vessel.

Johnson, Melvin L. (Wichita, KS); Shawver, Bruce M. (San Jose, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Quick release latch for reactor scram  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple, reliable, and fast-acting means for releasing a control element and allowing it to be inserted rapidly into the core region of a nuclear reactor for scram purposes is described. A latch mechanism grips a coupling head on a nuclear control element to connect the control element to the control drive assembly. The latch mechanism is closed by tensioning a cable or rod with an actuator. The control element is released by de-energizing the actuator, providing fail-safe, rapid release of the control element to effect reactor shutdown. A sensing rod provides indication that the control element is properly positioned in the latch. Two embodiments are illustrated, one involving a collet- type latch mechanism, the other a pliers-type latch mechanism with the actuator located inside the reactor vessel. (auth)

Johnson, M.L.; Shawver, B.M.

1975-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hot Fuel Examination Facility's neutron radiography reactor  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory-West is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho, and is operated by the University of Chicago for the United States Department of Energy in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, LMFBR. The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both nondestructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the nondestructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography, which is provided by the NRAD reactor facility (a TRIGA type reactor) below the HFEF hot cell.

Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Hydraulics of honeycomb type orifices for flow zoning in FBR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) has commenced at Kalpakkam, INDIA. PFBR is a sodium cooled pool type reactor. PFBR core subassemblies (SA) are supported vertically inside the sleeves provided in the Grid plate (GP). The GP acts ... Keywords: cavitation, fast breeder reactor, flow zoning device, reynolds number, similarity, subassemblies

G. K. Pandey; D. Ramdasu; P. Anup Kumar; M. Thirumalai; G. Padmakumar; V. Prakash; C. Anandbabu; P. Kalyanasundaram; G. Vaidyanathan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Russian RBMK reactor design information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document concerns the systems, design, and operations of the graphite-moderated, boiling, water-cooled, channel-type (RBMK) reactors located in the former Soviet Union (FSU). The Russian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Safety Institute (NSI) in Moscow, Russia, researched specific technical questions that were formulated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and provided detailed technical answers to those questions. The Russian response was prepared in English by NSI in a question-and-answer format. This report presents the results of that technical exchange in the context they were received from the NSI organization. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is generating this document to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) community in responding to requests from FSU states, which are seeking Western technological and financial assistance to improve the safety systems of the Russian-designed reactors. This report expands upon information that was previously available to the United States through bilateral information exchanges, international nuclear society meetings, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reactor safety programs, and Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) reports. The response to the PNL questions have not been edited or reviewed for technical consistency or accuracy by PNL staff or other US organizations, but are provided for use by the DOE community in the form they were received.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Foreign Research Reactor/Domestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Research ReactorDomestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

358

Micro -Thermonuclear AB-Reactors for Aerospace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author offers several innovations that he first suggested publicly early in 1983 for the AB multi-reflex engine, space propulsion, getting energy from plasma, etc. (see: A. Bolonkin, Non-Rocket Space Launch and Flight, Elsevier, London, 2006, Chapters 12, 3A). It is the micro-thermonuclear AB-Reactors. That is new micro-thermonuclear reactor with very small fuel pellet that uses plasma confinement generated by multi-reflection of laser beam or its own magnetic field. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The author also suggests a new method of heating the power-making fuel pellet by outer electric current as well as new direct method of transformation of ion kinetic energy into harvestable electricity. These offered innovations dramatically decrease the size, weight and cost of thermonuclear reactor, installation, propulsion system and electric generator. Non-industrial countries can produce these researches and constructions. Currently, the author is researching the efficiency of these innovations for two types of the micro-thermonuclear reactors: multi-reflection reactor (ICF) and self-magnetic reactor (MCF).

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

359

ADMINISTRATION OF ORNL RESEARCH REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Organization of the ORNL Operations division for administration of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, the Low Intensity Testing Reactor, and the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor is described. (J.R.D.)

Casto, W.R.

1962-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

360

Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

Li, Qing, 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Production reactor characteristics  

SciTech Connect

Reactors for the production of special nuclear materials share many similarities with commercial nuclear power plants. Each relies on nuclear fission, uses uranium fuel, and produces large quantities of thermal power. However, there are some important differences in production reactor characteristics that may best be discussed in terms of mission, role, and technology.

Thiessen, C.W.; Hootman, H.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

NEUTRONIC REACTOR BURIAL ASSEMBLY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burial assembly is shown whereby an entire reactor core may be encased with lead shielding, withdrawn from the reactor site and buried. This is made possible by a five-piece interlocking arrangement that may be easily put together by remote control with no aligning of bolt holes or other such close adjustments being necessary.

Treshow, M.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Integral Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Lineberry, M.J. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

365

Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report This report documents the establishment of a technical review process and the findings of the Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) Technical Review Panel (TRP).1 The intent of the process is to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. A goal of the process is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. The process involved establishing evaluation criteria, conducting a pilot review, soliciting concept inputs from industry entities, reviewing the concepts by TRP members and compiling the results. The eight concepts received from industry spanned a range of reactor types

366

Nuclear Reactor Safeguards and Monitoring with Antineutrino Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cubic-meter-sized antineutrino detectors can be used to non-intrusively, robustly and automatically monitor and safeguard a wide variety of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors. Since the antineutrino spectra and relative yields of fissioning isotopes depend on the isotopic composition of the core, changes in composition can be observed without ever directly accessing the core itself. Information from a modest-sized antineutrino detector, coupled with the well-understood principles that govern the core's evolution in time, can be used to determine whether the reactor is being operated in an illegitimate way. A group at Sandia is currently constructing a one cubic meter antineutrino detector at the San Onofre reactor site in California to demonstrate these principles.

Adam Bernstein; Yifang Wang; Giorgio Gratta; Todd West

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

EPRI NMAC Maintainability Review of the International Gas-Turbine Modular Helium Reactor Power Conversion Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information of interest to the designers of modular helium-reactor-driven gas turbines and persons considering the purchase of this type of plant.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Alternatives to proposed replacement production reactors  

SciTech Connect

To insure adequate supplies of plutonium and tritium for defense purposes, an independent evaluation was made by Los Alamos National Laboratory of the numerous alternatives to the proposed replacement production reactors (RPR). This effort concentrated on the defense fuel cycle operation and its technical implications in identifying the principal alternatives for the 1990s. The primary options were identified as (1) existing commercial reactors, (2) existing and planned government-owned facilities (not now used for defense materials production), and (3) other RPRs (not yet proposed) such as CANDU or CANDU-type heavy-water reactors (HWR) for both plutonium and tritium production. The evaluation considered features and differences of various options that could influence choice of RPR alternatives. Barring a change in the US approach to civilian and defense fuel cycles and precluding existing commercial reactors at government-owned sites, the most significant alternatives were identified as a CANDU-type HWR at Savannah River Plant (SRP) site or the Three Mile Island commercial reactor with reprocessing capability at Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant and at SRP.

Cullingford, H.S.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Supercritical CO2 direct cycle Gas Fast Reactor (SC-GFR) concept.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) direct cycle gas fast reactor (SC-GFR) concept. The SC-GFR reactor concept was developed to determine the feasibility of a right size reactor (RSR) type concept using S-CO{sub 2} as the working fluid in a direct cycle fast reactor. Scoping analyses were performed for a 200 to 400 MWth reactor and an S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Although a significant amount of work is still required, this type of reactor concept maintains some potentially significant advantages over ideal gas-cooled systems and liquid metal-cooled systems. The analyses presented in this report show that a relatively small long-life reactor core could be developed that maintains decay heat removal by natural circulation. The concept is based largely on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) commercial power plants operated in the United Kingdom and other GFR concepts.

Wright, Steven Alan; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma (Computational Engineering Analysis, Albuquerque, NM); Al Rashdan, Ahmad (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Vernon, Milton E.; Fleming, Darryn D.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Progress on reactor programs and in general engineering research and development programs is summarized. Research and development are reported on water-cooled reactors including EBWR and Borax-V, sodium-cooled reactors including ZPR-III, IV, and IX, Juggernaut, and EBR-I and II. Other work included a review of fast reactor technology, and studies on nuclear superheat, thermal and fast reactor safety, and reactor physics. Effort was also devoted to reactor materials and fuels development, heat engineering, separation processes and advanced reactor concepts. (J.R.D.)

1961-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM. PART I. SUMMARY OF TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC STATUS AS OF 1959  

SciTech Connect

The current technical and economic status for each reactor concept in the Civilian Power Reactor Program is summarized. The individual techical status reports which present detailed information will be published by AEC as TID-8518. Included in this summary are: power costs for various reactor types versus coal- fired plants; construction schedule for heavy-water natural-U reactors; and annual program costs. (T.R.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Need for Standards & Productivity Improvement in the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Safety, environmental, security compliance ... nuclear plant sub-tier suppliers through the suppliers through the EPC and reactor vendors ...

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

License extension for the MIT research reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 8, 1995, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) amended the operating license for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) research reactor (MITR) by extending its expiration date from May 7, 1996, to August 8, 1999. This increase of 2.25 yr in the duration of the license was for the purpose of recapturing construction time. Extensions of this type have routinely been granted to power plants. The significance of the present action is that it is the first such extension ever granted to a research reactor. This paper describes the basis for the amendment request and the supporting safety analysis.

Bernard, J.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Nuclear reactor control column  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Slurry reactor design studies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Nuclear reactor reflector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

1959-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fast Breeder Reactor studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Microfluidic electrochemical reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

Nuzzo, Ralph G. (Champaign, IL); Mitrovski, Svetlana M. (Urbana, IL)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Summary of advanced LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) evaluations: PRISM (Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module) and SAFR (Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed independent analyses of two advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) concepts. The designs, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) (Berglund, 1987) and the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) (Baumeister, 1987), were developed primarily by General Electric (GE) and Rockwell International (RI), respectively. Technical support was provided to DOE, RI, and GE, by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), particularly with respect to the characteristics of the metal fuels. There are several examples in both PRISM and SAFR where inherent or passive systems provide for a safe response to off-normal conditions. This is in contrast to the engineered safety systems utilized on current US Light Water Reactor (LWR) designs. One important design inherency in the LMRs is the inherent shutdown'', which refers to the tendency of the reactor to transition to a much lower power level whenever temperatures rise significantly. This type of behavior was demonstrated in a series of unscrammed tests at EBR-II (NED, 1986). The second key design feature is the passive air cooling of the vessel to remove decay heat. These systems, designated RVACS in PRISM and RACS in SAFR, always operate and are believed to be able to prevent core damage in the event that no other means of heat removal is available. 27 refs., 78 figs., 3 tabs.

Van Tuyle, G.J.; Slovik, G.C.; Chan, B.C.; Kennett, R.J.; Cheng, H.S.; Kroeger, P.G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the ..beta.. limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor).

Yoshikawa, S.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

384

Reactor hot spot analysis  

SciTech Connect

The principle methods for performing reactor hot spot analysis are reviewed and examined for potential use in the Applied Physics Division. The semistatistical horizontal method is recommended for future work and is now available as an option in the SE2-ANL core thermal hydraulic code. The semistatistical horizontal method is applied to a small LMR to illustrate the calculation of cladding midwall and fuel centerline hot spot temperatures. The example includes a listing of uncertainties, estimates for their magnitudes, computation of hot spot subfactor values and calculation of two sigma temperatures. A review of the uncertainties that affect liquid metal fast reactors is also presented. It was found that hot spot subfactor magnitudes are strongly dependent on the reactor design and therefore reactor specific details must be carefully studied. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Vilim, R.B.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Molten metal reactors  

SciTech Connect

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

Compact power reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

Wetch, Joseph R. (Woodland Hills, CA); Dieckamp, Herman M. (Canoga Park, CA); Wilson, Lewis A. (Canoga Park, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for operating a nuclear reactor having a negative coefficient of reactivity to compensate for the change in reactor reactivity due to the burn-up of the xenon peak following start-up of the reactor. When it is desired to start up the reactor within less than 72 hours after shutdown, the temperature of the reactor is lowered prior to start-up, and then gradually raised after start-up.

West, J.M.; Weills, J.T.

1960-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

An Innovative Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The existing sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) have two types of designs – loop type and pool type. In the loop type design, such as JOYO (Japan) [1] and MONJU (Japan), the primary coolant is circulated through intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) external to the reactor tank. The major advantages of loop design include compactness and easy maintenance. The disadvantage is higher possibility of sodium leakage. In the pool type design such as EBR-II (USA), BN-600M(Russia), Superphénix (France) and European Fast Reactor [2], the reactor core, primary pumps, IHXs and direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) all are immersed in a pool of sodium coolant within the reactor vessel, making a loss of primary coolant extremely unlikely. However, the pool type design makes primary system large. In the latest ANL’s Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design [3], the primary system is configured in a pool-type arrangement. The hot sodium at core outlet temperature in hot pool is separated from the cold sodium at core inlet temperature in cold pool by a single integrated structure called Redan. Redan provides the exchange of the hot sodium from hot pool to cold pool through IHXs. The IHXs were chosen as the traditional tube-shell design. This type of IHXs is large in size and hence large reactor vessel is needed.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

391

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

392

Software: Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis > Analysis > Software Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Software Bookmark and Share An extensive powerful suite of computer codes developed and validated by the NE Division and its predecessor divisions at Argonne supports the development of fast reactors; many of these codes are also applicable to other reactor types. A brief description of these codes follows. Contact

393

Hanging core support system for a nuclear reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For holding the reactor core in the confining reactor vessel, a support is disclosed that is structurally independent of the vessel, that is dimensionally accurate and stable, and that comprises tandem tension linkages that act redundantly of one another to maintain stabilized core support even in the unlikely event of the complete failure of one of the linkages. The core support has a mounting platform for the reactor core, and unitary structure including a flange overlying the top edge of the reactor vessels, and a skirt and box beams between the flange and platform for establishing one of the linkages. A plurality of tension rods connect between the deck closing the reactor vessel and the platform for establishing the redundant linkage. Loaded Belleville springs flexibly hold the tension rods at the deck and separable bayonet-type connections hold the tension rods at the platform.

Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Pan, Y.C.; Saiveau, J.G.; Seidensticker, R.W.

1984-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

394

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

395

B Reactor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Operational Management » History » Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » B Reactor B Reactor B Reactor Completed in September 1944, the B Reactor was the world's first large-scale plutonium production reactor. As at Oak Ridge, the need for labor turned Hanford into an atomic boomtown, with the population reaching 50,000 by summer 1944. Similar to the X-10 Graphite Reactor at Oak Ridge in terms of loading and unloading fuel, the B Reactor was built on a much larger scale and used water rather than air as a coolant. Whereas the X-10 had an initial design output of 1,000 kilowatts, the B Reactor was designed to operate at 250,000 kilowatts. Consisting of a 28- by 36-foot, 1,200-ton graphite cylinder lying on its side, the reactor was penetrated through its

396

Advanced Reactor Development and Technology - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Overview Advanced Fast Reactor...

397

Zero Power Reactor simulation | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zero Power Reactor simulation Share Description Ever wanted to see a nuclear reactor core in action? Here's a detailed simulation of the Zero Power Reactor experiment, run by...

398

THE MATERIALS OF FAST BREEDER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

jet aircraft engines, and nuclear reactor fuel elements. Ancomponents of a nuclear reactor core are susceptible tothe nuclear physics of the thermal and fast neutron reactors

Olander, Donald R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

Experience to date with operation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors has been quite favorable. Despite problems in completion of construction and startup, three high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) units have operated well. The Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) in the United Kingdom has had an excellent operating history, and initial operation of commercial AGRs shows them to be satisfactory. The latter reactors provide direct experience in scale-up from the Windscale experiment to fullscale commercial units. The Colorado Fort St. Vrain 330-MWe prototype helium-cooled HTGR is now in the approach-to-power phase while the 300-MWe Pebble Bed THTR prototype in the Federal Republic of Germany is scheduled for completion of construction by late 1978. THTR will be the first nuclear power plant which uses a dry cooling tower. Fuel reprocessing and refabrication have been developed in the laboratory and are now entering a pilot-plant scale development. Several commercial HTGR power station orders were placed in the U.S. prior to 1975 with similar plans for stations in the FRG. However, the combined effects of inflation, reduced electric power demand, regulatory uncertainties, and pricing problems led to cancellation of the 12 reactors which were in various stages of planning, design, and licensing.

Schulten, R.; Trauger, D.B.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Nuclear reactor safety device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

REACTOR CONTROL DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wholly mechanical compact control device is designed for automatically rendering the core of a fission reactor subcritical in response to core temperatures in excess of the design operating temperature limit. The control device comprises an expansible bellows interposed between the base of a channel in a reactor core and the inner end of a fuel cylinder therein which is normally resiliently urged inwardly. The bellows contains a working fluid which undergoes a liquid to vapor phase change at a temperature substantially equal to the design temperature limit. Hence, the bellows abruptiy expands at this limiting temperature to force the fuel cylinder outward and render the core subcritical. The control device is particularly applicable to aircraft propulsion reactor service. (AEC)

Graham, R.H.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for producing thermoelectric power is described. The reactor core comprises a series of thermoelectric assemblies, each assembly including fissionable fuel as an active element to form a hot junction and a thermocouple. The assemblies are disposed parallel to each other to form spaces and means are included for Introducing an electrically conductive coolant between the assemblies to form cold junctions of the thermocouples. An electromotive force is developed across the entire series of the thermoelectric assemblies due to fission heat generated in the fuel causing a current to flow perpendicular to the flow of coolant and is distributed to a load outside of the reactor by means of bus bars electrically connected to the outermost thermoelectric assembly.

Luebke, E.A.; Vandenberg, L.B.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Reactor for exothermic reactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

404

MERCHANT MARINE SHIP REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described for use in a merchant marine ship. The reactor is of pressurized light water cooled and moderated design in which three passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The foregoing design makes a compact reactor construction with extended core life. The core has an egg-crate lattice containing the fuel elements confined between a lower flow baffle and upper grid plate, with the latter serving also as part of a turn- around manifold from which the entire coolant is distributed into the outer fuel elements for the second pass through the core. The inner fuel elements are cooled in the third pass.

Mumm, J.F.; North, D.C. Jr.; Rock, H.R.; Geston, D.K.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extends from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extend from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

MERCHANT MARINE SHIP REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for use in a merchant marine ship is described. The reactor is of pressurized, light water cooled and moderated design in which three passes of the water through the core in successive regions of low, intermediate, and high heat generation and downflow in a fuel region are made. The design makes a compact reactor construction with extended core life. The core has an egg-crate lattice containing the fuel elements that are confined between a lower flow baffle and upper grid plate, with the latter serving also as part of a turn- around manifold from which the entire coolant is distributed into the outer fuel elements for the second pass through the core. The inner fuel elements are cooled in the third pass. (AEC)

Sankovich, M.F.; Mumm, J.F.; North, D.C. Jr.; Rock, H.R.; Gestson, D.K.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from

409

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations, which govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants, require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including

410

Large Scale Weather Control Using Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is pointed out that controlled release of thermal energy from fission type nuclear reactors can be used to alter weather patterns over significantly large geographical regions. (1) Nuclear heat creates a low pressure region, which can be used to draw moist air from oceans, onto deserts. (2) Creation of low pressure zones over oceans using Nuclear heat can lead to Controlled Cyclone Creation (CCC).(3) Nuclear heat can also be used to melt glaciers and control water flow in rivers.

Moninder Singh Modgil

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

411

Decommissioning Plan of the Musashi Reactor and Its Progress  

SciTech Connect

The Musashi Reactor is a TRIGA-II, tank-type research reactor, as shown in Table 1. The reactor had been operated at maximum thermal power level of 100 kW since first critical, January 30, 1963. Reactor operation was shut down due to small leakage of water from the reactor tank on December 21,1989. After shutdown, investigation of the causes, making plan of repair and discussions on restart or decommissioning had been done. Finally, decision of decommissioning was made in May, 2003. The initial plan of the decommissioning was submitted to the competent authority in January, 2004. Now, the reactor is under decommissioning. The plan of decommissioning and its progress are described. In conclusion: considering the status of undertaking plan of the waste disposal facility for the low level radioactive waste from research reactors, the phased decommissioning was selected for the Musashi Reactor. First phase of the decommissioning activities including the actions of permanent shutdown and delivering the spent nuclear fuels to US DOE was completed.

Tanzawa, Tomio [Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Musashi Institute of Technology, Ozenji 971, Asao-ku, Kawasaki, 215-0013 (Japan)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

NEUTRON REACTOR HAVING A Xe$sup 135$ SHIELD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Shielding for reactors of the type in which the fuel is a chain reacting liquid composition comprised essentially of a slurry of fissionable and fertile material suspended in a liquid moderator is discussed. The neutron reflector comprises a tank containing heavy water surrounding the reactor, a shield tank surrounding the reflector, a gamma ray shield surrounding said shield tank, and a means for conveying gaseous fission products, particularly Xe/sup 135/, from the reactor chamber to the shield tank, thereby serving as a neutron shield by capturing the thermalized neutrons that leak outwardly from the shield tank.

Stanton, H.E.

1957-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nuclear reactor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lifting, rotating and sealing apparatus for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor core. This apparatus permits rotation of the plugs to provide under the plug refueling of a nuclear core. It also provides a means by which positive top core holddown can be utilized. Both of these operations are accomplished by means of the apparatus lifting the top core holddown structure off the nuclear core while stationary, and maintaining this structure in its elevated position during plug rotation. During both of these operations, the interface between the rotating member and its supporting member is sealingly maintained.

Wade, Elman E. (Ruffs Dale, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Fusion reactor pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fast quench reactor method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Donaldson, Alan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Berry, Ray A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Perspectives on reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reactor Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precisely measuring $\\theta_{13}$ is one of the highest priority in neutrino oscillation study. Reactor experiments can cleanly determine $\\theta_{13}$. Past reactor neutrino experiments are reviewed and status of next precision $\\theta_{13}$ experiments are presented. Daya Bay is designed to measure $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ to better than 0.01 and Double Chooz and RENO are designed to measure it to 0.02-0.03. All are heading to full operation in 2010. Recent improvements in neutrino moment measurement are also briefed.

Jun Cao

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

418

Diagnostics for hybrid reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

Orsitto, Francesco Paolo [ENEA Unita' Tecnica Fusione , Associazione ENEA-EURATOM sulla Fusione C R Frascati v E Fermi 45 00044 Frascati (Italy)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

419

Reactor sharing experience at the MIT research reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a number of examples of how educational institutions in the Boston area and elsewhere that do not possess nuclear reactors for training and research purposes have successfully enriched their programs through utilization of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) with assistance from the Reactor Sharing Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

Clark, L. Jr.; Fecych, W.; Young, H.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Export possibilities for small nuclear reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide deployment of peaceful nuclear technology is predicated on conformance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1972. Under this international treaty, countries have traded away pursuit of nuclear weapons in exchange for access to commercial nuclear technology that could help them grow economically. Realistically, however, most nuclear technology has been beyond the capacity of the NPT developing countries to afford. Even if the capital cost of the plant is managed, the costs of the infrastructure and the operational complexity of most nuclear technology have taken it out of the hands of the nations who need it the most. Now, a new class of small sodium cooled reactors has been specifically designed to meet the electrical power, water, hydrogen and heat needs of small and remote users. These reactors feature small size, long refueling interval, no onsite fuel storage, and simplified operations. Sized in the 10 MW(e) to 50 MW(e) range these reactors are modularized for factory production and for rapid site assembly. The fuel would be <20% U-235 uranium fuel with a 30-year core life. This new reactor type more appropriately fills the needs of countries for lower power distributed systems that can fill the gap between large developed infrastructure and primitive distributed energy systems. Looking at UN Resolution 1540 and the impact of other agreements, there is a need to address the issues of nuclear security, fuel, waste, and economic/legal/political-stakeholder concerns. This paper describes the design features of this new reactor type that specifically address these issues in a manner that increases the availability of commercial nuclear technology to the developing nations of the world. (authors)

Campagna, M.S.; Hess, C.; Moor, P. [Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States); Sawruk, W. [ABSG Consulting, Inc., Shillington, PA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

THE HOMOGENEOUS SUSPENSION REACTOR PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The considerations which led to the study of a homogeneous suspension reactor are reviewed briefly. The characteristics of the KEMA Suspension Test Reactor (KSTR) are then summarized. (J.S.R.)

Went, J.J.

1963-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Advanced Nuclear Reactors | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Sodium Reactor Subassemblies Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) Coolant Flow At the heart of a nuclear power plant is the reactor. The fuel assembly is placed inside a reactor...

423

Innovative design of uranium startup fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sodium Fast Reactors are one of the three candidates of GEN-IV fast reactors. Fast reactors play an important role in saving uranium resources and reducing nuclear wastes. Conventional fast reactors rely on transuranic ...

Fei, Tingzhou

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Reactor operation safety information document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel slug for a reactor which acts as a safety device is described. The fuel slug is an aluminum tube with a foil lining the inside surface of the tube, the foil being fabricated of uranium in a lead matrix.

Horning, W.A.; Lanning, D.D.; Donahue, D.J.

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Nuclear reactor building  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed there above. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define there between an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin. 4 figures.

Gou, P.F.; Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

427

Neutronic reactor thermal shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

1. The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40-60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator.

Wende, Charles W. J. (West Chester, PA)

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL PUMP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor fuel pump is described which offers long life, low susceptibility to radiation damage, and gaseous fission product removal. An inert-gas lubricated bearing supports a journal on one end of the drive shsft. The other end has an impeller and expansion chamber which effect pumping and gas- liquid separation. (T.R.H.)

Cobb, W.G.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The First Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Chicago Pile-1 (CP-1) was the world's first nuclear reactor. CP-1 was built on a rackets court, under the abandoned west stands of the original Alonzo Stagg Field stadium, at the University of...

430

Thermal Reactor Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

WATER BOILER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

As its name implies, this reactor utilizes an aqueous solution of a fissionable element salt, and is also conventional in that it contains a heat exchanger cooling coil immersed in the fuel. Its novelty lies in the utilization of a cylindrical reactor vessel to provide a critical region having a large and constant interface with a supernatant vapor region, and the use of a hollow sleeve coolant member suspended from the cover assembly in coaxial relation with the reactor vessel. Cool water is circulated inside this hollow coolant member, and a gap between its outer wall and the reactor vessel is used to carry off radiolytic gases for recombination in an external catalyst chamber. The central passage of the coolant member defines a reflux condenser passage into which the externally recombined gases are returned and condensed. The large and constant interface between fuel solution and vapor region prevents the formation of large bubbles and minimizes the amount of fuel salt carried off by water vapor, thus making possible higher flux densities, specific powers and power densities.

King, L.D.P.

1960-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cermet fuel reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fossil fuel furnace reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

Parkinson, William J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Nuclear Reactors and Technology  

SciTech Connect

This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Nuclear reactor building  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed thereabove. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define therebetween an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Sirtori, IT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Reactor component automatic grapple  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

Greenaway, Paul R. (Bethel Park, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NEUTRONIC REACTOR STRUCTURE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutronic reactor is described. It has a core consisting of natural uranium and heavy water and having a K-factor greater than unity which is surrounded by a reflector consisting of natural uranium and ordinary water having a Kfactor less than unity.

Weinberg, A.M.; Vernon, H.C.

1961-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

NEUTRONIC REACTOR STRUCTURE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The neutronic reactor is comprised of a core consisting of natural uranium and heavy water with a K-factor greater than unity. The core is surrounded by a reflector consisting of natural uranium and ordinary water with a Kfactor less than unity. (AEC)

Vernon, H.C.; Weinberg, A.M.

1961-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

1957-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

440

NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boron-10 containing reactor control element wherein the boron-10 is dispersed in a matrix material is describeri. The concentration of boron-10 in the matrix varies transversely across the element from a minimum at the surface to a maximum at the center of the element, prior to exposure to neutrons. (AEC)

Beaver, R.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.

1962-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

1963-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An emergency shutdown or scram apparatus for use in a nuclear reactor that includes a neutron absorber suspended from a temperature responsive substance that is selected to fail at a preselected temperature in excess of the normal reactor operating temperature, whereby the neutron absorber is released and allowed to fall under gravity to a preselected position within the reactor core is presented. (AEC)

Paget, J.A.; Koutz, S.L.; Stone, R.S.; Stewart, H.B.

1963-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Modeling Chemical Reactors I: Quiescent Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a fully generalized quiescent chemical reactor system in arbitrary space $\\vdim =1,2$ or 3, with $n\\in\\mathbb{N}$ chemical constituents $\\alpha_{i}$, where the character of the numerical solution is strongly determined by the relative scaling between the local reactivity of species $\\alpha_{i}$ and the local functional diffusivity $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(\\alpha)$ of the reaction mixture. We develop an operator time-splitting predictor multi-corrector RK--LDG scheme, and utilize $hp$-adaptivity relying only on the entropy $\\mathscr{S}_{\\mathfrak{R}}$ of the reactive system $\\mathfrak{R}$. This condition preserves these bounded nonlinear entropy functionals as a necessarily enforced stability condition on the coupled system. We apply this scheme to a number of application problems in chemical kinetics; including a difficult classical problem arising in nonequilibrium thermodynamics known as the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction where we utilize a concentration-dependent diffusivity tensor $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(...

Michoski, C E; Schmitz, P G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Human Factors Aspects of Operating Small Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. They are considering small modular reactors (SMRs) as one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants, and so may require a concept of operations (ConOps) that also is different. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has begun examining the human factors engineering- (HFE) and ConOps- aspects of SMRs; if needed, they will formulate guidance to support SMR licensing reviews. We developed a ConOps model, consisting of the following dimensions: Plant mission; roles and responsibilities of all agents; staffing, qualifications, and training; management of normal operations; management of off-normal conditions and emergencies; and, management of maintenance and modifications. We are reviewing information on SMR design to obtain data about each of these dimensions, and have identified several preliminary issues. In addition, we are obtaining operations-related information from other types of multi-module systems, such as refineries, to identify lessons learned from their experience. Here, we describe the project's methodology and our preliminary findings.

OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Deem, R. (BNL); Xing, J.; DAgostino, A. (NRC)

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

446

Gas-Cooled Reactors: the importance of their development  

SciTech Connect

Gas-Cooled Reactors are considered to have a significant future impact on the application of fission energy. The specific types are the steam-cycle High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor, the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor, the gas-turbine HTGR, and the Very High-Temperature Process Heat Reactor. The importance of developing the above systems is discussed relative to alternative fission power systems involving Light Water Reactors, Heavy Water Reactors, Spectral Shift Controlled Reactors, and Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors. A primary advantage of developing GCRs as a class lies in the technology and cost interrelations, permitting cost-effective development of systems having diverse applications. Further, HTGR-type systems have highly proliferation-resistant characteristics and very attractive safety features. Finally, such systems and GCFRs are mutally complementary. Overall, GCRs provide interrelated systems that serve different purposes and needs; their development can proceed in stages that provide early benefits while contributing to future needs. It is concluded that the long-term importance of the various GCRs is as follows: HTGR, providing a technology for economic GCFRs and HTGR-GTs, while providing a proliferation-resistant reactor system having early economic and fuel utilization benefits; GCFR, providing relatively low cost fissile fuel and reducing overall separative work needs at capital costs lower than those for LMFBRs; HTGR-GT (in combination with a bottoming cycle), providing a very high thermal efficiency system having low capital costs and improved fuel utilization and technology pertinent to VHTRs; HTGR-GT, providing a power system well suited for dry cooling conditions for low-temperature process heat needs; and VHTR, providing a high-temperature heat source for hydrogen production processes.

Kasten, P.R.

1978-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

447

Survey of Optimization of Reactor Coolant Cleanup Systems: For Boiling Water Reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization of the reactor coolant cleanup systems in the boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment is important for controlling the transport of corrosion products (metals and activated metals), fission products, and coolant impurities (soluble and insoluble) throughout the reactor coolant loop, and this optimization contributes to reducing primary system radiation fields. The removal of radionuclides and corrosion products is just one of many functions (both ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

448

Reactor operations Brookhaven medical research reactor, Brookhaven high flux beam reactor informal monthly report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the April 1995 summary report on reactor operations at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Ongoing experiments/irradiations in each are listed, and other significant operations functions are also noted. The HFBR surveillance testing schedule is also listed.

Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

450

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Dispersion effects on membrane reactor performance  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model has been developed that predicts the effects of design parameters, operating variables and physical properties on the performance of a membrane reactor with a permselective wall. The model consists of the full set of partial differential equations that describe the conservation of mass, momentum and chemical species, coupled with chemical kinetics and appropriate boundary conditions for the physical problem. The solution of this system is obtained by a finite-volume technique. The model was applied to study the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane. Two membrane types in tubular form were studied: a selective porous glass with low gas permeabilities and a porous alumina with very high gas permeabilities. It is concluded that gas separation and reactor performance are strongly influenced by dispersion effects only in the latter membrane reactor, while in both cases radial concentration profiles do not correspond to those obtained with plug flow. Therefore, simulations of this type of problem should be based on complex dispersion models rather than the existing ideal plug-flow ones.

Koukou, M.K.; Papayannakos, N.; Markatos, N.C. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

This homogeneous reactor comprises a core occupied by a solution of a fissile material in a moderator liquid and a breeder region enclosing the core and having a suspension of fertile material in the same moderator liquid. There is communication between the core and breeder to allow mass transfer and pressure equalization between the regions. The zones each have a separate circuit for removing heat by a mixer chamber situated inside the reactor vessel. The effluents coming from the two regions are mixed and led to a common device for separation into a clear solution and suspension, which are each led back to its corresponding circuit. To control the relative concentration of the two regions, an evaporator is provided separating a part of the moderator liquid from the solution occupying the core, the condensed separated moderator liquid being led into the breeder region. (NPO)

1960-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nuclear reactor safety device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

Hutter, E.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Spherical torus fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Fusion reactor pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

Jassby, D.L.

1987-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

456

Water reactor fuel cladding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a nuclear reactor fuel element cladding tube. It comprises: an outer cylindrical layer of a first zirconium alloy selected from the group consisting of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4; an inner cylindrical layer of a second zirconium alloy consisting essentially of about 0.19 to 0.6 wt.% tin, about 0.19 to less than 0.5 wt.% iron, about 100 to 700 ppm oxygen, less than 2000 ppm total impurities, and the remainder essentially zirconium; the inner layer characterized by aqueous corrosion resistance substantially the same as the first zirconium alloy; the inner layer characterized by improved resistance to PCI crack propagation under reactor operating conditions compared to the first zirconium alloy and substantially the same PCI crack propagation resistance compared to unalloyed zirconium; and the inner cylindrical layer is metallurgically bonded to the outer layer.

Foster, J.P.; McDonald, S.G.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

457

Radionuclides in United States commercial nuclear power reactors  

SciTech Connect

In the next ten to twenty years, many of the commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States will be reaching their projected lifetime of forty years. As these power plants are decommissioned, it seems prudent to consider the recycling of structural materials such as stainless steel. Some of these materials and components have become radioactive through either nuclear activation of the elements within the components or surface contamination with radioactivity form the operational activities. In order to understand the problems associated with recycling stainless steel from decommissioned nuclear power reactors, it is necessary to have information on the radionuclides expected on or in the contaminated materials. A study has been conducted of radionuclide contamination information that is available for commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States. There are two types of nuclear power reactors in commercial use in the United States, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). Before presenting radionuclide activities information, a brief discussion is given on the major components and operational differences for the PWRs and BWRs. Radionuclide contamination information is presented from 11 PWRs and over 8 BWRs. These data include both the radionuclides within the circulating reactor coolant water as well as radionuclide contamination on and within component parts.

Bechtold, T.E. [ed.] [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dyer, N.C. [Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mar '07 to Apr '07: -5.5% Mar '07 to Apr '07: -5.5% Apr '06 to Apr '07: +7.6% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +7.6% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '07 to Apr '07: +2.4% Apr '06 to Apr '07: +34.5% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +16.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '07 to Apr '07: +2.2% Apr '06 to Apr '07: +3.1% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +1.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Mar '07 to Apr '07: -0.4% Apr '06 to Apr '07: -0.8% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.7%

459

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May '07 to Jun '07: -2.9% May '07 to Jun '07: -2.9% Jun '06 to Jun '07: +3.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +6.7% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '07 to Jun '07: -7.4% Jun '06 to Jun '07: +8.5% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +16.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '07 to Jun '07: +6.4% Jun '06 to Jun '07: +3.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +1.6% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* May '07 to Jun '07: +1.2% Jun '06 to Jun '07: +0.1% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.7%

460

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr '07 to May '07: +0.3% Apr '07 to May '07: +0.3% May '06 to May '07: +6.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +7.3% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '07 to May '07: -6.7% May '06 to May '07: +17.6% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +16.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '07 to May '07: -1.0% May '06 to May '07: +2.5% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +1.3% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Apr '07 to May '07: +2.8% May '06 to May '07: +1.3% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.8%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul '07 to Aug '07: +8.9% Jul '07 to Aug '07: +8.9% Aug '06 to Aug '07: +1.6% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.2% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '07 to Aug '07: +3.9% Aug '06 to Aug '07 -3.7% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +8.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '07 to Aug '07: +3.8% Aug '06 to Aug '07: +2.9% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '07 to Aug '07: +2.5% Aug '06 to Aug '07: -0.1% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +0.4%

462

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug '07 to Sep '07: -4.5% Aug '07 to Sep '07: -4.5% Sep '06 to Sep '07: +1.0% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.1% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '07 to Sep '07: -6.6% Sep '06 to Sep '07 -0.9% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +7.4% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '07 to Sep '07: -6.4% Sep '06 to Sep '07: +0.0% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +1.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '07 to Sep '07: -4.2% Sep '06 to Sep '07: -0.3%

463

O:\Data_Publication\Prime Supplier Report\historical\2006\10\ventura\c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jun '07 to Jul '07: -4.6% Jun '07 to Jul '07: -4.6% Jul '06 to Jul '07: -0.2% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +2.3% U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '07 to Jul '07: +0.4% Jul '06 to Jul '07: -1.5% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +10.7% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '07 to Jul '07: -2.8% Jul '06 to Jul '07: +2.8% YTD '06 to YTD '07: +1.8% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 2005 2006 2007 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jun '07 to Jul '07: -2.1% Jul '06 to Jul '07: -0.6%

464

Heat exchanger for reactor core and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact bayonet tube type heat exchanger which finds particular application as an auxiliary heat exchanger for transfer of heat from a reactor gas coolant to a secondary fluid medium. The heat exchanger is supported within a vertical cavity in a reactor vessel intersected by a reactor coolant passage at its upper end and having a reactor coolant return duct spaced below the inlet passage. The heat exchanger includes a plurality of relatively short length bayonet type heat exchange tube assemblies adapted to pass a secondary fluid medium therethrough and supported by primary and secondary tube sheets which are releasibly supported in a manner to facilitate removal and inspection of the bayonet tube assemblies from an access area below the heat exchanger. Inner and outer shrouds extend circumferentially of the tube assemblies and cause the reactor coolant to flow downwardly internally of the shrouds over the tube bundle and exit through the lower end of the inner shroud for passage to the return duct in the reactor vessel.

Kaufman, Jay S. (Del Mar, CA); Kissinger, John A. (Del Mar, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Power Reactor Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past two decades the NRC regulated nuclear industry has encountered and dealt with a diverse range of political, financial and technological challenges while decommissioning its nuclear facilities. During that time, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities has evolved into a mature industry in the United States with a number of large power reactors successfully decommissioned and their NRC licenses terminated. One of the challenges discussed in this report is site release standards, required ...

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

466

Exhaust gas reactor  

SciTech Connect

A reactor for the oxidation of unburned and partially burned components in the exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine comprising a chamber which is substantially circular in cross sections perpendicular to its axis, one or more inlet pipes which pass a mixture of exhaust gas and air substantially tangentially into the chamber near to one end thereof, and an outlet pipe near to the other end of the chamber and which is so arranged that exhaust gas leaves the chamber substantially tangentially. The tangential inlet and tangential outlet of gases minimizes energy losses in the gas passing through the reactor. The ratio of the cross-sectional areas of the inlet pipe(s) to reactor chamber is preferably from 1:9 to 25:36, and similar ranges of crosssectional area ratios are preferred for the outlet pipe and chamber. The ratio of the length of the reaction chamber to diameter is preferably from 1:1 to 4:1. The chamber may be cylindrical or divergent from inlet end to outlet end and may be thermally insulated.

Camarsa, M.; Cocchiara, F.; Garcea, G.P.

1981-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

467

Fuel handling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pool type nuclear fission reactor has a core, with a plurality of core elements and a redan which confines coolant as a hot pool at a first end of the core separated from a cold pool at a second end of the core by the redan. A fuel handling system for use with such reactors comprises a core element storage basket located outside of the redan in the cold pool. An access passage is formed in the redan with a gate for opening and closing the passage to maintain the temperature differential between the hot pool and the cold pool. A mechanism is provided for opening and closing the gate. A lifting arm is also provided for manipulating the fuel core elements through the access passage between the storage basket and the core when the redan gate is open.

Saiveau, James G. (Hickory Hills, IL); Kann, William J. (Park Ridge, IL); Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Modeling Chemical Reactors I: Quiescent Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a fully generalized quiescent chemical reactor system in arbitrary space $\\vdim =1,2$ or 3, with $n\\in\\mathbb{N}$ chemical constituents $\\alpha_{i}$, where the character of the numerical solution is strongly determined by the relative scaling between the local reactivity of species $\\alpha_{i}$ and the local functional diffusivity $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(\\alpha)$ of the reaction mixture. We develop an operator time-splitting predictor multi-corrector RK--LDG scheme, and utilize $hp$-adaptivity relying only on the entropy $\\mathscr{S}_{\\mathfrak{R}}$ of the reactive system $\\mathfrak{R}$. This condition preserves these bounded nonlinear entropy functionals as a necessarily enforced stability condition on the coupled system. We apply this scheme to a number of application problems in chemical kinetics; including a difficult classical problem arising in nonequilibrium thermodynamics known as the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction where we utilize a concentration-dependent diffusivity tensor $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(\\alpha)$, in addition to solving a simple equilibrium problem in order to evaluate the numerical error behavior.

C. E. Michoski; J. A. Evans; P. G. Schmitz

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

469

CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

470

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

471

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

472

Neutron damage reduction in a traveling wave reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traveling wave reactors are envisioned to run on depleted or natural uranium with no need for enrichment or reprocessing, and in a manner which requires little to no operator intervention. If feasible, this type of reactor has significant advantages over conventional nuclear power systems. However, a practical implementation of this concept is challenging as neutron irradiation levels many times greater than those in conventional reactors appear to be required for a fission wave to propagate. Radiation damage to the fuel and cladding materials presents a significant obstacle to a practical design. One possibility for reducing damage is to soften the neutron energy spectrum. Here we show that using a uranium oxide fuel form will allow a shift in the neutron spectrum that can result in at least a three fold decrease in dpa levels for fuel cladding and structural steels within the reactor compared with the dpa levels expected when using a uranium metal fuel. (authors)

Osborne, A. G.; Deinert, M. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Design guide for category V reactors transient reactors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirements of Category V reactor structures, components, and systems.

Brynda, W J; Karol, R C; Lobner, P R; Powell, R W; Straker, E A

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who  

SciTech Connect

The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who  

SciTech Connect

The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors - Reactors designed/built by...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

experiments, necessary to achieve higher precision for the determination of reactor power distribution patterns, effect of non-uniform void distributions, kinetic behavior,...

477

Reactor technology: power conversion systems and reactor operation and maintenance  

SciTech Connect

The use of advanced fuels permits the use of coolants (organic, high pressure helium) that result in power conversion systems with good thermal efficiency and relatively low cost. Water coolant would significantly reduce thermal efficiency, while lithium and salt coolants, which have been proposed for DT reactors, will have comparable power conversion efficiencies, but will probably be significantly more expensive. Helium cooled blankets with direct gas turbine power conversion cycles can also be used with DT reactors, but activation problems will be more severe, and the portion of blanket power in the metallic structure will probably not be available for the direct cycle, because of temperature limitations. A very important potential advantage of advanced fuel reactors over DT fusion reactors is the possibility of easier blanket maintenance and reduced down time for replacement. If unexpected leaks occur, in most cases the leaking circuit can be shut off and a redundant cooling curcuit will take over the thermal load. With the D-He/sup 3/ reactor, it appears practical to do this while the reactor is operating, as long as the leak is small enough not to shut down the reactor. Redundancy for Cat-D reactors has not been explored in detail, but appears feasible in principle. The idea of mobile units operating in the reactor chamber for service and maintenance of radioactive elements is explored.

Powell, J.R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We perform experiments simulating reactor core melt phenomena in which molten core debris ("corium") erodes the concrete floor of a containment building. This occurred during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident though the extent of concrete damage is yet unknown. This video shows the top view of a churning molten pool of uranium oxide at 2000°C (3600°F) seen during an experiment at Argonne. Corium behaves much like lava.

480

Designing Reactors to Facilitate Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Critics of nuclear power often cite issues with tail-end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities as reasons to oppose the building of new reactors. In fact, waste disposal and the decommissioning of large nuclear reactors have proven more challenging than anticipated. In the early days of the nuclear power industry the design and operation of various reactor systems was given a great deal of attention. Little effort, however, was expended on end-of-the-cycle activities, such as decommissioning and disposal of wastes. As early power and test reactors have been decommissioned difficulties with end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities have become evident. Even the small test reactors common at the INEEL were not designed to facilitate their eventual decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement. The results are that decommissioning of these facilities is expensive, time consuming, relatively hazardous, and generates large volumes of waste. This situation clearly supports critics concerns about building a new generation of power reactors.

Richard H. Meservey

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type reactor supplier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Identification and localization of absorbers of variable strength in nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

noise In order to get some physical insight about the space-dependence of the neutron noise induced`re a,*, G. Andhill b a Department of Reactor Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Go of the type ``absorber of variable strength'' (or reactor oscillator) from as few as five neutron detectors

Demazière, Christophe

482

Acceptability of reactors in space  

SciTech Connect

Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it does not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

Buden, D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Acceptability of reactors in space  

SciTech Connect

Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it dies not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

Buden, D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical project. The main point of preference for the offered reactor is its likely cheapness as a power source. Key words: Micro-thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, Self-magnetic AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

485

NEUTRONIC REACTOR CHARGING AND DISCHARGING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and arrangement is presented for removing a fuel element from a neutronic reactor tube through which a liquid coolant is being circulaled. The fuel element is moved into a section of the tube beyond the reactor proper, and then the coolant in the tube between the fuel element and the reactor proper is frozen, so that the fuel element may be removed from the tube without loss of the coolant therein. The method is particularly useful in the case of a liquid metal- cooled reactor.

Zinn, W.H.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

486

Reactor & Nuclear Systems Publications | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications and Reports NSED Monthly Reports Reactor and Nuclear Systems Publications 2013 Publications 2012 Publications 2011 Publications 2010 and Older Publications Nuclear...

487

Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in a two year study of a 1200 MWe commercial tandem mirror reactor (MARS - Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) has reached the point where major reactor system technologies are identified. New design features of the magnets, blankets, plug heating systems and direct converter are described. With the innovation of radial drift pumping to maintain low plug density, reactor recirculating power fraction is reduced to 20%. Dominance of radial ion and impurity losses into the halo permits gridless, circular direct converters to be dramatically reduced in size. Comparisons of MARS with the Starfire tokamak design are made.

Logan, B.G.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z